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Sample records for nanotube field emitters

  1. Carbon nanotubes as field emitter.

    PubMed

    Zou, Rujia; Hu, Junqing; Song, Yuelin; Wang, Na; Chen, Huihui; Chen, Haihua; Wu, Jianghong; Sun, Yangang; Chen, Zhigang

    2010-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as a promising material of electron field emitters. They exhibit extraordinary field emission properties because of their high electrical conductivity, high aspect ratio "needle like" shape for optimum geometrical field enhancement, and remarkable thermal stability. In this Review, we emphasize the estimation and influencing factors of CNTs' emission properties, and discuss in detail the emission properties of macroscopic CNT cathodes, especially fabricated by transplant methods, and describe recent progress on understanding of CNT field emitters and analyze issues related to applications of CNT based cold cathodes in field emission display (FED). We foresee that CNT-FED will take an important place in display technologies in the near future.

  2. Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish; Bronkowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Experiments have shown that with suitable choices of critical dimensions, planar arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes (see figure) can serve as high-current-density field emitter (cold-cathode) electron sources. Whereas some hot-cathode electron sources must be operated at supply potentials of thousands of volts, these cold-cathode sources generate comparable current densities when operated at tens of volts. Consequently, arrays of bundles of carbon nanotubes might prove useful as cold-cathode sources in miniature, lightweight electron-beam devices (e.g., nanoklystrons) soon to be developed. Prior to the experiments, all reported efforts to develop carbon-nanotube-based field-emission sources had yielded low current densities from a few hundred microamperes to a few hundred milliamperes per square centimeter. An electrostatic screening effect, in which taller nanotubes screen the shorter ones from participating in field emission, was conjectured to be what restricts the emission of electrons to such low levels. It was further conjectured that the screening effect could be reduced and thus emission levels increased by increasing the spacing between nanotubes to at least by a factor of one to two times the height of the nanotubes. While this change might increase the emission from individual nanotubes, it would decrease the number of nanotubes per unit area and thereby reduce the total possible emission current. Therefore, to maximize the area-averaged current density, it would be necessary to find an optimum combination of nanotube spacing and nanotube height. The present concept of using an array of bundles of nanotubes arises partly from the concept of optimizing the spacing and height of field emitters. It also arises partly from the idea that single nanotubes may have short lifetimes as field emitters, whereas bundles of nanotubes could afford redundancy so that the loss of a single nanotube would not significantly reduce the overall field emission.

  3. Theory of Carbon Nanotube (CNT)-Based Electron Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Bocharov, Grigory S.; Eletskii, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    Theoretical problems arising in connection with development and operation of electron field emitters on the basis of carbon nanotubes are reviewed. The physical aspects of electron field emission that underlie the unique emission properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are considered. Physical effects and phenomena affecting the emission characteristics of CNT cathodes are analyzed. Effects given particular attention include: the electric field amplification near a CNT tip with taking into account the shape of the tip, the deviation from the vertical orientation of nanotubes and electrical field-induced alignment of those; electric field screening by neighboring nanotubes; statistical spread of the parameters of the individual CNTs comprising the cathode; the thermal effects resulting in degradation of nanotubes during emission. Simultaneous consideration of the above-listed effects permitted the development of the optimization procedure for CNT array in terms of the maximum reachable emission current density. In accordance with this procedure, the optimum inter-tube distance in the array depends on the region of the external voltage applied. The phenomenon of self-misalignment of nanotubes in an array has been predicted and analyzed in terms of the recent experiments performed. A mechanism of degradation of CNT-based electron field emitters has been analyzed consisting of the bombardment of the emitters by ions formed as a result of electron impact ionization of the residual gas molecules.

  4. Evaluations of carbon nanotube field emitters for electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakahara, Hitoshi; Kusano, Yoshikazu; Kono, Takumi; Saito, Yahachi

    2009-11-01

    Brightness of carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters was already reported elsewhere. However, brightness of electron emitter is affected by a virtual source size of the emitter, which strongly depends on electron optical configuration around the emitter. In this work, I- V characteristics and brightness of a CNT emitter are measured under a practical field emission electron gun (e-gun) configuration to investigate availability of CNT for electron microscopy. As a result, it is obtained that an emission area of MWNT is smaller than its tip surface area, and the emission area corresponds to a five-membered-ring with 2nd nearest six-membered-rings on the MWNT cap surface. Reduced brightness of MWNT is measured as at least 2.6×109 A/m 2 sr V. It is concluded that even a thick MWNT has enough brightness under a practical e-gun electrode configuration and suitable for electron microscopy.

  5. Excellent oxidation endurance of boron nitride nanotube field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Yenan; Song, Yoon-Ho; Milne, William I.; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-04-21

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are considered as a promising cold electron emission material owing to their negative electron affinity. BNNT field emitters show excellent oxidation endurance after high temperature thermal annealing of 600 °C in air ambient. There is no damage to the BNNTs after thermal annealing at a temperature of 600 °C and also no degradation of field emission properties. The thermally annealed BNNTs exhibit a high maximum emission current density of 8.39 mA/cm{sup 2} and show very robust emission stability. The BNNTs can be a promising emitter material for field emission devices under harsh oxygen environments.

  6. Fowler Nordheim theory of carbon nanotube based field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parveen, Shama; Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Samina; Husain, Mushahid

    2017-01-01

    Field emission (FE) phenomena are generally explained in the frame-work of Fowler Nordheim (FN) theory which was given for flat metal surfaces. In this work, an effort has been made to present the field emission mechanism in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) which have tip type geometry at nanoscale. High aspect ratio of CNTs leads to large field enhancement factor and lower operating voltages because the electric field strength in the vicinity of the nanotubes tip can be enhanced by thousand times. The work function of nanostructure by using FN plot has been calculated with reverse engineering. With the help of modified FN equation, an important formula for effective emitting area (active area for emission of electrons) has been derived and employed to calculate the active emitting area for CNT field emitters. Therefore, it is of great interest to present a state of art study on the complete solution of FN equation for CNTs based field emitter displays. This manuscript will also provide a better understanding of calculation of different FE parameters of CNTs field emitters using FN equation.

  7. Systems and Methods for Implementing Robust Carbon Nanotube-Based Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, Harish (Inventor); Kristof, Valerie (Inventor); Toda, Risaku (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods in accordance with embodiments of the invention implement carbon nanotube-based field emitters. In one embodiment, a method of fabricating a carbon nanotube field emitter includes: patterning a substrate with a catalyst, where the substrate has thereon disposed a diffusion barrier layer; growing a plurality of carbon nanotubes on at least a portion of the patterned catalyst; and heating the substrate to an extent where it begins to soften such that at least a portion of at least one carbon nanotube becomes enveloped by the softened substrate.

  8. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube field emitters after high temperature thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Shin, Dong Hoon; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Hwang, Yeon Mo; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2014-07-15

    The carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters have been fabricated by attaching a CNT film on a graphite rod using graphite adhesive material. The CNT field emitters showed much improved field emission properties due to increasing crystallinity and decreasing defects in CNTs after the high temperature thermal annealing at 900 °C in vacuum ambient. The CNT field emitters showed the low turn-on electric field of 1.15 V/μm, the low threshold electric field of 1.62 V/μm, and the high emission current of 5.9 mA which corresponds to a current density of 8.5 A/cm{sup 2}. In addition, the CNT field emitters indicated the enhanced field emission properties due to the multi-stage effect when the length of the graphite rod increases. The CNT field emitter showed good field emission stability after the high temperature thermal annealing. The CNT field emitter revealed a focused electron beam spot without any focusing electrodes and also showed good field emission repeatability.

  9. New-type planar field emission display with superaligned carbon nanotube yarn emitter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Peng; Wei, Yang; Liu, Kai; Liu, Liang; Jiang, Kaili; Fan, Shoushan

    2012-05-09

    With the superaligned carbon nanotube yarn as emitter, we have fabricated a 16 × 16 pixel field emission display prototype by adopting screen printing and laser cutting technologies. A planar diode field emission structure has been adopted. A very sharp carbon nanotube yarn tip emitter can be formed by laser cutting. Low voltage phosphor was coated on the anode electrodes also by screen printing. With a specially designed circuit, we have demonstrated the dynamic character display with the field emission display prototype. The emitter material and fabrication technologies in this paper are both easy to scale up to large areas.

  10. High-Performance Field-Emission Properties of Boron Nitride Nanotube Field Emitters.

    PubMed

    Yun, Ki Nam; Sun, Yuning; Han, Jun Soo; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-01-18

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) have attracted considerable attention as a field emission material because of their high mechanical strength, high negative electron affinity, and high oxidation resistance. Nevertheless, the obtained field-emission properties of BNNTs have indicated poor emission performance, which is a very high turn-on electric field with a low emission current. We fabricated BNNT field emitters and investigated their field-emission properties. The field-emission properties of the BNNT field emitters were considerably enhanced compared to those of other BN nanomaterial-based field emitters. The turn-on and the threshold electric fields of the BNNT field emitter were 3.1 and 5.4 V/μm at the gap distance of 750 μm, respectively. Both the turn-on and the threshold electric fields of the BNNT field emitters were decreased by increasing the gap distance between the emitter tip and the anode electrode. Degradation of the emission current during field emission operation for 20 h showed no significant difference according to the gap distance. Emission current fluctuation of the BNNT field emitters showed that the smaller gap was more unstable than the larger gap. The enhanced emission properties are mainly attributed to the small diameter, high-quality, and straight structure of BNNTs as well as the stable network formation of the BNNT film with good mechanical and electrical contact between the BNNTs and the cathode electrode. The remarkable emission performance of the BNNT field emitters might have promising applications for various field-emission devices.

  11. Field emission from optimized structure of carbon nanotube field emitter array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, V.; Noguchi, T.; Kato, S.

    2016-04-01

    The authors report a detail study on the emission properties of field emitter array (FEA) of micro-circular emitters of multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The FEAs were fabricated on patterned substrates prepared with an array of circular titanium (Ti) islands on titanium nitride coated tantalum substrates. CNTs were rooted into these Ti islands to prepare an array of circular emitters. The circular emitters were prepared in different diameters and pitches in order to optimize their structure for acquiring a high emission current. The pitch was varied from 0 to 600 μm, while a diameter of circular emitters was kept constant to be 50 μm in order to optimize a pitch. For diameter optimization, a diameter was changed from 50 to 200 μm while keeping a constant edge-to-edge distance of 150 μm between the circular emitters. The FEA with a diameter of 50 μm and a pitch of 120 μm was found to be the best to achieve an emission current of 47 mA corresponding to an effective current density of 30.5 A/cm2 at 7 V/μm. The excellent emission current was attributed to good quality of CNT rooting into the substrate and optimized FEA structure, which provided a high electric field on a whole circular emitter of 50 μm and the best combination of the strong edge effect and CNT coverage. The experimental results were confirmed with computer simulation.

  12. Effects of oxygen adsorption on carbon nanotube field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Noejung; Han, Seungwu; Ihm, Jisoon

    2001-09-01

    Effects of oxygen adsorption on the field emission of carbon nanotubes are studied through first-principles calculations. Calculated emission currents are significantly enhanced when oxygen is adsorbed at the tip and the underlying physics is explained in terms of the change in the electronic structure by oxidation and the local field increase at the adsorption site. The issue of the current degradation accompanied by the oxidative etching is also addressed. The field-emission-microscopy images on the phosphor screen are simulated, displaying various patterns characteristic of each adsorption configuration.

  13. Growth of carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber: a linear electron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ha Jin; Jong Bae, Min; Kim, Yong C.; Cho, Eun S.; Sohn, Y. C.; Kim, D. Y.; Lee, S. E.; Kang, H. S.; Han, In T.; Kim, Young H.; Patole, Shashikant P.; Yoo, Ji Beom

    2011-03-01

    The multi-stage effect has been revisited through growing carbon nanotube field emitters on single strand carbon fiber with a thickness of 11 µm. A prepared linear electron source exhibits a turn-on field as low as 0.4 V µm - 1 and an extremely high field enhancement factor of 19 300, when compared with those results from reference nanotube emitters grown on flat silicone wafer; 3.0 V µm - 1 and 2500, respectively. In addition, we introduce a novel method to grow nanotubes uniformly around the circumference of carbon fibers by using direct resistive heating on the continuously feeding carbon threads. These results open up not only a new path for synthesizing nanocomposites, but also offer an excellent linear electron source for special applications such as backlight units for liquid crystal displays and multi-array x-ray sources.

  14. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm-2) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm-2 for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm-2). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  15. High-performance field emission of carbon nanotube paste emitters fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuning; Yun, Ki Nam; Leti, Guillaume; Lee, Sang Heon; Song, Yoon-Ho; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2017-02-10

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) paste emitters were fabricated using graphite nanopowder filler. The CNT paste emitters consist of CNTs as the emitting material, graphite nanopowder as the filler and a graphite rod as the cathode. Rather than metal or inorganic materials, graphite nanopowder was adapted as a filler material to make the CNT paste emitters. After fabricating the emitters, sandpaper treatment was applied to increase the density of emission sites. The CNT paste emitters showed a high field emission performance, for example a high emission current of 8.5 mA from a cylindrical emitter with a diameter of 0.7 mm (corresponding to a current density of 2.2 A cm(-2)) and an extremely stable emission current at 1 mA (260 mA cm(-2) for 20 h). Interestingly, after a number of electrical arcing events, the emitters still showed a high emission current of 5-8 mA (higher than 1 A cm(-2)). In addition to the sound electrical and thermal properties of the graphite filler, effective mechanical adhesion of the CNTs onto the graphite cathode induced by the use of the graphite nanopowder filler contributed the excellent field emission properties of the CNT paste emitters.

  16. Highly stable carbon nanotube field emitters on small metal tips against electrical arcing

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters that exhibit extremely high stability against high-voltage arcing have been demonstrated. The CNT emitters were fabricated on a sharp copper tip substrate that produces a high electric field. A metal mixture composed of silver, copper, and indium micro- and nanoparticles was used as a binder to attach CNTs to the substrate. Due to the strong adhesion of the metal mixture, CNTs were not detached from the substrate even after many intense arcing events. Through electrical conditioning of the as-prepared CNT emitters, vertically standing CNTs with almost the same heights were formed on the substrate surface and most of loosely bound impurities were removed from the substrate. Consequently, no arcing was observed during the normal operation of the CNT emitters and the emission current remained constant even after intentionally inducing arcing at current densities up to 70 mA/cm2. PMID:23953847

  17. Fabrication of Gate-Electrode Integrated Carbon-Nanotube Bundle Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Bronikowski, Michael; Luong, Edward; Manohara, Harish

    2008-01-01

    A continuing effort to develop carbon-nanotube-based field emitters (cold cathodes) as high-current-density electron sources has yielded an optimized device design and a fabrication scheme to implement the design. One major element of the device design is to use a planar array of bundles of carbon nanotubes as the field-emission tips and to optimize the critical dimensions of the array (principally, heights of bundles and distances between them) to obtain high area-averaged current density and high reliability over a long operational lifetime a concept that was discussed in more detail in Arrays of Bundles of Carbon Nanotubes as Field Emitters (NPO-40817), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 2 (February 2007), page 58. Another major element of the design is to configure the gate electrodes (anodes used to extract, accelerate, and/or focus electrons) as a ring that overhangs a recess wherein the bundles of nanotubes are located, such that by virtue of the proximity between the ring and the bundles, a relatively low applied potential suffices to generate the large electric field needed for emission of electrons.

  18. Fabrication of carbon nanotube emitters on the graphite rod and their high field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yuning; Hoon Shin, Dong; Nam Yun, Ki; Song, Yenan; Saito, Yahachi; Jin Lee, Cheol

    2014-01-27

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) emitters with small emission area were fabricated on graphite rods using CNT films. By introducing the edge polishing process, the field emission performance of the CNT emitter was much improved, which showed a very high emission current of 6.34 mA (1.6 A/cm{sup 2}) under an applied electric field of 5.3 V/μm. It also indicates good long-term emission stability, which reveals no degradation in the emission current for 20 h. The emission patterns demonstrate uniform and well-focused electron beam spots. The enhanced field emission performance is mainly attributed to the suppressed edge emission after the edge polishing process.

  19. Individual carbon nanotube probes and field emitters fabrication and their properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Guangyu

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNT) in 1999, they have attracted much attention due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties and potential applications. Yet their nanosize makes the study of individual CNTs easier said than done. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with nanotube cores have been synthesized with conventional chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method. The single multiwall carbon nanotube (MWNT) sticks out as a tip of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up the individual CNT tips, focused ion beam (FIB) technique is applied to cut and adhere the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first adhered on a micro-manipulator with the FIB welding function. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on any geometry of solid samples such as conventional atomic force microscopy (AFM) silicon tips. The procedures developed for the FIB assisted individual CNT tip fabrication will be described in detail. Because of their excellent electrical and stable chemical properties, individual CNTs are potential candidates as electron guns for electron based microscopes to produce highly coherent electron beams. Due to the flexibility of the FIB fabrication, the individual CNT tips can be easily fabricated on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission (FE) experimentation. Another promising application for individual CNT tips is as AFM probes. The high aspect ratio and mechanical resilience make individual CNTs ideal for scanning probe microscopy (SPM) tips. Atomic force microscopy with nanotube tips allows us to image relatively deep features of the sample surface at near nanometer resolution. Characterization of AFM with individual CNT tips and field emission properties of single CNT emitters will be studied and presented.

  20. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-01

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10 000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm-2. The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  1. Highly reliable field electron emitters produced from reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2014-02-14

    Highly reliable field electron emitters were developed using a formulation for reproducible damage-free carbon nanotube (CNT) composite pastes with optimal inorganic fillers and a ball-milling method. We carefully controlled the ball-milling sequence and time to avoid any damage to the CNTs, which incorporated fillers that were fully dispersed as paste constituents. The field electron emitters fabricated by printing the CNT pastes were found to exhibit almost perfect adhesion of the CNT emitters to the cathode, along with good uniformity and reproducibility. A high field enhancement factor of around 10,000 was achieved from the CNT field emitters developed. By selecting nano-sized metal alloys and oxides and using the same formulation sequence, we also developed reliable field emitters that could survive high-temperature post processing. These field emitters had high durability to post vacuum annealing at 950 °C, guaranteeing survival of the brazing process used in the sealing of field emission x-ray tubes. We evaluated the field emitters in a triode configuration in the harsh environment of a tiny vacuum-sealed vessel and observed very reliable operation for 30 h at a high current density of 350 mA cm(-2). The CNT pastes and related field emitters that were developed could be usefully applied in reliable field emission devices.

  2. A digital miniature x-ray tube with a high-density triode carbon nanotube field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jin-Woo; Kang, Jun-Tae; Choi, Sungyoul; Kim, Jae-Woo; Ahn, Seungjoon; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2013-01-01

    We have fabricated a digital miniature x-ray tube (6 mm in diameter and 32 mm in length) with a high-density triode carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter for special x-ray applications. The triode CNT emitter was densely formed within a diameter of below 4 mm with the focusing-functional gate. The brazing process enables us to obtain and maintain a desired vacuum level for the reliable electron emission from the CNT emitters after the vacuum packaging. The miniature x-ray tube exhibited a stable and reliable operation over 250 h in a pulse mode at an anode voltage of above 25 kV.

  3. Carbon and metal nanotube hybrid structures on graphene as efficient electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kwang; Lee, Byung Yang; Lee, Hyungwoo; Cho, Dong-guk; Arif, Muhammad; Kim, Kyu Young; Choi, Young Jin; Hong, Seunghun

    2016-07-01

    We report a facile and efficient method for the fabrication of highly-flexible field emission devices by forming tubular hybrid structures based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and nickel nanotubes (Ni NTs) on graphene-based flexible substrates. By employing an infiltration process in anodic alumina oxide (AAO) templates followed by Ni electrodeposition, we could fabricate CNT-wrapped Ni NT/graphene hybrid structures. During the electrodeposition process, the CNTs served as Ni nucleation sites, resulting in a large-area array of high aspect-ratio field emitters composed of CNT-wrapped Ni NT hybrid structures. As a proof of concepts, we demonstrate that high-quality flexible field emission devices can be simply fabricated using our method. Remarkably, our proto-type field emission devices exhibited a current density higher by two orders of magnitude compared to other devices fabricated by previous methods, while maintaining its structural integrity in various bending deformations. This novel fabrication strategy can be utilized in various applications such as optoelectronic devices, sensors and energy storage devices.

  4. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, J.G.; Smith, B.K.

    1995-10-10

    A method is disclosed for providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure. 17 figs.

  5. Asymmetrical field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, James G.; Smith, Bradley K.

    1995-01-01

    Providing a field emitter with an asymmetrical emitter structure having a very sharp tip in close proximity to its gate. One preferred embodiment of the present invention includes an asymmetrical emitter and a gate. The emitter having a tip and a side is coupled to a substrate. The gate is connected to a step in the substrate. The step has a top surface and a side wall that is substantially parallel to the side of the emitter. The tip of the emitter is in close proximity to the gate. The emitter is at an emitter potential, and the gate is at a gate potential such that with the two potentials at appropriate values, electrons are emitted from the emitter. In one embodiment, the gate is separated from the emitter by an oxide layer, and the emitter is etched anisotropically to form its tip and its asymmetrical structure.

  6. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  7. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    1998-01-01

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays.

  8. Pulsed hybrid field emitter

    DOEpatents

    Sampayan, S.E.

    1998-03-03

    A hybrid emitter exploits the electric field created by a rapidly depoled ferroelectric material. Combining the emission properties of a planar thin film diamond emitter with a ferroelectric alleviates the present technological problems associated with both types of emitters and provides a robust, extremely long life, high current density cathode of the type required by emerging microwave power generation, accelerator technology and display applications. This new hybrid emitter is easy to fabricate and not susceptible to the same failures which plague microstructure field emitter technology. Local electrode geometries and electric field are determined independently from those for optimum transport and brightness preservation. Due to the large amount of surface charge created on the ferroelectric, the emitted electrons have significant energy, thus eliminating the requirement for specialized phosphors in emissive flat-panel displays. 11 figs.

  9. Effect of increased crystallinity of single-walled carbon nanotubes used as field emitters on their electrical properties

    SciTech Connect

    Shimoi, Norihiro

    2015-12-07

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE) properties at a low driving voltage. We used a coating containing homogeneously dispersed highly crystalline SWCNTs produced by a high-temperature annealing process to fabricate an FE device by a wet-coating process at a low cost. Using the coating, we succeeded in reducing the power consumption of field emitters for planar lighting devices. SWCNTs synthesized by arc discharge have crystal defects in the carbon network, which are considered to induce inelastic electron tunneling that deteriorates the electrical conductivity of the SWCNTs. In this study, the blocking of the transport of electrons in SWCNTs with crystal defects is simulated using an inelastic electron tunneling model. We succeeded in clarifying the mechanism underlying the electrical conductivity of SWCNTs by controlling their crystallinity. In addition, it was confirmed that field emitters using highly crystalline SWCNTs can lead to new applications operating with low power consumption and new devices that may change our daily lives in the future.

  10. Decoration of cesium iodide nano particles on patterned carbon nanotube emitter arrays to improve their field emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-03-01

    Arrays of aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles were synthesized on the pre-patterned silicon substrate using thermal chemical vapor deposition. Silicon substrate was patterned with square arrays of 10 × 10 μm iron catalyst using photolithography, iron sputtering, and a lift-off process. After field emission (FE) measurement in diode configuration, CNT emitter arrays (CEAs) were decorated with cesium iodide (CsI) nano particles (NPs) using thermal evaporation with substrate heating at 300 °C. FE of pristine CEAs and CsI NPs decorated CEAs were carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Pristine CEAs and CsI NPs decorated CEAs were characterized using scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, and Raman characterization. From FE comparison plots, it was observed that CsI NPs decoration on the CEAs had significantly lowered the turn-on electric field from 3.00 to 2.13 V/μm. A remarkable improvement of more than 50 % in the current density, from 11.02 to 17.33 mA/cm2, was also observed at a constant applied electric field of 5 V/μm.

  11. Effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of multi-walled carbon nanotube emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Jha, P.; Kumar, P.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-05-28

    Present report aims to study the effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays. For development of four CNT emitter arrays (CEAs), low resistively silicon substrates were coated with thin film of iron catalyst using photolithography, sputtering, and lift off process. Four CEAs were synthesized on these substrates using thermal chemical vapor deposition with minor changes in pretreatment duration. Out of these, two CEAs have 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m and 40 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 40 {mu}m solid square dots of CNTs with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot separation. Other two CEAs have ring square bundles of CNTs and these CEAs are envisioned as 10 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m square dots with 4 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 4 {mu}m scooped out area and 15 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 15 {mu}m square dots with 5 {mu}m Multiplication-Sign 5 {mu}m lift out area with constant 20 {mu}m inter-dot spacing. Solid square dot structures have exactly constant edge length per unit area with more than four-fold difference in CNT growth area however ring square dot patterns have minor difference in edge length per unit area with approximately two times difference in CNT growth area. Quality and morphology of synthesized CEAs were assessed by scanning electron microscope and Raman characterization which confirm major differences. Field emission of all CEAs was carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Field emission of solid square dot CEAs show approximately identical current density-electric field curves and Fowler-Nordheim plots with little difference in emission current density at same electric field. Similar results were observed for ring square structure CEAs when compared separately. Maximum emission current density observed from these four CEAs reduces from 14.53, 12.23, 11.01, to 8.66 mA/cm{sup 2} at a constant electric field of 5 V/{mu}m, according to edge

  12. Effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of multi-walled carbon nanotube emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahi, Monika; Gautam, S.; Shah, P. V.; Jha, P.; Kumar, P.; Rawat, J. S.; Chaudhury, P. K.; HASH0x9890f80, Harsh; Tandon, R. P.

    2013-05-01

    Present report aims to study the effect of purity, edge length, and growth area on field emission of patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) emitter arrays. For development of four CNT emitter arrays (CEAs), low resistively silicon substrates were coated with thin film of iron catalyst using photolithography, sputtering, and lift off process. Four CEAs were synthesized on these substrates using thermal chemical vapor deposition with minor changes in pretreatment duration. Out of these, two CEAs have 10 μm × 10 μm and 40 μm × 40 μm solid square dots of CNTs with constant 20 μm inter-dot separation. Other two CEAs have ring square bundles of CNTs and these CEAs are envisioned as 10 μm × 10 μm square dots with 4 μm × 4 μm scooped out area and 15 μm × 15 μm square dots with 5 μm × 5 μm lift out area with constant 20 μm inter-dot spacing. Solid square dot structures have exactly constant edge length per unit area with more than four-fold difference in CNT growth area however ring square dot patterns have minor difference in edge length per unit area with approximately two times difference in CNT growth area. Quality and morphology of synthesized CEAs were assessed by scanning electron microscope and Raman characterization which confirm major differences. Field emission of all CEAs was carried out under same vacuum condition and constant inter-electrode separation. Field emission of solid square dot CEAs show approximately identical current density-electric field curves and Fowler-Nordheim plots with little difference in emission current density at same electric field. Similar results were observed for ring square structure CEAs when compared separately. Maximum emission current density observed from these four CEAs reduces from 14.53, 12.23, 11.01, to 8.66 mA/cm2 at a constant electric field of 5 V/μm, according to edge length of 1361.7, 1221.08, 872.20, to 872.16 mm rather than growth area and purity. Although, the 40 μm × 40 μm CEAs possessed highest

  13. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, Anthony F.

    1999-01-01

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area.

  14. Towards graphane field emitters

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shuyi; Li, Chi; Zhou, Yanhuai; Collins, Clare M.; Kang, Moon H.; Parmee, Richard J.; Zhang, Xiaobing; Milne, William I.; Wang, Baoping

    2015-01-01

    We report on the improved field emission performance of graphene foam (GF) following transient exposure to hydrogen plasma. The enhanced field emission mechanism associated with hydrogenation has been investigated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, plasma spectrophotometry, Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy. The observed enhanced electron emissionhas been attributed to an increase in the areal density of lattice defects and the formation of a partially hydrogenated, graphane-like material. The treated GF emitter demonstrated a much reduced macroscopic turn-on field (2.5 V μm–1), with an increased maximum current density from 0.21 mA cm–2 (pristine) to 8.27 mA cm–2 (treated). The treated GFs vertically orientated protrusions, after plasma etching, effectively increased the local electric field resulting in a 2.2-fold reduction in the turn-on electric field. The observed enhancement is further attributed to hydrogenation and the subsequent formation of a partially hydrogenated structured 2D material, which advantageously shifts the emitter work function. Alongside augmentation of the nominal crystallite size of the graphitic superstructure, surface bound species are believed to play a key role in the enhanced emission. The hydrogen plasma treatment was also noted to increase the emission spatial uniformity, with an approximate four times reduction in the per unit area variation in emission current density. Our findings suggest that plasma treatments, and particularly hydrogen and hydrogen-containing precursors, may provide an efficient, simple, and low cost means of realizing enhanced nanocarbon-based field emission devices via the engineered degradation of the nascent lattice, and adjustment of the surface work function. PMID:28066543

  15. Electrochemical formation of field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Bernhardt, A.F.

    1999-03-16

    Electrochemical formation of field emitters, particularly useful in the fabrication of flat panel displays is disclosed. The fabrication involves field emitting points in a gated field emitter structure. Metal field emitters are formed by electroplating and the shape of the formed emitter is controlled by the potential imposed on the gate as well as on a separate counter electrode. This allows sharp emitters to be formed in a more inexpensive and manufacturable process than vacuum deposition processes used at present. The fabrication process involves etching of the gate metal and the dielectric layer down to the resistor layer, and then electroplating the etched area and forming an electroplated emitter point in the etched area. 12 figs.

  16. A glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube based on carbon nanotube emitter for medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, Seung Jun; Jeong, Jaeik; Ahn, Jeung Sun; Park, Hunkuk; Kwak, Junghwan; Noh, Eunkyong; Paik, Sanghyun; Kim, Seung Hoon; Ryu, Jehwang

    2016-04-01

    We report the design and fabrication of a carbon nanotube based a glass-sealed field emission x-ray tube without vacuum pump. The x-ray tube consists of four electrodes with anode, focuser, gate, and cathode electrode. The shape of cathode is rectangular for isotropic focal spot size at anode target. The obtained x-ray images show clearly micrometer scale.

  17. Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes: A better field emitter and stable nanofluid with better thermal conductivity

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar, S.K.; Jha, A.; Chattopadhyay, K.K.

    2015-06-15

    Highlights: • Thionyl chloride assisted functionalization of amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs). • Improved dispersion enhanced thermal conductivity of engine oil. • Again f-a-CNTs showed enhanced field emission property compared to pure a-CNTs. - Abstract: Amorphous carbon nanotubes (a-CNTs) were synthesized at low temperature in open atmosphere and further functionalized by treating them in thionyl chloride added stearic acid-dichloro methane solution. The as prepared functionalized a-CNTs (f-a-CNTs) were characterized by Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transformed infrared spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, transmission and scanning electron microscopy. The nanofluid was prepared by dispersing f-a-CNTs in engine oil using ultrasonic treatment. The effective thermal conductivity of as prepared nanofluid was investigated at different loading (volume fraction of f-a-CNTs). Obtained experimental data of thermal conductivity were compared with the predicted values, calculated using existing theoretical models. Stability of the nanofluid was tested by means of zeta potential measurement to optimize the loading. The as prepared f-a-CNTs sample also showed improved field emission result as compared to pristine a-CNTs. Dependence of field emission behavior on inter electrode distance was investigated too.

  18. Design of a carbon-nanotube yarn field emitter for micro-focus X-ray generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2016-08-01

    The field-emission (F-E) characteristics of multi-walled carbon-nanotube (MWCNT) yarn and its contribution to X-ray generation have been investigated in the current work. A dry spinning method was used to fabricateMWCNT yarn from superMWCNTs that had been fabricated by using microwave plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition (MW-PECVD). The F-E behavior of the MWCNT yarn followed the Fowler-Nordheim model. Compared to a MWCNT, the MWCNT yarn displayed a significant F-E capability in both the diode and the triode X-ray generation structures. The low-voltage F-E of the MWCNT yarn can be attributed to the field-enhancing effect of the yarn due to its shape and to the contribution of the high-aspect-ratio nanotubes that protrude from the sides of the yarn. The effect of filters on the development of X-ray images has also been demonstrated. The amount of exposure of the samples to X-rays was also manipulated. Results of this study indicate that the MWCNT yarn may be a good candidate for use in low-voltage F-E applications for X-ray imaging.

  19. Improved Photoresist Coating for Making CNT Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toda, Risaku; Manohara, Harish

    2009-01-01

    An improved photoresist-coating technique has been developed for use in the fabrication of carbon-nanotube- (CNT) based field emitters is described. The improved photoresist coating technique overcomes what, heretofore, has been a major difficulty in the fabrication process.

  20. Diamond/diamond-like carbon coated nanotube structures for efficient electron field emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Steven (Inventor); Withers, James C. (Inventor); Loutfy, Raouf O. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a nanotube coated with diamond or diamond-like carbon, a field emitter cathode comprising same, and a field emitter comprising the cathode. It is also directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from a field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes by coating the nanotube with diamond or diamond-like carbon. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a method of preventing the evaporation of carbon from an electron field emitter comprising a cathode comprised of nanotubes, which method comprises coating the nanotubes with diamond or diamond-like carbon.

  1. Self-Aligned Integrally Gated Nanofilament Field Emitter Cell and Array

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-03-09

    composed of carbon nanotubes , alternate nanofilaments may be nanowires composed of Si, Ge, SiC, GaAs, GaP, InAs, InP, ZnS, ZnSe, CdS, CdSe, MoS2 , WS2...integrally gated, self-aligned field emitter cell and array whose cathode is formed of a recently discovered class of materials of nanotubes and...nanotechnology have resulted in the creation of nanofilaments including nanotubes . One such example is carbon nanotubes . These nanotubes behave like

  2. Field emitter technologies for nanovision science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mimura, H.; Neo, Y.; Aoki, T.; Nagao, M.; Yoshida, T.; Kanemaru, S.

    2009-10-01

    We have been investigating an ultra fine field emission display (FED) and an ultra fine CdTe X-ray image sensor for creating nanovision science. For an ultra fine FED with a sub-micron pixel, we have developed a volcano-structured double-gated field emitter arrays with a capability of focusing electron beam without serous reduction in emission current. For an ultra fine X-ray image sensor, we have proposed and demonstrated a novel CdTe X-ray sensor consisting of a CdTe diode and field emitter array.

  3. Field-emitter arrays for vacuum microelectronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spindt, C. A.; Holland, C. E.; Rosengreen, A.; Brodie, Ivor

    1991-01-01

    An ongoing program on microfabricated field-emitter arrays has produced a gated field-emitter tip structure with submicrometer dimensions and techniques for fabricating emitter arrays with tip packaging densities of up to 1.5 x 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Arrays have been fabricated over areas varying from a few micrometers up to 13 cm in diameter. Very small overall emitter size, materials selection, and rigorous emitter-tip processing procedures have contributed to reducing the potential required for field emission to tens of volts. Emission current densities of up to 100 A/sq cm have been achieved with small arrays of tips, and 100-mA total emission is commonly produced with arrays 1 mm in diameter containing 10,000 tips. Transconductances of 5.0 micro-S per tip have been demonstrated, indicating that 50 S/sq cm should be achievable with tip densities of 10 exp 7 tips/sq cm. Details of the cathode arrays and a variety of performance characteristics are discussed.

  4. Simple-to-prepare multipoint field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sominskii, G. G.; Taradaev, E. P.; Tumareva, T. A.; Mishin, M. V.; Kornishin, S. Yu.

    2015-07-01

    We investigate multitip field emitters prepared by electroerosion treatment of the surface of molybdenum samples. Their characteristics are determined for operation with a protecting activated fullerene coating. Our experiments indicate that such cathodes are promising for high-voltage electron devices operating in technical vacuum.

  5. Emittance of a Field Emission Electron Source

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-05

    mode within the wiggler in order for the laser threshold to be reached. The mode is characterized by a waist radius w and a divergence , the product...the field line red or curved compared to a massive particle trajectory blue or straight. The field lines originate on the surface at s ,zs and...emitter surface s ,zs and along the evalu- ation plane h ,zh. The equivalent sphere characterized by a , is also shown. The red curved line

  6. Spontaneous decay of the excited state of an emitter near a finite-length metallic carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemilentsau, A. M.; Slepyan, G. Ya.; Maksimenko, S. A.; Lakhtakia, A.; Rotkin, S. V.

    2010-12-01

    The spontaneous decay of an excited state of an emitter placed in the vicinity of a metallic single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) was examined theoretically. The emitter-SWNT coupling strongly depends on the position of the emitter relative to the SWNT, the length of the SWNT, the dipole transition frequency, and the orientation of the emitter. In the high-frequency regime, dips in the spectrum of the spontaneous decay rate exist at the resonance frequencies in the spectrum of the SWNT conductivity. In the intermediate-frequency regime, the SWNT conductivity is very low and the spontaneous decay rate is practically unaffected by the SWNT. In the low-frequency regime, the spectrum of the spontaneous decay rate contains resonances at the antennas resonance frequencies for surface-wave propagation in the SWNT. Enhancement of both the total and radiative spontaneous decay rates by several orders in magnitude is predicted at these resonance frequencies. The strong emitter-field coupling is achieved, in spite of the low- Q factor of the antenna resonances due to the very high magnitude of the electromagnetic field in the near-field zone. The vacuum Rabi oscillations of the population of the excited emitter state are exhibited when the emitter is coupled to an antenna resonance of the SWNT.

  7. Field emission from ZrC films on Si and Mo single emitters and emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Xie, T.; Mackie, W.A.; Davis, P.R.

    1996-05-01

    Field emission from ZrC films deposited on Si and Mo single emitters and field emitter arrays (FEAs) has been studied. For single emitters, the results show dramatic improvements in emitter performance by reducing work functions{emdash}on the order of 1 eV{emdash}and increasing stability. For FEAs, deposition of a ZrC film reduced the operating voltage 30{percent}{endash}50{percent} at an emission current of 1.0 {mu}A/tip and increased the emission stability. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Vacuum Society}

  8. Group-III Nitride Field Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bensaoula, Abdelhak; Berishev, Igor

    2008-01-01

    Field-emission devices (cold cathodes) having low electron affinities can be fabricated through lattice-mismatched epitaxial growth of nitrides of elements from group III of the periodic table. Field emission of electrons from solid surfaces is typically utilized in vacuum microelectronic devices, including some display devices. The present field-emission devices and the method of fabricating them were developed to satisfy needs to reduce the cost of fabricating field emitters, make them compatible with established techniques for deposition of and on silicon, and enable monolithic integration of field emitters with silicon-based driving circuitry. In fabricating a device of this type, one deposits a nitride of one or more group-III elements on a substrate of (111) silicon or other suitable material. One example of a suitable deposition process is chemical vapor deposition in a reactor that contains plasma generated by use of electron cyclotron resonance. Under properly chosen growth conditions, the large mismatch between the crystal lattices of the substrate and the nitride causes strains to accumulate in the growing nitride film, such that the associated stresses cause the film to crack. The cracks lie in planes parallel to the direction of growth, so that the growing nitride film becomes divided into microscopic growing single-crystal columns. The outer ends of the fully-grown columns can serve as field-emission tips. By virtue of their chemical compositions and crystalline structures, the columns have low work functions and high electrical conductivities, both of which are desirable for field emission of electrons. From examination of transmission electron micrographs of a prototype device, the average column width was determined to be about 100 nm and the sharpness of the tips was determined to be characterized by a dimension somewhat less than 100 nm. The areal density of the columns was found to about 5 x 10(exp 9)/sq cm . about 4 to 5 orders of magnitude

  9. Application of carbon nanotubes for field emission display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qunhua

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have great features to be excellent electron emitters. They are among the best candidates to replace metal emitters in field emission displays. In this work, carbon nanotubes have been synthesized by arc-discharge, catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon and nano template method. Arc-discharge produces nanotubes with the highest quality. Impurity particles in the raw material can be removed by filtration or oxidation. A slurry procedure has been developed to make films of randomly orientated nanotubes. Electron field emission of nanotubes made by three different methods has been measured and compared. Arc-produced nanotubes showed the best performance and stability. It is suggested that the defects of different tubes may account for their emission behavior. Carbon nanotube based diode and triode field emission display prototypes were successfully fabricated and tested. For the diode nanotube display prototype, row-column structure was used. Tests of the display prototype confirmed the emission stability and uniformity. Display pixels were well defined and switchable under a half-voltage "off pixel" scheme. With the available modern circuit board printing technology, the scale-up in display size is straightforward. Great efforts have been put into the development of a triode nanotube display prototype. The design was based on that of the planar emitter triode structure for diamond film. Several key engineering problems such as patternable thick dielectric layer and gate gap control etc. were solved. The achieved emitter arrays showed good uniformity. Emission behavior with regarding to emitter size was studied. The effectiveness of the gate control was confirmed by I-V measurement and modulating test at 40 V pulse input to the gate electrode.

  10. Modeling of carbon nanotube-based devices: from nanoFETs to THz emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Carlo, Aldo; Pecchia, Alessandro; Petrolati, Eleonora; Paoloni, Claudio

    2006-08-01

    In the first part of the present contribution, we will report on transport calculations of nanoscaled devices based on Carbon Nanotubes obtained via self-consistent density-functional method coupled with non-equilibrium Green's function approaches. In particular, density functional tight-binding techniques are very promising due to their intrinsic efficiency. This scheme allows treatment of systems comprising a large number of atoms and enables the computation of the current flowing between two or more contacts in a fully self-consistent manner with the open boundary conditions that naturally arise in transport problems. We will give a description of this methodology and application to field effect transistor based on Carbon nanotubes. The advances in manufacturing technology are allowing new opportunities even for vacuum electron devices producing radio-frequency radiation. Modern micro and nano-technologies can overcome the typical severe limitations of vacuum tube devices. As an example, Carbon Nanotubes used as cold emitters in micron-scaled triodes allow for frequency generation up to THz region. The purpose of the second part of this contribution will be a description of the modelling of Carbon Nanotube based vacuum devices such as triodes. We will present the calculation of important figures of merit and possible realizations.

  11. Edge enhancement control in linear arrays of ungated field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, J. R.; Jensen, K. L.; Shiffler, D. A.

    2016-01-01

    In arrays of ungated field emitters, the field enhancement factor of each emitter decreases as the distance between the emitters decreases, an effect known as screening. At the edge of these arrays, emitters experience reduced screening, leading to higher field enhancement factors than emitters at the array center, causing nonuniform emission across the array. Here, we consider this effect in linear arrays of ungated field emitters spaced at distances comparable to their heights, which is the regime that generally maximizes their average current density. A Line Charge Model is used to assess the degree to which these edge effects propagate into the array interior, and to study the impact of varying the height, location, and tip radius of emitters at the ends of an array on the edge enhancement. It is shown that each of these techniques can accomplish this edge enhancement control, but each has advantages and disadvantages that will be discussed.

  12. Plasmons in doped finite carbon nanotubes and their interactions with fast electrons and quantum emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vega, Sandra; Cox, Joel D.; de Abajo, F. Javier García

    2016-08-01

    We study the potential of highly doped finite carbon nanotubes to serve as plasmonic elements that mediate the interaction between quantum emitters. Similar to graphene, nanotubes support intense plasmons that can be modulated by varying their level of electrical doping. These excitations exhibit large interaction with light and electron beams, as revealed upon examination of the corresponding light extinction cross-section and electron energy-loss spectra. We show that quantum emitters experience record-high Purcell factors, while they undergo strong mutual interaction mediated by their coupling to the tube plasmons. Our results show the potential of doped finite nanotubes as tunable plasmonic materials for quantum optics applications.

  13. Magnetic field emission gun with zirconiated emitter.

    PubMed

    Troyon, M

    1989-03-01

    A magnetic-field-superimposed field emission gun with low aberrations and equipped with a zirconiated tungsten emitter has been developed for applications where very stable high probe currents are required. It has been tested on a conventional electron microscope at 10 kV and on an electron beam testing system at 1 kV. Probe current i = 250 nA in a probe size d = 0.4 micron is obtained at 10 kV; at 1 kV the resolution is 0.1 micron with i = 5 nA, and 0.4 micron with i = 30 nA. For these probe currents, the spatial broadening effect due to electron-electron interactions in the beam is the preponderant factor limiting the probe size.

  14. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters

    PubMed Central

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Ohta, R.; Ishii, A.; Liu, X.; Shimada, T.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-01-01

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters. PMID:25420679

  15. Ultralow mode-volume photonic crystal nanobeam cavities for high-efficiency coupling to individual carbon nanotube emitters.

    PubMed

    Miura, R; Imamura, S; Ohta, R; Ishii, A; Liu, X; Shimada, T; Iwamoto, S; Arakawa, Y; Kato, Y K

    2014-11-25

    The unique emission properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes are attractive for achieving increased functionality in integrated photonics. In addition to being room-temperature telecom-band emitters that can be directly grown on silicon, they are ideal for coupling to nanoscale photonic structures. Here we report on high-efficiency coupling of individual air-suspended carbon nanotubes to silicon photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. Photoluminescence images of dielectric- and air-mode cavities reflect their distinctly different mode profiles and show that fields in the air are important for coupling. We find that the air-mode cavities couple more efficiently, and estimated spontaneous emission coupling factors reach a value as high as 0.85. Our results demonstrate advantages of ultralow mode-volumes in air-mode cavities for coupling to low-dimensional nanoscale emitters.

  16. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes.

    PubMed

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R J Dwayne

    2016-12-23

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  17. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    PubMed Central

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R.J. Dwayne

    2016-01-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence. PMID:28008918

  18. Measurement of transverse emittance and coherence of double-gate field emitter array cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Soichiro; Das Kanungo, Prat; Monshipouri, Mahta; Lee, Chiwon; Miller, R. J. Dwayne

    2016-12-01

    Achieving small transverse beam emittance is important for high brightness cathodes for free electron lasers and electron diffraction and imaging experiments. Double-gate field emitter arrays with on-chip focussing electrode, operating with electrical switching or near infrared laser excitation, have been studied as cathodes that are competitive with photocathodes excited by ultraviolet lasers, but the experimental demonstration of the low emittance has been elusive. Here we demonstrate this for a field emitter array with an optimized double-gate structure by directly measuring the beam characteristics. Further we show the successful application of the double-gate field emitter array to observe the low-energy electron beam diffraction from suspended graphene in minimal setup. The observed low emittance and long coherence length are in good agreement with theory. These results demonstrate that our all-metal double-gate field emitters are highly promising for applications that demand extremely low-electron bunch-phase space volume and large transverse coherence.

  19. Sharpening of field emitter tips using high-energy ions

    DOEpatents

    Musket, Ronald G.

    1999-11-30

    A process for sharpening arrays of field emitter tips of field emission cathodes, such as found in field-emission, flat-panel video displays. The process uses sputtering by high-energy (more than 30 keV) ions incident along or near the longitudinal axis of the field emitter to sharpen the emitter with a taper from the tip or top of the emitter down to the shank of the emitter. The process is particularly applicable to sharpening tips of emitters having cylindrical or similar (e.g., pyramidal) symmetry. The process will sharpen tips down to radii of less than 12 nm with an included angle of about 20 degrees. Because the ions are incident along or near the longitudinal axis of each emitter, the tips of gated arrays can be sharpened by high-energy ion beams rastered over the arrays using standard ion implantation equipment. While the process is particularly applicable for sharpening of arrays of field emitters in field-emission flat-panel displays, it can be effectively utilized in the fabrication of other vacuum microelectronic devices that rely on field emission of electrons.

  20. The dust nature of micro field emitters in accelerators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkov, V.; Petrov, V. M.

    2016-11-01

    Field emission currents emitted by micro-emitters are a limiting factor for the operational gradients of accelerating radio frequency (rf) cavities. Within the rf field emission theory the existence of needle like micro field emitters with very high length relative to the radius and corresponding high enhancement factor (β) is assumed. In this article the hypothesis that micro field emitters consists of long chains of conductive micro-particles is considered. Five different forces acting onto the particles in a high rf field are considered and the respective equations are derived. Some experimental observations and their explanation within this hypothesis are discussed.

  1. Physical electrostatics of small field emitter arrays/clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forbes, Richard G.

    2016-08-01

    This paper aims to improve qualitative understanding of electrostatic influences on apex field enhancement factors (AFEFs) for small field emitter arrays/clusters. Using the "floating sphere at emitter-plate potential" (FSEPP) model, it re-examines the electrostatics and mathematics of three simple systems of identical post-like emitters. For the isolated emitter, various approaches are noted. An adequate approximation is to consider only the effects of sphere charges and (for significantly separated emitters) image charges. For the 2-emitter system, formulas are found for charge-transfer ("charge-blunting") effects and neighbor-field effects, for widely spaced and for "sufficiently closely spaced" emitters. Mutual charge-blunting is always the dominant effect, with a related (negative) fractional AFEF-change δtwo. For sufficiently small emitter spacing c, |δtwo| varies approximately as 1/c; for large spacing, |δtwo| decreases as 1/c3. In a 3-emitter equispaced linear array, differential charge-blunting and differential neighbor-field effects occur, but differential charge-blunting effects are dominant, and cause the "exposed" outer emitters to have higher AFEF (γ0) than the central emitter (γ1). Formulas are found for the exposure ratio Ξ = γ0/γ1, for large and for sufficiently small separations. The FSEPP model for an isolated emitter has accuracy around 30%. Line-charge models (LCMs) are an alternative, but an apparent difficulty with recent LCM implementations is identified. Better descriptions of array electrostatics may involve developing good fitting equations for AFEFs derived from accurate numerical solution of Laplace's equation, perhaps with equation form(s) guided qualitatively by FSEPP-model results. In existing fitting formulas, the AFEF-reduction decreases exponentially as c increases, which is different from the FSEPP-model formulas. This discrepancy needs to be investigated, using systematic Laplace-based simulations and appropriate results

  2. Nanotube field electron emission: principles, development, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Yeow, J. T. W.

    2015-06-01

    There is a growing trend to apply field emission (FE) electron sources in vacuum electronic devices due to their fast response, high efficiency and low energy consumption compared to thermionic emission ones. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been regarded as a promising class of electron field emitters since the 1990s and have promoted the development of FE technology greatly because of their high electrical and thermal conductivity, chemical stability, high aspect ratio and small size. Recent studies have shown that FE from CNTs has the potential to replace conventional thermionic emission in many areas and that it exhibits advanced features in practical applications. Consequently, FE from nanotubes and applications thereof have attracted much attention. This paper provides a comprehensive review of both recent advances in CNT field emitters and issues related to applications of CNT based FE. FE theories and principles are introduced, and the early development of field emitters is related. CNT emitter types and their FE performance are discussed. The current situation for applications based on nanotube FE is reviewed. Although challenges remain, the tremendous progress made in CNT FE over the past ten years indicates the field’s development potential.

  3. Field emission theory for an enhanced surface potential: a model for carbon field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choy, T. C.; Harker, A. H.; Stoneham, A. M.

    2004-02-01

    We propose a non-JWKB-based theory of electron field emission for carbon field emitters in which, for electrons with energy in the vicinity of the order of ϑ to the Fermi level, the effective (1/x) surface potential is strongly enhanced. The model grossly violates the WKB validity criteria and necessitates an analytic treatment of the one-dimensional Schrödinger equation, which we first obtain. We determine ϑ (which is field-dependent) from the wavefunction matching point close to the surface. For reasonable values of the surface parameters—work function \\varphi \\approx 2 -5 eV, electron affinity \\chi \\approx 2 \\varphi and an empirical electron loss factor \\sigma \\approx 10^{-3} (and with no other adjustable parameters)—the theory provides an intriguing agreement with experimental data from carbon epoxy graphite composite (PFE) and certain graphitized carbon nanotube field emitters. We speculate on the surface potential enhancement, which can be interpreted as a massive (field-induced) dielectric effect of dynamic origin. This can be related via time-dependent perturbation theory to second-order non-linear polarizability enhancements at ultraviolet {\\sim }3000~\\AA wavelengths near the tunnelling region. Finally some exact mathematical results are included in the appendix for future reference.

  4. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray.

  5. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-07-01

    This paper reports a novel implanting micromachining technology. By using this method, for the first time, we could implant nano-scale materials into milli-scale metal substrates at room temperature. Ni-based flexible carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters were fabricated by the novel micromachining method. By embedding CNT roots into Ni foil using polymer matrix as transfer media, effective direct contact between Ni and CNTs was achieved. As a result, our novel emitter shows relatively good field emission properties such as low turn-on field and good stability. Moreover, the emitter was highly flexible with preservation of the field emission properties. The excellent field emission characteristics attributed to the direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate. To check the practical application of the novel emitter, a simple X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a traditional tube. The gray shadow that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the successful generation of X-ray.

  6. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, D.F.; Kwan, S.W.

    1999-03-30

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10{sup {minus}4} Torr and about 10{sup {minus}7} Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10{sup {minus}8} Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters. 2 figs.

  7. Process for making a cesiated diamond film field emitter and field emitter formed therefrom

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, David F.; Kwan, Simon W.

    1999-01-01

    A process for making a cesiated diamond film comprises (a) depositing a quantity of cesium iodide on the diamond film in a vacuum of between about 10.sup.-4 Torr and about 10.sup.-7 Torr, (b) increasing the vacuum to at least about 10.sup.-8 Torr, and (c) imposing an electron beam upon the diamond film, said electron beam having an energy sufficient to dissociate said cesium iodide and to incorporate cesium into interstices of the diamond film. The cesiated diamond film prepared according to the process has an operating voltage that is reduced by a factor of at least approximately 2.5 relative to conventional, non-cesiated diamond film field emitters.

  8. Diamond-Coated Carbon Nanotubes for Efficient Field Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimitrijevic, Stevan; Withers, James C.

    2005-01-01

    Field-emission cathodes containing arrays of carbon nanotubes coated with diamond or diamondlike carbon (DLC) are undergoing development. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes have been shown to perform well as electron field emitters. The idea underlying the present development is that by coating carbon nanotubes with wideband- gap materials like diamond or DLC, one could reduce effective work functions, thereby reducing threshold electric-field levels for field emission of electrons and, hence, improving cathode performance. To demonstrate feasibility, experimental cathodes were fabricated by (1) covering metal bases with carbon nanotubes bound to the bases by an electrically conductive binder and (2) coating the nanotubes, variously, with diamond or DLC by plasma-assisted chemical vapor deposition. In tests, the threshold electric-field levels for emission of electrons were reduced by as much as 40 percent, relative to those of uncoated- nanotube cathodes. Coating with diamond or DLC could also make field emission-cathodes operate more stably by helping to prevent evaporation of carbon from nanotubes in the event of overheating of the cathodes. Cathodes of this type are expected to be useful principally as electron sources for cathode-ray tubes and flat-panel displays.

  9. A novel field emission microscopy method to study field emission characteristics of freestanding carbon nanotube array.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Jaffray, David; Yeow, John T W

    2017-02-17

    Field emission (FE) uniformity and mechanism of emitter failure of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have not been well studied due to the difficulty of observing and quantifying FE performance of each emitter in CNT arrays. Herein a field emission microscopy (FEM) method based on Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film is proposed to study the FE uniformity and CNT emitter failure of freestanding CNT arrays. FE uniformity of freestanding CNT arrays and different levels of FE current contributions from each emitter in the arrays are recorded and visualized. FEM patterns on the PMMA thin film contain the details of the CNT emitter tip shape and whether multiple CNT emitters occurring at an emission site. Observation of real-time FE performance and CNT emitter failure process in freestanding CNT arrays are successfully achieved using a microscopic camera. High emission currents through CNT emitters causes joule heating and light emission followed by an explosion of the CNTs. The proposed approach is capable of resolving the major challenge of building the relationship between FE performances and CNT morphologies, which can significantly facilitate the study of FE non-uniformity and emitter failure mechanism and the development of stable and reliable FE devices in practical applications.

  10. A novel field emission microscopy method to study field emission characteristics of freestanding carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yunhan; Sun, Yonghai; Jaffray, David A.; Yeow, John T. W.

    2017-04-01

    Field emission (FE) uniformity and the mechanism of emitter failure of freestanding carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays have not been well studied due to the difficulty of observing and quantifying FE performance of each emitter in CNT arrays. Herein a field emission microscopy (FEM) method based on poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) thin film is proposed to study the FE uniformity and CNT emitter failure of freestanding CNT arrays. FE uniformity of freestanding CNT arrays and different levels of FE current contributions from each emitter in the arrays are recorded and visualized. FEM patterns on the PMMA thin film contain the details of the CNT emitter tip shape and whether multiple CNT emitters occur at an emission site. Observation of real-time FE performance and the CNT emitter failure process in freestanding CNT arrays are successfully achieved using a microscopic camera. High emission currents through CNT emitters causes Joule heating and light emission followed by an explosion of the CNTs. The proposed approach is capable of resolving the major challenge of building the relationship between FE performance and CNT morphologies, which can significantly facilitate the study of FE non-uniformity, the emitter failure mechanism and the development of stable and reliable FE devices in practical applications.

  11. Field emission from open ended aluminum nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tondare, V. N.; Balasubramanian, C.; Shende, S. V.; Joag, D. S.; Godbole, V. P.; Bhoraskar, S. V.; Bhadbhade, M.

    2002-06-01

    This letter reports the field emission measurements from the nanotubes of aluminum nitride which were synthesized by gas phase condensation using the solid-vapor equilibria. A dc arc plasma reactor was used for producing the vapors of aluminum in a reactive nitrogen atmosphere. Nanoparticles and nanotubes of aluminum nitride were first characterized by transmission electron microscope and tube dimensions were found to be varying from 30 to 200 nm in diameter and 500 to 700 nm in length. These tubes were mixed with nanoparticles of size range between 5 and 200 nm in diameter. Tungsten tips coated with these nanoparticles and tubes were used as a field emitter. The field emission patterns display very interesting features consisting of sharp rings which were often found to change their shapes. The patterns are attributed to the open ended nanotubes of aluminum nitride. A few dot patterns corresponding to the nanoparticles were also seen to occur. The Fowler-Nordheim plots were seen to be nonlinear in nature, which reflects the semi-insulating behavior of the emitter. The field enhancement factor is estimated to be 34 500 indicating that the field enhancement due to the nanometric size of the emitter is an important cause for the observed emission.

  12. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-01-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10-11 to 10-6 Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  13. Wide-range Vacuum Measurements from MWNT Field Emitters Grown Directly on Stainless Steel Substrates.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Li, Detian; Zhao, Yangyang; Cheng, Yongjun; Dong, Changkun

    2016-12-01

    The field emission properties and the vacuum measurement application are investigated from the multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) grown directly on catalytic stainless steel substrates. The MWNT emitters present excellent emission properties after the acid treatment of the substrate. The MWNT gauge is able to work down to the extreme-high vacuum (XHV) range with linear measurement performance in wide range from 10(-11) to 10(-6) Torr. A modulating grid is attempted with improved gauge sensitivity. The extension of the lower pressure limit is attributed largely to low outgassing effect due to direct growth of MWNTs and justified design of the electron source.

  14. Modeling field emitter arrays using nonlinear line charge distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Debabrata; Singh, Gaurav; Kumar, Raghwendra

    2016-09-01

    Modeling high aspect ratio field emitter arrays is a computational challenge due to the enormity of the resources involved. The line charge model (LCM) provides an alternate semi-analytical tool that has been used to model both infinite as well as finite sized arrays. It is shown that the linearly varying charge density used in the LCM generically mimics ellipsoidal emitters rather than a Cylindrical-Post-with-an-Ellipsoidal-Tip (CPET) that is typical of nanowires. Furthermore, generalizing the charge density beyond the linear regime allows for modeling shapes that are closer to a CPET. Emitters with a fixed base radius and a fixed apex radius are studied with a view to understanding the effect of nonlinearity on the tip enhancement factor and the emitter current in each case. Furthermore, an infinite square array of the CPET emitters is studied using the nonlinear line charge model, each having a height h =1500 μm and a base radius b =1.5 μm . It is found that for moderate external field strengths ( 0.3 -0.4 V /μm ), the array current density falls sharply for lattice spacings smaller than 4/3 h . Beyond this value, the maximal array current density can be observed over a range of lattice spacings and falls gradually thereafter.

  15. Field emission characteristics of regular arrays of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghamdi, A A; Al-Heniti, S; Al-Hazmi, F S; Faidah, Adel S; Shalaan, E; Husain, M

    2014-06-01

    The developments of electronic devices based on micron-sized vacuum electron sources during the last decades have triggered intense research on highly efficient carbon based thin film electron emitters. The synthesis of massive arrays of carbon nanotubes that are oriented on patterned Fe catalyst deposited on quartz substrates is reported. The well-ordered nanotubes can be used as electron field emission arrays. Scaling up of the synthesis process should be entirely compatible with the existing semiconductor processes, and should allow the development of nanotubes devices integrated into future technology. The emission from carbon nanotubes array is explained by Fowler-Nordheim tunneling of electrons from tip-like structures in the nanometer range, which locally amplify the applied field by the field enhancement factor beta. We found that the low pressure chemical vapour deposition (LPCVD) system can produce nanotubes capable of excellent emission currents at lower voltages. The carbon nanotubes array shows good field emission with turn on field E(alpha) = 1.30 V/microm at the current density of 3.50 mA/cm2 with enhancement factor beta = 1.22 x 10(2).

  16. Micromachined mold-type double-gated metal field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yongjae; Kang, Seokho; Chun, Kukjin

    1997-12-01

    Electron field emitters with double gates were fabricated using micromachining technology and the effect of the electric potential of the focusing gate (or second gate) was experimentally evaluated. The molybdenum field emission tip was made by filling a cusplike mold formed when a conformal film was deposited on the hole-trench that had been patterned on stacked metals and dielectric layers. The hole-trench was patterned by electron beam lithography and reactive ion etching. Each field emitter has a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img1 diameter extraction gate (or first gate) and a 0960-1317/7/4/009/img2 diameter focusing gate (or second gate). To make a path for the emitted electrons, silicon bulk was etched anisotropically in KOH and EDP (ethylene-diamine pyrocatechol) solution successively. The I - V characteristics and anode current change due to the focusing gate potential were measured.

  17. Diamond coated silicon field emitter array

    SciTech Connect

    S. Albin; W. Fu; A. Varghese; A. C. Lavarias; G. R. Myneni

    1999-07-01

    Diamond coated silicon tip arrays, with and without a self-aligned gate, were fabricated, and current-voltage characteristics of 400 tips were measured. Diamond films were grown uniformly on Si tips using microwave plasma after nucleation with 10 nm diamond suspension and substrate bias. An emission current of 57 ?A was obtained at 5 V from the ungated array tips separated from an anode at 2 ?m. In the case of the gated arrays with 1.5 ?m aperture, an emission current of 3.4 ?A was measured at a gate voltage of 80 V for an anode separation of 200 ?m. The turn-on voltages for these two types of devices were 0.2 and 40 V, respectively. Diamond coated Si tip arrays have potential applications in field emission based low voltage vacuum electronic devices and microsensors.

  18. Compliance with High-Intensity Radiated Fields Regulations - Emitter's Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statman, Joseph; Jamnejad, Vahraz; Nguyen, Lee

    2012-01-01

    NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) uses high-power transmitters on its large antennas to communicate with spacecraft of NASA and its partner agencies. The prime reflectors of the DSN antennas are parabolic, at 34m and 70m in diameter. The DSN transmitters radiate Continuous Wave (CW) signals at 20 kW - 500 kW at X-band and S-band frequencies. The combination of antenna reflector size and high frequency results in a very narrow beam with extensive oscillating near-field pattern. Another unique feature of the DSN antennas is that they (and the radiated beam) move mostly at very slow sidereal rate, essentially identical in magnitude and at the opposite direction of Earth rotation.The DSN is in the process of revamping its documentation to provide analysis of the High Intensity Radiation Fields (HIRF) environment resulting from radio frequency radiation from DSN antennas for comparison to FAA regulations regarding certification of HIRF protection as outlined in the FAA regulations on HIRF protection for aircraft electrical and electronic systems (Title 14, Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) [section sign][section sign] 23.1308, 25.1317, 27.1317, and 29.1317).This paper presents work done at JPL, in consultation with the FAA. The work includes analysis of the radiated field structure created by the unique DSN emitters (combination of transmitters and antennas) and comparing it to the fields defined in the environments in the FAA regulations. The paper identifies areas that required special attention, including the implications of the very narrow beam of the DSN emitters and the sidereal rate motion. The paper derives the maximum emitter power allowed without mitigation and the mitigation zones, where required.Finally, the paper presents summary of the results of the analyses of the DSN emitters and the resulting DSN process documentation.

  19. Field Emitter Arrays for Plasma and Microwave Source Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kevin L.

    1998-11-01

    Field emitter arrays (FEAs) are attractive cathode candidates for many applications, e.g., electron microguns(C. Constancias, D. Herve, R. Accomo, and E. Molva, J. Vac. Sci. Tech. B13, 611, 1995.), miniaturized TWTs(H. Imura, S. Tsuida, M. Takahasi, A. Okamoto, H. Makishima, and S. Miyano, Tech. Dig. of the IEEE-IEDM (Dec. 7-11, Washington, DC) p721.), radiation sources, instrumentation , sensors, mass spectrometers, and electric propulsion (Hall thrusters (C. M. Marrese and Alec D. Gallimore, Tech. Dig. of Int'l. Conf. on Plasma Science, (Raleigh, NC, June 4-5, 1998), 1D05.)) due to their instant ON/OFF capability, high brightness and current density, large transconductance to capacitance ratio, low voltage operation, and so on. Two applications are significant: in the most widely pursued, FEAs may enable significant reductions in physical dimensions, weight, and power consumption of flat panel displays (FPDs)(A. Ghis, R. Meyer, P. Rambaud, F. Levy, and T. Leroux, IEEE-Trans. Elect. Dev. 36, 2320 (1991)), whereas the most challenging application, advanced RF tubes(M. A. Kodis, K. L. Jensen, E. G. Zaidman, B. Goplen, D. N. Smithe, IEEE-Trans. on Plas. Sci. 24, 970 (1996).), may benefit from the current densities and high pulse repetition frequencies field emitters are capable of. FEAs (a coplanar gate less than one micron from a microfabricated conical emitter for field enhancement), provide high current density for low gate voltages, are relatively temperature insensitive, and are capable of emission modulation at 10 GHz. High currents due to quantum mechanical tunneling are made possible by narrowing the field emission barrier to nanometer widths. Greater performance and robustness may be enabled through rugged low work function coatings. We shall describe the process of field emission by quantum mechanical tunneling, provide an overview of the applications and their demands on field emitters, and present a model of FEAs used to characterize their performance

  20. Spacecraft charging control by thermal, field emission with lanthanum-hexaboride emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    Thermal, field emitters of lanthanum (or perhaps cerium) hexaboride (LaB6) with temperature variability up to about 1500K are suggested for spacecraft charging control. Such emitters operate at much lower voltages with considerably more control and add plasma-diagnostic versatility. These gains should outweigh the additional complexity of providing heat for the LaB6 thermal, field emitter.

  1. Preparation and characterization of zirconium carbide field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Mackie, W.A.; Hinrichs, C.H. ); Davis, P.R. )

    1989-11-01

    The authors' report on experiments to determine the feasibility of using the refractory transition metal carbide ZrC as a stable field-emission cathode. Applications of such cathodes could include radiation-immune microcircuitry, flat-panel displays, e-beam lithography, and other uses where the need is for very high-density, small spot size electron sources. The primary emphasis of this paper is the preparation and analysis of methods needed to obtain stable electron emission from a cold field-emission cathode. CrC single-crystal specimens were prepared by arc floating zone refinement from sintered stock, yielding an average bulk stoichiometry of C/Zr = 0.913. Due to its brittle nature and the high temperatures required for cleaning of this carbide, new mounting methods were developed and are described. Emitter etching procedures are reported for ZrC, as well as {ital in situ} tip sharpening techniques of neon-ion bombardment and temperatures required for thermal cleaning. A temperature of 1500{degrees}C is required to remove adsorbates including oxygen. A clean ZrC field-emission pattern is shown. Ordering of work functions of various crystal planes is reported through field-emission microscopy and comparisons made with thermionic projection microscopy. Effective thermionic work functions are presented for clean surfaces to further support the ordering obtained. The ability of ZrC field emitters to operate at pressures far above those commonly found for field-emission cathodes is demonstrated.

  2. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Kyritsakis, A. Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-28

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  3. Extension of the general thermal field equation for nanosized emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyritsakis, A.; Xanthakis, J. P.

    2016-01-01

    During the previous decade, Jensen et al. developed a general analytical model that successfully describes electron emission from metals both in the field and thermionic regimes, as well as in the transition region. In that development, the standard image corrected triangular potential barrier was used. This barrier model is valid only for planar surfaces and therefore cannot be used in general for modern nanometric emitters. In a recent publication, the authors showed that the standard Fowler-Nordheim theory can be generalized for highly curved emitters if a quadratic term is included to the potential model. In this paper, we extend this generalization for high temperatures and include both the thermal and intermediate regimes. This is achieved by applying the general method developed by Jensen to the quadratic barrier model of our previous publication. We obtain results that are in good agreement with fully numerical calculations for radii R > 4 nm, while our calculated current density differs by a factor up to 27 from the one predicted by the Jensen's standard General-Thermal-Field (GTF) equation. Our extended GTF equation has application to modern sharp electron sources, beam simulation models, and vacuum breakdown theory.

  4. Origin of enhanced field emission characteristics postplasma treatment of multiwalled carbon nanotube array

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kyu; Lim, Seong Chu; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Young Chul

    2008-08-11

    Field emission properties of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with plasma treatment have been investigated. Origin of the enhanced field emission current was interpreted in terms of surface morphology of MWCNTs, work function, field enhancement factor, and emission area. Contrary to the general belief, the change in the work function increased slightly with the plasma treatment time, whereas the field enhancement factor decreased. We found that the number of emittable MWCNTs played a dominant role in the current enhancement.

  5. Quantum emitters dynamically coupled to a quantum field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acevedo, O. L.; Quiroga, L.; Rodríguez, F. J.; Johnson, N. F.

    2013-12-01

    We study theoretically the dynamical response of a set of solid-state quantum emitters arbitrarily coupled to a single-mode microcavity system. Ramping the matter-field coupling strength in round trips, we quantify the hysteresis or irreversible quantum dynamics. The matter-field system is modeled as a finite-size Dicke model which has previously been used to describe equilibrium (including quantum phase transition) properties of systems such as quantum dots in a microcavity. Here we extend this model to address non-equilibrium situations. Analyzing the system's quantum fidelity, we find that the near-adiabatic regime exhibits the richest phenomena, with a strong asymmetry in the internal collective dynamics depending on which phase is chosen as the starting point. We also explore signatures of the crossing of the critical points on the radiation subsystem by monitoring its Wigner function; then, the subsystem can exhibit the emergence of non-classicality and complexity.

  6. Study of porous silicon, silicon carbide and DLC coated field emitters for pressure sensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleps, Irina; Angelescu, Anca; Samfirescu, Narcis; Gil, Adriana; Correia, Antonio

    2001-06-01

    This paper is a revue of our experimental data regarding field emitter array fabrication, various field emission materials and application in pressure sensors domain. Silicon emitter's arrays of different sizes and geometrical shapes were realised using micromachining technologies. Some important aspects as control in etch rate, emitter profile, selectivity and surface morphology were investigated. The emitter surface was modified or was covered by different materials in order to improve the emission properties. The most usual materials investigated for FED applications were: Si, diamond-like carbon layers, silicon carbide, and porous silicon. The main application which is present in our attention is the field emission pressure sensor.

  7. Field Emitter Arrays and Displays Produced by Ion Tracking Lithography

    SciTech Connect

    Felter, T E; Musket, R G; Bernhardt, A F

    2004-12-28

    When ions of sufficient electronic energy loss traverse a dielectric film or foil, they alter the chemical bonding along their nominally straight path within the material. A suitable etchant can quickly dissolve these so-called latent tracks leaving holes of small diameter ({approx}10nm) but long length - several microns. Continuing the etching process gradually increases the diameter reproducibly and uniformly. The trackable medium can be applied as a uniform film onto large substrates. The small, monodisperse holes produced by this track etching can be used in conjunction with additional thin film processing to create functional structures attached to the substrate. For example, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and Candescent Technologies Corporation (CTC) co-developed a process to make arrays of gated field emitters ({approx}100nm diameter electron guns) for CTC's ThinCRT{trademark} displays, which have been fabricated to diagonal dimensions > 13. Additional technological applications of ion tracking lithography will be briefly covered.

  8. Electric Field Screening by the Proximity of Two Knife-Edge Field Emitters of Finite Width

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, P.; Tang, W.; Lau, Y. Y.; Hoff, B.

    2015-11-01

    Field emitter arrays have the potential to provide high current density, low voltage operation, and high pulse repetition for radar and communication. It is well known that packing density of the field emitter arrays significantly affect the emission current. Previously we calculated analytically the electric field profile of two-dimensional knife-edge cathodes with arbitrary separation by using a Schwarz-Christoffel transformation. Here we extend this previous work to include the finite width of two identical emitters. From the electric field profile, the field enhancement factor, thereby the severity of the electric field screening, are determined. It is found that for two identical emitters with finite width, the magnitude of the electric field on the knife-edge cathodes depends strongly on the ratio h / a and h / r , where h is the height of the knife-edge cathode, 2a is the distance between the cathodes, and 2 r represents their width. Particle-in-cell simulations are performed to compare with the analytical results on the emission current distribution. P. Y. Wong was supported by a Directed Energy Summer Scholar internship at Air Force Research Laboratory, Kirtland AFB, and by AFRL Award No. FA9451-14-1-0374.

  9. Field emission characteristics of a small number of carbon fiber emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Wilkin W.; Shiffler, Donald A.; Harris, John R.; Jensen, Kevin L.; Golby, Ken; LaCour, Matthew; Knowles, Tim

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports an experiment that studies the emission characteristics of small number of field emitters. The experiment consists of nine carbon fibers in a square configuration. Experimental results show that the emission characteristics depend strongly on the separation between each emitter, providing evidence of the electric field screening effects. Our results indicate that as the separation between the emitters decreases, the emission current for a given voltage also decreases. The authors compare the experimental results to four carbon fiber emitters in a linear and square configurations as well as to two carbon fiber emitters in a paired array. Voltage-current traces show that the turn-on voltage is always larger for the nine carbon fiber emitters as compared to the two and four emitters in linear configurations, and approximately identical to the four emitters in a square configuration. The observations and analysis reported here, based on Fowler-Nordheim field emission theory, suggest the electric field screening effect depends critically on the number of emitters, the separation between them, and their overall geometric configuration.

  10. Elementary framework for cold field emission from quantum-confined, non-planar emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, A. A. Akinwande, A. I.

    2015-05-07

    For suitably small field emitters, the effects of quantum confinement at the emitter tip may have a significant impact on the emitter performance and total emitted current density (ECD). Since the geometry of a quantum system uniquely determines the magnitude and distribution of its energy levels, a framework for deriving ECD equations from cold field electron emitters of arbitrary geometry and dimensionality is developed. In the interest of obtaining semi-analytical ECD equations, the framework is recast in terms of plane wave solutions to the Schrödinger equation via the use of the Jeffreys-Wentzel-Kramers-Brillouin approximation. To demonstrate the framework's consistency with our previous work and its capabilities in treating emitters with non-planar geometries, ECD equations were derived for the normally unconfined cylindrical nanowire (CNW) and normally confined (NC) CNW emitter geometries. As a function of the emitter radius, the NC CNW emitter ECD profile displayed a strong dependence on the Fermi energy and had an average ECD that exceeded the Fowler-Nordheim equation for typical values of the Fermi energy due to closely spaced, singly degenerate energy levels (excluding electron spin), comparatively large electron supply values, and the lack of a transverse, zero-point energy. Such characteristics suggest that emitters with non-planar geometries may be ideal for emission from both an electron supply and electrostatics perspective.

  11. Space charge effects on the current-voltage characteristics of gated field emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, K. L.; Kodis, M. A.; Murphy, R. A.; Zaidman, E. G.

    1997-07-01

    Microfabricated field emitter arrays (FEAs) can provide the very high electron current densities required for rf amplifier applications, typically on the order of 100 A/cm2. Determining the dependence of emission current on gate voltage is important for the prediction of emitter performance for device applications. Field emitters use high applied fields to extract current, and therefore, unlike thermionic emitters, the current densities can exceed 103A/cm2 when averaged over an array. At such high current densities, space charge effects (i.e., the influence of charge between cathode and collector on emission) affect the emission process or initiate conditions which can lead to failure mechanisms for field emitters. A simple model of a field emitter will be used to calculate the one-dimensional space charge effects on the emission characteristics by examining two components: charge between the gate and anode, which leads to Child's law, and charge within the FEA unit cell, which gives rise to a field suppression effect which can exist for a single field emitter. The predictions of the analytical model are compared with recent experimental measurements designed to assess space charge effects and predict the onset of gate current. It is shown that negative convexity on a Fowler-Nordheim plot of Ianode(Vgate) data can be explained in terms of field depression at the emitter tip in addition to reflection of electrons by a virtual cathode created when the anode field is insufficient to extract all of the current; in particular, the effects present within the unit cell constitute a newly described effect.

  12. Relation between field energy and RMS emittance in intense particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Wangler, T.P.; Crandall, K.R.; Mills, R.S.; Reiser, M.

    1985-01-01

    An equation is presented for continuous beams with azimuthal symmetry and continuous linear focusing, which expresses a relationship between the rate of change for squared rms emittance and the rate of change for a quantity we call the nonlinear field energy. The nonlinear field energy depends on the shape of the charge distribution and corresponds to the residual field energy possessed by beams with nonuniform charge distributions. The equation can be integrated for the case of an rms matched beam to yield a formula for space-charge-induced emittance growth that we have tested numerically for a variety of initial distributions. The results provide a framework for discussing the scaling of rms emittance growth and an explanation for the well-established lower limit on output emittance. 15 refs., 4 figs.

  13. On the Importance of Symmetrizing RF Coupler Fields for Low Emittance Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zenghai; Zhou, Feng; Vlieks, Arnold; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-06-23

    The input power of accelerator structure is normally fed through a coupling slot(s) on the outer wall of the accelerator structure via magnetic coupling. While providing perfect matching, the coupling slots may produce non-axial-symmetric fields in the coupler cell that can induce emittance growth as the beam is accelerated in such a field. This effect is especially important for low emittance beams at low energies such as in the injector accelerators for light sources. In this paper, we present studies of multipole fields of different rf coupler designs and their effect on beam emittance for an X-band photocathode gun being jointly designed with LLNL, and X-band accelerator structures. We will present symmetrized rf coupler designs for these components to preserve the beam emittance.

  14. Magnetoexciton in nanotube under external electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia Russi, L. F.; Paredes Gutiérrez, H.; Santos, Y. F.; Mikhailov, I. D.

    2016-08-01

    We study the Aharonov-Bohm oscillation of the energy levels of an electron-hole pair confined in a narrow nanotube in the presence of the magnetic field applied along the symmetry axis. We show that the electric field applied at the same direction makes the oscillation more pronounced.

  15. The effect of built-in drift field and emitter recombinations on FCVD of a p- n junction diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, S. C.; Ray, U. C.

    1983-06-01

    This paper discusses the Forward Current induced open circuit Voltage Decay (FCVD) of a p- n junction diode including the effects of recombinations in the emitter as well as the built-in drift fields in the base and in the emitter. The analysis is based on the quasi-static approximation (QSA) of the carrier profiles in the emitter. It is shown that the emitter effects on FCVD is completely determined by JEO, the dark saturation current in the emitter. The value of JEO in general, depends on the heavy doping effects in the emitter, the drift field in the emitter, emitter thickness and surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is shown that for a diode with retarding drift field in the base, emitter recombinations play a very significant role in FCVD. The decay time constant for large values of time in this case is given by τ eff = τ B/[1 + ƒ B2 - (a - ƒ B) 2], where a = J EO/J BO, ƒ B is the drift field parameter in the base. The higher value of a, the faster is the voltage decay. For accelerating fields in the base, the time constant for large values of time is independent of emitter recombinations and is given by τ eff = τ B/(1 + ƒ B2) . However, the decay rate for small values of time is strongly affected by emitter recombinations for both types of the field; the higher the emitter recombinations, the faster is the initial rate of the voltage decay. For extremely strong drift fields in the base, QSA in the emitter is not valid. The coupled continuity equations are solved with the conditions ƒ B2 ≫ τ B/τ E and an analytic expression for FCVD is derived. It is seen that FCVD for strong base fields is determined solely by emitter lifetime τE except for small values of time of the order of a few τE.

  16. Charge Control of Geosynchronous Spacecraft Using Field Effect Emitters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    conductivity of cold coverglasses are likely ingredients leading to ESD . However, the emitter maintains a normal gradient potential on the solar arrays, so the...potential of about +5 volts, leading to a " normal gradient " differential potential of about 40 volts. Because kilovolt potentials are required to cause...electrostatic discharges in the " normal gradient " configuration, the coverglass differential potential is not cause for concern. The shaded OSRs are charged

  17. Tip cooling effect and failure mechanism of field-emitting carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wei, Wei; Liu, Yang; Wei, Yang; Jiang, Kaili; Peng, Lian-Mao; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-01-01

    The cooling effect accompanying field electron emission has been considered for a single carbon nanotube (CNT) used as a field emission (FE) electron source. An improved model for the failure mechanism of field emitting CNTs has been proposed and validated. Our model predicts a maximum temperature (T-max) located at an interior point rather than the tip of the CNTs, and the failure of the CNT emitters tends to take place at the T-max point, inducing a segment by segment breakdown process. A combination of Joule heating and electrostatic force effect is proposed responsible for initiating the failure of the field emitting CNT and validated by in situ FE observation.

  18. Proton Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Evan R. Kemp, Ctr...United States. AFIT-ENP-T-14-J-39 PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Presented to...PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS Evan R. Kemp, BS Ctr, USAF Approved: // Signed

  19. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Arrays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    deposition (PE-CVD), which is a hybrid of plasma based and thermal based synthesis, and silicon carbide ( SiC ) surface decomposition which, though a true...fabrication method. 2.4.3.2. Surface Decomposition The fabrication of carbon nanotubes by surface decomposition of silicon carbide offers some unique...CNTs are vertically aligned and attached to the remaining silicon carbide substrate. Surface decomposition is achieved through high temperatures in a

  20. Microelectrode for energy and current control of nanotip field electron emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Lüneburg, S.; Müller, M. Paarmann, A. Ernstorfer, R.

    2013-11-18

    Emerging experiments and applications in electron microscopy, holography, and diffraction benefit from miniaturized electron guns for compact experimental setups. We present a highly compact microelectrode integrated field emitter that consists of a tungsten nanotip coated with a few micrometers thick polyimide film followed by a several nanometers thick gold film, both positioned behind the exposed emitter apex by approximately 10–30 μm. The control of the electric field strength at the nanometer scale tip apex allows suppression, extraction, and energy tuning of field-emitted electrons. The performance of the microelectrode is demonstrated experimentally and supported by numerical simulations.

  1. Electron gun using carbon-nanofiber field emitter.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Y; Haga, A; Sugita, S; Kita, S; Tanaka, S-I; Okuyama, F; Kobayashi, N

    2007-01-01

    An electron gun constructed using carbon-nanofiber (CNF) emitters and an electrostatic Einzel lens system has been characterized for the development of a high-resolution x-ray source. The CNFs used were grown on tungsten and palladium tips by plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition. Electron beams with the energies of 10

  2. Planar Field Emitters and High Efficiency Photocathodes Based on Ultrananocrystalline Diamond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumant, Anirudha V. (Inventor); Baryshev, Sergey V. (Inventor); Antipov, Sergey P. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  3. Planar field emitters and high efficiency photocathodes based on ultrananocrystalline diamond

    DOEpatents

    Sumant, Anirudha V.; Baryshev, Sergey V.; Antipov, Sergey P.

    2016-08-16

    A method of forming a field emitter comprises disposing a first layer on a substrate. The first layer is seeded with nanodiamond particles. The substrate with the first layer disposed thereon is maintained at a first temperature and a first pressure in a mixture of gases which includes nitrogen. The first layer is exposed to a microwave plasma to form a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on the first layer, which has a percentage of nitrogen in the range of about 0.05 atom % to about 0.5 atom %. The field emitter has about 10.sup.12 to about 10.sup.14 emitting sites per cm.sup.2. A photocathode can also be formed similarly by forming a nitrogen doped ultrananocrystalline diamond film on a substrate similar to the field emitter, and then hydrogen terminating the film. The photocathode is responsive to near ultraviolet light as well as to visible light.

  4. Root Causes of Field Emitters in SRF Cavities Placed in CEBAF Tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Geng, Rongli

    2016-05-01

    It has been suspected that appearance of new field emitters can occur in SRF cavities after their placement in accelerator tunnel for long term beam operation. This apparently has been the case for CEBAF. However, no physical evidence has been shown in the past. In this contribution, we will report on the recent results concerning the root cause of field emitters in SRF cavities placed in CEBAF tunnel. We will discuss these results in the context of high-reliability and low-cryogenic-loss operation of CEBAF.

  5. Behavior of Catalyst Particle at Tip of Carbon Nanotube during Field Emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Tadashi; Okai, Makoto; Hidaka, Kishio; Matsumoto, Hiroaki; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    A catalyst particle at the tip of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) during field emission inside a transmission electron microscope was observed in-situ. The particle streamed from the tip like a liquid as the emission current abruptly increased from 20 to 40 µA. This was due to the temperature rise at the tip of the MWNT, resulting from the increased emission current and dipole moment in the particle caused by the electric field. Maintenance of this high emission current led to an electrical discharge, which severely damaged the MWNT electron emitter. Under high emission currents, in particular, the catalyst particle caused an unstable emission.

  6. Field emitter activation on cleaned crystalline niobium surfaces relevant for superconducting rf technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Navitski, A.; Lagotzky, S.; Reschke, D.; Singer, X.; Müller, G.

    2013-11-01

    The influence of heat treatments at 122, 400, and 800°C on the field emission of large-grain and single-crystal high-purity niobium samples has been investigated. Buffered chemical polishing of 40μm and high pressure ultrapure water rinsing under clean-room conditions resulted in smooth surfaces with a linear surface roughness of 46 to 337 nm. By means of field emission scanning microscopy, an increasing number of emitters up to 40/cm2 with temperature were found at surface fields up to 160MV/m. Two different mechanisms of emitter activation were found, i.e. activation by the applied electric field and activation by temperature. Some emitters with an onset surface field of 50 to 100MV/m appeared already after the low-temperature bakeout. Correlated scanning-electron-microscopy/energy-dispersive-x-ray measurements revealed particles and surface defects as emitters. Their activation will be discussed with respect to the thickness of the insulating oxide layer.

  7. Transfer of arbitrary quantum emitter states to near-field photon superpositions in nanocavities.

    PubMed

    Thijssen, Arthur C T; Cryan, Martin J; Rarity, John G; Oulton, Ruth

    2012-09-24

    We present a method to analyze the suitability of particular photonic cavity designs for information exchange between arbitrary superposition states of a quantum emitter and the near-field photonic cavity mode. As an illustrative example, we consider whether quantum dot emitters embedded in "L3" and "H1" photonic crystal cavities are able to transfer a spin superposition state to a confined photonic superposition state for use in quantum information transfer. Using an established dyadic Green's function (DGF) analysis, we describe methods to calculate coupling to arbitrary quantum emitter positions and orientations using the modified local density of states (LDOS) calculated using numerical finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) simulations. We find that while superposition states are not supported in L3 cavities, the double degeneracy of the H1 cavities supports superposition states of the two orthogonal modes that may be described as states on a Poincaré-like sphere. Methods are developed to comprehensively analyze the confined superposition state generated from an arbitrary emitter position and emitter dipole orientation.

  8. Multi-field electron emission pattern of 2D emitter: Illustrated with graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Ma; Li, Zhibing

    2016-11-01

    The mechanism of laser-assisted multi-field electron emission of two-dimensional emitters is investigated theoretically. The process is basically a cold field electron emission but having more controllable components: a uniform electric field controls the emission potential barrier, a magnetic field controls the quantum states of the emitter, while an optical field controls electron populations of specified quantum states. It provides a highly orientational vacuum electron line source whose divergence angle over the beam plane is inversely proportional to square root of the emitter height. Calculations are carried out for graphene with the armchair emission edge, as a concrete example. The rate equation incorporating the optical excitation, phonon scattering, and thermal relaxation is solved in the quasi-equilibrium approximation for electron population in the bands. The far-field emission patterns, that inherit the features of the Landau bands, are obtained. It is found that the optical field generates a characteristic structure at one wing of the emission pattern.

  9. Doped carbon nanostructure field emitter arrays for infrared imaging

    DOEpatents

    Korsah, Kofi [Knoxville, TN; Baylor, Larry R [Farragut, TN; Caughman, John B [Oak Ridge, TN; Kisner, Roger A [Knoxville, TN; Rack, Philip D [Knoxville, TN; Ivanov, Ilia N [Knoxville, TN

    2009-10-27

    An infrared imaging device and method for making infrared detector(s) having at least one anode, at least one cathode with a substrate electrically connected to a plurality of doped carbon nanostructures; and bias circuitry for applying an electric field between the anode and the cathode such that when infrared photons are adsorbed by the nanostructures the emitted field current is modulated. The detectors can be doped with cesium to lower the work function.

  10. Comparative study of supertips for electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koops, Hans W. P.; Weber, Mark A.; Urban, J.; Schoessler, C.

    1995-09-01

    A numerical study of tips and supertips prone for fieldemission sources is performed using a 3D numerical electron optics package. Special supertips are fabricated with additive lithography under computer control. Different materials are used to generate amorphous or nanocrystalline tips. Its performance is simulated. Additive lithography using electron beam induced deposition allows to design base radii from 50 to 1000 nm. Tip radii and tip length of similar dimensions can be generated. Supertips on top of a deposited tip can have a radius as small as 5 nm. This is achieved using a high resolution scanning electron microscope with a cold field emission source. Gold-tips are constructed on top of Pt/Ir-wire tips. The positioning accuracy is 20 nm. Tips are routinely produced with aspect ratios of 5 to 10 and give an additional field enhancement factor. The influence of the nanocrystallinity of the deposited material to the field enhancement is investigated. Nanocrystals at the tip enhance the field up to a factor of 4. This effect explains the high emission current obtained in experiments from nanocrystalline tips.

  11. Focus Ion Beam Fabrication of Individual Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Guangyu; Byahut, Sitaram; Chow, Lee

    2003-11-01

    Individual CNTs are excellent candidates as electron sources for electron microscopes. Comparing to conventional electron sources, CNTs have the following advantages: (1) unique geometry, (2) highly coherent electron beams, and (3) stability. In our laboratory, carbon fibers with a nanotube core have been synthesized with a conventional chemical vapor deposition method. The whole assembly of nanotube/fiber is similar to a coaxial cable with CNT sticking out from one end of the carbon fiber. In order to pick up individual CNT field emitters, focus ion beam (FIB) technique is applied for cutting and adhering the samples. The carbon fiber with nanotube tip was first welded onto a micro-manipulator. Afterwards, by applying the FIB milling function, the fiber was cut from the base. This enables us to handle the individual CNT tips conveniently. By the same method, we can attach the nanotube tip on a sharpened clean tungsten wire for field emission experiment. FIB is proven to be appropriate and powerful for the nano-fabrication.

  12. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities of employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simakov, Evgenya I.; Andrews, Heather L.; Herman, Matthew J.; Hubbard, Kevin M.; Weis, Eric

    2017-03-01

    Demonstration of a stand-alone practical dielectric laser accelerator (DLA) requires innovation in two major critical components: high-current ultra-low-emittance cathodes and efficient laser accelerator structures. LANL develops two technologies that in our opinion are applicable to the novel DLA architectures: diamond field emitter array (DFEA) cathodes and additive manufacturing of photonic band-gap (PBG) structures. This paper discusses the results of testing of DFEA cathodes in the field-emission regime and the possibilities for their operation in the photoemission regime, and compares their emission characteristics to the specific needs of DLAs. We also describe recent advances in additive manufacturing of dielectric woodpile structures using a Nanoscribe direct laser-writing device capable of maskless lithography and additive manufacturing, and the development of novel infrared dielectric materials compatible with additive manufacturing.

  13. Behavior of molecules and molecular ions near a field emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gault, Baptiste; Saxey, David W.; Ashton, Michael W.; Sinnott, Susan B.; Chiaramonti, Ann N.; Moody, Michael P.; Schreiber, Daniel K.

    2016-03-01

    The cold emission of particles from surfaces under intense electric fields is a process which underpins a variety of applications including atom probe tomography (APT), an analytical microscopy technique with near-atomic spatial resolution. Increasingly relying on fast laser pulsing to trigger the emission, APT experiments often incorporate the detection of molecular ions emitted from the specimen, in particular from covalently or ionically bonded materials. Notably, it has been proposed that neutral molecules can also be emitted during this process. However, this remains a contentious issue. To investigate the validity of this hypothesis, a careful review of the literature is combined with the development of new methods to treat experimental APT data, the modeling of ion trajectories, and the application of density-functional theory simulations to derive molecular ion energetics. It is shown that the direct thermal emission of neutral molecules is extremely unlikely. However, neutrals can still be formed in the course of an APT experiment by dissociation of metastable molecular ions. This work is a partial contribution of the US Government and therefore is not subject to copyright in the United States.

  14. Handheld deep ultraviolet emission device based on aluminum nitride quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field emitters.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Takahiro; Iwayama, Sho; Saito, Takao; Kawakami, Yasuyuki; Kubo, Fumio; Amano, Hiroshi

    2012-10-22

    We report the successful fabrication of a compact deep ultraviolet emission device via a marriage of AlGaN quantum wells and graphene nanoneedle field electron emitters. The device demonstrated a 20-mW deep ultraviolet output power and an approximately 4% power efficiency. The performance of this device may lead toward the realization of an environmentally friendly, convenient and practical deep ultraviolet light source.

  15. Re-grown aligned carbon nanotubes with improved field emission.

    PubMed

    Lim, Xiaodai; Zhu, Yanwu; Varghese, Binni; Gao, Xingyu; Wee, Andrew Thye Shen; Sow, Chorng-Haur

    2012-01-01

    In this work, a simple technique to improve the field emission property of multi-walled carbon nanotubes is presented. Re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are grown on the same substrates after the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are transferred to other substrates using polydimethylsiloxane as intermediation. For the duration of the synthesis of the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes, similar synthesis parameters used in growing the as-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes are utilized. As a form of possible application, field emission studies show -2.6 times improvement in field enhancement factor and more uniform emission for the re-grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes. In addition, the turn-on field is reduced from 2.85 V/microm to 1.40 V/microm. Such significant improvements are attributed to new emission sites comprising of sharp carbonaceous impurities encompassing both tip and upper portion of the multi-walled carbon nanotubes. As such, this technique presents a viable route for the production of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with better field emission quality.

  16. Determination of satellite valley position in GaN emitter from photoexcited field emission investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenenko, M.; Yilmazoglu, O.; Hartnagel, H. L.; Pavlidis, D.

    2011-01-01

    Argon plasma etched GaN field-emitter rods with nanometer-scale diameter were fabricated on GaN grown on an n+-GaN substrate. Their electron field emission properties were investigated both without and under illumination by using light sources with various wavelengths. The Fowler-Nordheim current-voltage characteristics of the cathodes show a change in slope for illuminated cathodes. The electron affinity difference ΔE between the different valleys in the conduction band has been ascertained and is in the range from 1.18 up to 1.21 eV.

  17. A single-atom sharp iridium tip as an emitter of gas field ion sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuo, Hong-Shi; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Fu, Tsu-Yi; Hwang, Ying-Siang; Lu, Yi-Hsien; Lin, Chun-Yueh; Hou, Jin-Long; Tsong, Tien T.

    2009-08-01

    We report a reliable method for preparing a pure Ir single-atom tip by thermal treatment in oxygen. The atomic structure of the tip apex and its ion emission characteristics are investigated with field ion microscopy. We have shown that the Ir single-atom tip can be a good field ion emitter, capable of emitting a variety of gas ion beams, such as He+, H2+, N2+, and O2+, with high brightness and stability. In addition, this tip can easily be maintained and regenerated in vacuum, ensuring it has sufficient lifetime for practical applications.

  18. Study of thermionic RF-gun phase-space dynamics and slice emittance under influence of external electromagnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusoljariyakul, K.; Thongbai, C.

    2011-07-01

    A high brightness electron source of ultra-small emittance and high-average current is one of the most important components for future accelerators. In a RF-electron-gun, rapid acceleration can reduce emittance growth due to space charge effects. However, twisting or rotation of the transverse phase-space distribution as a function of time is observed in thermionic RF-electron-guns and may set a lower limit to the projected beam emittance. Such rotation being caused by the variation of the RF field with time may be compensated by fields from a specific cavity. In this work, we study RF-electron-gun phase-space dynamics and emittance under the influence of external fields to evaluate the compensation schemes.

  19. Resonance fluorescence of a two-level quantum emitter near a plasmonic nanoparticle: role of the near-field polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirova, Yu V.; Chubchev, E. D.; Zadkov, V. N.

    2017-02-01

    It is demonstrated that the interaction of a two-level quantum emitter (atom, molecule, etc) with a plasmonic nanoparticle (prolate nanospheroid) in an external laser field features either an essential increase (up to a few orders of magnitude) or reduction (up to a few times) of the total decay rate of the emitter in specific areas around the nanoparticle in contrast to its decay rate in a vacuum. It is also shown that the resonance fluorescence spectrum of the emitter in close proximity to a plasmonic nanoparticle is very sensitive to both the location of the emitter around the nanoparticle and to polarization of the near-field, which depends in turn on the polarization of the incident laser field. This can be used in engineering potential quantum optics experiments with quantum emitters in the near-field, as well as for 3D nanoscopy of the near-field by registering the resonance fluorescence spectra of quantum emitters scattered in the vicinity of a plasmonic nanoparticle.

  20. Field Enhancement Properties of Nanotubes in a Field Emission Set-Up

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adessi, Ch.; Devel, M.

    2001-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the mechanisms of emission of nanotubes. The field enhancement properties of carbon nanotubes, involved in the emission of electrons, is investigated theoretically for various single-wall (SWNT) and multi-wall nanotubes (MWNT). The presentation points out big differences between (n,0) and (n,n) nanotubes, and propose phenomenological laws for the variations of the enhancement factor with length and diameter

  1. Analysis of transverse RMS emittance growth of a beam induced by spherical and chromatic aberration in a solenoidal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Radhakanta; Nayak, Biswaranjan; Sharma, Archana; Mittal, Kailash C.

    2016-01-01

    In a medium energy beam transport line transverse rms emittance growth associated with spherical aberration is analysed. An analytical expression is derived for beam optics in a solenoid field considering terms up to the third order in the radial displacement. Two important phenomena: effect of spherical aberrations in axial-symmetric focusing lens and influence of nonlinear space charge forces on beam emittance growth are discussed for different beam distributions. In the second part nonlinear effect associated with chromatic aberration that describes the growth of emittance and distortion of phase space area is discussed.

  2. Prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime based on measurement of I- V curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bormashov, V. S.; Nikolski, K. N.; Baturin, A. S.; Sheshin, E. P.

    2003-06-01

    A technique is presented, which allows the prediction of field emitter cathode lifetime without long-term direct measurements of cathode parameters stability. This technique is based on periodic measurements of cathode I- V characteristics. Moreover, it allows performing a post-experiment optimization for the appropriate choice of the feedback system to provide a stable operation during a long time. The proposed technique was applied to study the emission properties of reticulated vitreous carbon (RVC) and thermo-enlarged graphite (TEG). For the given cathodes, the characteristic time of the cathode destruction was estimated.

  3. Field emission behavior of carbon nanotube yarn for micro-resolution X-ray tube cathode.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Jae Won; Mo, Chan Bin; Jung, Hyun Kyu; Ryu, Seongwoo; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2013-11-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) has excellent electrical and thermal conductivity and high aspect ratio for X-ray tube cathode. However, CNT field emission cathode has been shown unstable field emission and short life time due to field evaporation by high current density and detachment by electrostatic force. An alternative approach in this direction is the introduction of CNT yarn, which is a one dimensional assembly of individual carbon nanotubes bonded by the Van der Waals force. Because CNT yarn is composed with many CNTs, CNT yarns are expected to increase current density and life time for X-ray tube applications. In this research, CNT yarn was fabricated by spinning of a super-aligned CNT forest and was characterized for application to an X-ray tube cathode. CNT yarn showed a high field emission current density and a long lifetime of over 450 hours. Applying the CNT yarn field emitter to the X-ray tube cathode, it was possible to obtain micro-scale resolution images. The relationship between the field emission properties and the microstructure evolution was investigated and the unraveling effect of the CNT yarn was discussed.

  4. Pulsed laser-deposited nanocrystalline GdB6 thin films on W and Re as field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryawanshi, Sachin R.; Singh, Anil K.; Phase, Deodatta M.; Late, Dattatray J.; Sinha, Sucharita; More, Mahendra A.

    2016-10-01

    Gadolinium hexaboride (GdB6) nanocrystalline thin films were grown on tungsten (W), rhenium (Re) tips and foil substrates using optimized pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique. The X-ray diffraction analysis reveals formation of pure, crystalline cubic phase of GdB6 on W and Re substrates, under the prevailing PLD conditions. The field emission (FE) studies of GdB6/W and GdB6/Re emitters were performed in a planar diode configuration at the base pressure ~10-8 mbar. The GdB6/W and GdB6/Re tip emitters deliver high emission current densities of ~1.4 and 0.811 mA/cm2 at an applied field of ~6.0 and 7.0 V/µm, respectively. The Fowler-Nordheim ( F- N) plots were found to be nearly linear showing metallic nature of the emitters. The noticeably high values of field enhancement factor ( β) estimated using the slopes of the F- N plots indicate that the PLD GdB6 coating on W and Re substrates comprises of high-aspect-ratio nanostructures. Interestingly, the GdB6/W and GdB6/Re planar emitters exhibit excellent current stability at the preset values over a long-term operation, as compared to the tip emitters. Furthermore, the values of workfunction of the GdB6/W and GdB6/Re emitters, experimentally measured using ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy, are found to be same, ~1.6 ± 0.1 eV. Despite possessing same workfunction value, the FE characteristics of the GdB6/W emitter are markedly different from that of GdB6/Re emitter, which can be attributed to the growth of GdB6 films on W and Re substrates.

  5. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bankar, Prashant K.; Patil, Sandip S.; More, Mahendra A.

    2015-06-01

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10-8 mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ˜ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  6. Effect of synthesis parameters on morphology of polyaniline (PANI) and field emission investigation of PANI nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Bankar, Prashant K.; More, Mahendra A.; Patil, Sandip S.

    2015-06-24

    Polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures have been synthesized by simple chemical oxidation route at different monomer concentration along with variation in synthesis temperature. The effect of variation of synthesis parameters has been revealed using different characterization techniques. The structural and morphological characterization of the synthesized PANI nanostructures was carried out by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), whereas Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) has been used to reveal the chemical properties. With the variation in the synthesis temperature and monomer concentration, various morphologies characterized by formation of PANI nanoparticles, nanofibres, nanotubes and nanospheres, are revealed from the SEM analysis. The FTIR analysis reveals the formation of conducting state of PANI under prevailing experimental conditions. The field emission investigation of the conducting PANI nanotubes was performed in all metal UHV system at base pressure of 1x10{sup −8} mbar. The turn on field required to draw emission of 1 nA current was observed to be ∼ 2.2 V/μm and threshold field (corresponding to emission current density of 1 µA/cm2) was found to be 3.2 V/μm. The emission current was observed to be stable for more than three hours at a preset value 1 µA. The simple synthesis route and good field emission characteristics indicate potential of PANI nanofibres as a promising emitter for field emission based micro/nano devices.

  7. Integrated atom detector based on field ionization near carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Gruener, B.; Jag, M.; Stibor, A.; Visanescu, G.; Haeffner, M.; Kern, D.; Guenther, A.; Fortagh, J.

    2009-12-15

    We demonstrate an atom detector based on field ionization and subsequent ion counting. We make use of field enhancement near tips of carbon nanotubes to reach extreme electrostatic field values of up to 9x10{sup 9} V/m, which ionize ground-state rubidium atoms. The detector is based on a carpet of multiwall carbon nanotubes grown on a substrate and used for field ionization, and a channel electron multiplier used for ion counting. We measure the field enhancement at the tips of carbon nanotubes by field emission of electrons. We demonstrate the operation of the field ionization detector by counting atoms from a thermal beam of a rubidium dispenser source. By measuring the ionization rate of rubidium as a function of the applied detector voltage we identify the field ionization distance, which is below a few tens of nanometers in front of nanotube tips. We deduce from the experimental data that field ionization of rubidium near nanotube tips takes place on a time scale faster than 10{sup -10} s. This property is particularly interesting for the development of fast atom detectors suitable for measuring correlations in ultracold quantum gases. We also describe an application of the detector as partial pressure gauge.

  8. Radiation tolerant compact image sensor using CdTe photodiode and field emitter array (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masuzawa, Tomoaki; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Okamoto, Tamotsu; Nagao, Masayoshi; Akiyoshi, Masafumi; Sato, Nobuhiro; Takagi, Ikuji; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Gotoh, Yasuhito

    2016-10-01

    A growing demand on incident detection is recognized since the Great East Japan Earthquake and successive accidents in Fukushima nuclear power plant in 2011. Radiation tolerant image sensors are powerful tools to collect crucial information at initial stages of such incidents. However, semiconductor based image sensors such as CMOS and CCD have limited tolerance to radiation exposure. Image sensors used in nuclear facilities are conventional vacuum tubes using thermal cathodes, which have large size and high power consumption. In this study, we propose a compact image sensor composed of a CdTe-based photodiode and a matrix-driven Spindt-type electron beam source called field emitter array (FEA). A basic principle of FEA-based image sensors is similar to conventional Vidicon type camera tubes, but its electron source is replaced from a thermal cathode to FEA. The use of a field emitter as an electron source should enable significant size reduction while maintaining high radiation tolerance. Current researches on radiation tolerant FEAs and development of CdTe based photoconductive films will be presented.

  9. A carbon nanotube field effect transistor with a suspended nanotube gate.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Yury A; Kinaret, Jari M

    2007-08-01

    We investigate theoretically field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTFET) and explore two device geometries with suspended multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) functioning as gate electrodes. In the two geometries, a doubly or singly clamped MWNT is electrostatically deflected toward the transistor channel, allowing for a variable gate coupling and leading to, for instance, a superior subthreshold slope. We suggest that the proposed designs can be used as nanoelectromechanical switches and as detectors of mechanical motion on the nanoscale.

  10. Electron emission properties of gated silicon field emitter arrays driven by laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimawaki, Hidetaka; Nagao, Masayoshi; Neo, Yoichiro; Mimura, Hidenori; Wakaya, Fujio; Takai, Mikio

    2016-10-01

    We report optically modulated electron emission from gated p-type silicon field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). The device's "volcano" structure is designed to control the photoexcitation of electrons by transmitting light through the small gate aperture, thereby minimizing the photogeneration of slow diffusion carriers outside the depletion region in the tip. Compared to that in the dark, the emission current was enhanced by more than three orders of magnitude in the high field region when irradiated with blue laser pulses. Results from the time-resolved measurements of photoassisted electron emission showed that these possess the same response as the laser pulse with no discernible delay. These results indicate that the volcano device structure is effective at eliminating the generation of diffusion carriers and that a fully optimized FEA is promising as a photocathode for producing high-speed modulated electron beams.

  11. Transmission type flat-panel X-ray source using ZnO nanowire field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Daokun; Song, Xiaomeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Chen, Jun; Li, Ziping; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng

    2015-12-14

    A transmission type flat-panel X-ray source in diode structure was fabricated. Large-scale patterned ZnO nanowires grown on a glass substrate by thermal oxidation were utilized as field emitters, and tungsten thin film coated on silica glass was used as the transmission anode. Uniform distribution of X-ray generation was achieved, which benefited from the uniform electron emission from ZnO nanowires. Self-ballasting effect induced by the intrinsic resistance of ZnO nanowire and decreasing of screening effect caused by patterned emitters account for the uniform emission. Characteristic X-ray peaks of W-L lines and bremsstrahlung X-rays have been observed under anode voltages at a range of 18–20 kV, the latter of which were the dominant X-ray signals. High-resolution X-ray images with spatial resolution less than 25 μm were obtained by the flat-panel X-ray source. The high resolution was attributed to the small divergence angle of the emitted X-rays from the transmission X-ray source.

  12. Ampère-Class Pulsed Field Emission from Carbon-Nanotube Cathodes in a Radiofrequency Resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Mihalcea, D.; Faillace, L.; Hartzell, J.; Panuganti, H.; Boucher, S. M.; Murokh, A.; Piot, P.; Thangaraj, J. C.T.

    2014-12-01

    Pulsed field emission from cold carbon-nanotube cathodes placed in a radiofrequency resonant cavity was observed. The cathodes were located on the backplate of a conventional $1+\\frac{1}{2}$-cell resonant cavity operating at 1.3-GHz and resulted in the production of bunch train with maximum average current close to 0.7 Amp\\`ere. The measured Fowler-Nordheim characteristic, transverse emittance, and pulse duration are presented and, when possible, compared to numerical simulations. The implications of our results to high-average-current electron sources are briefly discussed.

  13. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Georgy; Smirnov, Dmitry; Tselev, Alexander; Yang, Yanfei; Kalugin, Nikolay

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic field, when applied parallel to the CNT axis, alters the energy gap in the CNT electron spectrum with a period corresponding to one quantum of magnetic flux through the cross-section of the CNT. With available magnetic fields (10^1T by the order of magnitude), gap oscillations can be observed only in multi-wall CNTs with diameters larger than approx 5 nm, where effects of band structure variation are smeared out by defects and by quantum interference effects. As follows from [1], it is possible to separate effects of disorder from those of the band structure modification by studying magnetotransport in small diameter CNTs while controllably changing the position of the Fermi level of the CNT by electrostatic doping, i.e. by applying a gate voltage in the field effect transistor configuration. We have studied several samples of individual CTNs contacted by palladium electrodes placed on an oxidized heavily doped silicon substrate that served as a back-gate. We find that magnetoresistance of a CNT strongly depends on the Fermi level position with respect to the nanotube's charge neutrality point (CNP). Details and the analysis of our experimental data will be presented. [1] S. Roche, R. Saito, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246803 (2001)

  14. Diamond field emitter array cathodes and possibilities for employing additive manufacturing for dielectric laser accelerating structures

    SciTech Connect

    Simakov, Evgenya Ivanovna; Andrews, Heather Lynn; Herman, Matthew Joseph; Hubbard, Kevin Mark; Weis, Eric

    2016-09-20

    These are slides for a presentation at Stanford University. The outline is as follows: Motivation: customers for compact accelerators, LANL's technologies for laser acceleration, DFEA cathodes, and additive manufacturing of micron-size structures. Among the stated conclusions are the following: preliminary study identified DFEA cathodes as promising sources for DLAs--high beam current and small emittance; additive manufacturing with Nanoscribe Professional GT can produce structures with the right scale features for a DLA operating at micron wavelengths (fabrication tolerances need to be studied, DLAs require new materials). Future plans include DLA experiment with a beam produced by the DFEA cathode with field emission, demonstration of photoemission from DFEAs, and new structures to print and test.

  15. Field-induced control of universal fluorescence intermittency of a quantum dot light emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J. D.; Maenosono, S.

    2010-08-01

    With the nonstochastic quantum mechanical study of a quantum dot light emitter, we find that fluorescence intermittency statistics are universal and insensitive to the microscopic nature of the tunneling fluctuation between quantum dot and trapping state. We also investigate the power-law exponent θ and the crossover time τC of the on-time (τon) probability P(τon)∝τon-θ (for τon≲τC) and ∝e-Γτon (for τon≳τC) under an optical field of given energy and strength. For easy off-resonance excitation, it is found in both numerical and analytic ways that τC-1 is proportional to the intensity of the optical field (i.e., the square of the field strength) independent of the internal parameters of a quantum dot. Furthermore, it is also found that θ =2 in the limit of vanishing field strength is the upper bound of the exponent and θ becomes less than 2 as the field strength increases.

  16. Simulation of the enhancement factor from an individual 3D hemisphere-on-post field emitter by using finite elements method.

    PubMed

    Roveri, D S; Sant'Anna, G M; Bertan, H H; Mologni, J F; Alves, M A R; Braga, E S

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a 3D computational framework for evaluating electrostatic properties of a single field emitter characterized by the hemisphere-on-post geometry. Numerical simulations employed the finite elements method by using Ansys-Maxwell software. Extensive parametric simulations were focused on the threshold distance from which the emitter field enhancement factor (γ) becomes independent from the anode-substrate gap (G). This investigation allowed demonstrating that the ratio between G and the emitter height (h) is a reliable reference for a broad range of emitter dimensions; furthermore, results permitted establishing G/h ≥ 2.2 as the threshold condition for setting the anode without affecting γ.

  17. Field Emission Stability of Individual Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Tadashi; Okai, Makoto; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2009-02-01

    We investigated the emission stability of individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) and clarified the mechanism of emission current instability. An initial decrease in the emission current, which is generally seen in the case of metal emitters, was hardly observed. Furthermore, the current fluctuation was much lower than that for a metal emitter, and the peak-to-peak fluctuation was less than 2% when the emission pattern was pentagonal. However, spikelike and steplike noises occurred, with a frequency approximately proportional to the product of the emission current and the background pressure. These noises may be caused by physical adsorption and ion impact desorption of residual gas molecules. The number of these noise events depended on the emission pattern: it was much greater in the case of a nonpentagonal emission pattern than in the case of a pentagonal emission pattern. This type of current noise is considered to be due to ionic-collision-induced damage at the surface of the tip when the emission pattern is nonpentagonal.

  18. Field emission of electrons by carbon nanotube twist-yarns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakhidov, Al. A.; Nanjundaswamy, R.; Obraztsov, A. N.; Zhang, M.; Fang, S.; Klesch, V. I.; Baughman, R. H.; Zakhidov, A. A.

    2007-09-01

    Field emission with high current density at low operating voltage was found for the yarns obtained by solid state spinning process from forest of vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes. The nanotube forest was produced catalytically by CVD method. It is found that only a small fraction of carbon nanotubes from their total amount in the yarn yields to electron emission from its free end. This led to resistive heating of the emitting tubes and limiting of the emission current. The field emission microscopy pictures of MWNT yarn in free-end geometry appears to be very different from that of the conventional non-yarn carbon nanotube-based cathodes described in all previous studies. The FEM patterns are found to consist of the set of line and arc segments rather than a set of spots. Possible explanation of this effect is presented and discussed. The field emission from the lateral side of the yarns showed the self-enhanced currents increasing with operation time. We assume that this current increase may be due to untwisting and unwrapping of yarns resulted of application of the electric field. The lowest threshold field of about 0.7 V/μm was obtained after a few cycles of applied field increase. The prototypes of cathodoluminescent lamps and alphanumerical indicators based on MWNT twist-yarn cold cathodes are demonstrated.

  19. Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors (CNTFETs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) by Matthew Chin and Dr. Stephen Kilpatrick...20783-1197 ARL-TR-5151 April 2010 Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) Dr...AND SUBTITLE Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  20. Mechanism of gas sensing in carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Isha

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotubes in the field effect transistor configuration have exhibited impressive sensitivities compared to the existing technologies. However, the lack of an understanding of the gas sensing mechanism in these carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) has impeded setting-up a calibration standard and customization of these nano-sensors for specified gas sensing application. Calibration requires identifying fundamental transistor parameters and establishing how they vary in the presence of a gas and influence the overall sensing behavior. This work focuses on modeling the sensing behavior of a CNTFET in the presence of oxidizing (NO 2) and reducing (NH3) gases and determining how each of the transistor parameters, namely: the Schottky barrier height, Schottky barrier width and doping level of the nanotube are affected by the presence of these gases. Earlier experiments have shown that the carbon nanotube-metal interface is responsible for the observed change in the CNTFET response. The interface consists of the metal contact and the depletion region in the carbon nanotube. A change in the metal work function will change the Schottky barrier height, whereas doping of the depletion region will affect the Schottky barrier width and the doping level of the carbon nanotube. A theoretical model containing these parameters was systematically fitted to the experimental transfer characteristics for different concentrations of NO2 and NH3. A direct correlation between the measured changes in the CNTFET saturated conductance and the Schottky barrier height was found. These changes are directly related to the changes in the metal work function of the electrodes that I determined experimentally, independently, with a Kelvin probe system. The overall change in the CNTFET characteristics were explained and quantified by also including changes due to doping from molecules adsorbed at the carbon nanotube-metal interface through the parameters

  1. Self-modulated field electron emitter: Gated device of integrated Si tip-on-nano-channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhijun; Huang, Yifeng; Pan, Zhangxu; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-12-01

    We report the featured gated field electron emission devices of Si nano-tips with individually integrated Si nano-channels and the interpretation of the related physics. A rational procedure was developed to fabricate the uniform integrated devices. The electrical and thermal conduction tests demonstrated that the Si nano-channel can limit both the current and heat flows. The integrated devices showed the specialties of self-enhancement and self-regulation. The heat resistance results in the heat accumulation at the tip-apex, inducing the thermally enhanced field electron emission. The self-regulated effect of the electrical resistance is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevents the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. The nano-channel-integrated Si nano-tip array exhibited emission current density up to 24.9 mA/cm2 at a gate voltage of 94 V, much higher than that of the Si nano-tip array without an integrated nano-channel.

  2. Statistical model for field emitter activation on metallic surfaces used in high-gradient accelerating structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagotzky, S.; Müller, G.

    2016-01-01

    Both super- and normal-conducting high-gradient linear accelerators are limited by enhanced field emission (EFE) in the accelerating structures, e.g. due to power loss or ignition of discharges. We discuss the dependence of the number density of typical emitters, i.e. particulates and surface defects, on the electric field level at which they are activated for naturally oxidized metallic surfaces. This activation is explained by the transition of a metal-insulator interface into geometric features that enhance the EFE process. A statistical model is successfully compared to systematic studies of niobium and copper relevant for recent and future linear accelerators. Our results show that the achievable surface quality of Nb might be sufficient for the suppression of EFE in the superconducting accelerating structures for the actual European XFEL but not for the planned International Linear Collider. Moreover, some effort will be required to reduce EFE and thus the breakdown rate of the normal conducting Cu structures for the Compact Linear Collider.

  3. Breakdown voltage reliability improvement in gas-discharge tube surge protectors employing graphite field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan; Rozman, Robert; Nemanič, Vincenc

    2012-04-01

    Gas-discharge tube (GDT) surge protectors are known for many decades as passive units used in low-voltage telecom networks for protection of electrical components from transient over-voltages (discharging) such as lightning. Unreliability of the mean turn-on DC breakdown voltage and the run-to-run variability has been overcome successfully in the past by adding, for example, a radioactive source inside the tube. Radioisotopes provide a constant low level of free electrons, which trigger the breakdown. In the last decades, any concept using environmentally harmful compounds is not acceptable anymore and new solutions were searched. In our application, a cold field electron emitter source is used as the trigger for the gas discharge but with no activating compound on the two main electrodes. The patent literature describes in details the implementation of the so-called trigger wires (auxiliary electrodes) made of graphite, placed in between the two main electrodes, but no physical explanation has been given yet. We present experimental results, which show that stable cold field electron emission current in the high vacuum range originating from the nano-structured edge of the graphite layer is well correlated to the stable breakdown voltage of the GDT surge protector filled with a mixture of clean gases.

  4. A multi-wavelength study of z = 3.15 Lyman-α emitters in the GOODS South Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nilsson, K. K.; Møller, P.; Möller, O.; Fynbo, J. P. U.; Michałowski, M. J.; Watson, D.; Ledoux, C.; Rosati, P.; Pedersen, K.; Grove, L. F.

    2007-08-01

    Context: Lyα-emitters have proven to be excellent probes of faint, star-forming galaxies in the high redshift universe. However, although the sample of known emitters is increasingly growing, their nature (e.g. stellar masses, ages, metallicities, star-formation rates) is still poorly constrained. Aims: We aim to study the nature of Lyα-emitters, to find the properties of a typical Lyα-emitting galaxy and to compare these properties with the properties of other galaxies at similar redshift, in particular Lyman-break galaxies. Methods: We have performed narrow-band imaging at the VLT, focused on Lyα at redshift z ≈ 3.15, in the GOODS-S field. We have identified a sample of Lyα-emitting candidates, and we have studied their Spectral Energy Distributions (SEDs). Results: We find that the emitters are best fit by an SED with low metallicity (Z/Z⊙ = 0.005), low dust extinction (AV ≈ 0.26) and medium stellar masses of approximately 109 M⊙. The age is not very well constrained. One object out of 24 appears to be a high redshift Lyα-emitting dusty starburst galaxy. We find filamentary structure as traced by the Lyα-emitters at the 4σ level. The rest-frame UV SED of these galaxies is very similar to that of Lyman Break Galaxies (LBGs) and comply with the selection criteria for U-band drop-outs, except they are intrinsically fainter than the current limit for LBGs. Conclusions: Lyα-emitters are excellent probes of galaxies in the distant universe, and represent a class of star-forming, dust and AGN free, medium mass objects. Based on observations carried out at the European Southern Observatory (ESO) under prog. ID No. 70.A-0447, 274.A-5029 and LP168.A-0485.

  5. Robust CNT field emitters: patterning, growth, transfer, and in situ anchoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Valerie J.; Manohara, Harish; Toda, Risaku; Del Castillo, Linda; Murthy, Rakesh; Mulder, Jerry; Murty, Eshwari; Clark Thompson, M.

    2016-12-01

    Robust carbon nanotube (CNT)-based cold cathodes were fabricated on titanium (Ti) substrates. Methods to grow vertically aligned CNTs directly on Ti substrates were developed. These cathodes can be treated post-growth at elevated temperatures under inert atmosphere which causes the surface-grown CNTs to become anchored to the substrate surface. These samples offer improvements in field emission properties over previously studied silicon (Si) substrate-based cathodes with no anchoring, displaying low threshold voltages, high field enhancement factors, and long operating lifetimes. Current densities of 25 mA cm-2 were held for over 24 h with anchored samples at low electric fields (observed thresholds as low as 0.5 V μm-1) and more current stability. Higher current densities of up to 150 mA cm-2 could be reached with anchored samples, limited only by the experimental setup. In efforts to generate even more stable and reproducible field emission, a transfer process of CNTs from polished Si to Ti with copper (Cu) was developed (flipCNTs). These cathodes display extreme improvements over previous results, with observed thresholds as low as 0.2 V μm-1 and γ-factors as high as 30 000. To demonstrate the utility of these robust cathodes, a flipCNT-based cathode was assembled into a fully functioning vacuum triode.

  6. Nanofabrication of arrays of silicon field emitters with vertical silicon nanowire current limiters and self-aligned gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrera, S. A.; Akinwande, A. I.

    2016-07-01

    We developed a fabrication process for embedding a dense array (108 cm-2) of high-aspect-ratio silicon nanowires (200 nm diameter and 10 μm tall) in a dielectric matrix and then structured/exposed the tips of the nanowires to form self-aligned gate field emitter arrays using chemical mechanical polishing (CMP). Using this structure, we demonstrated a high current density (100 A cm-2), uniform, and long lifetime (>100 h) silicon field emitter array architecture in which the current emitted by each tip is regulated by the silicon nanowire current limiter connected in series with the tip. Using the current voltage characteristics and with the aid of numerical device models, we estimated the tip radius of our field emission arrays to be ≈4.8 nm, as consistent with the tip radius measured using a scanning electron microscope (SEM).

  7. Application of the general thermal field model to simulate the behaviour of nanoscale Cu field emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Eimre, Kristjan; Aabloo, Alvo; Parviainen, Stefan Djurabekova, Flyura; Zadin, Vahur

    2015-07-21

    Strong field electron emission from a nanoscale tip can cause a temperature rise at the tip apex due to Joule heating. This becomes particularly important when the current value grows rapidly, as in the pre-breakdown (the electrostatic discharge) condition, which may occur near metal surfaces operating under high electric fields. The high temperatures introduce uncertainties in calculations of the current values when using the Fowler–Nordheim equation, since the thermionic component in such conditions cannot be neglected. In this paper, we analyze the field electron emission currents as the function of the applied electric field, given by both the conventional Fowler–Nordheim field emission and the recently developed generalized thermal field emission formalisms. We also compare the results in two limits: discrete (atomistic simulations) and continuum (finite element calculations). The discrepancies of both implementations and their effect on final results are discussed. In both approaches, the electric field, electron emission currents, and Joule heating processes are simulated concurrently and self-consistently. We show that the conventional Fowler–Nordheim equation results in significant underestimation of electron emission currents. We also show that Fowler–Nordheim plots used to estimate the field enhancement factor may lead to significant overestimation of this parameter especially in the range of relatively low electric fields.

  8. Flat Panel Light Source with Lateral Gate Structure Based on SiC Nanowire Field Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Youh, Meng-Jey; Tseng, Chun-Lung; Jhuang, Meng-Han; Chiu, Sheng-Cheng; Huang, Li-Hu; Gong, Jyun-An; Li, Yuan-Yao

    2015-01-01

    A field-emission light source with high luminance, excellent luminance uniformity, and tunable luminance characteristics with a novel lateral-gate structure is demonstrated. The lateral-gate triode structure comprises SiC nanowire emitters on a Ag cathode electrode and a pair of Ag gate electrodes placed laterally on both sides of the cathode. The simple and cost-effective screen printing technique is employed to pattern the lateral-gates and cathode structure on soda lime glass. The area coverage of the screen-printed cathode and gates on the glass substrate (area: 6 × 8 cm2) is in the range of 2.04% – 4.74% depending on the set of cathode-gate electrodes on the substrate. The lateral-gate structure with its small area coverage exhibits a two-dimensional luminance pattern with high brightness and good luminance uniformity. A maximum luminance of 10952 cd/cm2 and a luminance uniformity of >90% can be achieved with a gate voltage of 500 V and an anode voltage of 4000 V, with an anode current of 1.44 mA and current leakage to the gate from the cathode of about 10%. PMID:26042359

  9. Planar ultrananocrystalline diamond field emitter in accelerator radio frequency electron injector: Performance metrics

    SciTech Connect

    Baryshev, Sergey V. Antipov, Sergey; Jing, Chunguang; Qiu, Jiaqi; Shao, Jiahang; Liu, Wanming; Gai, Wei; Pérez Quintero, Kenneth J.; Sumant, Anirudha V.; Kanareykin, Alexei D.

    2014-11-17

    A case performance study of a planar field emission cathode (FEC) based on nitrogen-incorporated ultrananocrystalline diamond, (N)UNCD, was carried out in an RF 1.3 GHz electron gun. The FEC was a 100 nm (N)UNCD film grown on a 20 mm diameter stainless steel disk with a Mo buffer layer. At surface gradients 45–65 MV/m, peak currents of 1–80 mA (equivalent to 0.3–25 mA/cm{sup 2}) were achieved. Imaging with two YAG screens confirmed emission from the (N)UNCD surface with (1) the beam emittance of 1.5 mm × mrad/mm-rms and (2) longitudinal FWHM and rms widths of non-Gaussian energy spread of 0.7% and 11% at an electron energy of 2 MeV. Current stability was tested over the course of 36 × 10{sup 3} RF pulses (equivalent to 288 × 10{sup 6 }GHz oscillations)

  10. The effect of Ar neutral beam treatment of screen-printed carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission

    SciTech Connect

    Kyung, Se Jin; Park, Jae Beom; Park, Byung Jae; Min, Kyung Seok; Lee, June Hee; Yeom, Geun Young; Shin, Yong Sook; Park, Chong Yun

    2007-04-15

    This study examined the effectiveness of an Ar neutral beam as a surface treatment for improving the field emission properties of screen-printed carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A short period of the neutral beam treatment on tape-activated CNTs enhanced the emission properties of the CNTs, showing a decrease in the turn-on field and an increase in the number of emission sites. The neutral beam treatment appeared to render the CNT surfaces more actively by exposing more CNTs from the CNT paste without cutting or kinking the already exposed long CNT emitters. The treated CNTs emitted more electrons than the CNTs treated using other methods. When the field emission properties were measured after the neutral beam treatment, the turn-on field decreased from 1.65 to 0.60 V/{mu}m and the emission field at 1 mA/cm{sup 2} decreased from 3.10 to 2.41 V/{mu}m. After the neutral beam treatment for 10 s, there was an improvement in the stability of the emission current at a constant electric field. It is expected that the neutral beam treatment introduced in this study will provide an easy way of improving the emission intensity and stability of screen-printed CNT emitters.

  11. Design, Fabrication, and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices for Advanced Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radauscher, Erich Justin

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have recently emerged as promising candidates for electron field emission (FE) cathodes in integrated FE devices. These nanostructured carbon materials possess exceptional properties and their synthesis can be thoroughly controlled. Their integration into advanced electronic devices, including not only FE cathodes, but sensors, energy storage devices, and circuit components, has seen rapid growth in recent years. The results of the studies presented here demonstrate that the CNT field emitter is an excellent candidate for next generation vacuum microelectronics and related electron emission devices in several advanced applications. The work presented in this study addresses determining factors that currently confine the performance and application of CNT-FE devices. Characterization studies and improvements to the FE properties of CNTs, along with Micro-Electro-Mechanical Systems (MEMS) design and fabrication, were utilized in achieving these goals. Important performance limiting parameters, including emitter lifetime and failure from poor substrate adhesion, are examined. The compatibility and integration of CNT emitters with the governing MEMS substrate (i.e., polycrystalline silicon), and its impact on these performance limiting parameters, are reported. CNT growth mechanisms and kinetics were investigated and compared to silicon (100) to improve the design of CNT emitter integrated MEMS based electronic devices, specifically in vacuum microelectronic device (VMD) applications. Improved growth allowed for design and development of novel cold-cathode FE devices utilizing CNT field emitters. A chemical ionization (CI) source based on a CNT-FE electron source was developed and evaluated in a commercial desktop mass spectrometer for explosives trace detection. This work demonstrated the first reported use of a CNT-based ion source capable of collecting CI mass spectra. The CNT-FE source demonstrated low power requirements, pulsing

  12. Near-Field Radiation Between Graphene-Covered Carbon Nanotube Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Richard; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin; Nanoscale Thermal Radiation Laboratory Team

    2015-03-01

    It has been shown that at nanometer gap distances, or the near-field, thermal radiation is enhanced over blackbody between hyperbolic metamaterials. It was shown that vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays in the near-field demonstrate exceptional enhancement. In this study, graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite VACNT arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene (μ >= 0.3 eV) is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmons. Increasing doping that shifts the peak spectral heat flux toward higher frequencies attests to the tunable bandgap of graphene. Although graphene covering of VACNT does not offer many magnitudes of near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e. gap distance and doping) that best augments heat transfer to that of VACNT arrays. In addition, this study demonstrates the near-field Poynting vector to determine the energy absorption due to graphene. It is found that graphene, in low frequencies and high chemical potentials, attenuates large penetration depths of hyperbolic modes, thereby increasing the contribution of graphene-graphene surface plasmons. This study has an impact toward designing carbon-based emitters and thermal junctions.

  13. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  14. Evidence for Adsorbate-Enhanced Field Emission from Carbon Nanotube Fibers (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-31

    microscopy from single wall nanotube ( SWNT ) caps,9 and by current satura- tion measurements10 from adsorbate-covered SWNTs , were consistent with this...assertion. Comparison of the FE electron energy distributions acquired from clean and adsorbate- covered SWNTs led11 to the conclusion that enhancement...Residual Gas Analysis FE Field Emission CNT Carbon Nanotube SWNT Single Wall Nanotube CSA Chlorosulfonic Acid

  15. Remarkably improved field emission of TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays by annealing atmosphere engineering

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, Ai-Zhen; Wang, Cheng-Wei Chen, Jian-Biao; Zhang, Xu-Qiang; Li, Yan; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • TNAs were prepared by anodization and annealed in different atmospheres. • The crystal structure and electronic properties of the prepared TNAs were investigated. • The field emission of TNAs was highly dependent on annealing atmosphere. • A low turn-on of 2.44 V/μm was obtained for TNAs annealed in H{sub 2} atmosphere. - Abstract: Highly ordered TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays (TNAs) were prepared by anodization, and followed by annealing in the atmospheres of Air, Vacuum, Ar, and H{sub 2}. The effect of annealing atmosphere on the crystal structure, composition, and electronic properties of TNAs were systematically investigated. Raman and EDS results indicated that the TNAs annealed in anaerobic atmospheres contained more oxygen vacancies, which result in the substantially improved electron transport properties and reduced work function. Moreover, it was found that the FE properties of TNAs were highly dependent on the annealing atmosphere. By engineering the annealing atmosphere, the turn-on field as low as 2.44 V/μm can be obtained from TNAs annealed in H{sub 2}, which was much lower than the value of 18.23 V/μm from the TNAs annealed in the commonly used atmosphere of Air. Our work suggests an instructive and attractive way to fabricate high performance TNAs field emitters.

  16. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  17. Graphical modelling of carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, R.; Mishra, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube Field Effect Transistors (CNTFET) are found to be one of the most promising successors to conventional Si-MOSFET. This paper presents a novel modelling for planar CNTFET based on curve fitting method. The results obtained from the model are compared with the simulated results obtained by using the nanohub simulator. Finally the accuracy of the model is discussed by calculating the normalized root mean square difference between the nanohub simulation results and those obtained from the proposed model.

  18. Electric fields can control the transport of water in carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ritos, Konstantinos; Borg, Matthew K.; Mottram, Nigel J.

    2016-01-01

    The properties of water confined inside nanotubes are of considerable scientific and technological interest. We use molecular dynamics to investigate the structure and average orientation of water flowing within a carbon nanotube. We find that water exhibits biaxial paranematic liquid crystal ordering both within the nanotube and close to its ends. This preferred molecular ordering is enhanced when an axial electric field is applied, affecting the water flow rate through the nanotube. A spatially patterned electric field can minimize nanotube entrance effects and significantly increase the flow rate. PMID:26712640

  19. Single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite as broadband near infrared emitter for multifunctional photonic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Arnab; Ghosh, Sujan; Das, Sukhen; Das, Probal K.; Banerjee, Rajat

    2013-05-01

    Near infrared fluorescence was observed from single walled carbon nanotube-borosilicate glass composite around 0.84-2.03 μm with 325 nm laser excitation. Band gap fluorescence of SWCNT bundles along with defect related fluorescence from SiO2 structure were the source of the NIR emissions of the composite. The emission spectra was 1185 nm wide that contains three main transmission windows for fiber optic telecommunications. The results strongly indicate high potentiality of this material in broadband fiber optic telecommunications and fabrication of NIR tunable lasers.

  20. Electric-field-direction dependent spatial distribution of electron emission along electrically biased carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, X. L.; Golberg, D.; Chen, Q.; Bando, Y.; Peng, L.-M.

    2011-11-01

    The spatial distribution of lateral electron emission from individual electrically biased carbon nanotubes (CNTs) along the tube axis is resolved for the first time by combining multiprobe simultaneous emission current collection and electron trajectory simulations. The spatial distribution is found to be asymmetric along the tube axis and depends on the direction of the electric field in CNTs. The average emission density of the half tube with a higher electric potential is higher than that of the other half with a lower electric potential. The electric-field-direction dependent asymmetric spatial distribution of the electron emission is absent in all pre-existing well-established mechanisms but is well explained in terms of the recently proposed phonon-assisted electron emission (PAEE). This, together with a quantitative description of experimentally measured emission currents, provides solid evidence for the validity of the PAEE mechanism. PAEE from CNTs is predicted to take place near room temperature; thus, it opens up a new and promising route for fabricating cold electron emitters with a high emission density and a low working voltage.

  1. Field Emission Lamps Prepared with Dip-Coated and Nickel Electroless Plated Carbon Nanotube Cathodes.

    PubMed

    Pu, N W; Youh, M J; Chung, K J; Liu, Y M; Ger, M D

    2015-07-01

    Fabrication and efficiency enhancement of tubal field emission lamps (FELs) using multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) as the cathode field emitters were studied. The cathode filaments were prepared by eletrolessly plating a nickel (Ni) film on the cathode made of a 304 stainless steel wire dip-coated with MWNTs. The 304 wire was dip-coated with MWNTs and nano-sized Pd catalyst in a solution, and then eletrolessly plated with Ni to form an MWNT-embedded composite film. The MWNTs embedded in Ni not only had better adhesion but also exhibited a higher FE threshold voltage, which is beneficial to our FEL system and can increase the luminous efficiency of the anode phosphor. Our results show that the FE cathode prepared by dipping three times in a solution containing 400 ppm Pd nano-catalysts and 0.2 wt.% MWNTs and then eletrolessly plating a Ni film at a deposition temperature of 60 °C, pH value of 5, and deposition time of 7 min has the best FE uniformity and efficiency. Its emission current can stay as low as 2.5 mA at a high applied voltage of 7 kV, which conforms to the high-voltage-and-low-current requirement of the P22 phosphor and can therefore maximize the luminous efficiency of our FEL. We found that the MWNT cathodes prepared by this approach are suitable for making high-efficiency FELs.

  2. Effect of a concave grid mesh in a carbon nanotube-based field emission X-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun Suk; Castro, Edward Joseph D.; Lee, Choong Hun

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • Successful design using a concave grid mesh for the focusing electron. • Much better X-ray image due to the concave grid mesh. • Higher anode current efficiency using the concave grid mesh versus a flat grid mesh. - Abstract: This study introduces a simple approach to improve the X-ray image quality produced by the carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitter X-ray source by altering the geometrical shape of the grid mesh from the conventional flat shape to a concave one in a typical triode structure. The concave shape of the grid electrode increases the effective number of the grid cells in the mesh, which exerted an electric field in the direction of the emitted electrons, thereby increasing the emission current reaching the anode. Furthermore, the curved mesh (concave grid mesh), which was responsible for the extraction of electrons from the field emitter, exhibited a focusing effect on the electron beam trajectory thereby, reducing the focal spot size impinging on the anode and resulted in a better spatial resolution of the X-ray images produced.

  3. Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-25

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. ATR-2013-01138 Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors ...Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors November 25, 2013 Adam W. Bushmaker Electronics and...Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors Approved by: U^ g jj t^yt Steven C

  4. Planar-defect-rich zinc oxide nanoparticles assembled on carbon nanotube films as ultraviolet emitters and photocatalysts

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Yunqing; Zhang, Xiaohua; Li, Ru; Li, Qingwen

    2014-01-01

    Structural defects in zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are complex and hard to be controlled during the synthesis, however, diversifying the chemical and physical performances. Here we report a rapid and low-temperature deposition method to fabricate planar-defect-rich ZnO nanoparticles on freestanding and aligned carbon nanotube films, different from common treatments which remove structural defects as many as possible. The defect energy states are very close to the valence band of ZnO and serve as recombination centers for a nearly monochromatic ultraviolet luminescence within a wavelength range of 373–376 nm. The absence of point defects, especially of oxygen vacancies whose energy level is <1 eV below the conduction band, allows photoinduced electrons and holes to take parts in possible photocatalytic reactions rather than to recombine at the shallow energy levels of planar defects. PMID:24740315

  5. Integrated ZnO Nano-Electron-Emitter with Self-Modulated Parasitic Tunneling Field Effect Transistor at the Surface of the p-Si/ZnO Junction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Tao; Luo, Laitang; Huang, Yifeng; Ye, Bing; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-09-01

    The development of high performance nano-electron-emitter arrays with well reliability still proves challenging. Here, we report a featured integrated nano-electron-emitter. The vertically aligned nano-emitter consists of two segments. The top segment is an intrinsically lightly n-type doped ZnO nano-tip, while the bottom segment is a heavily p-type doped Si nano-pillar (denoted as p-Si/ZnO nano-emitter). The anode voltage not only extracted the electron emission from the emitter apex but also induced the inter-band electron tunneling at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO nano-junction. The designed p-Si/ZnO emitter is equivalent to a ZnO nano-tip individually ballasted by a p-Si/ZnO diode and a parasitic tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO junction. The parasitic TFET provides a channel for the supply of emitting electron, while the p-Si/ZnO diode is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevent the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. Well repeatable and stable field emission current were obtained from the p-Si/ZnO nano-emitters. High performance nano-emitters was developed using diamond-like-carbon coated p-Si/ZnO tip array (500 × 500), i.e., 178 μA (4.48 mA/cm2) at 75.7 MV/m.

  6. Integrated ZnO Nano-Electron-Emitter with Self-Modulated Parasitic Tunneling Field Effect Transistor at the Surface of the p-Si/ZnO Junction

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Tao; Luo, Laitang; Huang, Yifeng; Ye, Bing; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-01-01

    The development of high performance nano-electron-emitter arrays with well reliability still proves challenging. Here, we report a featured integrated nano-electron-emitter. The vertically aligned nano-emitter consists of two segments. The top segment is an intrinsically lightly n-type doped ZnO nano-tip, while the bottom segment is a heavily p-type doped Si nano-pillar (denoted as p-Si/ZnO nano-emitter). The anode voltage not only extracted the electron emission from the emitter apex but also induced the inter-band electron tunneling at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO nano-junction. The designed p-Si/ZnO emitter is equivalent to a ZnO nano-tip individually ballasted by a p-Si/ZnO diode and a parasitic tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO junction. The parasitic TFET provides a channel for the supply of emitting electron, while the p-Si/ZnO diode is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevent the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. Well repeatable and stable field emission current were obtained from the p-Si/ZnO nano-emitters. High performance nano-emitters was developed using diamond-like-carbon coated p-Si/ZnO tip array (500 × 500), i.e., 178 μA (4.48 mA/cm2) at 75.7 MV/m. PMID:27654068

  7. Integrated ZnO Nano-Electron-Emitter with Self-Modulated Parasitic Tunneling Field Effect Transistor at the Surface of the p-Si/ZnO Junction.

    PubMed

    Cao, Tao; Luo, Laitang; Huang, Yifeng; Ye, Bing; She, Juncong; Deng, Shaozhi; Chen, Jun; Xu, Ningsheng

    2016-09-22

    The development of high performance nano-electron-emitter arrays with well reliability still proves challenging. Here, we report a featured integrated nano-electron-emitter. The vertically aligned nano-emitter consists of two segments. The top segment is an intrinsically lightly n-type doped ZnO nano-tip, while the bottom segment is a heavily p-type doped Si nano-pillar (denoted as p-Si/ZnO nano-emitter). The anode voltage not only extracted the electron emission from the emitter apex but also induced the inter-band electron tunneling at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO nano-junction. The designed p-Si/ZnO emitter is equivalent to a ZnO nano-tip individually ballasted by a p-Si/ZnO diode and a parasitic tunneling field effect transistor (TFET) at the surface of the p-Si/ZnO junction. The parasitic TFET provides a channel for the supply of emitting electron, while the p-Si/ZnO diode is benefit for impeding the current overloading and prevent the emitters from a catastrophic breakdown. Well repeatable and stable field emission current were obtained from the p-Si/ZnO nano-emitters. High performance nano-emitters was developed using diamond-like-carbon coated p-Si/ZnO tip array (500 × 500), i.e., 178 μA (4.48 mA/cm(2)) at 75.7 MV/m.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Band Structure Effect on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamdi, M. T.; Johari, Z.; Ismail, R.; Webb, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The band structure of a carbon nanotube (CNT) near to the minimum band energy is parabolic. However it is not parabolic in other parts of the band energy. In the parabolic part, based on the confinement effect, we present an analytical model that captures the essence of the physical processes relevant to the operation of a carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET). The model covers seamlessly the whole range of transport from drift-diffusion to ballistic. It has been clarified that the intrinsic speed of CNTs is governed by the transit time of electrons. Although the transit time is more dependent on the saturation velocity than on the weak-field mobility, the feature of high-electron mobility is beneficial in the sense that the drift velocity is always maintained closer to the saturation velocity, at least at the drain end of the transistor where the electric field is necessarily high and controls the saturation current. The results obtained are applied to the modeling of the current-voltage characteristics of a CNTFET. The channel-length modulation is shown to arise from the drain velocity becoming closer to the ultimate saturation velocity as the drain voltage is increased.

  9. A case for ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays in advanced x-ray source applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Vance S.; Bergkvist, Magnus; Chen, Daokun; Chen, Jun; Huang, Mengbing

    2016-09-01

    Reviewing current efforts in X-ray source miniaturization reveals a broad spectrum of applications: Portable and/or remote nondestructive evaluation, high throughput protein crystallography, invasive radiotherapy, monitoring fluid flow and particulate generation in situ, and portable radiography devices for battle-front or large scale disaster triage scenarios. For the most part, all of these applications are being addressed with a top-down approach aimed at improving portability, weight and size. That is, the existing system or a critical sub-component is shrunk in some manner in order to miniaturize the overall package. In parallel to top-down x-ray source miniaturization, more recent efforts leverage field emission and semiconductor device fabrication techniques to achieve small scale x-ray sources via a bottom-up approach where phenomena effective at a micro/nanoscale are coordinated for macro-scale effect. The bottom-up approach holds potential to address all the applications previously mentioned but its entitlement extends into new applications with much more ground-breaking potential. One such bottom-up application is the distributed x-ray source platform. In the medical space, using an array of microscale x-ray sources instead of a single source promises significant reductions in patient dose as well as smaller feature detectability and fewer image artifacts. Cold cathode field emitters are ideal for this application because they can be gated electrostatically or via photonic excitation, they do not generate excessive heat like other common electron emitters, they have higher brightness and they are relatively compact. This document describes how ZnO nanowire field emitter arrays are well suited for distributed x-ray source applications because they hold promise in each of the following critical areas: emission stability, simple scalable fabrication, performance, radiation resistance and photonic coupling.

  10. [O II] emitters at z ˜ 4.6 in the GOODS field: a homogeneous measure of evolving star formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayliss, K. D.; McMahon, R. G.; Venemans, B. P.; Banerji, M.; Lewis, J. R.

    2012-11-01

    We present the results of a high-redshift, z = 4.6, survey of [O II] λ3727 emission line galaxies in the GOODS-S field. The survey uses deep near-infrared data in the NB2090 (λc = 2.095 μm, Δ λ = 0.02 μm) and Ks (λc = 2.146 μm, Δ λ = 0.324 μm) filters taken with the European Southern Observatory instrument, HAWK-I. The images reach an emission line flux limit (5σ) of 3.16 × 10-18 erg s-1 cm -2. At z = 4.6, the survey probes a comoving volume of ˜6680 Mpc3. Three [O II] emission line candidates at z ˜ 4.6 are selected using the Lyman-break criteria. Photometric redshift analysis supports the conclusion that these are genuine [O II] emitters, ruling out a z < 3 solution entirely for one of the candidates. In the analysis presented in this paper, two scenarios are considered: first, all three candidates are genuine [O II] emitters and secondly, only the most likely candidate is a genuine [O II] emitter. We use the line fluxes of these objects to place confidence limits on the star formation rate density (SFRD) in bright (log(L[O ii ])>42.0) [O II] emission line galaxies. Assuming an observed [O II]/Hα line ratio of 0.45 and A(Hα) = 1.0 mag, we report an SFRD of ρdot*(log(L[O ii ])>42.0)=0.058 M yr -1 Mpc -3 in our objects. Using small number statistics, we then place a 50 per cent confidence interval on the global star formation rate of ρdot;*(log(L[O ii ])>42.0)=0.058±0.013 M yr -1 Mpc -3. By combining our results with those from low-z surveys, we compile the first homogeneous set of measurements of the SFRD in bright [O II] emitters from z = 0 to 4.6. From this, we conclude that there was an increase in the SFRD in the brightest [O II] emitters of at least a factor of 2 between z = 4.6 and 1.85.

  11. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields.

  12. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Fibers and Sheets for a High Current Electron Source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christy, Larry

    Field emission (FE) properties of carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers from Rice University and the University of Cambridge have been studied for use within a high current electron source for a directed energy weapon. Upon reviewing the performance of these two prevalent CNT fibers, cathodes were designed with CNT fibers from the University of Cincinnati Nanoworld Laboratory. Cathodes composed of a single CNT fiber, an array of three CNT fibers, and a nonwoven CNT sheet were investigated for FE properties; the goal was to design a cathode with emission current in excess of 10 mA. Once the design phase was complete, the cathode samples were fabricated, characterized, and then analyzed to determine FE properties. Electrical conductivity of the CNT fibers was characterized with a 4-probe technique. FE characteristics were measured in an ultra-high vacuum chamber at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base. The arrayed CNT fiber and the enhanced nonwoven CNT sheet emitter design demonstrated the most promising FE properties. Future work will include further analysis and cathode design using this nonwoven CNT sheet material to increase peak current performance during electron emission.

  13. PHOTOMETRIC PROPERTIES OF Ly{alpha} EMITTERS AT z {approx} 4.86 IN THE COSMOS 2 SQUARE DEGREE FIELD

    SciTech Connect

    Shioya, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Nagao, T.; Saito, T.; Trump, J.; Sasaki, S. S.; Ideue, Y.; Nakajima, A.; Matsuoka, K.; Murayama, T.; Scoville, N. Z.; Capak, P.; Ellis, R. S.; Sanders, D. B.; Kartaltepe, J.; Mobasher, B.; Aussel, H.; Koekemoer, A.; Carilli, C.; Garilli, B.

    2009-05-01

    We present results of a survey for Ly{alpha} emitters at z {approx} 4.86 based on optical narrowband ({lambda} {sub c} = 7126 A, {delta}{lambda} = 73 A) and broadband (B, V, r', i', and z') observations of the Cosmic Evolution Survey field using Suprime-Cam on the Subaru Telescope. We find 79 Ly{alpha} emitter (LAE) candidates at z {approx} 4.86 over a contiguous survey area of 1.83 deg{sup 2}, down to the Ly{alpha} line flux of 1.47 x 10{sup -17} erg s{sup -1} cm{sup -2}. We obtain the Ly{alpha} luminosity function with a best-fit Schechter parameters of log L* = 42.9{sup +0.5} {sub -0.3} erg s{sup -1} and {phi}* = 1.2{sup +8.0} {sub -1.1} x 10{sup -4} Mpc{sup -3} for {alpha} = -1.5 (fixed). The two-point correlation function for our LAE sample is {xi}(r) = (r/4.4{sup +5.7} {sub -2.9} Mpc){sup -1.90{+-}}{sup 0.22}. In order to investigate the field-to-field variations of the properties of Ly{alpha} emitters, we divide the survey area into nine tiles of 0.{sup 0}5 x 0.{sup 0}5 each. We find that the number density varies with a factor of {approx_equal}2 from field to field with high statistical significance. However, we find no significant field-to-field variance when we divide the field into four tiles with 0.{sup 0}7 x 0.{sup 0}7 each. We conclude that at least 0.5 deg{sup 2} survey area is required to derive averaged properties of LAEs at z {approx} 5, and our survey field is wide enough to overcome the cosmic variance.

  14. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission electron gun

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getty, Stephanie A.; King, Todd T.; Bis, Rachael A.; Jones, Hollis H.; Herrero, Federico; Lynch, Bernard A.; Roman, Patrick; Mahaffy, Paul

    2007-04-01

    A cold cathode field emission electron gun (e-gun) based on a patterned carbon nanotube (CNT) film has been fabricated for use in a miniaturized reflectron time-of-flight mass spectrometer (RTOF MS), with future applications in other charged particle spectrometers, and performance of the CNT e-gun has been evaluated. A thermionic electron gun has also been fabricated and evaluated in parallel and its performance is used as a benchmark in the evaluation of our CNT e-gun. Implications for future improvements and integration into the RTOF MS are discussed.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor for DNA Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chu T.; Thuy, Nguyen T.; Luyen, Tran T.; Huyen, Tran T. T.; Tuan, Mai A.

    2017-01-01

    A field-effect transistor (FET) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the conducting channel (CNTFET) has been developed, designed such that the CNT conducting channel (15 μm long, 700 μm wide) is directly exposed to medium containing target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The CNTFET operates at high ON-current of 1.91 μA, ON/OFF-current ratio of 1.2 × 105, conductance of 4.3 μS, and leakage current of 16.4 pA. We present initial trials showing the response of the CNTFET to injection of target DNA into aqueous medium.

  16. Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N; Satishkumar, B C; Govindaraj, A; Nath, M

    2001-02-16

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered soon after the successful laboratory synthesis of fullerenes. Since their discovery in 1991, there has been intensive research activity in the area of carbon nanotubes, not only because of their fascinating structural features and properties, but also because of their potential technological applications. There is increasing experimental evidence to show that carbon nanotubes may find use in nanoelectronic devices, displays, and in hydrogen storage. In this article, we discuss various important aspects related to the synthesis, structure, characterization, and mechanism of formation of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a presentation of the important electronic, mechanical, hydrogen storage, and other properties of the nanotubes. Doping, as well as other chemical manipulations with boron and nitrogen, bring about significant changes in the properties of the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes also serve as useful templates to make other nanostructures. Layered metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, and other materials form nanotubes and provide considerable scope for study.

  17. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields.

    PubMed

    Winarto; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-03-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.

  18. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winarto, Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.

  19. Structures of water molecules in carbon nanotubes under electric fields

    SciTech Connect

    Winarto,; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2015-03-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising for water transport through membranes and for use as nano-pumps. The development of CNT-based nanofluidic devices, however, requires a better understanding of the properties of water molecules in CNTs because they can be very different from those in the bulk. Using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the structure of water molecules in CNTs having diameters ranging from (7,7) to (10,10). The water dipole moments were aligned parallel to the electric field, which increases the density of water inside the CNTs and forms ordered ice-like structures. The electric field induces the transition from liquid to ice nanotubes in a wide range of CNT diameters. Moreover, we found an increase in the lifetime of hydrogen bonds for water structures in the CNTs. Fast librational motion breaks some hydrogen bonds, but the molecular pairs do not separate and the hydrogen bonds reform. Thus, hydrogen bonds maintain the water structure in the CNTs, and the water molecules move collectively, decreasing the axial diffusion coefficient and permeation rate.

  20. Carbon nanotube field emitters for nanoklystrons and other high frequency tube sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manohara, H.; Bronikowski, M. J.; Hunt, B. D.; Siegel, P. H.

    2005-01-01

    Traditional submillimeter-wave vacuum tube sources, now available only from the former Soviet Union, have been a mainstay for generating modest amounts (mW) of narrow band (phase lockable) tunable CW RF power at frequencies from 50 to 1200 GHz.

  1. The wave-field from an array of periodic emitters driven simultaneously by a broadband pulse.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Steve; Hill, Samuel; Fan, Yichao; Rowlands, George

    2013-06-01

    The use of phased array methods are commonplace in ultrasonic applications, where controlling the variation of the phase between the narrowband emitters in an array facilitates beam steering and focusing of ultrasonic waves. An approach is presented here whereby emitters of alternating polarity arranged in a one-dimensional array are pulsed simultaneously, and have sufficiently wide, controlled bandwidth to emit a two-dimensional wave. This pulsed approach provides a rapid means of simultaneously covering a region of space with a wave-front, whereby any wave that scatters or reflects off a body to a detector will have a distinct arrival time and frequency. This is a general wave phenomenon with a potential application in radar, sonar, and ultrasound. The key result is that one can obtain a smooth, continuous wave-front emitted from the array, over a large solid angle, whose frequency varies as a function of angle to the array. Analytic and finite element models created to describe this phenomenon have been validated with experimental results using ultrasonic waves in metal samples.

  2. Amorphous-diamond electron emitter

    DOEpatents

    Falabella, Steven

    2001-01-01

    An electron emitter comprising a textured silicon wafer overcoated with a thin (200 .ANG.) layer of nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (a:D-N), which lowers the field below 20 volts/micrometer have been demonstrated using this emitter compared to uncoated or diamond coated emitters wherein the emission is at fields of nearly 60 volts/micrometer. The silicon/nitrogen-doped, amorphous-diamond (Si/a:D-N) emitter may be produced by overcoating a textured silicon wafer with amorphous-diamond (a:D) in a nitrogen atmosphere using a filtered cathodic-arc system. The enhanced performance of the Si/a:D-N emitter lowers the voltages required to the point where field-emission displays are practical. Thus, this emitter can be used, for example, in flat-panel emission displays (FEDs), and cold-cathode vacuum electronics.

  3. Pumping of water through carbon nanotubes by rotating electric field and rotating magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao-Peng; Kong, Gao-Pan; Zhang, Xing; He, Guo-Wei

    2013-09-01

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, we demonstrate pumping of water through a carbon nanotube by applying the combination of a rotating electric field and a rotating magnetic field. The driving force is a Lorentz force generated from the motion of charges in the magnetic field, and the motion is caused by the rotation of the electric field. We find that there exits a linear relationship between the average pumping velocity v and magnetic field strength B, which can be used to control the flux of the continuous unidirectional water flow. This approach is expected to be used in liquid circulation without a pressure gradient.

  4. Quantum transport in carbon nanotube field effect transistors in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jeffrey Dale

    The dissertation is a study of data taken from carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFET). The data presented was taken at two locations, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA and at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. The samples are exposed to very low temperature using dilution refrigerator techniques and placed in high magnetic fields using a superconducting magnet. One of the main focuses will be on the effect an external magnetic field can produce on the transport properties of a CNTFET. Particular attention will be paid to the Kondo effect and Coulomb blockade phenomena. Comparisons are drawn between the observed behavior of the samples studied and with published works on carbon nanotube electronics and traditional semiconductor quantum dots.

  5. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  6. Block Copolymers as Templates for Arrays of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bronikowski, Michael; Hunt, Brian

    2003-01-01

    A method of manufacturing regular arrays of precisely sized, shaped, positioned, and oriented carbon nanotubes has been proposed. Arrays of carbon nanotubes could prove useful in such diverse applications as communications (especially for filtering of signals), biotechnology (for sequencing of DNA and separation of chemicals), and micro- and nanoelectronics (as field emitters and as signal transducers and processors). The method is expected to be suitable for implementation in standard semiconductor-device fabrication facilities.

  7. Numerical Modeling of Ion Dynamics in a Carbon Nanotube Field-Ionized Thruster

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    ION SOURCES Ions may be produced by several methods: photo-ionization, electron bombardment, field ionization, surface ionization, and thermionic ...OF ION DYNAMICS IN A CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD -IONIZED ION THRUSTER by Sarah F. Michael December 2011 Thesis Advisors: Dragoslav Grbovic...December 2011 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Numerical Modeling of Ion Dynamics in a Carbon Nanotube Field

  8. Selective Emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  9. Selective emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1992-01-01

    This invention relates to a small particle selective emitter for converting thermal energy into narrow band radiation with high efficiency. The small particle selective emitter is used in combination with a photovoltaic array to provide a thermal to electrical energy conversion device. An energy conversion apparatus of this type is called a thermo-photovoltaic device. In the first embodiment, small diameter particles of a rare earth oxide are suspended in an inert gas enclosed between concentric cylinders. The rare earth oxides are used because they have the desired property of large emittance in a narrow wavelength band and small emittance outside the band. However, it should be emphasized that it is the smallness of the particles that enhances the radiation property. The small particle selective emitter is surrounded by a photovoltaic array. In an alternate embodiment, the small particle gas mixture is circulated through a thermal energy source. This thermal energy source can be a nuclear reactor, solar receiver, or combustor of a fossil fuel.

  10. Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, FRANCOIS; KIENLE, DIEGO; & STEWART, DEREK

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces. Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices

  11. Electronic Properties of Capped Carbon Nanotubes under an Electric Field: Inhomogeneous Electric-Field Screening Induced by Bond Alternation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanaka, Ayaka; Okada, Susumu

    2013-06-01

    We study the electronic properties of capped carbon nanotubes under an electric field by investigating their electrostatic potentials, total energies, and energy gaps under a parallel electric field, based on the density functional theory with effective screening medium method. We find that, in the capped carbon nanotubes, screening against the external electric field strongly depends on local atomic arrangement due to the inhomogeneous charge distribution arising from its bond alternation induced by the pentagonal rings in the cap region. In the case of armchair nanotubes, we find that the relative permittivity and energy gap between the highest occupied and the lowest unoccupied states oscillate in triple periodicity in their units with respect to the length. The electric field induces the charge redistribution in which the charge accumulation and depletion only occur around the pentagonal rings at or vicinity of the top/bottom of the nanotubes.

  12. Method of synthesizing small-diameter carbon nanotubes with electron field emission properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Jie (Inventor); Du, Chunsheng (Inventor); Qian, Cheng (Inventor); Gao, Bo (Inventor); Qiu, Qi (Inventor); Zhou, Otto Z. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Carbon nanotube material having an outer diameter less than 10 nm and a number of walls less than ten are disclosed. Also disclosed are an electron field emission device including a substrate, an optionally layer of adhesion-promoting layer, and a layer of electron field emission material. The electron field emission material includes a carbon nanotube having a number of concentric graphene shells per tube of from two to ten, an outer diameter from 2 to 8 nm, and a nanotube length greater than 0.1 microns. One method to fabricate carbon nanotubes includes the steps of (a) producing a catalyst containing Fe and Mo supported on MgO powder, (b) using a mixture of hydrogen and carbon containing gas as precursors, and (c) heating the catalyst to a temperature above 950.degree. C. to produce a carbon nanotube. Another method of fabricating an electron field emission cathode includes the steps of (a) synthesizing electron field emission materials containing carbon nanotubes with a number of concentric graphene shells per tube from two to ten, an outer diameter of from 2 to 8 nm, and a length greater than 0.1 microns, (b) dispersing the electron field emission material in a suitable solvent, (c) depositing the electron field emission materials onto a substrate, and (d) annealing the substrate.

  13. Experimental Development of Low-emittance Field-emission Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Lueangaranwong, A.; Buzzard, C.; Divan, R.; Korampally, V.; Piot, P.

    2016-10-10

    Field emission electron sources are capable of extreme brightness when excited by static or time-dependent electro- magnetic fields. We are currently developing a cathode test stand operating in DC mode with possibility to trigger the emission using ultra-short (~ 100-fs) laser pulses. This contribution describes the status of an experiment to investigate field-emission using cathodes under development at NIU in collaboration with the Argonne’s Center for Nanoscale Materials.

  14. Near-field imaging of single walled carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La China, F.; Caselli, N.; Sarti, F.; Biccari, F.; Torrini, U.; Intonti, F.; Vinattieri, A.; Durán-Valdeiglesias, E.; Alonso Ramos, C.; Le Roux, X.; Balestrieri, M.; Filoramo, A.; Vivien, L.; Gurioli, M.

    2016-09-01

    Hybrid systems based on carbon nanotubes emitting in the telecom wavelength range and Si-photonic platforms are promising candidates for developing integrated photonic circuits. Here, we consider semiconducting single walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) emitting around 1300 nm or 1550 nm wavelength. The nanotubes are deposited on quartz substrate for mapping their photoluminescence in hyperspectral near-field microscopy. This method allows for a sub-wavelength resolution in detecting the spatial distribution of the emission of single s-SWNTs at room temperature. Optical signature delocalized over several micrometers is observed, thus denoting the high quality of the produced carbon nanotubes on a wide range of tube diameters. Noteworthy, the presence of both nanotube bundles and distinct s-SWNT chiralities is uncovered.

  15. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    SciTech Connect

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-28

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  16. Effect of substrate material on the growth and field emission characteristics of large-area carbon nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ummethala, Raghunandan; Wenger, Daniela; Tedde, Sandro F.; Täschner, Christine; Leonhardt, Albrecht; Büchner, Bernd; Eckert, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are a promising replacement for tungsten filaments as electron emitters in conventional x-ray sources, owing to their higher aspect ratio, superior mechanical stability, chemical inertness, and high electrical and thermal conductivities. Conditions for realizing the best emission behavior from CNTs have been formulated over the last few years. In this paper, we report the relatively less-investigated factor, namely, the influence of the nature of substrate material on the growth as well as field emission characteristics of large-area multiwalled CNTs for their practical application in medical x-ray sources. We compare the morphology of CNTs on a variety of substrates such as stainless steel, copper, molybdenum, graphite, few-layer graphene, and carbon nanowalls grown by thermal chemical vapor deposition following a simple drop-coating of catalyst. We find that CNTs grown on stainless steel and graphite show the best combination of emission characteristics under pulsed operation mode. These studies are helpful in selecting the optimum substrate material for field emission applications. Ex situ studies on field emission degradation of CNTs are presented towards the end.

  17. The growth of graphite phase on an iridium field electron emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernatskii, D. P.; Pavlov, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The growth of graphite on the surface of an iridium tip in pyrolysis of benzene to give a ribbed crystal has been found by the methods of field electron and desorption microscopy. The formation of a graphite crystal results in the electric field factor increasing. The adsorption of alkali metals on the surface of graphite is accompanied by the intercalation effect.

  18. Electric field dependence of photoluminescence from individual single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasukochi, S.; Murai, T.; Shimada, T.; Chiashi, S.; Maruyama, S.; Kato, Y. K.

    2011-03-01

    Using suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes, we investigate electric field effects on photoluminescence. Trenches are fabricated on Si O2 /Si substrates, and Pt is deposited for electrical contacts. Carbon nanotubes are grown by patterned chemical vapor deposition. These devices operate as back-gate field effect transistors, allowing application of electric fields on as-grown ultraclean nanotubes. Individual suspended carbon nanotubes are identified by taking photoluminescence images using a home-built laser-scanning confocal microscope. After determining the chirality by photoluminescence excitation spectra, we measure gate voltage dependence of photoluminescence. We observe quenching of photoluminescence intensity and shifts of emission wavelength as gate voltages are applied. This work is supported by KAKENHI, Mizuho Foundation for the Promotion of Sciences, Research Foundation for Opto-Science and Technology, TEPCO Research Foundation, SCAT, SCOPE, and Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  19. TaSi2 nanowires: A potential field emitter and interconnect.

    PubMed

    Chueh, Yu-Lun; Ko, Mong-Tzong; Chou, Li-Jen; Chen, Lih-Juann; Wu, Cen-Shawn; Chen, Chii-Dong

    2006-08-01

    TaSi2 nanowires have been synthesized on a Si substrate by annealing NiSi2 films at 950 degrees C in an ambient containing Ta vapor. The nanowires could be grown up to 13 microm in length. Field-emission measurements show that the turn-on field is low at 4-4.5 V/microm and the threshold field is down to 6 V/microm with the field enhancement factor as high as 1800. The metallic TaSi2 nanowires exhibit excellent electrical properties with a remarkable high failure current density of 3 x 10(8) A cm(-2). In addition, effects of annealing temperatures and capability of metal silicide mediation layer on the growth of nanowires are addressed. This simple approach promises future applications in nanoelectronics and nano-optoelectronics.

  20. Plasma-induced field emission study of carbon nanotube cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yi; Xia, Liansheng; Zhang, Huang; Liu, Xingguang; Yang, Anmin; Shi, Jinshui; Zhang, Linwen; Liao, Qingliang; Zhang, Yue

    2011-10-01

    An investigation on the plasma-induced field emission (PFE) properties of a large area carbon nanotube (CNT) cathode on a 2 MeV linear induction accelerator injector is presented. Experimental results show that the cathode is able to emit intense electron beams. Intense electron beams of 14.9-127.8A/cm2 are obtained from the cathode. The CNT cathode desorbs gases from the CNTs during the PFE process. The fast cathode plasma expansion affects the diode perveance. The amount of outgassing is estimated to be 0.06-0.49Pa·L, and the ratio of outgassing and electron are roughly calculated to be within the range of 170-350 atoms per electron. The effect of the outgassing is analyzed, and the outgassing mass spectrum of the CNT cathode has been studied during the PFE. There is a significant desorption of CO2, N2(CO), and H2 gases, which plays an important role during the PFE process. All the experiments demonstrate that the outgassing plays an important role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Moreover, the characteristic turn-on time of the CNT cathode was measured to be 39 ns.

  1. Fabrication of co-axial field emitter tips for scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Song, Mi Yeon; Robinson, Alex P G; Palmer, Richard E

    2010-04-16

    We report on the fabrication of a co-axial tip for application to scanning probe energy loss spectroscopy (SPELS). The device consists of a 23.3 microm tall tip on a 76 microm tall mesa with a multilayer Si/Au/HfO(2)/Au structure; the outer Au and HfO(2) layers are stripped from the apex of the tip. The inner Au layer is used as a field emitting layer and the outer Au layer is grounded to screen the electric field between the tip and the substrate. The co-axial tip shows comparable field emission characteristics to electrochemically etched tungsten tips. The SPELS spectra of graphite obtained with the new tips show pi and sigma plasmon peaks and intense secondary electron emission peaks. It is anticipated that such co-axial tips will present a significant advantage for future angular resolved SPELS measurements.

  2. Electric field effect on (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Moghimi, Masoumeh

    2012-09-01

    Structural, electronic, and electrical responses of the H-capped (6,0) zigzag single-walled aluminum nitride nanotube was studied under the parallel and transverse electric fields with strengths 0-140 × 10(-4) a.u. by using density functional calculations. Geometry optimizations were carried out at the B3LYP/6-31G* level of theory using a locally modified version of the GAMESS electronic structure program. The dipole moments, atomic charge variations, and total energy of the (6,0) zigzag AlNNT show increases with increase in the applied external electric field strengths. The length, tip diameters, electronic spatial extent, and molecular volume of the nanotube do not significantly change with increasing electric field strength. The energy gap of the nanotube decreases with increases of the electric field strength and its reactivity is increased. Increase of the ionization potential, electron affinity, chemical potential, electrophilicity, and HOMO and LUMO in the nanotube with increase of the applied parallel electric field strengths shows that the parallel field has a much stronger interaction with the nanotube with respect to the transverse electric field strengths. Analysis of the parameters indicates that the properties of AlNNTs can be controlled by the proper external electric field.

  3. Nonaligned carbon nanotubes anchored on porous alumina: formation, process modeling, gas-phase analysis, and field-emission properties.

    PubMed

    Lysenkov, Dmitry; Engstler, Jörg; Dangwal, Arti; Popp, Alexander; Müller, Günter; Schneider, Jörg J; Janardhanan, Vinod M; Deutschmann, Olaf; Strauch, Peter; Ebert, Volker; Wolfrum, Jürgen

    2007-06-01

    We have developed a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process for the catalytic growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), anchored in a comose-type structure on top of porous alumina substrates. The mass-flow conditions of precursor and carrier gases and temperature distributions in the CVD reactor were studied by transient computational fluid dynamic simulation. Molecular-beam quadrupole mass spectroscopy (MB-QMS) has been used to analyze the gas phase during ferrocene CVD under reaction conditions (1073 K) in the boundary layer near the substrate. Field-emission (FE) properties of the nonaligned CNTs were measured for various coverages and pore diameters of the alumina. Samples with more dense CNT populations provided emitter-number densities up to 48,000 cm(-2) at an electric field of 6 V microm(-1). Samples with fewer but well-anchored CNTs in 22-nm pores yielded the highest current densities. Up to 83 mA cm(-2) at 7 V microm(-1) in dc mode and more than 200 mA cm(-2) at 11 V microm(-1) in pulsed diode operation have been achieved from a cathode size of 24 mm2.

  4. Applications and production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafner, Jason Howard

    Carbon nanotubes, a recently discovered form of carbon fiber with structural perfection similar to that of a fullerene molecule, have interesting electronic, chemical and mechanical properties due to their size and structure. Nanotubes have great potential as a bulk material for strong, lightweight composite materials, and as individual nano-scale tools or devices. Initial work on applications with individual multiwalled nanotubes as field emission sources and scanning force microscopy tips is described. The nanotubes display intriguing field emission behavior interpreted as the nanotube unraveling under the influence of the electric field. The unraveling process is believed to result in facile field emission from linear atomic carbon chains at the end of the nanotube. Such atomic wires represent an excellent field emitter. The work on multiwalled nanotube SFM tips was equally encouraging. The high aspect ratio of the nanotube allows it to image deep trenches inaccessible to commercially available Si pyramidal tips, and it reduces the interaction with the ambient water layer on the sample which perturbs image quality. The most remarkable advantage of nanotube SFM tips is a result of their mechanical properties. It was found that the nanotubes will remain rigid during normal imaging, but conveniently buckle to the side if circumstances arise which create large forces known to damage the tip and sample. This feature makes the tip more durable than Si tips, and is especially important for soft biological samples. In these two applications, as well as others, and in the measurements of novel nanotube properties, high quality, small diameter (0.5 to 2 nm) diameter single-walled nanotubes are most interesting. Such material can be produced slowly and in small amounts by catalytic arc vaporization and catalytic laser vaporization of graphite. It is well known that nanotubes can be mass produced by catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD), but the product consists only

  5. Field-Flow Fractionation of Carbon Nanotubes and Related Materials

    SciTech Connect

    John P. Selegue

    2011-11-17

    During the grant period, we carried out FFF studies of carbonaceous soot, single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes, carbon nano-onions and polyoxometallates. FFF alone does not provide enough information to fully characterize samples, so our suite of characterization techniques grew to include light scattering (especially Photon Correlation Spectroscopy), scanning and transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis and spectroscopic methods. We developed convenient techniques to deposit and examine minute FFF fractions by electron microscopy. In collaboration with Arthur Cammers (University of Kentucky), we used Flow Field-Flow Fractionation (Fl-FFF) to monitor the solution-phase growth of keplerates, a class of polyoxometallate (POM) nanoparticles. We monitored the evolution of Mo-POM nanostructures over the course of weeks by by using flow field-flow fractionation and corroborated the nanoparticle structures by using transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Total molybdenum in the solution and precipitate phases was monitored by using inductively coupled plasma analyses, and total Mo-POM concentration by following the UV-visible spectra of the solution phase. We observe crystallization-driven formation of (Mo132) keplerate and solution phase-driven evolution of structurally related nanoscopic species (3-60 nm). FFF analyses of other classes of materials were less successful. Attempts to analyze platelets of layered materials, including exfoliated graphite (graphene) and TaS2 and MoS2, were disappointing. We were not able to optimize flow conditions for the layered materials. The metal sulfides react with the aqueous carrier liquid and settle out of suspension quickly because of their high density.

  6. In Situ Transmission Electron Microscope Observation of Carbon Nanotubes in Electric Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okai, Makoto; Fujieda, Tadashi; Hidaka, Kishio; Muneyoshi, Takahiko; Yaguchi, Tomio

    2005-04-01

    Transmission electron microscope is used to examine the movements of carbon nanotubes in electric fields. Carbon nanotubes lying along the surface of the cathode electrode start to move into alignment with the electric field vector when the field strength reaches 0.5 V/μm and become increasingly well-aligned with the vector as field strength increases. The carbon nanotubes return to their original positions when the electric field strength returns to zero. We also examine the abrupt breakdown of carbon nanotubes when the electric field is maintained at 5.5 V/μm. The corresponding breakdown emission current density is estimated as 3.4× 107 A/cm2. The distance between the nearest nanotubes standing to align with the electric field vector is approximately 2 μm. This fact means that emission site density could be increased up to 3× 107 points/cm2 (which corresponds to one tube for each 2 μm square).

  7. Electrokinetics of scalable, electric-field-assisted fabrication of vertically aligned carbon-nanotube/polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellano, Richard J.; Akin, Cevat; Giraldo, Gabriel; Kim, Sangil; Fornasiero, Francesco; Shan, Jerry W.

    2015-06-01

    Composite thin films incorporating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VACNTs) offer promise for a variety of applications where the vertical alignment of the CNTs is critical to meet performance requirements, e.g., highly permeable membranes, thermal interfaces, dry adhesives, and films with anisotropic electrical conductivity. However, current VACNT fabrication techniques are complex and difficult to scale up. Here, we describe a solution-based, electric-field-assisted approach as a cost-effective and scalable method to produce large-area VACNT composites. Multiwall-carbon nanotubes are dispersed in a polymeric matrix, aligned with an alternating-current (AC) electric field, and electrophoretically concentrated to one side of the thin film with a direct-current (DC) component to the electric field. This approach enables the fabrication of highly concentrated, individually aligned nanotube composites from suspensions of very dilute ( ϕ = 4 × 10 - 4 ) volume fraction. We experimentally investigate the basic electrokinetics of nanotube alignment under AC electric fields, and show that simple models can adequately predict the rate and degree of nanotube alignment using classical expressions for the induced dipole moment, hydrodynamic drag, and the effects of Brownian motion. The composite AC + DC field also introduces complex fluid motion associated with AC electro-osmosis and the electrochemistry of the fluid/electrode interface. We experimentally probe the electric-field parameters behind these electrokinetic phenomena, and demonstrate, with suitable choices of processing parameters, the ability to scalably produce large-area composites containing VACNTs at number densities up to 1010 nanotubes/cm2. This VACNT number density exceeds that of previous electric-field-fabricated composites by an order of magnitude, and the surface-area coverage of the 40 nm VACNTs is comparable to that of chemical-vapor-deposition-grown arrays of smaller-diameter nanotubes.

  8. Breakdown voltage reduction by field emission in multi-walled carbon nanotubes based ionization gas sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Saheed, M. Shuaib M.; Muti Mohamed, Norani; Arif Burhanudin, Zainal

    2014-03-24

    Ionization gas sensors using vertically aligned multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are demonstrated. The sharp tips of the nanotubes generate large non-uniform electric fields at relatively low applied voltage. The enhancement of the electric field results in field emission of electrons that dominates the breakdown mechanism in gas sensor with gap spacing below 14 μm. More than 90% reduction in breakdown voltage is observed for sensors with MWCNT and 7 μm gap spacing. Transition of breakdown mechanism, dominated by avalanche electrons to field emission electrons, as decreasing gap spacing is also observed and discussed.

  9. Emittance compensation in split photoinjectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floettmann, Klaus

    2017-01-01

    The compensation of correlated emittance contributions is of primary importance to optimize the performance of high brightness photoinjectors. While only extended numerical simulations can capture the complex beam dynamics of space-charge-dominated beams in sufficient detail to optimize a specific injector layout, simplified models are required to gain a deeper understanding of the involved dynamics, to guide the optimization procedure, and to interpret experimental results. In this paper, a slice envelope model for the emittance compensation process in a split photoinjector is presented. The emittance term is included in the analytical solution of the beam envelope in a drift, which is essential to take the emittance contribution due to a beam size mismatch into account. The appearance of two emittance minima in the drift is explained, and the matching into the booster cavity is discussed. A comparison with simulation results points out effects which are not treated in the envelope model, such as overfocusing and field nonlinearities.

  10. Time-resolved far-field analysis of a high power single emitter laser diode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cornwell, Donald M., Jr.; Unge, Glenn L.

    1992-01-01

    A system was developed which is capable of measuring the time-resolved far-field radiation patterns from a high-power semiconductor laser under intensity modulated conditions. Angular steering of the fundamental spatial mode was observed, with pointing variations as large as 0.5 deg, or 7.5 percent of the beamwidth, during the time of the optical pulse. The variations in pointing angle were directly related to gradients in the transverse index profile of the laser, which may oscillate based on lateral spatial hole burning of the gain and carrier density.

  11. Electromagnetic near-field interactions of a dipolar emitter with metal and metamaterial nanoslabs

    SciTech Connect

    Hakkarainen, Timo; Setaelae, Tero; Friberg, Ari T.

    2011-09-15

    We investigate the emission properties of a polarizable point dipole placed within a subwavelength distance from a silver or a slightly absorbing, negative-index metamaterial nanoslab. Using electromagnetic theory we show that in the immediate vicinity of the slab the dipole-slab interaction prevents the dipole from radiating. For the metamaterial slab close to the perfect-lens arrangement, the interaction is relatively weak and of short range. In particular, a region exists in the near zone of the metamaterial slab where the dipole emission is not disturbed by the interaction, and a bright intensity distribution of subwavelength width is created on the opposite side of the slab. This suggests that a low-loss metamaterial slab can act as a near-field imaging device which does not disturb the object. For the silver slab the interaction is stronger and it reaches over the near-field zone, adversely influencing the imaging capabilities in terms of brightness and resolution. The results are important for the development of metal and metamaterial superlenses.

  12. EMITTANCE COMPENSATION FOR MAGNETIZED BEAMS

    SciTech Connect

    KEWISCH,J.; CHANG, X.

    2007-06-25

    Emittance compensation is a well established technique for minimizing the emittance of an electron beam from a RF photo-cathode gun. Longitudinal slices of a bunch have a small emittance, but due to the longitudinal charge distribution of the bunch and time dependent RF fields they are not focused in the same way, so that the direction of their phase ellipses diverges in phase space and the projected emittance is much larger. Emittance compensation reverses the divergence. At the location where the slopes of the phase ellipses coincide the beam is accelerated, so that the space charge forces are reduced. A recipe for emittance compensation is given in. For magnetized beams (where the angular momentum is non-zero) such emittance compensation is not sufficient because variations in the slice radius lead to variations in the angular speed and therefore to an increase of emittance in the rotating game. We describe a method and tools for a compensation that includes the beam magnetization.

  13. Flexible Field Emitter for X-ray Generation by Implanting CNTs into Nickel Foil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yan; Ding, Guifu

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports on a flexible Ni micro wire with CNTs embedded into its surface. By using micromachining technology, for the first time, we could implant nanoscale materials into micro-scale metal substrate at room temperature. Thanks to the effective direct contact and the strong interactions between CNTs and the substrate, field emission current of 1.11 mA (current density of 22.2 mA/cm2) could be achieved from the micro wire. Moreover, the wire shows excellent mechanical properties for large amplitude bending, which is beneficial for geometric designing. To check the practical application of the wire, a simplified X-ray imaging system was set up by modifying a conventional tube. The gray shade that appears on the sensitive film after being exposed to the radiation confirms the X-ray generation.

  14. Extraction of emission parameters for large-area field emitters, using a technically complete Fowler-Nordheim-type equation.

    PubMed

    Forbes, Richard G

    2012-03-09

    In papers on cold field electron emission from large-area field emitters (LAFEs), it has become widespread practice to publish a misleading Fowler-Nordheim-type (FN-type) equation. This equation over-predicts the LAFE-average current density by a large highly variable factor thought to usually lie between 10(3) and 10(9). This equation, although often referenced to FN's 1928 paper, is a simplified equation used in undergraduate teaching, does not apply unmodified to LAFEs and does not appear in the 1928 paper. Technological LAFE papers often do not cite any theoretical work more recent than 1928, and often do not comment on the discrepancy between theory and experiment. This usage has occurred widely, in several high-profile American and UK applied-science journals (including Nanotechnology), and in various other places. It does not inhibit practical LAFE development, but can give a misleading impression of potential LAFE performance to non-experts. This paper shows how the misleading equation can be replaced by a conceptually complete FN-type equation that uses three high-level correction factors. One of these, or a combination of two of them, may be useful as an additional measure of LAFE quality; this paper describes a method for estimating factor values using experimental data and discusses when it can be used. Suggestions are made for improved engineering practice in reporting LAFE results. Some of these should help to prevent situations arising whereby an equation appearing in high-profile applied-science journals is used to support statements that an engineering regulatory body might deem to involve professional negligence.

  15. Optimizing the Field Emission Properties of ZnO Nanowire Arrays by Precisely Tuning the Population Density and Application in Large-Area Gated Field Emitter Arrays.

    PubMed

    Li, Yufeng; Zhang, Zhipeng; Zhang, Guofu; Zhao, Long; Deng, Shaozhi; Xu, Ningsheng; Chen, Jun

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are prepared for application in large area gated field emitter arrays (FEAs). By oxidizing Al-coated Zn films, the population density of the ZnO nanowires was tuned precisely by varying the thickness of the Al film. The nanowire density decreased linearly as the thickness of the Al film increased. Optimal field emission properties with a turn-on field of 6.21 V μm(-1) and current fluctuations less than 1% are obtained. This can be explained by the minimized screening effect and good electrical conductivity of the back-contact layer. The mechanism responsible for the linear variation in the nanowire density is investigated in detail. Addressable FEAs using the optimal ZnO nanowire cathodes were fabricated and applied in a display device. Good gate-controlled characteristics and the display of video images are realized. The results indicate that ZnO nanowires could be applied in large area FEAs.

  16. Three-dimensional electromagnetic breathers in carbon nanotubes with the field inhomogeneity along their axes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Fedorov, Eduard G.; Belonenko, Mikhail B.

    2013-10-01

    We study the propagation of extremely short electromagnetic three-dimensional bipolar pulses in an array of semiconductor carbon nanotubes. The heterogeneity of the pulse field along the axis of the nanotubes is accounted for the first time. The evolution of the electromagnetic field and the charge density of the sample are described by Maxwell's equations supplemented by the continuity equation. Our analysis reveals for the first time the possibility of propagation of three-dimensional electromagnetic breathers in CNTs arrays. Specifically, we found that the propagation of short electromagnetic pulse induces a redistribution of the electron density in the sample.

  17. [Application of field-effect transistor based on carbon nanotube in biosensors].

    PubMed

    Yang, Danna; Wang, Lin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Sai

    2011-12-01

    With the emergence of avian flu, influence A virus and other diseases, the development of rapid, real-time, label-free biological sensors has become increasingly significant at the early detection and clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have unique one-dimensional structure, special electrical properties, good biocompatibility and size compatibility, so that the SWNTs have great potential uses in the biosensor fields due to these advantages. This article reviews recent examples of carbon nanotubes field-effect transistor (CNTFET) as a label-free biosensors for detecting a variety of biological macromolecules, such as protein, enzyme, DNA, cancer, virus, carbohydrate and so on.

  18. Brownian Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekov, Roumen

    2016-06-01

    A Brownian harmonic oscillator, which dissipates energy either by friction or via emission of electromagnetic radiation, is considered. This Brownian emitter is driven by the surrounding thermo-quantum fluctuations, which are theoretically described by the fluctuation-dissipation theorem. It is shown how the Abraham-Lorentz force leads to dependence of the half-width on the peak frequency of the oscillator amplitude spectral density. It is found that for the case of a charged particle moving in vacuum at zero temperature, its root-mean-square velocity fluctuation is a universal constant, equal to roughly 1/18 of the speed of light. The relevant Fokker-Planck and Smoluchowski equations are also derived.

  19. Large and stable emission current from synthesized carbon nanotube/fiber network

    SciTech Connect

    Di, Yunsong; Xiao, Mei; Zhang, Xiaobing Wang, Qilong; Li, Chen; Lei, Wei; Cui, Yunkang

    2014-02-14

    In order to obtain a large and stable electron field emission current, the carbon nanotubes have been synthesized on carbon fibers by cold wall chemical vapor deposition method. In the hierarchical nanostructures, carbon fibers are entangled together to form a conductive network, it could provide excellent electron transmission and adhesion property between electrode and emitters, dispersed clusters of carbon nanotubes with smaller diameters have been synthesized on the top of carbon fibers as field emitters, this kind of emitter distribution could alleviate electrostatic shielding effect and protect emitters from being wholly destroyed. Field emission properties of this kind of carbon nanotube/fiber network have been tested, up to 30 mA emission current at an applied electric field of 6.4 V/μm was emitted from as-prepared hierarchical nanostructures. Small current degradation at large emission current output by DC power operation indicated that carbon nanotube/fiber network could be a promising candidate for field emission electron source.

  20. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli; Fabbri, Jason D.; Melosh, Nicholas A.; Hussain, Zahid; Shen, Zhi-Xun

    2013-10-29

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  1. Diamondoid monolayers as electron emitters

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Wanli [El Cerrito, CA; Fabbri, Jason D [San Francisco, CA; Melosh, Nicholas A [Menlo Park, CA; Hussain, Zahid [Orinda, CA; Shen, Zhi-Xun [Stanford, CA

    2012-04-10

    Provided are electron emitters based upon diamondoid monolayers, preferably self-assembled higher diamondoid monolayers. High intensity electron emission has been demonstrated employing such diamondoid monolayers, particularly when the monolayers are comprised of higher diamondoids. The application of such diamondoid monolayers can alter the band structure of substrates, as well as emit monochromatic electrons, and the high intensity electron emissions can also greatly improve the efficiency of field-effect electron emitters as applied to industrial and commercial applications.

  2. TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors and their application as humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Fengxia; Luo, Lin-Bao; Tsang, Chun-Kwan; Zheng, Lingxia; Cheng, Hua; Li, Yang Yang

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes fabricated by directly anodizing a Ti foil followed by ultrasonification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes used to construct field effect transistors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical properties measured from the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitive response of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors to water vapor. -- Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are the building units of various devices of energy- and environment-related applications and the property studies of individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are important to understand and improve the performance of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes-based devices. Here we report the electrical property study of individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes enabled by the construction of field effect transistors based on individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. It is found that individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibit typical n-type electrical conduction characteristics, with electron mobility of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V s at V{sub ds} = 1 V, and electron concentration of 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Moreover, the on-off ratio of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors is as high as 10{sup 3}. Humidity sensing test shows the sensitive response of the individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes to water vapor.

  3. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  4. Electrostatic field-exposed water in nanotube at constant axial pressure

    PubMed Central

    He, Yuchi; Sun, Gang; Koga, Kenichiro; Xu, Limei

    2014-01-01

    Water confined within nanoscale geometries under external field has many interesting properties which is very important for its application in biological processes and engineering. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of external fields on polarization and structure as well as phase transformations of water confined within carbon nanotubes. We find that dipoles of water molecules tend to align along external field in nanoscale cylindrical confinement. Such alignment directly leads to the longitudinal electrostriction and cross-sectional dilation of water in nanotube. It also influences the stability of ice structures. As the electrostatic field strengthens, the confined water undergoes phase transitions from a prism structure to a helical one to a single chain as the electrostatic field strengthens. These results imply a rich phase diagram of the confined water due to the presence of external electriostatic field, which can be of importance for the industrial applications in nanopores. PMID:25318649

  5. Effect of oxygen plasma on field emission characteristics of single-wall carbon nanotubes grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, Avshish; Parveen, Shama; Husain, Samina; Ali, Javid; Zulfequar, Mohammad; Harsh; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-02-28

    Field emission properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) grown on iron catalyst film by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition system were studied in diode configuration. The results were analysed in the framework of Fowler-Nordheim theory. The grown SWCNTs were found to be excellent field emitters, having emission current density higher than 20 mA/cm{sup 2} at a turn-on field of 1.3 V/μm. The as grown SWCNTs were further treated with Oxygen (O{sub 2}) plasma for 5 min and again field emission characteristics were measured. The O{sub 2} plasma treated SWCNTs have shown dramatic improvement in their field emission properties with emission current density of 111 mA/cm{sup 2} at a much lower turn on field of 0.8 V/μm. The as grown as well as plasma treated SWCNTs were also characterized by various techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy, high resolution transmission electron microscopy, Raman spectroscopy, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy before and after O{sub 2} plasma treatment and the findings are being reported in this paper.

  6. Biosensors based on carbon nanotube-network field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-01-01

    We describe in detail the different steps involved in the construction of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The nonspecific binding of proteins or other interferences are avoided by covering the nonadsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The CNTFET is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  7. Angular distribution of field emitted electrons from vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobucci, S.; Fratini, M.; Rizzo, A.; Scarinci, F.; Zhang, Y.; Mann, M.; Li, C.; Milne, W. I.; El Gomati, M. M.; Lagomarsino, S.; Stefani, G.

    2012-01-01

    Angular field emission (FE) properties of vertically aligned carbon nanotube arrays have been measured on samples grown by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition and characterized by scanning electron microscope and I-V measurements. These properties determine the angular divergence of electron beams, a crucial parameter in order to obtain high brilliance FE based cathodes. From angular distributions of the electron beam transmitted through extraction grids of different mesh size and by using ray-tracing simulations, the maximum emission angle from carbon nanotube tips has been determined to be about ± 30° around the tube main axis.

  8. Magnetic-Field Dependence of Tunnel Couplings in Carbon Nanotube Quantum Dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Grap, S.; Paaske, J.; Flensberg, K.; Andergassen, S.; Meden, V.; Jørgensen, H. I.; Muraki, K.; Fujisawa, T.

    2012-04-01

    By means of sequential and cotunneling spectroscopy, we study the tunnel couplings between metallic leads and individual levels in a carbon nanotube quantum dot. The levels are ordered in shells consisting of two doublets with strong- and weak-tunnel couplings, leading to gate-dependent level renormalization. By comparison to a one- and two-shell model, this is shown to be a consequence of disorder-induced valley mixing in the nanotube. Moreover, a parallel magnetic field is shown to reduce this mixing and thus suppress the effects of tunnel renormalization.

  9. Triode carbon nanotube field emission display using barrier rib structure and manufacturing method thereof

    DOEpatents

    Han, In-taek; Kim, Jong-min

    2003-01-01

    A triode carbon nanotube field emission display (FED) using a barrier rib structure and a manufacturing method thereof are provided. In a triode carbon nanotube FED employing barrier ribs, barrier ribs are formed on cathode lines by a screen printing method, a mesh structure is mounted on the barrier ribs, and a spacer is inserted between the barrier ribs through slots of the mesh structure, thereby stably fixing the mesh structure and the spacer within a FED panel due to support by the barrier ribs.

  10. Anisotropic high-field terahertz response of free-standing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byounghwak; Mousavian, Ali; Paul, Michael J.; Thompson, Zachary J.; Stickel, Andrew D.; McCuen, Dalton R.; Jang, Eui Yun; Kim, Yong Hyup; Kyoung, Jisoo; Kim, Dai-Sik; Lee, Yun-Shik

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate that unidirectionally aligned, free-standing multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit highly anisotropic linear and nonlinear terahertz (THz) responses. For the polarization parallel to the CNT axis, strong THz pulses induce nonlinear absorption in the quasi-one-dimensional conducting media, while no nonlinear effect is observed in the perpendicular polarization configuration. Time-resolved measurements of transmitted THz pulses and a theoretical analysis of the data reveal that intense THz fields enhance permittivity in carbon nanotubes by generating charge carriers.

  11. Growth and field emission of carbon nanotubes on electroplated Ni catalyst coated on glass substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaemyung; No, Kwangsoo; Lee, Cheol Jin

    2001-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are grown on Ni catalyst coated on soda-lime glass substrates using chemical vapor deposition of C2H2 gas at 550 °C. Ni film is coated on the surface of Ag film using the electroplating method. Ni was etched by ammonia (NH3) gas in order to form nanometer sized catalytic particles before carbon nanotube growth. Pd film is applied as a gas activator to decrease the growth temperature of carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes grown on Ni catalyst particles showed a multiwalled structure with defective graphite sheets at the wall. The turn-on voltage was about 2.8 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 μA/cm2, and the threshold voltage was about 4.0 V/μm with an emission current density of 10 mA/cm2. The Fowler-Nordheim plot showed a good linear fit, indicating that the emission current of carbon nanotubes follows Fowler-Nordheim behavior. The calculated field enhancement factor was 2850.

  12. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers.

    PubMed

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S; Set, Sze Y

    2007-01-15

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  13. Carbon nanotube mode lockers with enhanced nonlinearity via evanescent field interaction in D-shaped fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Yong-Won; Yamashita, Shinji; Goh, Chee S.; Set, Sze Y.

    2007-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel passive mode-locking scheme for pulsed lasers enhanced by the interaction of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with the evanescent field of propagating light in a D-shaped optical fiber. The scheme features all-fiber operation as well as a long lateral interaction length, which guarantees a strong nonlinear effect from the nanotubes. Mode locking is achieved with less than 30% of the CNTs compared with the amount of nanotubes used for conventional schemes. Our method also ensures the preservation of the original morphology of the individual CNTs. The demonstrated pulsed laser with our CNT mode locker has a repetition rate of 5.88 MHz and a temporal pulse width of 470 fs.

  14. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, M. M.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at V{sub dd} = 1 V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60 mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when V{sub dd} is scaled down to 0.5 V.

  15. Emittance Growth in the NLCTA First Chicane

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Yipeng; Adolphsen, Chris; /SLAC

    2011-08-19

    In this paper, the emittance growth in the NLCTA (Next Linear Collider Test Accelerator) first chicane region is evaluated by simulation studies. It is demonstrated that the higher order fields of the chicane dipole magnet and the dipole corrector magnet (which is attached on the quadrupoles) are the main contributions for the emittance growth, especially for the case with a large initial emittance ({gamma}{epsilon}{sub 0} = 5 {micro}m for instance). These simulation results agree with the experimental observations.

  16. Multiscale model of heat dissipation mechanisms during field emission from carbon nanotube fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahay, M.; Zhu, W.; Fairchild, S.; Murray, P. T.; Back, T. C.; Gruen, G. J.

    2016-01-01

    A multiscale model of field emission (FE) from carbon nanotube fibers (CNFs) is developed, which takes into account Joule heating within the fiber and radiative cooling and the Nottingham effect at the tip of the individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the array located at the fiber tip. The model predicts the fraction of CNTs being destroyed as a function of the applied external electric field and reproduces many experimental features observed in some recently investigated CNFs, such as order of magnitude of the emission current (mA range), low turn on electric field (fraction of V/μm), deviation from pure Fowler-Nordheim behavior at large applied electric field, hysteresis of the FE characteristics, and a spatial variation of the temperature along the CNF axis with a maximum close to its tip of a few hundred °C.

  17. Multiscale model of heat dissipation mechanisms during field emission from carbon nanotube fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Cahay, M.; Zhu, W.; Fairchild, S.; Murray, P. T.; Back, T. C.; Gruen, G. J.

    2016-01-18

    A multiscale model of field emission (FE) from carbon nanotube fibers (CNFs) is developed, which takes into account Joule heating within the fiber and radiative cooling and the Nottingham effect at the tip of the individual carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the array located at the fiber tip. The model predicts the fraction of CNTs being destroyed as a function of the applied external electric field and reproduces many experimental features observed in some recently investigated CNFs, such as order of magnitude of the emission current (mA range), low turn on electric field (fraction of V/μm), deviation from pure Fowler-Nordheim behavior at large applied electric field, hysteresis of the FE characteristics, and a spatial variation of the temperature along the CNF axis with a maximum close to its tip of a few hundred  °C.

  18. Carbon Nanotube Field Emission Devices With Integrated Gate for High Current Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-08-01

    exhibits an edge effect and in fact, shows a slight enhancement. A baseline structure, consisting of two parallel plates with the same applied field and...electrostatics the addition of the gate electrode will not reduce the edge effect for the CNT pillars. As a result of this it is expected that the voltage...field emission from an individual aligned carbon nanotube bundle enhanced by edge effect ", Appl. Phys. Lett., 90, 153108, 2007. [6] Killian, J. L

  19. Emittance Theory for Thin Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin films of high temperature garnet materials such as yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) doped with rare earths are currently being investigated as selective emitters. This paper presents a radiative transfer analysis of the thin film emitter. From this analysis the emitter efficiency and power density are calculated. Results based on measured extinction coefficients for erbium-YAG and holmium-YAG are presented. These results indicated that emitter efficiencies of 50 percent and power densities of several watts/sq cm are attainable at moderate temperatures (less than 1750 K).

  20. High performance field emission and Nottingham effect observed from carbon nanotube yarn

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Young Chul; Kang, Jun-Tae; Park, Sora; Go, Eunsol; Jeon, Hyojin; Kim, Jae-Woo; Jeong, Jin-Woo; Park, Kyung-Ho; Song, Yoon-Ho

    2017-02-01

    Vertically aligned CNTs were synthesized on a four inch wafer, followed by the preparation of a CNT yarn. The yarn emitter was found to have an extremely high field enhancement factor, which was confirmed to have originated from multi-stage effect. In addition to superb field emission characteristics, the energy exchange during field emission, called Nottingham effect, was observed from the CNT yarn emitter. A CNT yarn was attached to the thermistor whose resistance depends on temperature. Then, the change of resistance was monitored during the field emission, which enabled us to calculate the energy exchange. It was found that the observed heating originated from both Nottingham and Joule heating. Nottingham heating was dominant at low current region while Joule heating became larger contribution at high current region. Very large Nottingham region of up to 33.35 mA was obtained, which is due presumably to the high performance field emission characteristics of a CNT yarn. This is believed to be an important observation for developing reliable field emission devices with suppressed Joule heating effect.

  1. Carbon nanotube growth for field-emission cathodes from graphite paste using Ar-ion bombardment

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Charles E.; Glembocki, Orest J.; Wang Yu; Prokes, Sharka M.

    2005-04-18

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MW-CNT) have been synthesized from solid-phase graphite. The graphite is deposited as a thick-film paste and irradiated with a 1.2 keV flood Ar-ion beam, transforming the graphite surface to a composite of MW-CNT embedded in the graphite matrix. Micro-Raman measurements have verified that the nanotubes are metallic in nature. The technique was used to make printed field-emission cathodes. Emission from these cathodes demonstrates Fowler-Nordheim tunneling characteristics. The irradiated film emits at an extraction field of 5.0 V/{mu}m, which is less than one-sixth of the minimum extraction field of the nonirradiated graphite film, and exhibit lower noise and greater emission uniformity.

  2. MUSE integral-field spectroscopy towards the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063. II. Properties of low luminosity Lyman α emitters at z > 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karman, W.; Caputi, K. I.; Caminha, G. B.; Gronke, M.; Grillo, C.; Balestra, I.; Rosati, P.; Vanzella, E.; Coe, D.; Dijkstra, M.; Koekemoer, A. M.; McLeod, D.; Mercurio, A.; Nonino, M.

    2017-02-01

    In spite of their conjectured importance for the Epoch of Reionization, the properties of low-mass galaxies are currently still very much under debate. In this article, we study the stellar and gaseous properties of faint, low-mass galaxies at z > 3. We observed the Frontier Fields cluster Abell S1063 with MUSE over a 2 arcmin2 field, and combined integral-field spectroscopy with gravitational lensing to perform a blind search for intrinsically faint Lyα emitters (LAEs). We determined in total the redshift of 172 galaxies of which 14 are lensed LAEs at z = 3-6.1. We increased the number of spectroscopically-confirmed multiple-image families from 6 to 17 and updated our gravitational-lensing model accordingly. The lensing-corrected Lyα luminosities are with LLyα ≲ 1041.5 erg/s among the lowest for spectroscopically confirmed LAEs at any redshift. We used expanding gaseous shell models to fit the Lyα line profile, and find low column densities and expansion velocities. This is, to our knowledge, the first time that gaseous properties of such faint galaxies at z ≳ 3 are reported. We performed SED modelling to broadband photometry from the U band through the infrared to determine the stellar properties of these LAEs. The stellar masses are very low (106-8M⊙ ), and are accompanied by very young ages of 1-100 Myr. The very high specific star-formation rates ( 100 Gyr-1) are characteristic of starburst galaxies, and we find that most galaxies will double their stellar mass in ≲20 Myr. The UV-continuum slopes β are low in our sample, with β < -2 for all galaxies with M⋆ < 108M⊙. We conclude that our low-mass galaxies at 3 < z < 6 are forming stars at higher rates when correcting for stellar mass effects than seen locally or in more massive galaxies. The young stellar populations with high star-formation rates and low H i column densities lead to continuum slopes and LyC-escape fractions expected for a scenario where low mass galaxies reionise the Universe.

  3. Recent progress in nanostructured next-generation field emission devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Gaurav; Lahiri, Indranil

    2014-08-01

    Field emission has been known to mankind for more than a century, and extensive research in this field for the last 40-50 years has led to development of exciting applications such as electron sources, miniature x-ray devices, display materials, etc. In the last decade, large-area field emitters were projected as an important material to revolutionize healthcare and medical devices, and space research. With the advent of nanotechnology and advancements related to carbon nanotubes, field emitters are demonstrating highly enhanced performance and novel applications. Next-generation emitters need ultra-high emission current density, high brightness, excellent stability and reproducible performance. Novel design considerations and application of new materials can lead to achievement of these capabilities. This article presents an overview of recent developments in this field and their effects on improved performance of field emitters. These advancements are demonstrated to hold great potential for application in next-generation field emission devices.

  4. The Effect of Hydrophobin Protein on Conductive Properties of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: First Study on Sensing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yotprayoonsakl, Peerapong; Szilvay, Géza R; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Ahlskog, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobin is a surface active protein having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional domains which has previously been used for functionalization and solubilization of graphene and carbon nanotubes. In this work, field-effect transistors based on single nanotubes have been employed for electronic detection of hydrophobin protein in phosphate buffer solution. Individual nanotubes, single- and multiwalled, are characterized by atomic force microscopy after being immersed in protein solution, showing a relatively dense coverage with hydrophobin. We have studied aspects such as nanotube length (0.3-1.2 µm) and the hysteresis effect in the gate voltage dependent conduction. When measured in ambient condition after the exposure to hydrophobin, the resistance increase has a strong dependence on the nanotube length, which we ascribe to mobility degradation and localization effects. The change could be exceptionally large when measured in-situ in solution and at suitable gate voltage conditions, which is shown to relate to the different mechanism behind the hysteresis effect.

  5. Neutralization of space charge on high-current low-energy ion beam by low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Gotoh, Yasuhito; Tsuji, Hiroshi; Taguchi, Shuhei; Ikeda, Keita; Kitagawa, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Junzo; Sakai, Shigeki

    2012-11-06

    Neutralization of space charge on a high-current and low-energy ion beam was attempted to reduce the divergence with an aid of low-energy electrons supplied from silicon based field emitter arrays (Si-FEAs). An argon ion beam with the energy of 500 eV and the current of 0.25 mA was produced by a microwave ion source. The initial beam divergence and the emittance were measured at the entrance of the analysis chamber in order to estimate the intrinsic factors for beam divergence. The current density distribution of the beam after transport of 730 mm was measured by a movable Faraday cup, with and without electron supply from Si-FEAs. A similar experiment was performed with tungsten filaments as an electron source. The results indicated that the electron supply from FEA had almost the same effect as the thermionic filament, and it was confirmed that both electron sources can neutralize the ion beam.

  6. The effects of O2 and H2O adsorbates on field-emission properties of an (8, 0) boron nitride nanotube: a density functional theory study.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing-xiang; Ding, Yi-hong

    2009-02-25

    Whether adsorbates might effectively lower the ionization potential (IP) of open-ended boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) in order to design BNNTs based on flat-panel display devices is an unanswered question. In the present work, through density functional theory (DFT) calculations we present the first attempt on the effects of O(2) and H(2)O adsorption on the field-emission properties of an open-ended (8, 0) BNNT. The two adsorbates can chemisorb at the tips of the open-ended BNNT with large adsorption energies and significant charge transfer. An applied electric field of 1 eV A(-1) at the tube tip (a) significantly increases the adsorption energy to stabilize the adsorbates, and (b) alters the emission properties such as ionization potential (IP) or bandgap. The IP of the open N-rich-ended BNNT is lowered, thereby making it easier to lose electrons. However, there is a slight increase of the IP for the open B-rich-end BNNT. Our results would be useful not only to better understand the property of open-ended BNNTs, but also to design more efficient field emitters of molecular electronic devices in experiments.

  7. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors using carbon nanotubes as the transducing layer.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a new type of ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). This type of ISFET incorporates a new architecture, containing a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the transduction layer, making an external reference electrode unnecessary. To show an example of its application, the SWCNT-based ISFET is able to detect at least 10(-8) M of potassium in water using an ion-selective membrane containing valinomycin.

  8. Dynamic radiography using a carbon-nanotube-based field-emission x-ray source

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Y.; Zhang, J.; Lee, Y.Z.; Gao, B.; Dike, S.; Lin, W.; Lu, J.P.; Zhou, O.

    2004-10-01

    We report a dynamic radiography system with a carbon nanotube based field-emission microfocus x-ray source. The system can readily generate x-ray radiation with continuous variation of temporal resolution as short as nanoseconds. Its potential applications for dynamic x-ray imaging are demonstrated. The performance characteristics of this compact and versatile system are promising for noninvasive imaging in biomedical research and industrial inspection.

  9. Improved field emission stability from single-walled carbon nanotubes chemically attached to silicon

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Here, we demonstrate the simple fabrication of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field emission electrode which shows excellent field emission characteristics and remarkable field emission stability without requiring posttreatment. Chemically functionalized SWCNTs were chemically attached to a silicon substrate. The chemical attachment led to vertical alignment of SWCNTs on the surface. Field emission sweeps and Fowler-Nordheim plots showed that the Si-SWCNT electrodes field emit with a low turn-on electric field of 1.5 V μm−1 and high electric field enhancement factor of 3,965. The Si-SWCNT electrodes were shown to maintain a current density of >740 μA cm−2 for 15 h with negligible change in applied voltage. The results indicate that adhesion strength between the SWCNTs and substrate is a much greater factor in field emission stability than previously reported. PMID:22853557

  10. Freestanding vertically aligned arrays of individual carbon nanotubes on metallic substrates for field emission cathodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauger, M.; Binh, Vu Thien; Levesque, A.; Guillot, D.

    2004-07-01

    Direct growth of individual and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) onto a metallic tip apex using a two-chamber radio-frequency plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition is reported. Individual Ni nanocatalysts, obtained by a sol-gel combustion technique, were dots for the nucleation of individual CNTs that were freestanding, clean, and vertically aligned by the presence of a controlled applied field. The arrays of CNTs obtained, having a low-density spatial distribution to avoid mutual electrostatic field screening, gave uniform stable overall field emission patterns after a conditioning process. Effective total current densities up to 1A /cm2 can be extracted.

  11. Electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition of boron nitride nanotube: Experiments and first principle calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhi; Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio

    2009-09-01

    We directly observed the Joule-heating-induced decomposition of multiwalled BN nanotubes using a transmission electron microscope equipped with a scanning tunneling microscope unit. The decomposition temperature is found to be dependent on an applied electrical field. We propose a model that due to the partially ionic nature of the B-N bond, the decomposition energy is both temperature- and electrical field-related: it is named as electrical field-assisted thermal decomposition. The model fits the experimental data very well and is considered to be general for all nanostructures with polar bonds.

  12. Solid-state single-photon emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharonovich, Igor; Englund, Dirk; Toth, Milos

    2016-10-01

    Single-photon emitters play an important role in many leading quantum technologies. There is still no 'ideal' on-demand single-photon emitter, but a plethora of promising material systems have been developed, and several have transitioned from proof-of-concept to engineering efforts with steadily improving performance. Here, we review recent progress in the race towards true single-photon emitters required for a range of quantum information processing applications. We focus on solid-state systems including quantum dots, defects in solids, two-dimensional hosts and carbon nanotubes, as these are well positioned to benefit from recent breakthroughs in nanofabrication and materials growth techniques. We consider the main challenges and key advantages of each platform, with a focus on scalable on-chip integration and fabrication of identical sources on photonic circuits.

  13. Emittance measurements of the CLIO electron beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaput, R.; Devanz, G.; Joly, P.; Kergosien, B.; Lesrel, J.

    1997-02-01

    We have designed a setup to measure the transverse emittance at the CLIO accelerator exit, based on the "3 gradients" method. The beam transverse size is measured simply by scanning it with a steering coil across a fixed jaw and recording the transmitted current, at various quadrupole strengths. A code then performs a complete calculation of the emittance using the transfer matrix of the quadrupole instead of the usual classical lens approximation. We have studied the influence of various parameters on the emittance: Magnetic field on the e-gun and the peak current. We have also improved a little the emittance by replacing a mismatched pipe between the buncher and accelerating section to avoid wake-field effects; The resulting improvements of the emittance have led to an increase in the FEL emitted power.

  14. Floating emitter solar cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chih, Sah (Inventor); Cheng, Li-Jen (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A front surface contact floating emitter solar cell transistor is provided in a semiconductor body (n-type), in which floating emitter sections (p-type) are diffused or implanted in the front surface. Between the emitter sections, a further section is diffused or implanted in the front surface, but isolated from the floating emitter sections, for use either as a base contact to the n-type semiconductor body, in which case the section is doped n+, or as a collector for the adjacent emitter sections.

  15. Electric field effect on the zigzag (6,0) single-wall BC2N nanotube for use in nano-electronic circuits.

    PubMed

    Baei, Mohammad T; Peyghan, Ali Ahmadi; Moghimi, Masoumeh; Hashemian, Saeede

    2013-01-01

    We have analyzed the effect of external electric field on the zigzag (6,0) single-wall BC2N nanotube using density functional theory calculations. Analysis of the structural parameters indicates that the nanotube is resistant against the external electric field strengths. Analysis of the electronic structure of the nanotube indicates that the applied parallel electric field strengths have a much stronger interaction with the nanotube with respect to the transverse electric field strengths and the nanotube is easier to modulate by the applied parallel electric field. Our results show that the properties of the nanotube can be controlled by the proper external electric field for use in nano-electronic circuits.

  16. Aligned Single Wall Carbon Nanotube Polymer Composites Using an Electric Field

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Cheol; Wiklinson, John; Banda, Sumanth; Ounaies, Zoubeida; Wise, Kristopher E.; Sauti, Godfrey; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.

    2005-01-01

    While high shear alignment has been shown to improve the mechanical properties of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT)-polymer composites, it is difficult to control and often results in degradation of the electrical and dielectric properties of the composite. Here, we report a novel method to actively align SWNTs in a polymer matrix, which allows for control over the degree of alignment of SWNTs without the side effects of shear alignment. In this process, SWNTs are aligned via field-induced dipolar interactions among the nanotubes under an AC electric field in a liquid matrix followed by immobilization by photopolymerization while maintaining the electric field. Alignment of SWNTs was controlled as a function of magnitude, frequency, and application time of the applied electric field. The degree of SWNT alignment was assessed using optical microscopy and polarized Raman spectroscopy and the morphology of the aligned nanocomposites was investigated by high resolution scanning electron microscopy. The structure of the field induced aligned SWNTs is intrinsically different from that of shear aligned SWNTs. In the present work, SWNTs are not only aligned along the field, but also migrate laterally to form thick, aligned SWNT percolative columns between the electrodes. The actively aligned SWNTs amplify the electrical and dielectric properties in addition to improving the mechanical properties of the composite. All of these properties of the aligned nanocomposites exhibited anisotropic characteristics, which were controllable by tuning the applied field conditions.

  17. Outstanding field emission properties of wet-processed titanium dioxide coated carbon nanotube based field emission devices

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Jinzhuo; Ou-Yang, Wei Chen, Xiaohong; Guo, Pingsheng; Piao, Xianqing; Sun, Zhuo; Xu, Peng; Wang, Miao; Li, Jun

    2015-02-16

    Field emission devices using a wet-processed composite cathode of carbon nanotube films coated with titanium dioxide exhibit outstanding field emission characteristics, including ultralow turn on field of 0.383 V μm{sup −1} and threshold field of 0.657 V μm{sup −1} corresponding with a very high field enhancement factor of 20 000, exceptional current stability, and excellent emission uniformity. The improved field emission properties are attributed to the enhanced edge effect simultaneously with the reduced screening effect, and the lowered work function of the composite cathode. In addition, the highly stable electron emission is found due to the presence of titanium dioxide nanoparticles on the carbon nanotubes, which prohibits the cathode from the influence of ions and free radical created in the emission process as well as residual oxygen gas in the device. The high-performance solution-processed composite cathode demonstrates great potential application in vacuum electronic devices.

  18. Dependence of the Light Emission Characteristics on the Ne Gas Pressure in an Electron-beam-pumped Light Source Using a Field Emitter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiozawa, Kazufumi; Neo, Yoichiro; Okada, Morihiro; Kume, Hiroshi; Matsumoto, Takahiro; Ikedo, Tomoyuki; Takahashi, Masafumi; Hashiguchi, Gen; Mimura, Hidenori

    The dependence of the light intensity on the gas pressure was investigated in an electron-beam-pumped-light source using a graphite nanoneedle field emitter, a Si electron-transparent film and a Ne gas. A spot-like light emission and a background light emission are observed in at a Ne gas pressure less than 0.4 atm, while the back ground light emission disappears and the light emission becomes a completely spot with increasing the gas pressure. These experimental results are explained by the Monte-Calro simulation of electron trajectories inside the gas cell. On the other hand, the light intensity almost saturates at a gas pressure of 0.4 atm and dose not increase with increasing the gas pressure. The Monte-Calro simulation suggests that the saturation of the light intensity is due to the increase of the excited Ne atoms losing their energy without light emission.

  19. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-01-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs. PMID:28317942

  20. Wide dynamic range enrichment method of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes with weak field centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Wieland G.; Tomović, Željko; Weitz, R. Thomas; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2017-03-01

    The potential of single–walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) to outperform silicon in electronic application was finally enabled through selective separation of semiconducting nanotubes from the as-synthesized statistical mix with polymeric dispersants. Such separation methods provide typically high semiconducting purity samples with narrow diameter distribution, i.e. almost single chiralities. But for a wide range of applications high purity mixtures of small and large diameters are sufficient or even required. Here we proof that weak field centrifugation is a diameter independent method for enrichment of semiconducting nanotubes. We show that the non-selective and strong adsorption of polyarylether dispersants on nanostructured carbon surfaces enables simple separation of diverse raw materials with different SWCNT diameter. In addition and for the first time, we demonstrate that increased temperature enables higher purity separation. Furthermore we show that the mode of action behind this electronic enrichment is strongly connected to both colloidal stability and protonation. By giving simple access to electronically sorted SWCNTs of any diameter, the wide dynamic range of weak field centrifugation can provide economical relevance to SWCNTs.

  1. Study of carbon nanotube field effect transistors performance based on changes in gate parameters.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Shaahin G; Mirzakuchaki, Sattar

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are known as an interesting material to be used in the next generations of electronic technology, especially at nano regime. Nowadays, carbon nanotube field effect transistor or CNTFET is one of the promising devices for future electronic applications. A CNTFET which uses carbon nanotube as channel or source/drain region is the most promising candidate for replacing the current silicon transistor technology. The study of modern manufacturing approach and impact of device parameters on its performance is one of the important research fields in nanoelectronics. In this paper we study some aspects of changes in gate parameters at different channel diameters. This paper shows that for small values of diameter, increasing the dielectric constant of gate insulator doesn't help to improve the performance as value of dielectric constant of gate insulator reaches a certain amount. Also, increasing the oxide thickness of gate insulator doesn't always decrease transistor performance. For high diameter values, increasing the thickness up to a certain value improves the transistor performance.

  2. Multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with compound channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-11-01

    A multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (MC-CNTFET) with compound channel layer has been built. In this MC-CNTFET, a dispersedly directed array of long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is used as primary channel layer and a randomly aligned monolayer network of short SWCNTs acts as secondary set of "bridge" channel layer, which causes large numbers of short semiconducting percolation paths formed. The device exhibits a large on-state current of 2.01 mA and simultaneously retains a high current on/off ratio of 103-104. The function dependency of the on-state current on the density of long SWCNTs and length of short SWCNTs is also presented.

  3. Selective functionalization and loading of biomolecules in crystalline silicon nanotube field-effect-transistors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Zack C Y; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, Hang; Cha, Jennifer N; Xiang, Jie

    2014-07-21

    Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length.

  4. Selective functionalization and loading of biomolecules in crystalline silicon nanotube field-effect-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Zack C. Y.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, Hang; Cha, Jennifer N.; Xiang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length.Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Modelling (Fig. S1) and

  5. Near-field thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials: Graphite and carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, X. L.; Zhang, R. Z.; Zhang, Z. M.

    2013-11-18

    The near-field radiative heat transfer for two hyperbolic metamaterials, namely, graphite and vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), is investigated. Graphite is a naturally existing uniaxial medium, while CNT arrays can be modeled as an effective anisotropic medium. Different hyperbolic modes can be separately supported by these materials in certain infrared regions, resulting in a strong enhancement in near-field heat transfer. It is predicted that the heat flux between two CNT arrays can exceed that between SiC plates at any vacuum gap distance and is about 10 times higher with a 10 nm gap.

  6. Noncollinear Spin-Orbit Magnetic Fields in a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot.

    PubMed

    Hels, M C; Braunecker, B; Grove-Rasmussen, K; Nygård, J

    2016-12-30

    We demonstrate experimentally that noncollinear intrinsic spin-orbit magnetic fields can be realized in a curved carbon nanotube two-segment device. Each segment, analyzed in the quantum dot regime, shows near fourfold degenerate shell structure allowing for identification of the spin-orbit coupling and the angle between the two segments. Furthermore, we determine the four unique spin directions of the quantum states for specific shells and magnetic fields. This class of quantum dot systems is particularly interesting when combined with induced superconducting correlations as it may facilitate unconventional superconductivity and detection of Cooper pair entanglement. Our device comprises the necessary elements.

  7. Performance of field-emitting resonating carbon nanotubes as radio-frequency demodulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, P.; Poncharal, P.; Barois, T.; Perisanu, S.; Gouttenoire, V.; Frachon, H.; Lazarus, A.; de Langre, E.; Minoux, E.; Charles, M.; Ziaei, A.; Guillot, D.; Choueib, M.; Ayari, A.; Purcell, S. T.

    2011-04-01

    We report on a systematic study of the use of resonating nanotubes in a field emission (FE) configuration to demodulate radio frequency signals. We particularly concentrate on how the demodulation depends on the variation of the field amplification factor during resonance. Analytical formulas describing the demodulation are derived as functions of the system parameters. Experiments using AM and FM demodulations in a transmission electron microscope are also presented with a determination of all the pertinent experimental parameters. Finally we discuss the use of CNTs undergoing FE as nanoantennae and the different geometries that could be used for optimization and implementation.

  8. Competition between magnetic field dependent band structure and coherent backscattering in multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stojetz, B.; Roche, S.; Miko, C.; Triozon, F.; Forró, L.; Strunk, C.

    2007-03-01

    Magnetotransport measurements in large diameter multiwall carbon nanotubes (20 40 nm) demonstrate the competition of a magnetic-field dependent bandstructure and Altshuler Aronov Spivak oscillations. By means of an efficient capacitive coupling to a backgate electrode, the magnetoconductance oscillations are explored as a function of Fermi level shift. Changing the magnetic field orientation with respect to the tube axis and by ensemble averaging, allows the contributions of different Aharonov Bohm phases to be identified. The results are in qualitative agreement with numerical calculations of the band structure and the conductance.

  9. Noncollinear Spin-Orbit Magnetic Fields in a Carbon Nanotube Double Quantum Dot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hels, M. C.; Braunecker, B.; Grove-Rasmussen, K.; Nygârd, J.

    2016-12-01

    We demonstrate experimentally that noncollinear intrinsic spin-orbit magnetic fields can be realized in a curved carbon nanotube two-segment device. Each segment, analyzed in the quantum dot regime, shows near fourfold degenerate shell structure allowing for identification of the spin-orbit coupling and the angle between the two segments. Furthermore, we determine the four unique spin directions of the quantum states for specific shells and magnetic fields. This class of quantum dot systems is particularly interesting when combined with induced superconducting correlations as it may facilitate unconventional superconductivity and detection of Cooper pair entanglement. Our device comprises the necessary elements.

  10. Negative Ion Beam Extraction and Emittance

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, Andrew J. T.

    2007-08-10

    The use of magnetic fields to both aid the production of negative ions and suppress the co-extracted electrons causes the emittance and hence the divergence of the negative ion beam to increase significantly due to the plasma non-uniformity from jxB drift. This drift distorts the beam-plasma meniscus and experimental results of the beam emittance are presented, which show that non-uniformity causes the square of the emittance to be proportional to the 2/3 power of the extracted current density. This can cause the divergence of the negative ion beam to be significantly larger than its positive ion counterpart. By comparing results from positive and negative ion beam emittances from the same source, it is also possible to draw conclusions about their vulnerability to magnetic effects. Finally emittances of caesiated and un-caesiated negative ion beams are compared to show how the surface and volume modes of production interact.

  11. Thermo acoustic study of carbon nanotubes in near and far field: Theory, simulation, and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asadzadeh, S. S.; Moosavi, A.; Huynh, C.; Saleki, O.

    2015-03-01

    Carbon nanotube webs exhibit interesting properties when used as thermo-acoustic projectors. This work studies thermo-acoustic effect of these sound sources both in near and far field regions. Based on two alternative forms of the energy equation, we have developed a straightforward formula for calculation of pressure field, which is consistent with experimental data in far field. Also we have solved full 3-D governing equations using numerical methods. Our three-dimensional simulation and experimental data show pressure waves are highly affected by dimensions of sound sources in near field due to interference effects. However, generation of sound waves in far field is independent of projectors area surface. Energy analysis for free standing Thermo-Acoustic (TA) sound sources show that aerogel TA sound sources like CNT based projectors could act more efficiently compared to the other sources in delivering more than 75% of alternative input energy to the medium gas up to a frequency of 1 MHz.

  12. Comment on ``Numerical calculation of the temperature distribution and evolution of the field-ion emitter under pulsed and continuous-wave laser irradiation'' [J. Appl. Phys. 59, 1334 (1986)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, G. Steven

    1987-08-01

    A recent paper having to do with numerical calculations of the temperature distribution in field emitters is criticized for an error in the governing heat-conduction equation used to formulate the finite difference algorithm. The correct form of the equation is derived retaining a possibly significant nonlinear term in the final formula.

  13. Nanoprocessing and nanomeasurements of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiwei

    A piezoelectric nanomanipulator inside a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) specimen holder has been developed, which is capable of manipulating a probe three-dimensionally in translation ranges wider than 40 mum with a positional control precision better than 0.4 nm, and meanwhile allows applying electrical potential across the probe and a sample. The nanomanipulator in TEM permits handling objects of small size with nanometer resolution under real-time TEM inspection, measuring the mechanical and electrical properties of the sample at specified locations, and, at the same time, analyzing the structures of the sample using various TEM techniques. The nanomanipulator in TEM was exploited as an effective tool to measure the electron transport properties of individual carbon nanotubes in contact with a copper probe, and to process multi-walled carbon nanotubes precisely by varieties of approaches, such as nano-welding, nano-cutting, peeling off the outer shells of multi-walled nanotubes. These approaches provide a controllable and reliable method to tailor carbon nanotubes into highly desirable geometry with an ideal number of the shells for many practical applications. The nanomanipulator in TEM was also used to study the field emission of carbon nanotubes by mounting single characterized nanotubes on the probe as the field emitters. It was found that the effective energy barrier for emitting electrons from nanotube tips is lower than the work function of graphite, which is responsible for the good field emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes as well as their high aspect ratio. The strong attractive interaction between carbon nanotube tips and in-situ carbon nanowire growth induced by a high electrical field were first observed using the nanomanipulator in TEM. Electron holography was employed to investigate the nanoscale features of carbon nanotubes and their particulate derivatives. Reconstructed phase images of holograms offer a quantitative means to

  14. Photonically Engineered Incandescent Emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2005-03-22

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  15. Photonically engineered incandescent emitter

    DOEpatents

    Gee, James M.; Lin, Shawn-Yu; Fleming, James G.; Moreno, James B.

    2003-08-26

    A photonically engineered incandescence is disclosed. The emitter materials and photonic crystal structure can be chosen to modify or suppress thermal radiation above a cutoff wavelength, causing the emitter to selectively emit in the visible and near-infrared portions of the spectrum. An efficient incandescent lamp is enabled thereby. A method for fabricating a three-dimensional photonic crystal of a structural material, suitable for the incandescent emitter, is also disclosed.

  16. Field emission of silicon emitter arrays coated with sol-gel (Ba0.65Sr0.35)1-xLaxTiO3 thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, H.; Pan, J. S.; Chen, X. F.; Zhu, W. G.

    2007-07-01

    (Ba0.65Sr0.35)1-xLaxTiO3 (BSLT) thin films with different La concentrations have been deposited on Si field emitter arrays (FEAs) using sol-gel technology for field electron emission applications. The films exhibit the perovskite structure at low La substitution level (x ≤0.5) and the pyrochlore phase at high La concentration (x ≥0.75). The 30-nm-thick BSLT (x =0.25) thin film has higher crystallinity of perovskite structure in the surface region. An x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy study indicates that the oxygen vacancy concentration decreases with La substitution. With respect to the undoped Ba0.65Sr0.35TiO3 thin film, the Fermi level shifts down for the BSLT sample with x =0.1 ascribed to the decreasing oxygen vacancy concentration, and then shifts up for the BSLT sample with x =0.25 attributed to the increasing La substitution level. In highly doped films with an x value over 0.5, it shifts down again associated with the second pyrochlore phase formation. The best enhancement in field emission is found for the BSLT-coated (x =0.25) Si FEAs due to the improved perovskite structure in the surface region and up-moved Fermi level of the coating.

  17. Interaction of carbon dioxide laser radiation with a nanotube array in the presence of a constant electric field

    SciTech Connect

    Sadykov, N. R.; Scorkin, N. A.

    2012-06-15

    The dependence of the current density on the leading edge width of the alternating (high-frequency) field amplitude is studied at various constant (or unsteady) fields. The dependence of amplified microwaves in the two-millimeter range on a longitudinal coordinate is determined. The problem of submillimeter radiation generation in a system of parallel carbon nanotubes exposed to two-frequency carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2} laser) laser radiation in the presence of a constant (or unsteady) field is studied. The possibility of using freely oriented carbon nanotubes parallel to each other is shown.

  18. Magnetic field induced tailoring of mechanical behavior of fluid filled micro porous carbon nanotube foam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Siva Kumar; Mukherjee, Anwesha; Misra, Abha

    2014-06-01

    Compressive loading of the carbon nanotube (CNT) has attracted much attention due to its entangled cellular like structure (CNT foam). This report investigates the mechanical behavior of magnetorheological fluid impregnated micro porous CNT foam that has not been realized before at this scale. Compressive behavior of CNT foam is found to greatly depend on the variation in both fluid viscosity as well as magnetic field intensity. Moreover, maximum achieved stress and energy absorption in CNT foam followed a power law behavior with the magnetic field intensity. Magnetic field induced movement of both CNT and iron oxide particles along the field direction is shown to dominate compressive behavior of CNT foam over highly attractive van der Waals forces between individual CNT. Therefore, this study demonstrates a method for tailoring the mechanical behavior of the fluid impregnated CNT foam.

  19. Near-Field Infrared Pump-Probe Imaging of Surface Phonon Coupling in Boron Nitride Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Gilburd, Leonid; Xu, Xiaoji G; Bando, Yoshio; Golberg, Dmitri; Walker, Gilbert C

    2016-01-21

    Surface phonon modes are lattice vibrational modes of a solid surface. Two common surface modes, called longitudinal and transverse optical modes, exhibit lattice vibration along or perpendicular to the direction of the wave. We report a two-color, infrared pump-infrared probe technique based on scattering type near-field optical microscopy (s-SNOM) to spatially resolve coupling between surface phonon modes. Spatially varying couplings between the longitudinal optical and surface phonon polariton modes of boron nitride nanotubes are observed, and a simple model is proposed.

  20. Very Stable Electron Field Emission From Strontium Titanate Coated Carbon Nanotube Matrices With Low Emission Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Pandey, Archana; Prasad, Abhishek; Moscatello, Jason; Engelhard, Mark H.; Wang, Chong M.; Yap, Yoke K.

    2013-01-22

    PMMA-STO-CNT matrices were created by opened-tip vertically-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotubes (VA-MWCNTs) with conformal coating of strontium titanate and Poly(methyl methacrylate). Emission threshold of 0.8 V/μm was demonstrated, about five-fold lower than that of the as-grown VAMWCNTs. Theoretical simulation and modeling suggest that PMMA-STO-CNT matrices have suppressed screening effects and Coulombs’ repulsion forces between electrons in adjacent CNTs, leading to low emission threshold, high emission density, and prolong emission stability. These findings are important for practical application of VA-MWCNTs in field emission devices.

  1. Determination of the electrostatic lever arm of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using Kelvin force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, David; Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We use Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) to study the electrostatic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor devices (CNTFETs) with backgate geometry at room temperature. We show that KFM maps recorded as a function of the device backgate polarization enable a complete phenomenological determination of the averaging effects associated with the KFM probe side capacitances, and thus, to obtain KFM measurements with quantitative character. The value of the electrostatic lever arm of the CNTFET is determined from KFM measurements and found in agreement with transport measurements based on Coulomb blockade.

  2. Fabrication and radio frequency characterization of carbon nanotube field effect transistor: evidence of quantum capacitance.

    PubMed

    Hwang, D H; Kang, M G; Kim, T G; Hwang, J S; Kim, D W; Whang, D; Hwang, S W

    2011-08-01

    We fabricated an radio frequency (RF) carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) whose electrode shapes were standard RF designed ground-signal-ground (GSG)-type pads. The S-parameters measured from our RF CNTFET in the frequency range up to 6 GHz were fitted with an RF equivalent circuit, and the extracted gate capacitance was shown to be the capacitance value of the series combination of the electrostatic capacitance and the quantum capacitance. The effect of the channel resistance and the kinetic inductance was also discussed.

  3. Scattering effects on the performance of carbon nanotube field effect transistor in a compact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, S. D.; Desgreys, P.; Naviner, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFET) are being extensively studied as possible successors to CMOS. Device simulators have been developed to estimate their performance in sub-10-nm and device structures have been fabricated. In this work, a new compact model of single-walled semiconducting CNTFET is proposed implementing the calculation of energy conduction sub-band minima and the treatment of scattering effects through energy shift in CNTFET. The developed model has been used to simulate I-V characteristics using VHDL-AMS simulator.

  4. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  5. The influence of external transverse magnetic field in propagation of electrostatic oscillations in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdikian, Alireza

    2016-10-01

    Propagation of an electrostatic oscillation by using the linearized quantum hydrodynamic model in conjunction with Maxwell's equations was studied. The dispersion relation of a system of electron plasma in single-walled carbon nanotubes in the presence of an external magnetic field B 0 by considering the exchange-correlation effects in 2D cylindrical geometry is derived here. The uniform static magnetic field is assumed to be normal to the cylindrical surface (Voigt configuration). Distribution of the electrons and ions are considered uniformly over the cylindrical surface of a nanotube. It is found that the external magnetic field has significant impact on the wave in the longer wavelength. The influence of variation in azimuthal index and radius of the nanotube on dispersion relation is also discussed. It is tried to plot some schemes and analyze numerically in different limits of cylindrical and planar geometries. The results can be important in the study of collective phenomena in nanostructures.

  6. Three-dimensional extremely-short optical pulses in carbon nanotube arrays in the presence of an external magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhukov, Alexander V.; Bouffanais, Roland; Belonenko, Mikhail B.; Galkina, Elena N.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study the behavior of three-dimensional extremely-short optical pulses propagating in a system made of carbon nanotubes in the presence of an external magnetic field applied perpendicular both to the nanotube axis and to the direction of propagation of the pulse. The evolution of the electromagnetic field is classically derived on the basis of the Maxwell’s equations. The electronic system of carbon nanotubes is considered in the low-temperature approximation. Our analysis reveals the novel and unique ability of controlling the shape of propagating short optical pulses by tuning the intensity of the applied magnetic field. This effect paves the way for the possible development of innovative applications in optoelectronics.

  7. Investigating the effect of some parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valed Karimi, Najmeh; Pourasad, Yaghoub

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies p-i-n tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor to investigate the effect of various parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. Tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (T-CNTFET) has been simulated using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), and the transmission was conducted through inelastic scattering. Besides the evaluation of device performance, various parameters of the channel were also compared. One of the parameters is considered as the variable, while other parameters of the channel are constant. Then, improved characteristics were discussed by selection of some channel parameters. T-CNTFET with CNT (10, 0) with oxide thickness = 1 nm shows reduced sub-threshold swing (18 mV/decade).

  8. Energy Spread of Field Emission Electrons from Single Pentagons in Individual Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujieda, Tadashi; Okai, Makoto; Tokumoto, Hiroshi

    2008-04-01

    We investigated the dependence of tip radius on the field emission energy spread of electrons emitted from clean single pentagons in individual multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in a wide range of total emission currents (10-2000 nA). We found that the full width at half maximum of the field emission energy distribution decreases in inverse proportion to the involution of the radius of curvature at a constant total emission current. This is because as the radius of curvature increases, the space between adjoining pentagons becomes wider, and therefore the stochastic Coulomb interactions between electrons emitted from adjoining pentagons become weaker. The full widths at half maximum of the field emission energy distributions of MWNTs with tip radii of 1.8-45.0 nm were 0.38-0.60 eV at a total emission current of 2000 nA.

  9. Rotating-Electric-Field-Induced Carbon-Nanotube-Based Nanomotor in Water: A Molecular Dynamics Study.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Md Mushfiqur; Chowdhury, Mokter Mahmud; Alam, Md Kawsar

    2017-03-29

    Using molecular dynamics simulations, it is shown that a carbon nanotube (CNT) suspended in water and subjected to a rotating electric field of proper magnitude and angular speed can be rotated with the aid of water dipole orientations. Based on this principle, a rotational nanomotor structure is designed and the system is simulated in water. Use of the fast responsiveness of electric-field-induced CNT orientation in water is employed and its operation at ultrahigh-speed (over 10(11) r.p.m.) is shown. To explain the basic mechanism, the behavior of the rotational actuation, originated from the water dipole orientation, is also analyzed . The proposed nanomotor is capable of rotating an attached load (such as CNT) at a precise angle as well as nanogear-based complex structures. The findings suggest potential way of using the electric-field-induced CNT rotation in a polarizable fluids as a novel tool to operate nanodevices and systems.

  10. Portable infrared reflectometer for evaluating emittance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaworske, Donald A.; Skowronski, Timothy J.

    2000-01-01

    Optical methods are frequently used to evaluate the emittance of candidate spacecraft thermal control materials. One new optical method utilizes a portable infrared reflectometer capable of obtaining spectral reflectance of an opaque surface in the range of 2 to 25 microns using a Michelson-Type FTIR interferometer. This miniature interferometer collects many infrared spectra over a short period of time. It also allows the size of the instrument to be small such that spectra can be collected in the laboratory or in the field. Infrared spectra are averaged and integrated with respect to the room temperature black body spectrum to yield emittance at 300 K. Integrating with respect to other black body spectra yields emittance values at other temperatures. Absorption bands in the spectra may also be used for chemical species identification. The emittance of several samples was evaluated using this portable infrared reflectometer, an old infrared reflectometer equipped with dual rotating black body cavities, and a bench top thermal vacuum chamber. Samples for evaluation were purposely selected such that a range of emittance values and thermal control material types would be represented, including polished aluminum, Kapton®, silvered Teflon®, and the inorganic paint Z-93-P. Results indicate an excellent linear relationship between the room temperature emittance calculated from infrared spectral data and the emittance obtained from the dual rotating black body cavities and thermal vacuum chamber. The prospect of using the infrared spectral data for chemical species identification will also be discussed. .

  11. Magnetic-field-induced diameter-selective synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yanjie; Zhang, Yaozhong; Wei, Hao; Zhang, Liling; Zhao, Jiang; Yang, Zhi; Zhang, Yafei

    2012-02-01

    We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process.We report a facile and scalable approach to synthesize single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with selected diameter distribution by applying a magnetic field perpendicular to the electric field in the arc plasma region. It is found that this magnetic field-induced diameter-selectivity strategy enables the control of the SWNTs with different diameter distributions in different regions, and the diameter-selective efficiency could be enhanced by modifying the direction of magnetic field. Our results indicate that the motions of the catalysts with different particle sizes, positive carbon ions and electrons are significantly influenced by the magnetic field and electromagnetic force, resulting in the different nucleation and growth processes of SWNTs due to the collective interactions between the magnetic field and arc plasma. This approach would enable a viable route towards the synthesis of SWNTs with desired diameter through the tuning of arc parameters in the arc discharge process

  12. AC field-induced polymer electroluminescence with single wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sung, Jinwoo; Choi, Yeon Sik; Kang, Seok Ju; Cho, Sung Hwan; Lee, Tae-Woo; Park, Cheolmin

    2011-03-09

    We developed a high-performance field-induced polymer electroluminescence (FPEL) device consisting of four stacked layers: a top metal electrode/thin solution-processed nanocomposite film of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and a fluorescent polymer/insulator/transparent bottom electrode working under an alternating current (AC) electric field. A small amount of SWNTs that were highly dispersed in the fluorescent polymer matrix by a conjugate block copolymer dispersant significantly enhanced EL, and we were able to realize an SWNT-FPEL device with a light emission of approximately 350 cd/m(2) at an applied voltage of ±25 V and an AC frequency of 300 kHz. The brightness of the SWNT-FPEL device is much greater than those of other AC-based organic or even inorganic ELs that generally require at least a few hundred volts. Light is emitted from our SWNT-FPEL device because of the sequential injection of field-induced holes and then electron carriers through ambipolar carbon nanotubes under an AC field, followed by exciton formation in the conjugated organic layer. Field-induced bipolar charge injection provides great material design freedom for our devices; the energy level does not have to be aligned between the electrode and the emission layer, and the balance of the carrier injected and transported can be altered in contrast to that in conventional organic light-emitting diodes, leading to an extremely cost-effective and unified device architecture that is applicable to all red-green-blue fluorescent polymers.

  13. Enhancement of Dimension Uniformity of Wet-Etched Thick Insulator Holes in Triode Carbon Nanotube Field-Emission Display Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Hsiao-Fen; Hsiue, Ging-Ho; Liu, Chin-Yh; Chen, Kuo-Feng

    2008-12-01

    A triode structure carbon nanotube field-emission display was fabricated using the thick-film process. The critical dimensional uniformity of wet-etched thick insulator holes was enhanced by changing the wet etching mechanism from vertical dip-etching to horizontal spray-etching. The profile of the insulator holes fabricated using the new etcher was similar to anisotropic. After optimizing the operation conditions of the new etcher, the dimensional uniformity of the insulator holes increased to 97.7%. The optimal concentration of etchant was 2.2 wt % for achieving the least side etching of the insulator holes. The carbon nanotube paste was pattern-printed into the insulator holes. The uniform size of the insulator holes implied that the carbon nanotube distribution was similarly among the insulator holes. This result showed an improved uniform field emission image over the panel from 59 to 83.85%.

  14. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency. PMID:22901374

  15. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga AJ, Gehan

    2012-08-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio ( I on/ I off), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  16. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-08-19

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  17. Magnetic field asymmetry and high temperature magnetoresistance in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cobden, David

    2006-03-01

    The length scales and scattering processes in the one-dimensional electron system in single-walled carbon nanotubes remain only partially understood. Measuring the magnetoresistance, in both linear and nonlinear response, is a way to investigate these processes. In disordered nanotubes with ballistic paths much shorter than the length, we observe magnetoresistance in the metallic regime which at low temperatures resembles the universal fluctuations and weak localization seen in higher dimensional metals. A parabolic magnetoresistance persists at room temperature, indicating a significant role for phase coherence and/or interactions at high temperatures. While the linear resistance of a two-terminal sample must be an even function of magnetic field B by Onsager's principle, the nonlinear resistance need not be. Importantly, the B-asymmetric nonlinear terms can in principle be used to infer the strength of electron-electron interactions in the sample [1]. We have therefore also measured in detail the lowest order B-asymmetric current contributions, with a focus on the B-linear term. This has apparently not been done before in any system. Consistent with general theory, at high temperatures the term is small and has a constant sign independent of Fermi energy. At low temperatures it grows and develops mesoscopic fluctuations. Although these result imply that interactions are involved in the transport, calculations specific to nanotubes are needed in order to extract interaction parameters. This work was done by the authors of Ref [2]. References: [1] E.L. Ivchenko and B. Spivak, Phys. Rev. B 66, 155404 (2002); [2] Jiang Wei, Michael Shimogawa, Zenghui Wang, Iuliana Radu, Robert Dormaier, and David H. Cobden, Phys. Rev. Lett. (Dec. 2005) (cond-mat/0506275).

  18. Nanofabrication of Arrays of Silicon Field Emitters with Vertical Silicon Nanowire Current Limiters and Self-Aligned Gates

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-08-19

    polysilicon is deposited at 625 °C using low-pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD). At this temperature, the polysilicon has columnar growth and large...results, as the transconductance for a cathode scales exponentially with the gate voltage, and the currents for which they report transconductance were...radius and perhaps a tighter distribution principally due to the exponential relationship between the field factor (and hence the tip radius) on the

  19. Intrinsic memory function of carbon nanotube-based ferroelectric field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Gu, Changzhi; Wang, Enge

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the intrinsic memory function of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) based on an integration of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and epitaxial ferroelectric films. In contrast to the previously reported "charge-storage" CNT-FET memories, whose operations are haunted by a lack of control over the "charge traps", the present CNT-FeFETs exhibit a well-defined memory hysteresis loop induced by the reversible remnant polarization of the ferroelectric films. Large memory windows approximately 4 V, data retention time up to 1 week, and ultralow power consumption (energy per bit) of femto-joule, are highlighted in this report. Further simulations and experimental results show that the memory device is valid under operation voltage less than 1 V due to an electric-field enhancement effect induced by the ultrathin SWCNTs.

  20. Robust Noise Modulation of Nonlinearity in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Maehashi, Kenzo; Ohno, Yasuhide; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the candidates for nanosize devices such as field-effect transistors. CNT field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have very special properties sometimes caused by surface states. For example, they are also well known as noisy devices caused by the molecule adhesion on the surface. Nonlinear systems, however, have some advantages such as weak signal detection or enhancement in working with noise. The small signal enhancement was conventionally studied as stochastic resonance. Therefore, we study the modification of nonlinearity of the systems under noise. For actual applications, the noise is also generated from the devices. Thus, we combined the noise CNTFET and another CNT transistor for the trial nonlinear system. Then, the sine wave amplification in the transistor with 1/ f noise of CNTFETs was measured. We used two different combinations of CNTFETs for noise and nonlinear CNTFETs, and observed the robustness of the noise modification on the nonlinearity.

  1. Performance analysis of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistors using NEGF formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbastegan, Saber; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation study of a junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor (JL-CNTFET) and a comparison is made with the conventional CNTFET using the atomistic scale simulation, within the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, both analog and digital parameters of the device are studied. Results have shown that JL-CNTFET with respect to C-CNTFET shows slightly higher ION/IOFF ratio about two times larger than that of C-CNTFET, smaller electric field along channel more than three order of magnitude and reduced tunneling current about 100 times. In addition, the investigation of analog properties of both devices has exhibited that junctionless structure has a transconductance about two times and an intrinsic gain of 15 dB larger than C-CNTFET in same bias condition which makes JL-CNTFET a promising candidate for low voltage analog applications.

  2. Half-metallicity modulation of hybrid BN-C nanotubes by external electric fields: A first-principles study

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Yunye; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2014-06-21

    On the basis of density functional theory, we systematically investigate the electronic and magnetic properties of hybrid BN-C nanotubes, C{sub x}(BN){sub y} where x + y = 12, with and without an external electric field. The BN-C nanotubes are totally distinct from pristine boron-nitride and carbon nanotubes. The electronic properties of C{sub x}(BN){sub y} change significantly with composition: from the nonmagnetic semiconductors to the half-metals. The half-metallicity is attributed to the competition among the band gap, which is related to the width of C domain, the width of BN domain, and the intrinsic polarization field. Application of the external fields can enhance or counterbalance the polarization fields and change the band gaps. The half-metallicity can be modulated. In BN-rich tubes, such as C{sub 2}(BN){sub 10}, the energy gap can be engineered from 0.50 eV to 0.95 eV and in C{sub 3}(BN){sub 9}, the ground state is converted from the nonmagnetic state into the anti-ferro-magnetic one. In other tubes, the half-metallicity can be enhanced or destroyed by different external fields. The modulation indicates that hybrid BN-C nanotubes can work as the components of the spin-filter devices.

  3. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-06-16

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics.

  4. Multinozzle Emitter Arrays for Nanoelectrospray Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Pan; Wang, Hung-Ta; Yang, Peidong; Wang, Daojing

    2011-01-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is the enabling technology for proteomics and metabolomics. However, dramatic improvements in both sensitivity and throughput are still required to achieve routine MS-based single cell proteomics and metabolomics. Here, we report the silicon-based monolithic multinozzle emitter array (MEA), and demonstrate its proof-of-principle applications in high-sensitivity and high-throughput nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry. Our MEA consists of 96 identical 10-nozzle emitters in a circular array on a 3-inch silicon chip. The geometry and configuration of the emitters, the dimension and number of the nozzles, and the micropillar arrays embedded in the main channel, can be systematically and precisely controlled during the microfabrication process. Combining electrostatic simulation and experimental testing, we demonstrated that sharpened-end geometry at the stem of the individual multinozzle emitter significantly enhanced the electric fields at its protruding nozzle tips, enabling sequential nanoelectrospray for the high-density emitter array. We showed that electrospray current of the multinozzle emitter at a given total flow rate was approximately proportional to the square root of the number of its spraying-nozzles, suggesting the capability of high MS sensitivity for multinozzle emitters. Using a conventional Z-spray mass spectrometer, we demonstrated reproducible MS detection of peptides and proteins for serial MEA emitters, achieving sensitivity and stability comparable to the commercial capillary emitters. Our robust silicon-based MEA chip opens up the possibility of a fully-integrated microfluidic system for ultrahigh-sensitivity and ultrahigh-throughput proteomics and metabolomics. PMID:21728281

  5. Water-processed carbon nanotube/graphene hybrids with enhanced field emission properties

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Meng; Xu, Peng; Wang, Xu; Wu, Huizhen; Wang, Miao E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Song, Yenan; Li, Zhenhua; Zhao, Pei E-mail: miaowang@css.zju.edu.cn; Shang, Xuefu

    2015-09-15

    Integrating carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene into hybrid structures provides a novel approach to three dimensional (3D) materials with advantageous properties. Here we present a water-processing method to create integrated CNT/graphene hybrids and test their field emission properties. With an optimized mass ratio of CNTs to graphene, the hybrid shows a significantly enhanced field emission performance, such as turn-on electric field of 0.79 V/μm, threshold electric field of 1.05 V/μm, maximum current density of 0.1 mA/cm{sup 2}, and field enhancement factor of ∼1.3 × 10{sup 4}. The optimized mass ratio for field emission emphasizes the importance of both CNTs and graphene in the hybrid. We also hypothesize a possible mechanism for this enhanced field emission performance from the CNT/graphene hybrid. During the solution treatment, graphene oxide behaves as surfactant sheets for CNTs to form a well dispersed solution, which leads to a better organized 3D structure with more conducting channels for electron transport.

  6. A New Flat-Panel Digital Mammography Detector with Avalanche Photoconductor and High-Resolution Field Emitter Readout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    electric field Ese as opposed to the fixed high conversion gain of HgI 2 or PbI2. One of 4 the practical problems of having a fixed high gain is that the...Nylen, K. Shah, L. Melekhov and H. Hermon, "Comparison of PbI2 and HgI 2 for direct detection active matrix x-ray image sensors", J. Appl. Phys. 91...a-Se and HgI 2", Appl. Phys. Lett. 80, 1664-1666 (2002) 23 14 N. Matsuura, Wei Zhao, Z. Huang and J. A. Rowlands, "Digital radiology using active

  7. Rapid detection of Aspergillus flavus in rice using biofunctionalized carbon nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Raquel A; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we have used carbon nanotube field effect transistors (FET) that have been functionalized with protein G and IgG to detect Aspergillus flavus in contaminated milled rice. The adsorbed protein G on the carbon nanotubes walls enables the IgG anti-Aspergillus antibodies to be well oriented and therefore to display full antigen binding capacity for fungal antigens. A solution of Tween 20 and gelatine was used as an effective blocking agent to prevent the non-specific binding of the antibodies and other moulds and also to protect the transducer against the interferences present in the rice samples. Our FET devices were able to detect at least 10 μg/g of A. flavus in only 30 min. To evaluate the selectivity of our biosensors, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium chrysogenum were tested as potential competing moulds for A. flavus. We have proved that our devices are highly selective tools for detecting mycotoxigenic moulds at low concentrations in real samples.

  8. Edge effect enhanced photo-thermionic emission from a carbon nanotubes array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chi; Li, Zhenjun; Chen, Ke; Bai, Bing; Dai, Qing

    2017-02-01

    Employing optical field enhancement at the edges of the nanostructures, an enhanced photo-thermionic emission (PTE) was obtained from a well-defined carbon nanotube (CNT) cluster array. Compared with the un-patterned carbon nanotube film, the PTE from the CNT cluster array was enhanced 10 times at the same laser intensity. The concept was proved by the computer simulation as well. We believe that an edge effect enhanced CNT PTE emitter is of great potential for application in next-generation portable and inexpensive vacuum electronic devices.

  9. Separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes and electric fields.

    PubMed

    Winarto; Takaiwa, Daisuke; Yamamoto, Eiji; Yasuoka, Kenji

    2016-12-07

    Bioethanol has been used as an alternative energy source for transportation vehicles to reduce the use of fossil fuels. The separation of water-ethanol solutions from fermentation processes is still an important issue in the production of anhydrous ethanol. Using molecular dynamics simulations, we investigate the effect of axial electric fields on the separation of water-ethanol solutions with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In the absence of an electric field, CNT-ethanol van der Waals interactions allow ethanol to fill the CNTs in preference to water, i.e., a separation effect for ethanol. However, as the CNT diameter increases, this ethanol separation effect significantly decreases owing to a decrease in the strength of the van der Waals interactions. In contrast, under an electric field, the energy of the electrostatic interactions within the water molecule structure induces water molecules to fill the CNTs in preference to ethanol, i.e., a separation effect for water. More importantly, the electrostatic interactions are dependent on the water molecule structure in the CNT instead of the CNT diameter. As a result, the separation effect observed under an electric field does not diminish over a wide CNT diameter range. Moreover, CNTs and electric fields can be used to separate methanol-ethanol solutions too. Under an electric field, methanol preferentially fills CNTs over ethanol in a wide CNT diameter range.

  10. Carbon nanotube substrates and catalyzed hot stamp for polishing and patterning the substrates

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Yuhuang; Hauge, Robert H.; Schmidt, Howard K.; Kim, Myung Jong; Kittrell, W. Carter

    2009-09-08

    The present invention is generally directed to catalyzed hot stamp methods for polishing and/or patterning carbon nanotube-containing substrates. In some embodiments, the substrate, as a carbon nanotube fiber end, is brought into contact with a hot stamp (typically at 200-800.degree. C.), and is kept in contact with the hot stamp until the morphology/patterns on the hot stamp have been transferred to the substrate. In some embodiments, the hot stamp is made of material comprising one or more transition metals (Fe, Ni, Co, Pt, Ag, Au, etc.), which can catalyze the etching reaction of carbon with H.sub.2, CO.sub.2, H.sub.2O, and/or O.sub.2. Such methods can (1) polish the carbon nanotube-containing substrate with a microscopically smooth finish, and/or (2) transfer pre-defined patterns from the hot stamp to the substrate. Such polished or patterned carbon nanotube substrates can find application as carbon nanotube electrodes, field emitters, and field emitter arrays for displays and electron sources.

  11. Ultrashort Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes Reveal Field-Emission Coulomb Blockade and Highest Electron-Source Brightness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pascale-Hamri, A.; Perisanu, S.; Derouet, A.; Journet, C.; Vincent, P.; Ayari, A.; Purcell, S. T.

    2014-03-01

    We present here well-defined Coulomb staircases using an original field-emission experiment on several individual in situ—grown single-wall carbon nanotubes. A unique in situ process was applied nine times to progressively shorten one single-wall carbon nanotube down to ≃10 nm, which increased the oscillations periods from 5.5 to 80 V, the temperature for observable Coulomb staircase to 1100 K and the currents to 1.8 μA. This process led to the brightest electron source ever reported [9×1011 A/(str m2 V)].

  12. DIAMOND SECONDARY EMITTER

    SciTech Connect

    BEN-ZVI, I.; RAO, T.; BURRILL, A.; CHANG, X.; GRIMES, J.; RANK, J.; SEGALOV, Z.; SMEDLEY, J.

    2005-10-09

    We present the design and experimental progress on the diamond secondary emitter as an electron source for high average power injectors. The design criteria for average currents up to 1 A and charge up to 20 nC are established. Secondary Electron Yield (SEY) exceeding 200 in transmission mode and 50 in emission mode have been measured. Preliminary results on the design and fabrication of the self contained capsule with primary electron source and secondary electron emitter will also be presented.

  13. The DIORAMA Neutron Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Terry, James Russell

    2016-05-05

    Emission of neutrons in a given event is modeled by the DioramaEmitterNeutron object, a subclass of the abstract DioramaEmitterModule object. The GenerateEmission method of this object is the entry point for generation of a neutron population for a given event. Shown in table 1, this method requires a number of parameters to be defined in the event definition.

  14. Search for z 6.96 Lyman-alpha Emitters with IMACS/Magellan in the COSMOS Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hibon, Pascale

    2011-01-01

    Searching high redshift galaxies is one of the most active fields of observational cosmology and is essential to the characterization and understanding of the formation and evolution of the galaxies. Galaxies at redshift 6 are routinely found. Detection of z 7 galaxies is however still rare. From z=6.5 to z=7 light dimming due to luminosity distance is 17% and the age of the Universe varies by 172 Myr. At these redshift, the Universe is thought to be undergoing re-ionization. One tracer of high z galaxies is the Ly-alpha line which can be detected through Narrow Band (NB) imaging surveys. The Luminosity Function (LF) of high z LAEs is one of the few observables of the re-ionization epoch accessible to date with 8-10m telescopes. The determination of the Ly-alpha LF at high z is actively pursued by several groups. The evolution of the Ly-alpha LF involves both the evolution of the re-ionization state of the Universe and of the Ly-alpha population which can also be traced by the evolution of the UVLF. This evolution with redshift allows us to constrain the evolution of LAEs and their role in re-ionizing the Universe at the end of the Dark Ages. Results on the evolution of both UVLF and LAEs LF at z 7 are still limited and occasionally contradictory. We have carried out a 28 hours NB (9680A) imaging program, targeting z 7 LAEs, using the IMACS/Magellan instrument. The data were taken over 2 years. We reached a detection limit of 8.9e-18 erg/s/cm2. From these observations, we have derived a photometric sample of z 7 LAEs candidates. After careful evaluation of possible sources of contamination, and accounting for cosmic variance, we inferred the LF at z 7 LAEs and constrain the LFs produced by different existing models. These results will need to be confirmed by spectroscopic follow-up.

  15. Metal halide perovskite light emitters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hoon; Cho, Himchan; Lee, Tae-Woo

    2016-01-01

    Twenty years after layer-type metal halide perovskites were successfully developed, 3D metal halide perovskites (shortly, perovskites) were recently rediscovered and are attracting multidisciplinary interest from physicists, chemists, and material engineers. Perovskites have a crystal structure composed of five atoms per unit cell (ABX3) with cation A positioned at a corner, metal cation B at the center, and halide anion X at the center of six planes and unique optoelectronic properties determined by the crystal structure. Because of very narrow spectra (full width at half-maximum ≤20 nm), which are insensitive to the crystallite/grain/particle dimension and wide wavelength range (400 nm ≤ λ ≤ 780 nm), perovskites are expected to be promising high-color purity light emitters that overcome inherent problems of conventional organic and inorganic quantum dot emitters. Within the last 2 y, perovskites have already demonstrated their great potential in light-emitting diodes by showing high electroluminescence efficiency comparable to those of organic and quantum dot light-emitting diodes. This article reviews the progress of perovskite emitters in two directions of bulk perovskite polycrystalline films and perovskite nanoparticles, describes current challenges, and suggests future research directions for researchers to encourage them to collaborate and to make a synergetic effect in this rapidly emerging multidisciplinary field. PMID:27679844

  16. Field emission with ultralow turn on voltage from metal decorated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sridhar, Srividya; Tiwary, Chandrasekhar; Vinod, Soumya; Taha-Tijerina, Jose Jaime; Sridhar, Srividvatha; Kalaga, Kaushik; Sirota, Benjamin; Hart, Amelia H C; Ozden, Sehmus; Sinha, Ravindra Kumar; Harsh; Vajtai, Robert; Choi, Wongbong; Kordás, Krisztián; Ajayan, Pulickel M

    2014-08-26

    A simple and scalable method of decorating 3D-carbon nanotube (CNT) forest with metal particles has been developed. The results observed in aluminum (Al) decorated CNTs and copper (Cu) decorated CNTs on silicon (Si) and Inconel are compared with undecorated samples. A significant improvement in the field emission characteristics of the cold cathode was observed with ultralow turn on voltage (Eto ∼ 0.1 V/μm) due to decoration of CNTs with metal nanoparticles. Contact resistance between the CNTs and the substrate has also been reduced to a large extent, allowing us to get stable emission for longer duration without any current degradation, thereby providing a possibility of their use in vacuum microelectronic devices.

  17. Reorientation of single-wall carbon nanotubes in negative anisotropy liquid crystals by an electric field

    PubMed Central

    García-García, Amanda; Vergaz, Ricardo; Algorri, José F; Zito, Gianluigi; Cacace, Teresa; Marino, Antigone; Otón, José M

    2016-01-01

    Summary Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are anisotropic nanoparticles that can cause modifications in the electrical and electro-optical properties of liquid crystals. The control of the SWCNT concentration, distribution and reorientation in such self-organized fluids allows for the possibility of tuning the liquid crystal properties. The alignment and reorientation of CNTs are studied in a system where the liquid crystal orientation effect has been isolated. Complementary studies including Raman spectroscopy, microscopic inspection and impedance studies were carried out. The results reveal an ordered reorientation of the CNTs induced by an electric field, which does not alter the orientation of the liquid crystal molecules. Moreover, impedance spectroscopy suggests a nonnegligible anchoring force between the CNTs and the liquid crystal molecules. PMID:27547599

  18. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  19. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. As a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  20. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  1. Second harmonic generation in carbon nanotubes induced by transversal electrostatic field.

    PubMed

    Trolle, Mads Lund; Pedersen, Thomas Garm

    2013-08-14

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) of armchair and zigzag type contain an inversion centre, and are thus intrinsically unable to generate dipole even-order nonlinearities, such as second harmonic generation (SHG). Breaking the inversion symmetry by application of an external voltage transversal to the CNT axis will, however, induce a second harmonic response. Similarly, additional non-vanishing second harmonic tensor elements will be induced in chiral tubes already displaying an intrinsic response. Many geometries realizing such a setup can be envisaged, e.g., an experimental gate setup or deposition of CNTs on, or integration in, strongly polarized host media, perhaps facilitating a tunable second harmonic response. In this work, we calculate the SHG signal from CNTs under transversally applied electric fields based on a tight-binding model.

  2. Imaging of soft material with carbon nanotube tip using near-field scanning microwave microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zhe; Sun, Wei-qiang; Feng, Tao; Tang, Shawn Wenjie; Li, Gang; Jiang, Kai-li; Xu, Sheng-yong; Ong, Chong Kim

    2015-01-01

    In this manuscript, a near-field scanning microwave microscope (NSMM) of our own design is introduced while using a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT) bundle as the tip (referred to as 'CNT tip'). Clear images of gold-patterned numbers, photoresist stripes and corneal endothelial cells (cell line B4G12) were obtained by mapping the resonant frequency fr and S11 amplitude of a given area while the NSMM is operating in tapping mode. The CNT tip helps to improve image quality and reveals more information about the sample as compared to a traditional metallic tip. The CNT tip is flexible and does not scratch the surface of the sample during the scan, which is useful for imaging soft material in biological science. In the imaging of the B4G12 endothelial cells, the nuclei and cytoplasm can be clearly distinguished from the rest of the cell and its surrounding medium.

  3. Effect of parametric variation on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube based field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Mubashshir; Khan, Ayub; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dielectric constant and gate insulator thickness on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been analyzed using a mathematical model based on FETToy simulator. Both the parameters are found to have significant effect on the device performance, particularly the on-current; while the on-current (ION) increases on scaling down the gate oxide thickness, the level of leakage current (IOFF) is not considerably affected. This is an advantage of CNTFET over conventional MOSFETs where the thickness of thin oxide layer causes drastic increase in gate leakage current. Our analysis results show that thinner gate oxide and larger CNT improve the performance of CNTFETs. Therefore, the performance of our simulated CNTFETs using this model has clear lead over those of conventional MOSFETs.

  4. Modeling and simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor and its circuit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Saini, Dinesh Kumar; Agarwal, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Sajal; Khosla, Mamta; Raj, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    The carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) is modelled for circuit application. The model is based on the transport mechanism and it directly relates the transport mechanism with the chirality. Also, it does not consider self consistent equations and thus is used to develop the HSPICE compatible circuit model. For validation of the model, it is applied to the top gate CNTFET structure and the MATLAB simulation results are compared with the simulations of a similar structure created in NanoTCAD ViDES. For demonstrating the circuit compatibility of the model, two circuits viz. inverter and SRAM are designed and simulated in HSPICE. Finally, SRAM performance metrics are compared with those of device simulations from Nano TCAD ViDES.

  5. Noise Reduction of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors by Alternating Current Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuki; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrated a marked improvement of sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio) in carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) sensors. The alternating current (AC) measurement with a lock-in amplifier, which suppresses the fluctuations in drain current in CNTFETs without decreasing the signal level, was adopted. The noise level of CNTFETs used in buffer solutions was greatly decreased by AC measurement. Furthermore, we investigated the sensing operations of CNTFET pH sensors and biosensors by AC measurement. The sensing performance of CNTFET sensors was markedly improved. The signal-to-noise ratio of pH sensors measured using AC was six times higher than that obtained by direct current (DC) measurement. A small amount of bovine serum albumin of 250 pM was effectively detected by CNTFET biosensors by AC measurement.

  6. Floating-gated memory based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si floating dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seike, Kohei; Fujii, Yusuke; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET)-based nonvolatile memory device with Si floating dots. The electrical characteristics of this memory device were compared with those of devices with a HfO2 charge storage layer or Au floating dots. For a sweep width of 6 V, the memory window of the devices with the Si floating dots increased twofold as compared with that of the devices with the HfO2 layer. Moreover, the retention characteristics revealed that, for the device with the Au floating dots, the off-state had almost the same current as the on-state at the 400th s. However, the devices with the Si floating dots had longer-retention characteristics. The results indicate that CNTFET-based devices with Si floating dots are promising candidates for low-power consumption nonvolatile memory devices.

  7. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon-nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are studied. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, and this makes the device characteristics quite unique. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and inversion and accumulation threshold voltages (V(sub Ti), and V(sub Ta)) are derived. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger doping dependence than that of the metal-oxide- semiconductor FETs, while V(sub Ta) of both devices depends weakly on doping with the same functional form.

  8. LDC-CNTFET: A carbon nanotube field effect transistor with linear doping profile channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali; Keshavarzi, Parviz; Orouji, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with linear doping profile channel (LDC-CNTFET) is presented. The channel impurity concentration of the proposed structure is at maximum level at source side and linearly decreases toward zero at drain side. The simulation results show that the leakage current, on-off current ratio, subthreshold swing, drain induced barrier lowering, and voltage gain of the proposed structure improve in comparison with conventional CNTFET. Also, due to spreading the impurity throughout the channel region, the proposed structure has superior performance compared with a single halo CNTFET structure with equal saturation current. Design considerations show that the proposed structure enhances the device performance all over a wide range of channel lengths.

  9. A mathematical space mapping model for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamifar, Farnousha; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a mathematical model is presented based on mathematical space mapping for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. This model is generalized from another model that was based on the concept of neural space mapping to calculate the three parameters of a coarse model. These parameters were the threshold voltage, the Early voltage, and assumed constant k of a modified "level 1" MOSFET model in simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE). In this work, three analytical relations are introduced to replace the neural networks of the main model. The comparisons between the proposed model and a well-known reference model, named FETToy, show that the proposed model had reasonable accuracy in terms of different biases and physical parameters.

  10. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    DOE PAGES

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-17

    We demonstrate that a non-perturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. Asmore » a result, we test this theory explicitly on the data reported in [NanoLetters 5, 2314 (2005)] and [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010)] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.« less

  11. Predicting excitonic gaps of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes from a field theoretic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konik, Robert M.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Misewich, James A.

    2015-02-01

    We demonstrate that a nonperturbative framework for the treatment of the excitations of single-walled carbon nanotubes based upon a field theoretic reduction is able to accurately describe experiment observations of the absolute values of excitonic energies. This theoretical framework yields a simple scaling function from which the excitonic energies can be read off. This scaling function is primarily determined by a single parameter, the charge Luttinger parameter of the tube, which is in turn a function of the tube chirality, dielectric environment, and the tube's dimensions, thus expressing disparate influences on the excitonic energies in a unified fashion. We test this theory explicitly on the data reported by Dukovic et al. [Nano Lett. 5, 2314 (2005), 10.1021/nl0518122] and Sfeir et al. [Phys. Rev. B 82, 195424 (2010), 10.1103/PhysRevB.82.195424] and so demonstrate the method works over a wide range of reported excitonic spectra.

  12. MORPHOLOGICAL PROPERTIES OF Lyα EMITTERS AT REDSHIFT 4.86 IN THE COSMOS FIELD: CLUMPY STAR FORMATION OR MERGER?

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Nagao, Tohru; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murayama, Takashi; Scoville, Nick Z.; Capak, Peter L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate morphological properties of 61 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 4.86 identified in the COSMOS field, based on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data in the F814W band. Out of the 61 LAEs, we find the ACS counterparts for 54 LAEs. Eight LAEs show double-component structures with a mean projected separation of 0.″63 (∼4.0 kpc at z = 4.86). Considering the faintness of these ACS sources, we carefully evaluate their morphological properties, that is, size and ellipticity. While some of them are compact and indistinguishable from the point-spread function (PSF) half-light radius of 0.″07 (∼0.45 kpc), the others are clearly larger than the PSF size and spatially extended up to 0.″3 (∼1.9 kpc). We find that the ACS sources show a positive correlation between ellipticity and size and that the ACS sources with large size and round shape are absent. Our Monte Carlo simulation suggests that the correlation can be explained by (1) the deformation effects via PSF broadening and shot noise or (2) the source blending in which two or more sources with small separation are blended in our ACS image and detected as a single elongated source. Therefore, the 46 single-component LAEs could contain the sources that consist of double (or multiple) components with small spatial separation (i.e., ≲0.″3 or 1.9 kpc). Further observation with high angular resolution at longer wavelengths (e.g., rest-frame wavelengths of ≳4000 Å) is inevitable to decipher which interpretation is adequate for our LAE sample.

  13. Rectangular computed tomography using a stationary array of CNT emitters: initial experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzales, Brian; Spronk, Derrek; Cheng, Yuan; Zhang, Zheng; Pan, Xiaochuan; Beckmann, Moritz; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2013-03-01

    XinRay Systems Inc has a rectangular x-ray computed tomography (CT) imaging setup using multibeam x-ray tubes. These multibeam x-ray tubes are based on cold cathodes using carbon nanotube (CNT) field emitters. Due to their unique design, a CNT x-ray tube can contain a dense array of independently controlled electron emitters which generate a linear array of x-ray focal spots. XinRay uses a set of linear CNT x-ray tubes to design and construct a stationary CT setup which achieves sufficient CT coverage from a fixed set of views. The CT system has no moving gantry, enabling it to be enclosed in a compact rectangular tunnel. The fixed locations of the x-ray focal spots were optimized through simulations. The rectangular shape creates significant variation in path length from the focal spots to the detector for different x-ray views. The shape also results in unequal x-ray coverage in the imaged space. We discuss the impact of this variation on the reconstruction. XinRay uses an iterative reconstruction algorithm to account for this unique geometry, which is implemented on a graphics processing unit (GPU). The fixed focal spots prohibit the use of an antiscatter grid. Quantitative measure of the scatter and its impact on the reconstruction will be discussed. These results represent the first known implementation of a completely stationary CT setup using CNT x-ray emitter arrays.

  14. Active spacecraft potential control: An ion emitter experiment. [Cluster mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riedler, W.; Goldstein, R.; Hamelin, M.; Maehlum, B. N.; Troim, J.; Olsen, R. C.; Pedersen, A.; Grard, R. J. L.; Schmidt, R.; Rudenauer, F.

    1988-01-01

    The cluster spacecraft are instrumented with ion emitters for charge neutralization. The emitters produce indium ions at 6 keV. The ion current is adjusted in a feedback loop with instruments measuring the spacecraft potential. The system is based on the evaporation of indium in the apex field of a needle. The design of the active spacecraft potential control instruments, and the ion emitters is presented.

  15. The effects of random field at surface on the magnetic properties in the Ising nanotube and nanowire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneyoshi, T.

    2016-12-01

    The phase diagrams and temperature dependences of total magnetization mT in two nanosystems (nanotube and nanowire) with a random magnetic field at the surface shell are studied by the uses of the effective-field theory with correlations. Some characteristic phenomena (reentrant phenomena and unconventional thermal variation of total magnetization) are found in the two systems. They are rather different between the two systems, which mainly come from the structural differences of the cores

  16. Hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes under the influence of quasi-static ac-field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amekpewu, M.; Mensah, S. Y.; Musah, R.; Mensah, N. G.; Abukari, S. S.; Dompreh, K. A.

    2016-07-01

    The theory of hot electrons injection in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) where both dc electric field (Ez), and a quasi-static ac field exist simultaneously (i.e. when the frequency ω of ac field is much less than the scattering frequency v (ω ≪ v or ωτ ≪ 1, v =τ-1) where τ is relaxation time) is studied. The investigation is done theoretically by solving semi-classical Boltzmann transport equation with and without the presence of the hot electrons source to derive the current densities. Plots of the normalized current density versus dc field (Ez) applied along the axis of the CNTs in the presence and absence of hot electrons reveal ohmic conductivity initially and finally negative differential conductivity (NDC) provided ωτ ≪ 1 (i.e. quasi- static case). With strong enough axial injection of the hot electrons, there is a switch from NDC to positive differential conductivity (PDC) about Ez ≥ 75 kV / cm and Ez ≥ 140 kV / cm for a zigzag CNT and an armchair CNT respectively. Thus, the most important tough problem for NDC region which is the space charge instabilities can be suppressed due to the switch from the NDC behaviour to the PDC behaviour predicting a potential generation of terahertz radiations whose applications are relevance in current-day technology, industry, and research.

  17. Field emission luminescence of nanodiamonds deposited on the aligned carbon nanotube array

    PubMed Central

    Fedoseeva, Yu. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kanygin, M. A.; Gorodetskiy, D. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Puzyr, A. P.; Bondar, V. S.

    2015-01-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) were deposited on the surface of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by immersing a CNT array in an aqueous suspension of NDs in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The structure and electronic state of the obtained CNT–ND hybrid material were studied using optical and electron microscopy and Infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A non-covalent interaction between NDs and CNT and preservation of vertical orientation of CNTs in the hybrid were revealed. We showed that current-voltage characteristics of the CNT–ND cathode are changed depending on the applied field; below ~3 V/µm they are similar to those of the initial CNT array and at the higher field they are close to the ND behavior. Involvement of the NDs in field emission process resulted in blue luminescence of the hybrid surface at an electric field higher than 3.5 V/µm. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the NDs emit blue-green light, while blue luminescence prevails in the CNT–ND hybrid. The quenching of green luminescence was attributed to a partial removal of oxygen-containing groups from the ND surface as the result of the hybrid synthesis. PMID:25797710

  18. Electromechanical interactions in a carbon nanotube based thin film field emitting diode.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N; Roy Mahapatra, D; Sun, Y; Yeow, J T W; Melnik, R V N; Jaffray, D A

    2008-01-16

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have emerged as promising candidates for biomedical x-ray devices and other applications of field emission. CNTs grown/deposited in a thin film are used as cathodes for field emission. In spite of the good performance of such cathodes, the procedure to estimate the device current is not straightforward and the required insight towards design optimization is not well developed. In this paper, we report an analysis aided by a computational model and experiments by which the process of evolution and self-assembly (reorientation) of CNTs is characterized and the device current is estimated. The modeling approach involves two steps: (i) a phenomenological description of the degradation and fragmentation of CNTs and (ii) a mechanics based modeling of electromechanical interaction among CNTs during field emission. A computational scheme is developed by which the states of CNTs are updated in a time incremental manner. Finally, the device current is obtained by using the Fowler-Nordheim equation for field emission and by integrating the current density over computational cells. A detailed analysis of the results reveals the deflected shapes of the CNTs in an ensemble and the extent to which the initial state of geometry and orientation angles affect the device current. Experimental results confirm these effects.

  19. Field emission luminescence of nanodiamonds deposited on the aligned carbon nanotube array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedoseeva, Yu. V.; Bulusheva, L. G.; Okotrub, A. V.; Kanygin, M. A.; Gorodetskiy, D. V.; Asanov, I. P.; Vyalikh, D. V.; Puzyr, A. P.; Bondar, V. S.

    2015-03-01

    Detonation nanodiamonds (NDs) were deposited on the surface of aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs) by immersing a CNT array in an aqueous suspension of NDs in dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO). The structure and electronic state of the obtained CNT-ND hybrid material were studied using optical and electron microscopy and Infrared, Raman, X-ray photoelectron and near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. A non-covalent interaction between NDs and CNT and preservation of vertical orientation of CNTs in the hybrid were revealed. We showed that current-voltage characteristics of the CNT-ND cathode are changed depending on the applied field; below ~3 V/µm they are similar to those of the initial CNT array and at the higher field they are close to the ND behavior. Involvement of the NDs in field emission process resulted in blue luminescence of the hybrid surface at an electric field higher than 3.5 V/µm. Photoluminescence measurements showed that the NDs emit blue-green light, while blue luminescence prevails in the CNT-ND hybrid. The quenching of green luminescence was attributed to a partial removal of oxygen-containing groups from the ND surface as the result of the hybrid synthesis.

  20. Transport of ions through a (6,6) carbon nanotube under electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Li; Xu, Zhen; Zhou, Zhe-Wei; Hu, Guo-Hui

    2014-11-01

    The transport of water and ions through carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is crucial in nanotechnology and biotechnology. Previous investigation indicated that the ions can hardly pass through (6,6) CNTs due to their hydrated shells. In the present study, utilizing molecular dynamics simulation, it is shown that the energy barrier mainly originating from the hydrated water molecules could be overcome by applying an electric field large enough in the CNT axis direction. Potential of mean force is calculated to show the reduction of energy barrier when the electric field is present for (Na+, K+, Cl-) ions. Consequently, ionic flux through (6,6) CNTs can be found once the electric field becomes larger than a threshold value. The variation of the coordination numbers of ions at different locations from the bulk to the center of the CNT is also explored to elaborate this dynamic process. The thresholds of the electric field are different for Na+, K+, and Cl- due to their characteristics. This consequence might be potentially applied in ion selectivity in the future.

  1. High-temperature annealing effects on multiwalled carbon nanotubes: electronic structure, field emission and magnetic behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ray, Sekhar Chandra; Pao, Chih-Wen; Tsai, Huang-Ming; Chen, Huang-Chin; Chen, Yu-Shin; Wu, Shang-Lun; Ling, Dah-Chin; Lin, I-Nan; Pong, Way-Faung; Gupta, Sanju; Giorcelli, Mauro; Bianco, Stefano; Musso, Simone; Tagliaferro, Alberto

    2009-12-01

    This work elucidates the effects of high-temperature annealing on the microscopic and electronic structure of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) using high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction, X-ray absorption near-edge structure (XANES) and valence-band photoemission spectroscopy (VBPES), respectively. The field emission and magnetization behaviors are also presented. The results of annealing are as follows: (1) MWCNTs tend to align in the form of small fringes along their length, promote graphitization and be stable in air, (2) XANES indicates an enhancement in oxygen content on the sample, implying that it can be adopted for sensing and storing oxygen gas, (3) the electron field emission current density (J) is enhanced and the turn-on electric field (E(TOE)) reduced, suggesting potential use in field emission displays and as electron sources in microwave tube amplifiers and (4) as-grown MWCNTs with embedded iron nanoparticles exhibits significantly higher coercivity approximately 750 Oe than its bulk counterpart (Fe(bulk) approximately 0.9 Oe), suggesting its potential use as low-dimensional high-density magnetic recording media.

  2. In situ electric-field-induced contrast imaging of electronic transport pathways in nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jesse, Stephen; Guillorn, Michael A.; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Puretzky, Alexander A.; Howe, Jane Y.; Britt, Phillip F.; Geohegan, David B.

    2006-07-01

    An electric-field-induced contrast mechanism for scanning electron microscopy is reported which permits the visualization of embedded nanomaterials inside various matrices with high contrast and high definition. The high contrast is proposed to result from localized enhancement of secondary electron emission from the nanomaterials due to electric-field-induced changes in their work functions. By utilizing a stage that allows in situ current-voltage measurements inside a scanning electron microscope, single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded within polymethyl methacrylate films were visualized directly. In addition to the rapid assessment of nanotube dispersion within polymers, electric-field-induced contrast imaging enables the determination of percolation pathways. From the contrast in the images, the relative voltage at all points in the electron micrograph can be determined, providing a new mechanism to understand electronic percolation through nanoscale networks.

  3. In Situ Electric-Field-Induced Contrast Imaging of Electronic Transport Pathways in Nanotube-Polymer Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jesse, Stephen; Guillorn, Michael A; Ivanov, Ilia N; Puretzky, Alexander A; Howe, Jane Y; Britt, Phillip F; Geohegan, David B

    2006-01-01

    An electric-field-induced contrast mechanism for scanning electron microscopy is reported which permits the visualization of embedded nanomaterials inside various matrices with high contrast and high definition. The high contrast is proposed to result from localized enhancement of secondary electron emission from the nanomaterials due to electric-field-induced changes in their work functions. By utilizing a stage that allows in situ current-voltage measurements inside a scanning electron microscope, single-walled carbon nanotubes embedded within polymethyl methacrylate films were visualized directly. In addition to the rapid assessment of nanotube dispersion within polymers, electric-field-induced contrast imaging enables the determination of percolation pathways. From the contrast in the images, the relative voltage at all points in the electron micrograph can be determined, providing a new mechanism to understand electronic percolation through nanoscale networks.

  4. Fast Growth of Highly Ordered TiO2 Nanotube Arrays on Si Substrate under High-Field Anodization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Jingnan; Zheng, Maojun; Zhang, Bin; Li, Qiang; Wang, Faze; Ma, Liguo; Li, Yanbo; Zhu, Changqing; Ma, Li; Shen, Wenzhong

    2017-04-01

    Highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays (NTAs) on Si substrate possess broad applications due to its high surface-to-volume ratio and novel functionalities, however, there are still some challenges on facile synthesis. Here, we report a simple and cost-effective high-field (90-180 V) anodization method to grow highly ordered TiO2 NTAs on Si substrate, and investigate the effect of anodization time, voltage, and fluoride content on the formation of TiO2 NTAs. The current density-time curves, recorded during anodization processes, can be used to determine the optimum anodization time. It is found that the growth rate of TiO2 NTAs is improved significantly under high field, which is nearly 8 times faster than that under low fields (40-60 V). The length and growth rate of the nanotubes are further increased with the increase of fluoride content in the electrolyte.

  5. Enhancement mechanism of field electron emission properties in hybrid carbon nanotubes with tree- and wing-like features

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.M.; Yang, C.C.; Xu, Q.; Zheng, W.T.; Li, S.

    2009-12-15

    In this work, the tree-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with branches of different diameters and the wing-like CNTs with graphitic-sheets of different densities were synthesized by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The nanostructures of the as-prepared hybrid carbon materials were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The structural dependence of field electron emission (FEE) property was also investigated. It is found that both of the tree- and wing-like CNTs exhibit a lower turn-on field and higher emission current density than the pristine CNTs, which can be ascribed to the effects of branch size, crystal orientation, and graphitic-sheet density. - Graphical abstract: Tree-like carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with branches and the wing-like CNTs with graphitic-sheets were synthesized by using plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition. The structural dependence of field electron emission property was also investigated.

  6. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2015-05-15

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  7. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  8. Geometry dependence of the electrostatic and thermal response of a carbon nanotube during field emission.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Jaime A; Mengüç, M Pinar

    2008-02-20

    In this paper we present an analysis to simulate heating within an isolated carbon nanotube (CNT) attached to an etched tungsten tip during field emission of an electron beam. The length, radius, wall thickness and shape of the tip (closed with a hemispherical shape or open and flat) of the CNT and its separation distance from the flat surface are considered as variables. Using a finite element method, we predict the field enhancement, emission current and temperature of the CNT as a function of these parameters. The electrostatic and transient thermal analyses are integrated with the field-emission models based on the Fowler-Nordheim approximation and heating/cooling due to emitting energetic electrons (the Nottingham effect). These simulations suggest that the main mechanism responsible for heating of the CNT is Joule heating, which is significantly larger than the Nottingham effect. Results also indicate that the electrostatic characteristics of CNTs are very sensitive to the considered parameters whereas the transient thermal response is only a function of the CNT radius and wall thickness. Further, the thermal response of the CNT is independent of its geometry, meaning that, as long as a given set of geometrical conditions are present that result in a given emission current, the maximum temperature a CNT attains will be the same.

  9. Fully Automated Field-Deployable Bioaerosol Monitoring System Using Carbon Nanotube-Based Biosensors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Junhyup; Jin, Joon-Hyung; Kim, Hyun Soo; Song, Wonbin; Shin, Su-Kyoung; Yi, Hana; Jang, Dae-Ho; Shin, Sehyun; Lee, Byung Yang

    2016-05-17

    Much progress has been made in the field of automated monitoring systems of airborne pathogens. However, they still lack the robustness and stability necessary for field deployment. Here, we demonstrate a bioaerosol automonitoring instrument (BAMI) specifically designed for the in situ capturing and continuous monitoring of airborne fungal particles. This was possible by developing highly sensitive and selective fungi sensors based on two-channel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT-FETs), followed by integration with a bioaerosol sampler, a Peltier cooler for receptor lifetime enhancement, and a pumping assembly for fluidic control. These four main components collectively cooperated with each other to enable the real-time monitoring of fungi. The two-channel CNT-FETs can detect two different fungal species simultaneously. The Peltier cooler effectively lowers the working temperature of the sensor device, resulting in extended sensor lifetime and receptor stability. The system performance was verified in both laboratory conditions and real residential areas. The system response was in accordance with reported fungal species distribution in the environment. Our system is versatile enough that it can be easily modified for the monitoring of other airborne pathogens. We expect that our system will expedite the development of hand-held and portable systems for airborne bioaerosol monitoring.

  10. Near-field radiation between graphene-covered carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Richard Z.; Liu, Xianglei; Zhang, Zhuomin M.

    2015-05-01

    It has been shown that at small separation distances, thermal radiation between hyperbolic metamaterials is enhanced over blackbodies. This theoretical study considers near-field radiation when graphene is covered on the surfaces of two semi-infinite vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) arrays separated by a sub-micron vacuum gap. Doped graphene is found to improve photon tunneling in a broad hyperbolic frequency range, due to the interaction with graphene-graphene surface plasmon polaritons (SPP). In order to elucidate the SPP resonance between graphene on hyperbolic substrates, vacuum-suspended graphene sheets separated by similar gap distances are compared. Increasing the Fermi energy through doping shifts the spectral heat flux peak toward higher frequencies. Although the presence of graphene on VACNT does not offer huge near-field heat flux enhancement over uncovered VACNT, this study identifies conditions (i.e., gap distance and doping level) that best utilize graphene to augment near-field radiation. Through the investigation of spatial Poynting vectors, heavily doped graphene is found to increase penetration depths in hyperbolic modes and the result is sensitive to the frequency regime. This study may have an impact on designing carbon-based vacuum thermophotovoltaics and thermal switches.

  11. A multifinger microtriode with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode operating at GHz frequency.

    PubMed

    Ulisse, G; Brunetti, F; Ciceroni, C; Gemma, F; Dispenza, M; Fiorello, A M; Ricci, F; Di Carlo, A

    2015-05-29

    Vacuum microelectronic devices play an important role in the field of micro- and nano-electronics and they have been strongly developed in recent decades. Vacuum microelectronics are mainly based on the field emission effect and the employment of electrons in vacuum in a device with dimensions from tenths to hundredths of a micrometer. In this work, we present the development of a carbon-nanotube-based multifinger microtriode operating from 0.5 to 2 GHz. In this frequency range, a minimum RF signal gain of 5 dB is achieved. Such a device represents an optimized alternative to the standard Spindt-type microtriode. The advantage of such multifinger architecture consists in the possibility to reduce the cathode-grid capacitance by reducing the overlap between the two electrodes using a parallel patterning. This approach allows increasing the cut-off frequency of the devices with respect to the Spindt-type triode. We realized a prototype of the multifinger triode and the field emission properties have been characterized. The frequency behavior has been measured, demonstrating the possibility to amplify RF signal.

  12. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: circuitry and mechanical design.

    PubMed

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-01

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 μs. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  13. Electric field induced needle-pulsed arc discharge carbon nanotube production apparatus: Circuitry and mechanical design

    SciTech Connect

    Kia, Kaveh Kazemi; Bonabi, Fahimeh

    2012-12-15

    A simple and low cost apparatus is reported to produce multiwall carbon nanotubes and carbon nano-onions by a low power short pulsed arc discharge reactor. The electric circuitry and the mechanical design details and a micro-filtering assembly are described. The pulsed-plasma is generated and applied between two graphite electrodes. The pulse width is 0.3 {mu}s. A strong dc electric field is established along side the electrodes. The repetitive discharges occur in less than 1 mm distance between a sharp tip graphite rod as anode, and a tubular graphite as cathode. A hydrocarbon vapor, as carbon source, is introduced through the graphite nozzle in the cathode assembly. The pressure of the chamber is controlled by a vacuum pump. A magnetic field, perpendicular to the plasma path, is provided. The results show that the synergetic use of a pulsed-current and a dc power supply enables us to synthesize carbon nanoparticles with short pulsed plasma. The simplicity and inexpensiveness of this plan is noticeable. Pulsed nature of plasma provides some extra degrees of freedom that make the production more controllable. Effects of some design parameters such as electric field, pulse frequency, and cathode shape are discussed. The products are examined using scanning probe microscopy techniques.

  14. A multifinger microtriode with carbon nanotubes field emission cathode operating at GHz frequency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulisse, G.; Brunetti, F.; Ciceroni, C.; Gemma, F.; Dispenza, M.; Fiorello, A. M.; Ricci, F.; Di Carlo, A.

    2015-05-01

    Vacuum microelectronic devices play an important role in the field of micro- and nano-electronics and they have been strongly developed in recent decades. Vacuum microelectronics are mainly based on the field emission effect and the employment of electrons in vacuum in a device with dimensions from tenths to hundredths of a micrometer. In this work, we present the development of a carbon-nanotube-based multifinger microtriode operating from 0.5 to 2 GHz. In this frequency range, a minimum RF signal gain of 5 dB is achieved. Such a device represents an optimized alternative to the standard Spindt-type microtriode. The advantage of such multifinger architecture consists in the possibility to reduce the cathode-grid capacitance by reducing the overlap between the two electrodes using a parallel patterning. This approach allows increasing the cut-off frequency of the devices with respect to the Spindt-type triode. We realized a prototype of the multifinger triode and the field emission properties have been characterized. The frequency behavior has been measured, demonstrating the possibility to amplify RF signal.

  15. Highly Efficient and Scalable Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes via Weak Field Centrifugation

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Wieland G.; Weitz, R. Thomas; Kettner, Michel; Kraus, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Tomović, Željko; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2016-01-01

    The identification of scalable processes that transfer random mixtures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into fractions featuring a high content of semiconducting species is crucial for future application of SWCNTs in high-performance electronics. Herein we demonstrate a highly efficient and simple separation method that relies on selective interactions between tailor-made amphiphilic polymers and semiconducting SWCNTs in the presence of low viscosity separation media. High purity individualized semiconducting SWCNTs or even self-organized semiconducting sheets are separated from an as-produced SWCNT dispersion via a single weak field centrifugation run. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy are applied to verify the high purity of the obtained SWCNTs. Furthermore SWCNT - network field-effect transistors were fabricated, which exhibit high ON/OFF ratios (105) and field-effect mobilities (17 cm2/Vs). In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of high purity separation by a novel low complexity process, our method can be readily transferred to large scale production. PMID:27188435

  16. Highly Efficient and Scalable Separation of Semiconducting Carbon Nanotubes via Weak Field Centrifugation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reis, Wieland G.; Weitz, R. Thomas; Kettner, Michel; Kraus, Alexander; Schwab, Matthias Georg; Tomović, Željko; Krupke, Ralph; Mikhael, Jules

    2016-05-01

    The identification of scalable processes that transfer random mixtures of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) into fractions featuring a high content of semiconducting species is crucial for future application of SWCNTs in high-performance electronics. Herein we demonstrate a highly efficient and simple separation method that relies on selective interactions between tailor-made amphiphilic polymers and semiconducting SWCNTs in the presence of low viscosity separation media. High purity individualized semiconducting SWCNTs or even self-organized semiconducting sheets are separated from an as-produced SWCNT dispersion via a single weak field centrifugation run. Absorption and Raman spectroscopy are applied to verify the high purity of the obtained SWCNTs. Furthermore SWCNT - network field-effect transistors were fabricated, which exhibit high ON/OFF ratios (105) and field-effect mobilities (17 cm2/Vs). In addition to demonstrating the feasibility of high purity separation by a novel low complexity process, our method can be readily transferred to large scale production.

  17. Improved analog and AC performance with increased noise immunity using nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rewari, Sonam; Nath, Vandana; Haldar, Subhasis; Deswal, S. S.; Gupta, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper for the first time, the noise immunity and analog performance of nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET) has been investigated. Small signal AC performance metrics namely Scattering parameters (S-parameters) have been analyzed along with analog parameters to validate the suitability of NJLFET for RFIC design. NJLFET performance is examined by comparing its performance with junctionless gate-all-around (JLGAA) MOSFET. It has been inferred that NJLFET has improved I on/ I off ratio directing improved digital performance at higher channel lengths, reduced channel resistance ( R ch) which enables the MOSFET to provide a low resistance path to current and improved early voltage ( V EA) which shows the capability for high-gain amplification and higher g m/ g d directing high intrinsic dc gain. Higher f Tmax for NJLFET has been observed posing its potential for terahertz applications. Higher gain transconductance frequency product makes NJLFET an ultimate device for high-speed switching applications. Higher maximum transducer power gain in NJLFET implies higher power gain than JLGAA MOSFET. Also, NJLFET exhibits lower harmonic distortion and it has been explained by significant reduction in third-order derivative of transconductance, g m3. Reduction in g m3 shows that NJLFET provides better linearity over JLGAA and is more suitable for RFIC design. Also the S-parameters namely S11, S12, S21 and S22 have been analyzed to verify the small signal performance. A lower magnitude for reflection coefficients S11 and S22 depicts minimum reflection and higher matching between ports in NJLFET than JLGAA MOSFET. Higher voltage gains S12 and S21 are present in NJLFET than its counterpart which shows the higher gains that can be achieved using nanotube architecture. The noise metrics which are noise figure and noise conductance show significant reduction for NJLFET justifying its noise immunity.

  18. Disposable immunosensors for C-reactive protein based on carbon nanotubes field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Justino, Celine I L; Freitas, Ana C; Amaral, José P; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Cardoso, Susana; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-04-15

    Label-free immunosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (NTFET) devices were developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) which is currently the best validated inflammatory biomarker associated with cardiovascular diseases. The immunoreaction principle consists in the direct adsorption of CRP specific antibodies (anti-CRP) to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) networks. Such anti-CRP are the molecular receptors of CRP antigens which, in turn, can be detected by the developed NTFET devices in a linear dynamic range of 10(-4)-10(2) μg/mL. Thus, typical values of CRP (in blood serum) for healthy persons (<1 μg/mL), and higher levels (>5 μg/mL) corresponding to pathological states, can be both detected with the NTFET immunosensors, becoming an advantageous alternative as the basis for the development of analytical instrumentation for assessment of risk of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. A log-log linear regression was applied to the experimental data with a correlation coefficient of r=0.9962 (p<0.001), and there is no statistical difference (from ANOVA) between individual NTFET devices (p=0.9582), demonstrating acceptable reproducibility. According to the experimental results, the estimate of detection limit (LOD, 10(-4)μg/mL) is 3-fold lower than that of some conventional immunoassay techniques for blood serum (e.g., LOD of 0.2 μg/mL for high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and the dynamic range (10(-4)-10(2)μg/mL) is about 6-fold higher. Furthermore, this simple and low-cost methodology allows the use of sample volumes as low as 1 μL for the label-free detection of CRP.

  19. Cancer from internal emitters

    SciTech Connect

    Boecker, B.B.; Griffith, W.C. Jr.

    1995-10-01

    Irradiation from internal emitters, or internally deposited radionuclides, is an important component of radiation exposures encountered in the workplace, home, or general environment. Long-term studies of human populations exposed to various internal emitters by different routes of exposure are producing critical information for the protection of workers and members of the general public. The purpose of this report is to examine recent developments and discuss their potential importance for understanding lifetime cancer risks from internal emitters. The major populations of persons being studied for lifetime health effects from internally deposited radionuclides are well known: Lung cancer in underground miners who inhaled Rn progeny, liver cancer from persons injected with the Th-containing radiographic contrast medium Thorotrast, bone cancer from occupational or medical intakes of {sup 226}Ra or medical injections of {sup 224}Ra, and thyroid cancer from exposures to iodine radionuclides in the environment or for medical purposes.

  20. Head erosion with emittance growth in PWFA

    SciTech Connect

    Li, S. Z.; Adli, E.; England, R. J.; Frederico, J.; Gessner, S. J.; Hogan, M. J.; Litos, M. D.; Walz, D. R.; Muggli, P.; An, W.; Clayton, C. E.; Joshi, C.; Lu, W.; Marsh, K. A.; Mori, W.; Vafaei, N.

    2012-12-21

    Head erosion is one of the limiting factors in plasma wakefield acceleration (PWFA). We present a study of head erosion with emittance growth in field-ionized plasma from the PWFA experiments performed at the FACET user facility at SLAC. At FACET, a 20.3 GeV bunch with 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10} electrons is optimized in beam transverse size and combined with a high density lithium plasma for beam-driven plasma wakefield acceleration experiments. A target foil is inserted upstream of the plasma source to increase the bunch emittance through multiple scattering. Its effect on beamplasma interaction is observed with an energy spectrometer after a vertical bend magnet. Results from the first experiments show that increasing the emittance has suppressed vapor field-ionization and plasma wakefields excitation. Plans for the future are presented.

  1. RFI emitter location techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rao, B. L. J.

    1973-01-01

    The possibility is discussed of using Doppler techniques for determining the location of ground based emitters causing radio frequency interference with low orbiting satellites. An error analysis indicates that it is possible to find the emitter location within an error range of 2 n.mi. The parameters which determine the required satellite receiver characteristic are discussed briefly along with the non-real time signal processing which may by used in obtaining the Doppler curve. Finally, the required characteristics of the satellite antenna are analyzed.

  2. Analysing one isolated single walled carbon nanotube in the near-field domain with selective nanovolume Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Atalay, Han; Lefrant, Serge

    2004-09-01

    In this paper, we describe a new method to the selective nanovolume analysing of one isolated single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT). This concept is based on actually available imaging micro-spectrometry systems for working in near-field domain combined with a stigmatic solid immersion lens. This combination of different analytical methods, and modified and configured equipment entitles us to expand the functionality toward a three-dimensional (3D) nanovolume Raman mapping and photoluminescence intensity with a possible discrimination in polarization, as well as photoluminescence decaytime constant mapping with their unique combination. Subsequently, selective spectra can be acquired from the same location on the samples. By spectrally selecting a SWNT, we registered the spatial distribution of the emitted photons in x, y, z vectors to determine the position of a SWNT in the near-field domain. For the SWNTs that are localized with an accuracy better than 18 nm in the x, y and <1 nm in the z directions, we demonstrate an analytical sensitivity close to a single nanotube with unity throughput. This near-field capability is applied to resolve local variations unambiguously in the Raman spectrum along one single SWNT. Finally, in this paper, we report what we believe to be the first evidence of Raman mapping and 3D real optical imaging of carbon nanotubes with near-field resolution.

  3. The effects of a static magnetic field on the microwave absorption of hydrogen plasma in carbon nanotubes: a numerical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Zhi-Hua; Gong, Xue-Yu; Peng, Yan-Feng; Guo, Yan-Chun; Ning, Yan-Tao

    2012-07-01

    We theoretically investigate the microwave absorption properties of hydrogen plasma in iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation-grown carbon nanotubes under an external static magnetic field in the frequency range 0.3 GHz to 30 GHz, using the Maxwell equations in conjunction with a general expression for the effective complex permittivity of magnetized plasma known as the Appleton—Hartree formula. The effects of the external static magnetic field intensity and the incident microwave propagation direction on the microwave absorption of hydrogen plasma in CNTs are studied in detail. The numerical results indicate that the microwave absorption properties of hydrogen plasma in iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation-grown carbon nanotubes can be obviously improved when the external static magnetic field is applied to the material. It is found that the specified frequency microwave can be strongly absorbed by the hydrogen plasma in iron-catalyzed high-pressure disproportionation-grown carbon nanotubes over a wide range of incidence angles by adjusting the external magnetic field intensity and the parameters of the hydrogen plasma.

  4. Point Defects in Carbon Nanotubes: ab initio and Force-Fields Based Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kroes, Jaap; Pietrucci, Fabio; Curioni, Alessandro; Andreoni, Wanda

    2014-03-01

    We present an extended investigation of point defects in carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their effects on mechanical and electronic properties. This study is based on large-scale calculations using DFT with exchange and correlation functionals of the GGA - including empirical corrections for van-der-Waals interactions - and of the hybrid type. Additional simulations using classical interatomic potentials allow us to obtain a critical comparison between the outcome of DFT and force-fields. The CNT models adopted have a range of sizes and chiralities. In particular, (i) our simulations of oxygen chemisorption revealed a tendency to clustering and the existence of kinetic traps (epoxides), which explain STS data; (ii) the extension to oxygen isovalent species on CNTs and other graphitic surfaces has suggested a simple predictive model for the chemisorption pattern. Moreover, (iii) our analysis shows an intrinsic difficulty of available force fields to account for the energetics of vacancies and adsorption site preferences. Additional results aiming at characterizing the interaction of nitrogen oxides (NOx) with the CNT surface will also be presented. Work supported by SNSF Nano-Tera.ch and CSCS.

  5. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. G.; Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H.; Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr; Kim, S. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  6. Morphological Properties of Lyα Emitters at Redshift 4.86 in the Cosmos Field: Clumpy Star Formation or Merger?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Masakazu A. R.; Murata, Katsuhiro L.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Murayama, Takashi; Taniguchi, Yoshiaki; Kajisawa, Masaru; Shioya, Yasuhiro; Scoville, Nick Z.; Nagao, Tohru; Capak, Peter L.

    2016-03-01

    We investigate morphological properties of 61 Lyα emitters (LAEs) at z = 4.86 identified in the COSMOS field, based on Hubble Space Telescope Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) imaging data in the F814W band. Out of the 61 LAEs, we find the ACS counterparts for 54 LAEs. Eight LAEs show double-component structures with a mean projected separation of 0.″63 (˜4.0 kpc at z = 4.86). Considering the faintness of these ACS sources, we carefully evaluate their morphological properties, that is, size and ellipticity. While some of them are compact and indistinguishable from the point-spread function (PSF) half-light radius of 0.″07 (˜0.45 kpc), the others are clearly larger than the PSF size and spatially extended up to 0.″3 (˜1.9 kpc). We find that the ACS sources show a positive correlation between ellipticity and size and that the ACS sources with large size and round shape are absent. Our Monte Carlo simulation suggests that the correlation can be explained by (1) the deformation effects via PSF broadening and shot noise or (2) the source blending in which two or more sources with small separation are blended in our ACS image and detected as a single elongated source. Therefore, the 46 single-component LAEs could contain the sources that consist of double (or multiple) components with small spatial separation (i.e., ≲0.″3 or 1.9 kpc). Further observation with high angular resolution at longer wavelengths (e.g., rest-frame wavelengths of ≳4000 Å) is inevitable to decipher which interpretation is adequate for our LAE sample. Based on observations with NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope, obtained at the Space Telescope Science Institute, which is operated by AURA, Inc., under NASA contract NAS 5-26555, and also based on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  7. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate Between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrow-band Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, M.; Kashikawa, N.; Shimasaku, K.; Doi, M.; Nagao, T.; Iye, M.; Kodama, T.; Morokuma, T.; Motohara, K.

    2006-06-01

    Subaru Deep Field line-emitting galaxies in four narrow-band filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broad-band colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple narrow-band filters are used to distinguish Hα, [OII], and [OIII] emitters between redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 to construct their averaged rest-frame optical-to-UV SED and luminosity functions. These luminosity functions are derived down to faint magnitudes, which allows for a more accurate determination of the faint end slope. With a large (N 200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each luminosity function. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [OIII] and [OII] luminosity functions reported in this paper agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al (2003). The z=0.066-0.092 Hα LF agrees with those of Jones & Bland-Hawthorn (2001), but for z=0.24 and 0.40, their number density is higher by a factor of two or more. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches two orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al. (1995), is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1 than predicted. The faint end slope α and φ* show a strong evolution with redshift while L* show little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated star formation rate densities are derived via Hα for 0.07

  8. Experimental Results of a Single Emittance Compensation Solenoidal Magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palmer, D. T.; Wang, X. J.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Miller, R. H.; Skaritka, J.

    1997-05-01

    A new iron dominated single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet was designed to be integrated with the BNL/SLAC/UCLA 1.6 cell S-Band Photocathode RF Gun. This emittance compensated photoinjector is now in operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility. It has produced a 300 pC electron bunches with a normalized rms transverse emittance of ɛ_n,rms = 0.7 π mm mrad. POISSON field maps were used with PARMELA to optimize the emittance compensation solenoidal magnet design. Magnetic field measurements show that at the cathode plane Bz <= 10 gauss for a peak magnetic field of B_z,max = 3 KG. Which is in agreement with POISSON simulation. A single emittance compensation solenoidal magnet will produces a initial angular momentum of the electron bunch that manifests itself in a initial magnetic emittance term that cannot be eliminated. This magnetic emittance ɛ_mag,n,rms scales as 0.01 π mm mrad per gauss at the cathode. Which is in agreement with PARMELA simulations. Experimental beam dynamics results are presented that show spot size and emittance as a function of cathode magnetic field. These results are compared to theory and simulations.

  9. Emittance growth due to dipole ripple and sextupole

    SciTech Connect

    Shih, H.J.; Ellison, J.A.; Syphers, M.J.; Newberger, B.S.

    1993-05-01

    Ripple in the power supplies for storage ring magnets can have adverse effects on the circulating beams: orbit distortion and emittance growth from dipole ripple, tune modulation and dynamic aperture reduction from quadrupole ripple, etc. In this paper, we study the effects of ripple in the horizontal bending field of the SSC in the presence of nonlinearity, in particular, the growth in beam emittance.

  10. Chiral-index resolved length mapping of carbon nanotubes in solution using electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wenshan; Hennrich, Frank; Flavel, Benjamin S.; Kappes, Manfred M.; Krupke, Ralph

    2016-09-01

    The length of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is an important metric for the integration of SWCNTs into devices and for the performance of SWCNT-based electronic or optoelectronic applications. In this work we propose a rather simple method based on electric-field induced differential absorption spectroscopy to measure the chiral-index-resolved average length of SWCNTs in dispersions. The method takes advantage of the electric-field induced length-dependent dipole moment of nanotubes and has been verified and calibrated by atomic force microscopy. This method not only provides a low cost, in situ approach for length measurements of SWCNTs in dispersion, but due to the sensitivity of the method to the SWCNT chiral index, the chiral index dependent average length of fractions obtained by chromatographic sorting can also be derived. Also, the determination of the chiral-index resolved length distribution seems to be possible using this method.

  11. Preparation and properties of alumina composites modified by electric field-induced alignment of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yue-Feng; Shi, Lei; Zhang, Chan; Yang, Xi-Zhi; Liang, Ji

    2007-11-01

    Catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) grown multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) are treated with HF and deionized water and are then placed into alumina ceramics for improvement of both electrical conductivity and mechanical properties. In particular, an alternating current (ac) electric field is applied during the coagulation of the alumina slurries to induce the formation of aligned MWNT networks in the alumina matrix. The coagulated alumina matrix composite bases filled with 2 wt. % ac electric field-induced aligned MWNTs, are then sintered by hot pressing. The electrical conductivities of the prepared composites in directions both parallel and perpendicular to the MWNTs alignment, reach values of 6.2×10-2 S m-1 and 6.8×10-9 S m-1, respectively, compared with that of 4.5×10-15 S m-1 for pristine alumina ceramics. The fracture toughness and flexing strengths of the prepared composites in the two directions are 4.66±0.66 MPa m0.5, 390±70 MPa, and 3.65±0.46 MPa m0.5, 191±5 MPa, respectively, compared with 3.78±0.66 MPa m0.5 and 302±50 MPa for pristine alumina, 4.09±0.15 MPa m0.5 and 334±60 MPa for alumina filled with 2 wt. % MWNTs prepared without the effect of an electric field, respectively. The results indicate that the electric field leads to anisotropic behaviour. The properties of the composites along the direction of the MWNTs alignment are much improved with the addition of a small amount of CVD grown MWNTs.

  12. Effect of Temperature Gradient on Thick Film Selective Emitter Emittance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Good, Brian S.; Clark, Eric B.; Chen, Zheng

    1997-01-01

    A temperature gradient across a thick (greater than or equal to .1 mm) film selective emitter will produce a significant reduction in the spectral emittance from the no temperature gradient case. Thick film selective emitters of rare earth doped host materials such as yttrium-aluminum-garnet (YAG) are examples where temperature gradient effects are important. In this paper a model is developed for the spectral emittance assuming a linear temperature gradient across the film. Results of the model indicate that temperature gradients will result in reductions the order of 20% or more in the spectral emittance.

  13. Optical Performance of Carbon-Nanotube Electron Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Jonge, Niels de; Allioux, Myriam; Oostveen, Jim T.; Teo, Kenneth B. K.; Milne, William I.

    2005-05-13

    The figure of merit for the electron optical performance of carbon-nanotube (CNT) electron sources is presented. This figure is given by the relation between the reduced brightness and the energy spread in the region of stable emission. It is shown experimentally that a CNT electron source exhibits a highly stable emission process that follows the Fowler-Nordheim theory for field emission, fixing the relationship among the energy spread, the current, and the radius. The performance of the CNT emitter under realistic operating conditions is compared with state-of-the-art electron point sources. It is demonstrated that the reduced brightness is a function of the tunneling parameter, a measure of the energy spread at low temperatures, only, independent of the geometry of the emitter.

  14. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  15. Power flow from a dipole emitter near an optical antenna.

    PubMed

    Huang, Kevin C Y; Jun, Young Chul; Seo, Min-Kyo; Brongersma, Mark L

    2011-09-26

    Current methods to calculate the emission enhancement of a quantum emitter coupled to an optical antenna of arbitrary geometry rely on analyzing the total Poynting vector power flow out of the emitter or the dyadic Green functions from full-field numerical simulations. Unfortunately, these methods do not provide information regarding the nature of the dominant energy decay pathways. We present a new approach that allows for a rigorous separation, quantification, and visualization of the emitter output power flow captured by an antenna and the subsequent reradiation power flow to the far field. Such analysis reveals unprecedented details of the emitter/antenna coupling mechanisms and thus opens up new design strategies for strongly interacting emitter/antenna systems used in sensing, active plasmonics and metamaterials, and quantum optics.

  16. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for the fast and selective detection of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The non-specific binding of proteins and the effects of other interferences are avoided by covering the non-adsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The selectivity of the sensor has been tested against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the most abundant protein in plasma. HIgG in aqueous solution with concentrations from 1.25 mg L(-1) (8 nM) can be readily detected with response times of about 10 min. The SWCNT networks that form the basis of the sensor are easily grown by chemical vapour deposition. Silver screen-printed electrodes make the sensor quick to build. The sensitivity obtained with this sensor is similar to other FET devices based on SWCNTs built using much more complicated lithography processes. Moreover, the sensor is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  17. High performance dendrimer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor biosensor for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Kotnala, Ravinder K.

    2016-12-01

    We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer with 128 carboxyl groups as anchors for site specific biomolecular immobilization of protein antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP) detection. The FET device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and current-gate voltage (I-Vg) characteristic studies. A concentration-dependent decrease in the source-drain current was observed in the regime of clinical significance, with a detection limit of ˜85 pM and a high sensitivity of 20% change in current (ΔI/I) per decade CRP concentration, showing SWNT being locally gated by the binding of CRP to antibody (anti-CRP) on the FET device. The low value of the dissociation constant (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.13 μg ml-1) indicated a high affinity of the device towards CRP analyte arising due to high anti-CRP loading with a better probe orientation on the 3-dimensional PAMAM structure.

  18. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  19. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Md. Abdul; Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-01

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5-22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5-16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ˜59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ˜ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were found to be ˜0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  20. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, Md. Abdul Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-04

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5–22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5–16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ∼59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ∼ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) were found to be ∼0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  1. Synthesized multiwall MoS2 nanotube and nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathipour, S.; Remskar, M.; Varlec, A.; Ajoy, A.; Yan, R.; Vishwanath, S.; Rouvimov, S.; Hwang, W. S.; Xing, H. G.; Jena, D.; Seabaugh, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of synthesized multiwall MoS2 nanotube (NT) and nanoribbon (NR) field-effect transistors (FETs). The MoS2 NTs and NRs were grown by chemical transport, using iodine as a transport agent. Raman spectroscopy confirms the material as unambiguously MoS2 in NT, NR, and flake forms. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe cross sections of the devices after electrical measurements and these were used in the interpretation of the electrical measurements, allowing the estimation of the current density. The NT and NR FETs demonstrate n-type behavior, with ON/OFF current ratios exceeding 103, and with current densities of 1.02 μA/μm and 0.79 μA/μm at VDS = 0.3 V and VBG = 1 V, respectively. Photocurrent measurements conducted on a MoS2 NT FET revealed short-circuit photocurrent of tens of nanoamps under an excitation optical power of 78 μW and 488 nm wavelength, which corresponds to a responsivity of 460 μA/W. A long channel transistor model was used to model the common-source characteristics of MoS2 NT and NR FETs and was shown to be consistent with the measured data.

  2. Synthesized multiwall MoS{sub 2} nanotube and nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Fathipour, S. Ajoy, A.; Vishwanath, S.; Rouvimov, S.; Xing, H. G.; Jena, D.; Seabaugh, A.; Remskar, M.; Varlec, A.; Yan, R.; Hwang, W. S.

    2015-01-12

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of synthesized multiwall MoS{sub 2} nanotube (NT) and nanoribbon (NR) field-effect transistors (FETs). The MoS{sub 2} NTs and NRs were grown by chemical transport, using iodine as a transport agent. Raman spectroscopy confirms the material as unambiguously MoS{sub 2} in NT, NR, and flake forms. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe cross sections of the devices after electrical measurements and these were used in the interpretation of the electrical measurements, allowing the estimation of the current density. The NT and NR FETs demonstrate n-type behavior, with ON/OFF current ratios exceeding 10{sup 3}, and with current densities of 1.02 μA/μm and 0.79 μA/μm at V{sub DS} = 0.3 V and V{sub BG} = 1 V, respectively. Photocurrent measurements conducted on a MoS{sub 2} NT FET revealed short-circuit photocurrent of tens of nanoamps under an excitation optical power of 78 μW and 488 nm wavelength, which corresponds to a responsivity of 460 μA/W. A long channel transistor model was used to model the common-source characteristics of MoS{sub 2} NT and NR FETs and was shown to be consistent with the measured data.

  3. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are derived and compared with those of the metal oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, which is the CNT diameter direction, and this makes the CNTFET characteristics quite different from those in MOSFETs. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and it is shown that the familiar relations are still valid because of the macroscopic number of states available in the CNTs. This is in sharp contrast to the cases of quantum dots. Using these relations, we derive an inversion threshold voltage V(sub Ti) and an accumulation threshold voltage V(sub Ta) as a function of the Fermi level E(sub F) in the channel, where E(sub F) is a measure of channel doping. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger dependence than that of MOSFETs, while V(sub Ta)s of both CNTFETs and MOSFETs depend quite weakly on E(sub F) with the same functional form. This means the transition from normally-off mode to normally-on mode is much sharper in CNTFETs as the doping increases, and this property has to be taken into account in circuit design.

  4. Novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with graded double halo channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali; Keshavarzi, Parviz

    2012-05-01

    A novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with symmetric graded double halo channel (GDH-CNTFET) is presented for suppressing band to band tunneling and improving the device performance. GDH structure includes two symmetric graded haloes which are broadened throughout the channel. The doping concentration of GDH channel is at maximum level at drain/source side and is reduced gradually toward zero at the middle of channel. The doping distribution at source side of channel reduces the drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and the drain side suppresses the band to band tunneling effect. In addition, broadening the doping throughout the channel increases the recombination of electrons and holes and acts as an additional factor for improving the band to band tunneling. Simulation results show that applying this structure on CNTFET enhances the device performance. In comparison with double halo structure with equal saturation current, the proposed GDH structure shows better characteristics and short channel parameters. Furthermore, the delay and power delay product (PDP) analysis versus on/off current ratio shows the efficiency of the proposed GDH structure.

  5. Compact model for ballistic MOSFET-like carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolkader, Tarek M.; Fikry, Wael

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a compact model for MOSFET-like ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) is presented. The model is based on calculating the charge and surface potential on the top of the barrier between source and drain using closed-form analytical formulae. The formula for the surface potential is obtained by merging two simplified expressions obtained in two extreme cases (very low and very high gate bias). Two fitting parameters are introduced whose values are extracted by best fitting model results with numerically calculated ones. The model has a continuous derivative and thus it is SPICE-compatible. Accuracy of the model is compared to previous analytical model presented in the literature with numerical results taken as a reference. Proposed model proves to give less relative error over a wide range of gate biases, and for a drain bias up to 0.5 V. In addition, the model enables the calculation of quantum and gate capacitance analytically reproducing the negative capacitance behaviour known in CNFETs.

  6. Near field acoustic holography measurements of carbon nanotube thin film speakers.

    PubMed

    Asgarisabet, Mahsa; Barnard, Andrew R; Bouman, Troy M

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film speakers produce sound with the thermoacoustic effect. Better understanding of the physical acoustic properties of these speakers will drive future design improvements. Measuring acoustic properties at the surface of the CNT thin film is difficult because the films, themselves, do not vibrate, are fragile and have a high surface temperature. In order to measure the surface particle velocity and sound pressure level (SPL), near field acoustic holography (NAH) has been used by employing probe microphones. NAH images the acoustic quantities of the source system using the set of acoustic pressure measurements on a hologram parallel to the source surface. It is shown that the particle velocity at the surface of an open-air, double-sided speaker is nominally zero, as expected. However, the SPL distribution is not uniform on the source surface, contrary to common lumped parameter model assumptions. Also, particle velocity and sound intensity distributions on the hologram have been obtained in this study. Finally, measured directivity patterns of the planar CNT speaker are reported.

  7. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  8. Detection of the Odor Signature of Ovarian Cancer using DNA-Decorated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Christopher; Kybert, Nicholas; Yodh, Jeremy; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Carbon nanotubes are low-dimensional materials that exhibit remarkable chemical and bio-sensing properties and have excellent compatibility with electronic systems. Here, we present a study that uses an electronic olfaction system based on a large array of DNA-carbon nanotube field effect transistors vapor sensors to analyze the VOCs of blood plasma samples collected from patients with malignant ovarian cancer, patients with benign ovarian lesions, and age-matched healthy subjects. Initial investigations involved coating each CNT sensor with single-stranded DNA of a particular base sequence. 10 distinct DNA oligomers were used to functionalize the carbon nanotube field effect transistors, providing a 10-dimensional sensor array output response. Upon performing a statistical analysis of the 10-dimensional sensor array responses, we showed that blood samples from patients with malignant cancer can be reliably differentiated from those of healthy control subjects with a p-value of 3 x 10-5. The results provide preliminary evidence that the blood of ovarian cancer patients contains a discernable volatile chemical signature that can be detected using DNA-CNT nanoelectronic vapor sensors, a first step towards a minimally invasive electronic diagnostic technology for ovarian cancer.

  9. Photoluminescence microscopy on air-suspended carbon nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miura, R.; Imamura, S.; Shimada, T.; Ohta, R.; Iwamoto, S.; Arakawa, Y.; Kato, Y. K.

    2014-03-01

    Because carbon nanotubes are room-temperature telecom-band emitters and can be grown on silicon substrates, they are ideal for coupling to silicon photonic cavities.[2,3 In particular, as-grown air-suspended carbon nanotubes show excellent optical properties, but cavity modes with large fields in the air are needed in order to achieve efficient coupling. Here we investigate individual air-suspended nanotubes coupled to photonic crystal nanobeam cavities. We utilize cavities that confine air-band modes which have large fields in the air. Dielectric mode cavities are also prepared for comparison. We fabricate the devices from silicon-on-insulator substrates by using electron beam lithography and dry etching to form the nanobeam structure. The buried oxide layer is removed by wet etching, and carbon nanotubes are grown onto the cavities by chemical vapor deposition. We perform photoluminescence imaging and excitation spectroscopy to find the positions of the nanotubes and identify their chiralities. For both types of devices, cavity modes with quality factors of ~3000 are observed within the nanotube emission peak. Work supported by SCOPE, KAKENHI, The Telecommunications Advancement Foundation, The Toyota Physical and Chemical Research Institute, Project for Developing Innovation Systems of MEXT, Japan and the Photon Frontier Network Program of MEXT, Japan.

  10. Reappraisal of solid selective emitters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.

    1990-01-01

    New rare earth oxide emitters show greater efficiency than previous emitters. As a result, based on a simple model the efficiency of these emitters was calculated. Results indicate that the emission band of the selective emitter must be at relatively low energy (less than or equal to .52 eV) to obtain maximum efficiency at moderate emitter temperatures (less than or equal to 1500 K). Thus low bandgap energy PV materials are required to obtain an efficient thermophotovoltaic (TPV) system. Of the 4 specific rare earths (Nd, Ho, Er, Yb) studied Ho has the largest efficiency at moderate temperatures (72 percent at 1500 K). A comparison was made between a selective emitter TPV system and a TPV system that uses a thermal emitter plus a band pass filter to make the thermal emitter behave like a selective emitter. Results of the comparison indicate that only for very optimistic filter and thermal emitter properties will the filter TPV system have a greater efficiency than the selective emitter system.

  11. The Nano-Memory Devices of a Single Wall and Peapod Structural Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Kang, K. T.; Park, K. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. G.; Fischer, J. E.; Johnson, A. T.

    2003-08-01

    The rediscovery and the memory application of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) give a new method in nanoelectronics applications. At first we will report the memory effects of a SWNT, and attempt to use this property in a memory device. To use a SWNT field effect transistor (FET) as a charge-storage memory device, the device operates by injecting electrons from the nanotube channel of a TubeFET into charge traps on the surface of the SiO2 gate dielectric, thus shifting the threshold voltage. This memory can be written and erased many times, and has a hold time of hundreds of seconds at room temperature. At second we have attempted to make a Peapod tubeFET. It is the structure that a C60 was contained within the tube and separated from it by a graphitic Van der Waals gap. I-V property of the Peapod shows semiconducting property.

  12. Electrical Detection of Negatively Charged Proteins Using n-Type Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuki; Maehashi, Kenzo; Ohno, Yasuhide; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-02-01

    We fabricated n-type carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. To prevent the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)/metal contacts from adsorption of ambient molecules, SiNx passivation films were deposited on CNTFETs by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. CNTFETs with SiNx passivation films on SWNT/metal contacts, but SWNT channels are exposed to environment for sensing, exhibit n-type behavior both in air and solution. Negatively charged bovine serum albumin is successfully detected using the fabricated n-type CNTFET biosensors with SiNx passivation films. Electrical detections of both negatively and positively charged proteins are achieved using n- and p-type CNTFET biosensors, respectively.

  13. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sung Hun E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A. E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  14. Rare Earth Garnet Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.75, sup 4)|(sub 15/2) - (sup 4)|(sub 13/2),for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approx. = 0.65, (sup 5)|(sub 7) - (sup 5)|(sub 8) for Ho-YAG) at 1500 K. In addition, low out-of-band spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda) less than 0.2, suggest these materials would be excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in thermophotovoltaic (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500 K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. Selective emitters in the near IR are of special interest for thermophotovoltaic (TPV) energy conversion. The most promising solid selective emitters for use in a TPV system are rare earth oxides. Early spectral emittance work on rare earth oxides showed strong emission bands in the infrared (0.9 - 3 microns). However, the emittance outside the emission band was also significant and the efficiency of these emitters was low. Recent improvements in efficiency have been made with emitters fabricated from fine (5 - 10 microns) rare earth oxide fibers similar to the Welsbach mantle used in gas lanterns. However, the rare earth garnet emitters are more rugged than the mantle type emitters. A thin film selective emitter on a low emissivity substrate such as gold, platinum etc., is rugged and easily adapted to a wide variety of thermal sources. The garnet structure and its many subgroups have been successfully used as hosts for rare earth ions, introduced as substitutional

  15. Direct growth of aligned carbon nanotubes on bulk metals.

    PubMed

    Talapatra, S; Kar, S; Pal, S K; Vajtai, R; Ci, L; Victor, P; Shaijumon, M M; Kaur, S; Nalamasu, O; Ajayan, P M

    2006-11-01

    There are several advantages of growing carbon nanotubes (CNTs) directly on bulk metals, for example in the formation of robust CNT-metal contacts during growth. Usually, aligned CNTs are grown either by using thin catalyst layers predeposited on substrates or through vapour-phase catalyst delivery. The latter method, although flexible, is unsuitable for growing CNTs directly on metallic substrates. Here we report on the growth of aligned multiwalled CNTs on a metallic alloy, Inconel 600 (Inconel), using vapour-phase catalyst delivery. The CNTs are well anchored to the substrate and show excellent electrical contact with it. These CNT-metal structures were then used to fabricate double-layer capacitors and field-emitter devices, which demonstrated improved performance over previously designed CNT structures. Inconel coatings can also be used to grow CNTs on other metallic substrates. This finding overcomes the substrate limitation for nanotube growth which should assist the development of future CNT-related technologies.

  16. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  17. Rare earth garnet selective emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, Roland A.; Chubb, Donald L.; Farmer, Serene C.; Good, Brian S.

    1994-01-01

    Thin film Ho-YAG and Er-YAG emitters with a platinum substrate exhibit high spectral emittance in the emission band (epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.74, ((4)l(sub 15/2)) - ( (4)l(sub13/2)), for Er-YAG and epsilon(sub lambda) approximately equal to 0.65, ((5)l(sub 7))-((5)l(sub 8)) for Ho-YAG) at excellent candidates for high efficiency selective emitters in the thermophotovoltaics (TPV) systems operating at moderate temperatures (1200-1500K). Spectral emittance measurements of the thin films were made (1.2 less than lambda less than 3.0 microns) and compared to the theoretical emittances calculated using measured values of the spectral extinction coefficient. In this paper we present the results for a new class of rare earth ion selective emitters. These emitters are thin sections (less than 1 mm) of yttrium aluminum garnet (YAG) single crystal with a rare earth substitutional impurity. This paper presents normal spectral emittance, epsilon(sub lambda), measurements of holmium (Ho), and erbium (Er) doped YAG thin film selective emitters at 1500 K, and compares those results with the theoretical spectral emittance.

  18. High Critical Field Superconductivity in FeSe0.1 Te0.9 Coated Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Haiyan; Cornell, Nicholas; Huang, Jijie; Salamon, Myron; Zakhidov, Anvar; Anvar Zakhidov; Haiyan Wang Team; Utd; Tamu Afosr Team

    2015-03-01

    Thin films of FeSe0.1Te0.9, grown on SrTi03, have been shown to possess an increased critical temperature, field, and current relative to both bulk samples of FeSe0.1Te0.9 and thin films of the related compound FeSe0.5Te0.5. Empirical measurement of FeSe0.1Te0.9 thin films reveal a zero temperature Hc2(0) ~ 45T. Carbon nanotubes are a promising lightweight flexible material for superconducting applications and have proven a robust substrate when conformally coated by superconducting MgB2. Thin film coatings of FeSe0.1Te0.9 have been deposited via pulsed laser deposition on dry- drawn multiwall carbon nanotube sheets drawn from CVD grown forests. While true zero resistance isn't achieved due to inter-connectivity issues or junction effects in multiwall CNT case, clear superconducting transitions with R reaching zero can be seen on other single wall CNT, and non-oriented carbon nanotube substrates. Properties of these superconducting FeSe0.1Te0.9@SWCNT thin films are discussed.

  19. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingqi; Zhang, Xixiang

    2011-09-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation.

  20. Monolithic multinozzle emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry

    DOEpatents

    Wang, Daojing; Yang, Peidong; Kim, Woong; Fan, Rong

    2011-09-20

    Novel and significantly simplified procedures for fabrication of fully integrated nanoelectrospray emitters have been described. For nanofabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (NM.sup.2 emitters), a bottom up approach using silicon nanowires on a silicon sliver is used. For microfabricated monolithic multinozzle emitters (M.sup.3 emitters), a top down approach using MEMS techniques on silicon wafers is used. The emitters have performance comparable to that of commercially-available silica capillary emitters for nanoelectrospray mass spectrometry.

  1. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H- ion source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, A.; Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-01

    The prototype rf-driven H- ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H- ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (TPE) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used TPE of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H- ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  2. Dependence of beam emittance on plasma electrode temperature and rf-power, and filter-field tuning with center-gapped rod-filter magnets in J-PARC rf-driven H{sup −} ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, A. Koizumi, I.; Ohkoshi, K.; Ikegami, K.; Takagi, A.; Yamazaki, S.; Oguri, H.

    2014-02-15

    The prototype rf-driven H{sup −} ion-source with a nickel plated oxygen-free-copper (OFC) plasma chamber, which satisfies the Japan Proton Accelerator Research Complex (J-PARC) 2nd stage requirements of a H{sup −} ion beam current of 60 mA within normalized emittances of 1.5 π mm mrad both horizontally and vertically, a flat top beam duty factor of 1.25% (500 μs × 25 Hz) and a life-time of more than 50 days, was reported at the 3rd international symposium on negative ions, beams, and sources (NIBS2012). The experimental results of the J-PARC ion source with a plasma chamber made of stainless-steel, instead of nickel plated OFC used in the prototype source, are presented in this paper. By comparing these two sources, the following two important results were acquired. One was that the about 20% lower emittance was produced by the rather low plasma electrode (PE) temperature (T{sub PE}) of about 120 °C compared with the typically used T{sub PE} of about 200 °C to maximize the beam current for the plasma with the abundant cesium (Cs). The other was that by using the rod-filter magnets with a gap at each center and tuning the gap-lengths, the filter-field was optimized and the rf-power necessary to produce the J-PARC required H{sup −} ion beam current was reduced typically 18%. The lower rf-power also decreases the emittances.

  3. Design considerations and emerging challenges for nanotube-, nanowire-, and negative capacitor-field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Md. Abdul

    As the era of classical planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) comes to an end, the semiconductor industry is beginning to adopt 3D device architectures, such as FinFETs, starting at the 22 nm technology node. Since physical limits such as short channel effect (SCE) and self-heating may dominate, it may be difficult to scale Si FinFET below 10 nm. In this regard, transistors with different materials, geometries, or operating principles may help. For example, gate has excellent electrostatic control over 2D thin film channel with planar geometry, and 1D nanowire (NW) channel with gate-all-around (GAA) geometry to reduce SCE. High carrier mobility of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) or III-V channels may reduce VDD to reduce power consumption. Therefore, as channel of transistor, 2D thin film of array SWNTs and 1D III-V multi NWs are promising for sub 10 nm technology nodes. In this thesis, we analyze the potential of these transistors from process, performance, and reliability perspectives. For SWNT FETs, we discuss a set of challenges (such as how to (i) characterize diameter distribution, (ii) remove metallic (m)-SWNTs, and (iii) avoid electrostatic cross-talk among the neighboring SWNTs), and demonstrate solution strategies both theoretically and experimentally. Regarding self-heating in these new class of devices (SWNT FET and GAA NW FET including state-of-the-art FinFET), higher thermal resistance from poor thermal conducting oxides results significant temperature rise, and reduces the IC life-time. For GAA NW FETs, we discuss accurate self-heating evaluation with good spatial, temporal, and thermal resolutions. The introduction of negative capacitor (NC), as gate dielectric stack of transistor, allows sub 60 mV/dec operation to reduce power consumption significantly. Taken together, our work provides a comprehensive perspective regarding the challenges and opportunities of sub 10 nm technology nodes.

  4. Characteristic dynamic modes and domain-wall motion in magnetic nanotubes excited by resonant rotating magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jaehak; Kim, Junhoe; Kim, Bosung; Cho, Young-Jun; Lee, Jae-Hyeok; Kim, Sang-Koog

    2016-07-01

    We performed micromagnetic numerical calculations to explore a cylindrical nanotube's magnetization dynamics and domain-wall (DW) motions driven by eigen-circular-rotating magnetic fields of different frequencies. We discovered the presence of two different localized DW oscillations as well as asymmetric ferromagnetic resonance precession and azimuthal spin-wave modes at the corresponding resonant frequencies of the circular-rotating fields. Associated with these intrinsic modes, there exist very contrasting DW motions of different speed and propagation direction for a given DW chirality. The direction and speed of the DW propagation were found to be controllable according to the rotation sense and frequency of noncontact circular-rotating fields. Furthermore, spin-wave emissions from the moving DW were observed at a specific field frequency along with their Doppler effect. This work furthers the fundamental understanding of soft magnetic nanotubes' intrinsic dynamic modes and spin-wave emissions and offers an efficient means of manipulating the speed and direction of their DW propagations.

  5. Ensemble-averaged particle orientation and shear viscosity of single-wall-carbon-nanotube suspensions under shear and electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chen; Shan, Jerry W.

    2010-02-01

    The ensemble-averaged particle-orientation angles and apparent shear viscosities of dilute suspensions of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in a liquid solvent, α-terpineol, were experimentally studied under combined shear flow and electric fields. An optical polarization-modulation method was used to measure the orientation angles of individual and small bundles of SWNTs, while a modified concentric-cylinder viscometer was used to make simultaneous electrorheological measurements of the apparent viscosity. The particle-orientation response occurs on time scales one to two orders of magnitude faster than the macroscopic electrorheological response, and does not appear to directly affect the apparent viscosity at these low concentrations. Particle-orientation angles for various shear rates and electric fields are found to collapse when plotted against the parameter, f ˜E2/γ˙, as predicted by the theory developed by Mason and co-workers for the equilibrium orientation angle of ellipsoids under electric fields and shear flow. However, comparison between measured and predicted particle-orientation angles shows poor agreement at intermediate values of f. Electrostatic interactions between large-aspect-ratio particles are shown to be significant, and may account for the discrepancy between the measurements and classical theory for even dilute suspensions of nanotubes under both shear and electric fields.

  6. Integration and characterization of aligned carbon nanotubes on metal/silicon substrates and effects of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yong; Li, Ruying; Liu, Hao; Sun, Xueliang; Mérel, Philippe; Désilets, Sylvain

    2009-02-01

    We report here a facile way to grow aligned multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) on various metal (e.g. gold, tungsten, vanadium and copper)/silicon electrically conductive substrates by aerosol-assisted chemical vapor deposition (AACVD). Without using any buffer layers, integration of high quality MWCNTs to the conductive substrates has been achieved by introducing appropriate amount of water vapor into the growth system. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) determination indicate tidy morphology and narrow diameter distribution of the nanotubes as well as promising growth rate suitable for industrial applications. Raman spectra analysis illustrates that the structural order and purity of the nanotubes are significantly improved in the presence of water vapor. The growth mechanism of the nanotubes has been discussed. It is believed that water vapor plays a key role in the catalyst-substrate interaction and nucleation of the carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. This synthesis approach is expected to be extended to other catalyst-conductive substrate systems and provide some new insight in the direct integration of carbon nanotubes onto conductive substrates, which promises great potential for applications in electrical interconnects, contacts for field emitters, and other electronic nanodevices.

  7. Field Effect Transistor Using Carbon Nanotubes and DNA as Electrical Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.

    2017-02-01

    We present an electronic sensor in the molecular scale, which is very sensitive for detection and sensing of DNA characteristics and DNA activities in particular activities between DNA duplex and any protein. Here, the device shows that DNA is electronically inserted to be on the same time as an electrical device transducer and as a biological target in a carbon nanotube-DNA-carbon nanotube electronic sensor. We have performed a DNA binding through an amide group by the electron transfer through amide group. The presented device has shown an efficient and rapid procedure to bind the electrical vulnerability of DNA with the detection of enzymatic effectiveness leading to high efficient biosensor.

  8. Magnetic field effect on Poiseuille flow and heat transfer of carbon nanotubes along a vertical channel filled with Casson fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aman, Sidra; Khan, Ilyas; Ismail, Zulkhibri; Salleh, Mohd Zuki; Alshomrani, Ali Saleh; Alghamdi, Metib Said

    2017-01-01

    Applications of carbon nanotubes, single walls carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multiple walls carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in thermal engineering have recently attracted significant attention. However, most of the studies on CNTs are either experimental or numerical and the lack of analytical studies limits further developments in CNTs research particularly in channel flows. In this work, an analytical investigation is performed on heat transfer analysis of SWCNTs and MWCNTs for mixed convection Poiseuille flow of a Casson fluid along a vertical channel. These CNTs are suspended in three different types of base fluids (Water, Kerosene and engine Oil). Xue [Phys. B Condens. Matter 368, 302-307 (2005)] model has been used for effective thermal conductivity of CNTs. A uniform magnetic field is applied in a transverse direction to the flow as magnetic field induces enhancement in the thermal conductivity of nanofluid. The problem is modelled by using the constitutive equations of Casson fluid in order to characterize the non-Newtonian fluid behavior. Using appropriate non-dimensional variables, the governing equations are transformed into the non-dimensional form, and the perturbation method is utilized to solve the governing equations with some physical conditions. Velocity and temperature solutions are obtained and discussed graphically. Expressions for skin friction and Nusselt number are also evaluated in tabular form. Effects of different parameters such as Casson parameter, radiation parameter and volume fraction are observed on the velocity and temperature profiles. It is found that velocity is reduced under influence of the exterior magnetic field. The temperature of single wall CNTs is found greater than MWCNTs for all the three base fluids. Increase in volume fraction leads to a decrease in velocity of the fluid as the nanofluid become more viscous by adding CNTs.

  9. Investigation of Schottky-Barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by an efficient semi-classical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-12-01

    An efficient semi-classical numerical modeling approach has been developed to simulate the coaxial Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (SB-CNTFET). In the modeling, the electrostatic potential of the CNT is obtained by self-consistently solving the analytic expression of CNT carrier distribution and the cylindrical Poisson equation, which significantly enhances the computational efficiency and simultaneously present a result in good agreement to that obtained from the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on the first principle. With this method, the effects of the CNT diameter, power supply voltage, thickness and dielectric constant of gate insulator on the device performance are investigated.

  10. Polarized light transmission in ferrofluids loaded with carbon nanotubes in the presence of a uniform magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vales-Pinzón, C.; Alvarado-Gil, J. J.; Medina-Esquivel, R.; Martínez-Torres, P.

    2014-11-01

    Magneto-optic phenomena in ferrofluids have been shown to be related to the formation of chain structures, due to the arrangement of the ferromagnetic particles, induced by an applied magnetic field. In this work, the effects on transmission of polarized light due to anisotropic effects induced by an external magnetic field in ferrofluids with carbon nanotubes are studied. The time response of the system presents two well defined stages, in the first one, which is very short, the fluid behaves as a polarizer. In contrast in the second stage, the effects of light transmission dominate. In this stage the transmitted light intensity grows with time and after a long time reaches a constant stable value. It is shown that these phenomena depend on the carbon nanotubes concentration as well as on the strength of the applied magnetic field. Using a simple model that considers a chain-like structure formation, it is possible to determine the rate of agglomeration of the formed structures and the attenuation coefficient of the transmitted light. The formation of nanostructures leads to variation in the transmitted light, depending on the polarization of the incident light. These magnetic nanostructures can find numerous applications in nanotechnology, optical devices and medicine.

  11. Printed PEDOT layers as transparent emitter electrodes for application in flexible inorganic photovoltaic structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Znajdek, Katarzyna; Sibiński, Maciej; Przymecki, Krzysztof; Wróblewski, Grzegorz; Lisik, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of the work is to find an appropriate flexible material to replace commonly used transparent conductive oxides (TCO) in photovoltaic (PV) emitter electrode applications. Authors show the alternative, potential possibility of using PEDOT conductive polymer as transparent emitter contacts for thin-film, flexible photovoltaic structures. The vast majority of contacts made of TCO layers, dominantly indium tin oxide ITO, are electrically unstable under the influence of mechanical stresses [1,2,3]. This drawback inhibits their usage in flexible devices, such as solar cells. The need of the development in the field of flexible PV structures induces searching for new materials. Investigated transparent conductive layers (TCL) were made of organic compositions based on PEDOT polymer and their parameters were compared with equally measured parameters of carbon nanotube (CNT) layers, commercial ITO and AgHT ultra-thin silver layers. Transparent conductive layers based on PEDOT:PSS compound were deposited on flexible substrates by screen printing technique. The analysis of achieved results shows the broad spectrum of application possibilities for PEDOT layers.

  12. Low Emittance Electron Beam Studies

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhoplav, Rodion

    2006-01-01

    We have studied the properties of a low emittance electron beam produced by laser pulses incident onto an rf gun photocathode. The experiments were carried out at the A0 photoinjector at Fermilab. Such beam studies are necessary for fixing the design of new Linear Colliders as well as for the development of Free Electron Lasers. An overview of the A0 photoinjector is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2 we describe the A0 photoinjector laser system. A stable laser system is imperative for reliable photoinjector operation. After the recent upgrade, we have been able to reach a new level of stability in the pulse-to-pulse fluctuations of the pulse amplitude, and of the temporal and transverse profiles. In Chapter 3 we present a study of transverse emittance versus the shape of the photo-cathode drive-laser pulse. For that purpose a special temporal profile laser shaping device called a pulse-stacker was developed. In Chapter 4 we discuss longitudinal beam dynamics studies using a two macro-particle bunch; this technique is helpful in analyzing pulse compression in the magnetic chicane, as well as velocity bunching effects in the rf-gun and the 9-cell accelerating cavity. In Chapter 5 we introduce a proposal for laser acceleration of electrons. We have developed a laser functioning on the TEM*01 mode, a mode with a longitudinal electric field component which is suitable for such a process. Using this technique at energies above 40 MeV, one would be able to observe laser-based acceleration.

  13. Effects of carbon nanotubes on electro-optical characteristics of liquid crystal cell driven by in-plane field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Sang Youn; Shin, Seung Hwan; Jeong, Seok Jin; Lee, Seung Hee; Jeong, Seok Ho; Lee, Young Hee; Choi, Hyun Chul; Kim, Kyeong Jin

    2007-03-01

    Homogeneously aligned nematic liquid crystal (LC) cells doped with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) driven by an in-plane field were fabricated and their electro-optic characteristics were investigated. The effective cell retardation values showed no difference between doped and undoped LC cells in the absence of electric field. However, in the presence of electric field, it was smaller in the CNT-doped cell than in the undoped cell, resulting in the decrease of transmittance. Furthermore, the CNT-doped cell exhibited a slight increase in the driving voltage due to the increase of the twist elastic constant (K22) and the decrease in the decay response time due to the decrease in the rotational viscosity (γ) and γ /K22 compared to the undoped cell.

  14. Effect of interaction between AC electric field and phonon oscillation of metal cluster on tip-growth of carbon nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidi, Mohammadreza

    2015-06-01

    The paper reports effect of interaction between AC electric field and metal cluster sitting at tip end of the carbon nanotube (CNT) on CNT tip-growth in CVD theoretically. For this purpose, a theoretical model based on phonon oscillations of the metal catalyst and influence of AC electric field on these oscillations is presented. Results show that there is an optimum AC electric field which optimizes growth of ultra-long CNTs. Then it is demonstrated that, in comparison with CNTs in the absence of field, CNTs under optimum electric field grow more. In addition, relation between optimum temperature and amplitude of AC electric field is investigated and it is shown that increasing electric field leads to higher optimum temperature. Finally, Investigation of effect of catalyst type on optimum electric field demonstrates the optimum field for various catalysts is different due to their different characteristics including van der Waals interaction with carbon, atomic mass and number of free charge carriers per each atom. All results are discussed and interpreted.

  15. Thin-Film Selective Emitter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chubb, Donald L.; Lowe, Roland A.

    1993-01-01

    Direct conversion of thermal energy into electrical energy using a photovoltaic cell is called thermophotovoltaic energy conversion. One way to make this an efficient process is to have the thermal energy source be an efficient selective emitter of radiation. The emission must be near the band-gap energy of the photovoltaic cell. One possible method to achieve an efficient selective emitter is the use of a thin film of rare-earth oxides. The determination of the efficiency of such an emitter requires analysis of the spectral emittance of the thin film including scattering and reflectance at the vacuum-film and film-substrate interfaces. Emitter efficiencies (power emitted in emission band/total emitted power) in the range 0.35-0.7 are predicted. There is an optimum optical depth to obtain maximum efficiency. High emitter efficiencies are attained only for low (less than 0.05) substrate emittance values, both with and without scattering. The low substrate emittance required for high efficiency limits the choice of substrate materials to highly reflective metals or high-transmission materials such as sapphire.

  16. AC magnetic field-assisted method to develop porous carbon nanotube/conducting polymer composites for application in thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Chun-Yu; Yang, Shu-Chian; Chang, Su-Hua; Yang, Ta-I.

    2015-04-01

    Thermoelectric materials are very effective in converting waste heat sources into useful electricity. Researchers are continuing to develop new polymeric thermoelectric materials. The segregated-network carbon nanotube (CNT)- polymer composites are most promising. Thus, the goal of this study is to develop novel porous CNT -polymer composites with improved thermoelectric properties. The research efforts focused on modifying the surface of the CNT with magnetic nanoparticles so that heat was released when subjecting to an AC magnetic field. Subsequently, polymers covered on the surface of the CNT were crosslinked. The porous CNT -polymer composites can be obtained by removing the un-crosslinked polymers. Polydimethylsiloxane polymer was utilized to investigate the effect of porosity and electrical conductivity on the thermoelectric properties of the composites. This AC magnetic field-assisted method to develop porous carbon nanotube/polymer composites for application in thermoelectric materials is introduced for the first time. The advantage of this method is that the electrical conductivity of the composites was high since we can easily to manipulate the CNT to form a conducting path. Another advantage is that the high porosity significantly reduced the thermal conductivity of the composites. These two advantages enable us to realize the polymer composites for thermoelectric applications. We are confident that this research will open a new avenue for developing polymer thermoelectric materials.

  17. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (Unabridged): Radiobiology and Dosimetry of alpha-Particle Emitters for Targeted Radionuclide Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C.; McDevitt, Michael S.; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J.; Fisher, Darrell R.; Brill, Bertrand A.; Song, Hong; Howell, R. W.; Akabani, Gamal

    2010-02-28

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides, in radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and in the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use have recently led to patient trials of alpha-particle-emitter labeled radiopharmaceuticals. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle-emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle-emitter dosimetry.

  18. MIRD Pamphlet No. 22 (abridged): radiobiology and dosimetry of alpha-particle emitters for targeted radionuclide therapy.

    PubMed

    Sgouros, George; Roeske, John C; McDevitt, Michael R; Palm, Stig; Allen, Barry J; Fisher, Darrell R; Brill, A Bertrand; Song, Hong; Howell, Roger W; Akabani, Gamal; Bolch, Wesley E; Brill, A Bertrand; Fisher, Darrell R; Howell, Roger W; Meredith, Ruby F; Sgouros, George; Wessels, Barry W; Zanzonico, Pat B

    2010-02-01

    The potential of alpha-particle emitters to treat cancer has been recognized since the early 1900s. Advances in the targeted delivery of radionuclides and radionuclide conjugation chemistry, and the increased availability of alpha-emitters appropriate for clinical use, have recently led to patient trials of radiopharmaceuticals labeled with alpha-particle emitters. Although alpha-emitters have been studied for many decades, their current use in humans for targeted therapy is an important milestone. The objective of this work is to review those aspects of the field that are pertinent to targeted alpha-particle emitter therapy and to provide guidance and recommendations for human alpha-particle emitter dosimetry.

  19. Parallel nanomanufacturing via electrohydrodynamic jetting from microfabricated externally-fed emitter arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce de Leon, Philip J.; Hill, Frances A.; Heubel, Eric V.; Velásquez-García, Luis F.

    2015-06-01

    We report the design, fabrication, and characterization of planar arrays of externally-fed silicon electrospinning emitters for high-throughput generation of polymer nanofibers. Arrays with as many as 225 emitters and with emitter density as large as 100 emitters cm-2 were characterized using a solution of dissolved PEO in water and ethanol. Devices with emitter density as high as 25 emitters cm-2 deposit uniform imprints comprising fibers with diameters on the order of a few hundred nanometers. Mass flux rates as high as 417 g hr-1 m-2 were measured, i.e., four times the reported production rate of the leading commercial free-surface electrospinning sources. Throughput increases with increasing array size at constant emitter density, suggesting the design can be scaled up with no loss of productivity. Devices with emitter density equal to 100 emitters cm-2 fail to generate fibers but uniformly generate electrosprayed droplets. For the arrays tested, the largest measured mass flux resulted from arrays with larger emitter separation operating at larger bias voltages, indicating the strong influence of electrical field enhancement on the performance of the devices. Incorporation of a ground electrode surrounding the array tips helps equalize the emitter field enhancement across the array as well as control the spread of the imprints over larger distances.

  20. Length separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes and its impact on structural and electrical properties of wafer-level fabricated carbon nanotube-field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Simon; Hermann, Sascha; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    For an industrial realization of devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) such as field-effect transistors (FETs) it becomes increasingly important to consider technological aspects such as intrinsic device structure, integration process controllability as well as yield. From the perspective of a wafer-level integration technology, the influence of SWCNT length on the performance of short-channel CNT-FETs is demonstrated by means of a statistical and comparative study. Therefore, a methodological development of a length separation process based on size-exclusion chromatography was conducted in order to extract well-separated SWCNT dispersions with narrowed length distribution. It could be shown that short SWCNTs adversely affect integrability and reproducibility, underlined by a 25% decline of the integration yield with respect to long SWCNTs. Furthermore, it turns out that the significant changes in electrical performance are directly linked to a SWCNT chain formation in the transistor channel. In particular, CNT-FETs with long SWCNTs outperform reference and short SWCNTs with respect to hole mobility and subthreshold controllability by up to 300% and up to 140%, respectively. As a whole, this study provides a statistical and comparative analysis towards chain-less CNT-FETs fabricated with a wafer-level technology.

  1. Highly directional thermal emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Ribaudo, Troy; Shaner, Eric A; Davids, Paul; Peters, David W

    2015-03-24

    A highly directional thermal emitter device comprises a two-dimensional periodic array of heavily doped semiconductor structures on a surface of a substrate. The array provides a highly directional thermal emission at a peak wavelength between 3 and 15 microns when the array is heated. For example, highly doped silicon (HDSi) with a plasma frequency in the mid-wave infrared was used to fabricate nearly perfect absorbing two-dimensional gratings structures that function as highly directional thermal radiators. The absorption and emission characteristics of the HDSi devices possessed a high degree of angular dependence for infrared absorption in the 10-12 micron range, while maintaining high reflectivity of solar radiation (.about.64%) at large incidence angles.

  2. Impact of Radial Compression on the Conductance of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Saini, Gaurav; Qureshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic behavior of semiconducting carbon nanotubes based CNTFET under the influence of radial deformation defect present in the channel is theoretically investigated using nonequilibrium Green's function method self-consistently coupled with three-dimensional electrostatics. It was found that deformation in the CNTFET channel composed of a small diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube can increase its conductance by a factor of 4 or more depending upon the average reduction in the C-C bond length after compression. This increase in CNTFET conductance is directly related to the movement of the electronic states toward the Fermi level when the tubes are squeezed. Furthermore, the device ON-OFF current ratio also decreases with increase in applied compression which makes it hard to switch-OFF the device.

  3. NEW INSTRUMENTS AND METHODS OF MEASUREMENTS: Liquid-metal ion emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabovich, M. D.

    1983-05-01

    This article describes and discusses the fundamental laws of ion emission from liquid-metal tips in a strong electric field. The widespread views of a liquid-metal emitter as being the smoothed tip of a Taylor cone are examined critically. The instability of a liquid metal in an electric field is discussed, and in line with this, an alternative concept is given of a sharp-tipped electrohydrodynamic emitter. The prospects for applying liquid-metal ion emitters are noted.

  4. Field-effect and frequency dependent transport in semiconductor-enriched single-wall carbon nanotube network device.

    PubMed

    Jaiswal, Manu; Sangeeth, C S Suchand; Wang, Wei; Sun, Ya-Ping; Menon, Reghu

    2009-11-01

    The electrical and optical response of a field-effect device comprising a network of semiconductor-enriched single-wall carbon nanotubes, gated with sodium chloride solution is investigated. Field-effect is demonstrated in a device that uses facile fabrication techniques along with a small-ion as the gate electrolyte-and this is accomplished as a result of the semiconductor enhancement of the tubes. The optical transparency and electrical resistance of the device are modulated with gate voltage. A time-response study of the modulation of optical transparency and electrical resistance upon application of gate voltage suggests the percolative charge transport in the network. Also the ac response in the network is investigated as a function of frequency and temperature down to 5 K. An empirical relation between onset frequency and temperature is determined.

  5. Electric field induced transformation of carbon nanotube to graphene nanoribbons using Nafion as a solid polymer electrolyte

    SciTech Connect

    Jaison, M. J.; Vikram, K.; Narayanan, Tharangattu N. E-mail: vk.pillai@ncl.res.in; Pillai, Vijayamohanan K. E-mail: vk.pillai@ncl.res.in

    2014-04-14

    We report a remarkable transformation of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs, average diameter 40 nm) to graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) in response to a field gradient of ∼25 V/cm, in a sandwich configuration using a solid state proton conducting polymer electrolyte like a thin perfluorosulphonated membrane, Nafion. In response to the application of a constant voltage for a sustained period of about 24 h at both room temperature and elevated temperatures, an interesting transformation of MWCNTs to GNRs has been observed with reasonable yield. GNRs prepared by this way are believed to be better for energy storage applications due to their enhanced surface area with more active smooth edge planes. Moreover, possible morphological changes in CNTs under electric field can impact on the performance and long term stability of devices that use CNTs in their electronic circuitry.

  6. Effect of doping on growth and field emission properties of spherical carbon nanotube tip placed over cylindrical surface

    SciTech Connect

    Santolia, Isha; Tewari, Aarti; Sharma, Suresh C.; Sharma, Rinku

    2014-06-15

    Theoretical investigations to study the effect of doping of hetero-atoms on the growth and field emission properties of Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) tip placed over a cylindrical surface in complex plasma have been carried out. A theoretical model incorporating kinetics of plasma species such as electron, ions, and neutral atoms including doping elements like nitrogen (N) and boron (B) and energy balance of CNTs in a complex plasma has been developed. The effect of doping elements of N and B on the growth of CNTs, namely, the tip radius has been carried out for typical glow discharge plasma parameters. It is found that N and B as doping elements affect the radius of CNTs extensively. We obtain small radii of CNT doped with N and large radius of CNT doped with B. The field emission characteristics from CNTs have therefore been suggested on the basis of results obtained. Some of theoretical results are in compliance with the existing experimental observations.

  7. Control of unidirectional transport of single-file water molecules through carbon nanotubes in an electric field.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiaye; Guo, Hongxia

    2011-01-25

    The transport of water molecules through nanopores is not only crucial to biological activities but also useful for designing novel nanofluidic devices. Despite considerable effort and progress that has been made, a controllable and unidirectional water flow is still difficult to achieve and the underlying mechanism is far from being understood. In this paper, using molecular dynamics simulations, we systematically investigate the effects of an external electric field on the transport of single-file water molecules through a carbon nanotube (CNT). We find that the orientation of water molecules inside the CNT can be well-tuned by the electric field and is strongly coupled to the water flux. This orientation-induced water flux is energetically due to the asymmetrical water-water interaction along the CNT axis. The wavelike water density profiles are disturbed under strong field strengths. The frequency of flipping for the water dipoles will decrease as the field strength is increased, and the flipping events vanish completely for the relatively large field strengths. Most importantly, a critical field strength E(c) related to the water flux is found. The water flux is increased as E is increased for E ≤ E(c), while it is almost unchanged for E > E(c). Thus, the electric field offers a level of governing for unidirectional water flow, which may have some biological applications and provides a route for designing efficient nanopumps.

  8. Numerical study of carbon nanotube field effect transistors in presence of carbon-carbon third nearest neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, for the first time, we have used a more precise Hamiltonian matrix based on first nearest neighbor (1NN) and third nearest neighbor (3NN) carbon-carbon interactions to simulate carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). By taking the interactions with more distant neighbors into account, an improvement in tight-binding picture is gained. A self-consistent solution of Schrodinger equation based on nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson's equation for treating the electrostatics of the device has been employed to simulate CNTFETs. A tight-binding Hamiltonian with an atomistic (pz orbitals) mode space basis in the ballistic limits has been used to describe the carbon nanotube (CNT) region. Simulations show that in the presence of 3NN, the energy bandgap of the CNT decreases and consequently the simulated device has lower threshold voltage compared to a simulated device with just 1NN. Short channel effects study demonstrates that neglecting 3NN underestimates the subthreshold swing and overestimates ON/OFF current ratio. All these investigations show that for simulating a CNTFET more precisely, the 3NN interactions can be taken into account in addition to the 1NN.

  9. Harmonic and Intermodulation Performance of Metallic Carbon Nanotube (MCNT) and Complementary Carbon Nantube Field Effect Transistor (CNTFET) Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuelma'Atti, Muhammad Taher

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a simple mathematical model for the output-voltage (current)/ input-voltage characteristic of the carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) complementary inverting amplifier and the metallic carbon nanotube (MCNT) interconnect. The model, basically a Fourier series, yields closed-form expressions for the amplitudes of the harmonic and intermodulation components of the output voltage (current) resulting from a multisinusoidal input voltage. The special case of a two-tone equal-amplitude input voltage is considered in detail. The results show that the harmonic and intermodulation performance of the complementary CNTFET-based inverting amplifier and the MCNT interconnect is strongly dependent on the values of the amplitudes of the input tones with the third-order intermodulation component dominating over a wide range of the input voltage amplitudes. The results also show that while the harmonics may exhibit minima, the intermodulation products are almost monotonically increasing with the increase in the input voltage amplitude and exhibit no minima.

  10. The Luminosity Function and Star Formation Rate between Redshifts of 0.07 and 1.47 for Narrowband Emitters in the Subaru Deep Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly, Chun; Malkan, Matt A.; Kashikawa, Nobunari; Shimasaku, Kazuhiro; Doi, Mamoru; Nagao, Tohru; Iye, Masanori; Kodama, Tadayuki; Morokuma, Tomoki; Motohara, Kentaro

    2007-03-01

    SDF line-emitting galaxies in four narrowband filters at low and intermediate redshifts are presented. Broadband colors, follow-up optical spectroscopy, and multiple NB filters are used to distinguish Hα, [O II], and [O III] emitters at z=0.07-1.47 to construct their LFs. These LFs are derived down to faint magnitudes, allowing for an accurate determination of the faint-end slope. With a large (N~200-900) sample for each redshift interval, a Schechter profile is fitted to each LF. Prior to dust extinction corrections, the [O III] and [O II] LFs agree reasonably well with those of Hippelein et al. The z=0.08 Hα LF, which reaches 2 orders of magnitude fainter than Gallego et al., is steeper by 25%. This indicates that there are more low-luminosity star-forming galaxies for z<0.1. The faint-end slope α and φ* show a strong redshift evolution, while L* shows little evolution. The evolution in α indicates that low-luminosity galaxies have a stronger evolution compared to brighter ones. Integrated SFR densities are derived via Hα, [O III], and [O II] for 0.071, the SFR densities are similar. The latter is consistent with previous UV and [O II] measurements. Below z<0.4, the SFR densities are consistent with several Hα, [O II], and UV measurements, but others are a factor of 2 higher. For example, the z=0.066-0.092 LF agrees with Jones & Bland-Hawthorn, but at z=0.24 and 0.40, their number densities are twice as high. This discrepancy can be explained by cosmic variance. Based in part on data collected at Subaru Telescope, which is operated by the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan.

  11. On Field-Effect Photovoltaics: Gate Enhancement of the Power Conversion Efficiency in a Nanotube/Silicon-Nanowire Solar Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Petterson, Maureen K.; Lemaitre, Maxime G.; Shen, Yu; Wadhwa, Pooja; Hou, Jie; Vasilyeva, Svetlana V.; Kravchenko, Ivan I.; Rinzler, Andrew G.

    2015-09-09

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in crystalline silicon Schottky junction solar cells distinguished by the use of low density of electronic states (DOS) nanocarbons (nanotubes, graphene) as the metal contacting the Si. Recently, unprecedented modulation of the power conversion efficiency in a single material system has been demonstrated in such cells by the use of electronic gating. The gate field induced Fermi level shift in the low-DOS carbon serves to enhance the junction built-in potential, while a gate field induced inversion layer at the Si surface, in regions remote from the junction, keeps the photocarriers well separated there, avoiding recombination at surface traps and defects (a key loss mechanism). Here, we extend these results into the third dimension of a vertical Si nanowire array solar cell. A single wall carbon nanotube layer engineered to contact virtually each n-Si nanowire tip extracts the minority carriers, while an ionic liquid electrolytic gate drives the nanowire body into inversion. The enhanced light absorption of the vertical forest cell, at 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5G illumination, results in a short-circuit current density of 35 mA/cm2 and associated power conversion efficiency of 15%. These results highlight the use of local fields as opposed to surface passivation as a means of avoiding front surface recombination. Finally, a deleterious electrochemical reaction of the silicon due to the electrolyte gating is shown to be caused by oxygen/water entrained in the ionic liquid electrolyte. While encapsulation can avoid the issue, a nonencapsulation-based approach is also implemented.

  12. On Field-Effect Photovoltaics: Gate Enhancement of the Power Conversion Efficiency in a Nanotube/Silicon-Nanowire Solar Cell

    DOE PAGES

    Petterson, Maureen K.; Lemaitre, Maxime G.; Shen, Yu; ...

    2015-09-09

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in crystalline silicon Schottky junction solar cells distinguished by the use of low density of electronic states (DOS) nanocarbons (nanotubes, graphene) as the metal contacting the Si. Recently, unprecedented modulation of the power conversion efficiency in a single material system has been demonstrated in such cells by the use of electronic gating. The gate field induced Fermi level shift in the low-DOS carbon serves to enhance the junction built-in potential, while a gate field induced inversion layer at the Si surface, in regions remote from the junction, keeps the photocarriers well separatedmore » there, avoiding recombination at surface traps and defects (a key loss mechanism). Here, we extend these results into the third dimension of a vertical Si nanowire array solar cell. A single wall carbon nanotube layer engineered to contact virtually each n-Si nanowire tip extracts the minority carriers, while an ionic liquid electrolytic gate drives the nanowire body into inversion. The enhanced light absorption of the vertical forest cell, at 100 mW/cm2 AM1.5G illumination, results in a short-circuit current density of 35 mA/cm2 and associated power conversion efficiency of 15%. These results highlight the use of local fields as opposed to surface passivation as a means of avoiding front surface recombination. Finally, a deleterious electrochemical reaction of the silicon due to the electrolyte gating is shown to be caused by oxygen/water entrained in the ionic liquid electrolyte. While encapsulation can avoid the issue, a nonencapsulation-based approach is also implemented.« less

  13. On Field-Effect Photovoltaics: Gate Enhancement of the Power Conversion Efficiency in a Nanotube/Silicon-Nanowire Solar Cell.

    PubMed

    Petterson, Maureen K; Lemaitre, Maxime G; Shen, Yu; Wadhwa, Pooja; Hou, Jie; Vasilyeva, Svetlana V; Kravchenko, Ivan I; Rinzler, Andrew G

    2015-09-30

    Recent years have seen a resurgence of interest in crystalline silicon Schottky junction solar cells distinguished by the use of low density of electronic states (DOS) nanocarbons (nanotubes, graphene) as the metal contacting the Si. Recently, unprecedented modulation of the power conversion efficiency in a single material system has been demonstrated in such cells by the use of electronic gating. The gate field induced Fermi level shift in the low-DOS carbon serves to enhance the junction built-in potential, while a gate field induced inversion layer at the Si surface, in regions remote from the junction, keeps the photocarriers well separated there, avoiding recombination at surface traps and defects (a key loss mechanism). Here, we extend these results into the third dimension of a vertical Si nanowire array solar cell. A single wall carbon nanotube layer engineered to contact virtually each n-Si nanowire tip extracts the minority carriers, while an ionic liquid electrolytic gate drives the nanowire body into inversion. The enhanced light absorption of the vertical forest cell, at 100 mW/cm(2) AM1.5G illumination, results in a short-circuit current density of 35 mA/cm(2) and associated power conversion efficiency of 15%. These results highlight the use of local fields as opposed to surface passivation as a means of avoiding front surface recombination. A deleterious electrochemical reaction of the silicon due to the electrolyte gating is shown to be caused by oxygen/water entrained in the ionic liquid electrolyte. While encapsulation can avoid the issue, a nonencapsulation-based approach is also implemented.

  14. Oxygen and light sensitive field-effect transistors based on ZnO nanoparticles attached to individual double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanaewa, Alina; Juárez, Beatriz H.; Weller, Horst; Klinke, Christian

    2011-12-01

    The attachment of semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes is one of the most challenging subjects in nanotechnology. Successful high coverage attachment and control over the charge transfer mechanism and photo-current generation open a wide field of new applications such as highly effective solar cells and fibre-enhanced polymers. In this work we study the charge transfer in individual double-walled carbon nanotubes highly covered with uniform ZnO nanoparticles. The synthetic colloidal procedure was chosen to avoid long-chained ligands at the nanoparticle-nanotube interface. The resulting composite material was used as conductive channel in a field-effect transistor device and the electrical photo-response was analysed under various conditions. By means of the transfer characteristics we could elucidate the mechanism of charge transfer from non-covalently attached semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes. The role of positive charges remaining on the nanoparticles is discussed in terms of a gating effect.The attachment of semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes is one of the most challenging subjects in nanotechnology. Successful high coverage attachment and control over the charge transfer mechanism and photo-current generation open a wide field of new applications such as highly effective solar cells and fibre-enhanced polymers. In this work we study the charge transfer in individual double-walled carbon nanotubes highly covered with uniform ZnO nanoparticles. The synthetic colloidal procedure was chosen to avoid long-chained ligands at the nanoparticle-nanotube interface. The resulting composite material was used as conductive channel in a field-effect transistor device and the electrical photo-response was analysed under various conditions. By means of the transfer characteristics we could elucidate the mechanism of charge transfer from non-covalently attached semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes. The role of positive

  15. Design and characterization of a multi-beam micro-CT scanner based on carbon nanotube field emission x-ray technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Rui

    In this dissertation, I will present the results for my Ph.D. research for the past five years. My project mainly focuses on advanced imaging applications with a multi-beam x-ray source array based on carbon nanotube field emission technology. In the past few years, research in carbon nanotubes gradually changed from the raw material science to its application. Field emission x-ray application is one of the hottest research areas for carbon nanotube. Compared to traditional thermionic x-ray sources, the carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source has some natural advantages over traditional thermionic x-ray sources such as instantaneous x-ray generation, programmability and miniaturization. For the past few years, the research and development of carbon nanotube field emission x-ray has shifted from single x-ray beam applications to spatially distributed multi-beam x-ray sources. Previously in Zhou group, we have already built a gated micro-CT system with single beam micro-focus x-ray tube for higher spatial and temporal resolution as required in live animal imaging and a multi-beam tomosynthesis system targeting for faster and more stable breast imaging. Now my project mainly focused on the design, characterization and optimization of a multi-beam micro-CT imaging system. With the increase of gantry rotation speed approaching the mechanical limit, it is getting more and more difficult to further speed up the CT scanning. My new system promises a potential solution for the problem, and it serves as a great test platform for truly stationary micro-CT geometry. The potential capabilities it showed during the characterization and imaging measurements was promising. The dissertation is composed of five chapters. In Chapter 1, I will generally review the physics principles of x-ray generation and interaction with matter. Then the discovery of carbon nanotube and its great potential to serve as an excellent field emission electron source will be introduced in the second

  16. Does Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFETs) Device Performance using Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Depend on the Density of SWNT in the Electrode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Narae; Sarker, Biddut K.; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes as an electrode material for organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have attracted significant attention. One open question is that whether the density of the Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the electrode has any influence in the device performance of OFETs. In order to address this issue, we fabricated OFETs using SWNT aligned array electrode, where we varied the linear density of the nanotubes in the array of the electrodes during dielectrophoretic assembly of high quality surfactant free and stable aqueous SWNT solution. The source and drain of SWNT electrodes have been formed by electron beam lithography (EBL) and oxygen plasma etching. The OFETs were fabricated by depositing a thin film of poly (3-hexylthiophene) on the SWNT electrodes. We will present detailed result of our study.

  17. Vibrations of fluid-conveying inclined single-walled carbon nanotubes acted upon by a longitudinal magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiani, Keivan

    2016-12-01

    This work deals with the influence of the longitudinal magnetic field on vibrations of inclined single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) subjected to an inside fluid flow. Using an equivalent continuum structure model for the SWCNT and a plug-like model for the moving inside fluid flow, the nonlocal longitudinal and transverse equations of motion of magnetically affected SWCNTs are obtained in the context of small deformations. By application of the assumed-mode methodology, the displacements are discretized in terms of vibration mode shapes, and by exploiting generalized Newmark-β scheme, their corresponding time-dependent parameters are determined at each time. In the presence of the longitudinal magnetic field, the effects of the small-scale parameter, fluid flow velocity, and inclination angle on both longitudinal and transverse vibrations of SWCNTs are addressed. The obtained results reveal that the longitudinal magnetic field has fairly no effect on the longitudinal dynamic behavior of the nanostructure. However, maximum values of both transverse displacement and nonlocal bending moment of the fluid-conveying SWCNT would reduce as the strength of the magnetic field grows. Such a fact becomes more highlighted for high levels of the fluid flow velocity. The obtained results indicate that the longitudinal magnetic field can be exploited as an efficient way to control transverse vibrations of SWCNTs conveying fluids.

  18. Improved field emission properties of carbon nanotubes grown on stainless steel substrate and its application in ionization gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Detian; Cheng, Yongjun; Wang, Yongjun; Zhang, Huzhong; Dong, Changkun; Li, Da

    2016-03-01

    Vertically aligned carbon nanotube (CNT) arrays were fabricated by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) technique on different substrates. Microstructures and field emission characteristics of the as-grown CNT arrays were investigated systematically, and its application in ionization gauge was also evaluated preliminarily. The results indicate that the as-grown CNT arrays are vertically well-aligned relating to the substrate surfaces, but the CNTs grown on stainless steel substrate are longer and more crystalline than the ones grown on silicon wafer substrate. The field emission behaviors of the as-grown CNT arrays are strongly dependent upon substrate properties. Namely, the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate has better field emission properties, including lower turn on and threshold fields, better emission stability and repeatability, compared with the one grown on silicon wafer substrate. The superior field emission properties of the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate are mainly attributed to low contact resistance, high thermal conductivity, good adhesion strength, etc. In addition, the metrological behaviors of ionization gauge with the CNT array grown on stainless steel substrate as an electron source were investigated, and this novel cathode ionization gauge extends the lower limit of linear pressure measurement to 10-8 Pa, which is one order of magnitude lower than the result reported for the same of gauge with CNT cathode.

  19. Controllable deformation of salt water-filled carbon nanotubes using an electric field with application to molecular sieving.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen

    2016-08-05

    Precisely controlling the deformation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has practical application in the development of nanoscale functional devices, although it is a challenging task. Here, we propose a novel method to guide the deformation of CNTs through filling them with salt water and applying an electric field. With the electric field along the axial direction, the height of CNTs is enlarged by the axial electric force due to the internal ions and polar water molecules. Under an electric field with two mutually orthogonal components, the transverse electric force could further induce the bending deformation of CNTs. Based on the classical rod and beam theories, two mechanical models are constructed to verify and quantitatively describe the relationships between the tension and bending deformations of CNTs and the electric field intensity. Moreover, by means of the electric field-driven tension behavior of CNTs, we design a stretchable molecular sieve to control the flow rate of mixed gas and collect a single high-purity gas. The present work opens up new avenues in the design and fabrication of nanoscale controlling units.

  20. Controllable deformation of salt water-filled carbon nanotubes using an electric field with application to molecular sieving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Hongfei; Zheng, Yonggang; Zhang, Zhongqiang; Zhang, Hongwu; Chen, Zhen

    2016-08-01

    Precisely controlling the deformation of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has practical application in the development of nanoscale functional devices, although it is a challenging task. Here, we propose a novel method to guide the deformation of CNTs through filling them with salt water and applying an electric field. With the electric field along the axial direction, the height of CNTs is enlarged by the axial electric force due to the internal ions and polar water molecules. Under an electric field with two mutually orthogonal components, the transverse electric force could further induce the bending deformation of CNTs. Based on the classical rod and beam theories, two mechanical models are constructed to verify and quantitatively describe the relationships between the tension and bending deformations of CNTs and the electric field intensity. Moreover, by means of the electric field-driven tension behavior of CNTs, we design a stretchable molecular sieve to control the flow rate of mixed gas and collect a single high-purity gas. The present work opens up new avenues in the design and fabrication of nanoscale controlling units.

  1. A Molecular Dynamics of Cold Neutral Atoms Captured by Carbon Nanotube Under Electric Field and Thermal Effect as a Selective Atoms Sensor.

    PubMed

    Santos, Elson C; Neto, Abel F G; Maneschy, Carlos E; Chen, James; Ramalho, Teodorico C; Neto, A M J C

    2015-05-01

    Here we analyzed several physical behaviors through computational simulation of systems consisting of a zig-zag type carbon nanotube and relaxed cold atoms (Rb, Au, Si and Ar). These atoms were chosen due to their different chemical properties. The atoms individually were relaxed on the outside of the nanotube during the simulations. Each system was found under the influence of a uniform electric field parallel to the carbon nanotube and under the thermal effect of the initial temperature at the simulations. Because of the electric field, the cold atoms orbited the carbon nanotube while increasing the initial temperature allowed the variation of the radius of the orbiting atoms. We calculated the following quantities: kinetic energy, potential energy and total energy and in situ temperature, molar entropy variation and average radius of the orbit of the atoms. Our data suggest that only the action of electric field is enough to generate the attractive potential and this system could be used as a selected atoms sensor.

  2. a Computational Study of Strain Effects in the Band-To Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Reza; Ghoreishi, Seyyed Saleh

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the transport properties of the band-to-band-tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (BTBT-CNTFETs) under uniaxial strain are studied, with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The effects of the uniaxial strain on the electrical properties, such as the ON current (ION), OFF current (IOFF), ION/IOFF ratio, subthreshold swing and intrinsic delay are evaluated. It was observed that the uniaxial strain has strong effects on the transport properties of these transistors. The results show that appropriate uniaxial strain, although degrades the ON current and the intrinsic delay, it also decreases the power consumption of the BTBT-CNTFETs and as a result can be used for low-power applications.

  3. Single-Hole Charging and Discharging Phenomena in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor-Based Nonvolatile Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohori, Takahiro; Nagaso, Satoshi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-06-01

    We have fabricated nonvolatile memory based on top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Two kinds of insulating films, SiNx and SiO2, were deposited to control the hysteresis characteristics after the removal of water molecules around the single-walled CNT channels. The interface between the SiNx and SiO2 films is expected to act as a charge storage node of nonvolatile memory. The fabricated CNTFET-based memory devices clearly exhibited not only a memory effect but also good retention characteristics for charge storage. Furthermore, single-hole charging and discharging phenomena were clearly observed in the CNTFET-based memory devices by reducing the number of carriers trapped in the interface between the SiNx and SiO2 films. These results indicate that the CNTFET-based nonvolatile memory can be potentially used to realize single-electron memory.

  4. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  5. Probing Biological Processes on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose Manuel; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2006-03-01

    We have formed supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) by small unilamellar vesicle fusion on substrates containing single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs). We are able to detect the self-assembly of SLBs electrically with SWNT-FETs since their threshold voltages are shifted by this event. The SLB fully covers the NT surface and lipid molecules can diffuse freely in the bilayer surface across the NT. To study the interactions of important biological entities with receptors imbedded within the membrane, we have also integrated a membrane protein, GT1b ganglioside, in the bilayer. While bare gangliosides can diffuse freely across the NT, interestingly the NT acts as a diffusion barrier for the gangliosides when they are bound with tetanus toxin. This experiment opens the possibility of using SWNT-FETs as biosensors for label-free detection.

  6. Visible Spectrum Incandescent Selective Emitter

    SciTech Connect

    Sonsight Inc.

    2004-04-30

    The purpose of the work performed was to demonstrate the feasibility of a novel bi-layer selective emitter. Selective emitters are incandescent radiant bodies with emissivities that are substantially larger in a selected part of the radiation spectrum, thereby significantly shifting their radiated spectral distribution from that of a blackbody radiating at the same temperature. The major research objectives involved answering the following questions: (1) What maximum VIS/NIR radiant power and emissivity ratios can be attained at 2650 K? (2) What is the observed emitter body life and how does its performance vary with time? (3) What are the design tradeoffs for a dual heating approach in which both an internally mounted heating coil and electrical resistance self-heating are used? (4) What are the quantitative improvements to be had from utilizing a bi-layer emitter body with a low emissivity inner layer and a partially transmissive outer layer? Two approaches to obtaining selective emissivity were investigated. The first was to utilize large optical scattering within an emitter material with a spectral optical absorption that is much greater within the visible spectrum than that within the NIR. With this approach, an optically thick emitter can radiate almost as if optically thin because essentially, scattering limits the distance below the surface from which significant amounts of internally generated radiation can emerge. The performance of thin emitters was also investigated (for optically thin emitters, spectral emissivity is proportional to spectral absorptivity). These emitters were fabricated from thin mono-layer emitter rods as well as from bi-layer rods with a thin emitter layer mounted on a substrate core. With an initially estimated energy efficiency of almost three times that of standard incandescent bulbs, a number of energy, economic and environmental benefits such as less energy use and cost, reduced CO{sub 2} emissions, and no mercury contamination

  7. Thermoplastic-based conductive composites containing multi-wall carbon nanotubes aligned under the application of external electric fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osazuwa, Osayuki

    The objective of this thesis is to prepare thermoplastic/multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and to apply external alternating current (AC) electric fields to achieve enhanced conductivity and dielectric properties. The first part of the thesis focuses on preparing polyolefin-based composites containing welldispersed MWCNTs. MWCNTs are functionalized with a hyperbranched polyethylene (HBPE) using a non-covalent, non-specific functionalization approach and melt compounded with an ethylene-octene copolymer (EOC) matrix. The improved filler dispersion in the functionalized EOC/MWCNT composite results in higher elongation at break compared to the non-functionalized composite. However, the electrical percolation threshold and the ultimate conductivity of the composites are not affected considerably, suggesting that this functionalization approach leaves the inherent properties of the nanotubes intact. EOC/HBPE-functionalized MWCNT composites are further subjected to external AC electric fields (35 -- 212 kV/m), which induce the formation of aligned columnar structures, as evidenced by Scanning Electron Microscopy. Experimentally acquired resistivity data are used to derive correlations between the characteristic insulator-to-conductor transition times of the composites and the electric field strength (E), polymer viscosity (eta) and MWCNT volume fraction (φ). A criterion for the selection of (eta, E, φ) conditions that enable MWCNT assembly under an electric field controlled regime (minimal Brownian motion-driven aggregation effects) is developed. The dielectric properties of the solidified aligned EOC/MWCNT composites are further studied using dielectric spectroscopy. Annealing of the composites at 160 °C results in the formation of interconnected structures, whereas electrification, using AC field of 71 and 212 kV/m induces the formation of aligned columnar structures. The electrified and annealed composites have increased real and imaginary permittivity compared

  8. Enhanced field emission from cerium hexaboride coated multiwalled carbon nanotube composite films: A potential material for next generation electron sources

    SciTech Connect

    Patra, Rajkumar; Ghosh, S.; Sheremet, E.; Rodriguez, R. D.; Lehmann, D.; Gordan, O. D.; Zahn, D. R. T.; Jha, M.; Ganguli, A. K.; Schmidt, H.; Schulze, S.; Schmidt, O. G.

    2014-03-07

    Intensified field emission (FE) current from temporally stable cerium hexaboride (CeB{sub 6}) coated carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on Si substrate is reported aiming to propose the new composite material as a potential candidate for future generation electron sources. The film was synthesized by a combination of chemical and physical deposition processes. A remarkable increase in maximum current density, field enhancement factor, and a reduction in turn-on field and threshold field with comparable temporal current stability are observed in CeB{sub 6}-coated CNT film when compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} film. The elemental composition and surface morphology of the films, as examined by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and energy dispersive X-ray measurements, show decoration of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles on top and walls of CNTs. Chemical functionalization of CNTs by the incorporation of CeB{sub 6} nanoparticles is evident by a remarkable increase in intensity of the 2D band in Raman spectrum of coated films as compared to pristine CeB{sub 6} films. The enhanced FE properties of the CeB{sub 6} coated CNT films are correlated to the microstructure of the films.

  9. Electromagnetic compatibility of implantable neurostimulators to RFID emitters

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The objective of this study is to investigate electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of implantable neurostimulators with the emissions from radio frequency identification (RFID) emitters. Methods Six active implantable neurostimulators with lead systems were tested for susceptibility to electromagnetic fields generated by 22 RFID emitters. These medical devices have been approved for marketing in the U.S. for a number of intended uses that include: epilepsy, depression, incontinence, Parkinsonian tremor and pain relief. Each RFID emitter had one of the following carrier frequencies: 125 kHz, 134 kHz, 13.56 MHz, 433 MHz, 915 MHz and 2.45 GHz Results The test results showed the output of one of the implantable neurostimulators was inhibited by 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less. The output of the same implantable neurostimulator was also inhibited by another 134 kHz RFID emitter at separation distances of 10 cm or less and also showed inconsistent pulsing rate at a separation distance of 15 cm. Both effects occurred during and lasted through out the duration of the exposure. Conclusions The clinical significance of the effects was assessed by a clinician at the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The effects were determined to be clinically significant only if they occurred for extended period of time. There were no observed effects from the other 5 implantable neurostimulators or during exposures from other RFID emitters. PMID:21658266

  10. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-14

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitter's far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Previous work has shown that these distortions can significantly degrade the imaging of the local density of states in metallic nanowires using polarization-resolved imaging. But unlike nanowires, nanoparticles do not have a well-defined axis of symmetry, which makes polarization-resolved imaging difficult to apply. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, which is in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter toward its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, subdiffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the

  11. Nanostructure-Induced Distortion in Single-Emitter Microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Kangmook; Ropp, Chad; Barik, Sabyasachi; Fourkas, John; Shapiro, Benjamin; Waks, Edo

    2016-09-01

    Single-emitter microscopy has emerged as a promising method of imaging nanostructures with nanoscale resolution. This technique uses the centroid position of an emitters far-field radiation pattern to infer its position to a precision that is far below the diffraction limit. However, nanostructures composed of high-dielectric materials such as noble metals can distort the far-field radiation pattern. Nanoparticles also exhibit a more complex range of distortions, because in addition to introducing a high dielectric surface, they also act as efficient scatterers. Thus, the distortion effects of nanoparticles in single-emitter microscopy remains poorly understood. Here we demonstrate that metallic nanoparticles can significantly distort the accuracy of single-emitter imaging at distances exceeding 300 nm. We use a single quantum dot to probe both the magnitude and the direction of the metallic nanoparticle-induced imaging distortion and show that the diffraction spot of the quantum dot can shift by more than 35 nm. The centroid position of the emitter generally shifts away from the nanoparticle position, in contradiction to the conventional wisdom that the nanoparticle is a scattering object that will pull in the diffraction spot of the emitter towards its center. These results suggest that dielectric distortion of the emission pattern dominates over scattering. We also show that by monitoring the distortion of the quantum dot diffraction spot we can obtain high-resolution spatial images of the nanoparticle, providing a new method for performing highly precise, sub-diffraction spatial imaging. These results provide a better understanding of the complex near-field coupling between emitters and nanostructures, and open up new opportunities to perform super-resolution microscopy with higher accuracy.

  12. Field enhanced photocatalytic inactivation of Escherichia coli using immobilized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huber, Jeffrey M.

    A batch reactor device utilizing photocatalysis and a flow reactor combining photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis were developed for bacterial disinfection in lab-synthesized and natural waters. The batch reactor provided a 90% decrease in initial concentration (~1 x 103 CFU/mL) after 60 minutes when subjected to incident light at 100 mW/cm2 and continuous mixing via aeration. A combination of photocatalysis and photoelectrocatalysis in the flow reactor provided complete inactivation of contaminated waters with flow rates of 50 mL/min. Both devices consisted of immobilized titanium dioxide nanotube arrays as the catalyzing medium. The flow reactor used an applied bias of up to 6 V without noticeable water splitting. Light intensity, applied voltage, and background electrolytes and concentration were all found to impact the device performance. Complete inactivation of E. coli W3110 (800 CFU/mL) occurred in 15 seconds in the flow reactor irradiated at 25 mW/cm2 with an applied voltage of 4 V in a 100 ppm NaCl solution. Disinfection in natural water was inhibited by the presence of inorganic ions and other constituents that are commonly found in natural water. To simulate natural scenarios in which a point-of-use device might be employed, testing was conducted in a natural environment using source water from Emigration Creek in Salt Lake City, Utah. A higher voltage of 6 V was required to reach 100% inactivation in natural surface water. The nanotube flow through disinfection chamber shows promise as a personal point-of use device for E. coli inactivation.

  13. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  14. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURE, MECHANICAL AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Effect of Electrochemical Treatment in a Lithium Chloride Solution on Field Emission from Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qiang; Li, Chun; Yuan, Guang; Gu, Chang-Zhi

    2009-08-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are electrochemically treated in a lithium chloride solution at a concentration 0.1 mol/L. The field emission properties of the CNTs are investigated at different temperatures before and after the electrochemical treatment. After treatment, the turn-on voltage to produce field emission current of 10 μA decreases from 4.2 kV to 2.7 kV and the field emission current increases distinctly, but the stability falls off. Based on the Fowler-Nordheim plot, the values of the work function for the CNTs are calculated, which reveals that work function decreases after the electrochemical treatment. These results are attributed to the decrease of the work function of the carbon nanotubes.

  15. Static and alternating electric field and distance-dependent effects on carbon nanotube-assisted water self-diffusion across lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Garate, José-Antonio; English, Niall J; MacElroy, J M D

    2009-09-21

    Water-self-diffusion through single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) inserted normal to a phospholipid membrane has been studied using equilibrium and nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations in the presence of static and alternating electrical fields. Four different SWCNTs were investigated: (5,5), (6,6), (8,8), and (11,11) and also three arrays of four (6,6) SWCNTs separated by 15, 20, and 25 A, respectively. The (5,5) system shows interesting behavior, where an increase in the applied field frequency in the z direction decreases the water permeation rates, reaching values at higher frequencies similar to zero-field conditions. The (6,6) arrays simulations demonstrated that there is a friction effect, when the nanotubes are closely packed, which retards the movement of the individual water files.

  16. Electromechanical properties of multi-walled carbon nanotube/gelatin hydrogel composites: effects of aspect ratios, electric field, and temperature.

    PubMed

    Tungkavet, Thawatchai; Seetapan, Nispa; Pattavarakorn, Datchanee; Sirivat, Anuvat

    2015-01-01

    The effects of multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWNT) aspect ratio, electric field strength and temperature on the electromechanical properties of MWNT/gelatin hydrogel composites were investigated. The highest aspect ratio of MWNT provides the composites with the highest dynamic moduli under electric field. The MWNT/gelatin hydrogel composites of 0.01, 0.1, 0.5, and 1 vol.% and the pure gelatin hydrogel possess the storage modulus sensitivity values of 0.69, 1.23, 0.94, 0.81 and 0.47, respectively, at 800 V/mm. The results can be interpreted in terms of the enhanced polarizability between the carboxyl groups of gelatin under the presence of MWNT. The effect of temperature on the electromechanical properties of MWNT/gelatin hydrogel composites investigated between 30 °C and 90 °C shows three distinct regimes of temperature-dependent storage modulus behavior. In the deflection testing, the effects of electric field on the deflection distance and the dielectrophoresis force of the MWNT/gelatin hydrogel composites were also investigated. MWNT/gelatin hydrogel composites suspended in the silicone oil between electrodes, respond rapidly with a deflection toward the anode site, indicating the attractive force between anode and the polarized carboxyl group as the gelatin structure possesses negative charges.

  17. A rational design for the separation of metallic and semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes using a magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Chengzhi; Wan, Da; Jia, Junji; Li, Delong; Pan, Chunxu; Liao, Lei

    2016-06-01

    The separation of metallic (m-) and semiconducting (s-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without causing contamination and damage is a major challenge for SWNT-based devices. As a facile and nondestructive tool, the use of a magnetic field could be an ideal strategy to separate m-/s-SWNTs, based on the difference of magnetic susceptibilities. Here, we designed a novel magnetic field-assisted floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system to separate m-/s-SWNTs. Briefly, m-SWNTs are attracted toward the magnetic pole, leaving s-SWNTs on the substrate. By using this strategy, s-SWNTs with a purity of 99% could be obtained, which is enough to construct high-performance transistors with a mobility of 230 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of 106. We also established a model to quantitatively calculate the percentage of m-SWNTs on the substrate and this model shows a good match with the experimental data. Furthermore, our rational design also provides a new avenue for the growth of SWNTs with specific chirality and manipulated arrangement due to the difference of magnetic susceptibilities between different diameters, chiralities, and types.The separation of metallic (m-) and semiconducting (s-) single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) without causing contamination and damage is a major challenge for SWNT-based devices. As a facile and nondestructive tool, the use of a magnetic field could be an ideal strategy to separate m-/s-SWNTs, based on the difference of magnetic susceptibilities. Here, we designed a novel magnetic field-assisted floating catalyst chemical vapor deposition system to separate m-/s-SWNTs. Briefly, m-SWNTs are attracted toward the magnetic pole, leaving s-SWNTs on the substrate. By using this strategy, s-SWNTs with a purity of 99% could be obtained, which is enough to construct high-performance transistors with a mobility of 230 cm2 V-1 s-1 and an on/off ratio of 106. We also established a model to quantitatively calculate the percentage of m

  18. Density functional theory for field emission from carbon nano-structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhibing

    2015-12-01

    Electron field emission is understood as a quantum mechanical many-body problem in which an electronic quasi-particle of the emitter is converted into an electron in vacuum. Fundamental concepts of field emission, such as the field enhancement factor, work-function, edge barrier and emission current density, will be investigated, using carbon nanotubes and graphene as examples. A multi-scale algorithm basing on density functional theory is introduced. We will argue that such a first principle approach is necessary and appropriate for field emission of nano-structures, not only for a more accurate quantitative description, but, more importantly, for deeper insight into field emission.

  19. Heavily doped transparent-emitter regions in junction solar cells, diodes, and transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shibib, M. A.; Lindholm, F. A.; Therez, F.

    1979-01-01

    The paper presents an analytical treatment of transparent-emitter devices, particularly solar cells, that is more complete than previously available treatments. The proposed approach includes the effects of bandgap narrowing, Fermi-Dirac statistics, built-in field due to impurity profile, and a finite surface recombination velocity at the emitter surface. It is demonstrated that the transparent-emitter model can predict experimental values of Voc observed on n(plus)-p thin diffused junction silicon solar cells made on low-resistivity (0.1 ohm-cm) substrates. A test is included for the self-consistent validity of the transparent-emitter model. This test compares the calculated transit time of minority carriers across the emitter with the Auger-impact minority-carrier lifetime within the emitter region.

  20. Radial arrays of nano-electrospray ionization emitters and methods of forming electrosprays

    DOEpatents

    Kelly, Ryan T [West Richland, WA; Tang, Keqi [Richland, WA; Smith, Richard D [Richland, WA

    2010-10-19

    Electrospray ionization emitter arrays, as well as methods for forming electrosprays, are described. The arrays are characterized by a radial configuration of three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters without an extractor electrode. The methods are characterized by distributing fluid flow of the liquid sample among three or more nano-electrospray ionization emitters, forming an electrospray at outlets of the emitters without utilizing an extractor electrode, and directing the electrosprays into an entrance to a mass spectrometry device. Each of the nano-electrospray ionization emitters can have a discrete channel for fluid flow. The nano-electrospray ionization emitters are circularly arranged such that each is shielded substantially equally from an electrospray-inducing electric field.

  1. Field emission electron source

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter; Cohen, Marvin Lou

    2000-01-01

    A novel field emitter material, field emission electron source, and commercially feasible fabrication method is described. The inventive field emission electron source produces reliable electron currents of up to 400 mA/cm.sup.2 at 200 volts. The emitter is robust and the current it produces is not sensitive to variability of vacuum or the distance between the emitter tip and the cathode. The novel emitter has a sharp turn-on near 100 volts.

  2. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a therminonic converter to support an end of an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially as its temperature changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housing, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  3. Thermionic converter emitter support arrangement

    DOEpatents

    Allen, Daniel T.

    1990-01-01

    A support is provided for use in a thermionic converter to support an end an emitter to keep it out of contact with a surrounding collector while allowing the emitter end to move axially at its temperatures changes. The emitter end (34) is supported by a spring structure (44) that includes a pair of Belleville springs, and the spring structure is supported by a support structure (42) fixed to the housing that includes the collector. The support structure is in the form of a sandwich with a small metal spring-engaging element (74) at the front end, a larger metal main support (76) at the rear end that is attached to the housng, and with a ceramic layer (80) between them that is bonded by hot isostatic pressing to the metal element and metal main support. The spring structure can include a loose wafer (120) captured between the Belleville springs.

  4. Solution-phase synthesis of single-crystal Cu3Si nanowire arrays on diverse substrates with dual functions as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Fang-Wei; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Li, Guo-An; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chu, Li-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-09-01

    There is strong and growing interest in applying metal silicide nanowires as building blocks for a new class of silicide-based applications, including spintronics, nano-scale interconnects, thermoelectronics, and anti-reflective coating materials. Solution-phase environments provide versatile materials chemistry as well as significantly lower production costs compared to gas-phase synthesis. However, solution-phase synthesis of silicide nanowires remains challenging due to the lack of fundamental understanding of silicidation reactions. In this study, single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized in an organic solvent. Self-catalyzed, dense single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized by thermal decomposition of monophenylsilane in the presence of copper films or copper substrates at 420 to 475 °C and 10.3 MPa in supercritical benzene. The solution-grown Cu3Si nanowire arrays serve dual functions as field emitters and anti-reflective layers, which are reported on copper silicide materials for the first time. Cu3Si nanowires exhibit superior field-emission properties, with a turn-on-voltage as low as 1.16 V μm-1, an emission current density of 8 mA cm-2 at 4.9 V μm-1, and a field enhancement factor (β) of 1500. Cu3Si nanowire arrays appear black with optical absorption less than 5% between 400 and 800 nm with minimal reflectance, serving as highly efficient anti-reflective layers. Moreover, the Cu3Si nanowires could be grown on either rigid or flexible substrates (PI). This study shows that solution-phase silicide reactions are adaptable for high-quality silicide nanowire growth and demonstrates their promise towards fabrication of metal silicide-based devices.There is strong and growing interest in applying metal silicide nanowires as building blocks for a new class of silicide-based applications, including spintronics, nano-scale interconnects, thermoelectronics, and anti-reflective coating materials. Solution-phase environments

  5. Solution-phase synthesis of single-crystal Cu3Si nanowire arrays on diverse substrates with dual functions as high-performance field emitters and efficient anti-reflective layers.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Fang-Wei; Wang, Chiu-Yen; Li, Guo-An; Chang, Shu-Hao; Chu, Li-Wei; Chen, Lih-Juann; Tuan, Hsing-Yu

    2013-10-21

    There is strong and growing interest in applying metal silicide nanowires as building blocks for a new class of silicide-based applications, including spintronics, nano-scale interconnects, thermoelectronics, and anti-reflective coating materials. Solution-phase environments provide versatile materials chemistry as well as significantly lower production costs compared to gas-phase synthesis. However, solution-phase synthesis of silicide nanowires remains challenging due to the lack of fundamental understanding of silicidation reactions. In this study, single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized in an organic solvent. Self-catalyzed, dense single-crystalline Cu3Si nanowire arrays were synthesized by thermal decomposition of monophenylsilane in the presence of copper films or copper substrates at 420 to 475 °C and 10.3 MPa in supercritical benzene. The solution-grown Cu3Si nanowire arrays serve dual functions as field emitters and anti-reflective layers, which are reported on copper silicide materials for the first time. Cu3Si nanowires exhibit superior field-emission properties, with a turn-on-voltage as low as 1.16 V μm(-1), an emission current density of 8 mA cm(-2) at 4.9 V μm(-1), and a field enhancement factor (β) of 1500. Cu3Si nanowire arrays appear black with optical absorption less than 5% between 400 and 800 nm with minimal reflectance, serving as highly efficient anti-reflective layers. Moreover, the Cu3Si nanowires could be grown on either rigid or flexible substrates (PI). This study shows that solution-phase silicide reactions are adaptable for high-quality silicide nanowire growth and demonstrates their promise towards fabrication of metal silicide-based devices.

  6. Understanding the Impact of Field-Emitter Characteristics on Electron Beam Focusing in the VAPoR Time-of-Fight Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Southard, Adrian E.; Getty, Stephanie A.; Costen, Nicholas P.; Hidrobo, Gregory B.; Glavin, Daniel P.

    2013-01-01

    Simulations of field emission of electrons from an electron gun are used to determine the angular distribution of the emitted electron beam and the percentage of charge transmitted through the grid. The simulations are a first step towards understanding the spherical aberration present after focusing the electron beam. The effect of offset of the cathode with respect to the grid and the separation between cathode and grid on the angular distributions of emitted electrons and transmission of the grid are explored.

  7. Combustion powered thermophotovoltaic emitter system

    SciTech Connect

    McHenry, R.S.

    1995-07-01

    The US Naval Academy (USNA) has recently completed an engineering design project for a high temperature thermophotovoltaic (TPV) photon emitter. The final apparatus was to be portable, completely self contained, and was to incorporate cycle efficiency optimization such as exhaust stream recuperation. Through computer modeling and prototype experimentation, a methane fueled emitter system was designed from structural ceramic materials to fulfill the high temperature requirements necessary for high system efficiency. This paper outlines the engineering design process, discusses obstacles and solutions encountered, and presents the final design.

  8. Novel attributes in the performance and scaling effects of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with halo doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefinia, Zahra; Orouji, Ali A.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we performed a comprehensive scaling study of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) with halo doping (HD) using self-consistent and atomistic scale simulations. Our simulation results demonstrate that drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) diminishes in the HD-CNTFET due to a step in the potential of the CNT at the interface of p-doped and undoped regions in the channel. Also, the hot carrier effect minimizes with reduction of the peak of the electric field at the drain side of the HD-CNTFET. Moreover, the features of the HD-CNTFET can be controlled by the length and concentration engineering of the HD region. Leakage current, on-off current ratio and subthreshold swing improve with an increase of the length and concentration of the HD region, due to the increment of the threshold voltage and the barrier height of the p-n junction near the source. Therefore, this work can provide an incentive for further experimental exploration.

  9. Photopatternable source/drain electrodes using multiwalled carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites for organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kipyo; Yang, Chanwoo; Kim, Se Hyun; Jang, Jaeyoung; Nam, Sooji; Park, Chan Eon

    2009-10-01

    We fabricated photopatternable and conductive polymer/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composites by dispersing MWNTs with poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in water. PAA enables photo-cross-linking in the composite by adding ammonium dichromate, and PSS assists the dispersion of MWNTs in the composites, leading to higher conductivity. Composite films of PAA/PSS-MWNTs were characterized by conductivities of 1.4-210 S/cm and a work function of 4.46 eV, which could be increased to 4.76 eV during UV photo-cross-linking. By using PAA/PSS-MWNT composites as source/drain electrodes, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene field-effect transistors (FET) exhibited a field-effect mobility of 0.101 +/- 0.034 cm(2)/(V s), which is 9 times higher than that of FETs fabricated with gold as source/drain electrodes (0.012 +/- 0.003 cm(2)/(V s)).

  10. Rotating Casimir systems: Magnetic-field-enhanced perpetual motion, possible realization in doped nanotubes, and laws of thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernodub, M. N.

    2013-01-01

    Recently, we have demonstrated that for a certain class of Casimir-type systems (“devices”) the energy of zero-point vacuum fluctuations reaches its global minimum when the device rotates about a certain axis rather than remains static. This rotational vacuum effect may lead to the emergence of permanently rotating objects provided the negative rotational energy of zero-point fluctuations cancels the positive rotational energy of the device itself. In this paper, we show that for massless electrically charged particles the rotational vacuum effect should be drastically (astronomically) enhanced in the presence of a magnetic field. As an illustration, we show that in a background of experimentally available magnetic fields the zero-point energy of massless excitations in rotating torus-shaped doped carbon nanotubes may indeed overwhelm the classical energy of rotation for certain angular frequencies so that the permanently rotating state is energetically favored. The suggested “zero-point-driven” devices—which have no internally moving parts—correspond to a perpetuum mobile of a new, fourth kind: They do not produce any work despite the fact that their equilibrium (ground) state corresponds to a permanent rotation even in the presence of an external environment. We show that our proposal is consistent with the laws of thermodynamics.

  11. High efficiency thermophotovoltaic emitter by metamaterial-based nano-pyramid array.

    PubMed

    Gu, Wei; Tang, Guihua; Tao, Wenquan

    2015-11-30

    A 2D pyramidal metamaterial-based nano-structure is proposed as a wavelength-selective Thermophotovoltaic (TPV) emitter. Rigorous coupled-wave analysis complemented with normal field method is used to predict the emittance as well as the electromagnetic field and Poynting vector distributions. The proposed emitter is shown to be wavelength-selective, polarization-insensitive, and direction-insensitive in emittance. The mechanisms supporting the emittance close to 1.0 in the wavelength range of 0.3-2.0 μm are elucidated by the distribution of electromagnetic field and Poynting vectors in the proposed structure. Finally, thermal stability and radiant heat-to-electricity TPV efficiency for a realistic InGaAsSb TPV system are discussed.

  12. Single- and few-walled carbon nanotubes grown at temperatures as low as 450 degrees c: electrical and field emission characterization.

    PubMed

    Gohier, A; Djouadi, M A; Dubosc, M; Granier, A; Minea, T M; Sirghi, L; Rossi, F; Paredez, P; Alvarez, F

    2007-09-01

    Single-wall (SW-) and few-walled (FW-) carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were synthesized on aluminum/ cobalt coated silicon at temperatures as low as 450 degrees C by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition technique (PECVD). The SWCNTs and FWCNTs grow vertically oriented and well separated from each other. The cold field emission studies of as-grown SWCNTs and FWCNTs showed low turn-on field emission threshold voltages, strongly dependent of the nanotubes morphology. Current-voltage curves of individual CNTs, measured by conductive atomic force microscopy (CAFM), showed an electrical resistance of about 90 Komega, that is attributed mainly to the resistance of the contact between the CNTs and the conductive CAFM tip (Au and Pt).

  13. The 3D-tomography of the nano-clusters formed by Fe-coating and annealing of diamond films for enhancing their surface electron field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Huang-Chin; Lo, Shen-Chuan; Lin, Li-Jiaun; Huang, Pin-Chang; Shih, Wen-Ching; Lin, I.-Nan; Lee, Chi-Young

    2012-09-01

    The Fe-coating and H2-annealed processes markedly increased the conductivity and enhanced the surface electron field emission (s-EFE) properties for the diamond films. The enhancement on the s-EFE properties for the diamond films is presumably owing to the formation of nano-graphite clusters on the surface of the films via the Fe-to-diamond interaction. However, the extent of enhancement varied with the granular structure of the diamond films. For the microcrystalline (MCD) films, the s-EFE process can be turned on at (E0)MCD = 1.9 V/μm, achieving a large s-EFE current density of (Je)MCD = 315 μA/cm2 at an applied field of 8.8 V/μm. These s-EFE properties are markedly better than those for Fe-coated/annealed ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD) films with (E0)UNCD = 2.0 V/μm and (Je)UNCD = 120 μA/cm2. The transmission electron microscopy showed that the nano-graphite clusters formed an interconnected network for MCD films that facilitated the electron transport more markedly, as compared with the isolated nano-graphitic clusters formed at the surface of the UNCD films. Therefore, the Fe-coating/annealing processes improved the s-EFE properties for the MCD films more markedly than that for the UNCD films. The understanding on the distribution of the nano-clusters is of critical importance in elucidating the authentic factor that influences the s-EFE properties of the diamond films. Such an understanding is possible only through the 3D-tomographic investigations.

  14. Ultra Low Emittance Light Sources

    SciTech Connect

    Bengtsson,J.

    2008-06-23

    This paper outlines the special issues for reaching sub-nm emittance in a storage ring. Effects of damping wigglers, intra-beam scattering and lifetime issues, dynamic aperture optimization, control of optics, and their interrelations are covered in some detail. The unique choices for the NSLS-II are given as one example.

  15. Effect of anodization voltage on electron field emission from carbon nanotubes in anodized alumina template.

    PubMed

    Wisitsoraat, A; Phokharatkul, D; Komin, K; Jaruwongrangsee, K; Tuantranont, A

    2011-12-01

    In this work, electron field emission from AAO-CNT structure is studied as a function of anodizing voltage. It is found that the turn-on electric field of AAO-CNTs reduces from 5 V/microm to 4 V/microm as anodization voltage increase from 20 to 30 V. On the other hand, CNTs the turn-on electric field of AAO-CNTs increases from 4 V/microm to 6 V/microm as anodization voltage increase from 30 to 40 V. Thus, anodization voltage of 30 V provides an optimal AAO-CNTs structure for electron field emission. The emission data have been analyzed based on the Fowler Nordhiem (F-N) model. AAO template prepared with 30 V anodization voltage is found to yield CNT nanoarray with optimum alignment and spacing that increase field enhancement factor by the lowering of field screening effect without significant lowering of CNTs density.

  16. Field Emission Properties of Carbon Nanotube Pillar Arrays Patterned Directly on Metal Alloy Surfaces

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-01

    V/μm, respectively. The dramatic reduction in turn-on fields exhibited by the high aspect-ratio CPA samples is attributed to the edge effect ,1...the CPA samples occurred primarily from the pillar edges where the local electric field was greatly enhanced by the edge effect . Furthermore, the...influences the electric field at the edges of the pillar structures. We employed finite element electrostatic simulations to quantify this CPA edge

  17. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  18. High-Performance Stable Field Emission with Ultralow Turn on Voltage from rGO Conformal Coated TiO2 Nanotubes 3D Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yogyata; Kedawat, Garima; Kumar, Pawan; Dwivedi, Jaya; Singh, V. N.; Gupta, R. K.; Gupta, Bipin Kumar

    2015-01-01

    A facile method to produce conformal coated reduced graphene oxide (rGO) on vertically aligned titanium oxide (TiO2) nanotubes three dimensional (3D) arrays (NTAs) is demonstrated for enhanced field emission display applications. These engineered nano arrays exhibit efficient electron field emission properties such as high field emission current density (80 mA/cm2), low turn-on field (1.0 V/μm) and field enhancement factor (6000) with high emission current stability. Moreover, these enhancements observed in nano arrays attribute to the contribution of low work function with non-rectifying barriers, which allow an easy injection of electrons from the conduction band of TiO2 into the Fermi level of reduced graphene oxide under external electric field. The obtained results are extremely advantageous for its potential application in field emission devices. PMID:26152895

  19. Bio-fabrication of nanomesh channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes for locally gated field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Woo Chul; Kim, Wonbin; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2017-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are one of the promising electronic components for nanoscale electronic devices such as field-effect transistors (FETs) owing to their excellent device characteristics such as high conductivity, high carrier mobility and mechanical flexibility. Localized gating gemometry of FETs enables individual addressing of active channels and allows for better electrostatics via thinner dielectric layer of high k-value. For localized gating of SWNTs, it becomes critical to define SWNTs of controlled nanostructures and functionality onto desired locations in high precision. Here, we demonstrate that a biologically templated approach in combination of microfabrication processes can successfully produce a nanostructured channels of SWNTs for localized active devices such as local bottom-gated FETs. A large-scale nanostructured network, nanomesh, of SWNTs were assembled in solution using an M13 phage with strong binding affinity toward SWNTs and micrometer-scale nanomesh channels were defined using negative photolithography and plasma-etching processes. The bio-fabrication approach produced local bottom-gated FETs with remarkably controllable nanostructures and successfully enabled semiconducting behavior out of unsorted SWNTs. In addition, the localized gating scheme enhanced the device performances such as operation voltage and I on/I off ratio. We believe that our approach provides a useful and integrative method for fabricating electronic devices out of nanoscale electronic materials for applications in which tunable electrical properties, mechanical flexibility, ambient stability, and chemical stability are of crucial importance.

  20. A dynamic micro-CT scanner based on a carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, G.; Lee, Y. Z.; Peng, R.; Liu, Z.; Rajaram, R.; Calderon-Colon, X.; An, L.; Wang, P.; Phan, T.; Sultana, S.; Lalush, D. S.; Lu, J. P.; Zhou, O.

    2009-04-01

    Current commercial micro-CT scanners have the capability of imaging objects ex vivo with high spatial resolution, but performing in vivo micro-CT on free-breathing small animals is still challenging because their physiological motions are non-periodic and much faster than those of humans. In this paper, we present a prototype physiologically gated micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner based on a carbon nanotube field emission micro-focus x-ray source. The novel x-ray source allows x-ray pulses and imaging sequences to be readily synchronized and gated to non-periodic physiological signals from small animals. The system performance is evaluated using phantoms and sacrificed and anesthetized mice. Prospective respiratory-gated micro-CT images of anesthetized free-breathing mice were collected using this scanner at 50 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp mm-1 at 10% system MTF. The high spatial and temporal resolutions of the micro-CT scanner make it well suited for high-resolution imaging of free-breathing small animals.

  1. Synthesis of MoS₂ nano-petal forest supported on carbon nanotubes for enhanced field emission performance

    SciTech Connect

    Murawala, Aditya P.; Loh, Tamie A. J.; Chua, Daniel H. C.

    2014-09-21

    We report the fabrication of a three-dimensional forest of highly crystalline two-dimensional (2D) molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) nano-petals encapsulating vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) in a core-shell configuration. Growth was conducted via magnetron sputtering at room temperature and it was found that the nano-petal morphology was formed only when a critical threshold in sputter deposition time was reached. Below this threshold, an amorphous tubular structure composed of mainly molybdenum oxides dominates instead. The presence of the MoS₂ nano-petals was shown to impart photoluminescence to the CNTs, in addition to significantly enhancing their electron emission properties, where the turn-on field was lowered from 2.50 Vμm⁻¹ for pristine CNTs to 0.80 Vμm⁻¹ for MoS₂-CNT heterostructures fabricated at 30 min sputter deposition time. Photoluminescence was detected at wavelengths of approximately 684 nm and 615 nm, with the band at 684 nm gradually blue-shifting as sputter time was increased. These results demonstrate that it is possible to synthesize 2D MoS₂ layers without the need for chemical routes and high growth temperatures.

  2. Optically encoded nanoprobes using single walled carbon nanotube as the building scaffold for magnetic field guided cell imaging.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hong; Wang, Zhuyuan; Ye, Minglang; Zong, Shenfei; Li, Mingyue; Chen, Peng; Ma, Xueqin; Cui, Yiping

    2014-02-01

    We construct a novel fluorescent, surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) encoded and magnetic nanoprobe for live cell imaging. To fabricate this nanoprobe, single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) is used as the building scaffold while gold nanoparticles (Au NPs), superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) and quantum dots (QDs) are employed as the building blocks. Here, Au NPs serve as the SERS substrate and QDs act as the fluorescent agent. Au NPs and SPIONs are first adsorbed on the SWNT via electrostatic interactions. Then a silica layer is coated on the SWNT. Finally, QDs are attached on the silica shell. With such a structure, various optical signals can be readily encoded to the nanoprobe simply by using different Raman molecules and QDs with different emission wavelengths. Experimental results show that the as-prepared nanoprobe exhibits well fluorescence and SERS performance. Furthermore, in vitro experiments demonstrate that the nanoprobe can fulfill magnetic field guided fluorescence and SERS dual mode imaging of live cells. As a fascinating optical encoding material and a multifunctional nanoplatform, the presented nanoprobe holds genuine potential in future biosensing applications.

  3. Polypyrrole nanotube embedded reduced graphene oxide transducer for field-effect transistor-type H2O2 biosensor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Wook; Park, Seon Joo; Kwon, Oh Seok; Lee, Choonghyeon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2014-02-04

    We report a rapid-response and high-sensitivity sensor with specificity toward H2O2 based on a liquid-ion-gated field-effect transistor (FET) using graphene-polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube (NT) composites as the conductive channel. The rGO, PPy, NTs, and nanocomposite materials were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the basis of these results, a well-organized structure is successfully prepared owing to the specific interactions between the PPy NTs and the rGO sheet. Reliable electrical contacts were developed between the rGO/PPy NTs and the microelectrodes, which remained stable when exposed to the liquid-phase analyte. Liquid-ion-gated FETs composed of these graphene nanocomposites exhibited hole-transport behavior with conductivities higher than those of rGO sheets or PPy NTs. This implies an interaction between the PPy NTs and the rGO layers, which is explained in terms of the PPy NTs forming a bridge between the rGO layers. The FET sensor provided a rapid response in real time and high sensitivity toward H2O2 with a limit of detection of 100 pM. The FET-type biosensing geometry was also highly reproducible and stable in air. Furthermore, the liquid-gated FET-type sensor exhibited specificity toward H2O2 in a mixed solution containing compounds found in biological fluids.

  4. A dynamic micro-CT scanner based on a carbon nanotube field emission x-ray source.

    PubMed

    Cao, G; Lee, Y Z; Peng, R; Liu, Z; Rajaram, R; Calderon-Colon, X; An, L; Wang, P; Phan, T; Sultana, S; Lalush, D S; Lu, J P; Zhou, O

    2009-04-21

    Current commercial micro-CT scanners have the capability of imaging objects ex vivo with high spatial resolution, but performing in vivo micro-CT on free-breathing small animals is still challenging because their physiological motions are non-periodic and much faster than those of humans. In this paper, we present a prototype physiologically gated micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) scanner based on a carbon nanotube field emission micro-focus x-ray source. The novel x-ray source allows x-ray pulses and imaging sequences to be readily synchronized and gated to non-periodic physiological signals from small animals. The system performance is evaluated using phantoms and sacrificed and anesthetized mice. Prospective respiratory-gated micro-CT images of anesthetized free-breathing mice were collected using this scanner at 50 ms temporal resolution and 6.2 lp mm(-1) at 10% system MTF. The high spatial and temporal resolutions of the micro-CT scanner make it well suited for high-resolution imaging of free-breathing small animals.

  5. Sdc-Cntfet Stepwise Doping Channel Design in Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors for Improving Short Channel Effects Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalabadi, Zahra; Keshavarzi, Parviz; Naderi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A novel carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with stepwise doping profile channel (SDC-CNTFET) is introduced for short-channel effects (SCEs) improvement. In SDC-CNTFET, the channel is divided into five sections of equal length. Impurity concentration was reduced from 0.8 nm-1 to zero from the source side to the drain side of the channel, with stepwise profile. The devices have been simulated by the self-consistent solution of two-dimensional (2D) Poisson-Schrödinger equations, within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. We demonstrate that the proposed structure for CNTFETs shows considerable improvement in device performance focusing on leakage current and ON-OFF current ratio. In addition, the investigation of SCEs for the proposed structure shows the improved drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and subthreshold swing (SS). Moreover, we will prove that the proposed structure has acceptable performance at different values of channel impurity concentration in terms of delay and power-delay product (PDP). All these investigations introduce SDC-CNTFET as a more reliable device structure in short-channel regime.

  6. Physics and simulation of photonic crystal Purcell light emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witzigmann, Bernd; Römer, Friedhard

    2008-02-01

    Photonic crystal membrane microcavities (PCMC) exhibit modes with highest quality factors and ultrasmall volume at the same time. This makes them the ideal solid state implementation for studying cavity quantum electrodynamics, as a quantum emitter such as a quantum dot can be placed at an electric field maximum with only moderate technological effort. Ultimately, this shall lead to novel classes of light emitters, such as highe efficiency LEDs or devices for quantum information processing. This paper discusses PCMC's operating in the weak coupling regime, shows an efficient and realistic simulation method based on the finite element method, and the design trade-offs for cavities used as light emitters. Finally, a comparison to measured spectra illustrates technological aspects.

  7. Performance of a carbon nanotube field emission X-ray source array for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gidcumb, Emily Morgan

    This work describes the performance of a stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (s-DBT) X-ray tube based on carbon nanotube (CNT) cathodes, and the imaging system developed around it. The s-DBT system has the potential to improve the detection and diagnosis of breast cancer over commercially available digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) systems. DBT is growing in popularity in the United States, and around the world, as a potential replacement for traditional 2D mammography. The main advantage of DBT over 2D mammography lies in the pseudo-3D nature of the technique allowing the removal of overlapping breast tissue within the image. s-DBT builds on this advantage by removing blur from focal spot motion. Introductions to breast imaging techniques and the DBT modality are given, followed by an introduction to carbon nanotube field emission, the foundation of the s-DBT technology. Details of the s-DBT X-ray tube design and system integration are discussed including specific design parameters, system requirements, and the development process. Also included are summaries of the X-ray tube and system performance over time, and results from characterization measurements. Specific focus is given to the development and completion of a fabrication procedure for tungsten gate mesh, characterization of the CNT cathodes, and improving the system's spatial resolution with use of the focusing electrodes. The tungsten gate mesh is an essential component for extracting electrons from CNTs. A successful deep reactive ion etching fabrication procedure was developed, and the improved gate mesh allowed for higher cathode current and longer pulse widths to be employed in the s-DBT system. Characterization of the CNT cathodes revealed their high-current capacity and the ability to produce relatively long pulse widths, mimicking a 2D imaging modality. This work confirmed that the cathodes are well suited for the task of breast imaging, and explored possible improvements. Lastly, it was

  8. The fabrication of single-walled carbon nanotube/polyelectrolyte multilayer composites by layer-by-layer assembly and magnetic field assisted alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ying; Park, Jin Gyu; Cheng, Qunfeng; Liang, Zhiyong; Zhang, Chuck; Wang, Ben

    2009-08-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)/polymer composites are widely studied because of their potential for high mechanical performance and multifunctional applications. In order to realize highly ordered multilayer nanostructures, we combined the layer-by-layer (LBL) assembly method with magnetic force-induced alignment to fabricate SWNT/poly(ethylamine) (PEI) multilayer composites. The SWNTs were functionalized with the anionic surfactant sodium dodecylbenzenesulfonate (NaDDBS) to realize negative charge at pH>7, while the PEI is positively charged at pH<7. The LBL method is based on the electrostatic absorption between the charged SWNTs and PEI resin to form multilayer composites on a solid substrate polydimethylsiloxane. Since the fabricated thickness of each SWNT-NaDDBS/PEI bilayer is uniform (~150 nm), the multilayer film thickness can be strictly controlled via the number of deposition cycles. A high magnetic field (8.5 Tesla) was used to align the SWNTs during the LBL process. The resultant LBL composite samples demonstrated high SWNT loading of approximately 50 wt% and uniform distribution of SWNTs in the multilayer structures, which was verified using a quartz crystal microbalance. Good alignment was also realized and observed through using high magnetic fields to align the nanotubes during the LBL deposition process. The results indicate that the LBL/magnetic alignment approach has potential for fabricating nanotube composites with highly ordered nanostructures for multifunctional materials and device applications.

  9. A New Approach to the Characteristics and Short-Channel Effects of Double-Gate Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors using MATLAB: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Alireza; Heidari, Niloofar; Jahromi, Foad Khademi; Amiri, Roozbeh; Ghorbani, Mohammadali

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, first, the impact of different gate arrangements on the short-channel effects of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with doped source and drain with the self-consistent solution of the three-dimensional Poisson equation and the Schr¨odinger equation with open boundary conditions, within the non-equilibrium Green function, is investigated. The results indicate that the double-gate structure possesses a quasi-ideal subthreshold oscillation and an acceptable decrease in the drain induced barrier even for a relatively thick gate oxide (5 nm). Afterward, the electrical characteristics of the double-gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (DG-CNTFET) are investigated. The results demonstrate that an increase in diameter and density of the nanotubes in the DG-CNTFET increases the on-state current. Also, as the drain voltage increases, the off-state current of the DG-CNTFET decreases. In addition, regarding the negative gate voltages, for a high drain voltage, increasing in the drain current due to band-to-band tunnelling requires a larger negative gate voltage, and for a low drain voltage, resonant states appear

  10. Alpha particle emitters in medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Fisher, D.R.

    1989-09-01

    Radiation-induced cancer of bone, liver and lung has been a prominent harmful side-effect of medical applications of alpha emitters. In recent years, however, the potential use of antibodies labeled with alpha emitting radionuclides against cancer has seemed promising because alpha particles are highly effective in cell killing. High dose rates at high LET, effectiveness under hypoxic conditions, and minimal expectancy of repair are additional advantages of alpha emitters over antibodies labeled with beta emitting radionuclides for cancer therapy. Cyclotron-produced astatine-211 ({sup 211}At) and natural bismuth-212 ({sup 212}Bi) have been proposed and are under extensive study in the United States and Europe. Radium-223 ({sup 223}Ra) also has favorable properties as a potential alpha emitting label, including a short-lived daughter chain with four alpha emissions. The radiation dosimetry of internal alpha emitters is complex due to nonuniformly distributed sources, short particle tracks, and high relative specific ionization. The variations in dose at the cellular level may be extreme. Alpha-particle radiation dosimetry, therefore, must involve analysis of statistical energy deposition probabilities for cellular level targets. It must also account fully for nonuniform distributions of sources in tissues, source-target geometries, and particle-track physics. 18 refs., 4 figs.

  11. Ionic liquid flow along the carbon nanotube with DC electric field

    PubMed Central

    Hwal Shin, Jung; Hwee Kim, Geon; Kim, Intae; Jeon, Hyungkook; An, Taechang; Lim, Geunbae

    2015-01-01

    Liquid pumping can occur along the outer surface of an electrode under a DC electric field. For biological applications, a better understanding of the ionic solution pumping mechanism is required. Here, we fabricated CNT wire electrodes (CWEs) and tungsten wire electrodes (TWEs) of various diameters to assess an ionic solution pumping. A DC electric field created by a bias of several volts pumped the ionic solution in the direction of the negatively biased electrode. The resulting electro-osmotic flow was attributed to the movement of an electric double layer near the electrode, and the flow rates along the CWEs were on the order of picoliters per minute. According to electric field analysis, the z-directional electric field around the meniscus of the small electrode was more concentrated than that of the larger electrode. Thus, the pumping effect increased as the electrode diameter decreased. Interestingly in CWEs, the initiating voltage for liquid pumping did not change with increasing diameter, up to 20 μm. We classified into three pumping zones, according to the initiating voltage and faradaic reaction. Liquid pumping using the CWEs could provide a new method for biological studies with adoptable flow rates and a larger ‘Recommended pumping zone’. PMID:26135840

  12. Ionic liquid flow along the carbon nanotube with DC electric field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwal Shin, Jung; Hwee Kim, Geon; Kim, Intae; Jeon, Hyungkook; An, Taechang; Lim, Geunbae

    2015-07-01

    Liquid pumping can occur along the outer surface of an electrode under a DC electric field. For biological applications, a better understanding of the ionic solution pumping mechanism is required. Here, we fabricated CNT wire electrodes (CWEs) and tungsten wire electrodes (TWEs) of various diameters to assess an ionic solution pumping. A DC electric field created by a bias of several volts pumped the ionic solution in the direction of the negatively biased electrode. The resulting electro-osmotic flow was attributed to the movement of an electric double layer near the electrode, and the flow rates along the CWEs were on the order of picoliters per minute. According to electric field analysis, the z-directional electric field around the meniscus of the small electrode was more concentrated than that of the larger electrode. Thus, the pumping effect increased as the electrode diameter decreased. Interestingly in CWEs, the initiating voltage for liquid pumping did not change with increasing diameter, up to 20 μm. We classified into three pumping zones, according to the initiating voltage and faradaic reaction. Liquid pumping using the CWEs could provide a new method for biological studies with adoptable flow rates and a larger ‘Recommended pumping zone’.

  13. Lyα Emitter Galaxies at z˜ 2.8 in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South. I. Tracing the Large-scale Structure via Lyα Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Zhen-Ya; Malhotra, Sangeeta; Rhoads, James E.; Finkelstein, Steven L.; Wang, Jun-Xian; Jiang, Chun-Yan; Cai, Zheng

    2016-10-01

    We present a narrowband survey with three adjacent filters for z = 2.8-2.9 Lyman alpha (Lyα) emitter (LAE) galaxies in the Extended Chandra Deep Field South (ECDFS), along with spectroscopic follow-up. With a complete sample of 96 LAE candidates in the narrowband NB466, we confirm the large-scale structure at z ˜ 2.8 suggested by previous spectroscopic surveys. Compared to the blank field detected with the other two narrowband filters NB470 and NB475, the LAE-density excess in NB466 (900 arcmin2) is ˜ 6.0 ± 0.8 times the standard deviation expected at z ˜ 2.8, assuming a linear bias of 2. The overdense large-scale structure in NB466 can be decomposed into four protoclusters, whose overdensities (each within an equivalent comoving volume 153 Mpc3) relative to the blank field (NB470+NB475) are in the range of 4.6-6.6. These four protoclusters are expected to evolve into a Coma-like cluster (M ≥ 1015 M ⊙) at z ˜ 0. We also investigate the various properties of LAEs at z = 2.8-2.9 and their dependence on the environment. The average star formation rates derived from the Lyα, rest-frame UV, and X-ray bands are ˜4, 10, and <16 M ⊙ yr-1, respectively, implying a Lyα escape fraction of 25% ≲ {f}{{ESC}}{Lyα } ≲ 40% and a UV continuum escape fraction of {f}{{ESC}}{{UV,cont}} ≳ 62% for LAEs at z ˜ 2.8. The Lyα photon density calculated from the integrated Lyα luminosity function in the overdense field (NB466) is ˜50% higher than that in the blank field (NB470+NB475), and more bright LAEs are found in the overdense field. The three brightest LAEs, including a quasar at z = 2.81, are all detected in the X-ray band and in NB466. These three LAE-active galactic nuclei contribute an extra 20%-30% Lyα photon density compared to other LAE galaxies. Furthermore, we find that LAEs in overdense regions have larger equivalent width values, bluer U - B and V - R (˜2-3σ) colors compared with those in lower density regions, indicating that LAEs in overdense

  14. Modal Coupling of Single Photon Emitters Within Nanofiber Waveguides

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Nanoscale generation of individual photons in confined geometries is an exciting research field aiming at exploiting localized electromagnetic fields for light manipulation. One of the outstanding challenges of photonic systems combining emitters with nanostructured media is the selective channelling of photons emitted by embedded sources into specific optical modes and their transport at distant locations in integrated systems. Here, we show that soft-matter nanofibers, electrospun with embedded emitters, combine subwavelength field localization and large broadband near-field coupling with low propagation losses. By momentum spectroscopy, we quantify the modal coupling efficiency identifying the regime of single-mode coupling. These nanofibers do not rely on resonant interactions, making them ideal for room-temperature operation, and offer a scalable platform for future quantum information technology. PMID:27203403

  15. Ideal near-field thermophotovoltaic cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molesky, Sean; Jacob, Zubin

    2015-05-01

    We ask the question, what are the ideal characteristics of a near-field thermophotovoltaic cell? Our search leads us to a reformulation of near-field radiative heat transfer in terms of the joint density of electronic states of the emitter-absorber pair in the thermophotovoltaic system. This form reveals that semiconducting materials with narrowband absorption spectra are critical to the energy-conversion efficiency. This essential feature is unavailable in conventional bulk semiconductor cells but can be obtained using low-dimensional materials. Our results show that the presence of matched van Hove singularities resulting from quantum confinement in the emitter and absorber of a thermophotovoltaic cell boosts both the magnitude and spectral selectivity of radiative heat transfer, dramatically improving energy-conversion efficiency. We provide a model near-field thermophotovoltaic system design making use of this idea by employing the van Hove singularities present in carbon nanotubes. Shockley-Queisser analysis shows that the predicted heat transfer characteristics of this model device are fundamentally better than existing thermophotovoltaic designs. Our work paves the way for the use of quantum dots, quantum wells, two-dimensional semiconductors, semiconductor nanowires, and carbon nanotubes as future materials for thermophotovoltaic cells.

  16. Transverse Emittance Reduction with Tapered Foil

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yi; Chao, Alex; Cai, Yunhai; /SLAC

    2011-12-09

    The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is proposed by J.M. Peterson in 1980s and recently by B. Carlsten. In this paper, we present the physical model of tapered energy-loss foil and analyze the emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance. The study shows that, to reduce transverse emittance, one should collimate at least 4% of particles which has either much low energy or large transverse divergence. The multiple coulomb scattering is not trivial, leading to a limited emittance reduction ratio. Small transverse emittances are of essential importance for the accelerator facilities generating free electron lasers, especially in hard X-ray region. The idea of reducing transverse emittance with tapered energy-loss foil is recently proposed by B. Carlsten [1], and can be traced back to J.M. Peterson's work in 1980s [2]. Peterson illustrated that a transverse energy gradient can be produced with a tapered energy-loss foil which in turn leads to transverse emittance reduction, and also analyzed the emittance growth from the associated multiple coulomb scattering. However, what Peterson proposed was rather a conceptual than a practical design. In this paper, we build a more complete physical model of the tapered foil based on Ref. [2], including the analysis of the transverse emittance reduction using the concept of eigen emittance and confirming the results by various numerical simulations. The eigen emittance equals to the projected emittance when there is no cross correlation in beam's second order moments matrix [3]. To calculate the eigen emittances, it requires only to know the beam distribution at the foil exit. Thus, the analysis of emittance reduction and the optics design of the subsequent beam line section can be separated. In addition, we can combine the effects of multiple coulomb scattering and transverse energy gradient together in the beam matrix and analyze their net effect. We find that,when applied to an

  17. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  18. Membrane-Based Emitter for Coupling Microfluidics with Ultrasensitive Nanoelectrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T.; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D.

    2011-06-09

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high performance nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (nanoESI-MS) has been fabricated and evaluated. The ~100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter provides highly stable electrospray at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min, and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction, and provides excellent stability, reproducibility and sensitivity, as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  19. Membrane-based emitter for coupling microfluidics with ultrasensitive nanoelectrospray ionization-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuefei; Kelly, Ryan T; Tang, Keqi; Smith, Richard D

    2011-07-15

    An integrated poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane-based microfluidic emitter for high-performance nanoelectrospray ionization mass spectrometry has been fabricated and evaluated. The ∼100-μm-thick emitter was created by cutting a PDMS membrane that protrudes beyond the bulk substrate. The reduced surface area at the emitter enhances the electric field and reduces wetting of the surface by the electrospray solvent. As such, the emitter enables highly stable electrosprays at flow rates as low as 10 nL/min and is compatible with electrospray solvents containing a large organic component (e.g., 90% methanol). This approach enables facile emitter construction and provides excellent stability, reproducibility, and sensitivity as well as compatibility with multilayer soft lithography.

  20. Emittance control and RF bunch compression in the NSRRC photoinjector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, W. K.; Hung, S. B.; Lee, A. P.; Chou, C. S.; Huang, N. Y.

    2011-05-01

    The high-brightness photoinjector being constructed at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center is for testing new accelerator and light-source concepts. It is the so-called split photoinjector configuration in which a short solenoid magnet is used for emittance compensation. The UV-drive laser pulses are also shaped to produce uniform cylindrical bunches for further reduction of beam emittance. However, limited by the available power from our microwave power system, the nominal accelerating gradient in the S-band booster linac is set at 18 MV/m. A simulation study with PARMELA shows that the linac operating at this gradient fails to freeze the electron beam emittance at low value. A background solenoid magnetic field is applied for beam emittance control in the linac during acceleration. A satisfactory result that meets our preliminary goal has been achieved with the solenoid magnetic field strength at 0.1 T. RF bunch compression as a means to achieve the required beam brightness for high-gain free-electron laser experiments is also examined. The reduction of bunch length to a few hundred femtoseconds can be obtained.