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Sample records for nanotube field-effect transistors

  1. Proton Damage Effects on Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-19

    PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Evan R. Kemp, Ctr...United States. AFIT-ENP-T-14-J-39 PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS THESIS Presented to...PROTON DAMAGE EFFECTS ON CARBON NANOTUBE FIELD-EFFECT TRANSISTORS Evan R. Kemp, BS Ctr, USAF Approved: // Signed

  2. Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors (CNTFETs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-01

    Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) by Matthew Chin and Dr. Stephen Kilpatrick...20783-1197 ARL-TR-5151 April 2010 Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) Dr...AND SUBTITLE Differential Amplifier Circuits Based on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors ( CNTFETs ) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  3. Hysteresis modeling in ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yian; Moura, Mateus S; Costa, Ademir J; de Almeida, Luiz Alberto L; Paranjape, Makarand; Fontana, Marcio

    2014-01-01

    Theoretical models are adapted to describe the hysteresis effects seen in the electrical characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The ballistic transport model describes the contributions of conduction energy sub-bands over carbon nanotube field-effect transistor drain current as a function of drain-source and gate-source voltages as well as other physical parameters of the device. The limiting-loop proximity model, originally developed to understand magnetic hysteresis, is also utilized in this work. The curves obtained from our developed model corroborate well with the experimentally derived hysteretic behavior of the transistors. Modeling the hysteresis behavior will enable designers to reliably use these effects in both analog and memory applications. PMID:25187698

  4. Mechanism of gas sensing in carbon nanotube field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dube, Isha

    Gas sensors based on carbon nanotubes in the field effect transistor configuration have exhibited impressive sensitivities compared to the existing technologies. However, the lack of an understanding of the gas sensing mechanism in these carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) has impeded setting-up a calibration standard and customization of these nano-sensors for specified gas sensing application. Calibration requires identifying fundamental transistor parameters and establishing how they vary in the presence of a gas and influence the overall sensing behavior. This work focuses on modeling the sensing behavior of a CNTFET in the presence of oxidizing (NO 2) and reducing (NH3) gases and determining how each of the transistor parameters, namely: the Schottky barrier height, Schottky barrier width and doping level of the nanotube are affected by the presence of these gases. Earlier experiments have shown that the carbon nanotube-metal interface is responsible for the observed change in the CNTFET response. The interface consists of the metal contact and the depletion region in the carbon nanotube. A change in the metal work function will change the Schottky barrier height, whereas doping of the depletion region will affect the Schottky barrier width and the doping level of the carbon nanotube. A theoretical model containing these parameters was systematically fitted to the experimental transfer characteristics for different concentrations of NO2 and NH3. A direct correlation between the measured changes in the CNTFET saturated conductance and the Schottky barrier height was found. These changes are directly related to the changes in the metal work function of the electrodes that I determined experimentally, independently, with a Kelvin probe system. The overall change in the CNTFET characteristics were explained and quantified by also including changes due to doping from molecules adsorbed at the carbon nanotube-metal interface through the parameters

  5. Graphical modelling of carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, R.; Mishra, R. R.

    2015-02-01

    Carbon nanotube Field Effect Transistors (CNTFET) are found to be one of the most promising successors to conventional Si-MOSFET. This paper presents a novel modelling for planar CNTFET based on curve fitting method. The results obtained from the model are compared with the simulated results obtained by using the nanohub simulator. Finally the accuracy of the model is discussed by calculating the normalized root mean square difference between the nanohub simulation results and those obtained from the proposed model.

  6. Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-25

    AEROSPACE REPORT NO. ATR-2013-01138 Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors ...Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors November 25, 2013 Adam W. Bushmaker Electronics and...Electrical Transport and Channel Length Modulation in Semiconducting Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors Approved by: U^ g jj t^yt Steven C

  7. Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor for DNA Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xuan, Chu T.; Thuy, Nguyen T.; Luyen, Tran T.; Huyen, Tran T. T.; Tuan, Mai A.

    2017-01-01

    A field-effect transistor (FET) using carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as the conducting channel (CNTFET) has been developed, designed such that the CNT conducting channel (15 μm long, 700 μm wide) is directly exposed to medium containing target deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA). The CNTFET operates at high ON-current of 1.91 μA, ON/OFF-current ratio of 1.2 × 105, conductance of 4.3 μS, and leakage current of 16.4 pA. We present initial trials showing the response of the CNTFET to injection of target DNA into aqueous medium.

  8. A carbon nanotube field effect transistor with a suspended nanotube gate.

    PubMed

    Tarakanov, Yury A; Kinaret, Jari M

    2007-08-01

    We investigate theoretically field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTFET) and explore two device geometries with suspended multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) functioning as gate electrodes. In the two geometries, a doubly or singly clamped MWNT is electrostatically deflected toward the transistor channel, allowing for a variable gate coupling and leading to, for instance, a superior subthreshold slope. We suggest that the proposed designs can be used as nanoelectromechanical switches and as detectors of mechanical motion on the nanoscale.

  9. Analysis of long-channel nanotube field-effect-transistors (NT FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an analysis of long-channel nanotube (NT) field effect transistors (FET) from NASA's Ames Research Center. The structure of such a transistor including the electrode contact, 1D junction, and the planar junction is outlined. Also mentioned are various characteristics of a nanotube tip-equipped scanning tunnel microscope (STM).

  10. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors under high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fedorov, Georgy; Smirnov, Dmitry; Tselev, Alexander; Yang, Yanfei; Kalugin, Nikolay

    2006-03-01

    Magnetic field, when applied parallel to the CNT axis, alters the energy gap in the CNT electron spectrum with a period corresponding to one quantum of magnetic flux through the cross-section of the CNT. With available magnetic fields (10^1T by the order of magnitude), gap oscillations can be observed only in multi-wall CNTs with diameters larger than approx 5 nm, where effects of band structure variation are smeared out by defects and by quantum interference effects. As follows from [1], it is possible to separate effects of disorder from those of the band structure modification by studying magnetotransport in small diameter CNTs while controllably changing the position of the Fermi level of the CNT by electrostatic doping, i.e. by applying a gate voltage in the field effect transistor configuration. We have studied several samples of individual CTNs contacted by palladium electrodes placed on an oxidized heavily doped silicon substrate that served as a back-gate. We find that magnetoresistance of a CNT strongly depends on the Fermi level position with respect to the nanotube's charge neutrality point (CNP). Details and the analysis of our experimental data will be presented. [1] S. Roche, R. Saito, Phys. Rev. Lett. 87, 246803 (2001)

  11. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  12. Carbon Nanotube Band Structure Effect on Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahamdi, M. T.; Johari, Z.; Ismail, R.; Webb, J. F.

    2010-06-01

    The band structure of a carbon nanotube (CNT) near to the minimum band energy is parabolic. However it is not parabolic in other parts of the band energy. In the parabolic part, based on the confinement effect, we present an analytical model that captures the essence of the physical processes relevant to the operation of a carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET). The model covers seamlessly the whole range of transport from drift-diffusion to ballistic. It has been clarified that the intrinsic speed of CNTs is governed by the transit time of electrons. Although the transit time is more dependent on the saturation velocity than on the weak-field mobility, the feature of high-electron mobility is beneficial in the sense that the drift velocity is always maintained closer to the saturation velocity, at least at the drain end of the transistor where the electric field is necessarily high and controls the saturation current. The results obtained are applied to the modeling of the current-voltage characteristics of a CNTFET. The channel-length modulation is shown to arise from the drain velocity becoming closer to the ultimate saturation velocity as the drain voltage is increased.

  13. Robust Noise Modulation of Nonlinearity in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawahara, Toshio; Yamaguchi, Satarou; Maehashi, Kenzo; Ohno, Yasuhide; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoji

    2010-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are one of the candidates for nanosize devices such as field-effect transistors. CNT field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) have very special properties sometimes caused by surface states. For example, they are also well known as noisy devices caused by the molecule adhesion on the surface. Nonlinear systems, however, have some advantages such as weak signal detection or enhancement in working with noise. The small signal enhancement was conventionally studied as stochastic resonance. Therefore, we study the modification of nonlinearity of the systems under noise. For actual applications, the noise is also generated from the devices. Thus, we combined the noise CNTFET and another CNT transistor for the trial nonlinear system. Then, the sine wave amplification in the transistor with 1/ f noise of CNTFETs was measured. We used two different combinations of CNTFETs for noise and nonlinear CNTFETs, and observed the robustness of the noise modification on the nonlinearity.

  14. Si/Ge hetero-structure nanotube tunnel field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, A. N.; Hussain, M. M.

    2015-01-07

    We discuss the physics of conventional channel material (silicon/germanium hetero-structure) based transistor topology mainly core/shell (inner/outer) gated nanotube vs. gate-all-around nanowire architecture for tunnel field effect transistor application. We show that nanotube topology can result in higher performance through higher normalized current when compared to nanowire architecture at V{sub dd} = 1 V due to the availability of larger tunneling cross section and lower Shockley-Reed-Hall recombination. Both architectures are able to achieve sub 60 mV/dec performance for more than five orders of magnitude of drain current. This enables the nanotube configuration achieving performance same as the nanowire architecture even when V{sub dd} is scaled down to 0.5 V.

  15. Ion-sensitive field effect transistors using carbon nanotubes as the transducing layer.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a new type of ion-sensitive field effect transistor (ISFET). This type of ISFET incorporates a new architecture, containing a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as the transduction layer, making an external reference electrode unnecessary. To show an example of its application, the SWCNT-based ISFET is able to detect at least 10(-8) M of potassium in water using an ion-selective membrane containing valinomycin.

  16. Biosensors based on carbon nanotube-network field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2010-01-01

    We describe in detail the different steps involved in the construction of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The nonspecific binding of proteins or other interferences are avoided by covering the nonadsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The CNTFET is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  17. [Application of field-effect transistor based on carbon nanotube in biosensors].

    PubMed

    Yang, Danna; Wang, Lin; Chen, Zhiqiang; Li, Sai

    2011-12-01

    With the emergence of avian flu, influence A virus and other diseases, the development of rapid, real-time, label-free biological sensors has become increasingly significant at the early detection and clinical diagnoses of various diseases. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) have unique one-dimensional structure, special electrical properties, good biocompatibility and size compatibility, so that the SWNTs have great potential uses in the biosensor fields due to these advantages. This article reviews recent examples of carbon nanotubes field-effect transistor (CNTFET) as a label-free biosensors for detecting a variety of biological macromolecules, such as protein, enzyme, DNA, cancer, virus, carbohydrate and so on.

  18. Study of carbon nanotube field effect transistors performance based on changes in gate parameters.

    PubMed

    Shirazi, Shaahin G; Mirzakuchaki, Sattar

    2011-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes are known as an interesting material to be used in the next generations of electronic technology, especially at nano regime. Nowadays, carbon nanotube field effect transistor or CNTFET is one of the promising devices for future electronic applications. A CNTFET which uses carbon nanotube as channel or source/drain region is the most promising candidate for replacing the current silicon transistor technology. The study of modern manufacturing approach and impact of device parameters on its performance is one of the important research fields in nanoelectronics. In this paper we study some aspects of changes in gate parameters at different channel diameters. This paper shows that for small values of diameter, increasing the dielectric constant of gate insulator doesn't help to improve the performance as value of dielectric constant of gate insulator reaches a certain amount. Also, increasing the oxide thickness of gate insulator doesn't always decrease transistor performance. For high diameter values, increasing the thickness up to a certain value improves the transistor performance.

  19. TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors and their application as humidity sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Fengxia; Luo, Lin-Bao; Tsang, Chun-Kwan; Zheng, Lingxia; Cheng, Hua; Li, Yang Yang

    2012-01-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes fabricated by directly anodizing a Ti foil followed by ultrasonification. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes used to construct field effect transistors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Electrical properties measured from the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sensitive response of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors to water vapor. -- Abstract: TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are the building units of various devices of energy- and environment-related applications and the property studies of individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are important to understand and improve the performance of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes-based devices. Here we report the electrical property study of individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes enabled by the construction of field effect transistors based on individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. It is found that individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes exhibit typical n-type electrical conduction characteristics, with electron mobility of 6.9 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} cm{sup 2}/V s at V{sub ds} = 1 V, and electron concentration of 2.8 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3}. Moreover, the on-off ratio of the TiO{sub 2} nanotube-based field effect transistors is as high as 10{sup 3}. Humidity sensing test shows the sensitive response of the individual TiO{sub 2} nanotubes to water vapor.

  20. Determination of the electrostatic lever arm of carbon nanotube field effect transistors using Kelvin force microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunel, David; Deresmes, Dominique; Mélin, Thierry

    2009-06-01

    We use Kelvin force microscopy (KFM) to study the electrostatic properties of single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistor devices (CNTFETs) with backgate geometry at room temperature. We show that KFM maps recorded as a function of the device backgate polarization enable a complete phenomenological determination of the averaging effects associated with the KFM probe side capacitances, and thus, to obtain KFM measurements with quantitative character. The value of the electrostatic lever arm of the CNTFET is determined from KFM measurements and found in agreement with transport measurements based on Coulomb blockade.

  1. Fabrication and radio frequency characterization of carbon nanotube field effect transistor: evidence of quantum capacitance.

    PubMed

    Hwang, D H; Kang, M G; Kim, T G; Hwang, J S; Kim, D W; Whang, D; Hwang, S W

    2011-08-01

    We fabricated an radio frequency (RF) carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) whose electrode shapes were standard RF designed ground-signal-ground (GSG)-type pads. The S-parameters measured from our RF CNTFET in the frequency range up to 6 GHz were fitted with an RF equivalent circuit, and the extracted gate capacitance was shown to be the capacitance value of the series combination of the electrostatic capacitance and the quantum capacitance. The effect of the channel resistance and the kinetic inductance was also discussed.

  2. Scattering effects on the performance of carbon nanotube field effect transistor in a compact model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamieh, S. D.; Desgreys, P.; Naviner, J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFET) are being extensively studied as possible successors to CMOS. Device simulators have been developed to estimate their performance in sub-10-nm and device structures have been fabricated. In this work, a new compact model of single-walled semiconducting CNTFET is proposed implementing the calculation of energy conduction sub-band minima and the treatment of scattering effects through energy shift in CNTFET. The developed model has been used to simulate I-V characteristics using VHDL-AMS simulator.

  3. Ultrasensitive Detection of DNA Hybridization Using Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko; Kerman, Kagan; Takamura, Yuzuru; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2004-12-01

    We have sensitively detected DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) in real time. Amino modified peptide nucleic acid (PNA) oligonucleotides at 5' end were covalently immobilized onto the Au surface of the back gate. For 11-mer PNA oligonucletide probe, full-complementary DNA with concentration as low as 6.8 fM solution could be effectively detected. Our CNTFET-based biochip is a promising candidate for the development of an integrated, high-throughput, multiplexed DNA biosensor for medical, forensic and environmental diagnostics.

  4. Multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with compound channel layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-11-01

    A multichannel carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (MC-CNTFET) with compound channel layer has been built. In this MC-CNTFET, a dispersedly directed array of long single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is used as primary channel layer and a randomly aligned monolayer network of short SWCNTs acts as secondary set of "bridge" channel layer, which causes large numbers of short semiconducting percolation paths formed. The device exhibits a large on-state current of 2.01 mA and simultaneously retains a high current on/off ratio of 103-104. The function dependency of the on-state current on the density of long SWCNTs and length of short SWCNTs is also presented.

  5. Quantum transport in carbon nanotube field effect transistors in high magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stephens, Jeffrey Dale

    The dissertation is a study of data taken from carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFET). The data presented was taken at two locations, University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, PA and at Lehigh University in Bethlehem, PA. The samples are exposed to very low temperature using dilution refrigerator techniques and placed in high magnetic fields using a superconducting magnet. One of the main focuses will be on the effect an external magnetic field can produce on the transport properties of a CNTFET. Particular attention will be paid to the Kondo effect and Coulomb blockade phenomena. Comparisons are drawn between the observed behavior of the samples studied and with published works on carbon nanotube electronics and traditional semiconductor quantum dots.

  6. Selective functionalization and loading of biomolecules in crystalline silicon nanotube field-effect-transistors.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Zack C Y; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, Hang; Cha, Jennifer N; Xiang, Jie

    2014-07-21

    Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length.

  7. Investigating the effect of some parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valed Karimi, Najmeh; Pourasad, Yaghoub

    2016-08-01

    This paper studies p-i-n tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor to investigate the effect of various parameters of the channel on the characteristics of tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor. Tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (T-CNTFET) has been simulated using non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF), and the transmission was conducted through inelastic scattering. Besides the evaluation of device performance, various parameters of the channel were also compared. One of the parameters is considered as the variable, while other parameters of the channel are constant. Then, improved characteristics were discussed by selection of some channel parameters. T-CNTFET with CNT (10, 0) with oxide thickness = 1 nm shows reduced sub-threshold swing (18 mV/decade).

  8. Selective functionalization and loading of biomolecules in crystalline silicon nanotube field-effect-transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Zack C. Y.; Noh, Hyunwoo; Lee, Ju Hun; Liu, Hang; Cha, Jennifer N.; Xiang, Jie

    2014-06-01

    Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length.Crystalline silicon nanotubes (Si NTs) provide distinctive advantages as electrical and biochemical analysis scaffolds through their unique morphology and electrical tunability compared to solid nanowires or amorphous/non-conductive nanotubes. Such potential is investigated in this report. Gate-dependent four-probe current-voltage analysis reveals electrical properties such as resistivity to differ by nearly 3 orders of magnitude between crystalline and amorphous Si NTs. Analysis of transistor transfer characteristics yields a field effect mobility of 40.0 cm2 V-1 s-1 in crystalline Si NTs. The hollow morphology also allows selective inner/outer surface functionalization and loading capability either as a carrier for molecular targets or as a nanofluidic channel for biomolecular assays. We present for the first time a demonstration of internalization of fluorescent dyes (rhodamine) and biomolecules (BSA) in Si NTs as long as 22 μm in length. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Modelling (Fig. S1) and

  9. Design considerations and emerging challenges for nanotube-, nanowire-, and negative capacitor-field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wahab, Md. Abdul

    As the era of classical planar metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) comes to an end, the semiconductor industry is beginning to adopt 3D device architectures, such as FinFETs, starting at the 22 nm technology node. Since physical limits such as short channel effect (SCE) and self-heating may dominate, it may be difficult to scale Si FinFET below 10 nm. In this regard, transistors with different materials, geometries, or operating principles may help. For example, gate has excellent electrostatic control over 2D thin film channel with planar geometry, and 1D nanowire (NW) channel with gate-all-around (GAA) geometry to reduce SCE. High carrier mobility of single wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) or III-V channels may reduce VDD to reduce power consumption. Therefore, as channel of transistor, 2D thin film of array SWNTs and 1D III-V multi NWs are promising for sub 10 nm technology nodes. In this thesis, we analyze the potential of these transistors from process, performance, and reliability perspectives. For SWNT FETs, we discuss a set of challenges (such as how to (i) characterize diameter distribution, (ii) remove metallic (m)-SWNTs, and (iii) avoid electrostatic cross-talk among the neighboring SWNTs), and demonstrate solution strategies both theoretically and experimentally. Regarding self-heating in these new class of devices (SWNT FET and GAA NW FET including state-of-the-art FinFET), higher thermal resistance from poor thermal conducting oxides results significant temperature rise, and reduces the IC life-time. For GAA NW FETs, we discuss accurate self-heating evaluation with good spatial, temporal, and thermal resolutions. The introduction of negative capacitor (NC), as gate dielectric stack of transistor, allows sub 60 mV/dec operation to reduce power consumption significantly. Taken together, our work provides a comprehensive perspective regarding the challenges and opportunities of sub 10 nm technology nodes.

  10. Enrichment of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes by carbothermic reaction for use in all-nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Shisheng; Liu, Chang; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2012-11-27

    Selective removal of metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and consequent enrichment of semiconducting SWCNTs were achieved through an efficient carbothermic reaction with a NiO thin film at a relatively low temperature of 350 °C. All-SWCNT field effect transistors (FETs) were fabricated with the aid of a patterned NiO mask, in which the as-grown SWCNTs behaving as source/drain electrodes and the remaining semiconducting SWCNTs that survive in the carbothermic reaction as a channel material. The all-SWCNT FETs demonstrate improved current ON/OFF ratios of ∼10(3).

  11. Intrinsic memory function of carbon nanotube-based ferroelectric field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Xu, Zhi; Bai, Xuedong; Gu, Changzhi; Wang, Enge

    2009-03-01

    We demonstrate the intrinsic memory function of ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) based on an integration of individual single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and epitaxial ferroelectric films. In contrast to the previously reported "charge-storage" CNT-FET memories, whose operations are haunted by a lack of control over the "charge traps", the present CNT-FeFETs exhibit a well-defined memory hysteresis loop induced by the reversible remnant polarization of the ferroelectric films. Large memory windows approximately 4 V, data retention time up to 1 week, and ultralow power consumption (energy per bit) of femto-joule, are highlighted in this report. Further simulations and experimental results show that the memory device is valid under operation voltage less than 1 V due to an electric-field enhancement effect induced by the ultrathin SWCNTs.

  12. Single-molecule measurements of proteins using carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Patrick Craig

    Single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) field-effect transistors (FETs) provide a promising platform for investigating proteins at the single-molecule level. Recently, we have demonstrated that SWCNT FETs have sufficient sensitivity and bandwidth to monitor the conformational motions and processivity of an individual T4 lysozyme molecule. This is accomplished by functionalizing a SWCNT FET device with a single protein and measuring the conductance versus time through the device as it is submerged in an electrolyte solution. To generalize this approach for the study of a wide variety of proteins at the single-molecule level, this dissertation investigates the conjugation process to determine and isolate the key parameters involved in functionalizing a SWCNT with a single protein, the physical basis for transducing conformational motion of a protein into an electrical signal, and finally, the general application of the technique to monitor the binary and ternary complex formation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA).

  13. Label-free detection of DNA hybridization using carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Star, Alexander; Tu, Eugene; Niemann, Joseph; Gabriel, Jean-Christophe P.; Joiner, C. Steve; Valcke, Christian

    2006-01-01

    We report carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NTNFETs) that function as selective detectors of DNA immobilization and hybridization. NTNFETs with immobilized synthetic oligonucleotides have been shown to specifically recognize target DNA sequences, including H63D single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) discrimination in the HFE gene, responsible for hereditary hemochromatosis. The electronic responses of NTNFETs upon single-stranded DNA immobilization and subsequent DNA hybridization events were confirmed by using fluorescence-labeled oligonucleotides and then were further explored for label-free DNA detection at picomolar to micromolar concentrations. We have also observed a strong effect of DNA counterions on the electronic response, thus suggesting a charge-based mechanism of DNA detection using NTNFET devices. Implementation of label-free electronic detection assays using NTNFETs constitutes an important step toward low-cost, low-complexity, highly sensitive and accurate molecular diagnostics. hemochromatosis | SNP | biosensor

  14. Effect of parametric variation on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube based field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Avshish; Husain, Mubashshir; Khan, Ayub; Husain, Mushahid

    2014-11-01

    The effects of dielectric constant and gate insulator thickness on the performance of single wall carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs) have been analyzed using a mathematical model based on FETToy simulator. Both the parameters are found to have significant effect on the device performance, particularly the on-current; while the on-current (ION) increases on scaling down the gate oxide thickness, the level of leakage current (IOFF) is not considerably affected. This is an advantage of CNTFET over conventional MOSFETs where the thickness of thin oxide layer causes drastic increase in gate leakage current. Our analysis results show that thinner gate oxide and larger CNT improve the performance of CNTFETs. Therefore, the performance of our simulated CNTFETs using this model has clear lead over those of conventional MOSFETs.

  15. Modeling and simulation of carbon nanotube field effect transistor and its circuit application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Amandeep; Saini, Dinesh Kumar; Agarwal, Dinesh; Aggarwal, Sajal; Khosla, Mamta; Raj, Balwinder

    2016-07-01

    The carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) is modelled for circuit application. The model is based on the transport mechanism and it directly relates the transport mechanism with the chirality. Also, it does not consider self consistent equations and thus is used to develop the HSPICE compatible circuit model. For validation of the model, it is applied to the top gate CNTFET structure and the MATLAB simulation results are compared with the simulations of a similar structure created in NanoTCAD ViDES. For demonstrating the circuit compatibility of the model, two circuits viz. inverter and SRAM are designed and simulated in HSPICE. Finally, SRAM performance metrics are compared with those of device simulations from Nano TCAD ViDES.

  16. Noise Reduction of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors by Alternating Current Measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuki; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-06-01

    We demonstrated a marked improvement of sensitivity (signal-to-noise ratio) in carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) sensors. The alternating current (AC) measurement with a lock-in amplifier, which suppresses the fluctuations in drain current in CNTFETs without decreasing the signal level, was adopted. The noise level of CNTFETs used in buffer solutions was greatly decreased by AC measurement. Furthermore, we investigated the sensing operations of CNTFET pH sensors and biosensors by AC measurement. The sensing performance of CNTFET sensors was markedly improved. The signal-to-noise ratio of pH sensors measured using AC was six times higher than that obtained by direct current (DC) measurement. A small amount of bovine serum albumin of 250 pM was effectively detected by CNTFET biosensors by AC measurement.

  17. Floating-gated memory based on carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with Si floating dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seike, Kohei; Fujii, Yusuke; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We have fabricated a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET)-based nonvolatile memory device with Si floating dots. The electrical characteristics of this memory device were compared with those of devices with a HfO2 charge storage layer or Au floating dots. For a sweep width of 6 V, the memory window of the devices with the Si floating dots increased twofold as compared with that of the devices with the HfO2 layer. Moreover, the retention characteristics revealed that, for the device with the Au floating dots, the off-state had almost the same current as the on-state at the 400th s. However, the devices with the Si floating dots had longer-retention characteristics. The results indicate that CNTFET-based devices with Si floating dots are promising candidates for low-power consumption nonvolatile memory devices.

  18. Performance analysis of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistors using NEGF formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbastegan, Saber; Shahhoseini, Ali

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents the simulation study of a junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor (JL-CNTFET) and a comparison is made with the conventional CNTFET using the atomistic scale simulation, within the non-equilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. In order to have a comprehensive analysis, both analog and digital parameters of the device are studied. Results have shown that JL-CNTFET with respect to C-CNTFET shows slightly higher ION/IOFF ratio about two times larger than that of C-CNTFET, smaller electric field along channel more than three order of magnitude and reduced tunneling current about 100 times. In addition, the investigation of analog properties of both devices has exhibited that junctionless structure has a transconductance about two times and an intrinsic gain of 15 dB larger than C-CNTFET in same bias condition which makes JL-CNTFET a promising candidate for low voltage analog applications.

  19. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toshishige, Yamada; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon-nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are studied. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, and this makes the device characteristics quite unique. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and inversion and accumulation threshold voltages (V(sub Ti), and V(sub Ta)) are derived. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger doping dependence than that of the metal-oxide- semiconductor FETs, while V(sub Ta) of both devices depends weakly on doping with the same functional form.

  20. LDC-CNTFET: A carbon nanotube field effect transistor with linear doping profile channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali; Keshavarzi, Parviz; Orouji, Ali A.

    2011-08-01

    In this paper, a novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with linear doping profile channel (LDC-CNTFET) is presented. The channel impurity concentration of the proposed structure is at maximum level at source side and linearly decreases toward zero at drain side. The simulation results show that the leakage current, on-off current ratio, subthreshold swing, drain induced barrier lowering, and voltage gain of the proposed structure improve in comparison with conventional CNTFET. Also, due to spreading the impurity throughout the channel region, the proposed structure has superior performance compared with a single halo CNTFET structure with equal saturation current. Design considerations show that the proposed structure enhances the device performance all over a wide range of channel lengths.

  1. A mathematical space mapping model for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamifar, Farnousha; Yousefi, Reza

    2016-11-01

    In this study, a mathematical model is presented based on mathematical space mapping for ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. This model is generalized from another model that was based on the concept of neural space mapping to calculate the three parameters of a coarse model. These parameters were the threshold voltage, the Early voltage, and assumed constant k of a modified "level 1" MOSFET model in simulation program with integrated circuit emphasis (SPICE). In this work, three analytical relations are introduced to replace the neural networks of the main model. The comparisons between the proposed model and a well-known reference model, named FETToy, show that the proposed model had reasonable accuracy in terms of different biases and physical parameters.

  2. Synthesized multiwall MoS2 nanotube and nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathipour, S.; Remskar, M.; Varlec, A.; Ajoy, A.; Yan, R.; Vishwanath, S.; Rouvimov, S.; Hwang, W. S.; Xing, H. G.; Jena, D.; Seabaugh, A.

    2015-01-01

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of synthesized multiwall MoS2 nanotube (NT) and nanoribbon (NR) field-effect transistors (FETs). The MoS2 NTs and NRs were grown by chemical transport, using iodine as a transport agent. Raman spectroscopy confirms the material as unambiguously MoS2 in NT, NR, and flake forms. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe cross sections of the devices after electrical measurements and these were used in the interpretation of the electrical measurements, allowing the estimation of the current density. The NT and NR FETs demonstrate n-type behavior, with ON/OFF current ratios exceeding 103, and with current densities of 1.02 μA/μm and 0.79 μA/μm at VDS = 0.3 V and VBG = 1 V, respectively. Photocurrent measurements conducted on a MoS2 NT FET revealed short-circuit photocurrent of tens of nanoamps under an excitation optical power of 78 μW and 488 nm wavelength, which corresponds to a responsivity of 460 μA/W. A long channel transistor model was used to model the common-source characteristics of MoS2 NT and NR FETs and was shown to be consistent with the measured data.

  3. Synthesized multiwall MoS{sub 2} nanotube and nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Fathipour, S. Ajoy, A.; Vishwanath, S.; Rouvimov, S.; Xing, H. G.; Jena, D.; Seabaugh, A.; Remskar, M.; Varlec, A.; Yan, R.; Hwang, W. S.

    2015-01-12

    We report on the fabrication and characterization of synthesized multiwall MoS{sub 2} nanotube (NT) and nanoribbon (NR) field-effect transistors (FETs). The MoS{sub 2} NTs and NRs were grown by chemical transport, using iodine as a transport agent. Raman spectroscopy confirms the material as unambiguously MoS{sub 2} in NT, NR, and flake forms. Transmission electron microscopy was used to observe cross sections of the devices after electrical measurements and these were used in the interpretation of the electrical measurements, allowing the estimation of the current density. The NT and NR FETs demonstrate n-type behavior, with ON/OFF current ratios exceeding 10{sup 3}, and with current densities of 1.02 μA/μm and 0.79 μA/μm at V{sub DS} = 0.3 V and V{sub BG} = 1 V, respectively. Photocurrent measurements conducted on a MoS{sub 2} NT FET revealed short-circuit photocurrent of tens of nanoamps under an excitation optical power of 78 μW and 488 nm wavelength, which corresponds to a responsivity of 460 μA/W. A long channel transistor model was used to model the common-source characteristics of MoS{sub 2} NT and NR FETs and was shown to be consistent with the measured data.

  4. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency. PMID:22901374

  5. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga AJ, Gehan

    2012-08-01

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio ( I on/ I off), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  6. Device and circuit-level performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with benchmarking against a nano-MOSFET.

    PubMed

    Tan, Michael Loong Peng; Lentaris, Georgios; Amaratunga Aj, Gehan

    2012-08-19

    The performance of a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT) is assessed and tabulated for parameters against those of a metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET). Both CNT and MOSFET models considered agree well with the trends in the available experimental data. The results obtained show that nanotubes can significantly reduce the drain-induced barrier lowering effect and subthreshold swing in silicon channel replacement while sustaining smaller channel area at higher current density. Performance metrics of both devices such as current drive strength, current on-off ratio (Ion/Ioff), energy-delay product, and power-delay product for logic gates, namely NAND and NOR, are presented. Design rules used for carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) are compatible with the 45-nm MOSFET technology. The parasitics associated with interconnects are also incorporated in the model. Interconnects can affect the propagation delay in a CNTFET. Smaller length interconnects result in higher cutoff frequency.

  7. Rapid detection of Aspergillus flavus in rice using biofunctionalized carbon nanotube field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Villamizar, Raquel A; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2011-01-01

    In the present study, we have used carbon nanotube field effect transistors (FET) that have been functionalized with protein G and IgG to detect Aspergillus flavus in contaminated milled rice. The adsorbed protein G on the carbon nanotubes walls enables the IgG anti-Aspergillus antibodies to be well oriented and therefore to display full antigen binding capacity for fungal antigens. A solution of Tween 20 and gelatine was used as an effective blocking agent to prevent the non-specific binding of the antibodies and other moulds and also to protect the transducer against the interferences present in the rice samples. Our FET devices were able to detect at least 10 μg/g of A. flavus in only 30 min. To evaluate the selectivity of our biosensors, Fusarium oxysporum and Penicillium chrysogenum were tested as potential competing moulds for A. flavus. We have proved that our devices are highly selective tools for detecting mycotoxigenic moulds at low concentrations in real samples.

  8. Strain on field effect transistors with single–walled–carbon nanotube network on flexible substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, T. G.; Kim, U. J.; Lee, E. H.; Hwang, J. S.; Hwang, S. W. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr; Kim, S. E-mail: sangsig@korea.ac.kr

    2013-12-07

    We have systematically analyzed the effect of strain on the electrical properties of flexible field effect transistors with a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network on a polyethersulfone substrate. The strain was applied and estimated at the microscopic scale (<1 μm) by using scanning electron microscope (SEM) equipped with indigenously designed special bending jig. Interestingly, the strain estimated at the microscopic scale was found to be significantly different from the strain calculated at the macroscopic scale (centimeter-scale), by a factor of up to 4. Further in-depth analysis using SEM indicated that the significant difference in strain, obtained from two different measurement scales (microscale and macroscale), could be attributed to the formation of cracks and tears in the SWCNT network, or at the junction of SWCNT network and electrode during the strain process. Due to this irreversible morphological change, the electrical properties, such as on current level and field effect mobility, lowered by 14.3% and 4.6%, respectively.

  9. Demonstration of high current carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors at industrially relevant voltages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCarthy, Mitchell

    The display market is presently dominated by the active matrix liquid crystal display (LCD). However, the active matrix organic light emitting diode (AMOLED) display is argued to become the successor to the LCD, and is already beginning its way into the market, mainly in small size displays. But, for AMOLED technology to become comparable in market share to LCD, larger size displays must become available at a competitive price with their LCD counterparts. A major issue preventing low-cost large AMOLED displays is the thin-film transistor (TFT) technology. Unlike the voltage driven LCD, the OLEDs in the AMOLED display are current driven. Because of this, the mature amorphous silicon TFT backplane technology used in the LCD must be upgraded to a material possessing a higher mobility. Polycrystalline silicon and transparent oxide TFT technologies are being considered to fill this need. But these technologies bring with them significant manufacturing complexity and cost concerns. Carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic field effect transistors (CN-VFETs) offer a unique solution to this problem (now known as the AMOLED backplane problem). The CN-VFET allows the use of organic semiconductors to be used for the semiconductor layer. Organics are known for their low-cost large area processing compatibility. Although the mobility of the best organics is only comparable to that of amorphous silicon, the CN-VFET makes up for this by orienting the channel vertically, as opposed to horizontally (like in conventional TFTs). This allows the CN-VFET to achieve sub-micron channel lengths without expensive high resolution patterning. Additionally, because the CN-VFET can be easily converted into a light emitting transistor (called the carbon nanotube enabled vertical organic light emitting transistor---CN-VOLET) by essentially stacking an OLED on top of the CN-VFET, more potential benefits can be realized. These potential benefits include, increased aperture ratio, increased OLED

  10. The Effect of Hydrophobin Protein on Conductive Properties of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors: First Study on Sensing Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Yotprayoonsakl, Peerapong; Szilvay, Géza R; Laaksonen, Päivi; Linder, Markus B; Ahlskog, Markus

    2015-03-01

    Hydrophobin is a surface active protein having both hydrophobic and hydrophilic functional domains which has previously been used for functionalization and solubilization of graphene and carbon nanotubes. In this work, field-effect transistors based on single nanotubes have been employed for electronic detection of hydrophobin protein in phosphate buffer solution. Individual nanotubes, single- and multiwalled, are characterized by atomic force microscopy after being immersed in protein solution, showing a relatively dense coverage with hydrophobin. We have studied aspects such as nanotube length (0.3-1.2 µm) and the hysteresis effect in the gate voltage dependent conduction. When measured in ambient condition after the exposure to hydrophobin, the resistance increase has a strong dependence on the nanotube length, which we ascribe to mobility degradation and localization effects. The change could be exceptionally large when measured in-situ in solution and at suitable gate voltage conditions, which is shown to relate to the different mechanism behind the hysteresis effect.

  11. Carbon nanotube field effect transistors for the fast and selective detection of human immunoglobulin G.

    PubMed

    Cid, Cristina C; Riu, Jordi; Maroto, Alicia; Rius, F Xavier

    2008-08-01

    We report a field effect transistor (FET) based on a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) which can selectively detect human immunoglobulin G (HIgG). HIgG antibodies, which are strongly adsorbed onto the walls of the SWCNTs, are the basic elements of the recognition layer. The non-specific binding of proteins and the effects of other interferences are avoided by covering the non-adsorbed areas of the SWCNTs with Tween 20. The selectivity of the sensor has been tested against bovine serum albumin (BSA), the most abundant protein in plasma. HIgG in aqueous solution with concentrations from 1.25 mg L(-1) (8 nM) can be readily detected with response times of about 10 min. The SWCNT networks that form the basis of the sensor are easily grown by chemical vapour deposition. Silver screen-printed electrodes make the sensor quick to build. The sensitivity obtained with this sensor is similar to other FET devices based on SWCNTs built using much more complicated lithography processes. Moreover, the sensor is a reagentless device that does not need labels to detect HIgG.

  12. High performance dendrimer functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor biosensor for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajesh, Sharma, Vikash; Puri, Nitin K.; Mulchandani, Ashok; Kotnala, Ravinder K.

    2016-12-01

    We report a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) functionalized with Polyamidoamine (PAMAM) dendrimer with 128 carboxyl groups as anchors for site specific biomolecular immobilization of protein antibody for C-reactive protein (CRP) detection. The FET device was characterized by scanning electron microscopy and current-gate voltage (I-Vg) characteristic studies. A concentration-dependent decrease in the source-drain current was observed in the regime of clinical significance, with a detection limit of ˜85 pM and a high sensitivity of 20% change in current (ΔI/I) per decade CRP concentration, showing SWNT being locally gated by the binding of CRP to antibody (anti-CRP) on the FET device. The low value of the dissociation constant (Kd = 0.31 ± 0.13 μg ml-1) indicated a high affinity of the device towards CRP analyte arising due to high anti-CRP loading with a better probe orientation on the 3-dimensional PAMAM structure.

  13. Advantages of flattened electrode in bottom contact single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi Saito, Akira; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2014-09-01

    We fabricated single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) field-effect transistor (FET) devices on flattened electrodes, in which there are no height difference between metal electrodes and the substrate. SWNT-FET fabricated using bottom contact technique have some advantages, such that the SWNTs are free from electron irradiation, have direct contact with the desired metal electrodes, and can be functionalized before or after deposition. However, the SWNTs can be bent at the contact point with the metal electrodes leading to a different electrical characteristic of the devices. The number of SWNT direct junctions in short channel length devices is drastically increased by the use of flattened electrodes due to strong attractive interaction between SWNT and the substrate. The flattened electrodes show a better balance between their hole and electron mobility compared to that of the non-flattened electrodes, that is, ambipolar FET characteristic. It is considered that bending of the SWNTs in the non-flattened electrode devices results in a higher Schottky barrier for the electrons.

  14. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barik, Md. Abdul; Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-01

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5-22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5-16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ˜59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ˜ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (Km) were found to be ˜0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  15. Fabrication and characterization of junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor for cholesterol detection

    SciTech Connect

    Barik, Md. Abdul Dutta, Jiten Ch.

    2014-08-04

    We have reported fabrication and characterization of polyaniline (PANI)/zinc oxide (ZnO) membrane-based junctionless carbon nanotube field effect transistor deposited on indium tin oxide glass plate for the detection of cholesterol (0.5–22.2 mM). Cholesterol oxidase (ChOx) has been immobilized on the PANI/ZnO membrane by physical adsorption technique. Electrical response has been recorded using digital multimeter (Agilent 3458A) in the presence of phosphate buffer saline of 50 mM, pH 7.0, and 0.9% NaCl contained in a glass pot. The results of response studies for cholesterol reveal linearity as 0.5–16.6 mM and improved sensitivity of 60 mV/decade in good agreement with Nernstian limit ∼59.2 mV/decade. The life time of this sensor has been found up to 5 months and response time of 1 s. The limit of detection with regression coefficient (r) ∼ 0.998 and Michaelis-Menten constant (K{sub m}) were found to be ∼0.25 and 1.4 mM, respectively, indicating high affinity of ChOx to cholesterol. The results obtained in this work show negligible interference with glucose and urea.

  16. Modeling of Gate Bias Modulation in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The threshold voltages of a carbon nanotube (CNT) field-effect transistor (FET) are derived and compared with those of the metal oxide-semiconductor (MOS) FETs. The CNT channel is so thin that there is no voltage drop perpendicular to the gate electrode plane, which is the CNT diameter direction, and this makes the CNTFET characteristics quite different from those in MOSFETs. The relation between the voltage and the electrochemical potentials, and the mass action law for electrons and holes are examined in the context of CNTs, and it is shown that the familiar relations are still valid because of the macroscopic number of states available in the CNTs. This is in sharp contrast to the cases of quantum dots. Using these relations, we derive an inversion threshold voltage V(sub Ti) and an accumulation threshold voltage V(sub Ta) as a function of the Fermi level E(sub F) in the channel, where E(sub F) is a measure of channel doping. V(sub Ti) of the CNTFETs has a much stronger dependence than that of MOSFETs, while V(sub Ta)s of both CNTFETs and MOSFETs depend quite weakly on E(sub F) with the same functional form. This means the transition from normally-off mode to normally-on mode is much sharper in CNTFETs as the doping increases, and this property has to be taken into account in circuit design.

  17. Novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with graded double halo channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali; Keshavarzi, Parviz

    2012-05-01

    A novel carbon nanotube field effect transistor with symmetric graded double halo channel (GDH-CNTFET) is presented for suppressing band to band tunneling and improving the device performance. GDH structure includes two symmetric graded haloes which are broadened throughout the channel. The doping concentration of GDH channel is at maximum level at drain/source side and is reduced gradually toward zero at the middle of channel. The doping distribution at source side of channel reduces the drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and the drain side suppresses the band to band tunneling effect. In addition, broadening the doping throughout the channel increases the recombination of electrons and holes and acts as an additional factor for improving the band to band tunneling. Simulation results show that applying this structure on CNTFET enhances the device performance. In comparison with double halo structure with equal saturation current, the proposed GDH structure shows better characteristics and short channel parameters. Furthermore, the delay and power delay product (PDP) analysis versus on/off current ratio shows the efficiency of the proposed GDH structure.

  18. Compact model for ballistic MOSFET-like carbon nanotube field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdolkader, Tarek M.; Fikry, Wael

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a compact model for MOSFET-like ballistic carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNFETs) is presented. The model is based on calculating the charge and surface potential on the top of the barrier between source and drain using closed-form analytical formulae. The formula for the surface potential is obtained by merging two simplified expressions obtained in two extreme cases (very low and very high gate bias). Two fitting parameters are introduced whose values are extracted by best fitting model results with numerically calculated ones. The model has a continuous derivative and thus it is SPICE-compatible. Accuracy of the model is compared to previous analytical model presented in the literature with numerical results taken as a reference. Proposed model proves to give less relative error over a wide range of gate biases, and for a drain bias up to 0.5 V. In addition, the model enables the calculation of quantum and gate capacitance analytically reproducing the negative capacitance behaviour known in CNFETs.

  19. Improved analog and AC performance with increased noise immunity using nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rewari, Sonam; Nath, Vandana; Haldar, Subhasis; Deswal, S. S.; Gupta, R. S.

    2016-12-01

    In this paper for the first time, the noise immunity and analog performance of nanotube junctionless field effect transistor (NJLFET) has been investigated. Small signal AC performance metrics namely Scattering parameters (S-parameters) have been analyzed along with analog parameters to validate the suitability of NJLFET for RFIC design. NJLFET performance is examined by comparing its performance with junctionless gate-all-around (JLGAA) MOSFET. It has been inferred that NJLFET has improved I on/ I off ratio directing improved digital performance at higher channel lengths, reduced channel resistance ( R ch) which enables the MOSFET to provide a low resistance path to current and improved early voltage ( V EA) which shows the capability for high-gain amplification and higher g m/ g d directing high intrinsic dc gain. Higher f Tmax for NJLFET has been observed posing its potential for terahertz applications. Higher gain transconductance frequency product makes NJLFET an ultimate device for high-speed switching applications. Higher maximum transducer power gain in NJLFET implies higher power gain than JLGAA MOSFET. Also, NJLFET exhibits lower harmonic distortion and it has been explained by significant reduction in third-order derivative of transconductance, g m3. Reduction in g m3 shows that NJLFET provides better linearity over JLGAA and is more suitable for RFIC design. Also the S-parameters namely S11, S12, S21 and S22 have been analyzed to verify the small signal performance. A lower magnitude for reflection coefficients S11 and S22 depicts minimum reflection and higher matching between ports in NJLFET than JLGAA MOSFET. Higher voltage gains S12 and S21 are present in NJLFET than its counterpart which shows the higher gains that can be achieved using nanotube architecture. The noise metrics which are noise figure and noise conductance show significant reduction for NJLFET justifying its noise immunity.

  20. Disposable immunosensors for C-reactive protein based on carbon nanotubes field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Justino, Celine I L; Freitas, Ana C; Amaral, José P; Rocha-Santos, Teresa A P; Cardoso, Susana; Duarte, Armando C

    2013-04-15

    Label-free immunosensors based on single-walled carbon nanotubes field effect transistor (NTFET) devices were developed for the detection of C-reactive protein (CRP) which is currently the best validated inflammatory biomarker associated with cardiovascular diseases. The immunoreaction principle consists in the direct adsorption of CRP specific antibodies (anti-CRP) to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) networks. Such anti-CRP are the molecular receptors of CRP antigens which, in turn, can be detected by the developed NTFET devices in a linear dynamic range of 10(-4)-10(2) μg/mL. Thus, typical values of CRP (in blood serum) for healthy persons (<1 μg/mL), and higher levels (>5 μg/mL) corresponding to pathological states, can be both detected with the NTFET immunosensors, becoming an advantageous alternative as the basis for the development of analytical instrumentation for assessment of risk of occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. A log-log linear regression was applied to the experimental data with a correlation coefficient of r=0.9962 (p<0.001), and there is no statistical difference (from ANOVA) between individual NTFET devices (p=0.9582), demonstrating acceptable reproducibility. According to the experimental results, the estimate of detection limit (LOD, 10(-4)μg/mL) is 3-fold lower than that of some conventional immunoassay techniques for blood serum (e.g., LOD of 0.2 μg/mL for high-sensitivity enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay), and the dynamic range (10(-4)-10(2)μg/mL) is about 6-fold higher. Furthermore, this simple and low-cost methodology allows the use of sample volumes as low as 1 μL for the label-free detection of CRP.

  1. Solution-processed single-walled carbon nanotube field effect transistors and bootstrapped inverters for disintegratable, transient electronics

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Sung Hun E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr Shin, Jongmin; Cho, In-Tak; Lee, Jong-Ho E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr; Han, Sang Youn; Lee, Dong Joon; Lee, Chi Hwan; Rogers, John A. E-mail: jhl@snu.ac.kr

    2014-07-07

    This paper presents materials, device designs, and physical/electrical characteristics of a form of nanotube electronics that is physically transient, in the sense that all constituent elements dissolve and/or disperse upon immersion into water. Studies of contact effects illustrate the ability to use water soluble metals such as magnesium for source/drain contacts in nanotube based field effect transistors. High mobilities and on/off ratios in transistors that use molybdenum, silicon nitride, and silicon oxide enable full swing characteristics for inverters at low voltages (∼5 V) and with high gains (∼30). Dissolution/disintegration tests of such systems on water soluble sheets of polyvinyl alcohol demonstrate physical transience within 30 min.

  2. Metallic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farooq, Hassan

    This thesis investigates the principle of operation behind metallic-field effect transistors (METFETs) through a systematic study of atomistic simulations performed on metallic bulk, nanowire and transistor structures. In particular, density functional theory (DFT) and non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) based models were used to study the effect on the bandstructure and density of states of highly scaled metallic nanowires with varying parameters such as crystal orientation, cross-sectional area, and applied external bias. Similarly, the effect of varying similar parameters on the transfer and output characteristics of highly scaled metallic transistors was studied. Furthermore, oxide interfaces with metallic channels were investigated. The simulation results show that a gold METFET in the [100] crystal orientation has an I ON /IOFF ratio of 41, ION of 29.5microA and fT of 6.7THz, outperforming similarly sized MOSFETs as a promising alternative for use in high-frequency circuits.

  3. Detection of the Odor Signature of Ovarian Cancer using DNA-Decorated Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kehayias, Christopher; Kybert, Nicholas; Yodh, Jeremy; Johnson, A. T. Charlie

    Carbon nanotubes are low-dimensional materials that exhibit remarkable chemical and bio-sensing properties and have excellent compatibility with electronic systems. Here, we present a study that uses an electronic olfaction system based on a large array of DNA-carbon nanotube field effect transistors vapor sensors to analyze the VOCs of blood plasma samples collected from patients with malignant ovarian cancer, patients with benign ovarian lesions, and age-matched healthy subjects. Initial investigations involved coating each CNT sensor with single-stranded DNA of a particular base sequence. 10 distinct DNA oligomers were used to functionalize the carbon nanotube field effect transistors, providing a 10-dimensional sensor array output response. Upon performing a statistical analysis of the 10-dimensional sensor array responses, we showed that blood samples from patients with malignant cancer can be reliably differentiated from those of healthy control subjects with a p-value of 3 x 10-5. The results provide preliminary evidence that the blood of ovarian cancer patients contains a discernable volatile chemical signature that can be detected using DNA-CNT nanoelectronic vapor sensors, a first step towards a minimally invasive electronic diagnostic technology for ovarian cancer.

  4. Investigation of Schottky-Barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor by an efficient semi-classical numerical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Changxin; Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Bo; Zhang, Yafei

    2009-12-01

    An efficient semi-classical numerical modeling approach has been developed to simulate the coaxial Schottky-barrier carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (SB-CNTFET). In the modeling, the electrostatic potential of the CNT is obtained by self-consistently solving the analytic expression of CNT carrier distribution and the cylindrical Poisson equation, which significantly enhances the computational efficiency and simultaneously present a result in good agreement to that obtained from the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism based on the first principle. With this method, the effects of the CNT diameter, power supply voltage, thickness and dielectric constant of gate insulator on the device performance are investigated.

  5. a Computational Study of Strain Effects in the Band-To Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousefi, Reza; Ghoreishi, Seyyed Saleh

    2012-11-01

    In this paper, the transport properties of the band-to-band-tunneling carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (BTBT-CNTFETs) under uniaxial strain are studied, with the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. The effects of the uniaxial strain on the electrical properties, such as the ON current (ION), OFF current (IOFF), ION/IOFF ratio, subthreshold swing and intrinsic delay are evaluated. It was observed that the uniaxial strain has strong effects on the transport properties of these transistors. The results show that appropriate uniaxial strain, although degrades the ON current and the intrinsic delay, it also decreases the power consumption of the BTBT-CNTFETs and as a result can be used for low-power applications.

  6. High-performance carbon-nanotube-based complementary field-effect-transistors and integrated circuits with yttrium oxide

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shibo; Zhang, Zhiyong Si, Jia; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2014-08-11

    High-performance p-type carbon nanotube (CNT) transistors utilizing yttrium oxide as gate dielectric are presented by optimizing oxidization and annealing processes. Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect-transistors (FETs) are then fabricated on CNTs, and the p- and n-type devices exhibit symmetrical high performances, especially with low threshold voltage near to zero. The corresponding CMOS CNT inverter is demonstrated to operate at an ultra-low supply voltage down to 0.2 V, while displaying sufficient voltage gain, high noise margin, and low power consumption. Yttrium oxide is proven to be a competitive gate dielectric for constructing high-performance CNT CMOS FETs and integrated circuits.

  7. The Nano-Memory Devices of a Single Wall and Peapod Structural Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C. H.; Kang, K. T.; Park, K. S.; Kim, M. S.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. G.; Fischer, J. E.; Johnson, A. T.

    2003-08-01

    The rediscovery and the memory application of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) give a new method in nanoelectronics applications. At first we will report the memory effects of a SWNT, and attempt to use this property in a memory device. To use a SWNT field effect transistor (FET) as a charge-storage memory device, the device operates by injecting electrons from the nanotube channel of a TubeFET into charge traps on the surface of the SiO2 gate dielectric, thus shifting the threshold voltage. This memory can be written and erased many times, and has a hold time of hundreds of seconds at room temperature. At second we have attempted to make a Peapod tubeFET. It is the structure that a C60 was contained within the tube and separated from it by a graphitic Van der Waals gap. I-V property of the Peapod shows semiconducting property.

  8. Electrical Detection of Negatively Charged Proteins Using n-Type Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Yasuki; Maehashi, Kenzo; Ohno, Yasuhide; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-02-01

    We fabricated n-type carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) biosensors. To prevent the single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT)/metal contacts from adsorption of ambient molecules, SiNx passivation films were deposited on CNTFETs by catalytic chemical vapor deposition. CNTFETs with SiNx passivation films on SWNT/metal contacts, but SWNT channels are exposed to environment for sensing, exhibit n-type behavior both in air and solution. Negatively charged bovine serum albumin is successfully detected using the fabricated n-type CNTFET biosensors with SiNx passivation films. Electrical detections of both negatively and positively charged proteins are achieved using n- and p-type CNTFET biosensors, respectively.

  9. Simulation of diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with symmetric source and drain contacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingqi; Zhang, Xixiang

    2011-09-01

    The diode characteristics of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) with symmetric source and drain contacts have been experimentally found at zero gate voltage (Li J. et al., Appl. Phys. Lett., 92 (2008) 133111). We calculate this characteristic using a semiclassical method based on Schottky barrier transistor mechanism. The influences of metal work function, the diameter of the carbon nanotubes and the dielectric thickness on the rectification behavior have been studied. The calculation results show that the metal with a higher work function results in a better diode characteristics for a p-type CNTFET. For single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) with different band gaps, both forward current and reverse current increase with decreasing band gap, but the ratio of forward current to reverse current decreases with decreasing band gap. This result is well consistent with the experimental observations reported previously. The simulation of the dielectric thickness effect indicates that the thinner the dielectric layer, the better the rectification behavior. The CNTFETs without a bottom gate could not show the diode characteristics, which is consistent with the reported experimental observation.

  10. Single-Hole Charging and Discharging Phenomena in Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistor-Based Nonvolatile Memory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohori, Takahiro; Nagaso, Satoshi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2010-06-01

    We have fabricated nonvolatile memory based on top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs). Two kinds of insulating films, SiNx and SiO2, were deposited to control the hysteresis characteristics after the removal of water molecules around the single-walled CNT channels. The interface between the SiNx and SiO2 films is expected to act as a charge storage node of nonvolatile memory. The fabricated CNTFET-based memory devices clearly exhibited not only a memory effect but also good retention characteristics for charge storage. Furthermore, single-hole charging and discharging phenomena were clearly observed in the CNTFET-based memory devices by reducing the number of carriers trapped in the interface between the SiNx and SiO2 films. These results indicate that the CNTFET-based nonvolatile memory can be potentially used to realize single-electron memory.

  11. Probing Biological Processes on Supported Lipid Bilayers with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose Manuel; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2006-03-01

    We have formed supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) by small unilamellar vesicle fusion on substrates containing single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (SWNT-FETs). We are able to detect the self-assembly of SLBs electrically with SWNT-FETs since their threshold voltages are shifted by this event. The SLB fully covers the NT surface and lipid molecules can diffuse freely in the bilayer surface across the NT. To study the interactions of important biological entities with receptors imbedded within the membrane, we have also integrated a membrane protein, GT1b ganglioside, in the bilayer. While bare gangliosides can diffuse freely across the NT, interestingly the NT acts as a diffusion barrier for the gangliosides when they are bound with tetanus toxin. This experiment opens the possibility of using SWNT-FETs as biosensors for label-free detection.

  12. Paper field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortunato, E.; Correia, Nuno; Barquinha, Pedro; Costa, Cláudia; Pereira, Luís; Gonçalves, Gonçalo; Martins, Rodrigo

    2009-02-01

    In this paper we report the use of a sheet of cellulose fiber-based paper as the dielectric layer used in oxide based semiconductor thin film field-effect transistors (FETs). In this new approach we are using the cellulose fiber-based paper in an "interstrate" structure since the device is build on both sides of the cellulose sheet. Such hybrid FETs present excellent operating characteristics such as high channel saturation mobility (>30 cm2/Vs), drain-source current on/off modulation ratio of approximately 104, near-zero threshold voltage, enhancement n-type operation and sub-threshold gate voltage swing of 0.8 V/decade. The cellulose fiber-based paper FETs characteristics have been measured in air ambient conditions and present good stability. The obtained results outpace those of amorphous Si TFTs and rival with the same oxide based TFTs produced on either glass or crystalline silicon substrates. The compatibility of these devices with large-scale/large-area deposition techniques and low cost substrates as well as their very low operating bias delineates this as a promising approach to attain high-performance disposable electronics like paper displays, smart labels, smart packaging, RFID and point-of-care systems for self analysis in bio-applications, among others.

  13. Numerical study of carbon nanotube field effect transistors in presence of carbon-carbon third nearest neighbor interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naderi, Ali

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, for the first time, we have used a more precise Hamiltonian matrix based on first nearest neighbor (1NN) and third nearest neighbor (3NN) carbon-carbon interactions to simulate carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). By taking the interactions with more distant neighbors into account, an improvement in tight-binding picture is gained. A self-consistent solution of Schrodinger equation based on nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism coupled to a two-dimensional Poisson's equation for treating the electrostatics of the device has been employed to simulate CNTFETs. A tight-binding Hamiltonian with an atomistic (pz orbitals) mode space basis in the ballistic limits has been used to describe the carbon nanotube (CNT) region. Simulations show that in the presence of 3NN, the energy bandgap of the CNT decreases and consequently the simulated device has lower threshold voltage compared to a simulated device with just 1NN. Short channel effects study demonstrates that neglecting 3NN underestimates the subthreshold swing and overestimates ON/OFF current ratio. All these investigations show that for simulating a CNTFET more precisely, the 3NN interactions can be taken into account in addition to the 1NN.

  14. Harmonic and Intermodulation Performance of Metallic Carbon Nanotube (MCNT) and Complementary Carbon Nantube Field Effect Transistor (CNTFET) Amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abuelma'Atti, Muhammad Taher

    2009-05-01

    This paper presents a simple mathematical model for the output-voltage (current)/ input-voltage characteristic of the carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) complementary inverting amplifier and the metallic carbon nanotube (MCNT) interconnect. The model, basically a Fourier series, yields closed-form expressions for the amplitudes of the harmonic and intermodulation components of the output voltage (current) resulting from a multisinusoidal input voltage. The special case of a two-tone equal-amplitude input voltage is considered in detail. The results show that the harmonic and intermodulation performance of the complementary CNTFET-based inverting amplifier and the MCNT interconnect is strongly dependent on the values of the amplitudes of the input tones with the third-order intermodulation component dominating over a wide range of the input voltage amplitudes. The results also show that while the harmonics may exhibit minima, the intermodulation products are almost monotonically increasing with the increase in the input voltage amplitude and exhibit no minima.

  15. Photopatternable source/drain electrodes using multiwalled carbon nanotube/polymer nanocomposites for organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Hong, Kipyo; Yang, Chanwoo; Kim, Se Hyun; Jang, Jaeyoung; Nam, Sooji; Park, Chan Eon

    2009-10-01

    We fabricated photopatternable and conductive polymer/multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) composites by dispersing MWNTs with poly(4-styrenesulfonic acid) (PSS) and poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) in water. PAA enables photo-cross-linking in the composite by adding ammonium dichromate, and PSS assists the dispersion of MWNTs in the composites, leading to higher conductivity. Composite films of PAA/PSS-MWNTs were characterized by conductivities of 1.4-210 S/cm and a work function of 4.46 eV, which could be increased to 4.76 eV during UV photo-cross-linking. By using PAA/PSS-MWNT composites as source/drain electrodes, 6,13-bis(triisopropylsilylethynyl)pentacene field-effect transistors (FET) exhibited a field-effect mobility of 0.101 +/- 0.034 cm(2)/(V s), which is 9 times higher than that of FETs fabricated with gold as source/drain electrodes (0.012 +/- 0.003 cm(2)/(V s)).

  16. Gyrator employing field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochmair, E. S. (Inventor)

    1973-01-01

    A gyrator circuit of the conventional configuration of two amplifiers in a circular loop, one producing zero phase shift and the other producing 180 deg phase reversal is examined. All active elements are MOS field effect transistors. Each amplifier comprises a differential amplifier configuration with current limiting transistor, followed by an output transistor in cascode configuration, and two load transistors of opposite conductivity type from the other transistors. A voltage divider control circuit comprises a series string of transistors with a central voltage input to provide control, with locations on the amplifiers receiving reference voltages by connection to appropriate points on the divider. The circuit produces excellent response and is well suited for fabrication by integrated circuits.

  17. Harmonic and intermodulation performance of carbon nanotube field-effect transistor-based and single-electron tunnelling transistor-based inverting amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taher Abuelma'atti, Muhammad

    2011-07-01

    This article presents a simple mathematical model for the output-voltage/input-voltage characteristics of the carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET)-based and the single-electron tunnelling transistor (SET)-based inverting amplifiers. The model, basically a Fourier-series, yields closed-form expressions for the amplitudes of the harmonic and intermodulation components of the output voltage resulting from a multisinusoidal input voltage. The special case of a two-tone equal-amplitude input signal is considered in detail. The results show that the harmonic and intermodulation performance of the CNTFET-based and SET-based inverting amplifiers is strongly dependent on the values of the bias voltage and the amplitudes of the input tones. Moreover, the results show that for the CNTFET-based inverting amplifier, either the relative second-order or the relative third-order intermodulation component is dominant, while for the SET-based inverting amplifier, the relative third-order intermodulation is always dominant. The results also show that all the harmonics and intermodulation products may exhibit minima at different values of the input bias voltages and tone amplitudes.

  18. Bio-fabrication of nanomesh channels of single-walled carbon nanotubes for locally gated field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Woo Chul; Kim, Wonbin; Kim, Seong Keun; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2017-01-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are one of the promising electronic components for nanoscale electronic devices such as field-effect transistors (FETs) owing to their excellent device characteristics such as high conductivity, high carrier mobility and mechanical flexibility. Localized gating gemometry of FETs enables individual addressing of active channels and allows for better electrostatics via thinner dielectric layer of high k-value. For localized gating of SWNTs, it becomes critical to define SWNTs of controlled nanostructures and functionality onto desired locations in high precision. Here, we demonstrate that a biologically templated approach in combination of microfabrication processes can successfully produce a nanostructured channels of SWNTs for localized active devices such as local bottom-gated FETs. A large-scale nanostructured network, nanomesh, of SWNTs were assembled in solution using an M13 phage with strong binding affinity toward SWNTs and micrometer-scale nanomesh channels were defined using negative photolithography and plasma-etching processes. The bio-fabrication approach produced local bottom-gated FETs with remarkably controllable nanostructures and successfully enabled semiconducting behavior out of unsorted SWNTs. In addition, the localized gating scheme enhanced the device performances such as operation voltage and I on/I off ratio. We believe that our approach provides a useful and integrative method for fabricating electronic devices out of nanoscale electronic materials for applications in which tunable electrical properties, mechanical flexibility, ambient stability, and chemical stability are of crucial importance.

  19. Polypyrrole nanotube embedded reduced graphene oxide transducer for field-effect transistor-type H2O2 biosensor.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin Wook; Park, Seon Joo; Kwon, Oh Seok; Lee, Choonghyeon; Jang, Jyongsik

    2014-02-04

    We report a rapid-response and high-sensitivity sensor with specificity toward H2O2 based on a liquid-ion-gated field-effect transistor (FET) using graphene-polypyrrole (PPy) nanotube (NT) composites as the conductive channel. The rGO, PPy, NTs, and nanocomposite materials were characterized using Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). On the basis of these results, a well-organized structure is successfully prepared owing to the specific interactions between the PPy NTs and the rGO sheet. Reliable electrical contacts were developed between the rGO/PPy NTs and the microelectrodes, which remained stable when exposed to the liquid-phase analyte. Liquid-ion-gated FETs composed of these graphene nanocomposites exhibited hole-transport behavior with conductivities higher than those of rGO sheets or PPy NTs. This implies an interaction between the PPy NTs and the rGO layers, which is explained in terms of the PPy NTs forming a bridge between the rGO layers. The FET sensor provided a rapid response in real time and high sensitivity toward H2O2 with a limit of detection of 100 pM. The FET-type biosensing geometry was also highly reproducible and stable in air. Furthermore, the liquid-gated FET-type sensor exhibited specificity toward H2O2 in a mixed solution containing compounds found in biological fluids.

  20. Sdc-Cntfet Stepwise Doping Channel Design in Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors for Improving Short Channel Effects Immunity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalabadi, Zahra; Keshavarzi, Parviz; Naderi, Ali

    2014-01-01

    A novel carbon nanotube field-effect transistor with stepwise doping profile channel (SDC-CNTFET) is introduced for short-channel effects (SCEs) improvement. In SDC-CNTFET, the channel is divided into five sections of equal length. Impurity concentration was reduced from 0.8 nm-1 to zero from the source side to the drain side of the channel, with stepwise profile. The devices have been simulated by the self-consistent solution of two-dimensional (2D) Poisson-Schrödinger equations, within the nonequilibrium Green's function (NEGF) formalism. We demonstrate that the proposed structure for CNTFETs shows considerable improvement in device performance focusing on leakage current and ON-OFF current ratio. In addition, the investigation of SCEs for the proposed structure shows the improved drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and subthreshold swing (SS). Moreover, we will prove that the proposed structure has acceptable performance at different values of channel impurity concentration in terms of delay and power-delay product (PDP). All these investigations introduce SDC-CNTFET as a more reliable device structure in short-channel regime.

  1. Novel attributes in the performance and scaling effects of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with halo doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefinia, Zahra; Orouji, Ali A.

    2009-06-01

    In this paper, we performed a comprehensive scaling study of a carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) with halo doping (HD) using self-consistent and atomistic scale simulations. Our simulation results demonstrate that drain induced barrier lowering (DIBL) diminishes in the HD-CNTFET due to a step in the potential of the CNT at the interface of p-doped and undoped regions in the channel. Also, the hot carrier effect minimizes with reduction of the peak of the electric field at the drain side of the HD-CNTFET. Moreover, the features of the HD-CNTFET can be controlled by the length and concentration engineering of the HD region. Leakage current, on-off current ratio and subthreshold swing improve with an increase of the length and concentration of the HD region, due to the increment of the threshold voltage and the barrier height of the p-n junction near the source. Therefore, this work can provide an incentive for further experimental exploration.

  2. Field Effect Transistor Using Carbon Nanotubes and DNA as Electrical Gate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, S.; Al-Marzouki, F. M.; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed A.

    2017-02-01

    We present an electronic sensor in the molecular scale, which is very sensitive for detection and sensing of DNA characteristics and DNA activities in particular activities between DNA duplex and any protein. Here, the device shows that DNA is electronically inserted to be on the same time as an electrical device transducer and as a biological target in a carbon nanotube-DNA-carbon nanotube electronic sensor. We have performed a DNA binding through an amide group by the electron transfer through amide group. The presented device has shown an efficient and rapid procedure to bind the electrical vulnerability of DNA with the detection of enzymatic effectiveness leading to high efficient biosensor.

  3. Impact of Radial Compression on the Conductance of Carbon Nanotube Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choudhary, Sudhanshu; Saini, Gaurav; Qureshi, S.

    2014-01-01

    The electronic behavior of semiconducting carbon nanotubes based CNTFET under the influence of radial deformation defect present in the channel is theoretically investigated using nonequilibrium Green's function method self-consistently coupled with three-dimensional electrostatics. It was found that deformation in the CNTFET channel composed of a small diameter semiconducting carbon nanotube can increase its conductance by a factor of 4 or more depending upon the average reduction in the C-C bond length after compression. This increase in CNTFET conductance is directly related to the movement of the electronic states toward the Fermi level when the tubes are squeezed. Furthermore, the device ON-OFF current ratio also decreases with increase in applied compression which makes it hard to switch-OFF the device.

  4. Length separation of single-walled carbon nanotubes and its impact on structural and electrical properties of wafer-level fabricated carbon nanotube-field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger, Simon; Hermann, Sascha; Schulz, Stefan E.; Gessner, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    For an industrial realization of devices based on single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNTs) such as field-effect transistors (FETs) it becomes increasingly important to consider technological aspects such as intrinsic device structure, integration process controllability as well as yield. From the perspective of a wafer-level integration technology, the influence of SWCNT length on the performance of short-channel CNT-FETs is demonstrated by means of a statistical and comparative study. Therefore, a methodological development of a length separation process based on size-exclusion chromatography was conducted in order to extract well-separated SWCNT dispersions with narrowed length distribution. It could be shown that short SWCNTs adversely affect integrability and reproducibility, underlined by a 25% decline of the integration yield with respect to long SWCNTs. Furthermore, it turns out that the significant changes in electrical performance are directly linked to a SWCNT chain formation in the transistor channel. In particular, CNT-FETs with long SWCNTs outperform reference and short SWCNTs with respect to hole mobility and subthreshold controllability by up to 300% and up to 140%, respectively. As a whole, this study provides a statistical and comparative analysis towards chain-less CNT-FETs fabricated with a wafer-level technology.

  5. Does Organic Field Effect Transistors (OFETs) Device Performance using Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes (SWNTs) Depend on the Density of SWNT in the Electrode?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Narae; Sarker, Biddut K.; Khondaker, Saiful I.

    2012-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes as an electrode material for organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have attracted significant attention. One open question is that whether the density of the Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in the electrode has any influence in the device performance of OFETs. In order to address this issue, we fabricated OFETs using SWNT aligned array electrode, where we varied the linear density of the nanotubes in the array of the electrodes during dielectrophoretic assembly of high quality surfactant free and stable aqueous SWNT solution. The source and drain of SWNT electrodes have been formed by electron beam lithography (EBL) and oxygen plasma etching. The OFETs were fabricated by depositing a thin film of poly (3-hexylthiophene) on the SWNT electrodes. We will present detailed result of our study.

  6. A New Approach to the Characteristics and Short-Channel Effects of Double-Gate Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors using MATLAB: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Alireza; Heidari, Niloofar; Jahromi, Foad Khademi; Amiri, Roozbeh; Ghorbani, Mohammadali

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, first, the impact of different gate arrangements on the short-channel effects of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with doped source and drain with the self-consistent solution of the three-dimensional Poisson equation and the Schr¨odinger equation with open boundary conditions, within the non-equilibrium Green function, is investigated. The results indicate that the double-gate structure possesses a quasi-ideal subthreshold oscillation and an acceptable decrease in the drain induced barrier even for a relatively thick gate oxide (5 nm). Afterward, the electrical characteristics of the double-gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (DG-CNTFET) are investigated. The results demonstrate that an increase in diameter and density of the nanotubes in the DG-CNTFET increases the on-state current. Also, as the drain voltage increases, the off-state current of the DG-CNTFET decreases. In addition, regarding the negative gate voltages, for a high drain voltage, increasing in the drain current due to band-to-band tunnelling requires a larger negative gate voltage, and for a low drain voltage, resonant states appear

  7. Mobilities in ambipolar field effect transistors based on single-walled carbon nanotube network and formed on a gold nanoparticle template

    SciTech Connect

    Wongsaeng, Chalao; Singjai, Pisith

    2014-04-07

    Ambipolar field effect transistors based on a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) network formed on a gold nanoparticle (AuNP) template with polyvinyl alcohol as a gate insulator were studied by measuring the current–gate voltage characteristics. It was found that the mobilities of holes and electrons increased with increasing AuNP number density. The disturbances in the flow pattern of the carbon feedstock in the chemical vapor deposition growth that were produced by the AuNP geometry, resulted in the differences in the crystallinity and the diameter, as well as the changes in the degree of the semiconductor behavior of the SWNTs.

  8. Oxygen and light sensitive field-effect transistors based on ZnO nanoparticles attached to individual double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chanaewa, Alina; Juárez, Beatriz H.; Weller, Horst; Klinke, Christian

    2011-12-01

    The attachment of semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes is one of the most challenging subjects in nanotechnology. Successful high coverage attachment and control over the charge transfer mechanism and photo-current generation open a wide field of new applications such as highly effective solar cells and fibre-enhanced polymers. In this work we study the charge transfer in individual double-walled carbon nanotubes highly covered with uniform ZnO nanoparticles. The synthetic colloidal procedure was chosen to avoid long-chained ligands at the nanoparticle-nanotube interface. The resulting composite material was used as conductive channel in a field-effect transistor device and the electrical photo-response was analysed under various conditions. By means of the transfer characteristics we could elucidate the mechanism of charge transfer from non-covalently attached semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes. The role of positive charges remaining on the nanoparticles is discussed in terms of a gating effect.The attachment of semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes is one of the most challenging subjects in nanotechnology. Successful high coverage attachment and control over the charge transfer mechanism and photo-current generation open a wide field of new applications such as highly effective solar cells and fibre-enhanced polymers. In this work we study the charge transfer in individual double-walled carbon nanotubes highly covered with uniform ZnO nanoparticles. The synthetic colloidal procedure was chosen to avoid long-chained ligands at the nanoparticle-nanotube interface. The resulting composite material was used as conductive channel in a field-effect transistor device and the electrical photo-response was analysed under various conditions. By means of the transfer characteristics we could elucidate the mechanism of charge transfer from non-covalently attached semiconducting nanoparticles to carbon nanotubes. The role of positive

  9. Photovoltage field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adinolfi, Valerio; Sargent, Edward H.

    2017-02-01

    The detection of infrared radiation enables night vision, health monitoring, optical communications and three-dimensional object recognition. Silicon is widely used in modern electronics, but its electronic bandgap prevents the detection of light at wavelengths longer than about 1,100 nanometres. It is therefore of interest to extend the performance of silicon photodetectors into the infrared spectrum, beyond the bandgap of silicon. Here we demonstrate a photovoltage field-effect transistor that uses silicon for charge transport, but is also sensitive to infrared light owing to the use of a quantum dot light absorber. The photovoltage generated at the interface between the silicon and the quantum dot, combined with the high transconductance provided by the silicon device, leads to high gain (more than 104 electrons per photon at 1,500 nanometres), fast time response (less than 10 microseconds) and a widely tunable spectral response. Our photovoltage field-effect transistor has a responsivity that is five orders of magnitude higher at a wavelength of 1,500 nanometres than that of previous infrared-sensitized silicon detectors. The sensitization is achieved using a room-temperature solution process and does not rely on traditional high-temperature epitaxial growth of semiconductors (such as is used for germanium and III–V semiconductors). Our results show that colloidal quantum dots can be used as an efficient platform for silicon-based infrared detection, competitive with state-of-the-art epitaxial semiconductors.

  10. Graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Dharmendar; Register, Leonard F.; Carpenter, Gary D.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.

    2011-08-01

    Owing in part to scaling challenges for metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) and complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) logic, the semiconductor industry is placing an increased emphasis on emerging materials and devices that may provide improved MOSFET performance beyond the 22 nm node, or provide novel functionality for, e.g. 'beyond CMOS' devices. Graphene, with its novel and electron-hole symmetric band structure and its high carrier mobilities and thermal velocities, is one such material that has garnered a great deal of interest for both purposes. Single and few layer carbon sheets have been fabricated by a variety of techniques including mechanical exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition, and field-effect transistors have been demonstrated with room-temperature mobilities as high as 10 000 cm2 V-1 s-1. But graphene is a gapless semiconductor and gate control of current is challenging, off-state leakage currents are high, and current does not readily saturate with drain voltage. However, various ways to overcome, adapt to, or even embrace this property are now being considered for device applications. In this work we explore through illustrative examples the potential of and challenges to graphene use for conventional and novel device applications.

  11. High-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes for use in field effect transistors and biosensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Shan; Hou, Peng-Xiang; Liu, Chang; Sun, Dong-Ming; Yuan, Jiangtan; Zhao, Shi-Yong; Yin, Li-Chang; Cong, Hongtao; Cheng, Hui-Ming

    2013-08-27

    We developed a simple and scalable selective synthesis method of high-quality, highly concentrated semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) by in situ hydrogen etching. Samples containing ~93% s-SWCNTs were obtained in bulk. These s-SWCNTs with good structural integrity showed a high oxidation resistance temperature of ~800 °C. Thin-film transistors based on the s-SWCNTs demonstrated a high carrier mobility of 21.1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at an on/off ratio of 1.1 × 10(4) and a high on/off ratio of 4.0 × 10(5) with a carrier mobility of 7.0 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1). A biosensor fabricated using the s-SWCNTs had a very low dopamine detection limit of 10(-18) mol/L at room temperature.

  12. Ambipolar phosphorene field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Demarteau, Marcel; Roelofs, Andreas

    2014-11-25

    In this article, we demonstrate enhanced electron and hole transport in few-layer phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) using titanium as the source/drain contact electrode and 20 nm SiO2 as the back gate dielectric. The field effect mobility values were extracted to be ∼38 cm(2)/Vs for electrons and ∼172 cm(2)/Vs for the holes. On the basis of our experimental data, we also comprehensively discuss how the contact resistances arising due to the Schottky barriers at the source and the drain end effect the different regime of the device characteristics and ultimately limit the ON state performance. We also propose and implement a novel technique for extracting the transport gap as well as the Schottky barrier height at the metal-phosphorene contact interface from the ambipolar transfer characteristics of the phosphorene FETs. This robust technique is applicable to any ultrathin body semiconductor which demonstrates symmetric ambipolar conduction. Finally, we demonstrate a high gain, high noise margin, chemical doping free, and fully complementary logic inverter based on ambipolar phosphorene FETs.

  13. Simultaneous Improvement of Hole and Electron Injection in Organic Field-effect Transistors by Conjugated Polymer-wrapped Carbon Nanotube Interlayers

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Hoon; Khim, Dongyoon; Xu, Yong; Kim, Juhwan; Park, Won-Tae; Kim, Dong-Yu; Noh, Yong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Efficient charge injection is critical for flexible organic electronic devices such as organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) and field-effect transistors (OFETs). Here, we investigated conjugated polymer-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWNTs) as solution-processable charge-injection layers in ambipolar organic field-effect transistors with poly(thienylenevinylene-co-phthalimide)s. The interlayers were prepared using poly(9,9-di-n-octylfluorene-alt-benzothiadiazole) (F8BT) or poly(9,9-dioctylfluorene) (PFO) to wrap s-SWNTs. In the contact-limited ambipolar OFETs, the interlayer led to significantly lower contact resistance (Rc) and increased mobilities for both holes and electrons. The resulting PTVPhI-Eh OFETs with PFO-wrapped s-SWNT interlayers showed very well-balanced ambipolar transport properties with a hole mobility of 0.5 cm2V-1S-1 and an electron mobility of 0.5 cm2V-1S-1 in linear regime. In addition, the chirality of s-SWNTs and kind of wrapping of conjugated polymers are not critical to improving charge-injection properties. We found that the improvements caused by the interlayer were due to the better charge injection at the metal/organic semiconductor contact interface and the increase in the charge concentration through a detailed examination of charge transport with low-temperature measurements. Finally, we successfully demonstrated complementary ambipolar inverters incorporating the interlayers without excessive patterning. PMID:26001198

  14. Adjustable hydrazine modulation of single-wall carbon nanotube network field effect transistors from p-type to n-type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Ruixuan; Xie, Dan; Xu, Jianlong; Sun, Yilin; Sun, MengXing; Zhang, Cheng; Li, Xian

    2016-11-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) network field effect transistors (FETs), which show decent p-type electronic properties, have been fabricated. The use of hydrazine as an aqueous solution and a strong n-type dopant for the SWCNTs is demonstrated in this paper. The electrical properties are obviously tuned by hydrazine treatment at different concentrations on the surface of the SWCNT network FETs. The transport behavior of SWCNTs can be modulated from p-type to n-type, demonstrating the controllable and adjustable doping effect of hydrazine. With a higher concentration of hydrazine, more electrons can be transferred from the hydrazine molecules to the SWCNT network films, thus resulting in a change of threshold voltage, carrier mobility and on-current. By cleaning the device, the hydrazine doping effects vanish, which indicates that the doping effects of hydrazine are reversible. Through x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) characterization, the doping effects of hydrazine have also been studied.

  15. Fast picomolar selective detection of bisphenol A in water using a carbon nanotube field effect transistor functionalized with estrogen receptor-alpha.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Acevedo, Zayda C; Riu, Jordi; Rius, F Xavier

    2009-05-15

    In this paper we report a biosensor for the fast, ultrasensitive and selective determination of bisphenol A in water. It is based on a field effect transistor (FET) in which a network of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) acts as the conductor channel. SWCNTs are functionalized for the first time with a nuclear receptor, the estrogen receptor alpha (ER-alpha), which is adsorbed onto the SWCNTs and acts as the sensing part of the biosensor. SWCTNs are subsequently protected to prevent the non-specific binding of interferences. With this biosensor we can detect picomolar concentrations of BPA in only 2 min of analysis. Selectivity has been tested against possible interferences such as fluoranthene, pentacloronitrobenzene and malathion, and this is the first device that experimentally shows that small molecules can also be selectively detected at ultralow concentrations using a CNTFET biosensor.

  16. Network single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistors (SWNT-FETs) with increased Schottky contact area for highly sensitive biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Byon, Hye Ryung; Choi, Hee Cheul

    2006-02-22

    Highly sensitive single-walled carbon nanotube-field effect transistor (SWNT-FET) devices, which detect protein adsorptions and specific protein-protein interactions at 1 pM concentrations, have been achieved. The detection limit has been improved 104-fold compared to the devices fabricated by photolithography. The substantially increased sensitivity is mainly due to the increased Schottky contact area which accommodates relatively more numbers of proteins even at very low concentration. The augmented number of proteins adsorbed on a device induces instant modulation of the work function of metal contact electrodes, which eventually changes the conductance of the device. Such devices have been attained by addressing metal electrodes on network-type SWNTs using a shadow mask on a tilted angle sample stage. The shadow mask allows metals to penetrate underneath the mask efficiently, therefore forming a thin and wide Schottky contact area on SWNT channels.

  17. Investigation of the performance and band-to-band tunneling effect of a new double-halo-doping carbon nanotube field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arefinia, Zahra

    2009-10-01

    Carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNTFETs) can be fabricated with Ohmic- or Schottky-type contacts. We focus here on Ohmic CNTFETs. The CNTFETs suffer from band-to-band tunneling which in turn causes the ambipolar conduction. In this paper, to suppress the ambipolar behavior of CNTFETs and improve the performance of these devices, we have proposed application of symmetric double-halo (DH)-doping in CNTFETs. In this new structure, the source-side halo doping reduces the drain-induced barrier lowering (DIBL) and the drain-side halo reduces the band-to-band tunneling effect. Simulation results show in the DH-CNTFET, subthreshold swing below the 60 mV/decade conventional limit can be achieved. Also it decreases significantly the leakage current and drain conductance and increases on-off current ratio and voltage gain as compared to conventional CNTFET.

  18. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, A.G.; Drummond, T.J.; Robertson, P.J.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1995-12-26

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits. 10 figs.

  19. Complementary junction heterostructure field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Baca, Albert G.; Drummond, Timothy J.; Robertson, Perry J.; Zipperian, Thomas E.

    1995-01-01

    A complimentary pair of compound semiconductor junction heterostructure field-effect transistors and a method for their manufacture are disclosed. The p-channel junction heterostructure field-effect transistor uses a strained layer to split the degeneracy of the valence band for a greatly improved hole mobility and speed. The n-channel device is formed by a compatible process after removing the strained layer. In this manner, both types of transistors may be independently optimized. Ion implantation is used to form the transistor active and isolation regions for both types of complimentary devices. The invention has uses for the development of low power, high-speed digital integrated circuits.

  20. Transition of single-walled carbon nanotubes from metallic to semiconducting in field-effect transistors by hydrogen plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Gang; Li, Qunqing; Jiang, Kaili; Zhang, Xiaobo; Chen, Jia; Ren, Zheng; Fan, Shoushan

    2007-06-01

    We report hydrogen plasma treatment results on converting the metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes to semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes. We found that the as-grown single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can be sorted as three groups which behave as metallic, as-metallic, and semiconducting SWNTs. These three groups have different changes under hydrogen plasma treatment and successive annealing process. The SWNTs can be easily hydrogenated in the hydrogen plasma environment and the as-metallic SWNTs can be transformed to semiconducting SWNTs. The successive annealing process can break the C-H bond, so the conversion is reversible.

  1. Electrical transport properties of single wall carbon nanotube/polyurethane composite based field effect transistors fabricated by UV-assisted direct-writing technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aïssa, B.; Therriault, D.; Farahani, R. D.; Lebel, L. L.; El Khakani, M. A.

    2012-03-01

    We report on the fabrication and transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polyurethane (PU) nanocomposite microfiber-based field effect transistors (FETs). UV-assisted direct-writing technology was used, and microfibers consisting of cylindrical micro-rods, having different diameters and various SWCNT loads, were fabricated directly onto SiO2/Si substrates in a FET scheme. The room temperature dc electrical conductivities of these microfibers were shown to increase with respect to the SWCNT concentrations in the nanocomposite, and were about ten orders of magnitude higher than that of the pure polyurethane, when the SWCNT load ranged from 0.1 to 2.5 wt% only. Our results show that for SWCNT loads ≤ 1.5 wt%, all the microfibers behave as a FET with p-type transport. The resulting FET exhibited excellent performance, with an Ion/Ioff ratio of 105 and a maximum on-state current (Ion) exceeding 70 µA. Correlations between the FET performance, SWCNTs concentration, and the microfiber diameters are also discussed.

  2. Electrical transport properties of single wall carbon nanotube/polyurethane composite based field effect transistors fabricated by UV-assisted direct-writing technology.

    PubMed

    Aïssa, B; Therriault, D; Farahani, R D; Lebel, L L; El Khakani, M A

    2012-03-23

    We report on the fabrication and transport properties of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT)/polyurethane (PU) nanocomposite microfiber-based field effect transistors (FETs). UV-assisted direct-writing technology was used, and microfibers consisting of cylindrical micro-rods, having different diameters and various SWCNT loads, were fabricated directly onto SiO₂/Si substrates in a FET scheme. The room temperature dc electrical conductivities of these microfibers were shown to increase with respect to the SWCNT concentrations in the nanocomposite, and were about ten orders of magnitude higher than that of the pure polyurethane, when the SWCNT load ranged from 0.1 to 2.5 wt% only. Our results show that for SWCNT loads ≤ 1.5 wt%, all the microfibers behave as a FET with p-type transport. The resulting FET exhibited excellent performance, with an I(on)/I(off) ratio of 10⁵ and a maximum on-state current (I(on)) exceeding 70 µA. Correlations between the FET performance, SWCNTs concentration, and the microfiber diameters are also discussed.

  3. Graphene Field Effect Transistor for Radiation Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Mary J. (Inventor); Chen, Zhihong (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The present invention relates to a graphene field effect transistor-based radiation sensor for use in a variety of radiation detection applications, including manned spaceflight missions. The sensing mechanism of the radiation sensor is based on the high sensitivity of graphene in the local change of electric field that can result from the interaction of ionizing radiation with a gated undoped silicon absorber serving as the supporting substrate in the graphene field effect transistor. The radiation sensor has low power and high sensitivity, a flexible structure, and a wide temperature range, and can be used in a variety of applications, particularly in space missions for human exploration.

  4. Raman mapping investigation of single-walled carbon nanotube bending in bottom-contact field-effect-transistor devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setiadi, Agung; Akai-Kasaya, Megumi; Kuwahara, Yuji

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the bending of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in bottom-contact SWNT devices using Raman mapping measurements. The height difference between the metal electrodes and the substrate caused the SWNTs to bend, down-shifting the G+ and G- bands of the bent SWNTs. No shifting of the G+ and G- bands was observed when flat electrodes were used. Shifting of the G+ and G- bands in SWNTs is strongly correlated to modulation of the Fermi level. We confirmed this effect by measuring the transport properties of the SWNT devices, which were in good agreement with the Raman measurement results.

  5. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Shul, Randy J.

    1999-01-01

    An all-ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorous co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials.

  6. Gallium nitride junction field-effect transistor

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, J.C.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-02-02

    An ion implanted gallium-nitride (GaN) junction field-effect transistor (JFET) and method of making the same are disclosed. Also disclosed are various ion implants, both n- and p-type, together with or without phosphorus co-implantation, in selected III-V semiconductor materials. 19 figs.

  7. Silicon nanowire field effect transistor for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu

    Detection and recognition of chemical ions and biological molecules are important in basic science as well as in pharmacology and medicine. Nanotechnology has made it possible to greatly enhance detection sensitivity through the use of nanowires, nanotubes, nanocrystals, nanocantilevers, and quantum dots as sensing platforms. In this work silicon nanowires are used as the conductance channel between the source and drain of a FET (field effect transistor) device and the biomolecular binding on the surface of nanowire modifies the conductance like a change in gate voltage. Due to the high surface-to-volume ratio and unique character of the silicon nanowires, this device has significant advantages in real-time, label-free and highly sensitive detection of a wide range of species, including proteins, nucleic acids and other small molecules. Here we present a biosensor fabricated from CMOS (complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor) compatible top-down methods including electron beam lithography. This method enables scalable manufacturing of multiple sensor arrays with high efficiency. In a systematic study of the device characteristics with different wire widths, we have found the sensitivity of the device increases when wire width decreases. By operating the device in appropriate bias region, the sensitivity of the device can be improved without doping or high temperature annealing. Not only can this device be used to detect the concentration of proteins and metabolites like urea or glucose, but also dynamic information like the dissociation constant can be extracted from the measurement. The device is also used to detect the clinically related cancer antigen CA 15.3 and shows potential application in cancer studies.

  8. Investigation of light doping and hetero gate dielectric carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor for improved device and circuit-level performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Sun, Yuan; Wang, Huan; Xu, Hongsong; Xu, Min; Jiang, Sitao; Yue, Gongshu

    2016-03-01

    We perform a comparative study (both for device and circuit simulations) of three carbon nanotube tunneling field-effect transistor (CNT-TFET) designs: high-K gate dielectric TFETs (HK-TFETs), hetero gate dielectric TFETs (HTFETs) and a novel CNT-TFET-based combination of light doping and hetero gate dielectric TFETs (LD-HTFETs). At device level, the effects of channel and gate dielectric engineering on the switching and high-frequency characteristics for CNT-TFET have been theoretically investigated using a quantum kinetic model. This model is based on two-dimensional non-equilibrium Green’s functions solved self-consistently with Poisson’s equations. It is revealed that the proposed LD-HTFET structure can significantly reduce leakage current, enhance control ability of the gate on the channel, improve the switching speed, and is more suitable for use in low-power, high-frequency circuits. At circuit level, using HSPICE with look-up table-based Verilog-A models, the performance and reliability of CNT-TFET logic gate circuits is evaluated on the basis of power consumption, average delay, stability, energy consumption and power-delay product (PDP). Simulation results indicate that, compared to a traditional CNT-TFET-based circuit, the one based on LD-HTFET has a significantly better performance (static noise margin, energy, delay, PDP). It is also observed that our proposed design exhibits better robustness under different operational conditions by considering power supply voltage and temperature variations. Our results may be useful for designing and optimizing CNTFET devices and circuits.

  9. Organic field effect transistors for textile applications.

    PubMed

    Bonfiglio, Annalisa; De Rossi, Danilo; Kirstein, Tünde; Locher, Ivo R; Mameli, Fulvia; Paradiso, Rita; Vozzi, Giovanni

    2005-09-01

    In this paper, several issues concerning the development of textiles endowed with electronic functions will be discussed. In particular, issues concerning materials, structures, electronic models, and the mechanical constraints due to textile technologies will be detailed. The idea starts from an already developed organic field-effect transistor that is realized on a flexible film that can be applied, after the assembly, on whatever kind of substrate, in particular, on textiles. This could pave the way to a variety of applications aimed to conjugate the favorable mechanical properties of textiles with the electronic functions of transistors. Furthermore, a possible perspective for the developments of organic sensors based on this structure are described.

  10. A silicon nanocrystal tunnel field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Drouin, Dominique; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2014-05-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a silicon nanocrystal Field Effect Transistor (ncFET). Its operation is similar to that of a Tunnelling Field Effect Transistor (TFET) with two barriers in series. The tunnelling barriers are fabricated in very thin silicon dioxide and the channel in intrinsic polycrystalline silicon. The absence of doping eliminates the problem of achieving sharp doping profiles at the junctions, which has proven a challenge for large-scale integration and, in principle, allows scaling down the atomic level. The demonstrated ncFET features a 104 on/off current ratio at room temperature, a low 30 pA/μm leakage current at a 0.5 V bias, an on-state current on a par with typical all-Si TFETs and bipolar operation with high symmetry. Quantum dot transport spectroscopy is used to assess the band structure and energy levels of the silicon island.

  11. A silicon nanocrystal tunnel field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey-Collard, Patrick; Drouin, Dominique; Pioro-Ladrière, Michel

    2014-05-12

    In this work, we demonstrate a silicon nanocrystal Field Effect Transistor (ncFET). Its operation is similar to that of a Tunnelling Field Effect Transistor (TFET) with two barriers in series. The tunnelling barriers are fabricated in very thin silicon dioxide and the channel in intrinsic polycrystalline silicon. The absence of doping eliminates the problem of achieving sharp doping profiles at the junctions, which has proven a challenge for large-scale integration and, in principle, allows scaling down the atomic level. The demonstrated ncFET features a 10{sup 4} on/off current ratio at room temperature, a low 30 pA/μm leakage current at a 0.5 V bias, an on-state current on a par with typical all-Si TFETs and bipolar operation with high symmetry. Quantum dot transport spectroscopy is used to assess the band structure and energy levels of the silicon island.

  12. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.

  13. Vertically Integrated Multiple Nanowire Field Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Hyun; Kang, Min-Ho; Ahn, Dae-Chul; Park, Jun-Young; Bang, Tewook; Jeon, Seung-Bae; Hur, Jae; Lee, Dongil; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2015-12-09

    A vertically integrated multiple channel-based field-effect transistor (FET) with the highest number of nanowires reported ever is demonstrated on a bulk silicon substrate without use of wet etching. The driving current is increased by 5-fold due to the inherent vertically stacked five-level nanowires, thus showing good feasibility of three-dimensional integration-based high performance transistor. The developed fabrication process, which is simple and reproducible, is used to create multiple stiction-free and uniformly sized nanowires with the aid of the one-route all-dry etching process (ORADEP). Furthermore, the proposed FET is revamped to create nonvolatile memory with the adoption of a charge trapping layer for enhanced practicality. Thus, this research suggests an ultimate design for the end-of-the-roadmap devices to overcome the limits of scaling.

  14. Hysteresis modeling in graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, M.; Rorsman, N.; Sveinbjörnsson, E. Ö.

    2015-02-21

    Graphene field effect transistors with an Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} gate dielectric are fabricated on H-intercalated bilayer graphene grown on semi-insulating 4H-SiC by chemical vapour deposition. DC measurements of the gate voltage v{sub g} versus the drain current i{sub d} reveal a severe hysteresis of clockwise orientation. A capacitive model is used to derive the relationship between the applied gate voltage and the Fermi energy. The electron transport equations are then used to calculate the drain current for a given applied gate voltage. The hysteresis in measured data is then modeled via a modified Preisach kernel.

  15. Graphene junction field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ou, Tzu-Min; Borsa, Tomoko; van Zeghbroeck, Bart

    2014-03-01

    We have demonstrated for the first time a novel graphene transistor gated by a graphene/semiconductor junction rather than an insulating gate. The transistor operates much like a semiconductor junction Field Effect Transistor (jFET) where the depletion layer charge in the semiconductor modulates the mobile charge in the channel. The channel in our case is the graphene rather than another semiconductor layer. An increased reverse bias of the graphene/n-silicon junction increases the positive charge in the depletion region and thereby reduces the total charge in the graphene. We fabricated individual graphene/silicon junctions as well as graphene jFETs (GjFETs) on n-type (4.5x1015 cm-3) silicon with Cr/Au electrodes and 3 μm gate length. As a control device, we also fabricated back-gated graphene MOSFETs using a 90nm SiO2 on a p-type silicon substrate (1019 cm-3) . The graphene was grown by APCVD on copper foil and transferred with PMMA onto the silicon substrate. The GjFET exhibited an on-off ratio of 3.75, an intrinsic graphene doping of 1.75x1012 cm-2, compared to 1.17x1013 cm-2 in the MOSFET, and reached the Dirac point at 13.5V. Characteristics of the junctions and transistors were measured as a function of temperature and in response to light. Experimental data and a comparison with simulations will be presented.

  16. Field-effect transistors (2nd revised and enlarged edition)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bocharov, L. N.

    The design, principle of operation, and principal technical characteristics of field-effect transistors produced in the USSR are described. Problems related to the use of field-effect transistors in various radioelectronic devices are examined, and tables of parameters and mean statistical characteristics are presented for the main types of field-effect transistors. Methods for calculating various circuit components are discussed and illustrated by numerical examples.

  17. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    DOE PAGES

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; ...

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibilitymore » of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.« less

  18. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-04-06

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. In conclusion, our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale.

  19. Polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, F.; Estrela, P.; Mo, Y.; Migliorato, P.; Maeda, H.; Inoue, S.; Shimoda, T.

    2005-01-01

    We report the operation of polycrystalline silicon ion sensitive field effect transistors. These devices can be fabricated on inexpensive disposable substrates such as glass or plastics and are, therefore, promising candidates for low cost single-use intelligent multisensors. In this work we have developed an extended gate structure with a Si3N4 sensing layer. Nearly ideal pH sensitivity (54mV /pH) and stable operation have been achieved. Temperature effects have been characterized. A penicillin sensor has been fabricated by functionalizing the sensing area with penicillinase. The sensitivity to penicillin G is about 10mV/mM, in solutions with concentration lower than the saturation value, which is about 7 mM.

  20. Antiferromagnetic Spin Wave Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Ran; Daniels, Matthew W.; Zhu, Jian-Gang; Xiao, Di

    2016-01-01

    In a collinear antiferromagnet with easy-axis anisotropy, symmetry dictates that the spin wave modes must be doubly degenerate. Theses two modes, distinguished by their opposite polarization and available only in antiferromagnets, give rise to a novel degree of freedom to encode and process information. We show that the spin wave polarization can be manipulated by an electric field induced Dzyaloshinskii-Moriya interaction and magnetic anisotropy. We propose a prototype spin wave field-effect transistor which realizes a gate-tunable magnonic analog of the Faraday effect, and demonstrate its application in THz signal modulation. Our findings open up the exciting possibility of digital data processing utilizing antiferromagnetic spin waves and enable the direct projection of optical computing concepts onto the mesoscopic scale. PMID:27048928

  1. Chemical optimization of self-assembled carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Auvray, Stéphane; Derycke, Vincent; Goffman, Marcelo; Filoramo, Arianna; Jost, Oliver; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe

    2005-03-01

    We present the improvement of carbon nanotube field effects transistors (CNTFETs) performances by chemical tuning of the nanotube/substrate and nanotube/electrode interfaces. Our work is based on a method of selective placement of individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by patterned aminosilane monolayer and its use for the fabrication of self-assembled nanotube transistors. This method brings a relevant solution to the problem of systematic connection of self-organized nanotubes. The aminosilane monolayer reactivity can be used to improve carrier injection and doping level of the SWNT. We show that the Schottky barrier height at the nanotube/metal interface can be diminished in a continuous fashion down to an almost ohmic contact through these chemical treatments. Moreover, sensitivity to 20 ppb of triethylamine is demonstrated for self-assembled CNTFETs, thus opening new prospects for gas sensors taking advantages of the chemical functionality of the aminosilane used for assembling the CNTFETs.

  2. Nanometer size field effect transistors for terahertz detectors.

    PubMed

    Knap, W; Rumyantsev, S; Vitiello, M S; Coquillat, D; Blin, S; Dyakonova, N; Shur, M; Teppe, F; Tredicucci, A; Nagatsuma, T

    2013-05-31

    Nanometer size field effect transistors can operate as efficient resonant or broadband terahertz detectors, mixers, phase shifters and frequency multipliers at frequencies far beyond their fundamental cut-off frequency. This work is an overview of some recent results concerning the application of nanometer scale field effect transistors for the detection of terahertz radiation.

  3. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; ...

    2016-02-05

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under variousmore » bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (insitu STM-TEM). Ultimately, as suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending.« less

  4. Compact model for switching characteristics of graphene field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenath, R.; Bala Tripura Sundari, B.

    2016-04-01

    The scaling of CMOS transistors has resulted in intensified short channel effects, indicating that CMOS has reached its physical limits. Alternate non silicon based materials namely carbon based graphene, carbon nanotubes are being explored for usability as channel and interconnect material due to their established higher mobility and robustness. This paper presents a drift-diffusion based circuit simulatable Verilog-A compact model of graphene field effect transistor (GFET) for channel length of 100nm.The focus is on the development of simulatable device model in Verilog A based on intrinsic parameters and obtain the current, high cutoff frequency and use the model into circuit level simulations to realize an inverter and a 3-stage ring oscillator using Synopsys HSPICE. The applications are so chosen that their switching characteristics enable the determination of the RF frequency ranges of operation that the model can achieve when used in digital applications and also to compare its performance with existing CMOS model. The GFET's switching characteristics and power consumption were found to be better than similarly sized CMOS operating at same range of voltages. The basic frequency of operation in the circuit is of significant importance so as to use the model in other applications at RF and in future for millimeter wave applications. The frequency of operation at circuit level is found to be 1.1GHz at 100nm which is far higher than the existing frequency of 245 MHz reported at 500nm using AlN.

  5. New Flexible Channels for Room Temperature Tunneling Field Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Boyi; Asthana, Anjana; Hazaveh, Paniz Khanmohammadi; Bergstrom, Paul L.; Banyai, Douglas; Savaikar, Madhusudan A.; Jaszczak, John A.; Yap, Yoke Khin

    2016-01-01

    Tunneling field effect transistors (TFETs) have been proposed to overcome the fundamental issues of Si based transistors, such as short channel effect, finite leakage current, and high contact resistance. Unfortunately, most if not all TFETs are operational only at cryogenic temperatures. Here we report that iron (Fe) quantum dots functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (QDs-BNNTs) can be used as the flexible tunneling channels of TFETs at room temperatures. The electrical insulating BNNTs are used as the one-dimensional (1D) substrates to confine the uniform formation of Fe QDs on their surface as the flexible tunneling channel. Consistent semiconductor-like transport behaviors under various bending conditions are detected by scanning tunneling spectroscopy in a transmission electron microscopy system (in-situ STM-TEM). As suggested by computer simulation, the uniform distribution of Fe QDs enable an averaging effect on the possible electron tunneling pathways, which is responsible for the consistent transport properties that are not sensitive to bending. PMID:26846587

  6. Electroluminescence from single-wall carbon nanotube network transistors.

    PubMed

    Adam, E; Aguirre, C M; Marty, L; St-Antoine, B C; Meunier, F; Desjardins, P; Ménard, D; Martel, R

    2008-08-01

    The electroluminescence (EL) properties from single-wall carbon nanotube network field-effect transistors (NNFETs) and small bundle carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNFETs) are studied using spectroscopy and imaging in the near-infrared (NIR). At room temperature, NNFETs produce broad (approximately 180 meV) and structured NIR spectra, while they are narrower (approximately 80 meV) for CNFETs. EL emission from NNFETs is located in the vicinity of the minority carrier injecting contact (drain) and the spectrum of the emission is red shifted with respect to the corresponding absorption spectrum. A phenomenological model based on a Fermi-Dirac distribution of carriers in the nanotube network reproduces the spectral features observed. This work supports bipolar (electron-hole) current recombination as the main mechanism of emission and highlights the drastic influence of carrier distribution on the optoelectronic properties of carbon nanotube films.

  7. A seamless-pitched graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haji-Nasiri, Saeed; Kazem Moravvej-Farshi, Mohammad; Faez, Rahim

    2015-11-01

    This paper proposes a graphene nanoribbon field effect transistor (GNRFET) consisting of pitched semiconducting GNRs as the channels that are connected to the metallic graphene source/drain in a seamless fashion. We obtained the diagrams for frequency bandwidths, step time responses, and Nyquist stability for the seamless pitched GNRFET (SP-GNRFET) with a channel having 100 pitched GNRs at 10 nm pitch in the common source configuration with various dimensions of the GNRs. The aforementioned diagrams were also obtained for the pitched carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) with a channel having 100 pitched CNTs at 10 nm pitch in the common source configuration with various dimensions of the CNTs. In order to compare the SP-GNRFET and the pitched CNTFET, physical parameters of the GNRs/CNTs were assumed to be the same in both devices. The results show that when the dimensions of GNRs in the SP-GNRFET increase, the frequency bandwidth decreases, but relaxation time and Nyquist stability increase. Moreover, with an increase in the dimensions of CNTs, similar behavior is observed for the pitched CNTFET. The results also show that the frequency bandwidth of SP-GNRFET is in the range of 10 THz and is more than that of the pitched CNTFET by two orders of magnitude. This is achieved by eliminating the Schottky barrier between the channels and source/drain contacts in the SP-GNRFET. Nevertheless, step time responses for the SP-GNRFET show multi-harmonic oscillations like those for the pitched CNTFET. This shows the importance of stability analysis as a challenge to the SP-GNRFET. Nyquist diagrams predict lower stability for SP-GNRFETs than for pitched CNTFETs. This is because elimination of the Schottky barrier results in a reduction in the overall impedance of the SP-GNRFET, which in turn leads to the frequency of the fluctuations in the SP-GNRFET being more than that in the pitched CNTFET.

  8. Carbon nanotube electrodes in organic transistors.

    PubMed

    Valitova, Irina; Amato, Michele; Mahvash, Farzaneh; Cantele, Giovanni; Maffucci, Antonio; Santato, Clara; Martel, Richard; Cicoira, Fabio

    2013-06-07

    The scope of this Minireview is to provide an overview of the recent progress on carbon nanotube electrodes applied to organic thin film transistors. After an introduction on the general aspects of the charge injection processes at various electrode-semiconductor interfaces, we discuss the great potential of carbon nanotube electrodes for organic thin film transistors and the recent achievements in the field.

  9. Charge transfer induced polarity switching in carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Klinke, Christian; Chen, Jia; Afzali, Ali; Avouris, Phaedon

    2005-03-01

    We probed the charge transfer interaction between the amine-containing molecules hydrazine, polyaniline, and aminobutyl phosphonic acid and carbon nanotube field effect transistors (CNTFETs). We successfully converted p-type CNTFETs to n-type and drastically improved the device performance in both the ON- and OFF-transistor states, utilizing hydrazine as dopant. We effectively switched the transistor polarity between p- and n- type by accessing different oxidation states of polyaniline. We also demonstrated the flexibility of modulating the threshold voltage (Vth) of a CNTFET by engineering various charge-accepting and -donating groups in the same molecule.

  10. I-V Characteristics of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    1999-01-01

    There are many possible uses for ferroelectric field effect transistors.To understand their application, a fundamental knowledge of their basic characteristics must first be found. In this research, the current and voltage characteristics of a field effect transistor are described. The effective gate capacitance and charge are derived from experimental data on an actual FFET. The general equation for a MOSFET is used to derive the internal characteristics of the transistor: This equation is modified slightly to describe the FFET characteristics. Experimental data derived from a Radiant Technologies FFET is used to calculate the internal transistor characteristics using fundamental MOSFET equations. The drain current was measured under several different gate and drain voltages and with different initial polarizations on the ferroelectric material in the transistor. Two different polarization conditions were used. One with the gate ferroelectric material polarized with a +9.0 volt write pulse and one with a -9.0 volt pulse.

  11. Ionizing Radiation Effects on Graphene Based Field Effects Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos

    Graphene, first isolated in 2004 by Andre Geim and Konstantin Novoselov, is an atomically thin two-dimensional layer of hexagonal carbon that has been extensively studied due to its unique electronic, mechanical, thermal and optical properties. Its vast potential has led to the development of a wide variety of novel devices such as, transistors, solar cells, batteries and sensors that offer significant advantages over the conventional microelectronic ones. Although graphene-based devices show very promising performance characteristics, limited has been done in order to evaluate how these devices operate in a radiation harsh environment. Undesirable phenomena such as total dose effects, single event upsets, displacement damage and soft errors that silicon-based devices are prone to, can have a detrimental impact on performance and reliability. Similarly, the significant effects of irradiation on carbon nanotubes indicate the potential for related radiation induced defects in carbon-based materials, such as graphene. In this work, we fabricate graphene field effect transistors (GFETs) and systematically study the various effects of ionizing radiation on the material and device level. Graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition (CVD) along with standard lithographic and shadow masking techniques, was used for the transistor fabrication. GFETs were subjected to different radiation sources, such as, beta particles (electron radiation), gamma (photons) and ions (alpha, protons and Fe particles) under various radiation doses and energies. The effects on graphene's crystal structure, transport properties and doping profile were examined by using a variety of characterization tools and techniques. We demonstrate not only the mechanisms of ionized charge build up in the substrate and displacement damage effects on GFET performance, but also that atmospheric adsorbents from the surrounding environment can have a significant impact on the radiation hardness of graphene. We

  12. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts.

  13. Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakayama, Yutaka; Hayakawa, Ryoma; Seo, Hoon-Seok

    2014-04-01

    Recent progress in photoactive organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) is reviewed. Photoactive OFETs are divided into light-emitting (LE) and light-receiving (LR) OFETs. In the first part, LE-OFETs are reviewed from the viewpoint of the evolution of device structures. Device performances have improved in the last decade with the evolution of device structures from single-layer unipolar to multi-layer ambipolar transistors. In the second part, various kinds of LR-OFETs are featured. These are categorized according to their functionalities: phototransistors, non-volatile optical memories, and photochromism-based transistors. For both, various device configurations are introduced: thin-film based transistors for practical applications, single-crystalline transistors to investigate fundamental physics, nanowires, multi-layers, and vertical transistors based on new concepts.

  14. Assembly, physics, and application of highly electronic-type purified semiconducting carbon nanotubes in aligned array field effect transistors and photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Michael

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in (1) achieving highly monodisperse semiconducting carbon nanotubes without problematic metallic nanotubes and (2) depositing these nanotubes into useful, organized arrays and assemblies on substrates have created new opportunities for studying the physics of these one-dimensional conductors and for applying them in electronics and photonics technologies. In this talk, I will present on two topics that are along these lines. In the first, we have pioneered a scalable approach for depositing aligned arrays of ultrahigh purity semiconducting SWCNTs (prepared using polyfluorene-derivatives) called floating evaporative self-assembly (FESA). FESA is exploited to create FETs with exceptionally high combined on-conductance and on-off ratio of 261 μS/ μm and 2 x105, respectively, for a channel length of 240 nm. This is 1400 x greater on-off ratio than SWCNT FETs fabricated by other methods, at comparable on-conductance per width of 250 μS/ μm, and 30-100 x greater on-conductance per width, at comparable on-off ratio of 105-107. In the second, we have discovered how to efficiently harvest photons using semiconducting SWCNTs by driving the dissociation of excitons using donor/acceptor heterojunctions. The flow of energy in SWCNT films occurs across a complex energy landscape, temporally resolved using two-dimensional white light ultrafast spectroscopy. We have demonstrated simple solar cells driven by SWCNT excitons, based on bilayers between C60 and ultrathin (5 nm) films of SWCNTs that achieve a 1% solar power conversion efficiency (7% at the bandgap). High internal quantum efficiency indicates that future blended or multijunction cells exploiting multiple layers will be many times more efficient.

  15. Improved Field-Effect Transistor Equations for Computer Simulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidd, Richard; Ardini, James

    1979-01-01

    Presents a laboratory experiment that was developed to acquaint physics students with field-effect transistor characteristics and circuits. Computer-drawn curves supplementing student laboratory exercises can be generated to provide more permanent, usable data than those taken from a curve tracer. (HM)

  16. Radiation tolerant silicon nitride insulated gate field effect transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, P. A.

    1969-01-01

    Metal-Insulated-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistor /MISFET/ device uses a silicon nitride passivation layer over a thin silicon oxide layer to enhance the radiation tolerance. It is useful in electronic systems exposed to space radiation environment or the effects of nuclear weapons.

  17. TOPICAL REVIEW: Molecular materials for organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, T.

    2008-05-01

    Organic field-effect transistors are important applications of thin films of molecular materials. A variety of materials have been explored for improving the performance of organic transistors. The materials are conventionally classified as p-channel and n-channel, but not only the performance but also even the carrier polarity is greatly dependent on the combinations of organic semiconductors and electrode materials. In this review, particular emphasis is laid on multi-sulfur compounds such as tetrathiafulvalenes and metal dithiolates. These compounds are components of highly conducting materials such as organic superconductors, but are also used in organic transistors. The charge-transfer complexes are used in organic transistors as active layers as well as electrodes.

  18. CMOS-based carbon nanotube pass-transistor logic integrated circuits.

    PubMed

    Ding, Li; Zhang, Zhiyong; Liang, Shibo; Pei, Tian; Wang, Sheng; Li, Yan; Zhou, Weiwei; Liu, Jie; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2012-02-14

    Field-effect transistors based on carbon nanotubes have been shown to be faster and less energy consuming than their silicon counterparts. However, ensuring these advantages are maintained for integrated circuits is a challenge. Here we demonstrate that a significant reduction in the use of field-effect transistors can be achieved by constructing carbon nanotube-based integrated circuits based on a pass-transistor logic configuration, rather than a complementary metal-oxide semiconductor configuration. Logic gates are constructed on individual carbon nanotubes via a doping-free approach and with a single power supply at voltages as low as 0.4 V. The pass-transistor logic configurarion provides a significant simplification of the carbon nanotube-based circuit design, a higher potential circuit speed and a significant reduction in power consumption. In particular, a full adder, which requires a total of 28 field-effect transistors to construct in the usual complementary metal-oxide semiconductor circuit, uses only three pairs of n- and p-field-effect transistors in the pass-transistor logic configuration.

  19. A scheme for a topological insulator field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vali, Mehran; Dideban, Daryoosh; Moezi, Negin

    2015-05-01

    We propose a scheme for a topological insulator field effect transistor. The idea is based on the gate voltage control of the Dirac fermions in a ferromagnetic topological insulator channel with perpendicular magnetization connecting to two metallic topological insulator leads. Our theoretical analysis shows that the proposed device displays a switching effect with high on/off current ratio and a negative differential conductance with a good peak to valley ratio.

  20. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-06-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic-inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm2 Vs-1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  2. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-04-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for 'plastic electronics'. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20-40 cm(2) Vs(-1), achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps.

  3. Lead iodide perovskite light-emitting field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Chin, Xin Yu; Cortecchia, Daniele; Yin, Jun; Bruno, Annalisa; Soci, Cesare

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread use of solution-processable hybrid organic–inorganic perovskites in photovoltaic and light-emitting applications, determination of their intrinsic charge transport parameters has been elusive due to the variability of film preparation and history-dependent device performance. Here we show that screening effects associated to ionic transport can be effectively eliminated by lowering the operating temperature of methylammonium lead iodide perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3) field-effect transistors. Field-effect carrier mobility is found to increase by almost two orders of magnitude below 200 K, consistent with phonon scattering-limited transport. Under balanced ambipolar carrier injection, gate-dependent electroluminescence is also observed from the transistor channel, with spectra revealing the tetragonal to orthorhombic phase transition. This demonstration of CH3NH3PbI3 light-emitting field-effect transistors provides intrinsic transport parameters to guide materials and solar cell optimization, and will drive the development of new electro-optic device concepts, such as gated light-emitting diodes and lasers operating at room temperature. PMID:26108967

  4. Organic field-effect transistors using single crystals

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Takeya, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Organic field-effect transistors using small-molecule organic single crystals are developed to investigate fundamental aspects of organic thin-film transistors that have been widely studied for possible future markets for ‘plastic electronics’. In reviewing the physics and chemistry of single-crystal organic field-effect transistors (SC-OFETs), the nature of intrinsic charge dynamics is elucidated for the carriers induced at the single crystal surfaces of molecular semiconductors. Materials for SC-OFETs are first reviewed with descriptions of the fabrication methods and the field-effect characteristics. In particular, a benchmark carrier mobility of 20–40 cm2 Vs−1, achieved with thin platelets of rubrene single crystals, demonstrates the significance of the SC-OFETs and clarifies material limitations for organic devices. In the latter part of this review, we discuss the physics of microscopic charge transport by using SC-OFETs at metal/semiconductor contacts and along semiconductor/insulator interfaces. Most importantly, Hall effect and electron spin resonance (ESR) measurements reveal that interface charge transport in molecular semiconductors is properly described in terms of band transport and localization by charge traps. PMID:27877287

  5. Interdigitated Extended Gate Field Effect Transistor Without Reference Electrode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, Ghusoon M.

    2017-02-01

    An interdigitated extended gate field effect transistor (IEGFET) has been proposed as a modified pH sensor structure of an extended gate field effect transistor (EGFET). The reference electrode and the extended gate in the conventional device have been replaced by a single interdigitated extended gate. A metal-semiconductor-metal interdigitated extended gate containing two multi-finger Ni electrodes based on zinc oxide (ZnO) thin film as a pH-sensitive membrane. ZnO thin film was grown on a p-type Si (100) substrate by the sol-gel technique. The fabricated extended gate is connected to a commercial metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor device in CD4007UB. The experimental data show that this structure has real time and linear pH voltage and current sensitivities in a concentration range between pH 4 and 11. The voltage and current sensitivities are found to be about 22.4 mV/pH and 45 μA/pH, respectively. Reference electrode elimination makes the IEGFET device simple to fabricate, easy to carry out the measurements, needing a small volume of solution to test and suitable for disposable biosensor applications. Furthermore, this uncomplicated structure could be extended to fabricate multiple ions microsensors and lab-on-chip devices.

  6. Local Ambipolar Graphene Field Effect Transistors via Metal Side Gates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Jifa; Jauregui, Luis; Lopez, Gabriel; Cao, Helin; Chen, Yong

    2010-03-01

    We fabricated local graphene field effect transistors (FET) based on metal side gates. The characteristic ambipolar field effect of graphene device was observed by sweeping only the voltage of a local metal side gate. The local charge neutrality point of the side-gate graphene FET can be tuned in a large voltage range from positive to negative by a second side gate. Furthermore, we observed that the field effect due to the side gate can be appreciably weakened by electrically grounding the back gate compared to floating the back gate. The experimental results can be well explained by electrostatic simulation using COMSOL. Our technique offers a simple method for local tuning of charge density of graphene nanodevices while avoiding coating graphene surface with dielectrics, which may cause contamination and degradation of graphene.

  7. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators.

  8. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Vandenberghe, William G; Fischetti, Massimo V

    2017-01-20

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators.

  9. Imperfect two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Vandenberghe, William G.; Fischetti, Massimo V.

    2017-01-01

    To overcome the challenge of using two-dimensional materials for nanoelectronic devices, we propose two-dimensional topological insulator field-effect transistors that switch based on the modulation of scattering. We model transistors made of two-dimensional topological insulator ribbons accounting for scattering with phonons and imperfections. In the on-state, the Fermi level lies in the bulk bandgap and the electrons travel ballistically through the topologically protected edge states even in the presence of imperfections. In the off-state the Fermi level moves into the bandgap and electrons suffer from severe back-scattering. An off-current more than two-orders below the on-current is demonstrated and a high on-current is maintained even in the presence of imperfections. At low drain-source bias, the output characteristics are like those of conventional field-effect transistors, at large drain-source bias negative differential resistance is revealed. Complementary n- and p-type devices can be made enabling high-performance and low-power electronic circuits using imperfect two-dimensional topological insulators. PMID:28106059

  10. Graphene-graphite oxide field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Standley, Brian; Mendez, Anthony; Schmidgall, Emma; Bockrath, Marc

    2012-03-14

    Graphene's high mobility and two-dimensional nature make it an attractive material for field-effect transistors. Previous efforts in this area have used bulk gate dielectric materials such as SiO(2) or HfO(2). In contrast, we have studied the use of an ultrathin layered material, graphene's insulating analogue, graphite oxide. We have fabricated transistors comprising single or bilayer graphene channels, graphite oxide gate insulators, and metal top-gates. The graphite oxide layers show relatively minimal leakage at room temperature. The breakdown electric field of graphite oxide was found to be comparable to SiO(2), typically ~1-3 × 10(8) V/m, while its dielectric constant is slightly higher, κ ≈ 4.3.

  11. Cryogenetically Cooled Field Effect Transistors for Low-Noise Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wollack, Edward J.; Rabin, Douglas M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Recent tends in the design, fabrication and use of High-Electron-Mobility-Transistors (HEMT) in low noise amplifiers are reviewed. Systems employing these devices have achieved the lowest system noise for wavelengths greater than three millimeters with relatively modest cryogenic cooling requirements in a variety of ground and space based applications. System requirements which arise in employing such devices in imaging applications are contrasted with other leading coherent detector candidates at microwave wavelengths. Fundamental and practical limitations which arise in the context of microwave application of field effect devices at cryogenic temperatures will be discussed from a component and systems point of view.

  12. High-transconductance graphene solution-gated field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hess, L. H.; Hauf, M. V.; Seifert, M.; Speck, F.; Seyller, T.; Stutzmann, M.; Sharp, I. D.; Garrido, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    In this work, we report on the electronic properties of solution-gated field effect transistors (SGFETs) fabricated using large-area graphene. Devices prepared both with epitaxially grown graphene on SiC as well as with chemical vapor deposition grown graphene on Cu exhibit high transconductances, which are a consequence of the high mobility of charge carriers in graphene and the large capacitance at the graphene/water interface. The performance of graphene SGFETs, in terms of gate sensitivity, is compared to other SGFET technologies and found to be clearly superior, confirming the potential of graphene SGFETs for sensing applications in electrolytic environments.

  13. Ion-Sensitive Field-Effect Transistor for Biological Sensing

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Soo; Kim, Sang Kyu; Kim, Moonil

    2009-01-01

    In recent years there has been great progress in applying FET-type biosensors for highly sensitive biological detection. Among them, the ISFET (ion-sensitive field-effect transistor) is one of the most intriguing approaches in electrical biosensing technology. Here, we review some of the main advances in this field over the past few years, explore its application prospects, and discuss the main issues, approaches, and challenges, with the aim of stimulating a broader interest in developing ISFET-based biosensors and extending their applications for reliable and sensitive analysis of various biomolecules such as DNA, proteins, enzymes, and cells. PMID:22423205

  14. Graphene based field effect transistors: Efforts made towards flexible electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Bhupendra K.; Ahn, Jong-Hyun

    2013-11-01

    The integration of flexibility in existing electronics has been realized as a key point for practical application of unusual format electronics that can extend the application limit of biomedical equipments and of course daily routine kind of electronic devices. Graphene showed the great potentiality for flexible format owing to its excellent electronic, mechanical and optical properties. Field effect transistor (FET) is a basic unit for digital and analog electronics thus enormous efforts have been attempted to fabricate the flexible FETs in order to get the high performance. This article reviews the recent development of graphene based FETs including the fabrication and active layers material compatibility in flexible format.

  15. Application of nanoimprinting technology to organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Wei-Yang; Chang, Ming-Hua; Cheng, Horng-Long; Yu, Shih-Po; Lee, Yung-Chun; Chiu, Cheng-Yu; Lee, Chung-Yi; Shu, Dun-Ying

    2010-02-01

    The charge carrier transport efficiency and issues of patterning in organic semiconductors limit the potential range of microelectronic and optoelectronic applications of organic devices in nanoscale. We demonstrate high-performance organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) with a mobility of approximately 2.5 cm2/V s using nanogroove gate-dielectrics formed by nanoimprinting. The preferred flow of charge carriers in OFETs parallel to the nanogrooves yields a high mobility anisotropic ratio (above 220), providing a built-in autopattern organic semiconductor function with nanoscale resolution. This nanostructure embedded device has great potential for use in the manufacture and lithography-free patterning of organic semiconductor films in integrated circuits.

  16. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistor using gate insulator hysteresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizuno, Eriko; Taniguchi, Masateru; Kawai, Tomoji

    2005-04-01

    An organic field-effect transistor based on a copper-phthalocyanine and cyanoethylpullulan gate insulator showed ambipolar operation using gate insulator hysteresis, which appeared at less than 1mHz. The gate insulator possesses spontaneous polarization of 1.6μC/cm2 and a coercive electric field of 50kV/cm. After poling in an effort to obtain a large amount of accumulated charge, the field-effect mobilities of the hole and electron were 4.1×10-3 and 3.5×10-6cm2/Vs, respectively. The on/off ratio at VSG=±10V was 6×104 for the p type and 70 for the n type.

  17. High-performance carbon nanotube thin-film transistors on flexible paper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Na; Yun, Ki Nam; Yu, Hyun-Yong; Lee, Cheol Jin; Shim, Joon Hyung

    2015-03-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are promising materials as active channels for flexible transistors owing to their excellent electrical and mechanical properties. However, flexible SWCNT transistors have never been realized on paper substrates, which are widely used, inexpensive, and recyclable. In this study, we fabricated SWCNT thin-film transistors on photo paper substrates. The devices exhibited a high on/off current ratio of more than 10{sup 6} and a field-effect mobility of approximately 3 cm{sup 2}/V·s. The proof-of-concept demonstration indicates that SWCNT transistors on flexible paper substrates could be applied as low-cost and recyclable flexible electronics.

  18. Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor Differential Amplifier Circuit Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2008-01-01

    There has been considerable research investigating the Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor (FeFET) in memory circuits. However, very little research has been performed in applying the FeFET to analog circuits. This paper investigates the use of FeFETs in a common analog circuit, the differential amplifier. The two input Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (MOS) transistors in a general MOS differential amplifier circuit are replaced with FeFETs. Resistors are used in place of the other three MOS transistors. The FeFET model used in the analysis has been previously reported and was based on experimental device data. Because of the FeFET hysteresis, the FeFET differential amplifier has four different operating modes depending on whether the FeFETs are positively or negatively polarized. The FeFET differential amplifier operation in the different modes was analyzed by calculating the amplifier voltage transfer and gain characteristics shown in figures 2 through 5. Comparisons were made between the FeFET differential amplifier and the standard MOS differential amplifier. Possible applications and benefits of the FeFET differential amplifier are discussed.

  19. Infrared light gated MoS₂ field effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Fang, Huajing; Lin, Ziyuan; Wang, Xinsheng; Tang, Chun-Yin; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Fan; Chai, Yang; Li, Qiang; Yan, Qingfeng; Chan, H L W; Dai, Ji-Yan

    2015-12-14

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS₂) as a promising 2D material has attracted extensive attentions due to its unique physical, optical and electrical properties. In this work, we demonstrate an infrared (IR) light gated MoS₂ transistor through a device composed of MoS₂ monolayer and a ferroelectric single crystal Pb(Mg(1/3)Nb(2/3))O₃-PbTiO₃ (PMN-PT). With a monolayer MoS₂ onto the top surface of (111) PMN-PT crystal, the drain current of MoS₂ channel can be modulated with infrared illumination and this modulation process is reversible. Thus, the transistor can work as a new kind of IR photodetector with a high IR responsivity of 114%/Wcm⁻². The IR response of MoS₂ transistor is attributed to the polarization change of PMN-PT single crystal induced by the pyroelectric effect which results in a field effect. Our result promises the application of MoS₂ 2D material in infrared optoelectronic devices. Combining with the intrinsic photocurrent feature of MoS₂ in the visible range, the MoS₂ on ferroelectric single crystal may be sensitive to a broadband wavelength of light.

  20. Charge Transport in Hybrid Halide Perovskite Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jurchescu, Oana

    Hybrid organic-inorganic trihalide perovskite (HTP) materials exhibit a strong optical absorption, tunable band gap, long carrier lifetimes and fast charge carrier transport. These remarkable properties, coupled with their reduced complexity processing, make the HTPs promising contenders for large scale, low-cost thin film optoelectronic applications. But in spite of the remarkable demonstrations of high performance solar cells, light-emitting diodes and field-effect transistor devices, all of which took place in a very short time period, numerous questions related to the nature and dynamics of the charge carriers and their relation to device performance, stability and reliability still remain. This presentation describes the electrical properties of HTPs evaluated from field-effect transistor measurements. The electrostatic gating of provides an unique platform for the study of intrinsic charge transport in these materials, and, at the same time, expand the use of HTPs towards switching electronic devices, which have not been explored previously. We fabricated FETs on SiO2 and polymer dielectrics from spin coating, thermal evaporation and spray deposition and compare their properties. CH3NH3PbI3-xClx can reach balanced electron and hole mobilities of 10 cm2/Vs upon tuning the thin-film microstructure, injection and the defect density at the semiconductor/dielectric interface. The work was performed in collaboration with Yaochuan Mei (Wake Forest University), Chuang Zhang, and Z. Valy Vardeny (University of Utah). The work is supported by ONR Grant N00014-15-1-2943.

  1. Liquid Crystals for Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mary; Kelly, Stephen M.

    Columnar, smectic and lamellar polymeric liquid crystals are widely recognized as very promising charge-transporting organic semiconductors due to their ability to spontaneously self-assemble into highly ordered domains in uniform thin films over large areas. The transport properties of smectic and columnar liquid crystals are discussed in Chaps. 2 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_2) and 3 (10.1007/978-90-481-2873-0_3). Here we examine their application to organic field-effect transistors (OFETs): after a short introduction in Sect. 9.1 we introduce the OFET configuration and show how the mobility is measured in Sect. 9.2. Section 9.3 discusses polymeric liquid crystalline semiconductors in OFETs. We review research that shows that annealing of polymers in a fluid mesophase gives a more ordered microcrystalline morphology on cooling than that kinetically determined by solution processing of the thin film. We also demonstrate the benefits of monodomain alignment and show the application of liquid crystals in light-emitting field-effect transistors. Some columnar and smectic phases are highly ordered with short intermolecular separation to give large π-π coupling. We discuss their use in OFETs in Sects. 9.4, and 9.5 respectively. Section 9.6 summarises the conclusions of the chapter.

  2. Graphene field effect transistor without an energy gap

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Hyungjun; Son, Young-Woo; Atwater, Harry A.; Goddard, William A.

    2013-01-01

    Graphene is a room temperature ballistic electron conductor and also a very good thermal conductor. Thus, it has been regarded as an ideal material for postsilicon electronic applications. A major complication is that the relativistic massless electrons in pristine graphene exhibit unimpeded Klein tunneling penetration through gate potential barriers. Thus, previous efforts to realize a field effect transistor for logic applications have assumed that introduction of a band gap in graphene is a prerequisite. Unfortunately, extrinsic treatments designed to open a band gap seriously degrade device quality, yielding very low mobility and uncontrolled on/off current ratios. To solve this dilemma, we propose a gating mechanism that leads to a hundredfold enhancement in on/off transmittance ratio for normally incident electrons without any band gap engineering. Thus, our saw-shaped geometry gate potential (in place of the conventional bar-shaped geometry) leads to switching to an off state while retaining the ultrahigh electron mobility in the on state. In particular, we report that an on/off transmittance ratio of 130 is achievable for a sawtooth gate with a gate length of 80 nm. Our switching mechanism demonstrates that intrinsic graphene can be used in designing logic devices without serious alteration of the conventional field effect transistor architecture. This suggests a new variable for the optimization of the graphene-based device—geometry of the gate electrode. PMID:23671093

  3. Graphene field effect transistor without an energy gap.

    PubMed

    Jang, Min Seok; Kim, Hyungjun; Son, Young-Woo; Atwater, Harry A; Goddard, William A

    2013-05-28

    Graphene is a room temperature ballistic electron conductor and also a very good thermal conductor. Thus, it has been regarded as an ideal material for postsilicon electronic applications. A major complication is that the relativistic massless electrons in pristine graphene exhibit unimpeded Klein tunneling penetration through gate potential barriers. Thus, previous efforts to realize a field effect transistor for logic applications have assumed that introduction of a band gap in graphene is a prerequisite. Unfortunately, extrinsic treatments designed to open a band gap seriously degrade device quality, yielding very low mobility and uncontrolled on/off current ratios. To solve this dilemma, we propose a gating mechanism that leads to a hundredfold enhancement in on/off transmittance ratio for normally incident electrons without any band gap engineering. Thus, our saw-shaped geometry gate potential (in place of the conventional bar-shaped geometry) leads to switching to an off state while retaining the ultrahigh electron mobility in the on state. In particular, we report that an on/off transmittance ratio of 130 is achievable for a sawtooth gate with a gate length of 80 nm. Our switching mechanism demonstrates that intrinsic graphene can be used in designing logic devices without serious alteration of the conventional field effect transistor architecture. This suggests a new variable for the optimization of the graphene-based device--geometry of the gate electrode.

  4. Dielectric influence on IV curve of graphene field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shostachenko, Stanislav A.; Zakharchenko, Roman V.; Zebrev, Gennady I.; Stanishevskiy, Yaroslav M.; Kargin, Nikolay I.

    2016-12-01

    In this article, we have studied the influence of Si3N4 and SiO2 thin film gate dielectrics on the current-voltage characteristics of the graphene-based transistor. The test structure of graphene transistor was fabricated with the top and back gate. Graphene has been produced by chemical vapor deposition, and then transferred to the silicon dioxide on a silicon wafer. The channel of the transistor has been formed by etching in oxygen plasma through a photolithographic mask. Metals electrodes of the drain, source, and gate were deposited by resistive evaporation in a vacuum. It was used titanium / aluminum with a thickness of 50/200 nm. In the case of the back gate, silicon dioxide was used, obtained by thermal oxidation of the silicon substrate. For top gate was used silicon nitride deposited by plasma chemical deposition. It was demonstrated that field effect is more pronounced for the case of SiO2 back gate compare to the Si3N4 top gate. For the SiO2 back gate we have observed that the source- drain current decreases, from 2 mA to 3 mA, with increasing the gate voltage, from 0 to 40 V, at constant source-drain voltage, 2 V. In case of Si3N4 top gate the modulation of source-drain current was not significant for the comparable electric field strength. Based on the value of gate voltage for current minima in transfer function the poor quality of Si3N4 -graphene interface is concluded.

  5. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; Wishart, James F.; Hao, Yufeng; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2016-10-01

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. Here, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. We believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.

  6. Gas Sensors Based on Polymer Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Aifeng; Pan, Yong; Chi, Lifeng

    2017-01-01

    This review focuses on polymer field-effect transistor (PFET) based gas sensor with polymer as the sensing layer, which interacts with gas analyte and thus induces the change of source-drain current (ΔISD). Dependent on the sensing layer which can be semiconducting polymer, dielectric layer or conducting polymer gate, the PFET sensors can be subdivided into three types. For each type of sensor, we present the molecular structure of sensing polymer, the gas analyte and the sensing performance. Most importantly, we summarize various analyte–polymer interactions, which help to understand the sensing mechanism in the PFET sensors and can provide possible approaches for the sensor fabrication in the future. PMID:28117760

  7. Encapsulated graphene field-effect transistors for air stable operation

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos Kymissis, Ioannis; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James

    2015-03-16

    In this work, we report the fabrication of encapsulated graphene field effects transistors (GFETs) with excellent air stability operation in ambient environment. Graphene's 2D nature makes its electronics properties very sensitive to the surrounding environment, and thus, non-encapsulated graphene devices show extensive vulnerability due to unintentional hole doping from the presence of water molecules and oxygen limiting their performance and use in real world applications. Encapsulating GFETs with a thin layer of parylene-C and aluminum deposited on top of the exposed graphene channel area resulted in devices with excellent electrical performance stability for an extended period of time. Moisture penetration is reduced significantly and carrier mobility degraded substantially less when compared to non-encapsulated control devices. Our CMOS compatible encapsulation method minimizes the problems of environmental doping and lifetime performance degradation, enabling the operation of air stable devices for next generation graphene-based electronics.

  8. Electrospun Polyaniline/Polyethylene Oxide Nanofiber Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinto, N. J.; Johnson, A. T.; MacDiarmid, A. G.; Mueller, C. H.; Theofylaktos, N.; Robinson, D. C.; Miranda, F. A.

    2003-01-01

    We report on the observation of field effect transistor (FET) behavior in electrospun camphorsulfonic acid doped polyaniline(PANi)/polyethylene oxide(PE0) nanofibers. Saturation channel currents are observed at surprisingly low source/drain voltages. The hole mobility in the depletion regime is 1.4 x 10(exp -4) sq cm/V s while the 1-D charge density (at zero gate bias) is calculated to be approximately 1 hole per 50 two-ring repeat units of polyaniline, consistent with the rather high channel conductivity (approx. 10(exp -3) S/cm). Reducing or eliminating the PEO content in the fiber is expected to enhance device parameters. Electrospinning is thus proposed as a simple method of fabricating 1-D polymer FET's.

  9. Field-Effect Tunneling Transistor Based on Vertical Graphene Heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Britnell, L.; Gorbachev, R. V.; Jalil, R.; Belle, B. D.; Schedin, F.; Mishchenko, A.; Georgiou, T.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Eaves, L.; Morozov, S. V.; Peres, N. M. R.; Leist, J.; Geim, A. K.; Novoselov, K. S.; Ponomarenko, L. A.

    2012-02-01

    An obstacle to the use of graphene as an alternative to silicon electronics has been the absence of an energy gap between its conduction and valence bands, which makes it difficult to achieve low power dissipation in the OFF state. We report a bipolar field-effect transistor that exploits the low density of states in graphene and its one-atomic-layer thickness. Our prototype devices are graphene heterostructures with atomically thin boron nitride or molybdenum disulfide acting as a vertical transport barrier. They exhibit room-temperature switching ratios of ≈50 and ≈10,000, respectively. Such devices have potential for high-frequency operation and large-scale integration.

  10. Modeling of Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duen Ho, Fat; Macleod, Todd C.

    1998-01-01

    The characteristics for a MFSFET (metal-ferroelectric-semiconductor field effect transistor) is very different than a conventional MOSFET and must be modeled differently. The drain current has a hysteresis shape with respect to the gate voltage. The position along the hysteresis curve is dependent on the last positive or negative polling of the ferroelectric material. The drain current also has a logarithmic decay after the last polling. A model has been developed to describe the MFSFET drain current for both gate voltage on and gate voltage off conditions. This model takes into account the hysteresis nature of the MFSFET and the time dependent decay. The model is based on the shape of the Fermi-Dirac function which has been modified to describe the MFSFET's drain current. This is different from the model proposed by Chen et. al. and that by Wu.

  11. Gas Sensors Based on Polymer Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Lv, Aifeng; Pan, Yong; Chi, Lifeng

    2017-01-22

    This review focuses on polymer field-effect transistor (PFET) based gas sensor with polymer as the sensing layer, which interacts with gas analyte and thus induces the change of source-drain current (ΔISD). Dependent on the sensing layer which can be semiconducting polymer, dielectric layer or conducting polymer gate, the PFET sensors can be subdivided into three types. For each type of sensor, we present the molecular structure of sensing polymer, the gas analyte and the sensing performance. Most importantly, we summarize various analyte-polymer interactions, which help to understand the sensing mechanism in the PFET sensors and can provide possible approaches for the sensor fabrication in the future.

  12. Field-effect tunneling transistor based on vertical graphene heterostructures.

    PubMed

    Britnell, L; Gorbachev, R V; Jalil, R; Belle, B D; Schedin, F; Mishchenko, A; Georgiou, T; Katsnelson, M I; Eaves, L; Morozov, S V; Peres, N M R; Leist, J; Geim, A K; Novoselov, K S; Ponomarenko, L A

    2012-02-24

    An obstacle to the use of graphene as an alternative to silicon electronics has been the absence of an energy gap between its conduction and valence bands, which makes it difficult to achieve low power dissipation in the OFF state. We report a bipolar field-effect transistor that exploits the low density of states in graphene and its one-atomic-layer thickness. Our prototype devices are graphene heterostructures with atomically thin boron nitride or molybdenum disulfide acting as a vertical transport barrier. They exhibit room-temperature switching ratios of ≈50 and ≈10,000, respectively. Such devices have potential for high-frequency operation and large-scale integration.

  13. Bias temperature instability in tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mizubayashi, Wataru; Mori, Takahiro; Fukuda, Koichi; Ishikawa, Yuki; Morita, Yukinori; Migita, Shinji; Ota, Hiroyuki; Liu, Yongxun; O’uchi, Shinichi; Tsukada, Junichi; Yamauchi, Hiromi; Matsukawa, Takashi; Masahara, Meishoku; Endo, Kazuhiko

    2017-04-01

    We systematically investigated the bias temperature instability (BTI) of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). The positive BTI and negative BTI mechanisms in TFETs are the same as those in metal–oxide–semiconductor FETs (MOSFETs). In TFETs, although traps are generated in high-k gate dielectrics by the bias stress and/or the interface state is degraded at the interfacial layer/channel interface, the threshold voltage (V th) shift due to BTI degradation is caused by the traps and/or the degradation of the interface state locating the band-to-band tunneling (BTBT) region near the source/gate edge. The BTI lifetime in n- and p-type TFETs is improved by applying a drain bias corresponding to the operation conditions.

  14. Semianalytical quantum model for graphene field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Pugnaghi, Claudio; Grassi, Roberto Gnudi, Antonio; Di Lecce, Valerio; Gnani, Elena; Reggiani, Susanna; Baccarani, Giorgio

    2014-09-21

    We develop a semianalytical model for monolayer graphene field-effect transistors in the ballistic limit. Two types of devices are considered: in the first device, the source and drain regions are doped by charge transfer with Schottky contacts, while, in the second device, the source and drain regions are doped electrostatically by a back gate. The model captures two important effects that influence the operation of both devices: (i) the finite density of states in the source and drain regions, which limits the number of states available for transport and can be responsible for negative output differential resistance effects, and (ii) quantum tunneling across the potential steps at the source-channel and drain-channel interfaces. By comparison with a self-consistent non-equilibrium Green's function solver, we show that our model provides very accurate results for both types of devices, in the bias region of quasi-saturation as well as in that of negative differential resistance.

  15. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; ...

    2016-10-11

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally,more » we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.« less

  16. Improving the radiation hardness of graphene field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Konstantinos; Masurkar, Amrita; Edrees, Hassan; Wishart, James F.; Hao, Yufeng; Petrone, Nicholas; Hone, James; Kymissis, Ioannis

    2016-10-11

    Ionizing radiation poses a significant challenge to the operation and reliability of conventional silicon-based devices. In this paper, we report the effects of gamma radiation on graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs), along with a method to mitigate those effects by developing a radiation-hardened version of our back-gated GFETs. We demonstrate that activated atmospheric oxygen from the gamma ray interaction with air damages the semiconductor device, and damage to the substrate contributes additional threshold voltage instability. Our radiation-hardened devices, which have protection against these two effects, exhibit minimal performance degradation, improved stability, and significantly reduced hysteresis after prolonged gamma radiation exposure. Finally, we believe this work provides an insight into graphene's interactions with ionizing radiation that could enable future graphene-based electronic devices to be used for space, military, and other radiation-sensitive applications.

  17. The fundamental downscaling limit of field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Mamaluy, Denis Gao, Xujiao

    2015-05-11

    We predict that within next 15 years a fundamental down-scaling limit for CMOS technology and other Field-Effect Transistors (FETs) will be reached. Specifically, we show that at room temperatures all FETs, irrespective of their channel material, will start experiencing unacceptable level of thermally induced errors around 5-nm gate lengths. These findings were confirmed by performing quantum mechanical transport simulations for a variety of 6-, 5-, and 4-nm gate length Si devices, optimized to satisfy high-performance logic specifications by ITRS. Different channel materials and wafer/channel orientations have also been studied; it is found that altering channel-source-drain materials achieves only insignificant increase in switching energy, which overall cannot sufficiently delay the approaching downscaling limit. Alternative possibilities are discussed to continue the increase of logic element densities for room temperature operation below the said limit.

  18. Nano-textured high sensitivity ion sensitive field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Hajmirzaheydarali, M.; Sadeghipari, M.; Akbari, M.; Shahsafi, A.; Mohajerzadeh, S.

    2016-02-07

    Nano-textured gate engineered ion sensitive field effect transistors (ISFETs), suitable for high sensitivity pH sensors, have been realized. Utilizing a mask-less deep reactive ion etching results in ultra-fine poly-Si features on the gate of ISFET devices where spacing of the order of 10 nm and less is achieved. Incorporation of these nano-sized features on the gate is responsible for high sensitivities up to 400 mV/pH in contrast to conventional planar structures. The fabrication process for this transistor is inexpensive, and it is fully compatible with standard complementary metal oxide semiconductor fabrication procedure. A theoretical modeling has also been presented to predict the extension of the diffuse layer into the electrolyte solution for highly featured structures and to correlate this extension with the high sensitivity of the device. The observed ultra-fine features by means of scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy tools corroborate the theoretical prediction.

  19. Electronic Model of a Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen; Russell, Larry (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    A pair of electronic models has been developed of a Ferroelectric Field Effect transistor. These models can be used in standard electrical circuit simulation programs to simulate the main characteristics of the FFET. The models use the Schmitt trigger circuit as a basis for their design. One model uses bipolar junction transistors and one uses MOSFET's. Each model has the main characteristics of the FFET, which are the current hysterisis with different gate voltages and decay of the drain current when the gate voltage is off. The drain current from each model has similar values to an actual FFET that was measured experimentally. T'he input and o Output resistance in the models are also similar to that of the FFET. The models are valid for all frequencies below RF levels. No attempt was made to model the high frequency characteristics of the FFET. Each model can be used to design circuits using FFET's with standard electrical simulation packages. These circuits can be used in designing non-volatile memory circuits and logic circuits and is compatible with all SPICE based circuit analysis programs. The models consist of only standard electrical components, such as BJT's, MOSFET's, diodes, resistors, and capacitors. Each model is compared to the experimental data measured from an actual FFET.

  20. Sensing at the Surface of Graphene Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wangyang; Jiang, Lin; van Geest, Erik P; Lima, Lia M C; Schneider, Grégory F

    2017-02-01

    Recent research trends now offer new opportunities for developing the next generations of label-free biochemical sensors using graphene and other two-dimensional materials. While the physics of graphene transistors operated in electrolyte is well grounded, important chemical challenges still remain to be addressed, namely the impact of the chemical functionalizations of graphene on the key electrical parameters and the sensing performances. In fact, graphene - at least ideal graphene - is highly chemically inert. The functionalizations and chemical alterations of the graphene surface - both covalently and non-covalently - are crucial steps that define the sensitivity of graphene. The presence, reactivity, adsorption of gas and ions, proteins, DNA, cells and tissues on graphene have been successfully monitored with graphene. This review aims to unify most of the work done so far on biochemical sensing at the surface of a (chemically functionalized) graphene field-effect transistor and the challenges that lie ahead. The authors are convinced that graphene biochemical sensors hold great promise to meet the ever-increasing demand for sensitivity, especially looking at the recent progresses suggesting that the obstacle of Debye screening can be overcome.

  1. Silicon junctionless field effect transistors as room temperature terahertz detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Marczewski, J. Tomaszewski, D.; Zaborowski, M.; Zagrajek, P.

    2015-09-14

    Terahertz (THz) radiation detection by junctionless metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (JL MOSFETs) was studied and compared with THz detection using conventional MOSFETs. It has been shown that in contrast to the behavior of standard transistors, the junctionless devices have a significant responsivity also in the open channel (low resistance) state. The responsivity for a photolithographically defined JL FET was 70 V/W and the noise equivalent power 460 pW/√Hz. Working in the open channel state may be advantageous for THz wireless and imaging applications because of its low thermal noise and possible high operating speed or large bandwidth. It has been proven that the junctionless MOSFETs can also operate in a zero gate bias mode, which enables simplification of the THz array circuitry. Existing models of THz detection by MOSFETs were considered and it has been demonstrated that the process of detection by these junctionless devices cannot be explained within the framework of the commonly accepted models and therefore requires a new theoretical approach.

  2. Slowing DNA Translocation in a Nanofluidic Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yifan; Yobas, Levent

    2016-04-26

    Here, we present an experimental demonstration of slowing DNA translocation across a nanochannel by modulating the channel surface charge through an externally applied gate bias. The experiments were performed on a nanofluidic field-effect transistor, which is a monolithic integrated platform featuring a 50 nm-diameter in-plane alumina nanocapillary whose entire length is surrounded by a gate electrode. The field-effect transistor behavior was validated on the gating of ionic conductance and protein transport. The gating of DNA translocation was subsequently studied by measuring discrete current dips associated with single λ-DNA translocation events under a source-to-drain bias of 1 V. The translocation speeds under various gate bias conditions were extracted by fitting event histograms of the measured translocation time to the first passage time distributions obtained from a simple 1D biased diffusion model. A positive gate bias was observed to slow the translocation of single λ-DNA chains markedly; the translocation speed was reduced by an order of magnitude from 18.4 mm/s obtained under a floating gate down to 1.33 mm/s under a positive gate bias of 9 V. Therefore, a dynamic and flexible regulation of the DNA translocation speed, which is vital for single-molecule sequencing, can be achieved on this device by simply tuning the gate bias. The device is realized in a conventional semiconductor microfabrication process without the requirement of advanced lithography, and can be potentially further developed into a compact electronic single-molecule sequencer.

  3. Biologically sensitive field-effect transistors: from ISFETs to NanoFETs

    PubMed Central

    Pachauri, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Biologically sensitive field-effect transistors (BioFETs) are one of the most abundant classes of electronic sensors for biomolecular detection. Most of the time these sensors are realized as classical ion-sensitive field-effect transistors (ISFETs) having non-metallized gate dielectrics facing an electrolyte solution. In ISFETs, a semiconductor material is used as the active transducer element covered by a gate dielectric layer which is electronically sensitive to the (bio-)chemical changes that occur on its surface. This review will provide a brief overview of the history of ISFET biosensors with general operation concepts and sensing mechanisms. We also discuss silicon nanowire-based ISFETs (SiNW FETs) as the modern nanoscale version of classical ISFETs, as well as strategies to functionalize them with biologically sensitive layers. We include in our discussion other ISFET types based on nanomaterials such as carbon nanotubes, metal oxides and so on. The latest examples of highly sensitive label-free detection of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) molecules using SiNW FETs and single-cell recordings for drug screening and other applications of ISFETs will be highlighted. Finally, we suggest new device platforms and newly developed, miniaturized read-out tools with multichannel potentiometric and impedimetric measurement capabilities for future biomedical applications. PMID:27365038

  4. Gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Feng, Ping; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-09-17

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In these sensors, a third electrode, which serves as the gate, is used to tune the carrier concentration of the nanowires to realize better sensing performance, including sensitivity, selectivity and response time, etc. The FET parameters can be modulated by the presence of the target gases and their change relate closely to the type and concentration of the gas molecules. In addition, extra controls such as metal decoration, local heating and light irradiation can be combined with the gate electrode to tune the nanowire channel and realize more effective gas sensing. With the help of micro-fabrication techniques, these sensors can be integrated into smart systems. Finally, some challenges for the future investigation and application of nanowire field-effect gas sensors are discussed.

  5. Gas Sensors Based on Semiconducting Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Ping; Shao, Feng; Shi, Yi; Wan, Qing

    2014-01-01

    One-dimensional semiconductor nanostructures are unique sensing materials for the fabrication of gas sensors. In this article, gas sensors based on semiconducting nanowire field-effect transistors (FETs) are comprehensively reviewed. Individual nanowires or nanowire network films are usually used as the active detecting channels. In these sensors, a third electrode, which serves as the gate, is used to tune the carrier concentration of the nanowires to realize better sensing performance, including sensitivity, selectivity and response time, etc. The FET parameters can be modulated by the presence of the target gases and their change relate closely to the type and concentration of the gas molecules. In addition, extra controls such as metal decoration, local heating and light irradiation can be combined with the gate electrode to tune the nanowire channel and realize more effective gas sensing. With the help of micro-fabrication techniques, these sensors can be integrated into smart systems. Finally, some challenges for the future investigation and application of nanowire field-effect gas sensors are discussed. PMID:25232915

  6. Polymer electrolyte enhanced performance in graphene nanoribbon field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ling, Cheng; Lin, Ming-Wei; Zhang, Yiyang; Tan, Xuebin; Cheng, Mark Ming-Cheng; Zhou, Zhixian

    2011-03-01

    Graphene nanoribbon Field-effect transistors were fabricated from unzipped multiwall carbon nanotubes on Si/SiO2 substrate by standard electron beam lithography and metal deposition. A small drop of polymer electrolyte consisting of poly(ethylene oxide) and lithium perchlorate was applied to the graphene nanoribbon devices. Electrical transport properties of the polymer electrolyte covered devices were measured using both the Si-back-gate and polymer-electrolyte-gate configurations. We observed dramatic increase of carrier mobility, significant reduction of the peak-width of the resistance as a function of the back-gate voltage, and the shift of the charge neutrality point toward zero gate-voltage in polymer electrolyte covered graphene nanoribbon devices. These experimental results will be presented and discussed in the context of ionic and dielectric screening of charged impurities on or near the graphene nanoribbons. ZZ acknowledges the support of the WSU new faculty startup funds.

  7. Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors by Timothy E. Griffin ARL-TR-4475 May 2008...Development of Gate and Base Drive Using SiC Junction Field Effect Transistors Timothy E. Griffin Sensors and Electron Devices...Effect Transistors 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Timothy E. Griffin 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER

  8. Interfacial fields in organic field-effect transistors and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawidczyk, Thomas J.

    Organic electronics are currently being commercialized and present a viable alternative to conventional electronics. These organic materials offer the ability to chemically manipulate the molecule, allowing for more facile mass processing techniques, which in turn reduces the cost. One application where organic semiconductors (OSCs) are being investigated is sensors. This work evaluates an assortment of n- and p-channel semiconductors as organic field-effect transistor (OFET) sensors. The sensor responses to dinitrotoluene (DNT) vapor and solid along with trinitrotoluene (TNT) solid were studied. Different semiconductor materials give different magnitude and direction of electrical current response upon exposure to DNT. Additional OFET parameters---mobility and threshold voltage---further refine the response to the DNT with each OFET sensor requiring a certain gate voltage for an optimized response to the vapor. The pattern of responses has sufficient diversity to distinguish DNT from other vapors. To effectively use these OFET sensors in a circuit, the threshold voltage needs to be tuned for each transistor to increase the efficiency of the circuit and maximize the sensor response. The threshold voltage can be altered by embedding charges into the dielectric layer of the OFET. To study the quantity and energy of charges needed to alter the threshold voltage, charge carriers were injected into polystyrene (PS) and investigated with scanning Kelvin probe microscopy (SKPM) and thermally stimulated discharge current (TSDC). Lateral heterojunctions of pentacene/PS were scanned using SKPM, effectively observing polarization along a side view of a lateral nonvolatile organic field-effect transistor dielectric interface. TSDC was used to observe charge migration out of PS films and to estimate the trap energy level inside the PS, using the initial rise method. The process was further refined to create lateral heterojunctions that were actual working OFETs, consisting of a

  9. Plasmonic response of partially gated field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudin, S.; Rupper, G.; Reed, M. L.; Shur, M.

    2016-09-01

    Electron density oscillations in the transistor channels - plasma waves in the two-dimensional electron gas - determine the high frequency device response. Plasmonic field effect transistors have emerged as very sensitive, tunable, and extremely fast detectors of THz radiation. They have been implemented using silicon (CMOS), AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, and AlGaAs/InGaAs HEMTs, with the HEMTs shown to operate more efficiently at higher THz frequencies. These HEMTs have both gated and ungated sections of the device channel between the source and drain, and the photovoltaic regime of operation requires an asymmetric gate placement in the device channel. The interactions of the plasma waves in the gated and ungated channel regions strongly affect the overall response and have been investigated in numerous publications. This work addresses a new aspect of such interaction - the effect of the relative position of the gated and ungated section. We show this previously unexplored effect plays a dominant role in determining the response. The results of the numerical simulation based on the solution of the complete system of the hydrodynamic equations describing the electron fluid in the device channel show that the inverse response frequency could be approximated by the sum of the gated plasmon transit time in the gated section of the device, the ungated plasmon transit time in the ungated section of the device between the gate and the drain, and the RC gate-to-source constant. Here R and C are the resistance and capacitance of the gate to source section. Hence, the highest speed is achieved when the gate is as close to the source as possible. This suggests a novel plasmonic detector design, where the gate and source electrode overlap, which is shown to have a superior frequency response for the same distance between the source and the drain.

  10. Stretchable transistors with buckled carbon nanotube films as conducting channels

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Michael S; Xu, Feng

    2015-03-24

    Thin-film transistors comprising buckled films comprising carbon nanotubes as the conductive channel are provided. Also provided are methods of fabricating the transistors. The transistors, which are highly stretchable and bendable, exhibit stable performance even when operated under high tensile strains.

  11. SiC Optically Modulated Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tabib-Azar, Massood

    2009-01-01

    An optically modulated field-effect transistor (OFET) based on a silicon carbide junction field-effect transistor (JFET) is under study as, potentially, a prototype of devices that could be useful for detecting ultraviolet light. The SiC OFET is an experimental device that is one of several devices, including commercial and experimental photodiodes, that were initially evaluated as detectors of ultraviolet light from combustion and that could be incorporated into SiC integrated circuits to be designed to function as combustion sensors. The ultraviolet-detection sensitivity of the photodiodes was found to be less than desired, such that it would be necessary to process their outputs using high-gain amplification circuitry. On the other hand, in principle, the function of the OFET could be characterized as a combination of detection and amplification. In effect, its sensitivity could be considerably greater than that of a photodiode, such that the need for amplification external to the photodetector could be reduced or eliminated. The experimental SiC OFET was made by processes similar to JFET-fabrication processes developed at Glenn Research Center. The gate of the OFET is very long, wide, and thin, relative to the gates of typical prior SiC JFETs. Unlike in prior SiC FETs, the gate is almost completely transparent to near-ultraviolet and visible light. More specifically: The OFET includes a p+ gate layer less than 1/4 m thick, through which photons can be transported efficiently to the p+/p body interface. The gate is relatively long and wide (about 0.5 by 0.5 mm), such that holes generated at the body interface form a depletion layer that modulates the conductivity of the channel between the drain and the source. The exact physical mechanism of modulation of conductivity is a subject of continuing research. It is known that injection of minority charge carriers (in this case, holes) at the interface exerts a strong effect on the channel, resulting in amplification

  12. Nanowire Tunnel Field Effect Transistors: Prospects and Pitfalls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sylvia, Somaia Sarwat

    The tunnel field effect transistor (TFET) has the potential to operate at lower voltages and lower power than the field effect transistor (FET). The TFET can circumvent the fundamental thermal limit of the inverse subthreshold slope (S) by exploiting interband tunneling of non-equilibrium "cold" carriers. The conduction mechanism in the TFET is governed by band-to-band tunneling which limits the drive current. TFETs built with III-V materials like InAs and InSb can produce enough tunneling current because of their small direct bandgap. Our simulation results show that although they require highly degenerate source doping to support the high electric fields in the tunnel region, the devices achieve minimum inverse subthreshold slopes of 30 mV/dec. In subthreshold, these devices experience both regimes of voltage-controlled tunneling and cold-carrier injection. Numerical results based on a discretized 8-band k.p model are compared to analytical WKB theory. For both regular FETs and TFETs, direct channel tunneling dominates the leakage current when the physical gate length is reduced to 5 nm. Therefore, a survey of materials is performed to determine their ability to suppress the direct tunnel current through a 5 nm barrier. The tunneling effective mass gives the best indication of the relative size of the tunnel currents. Si gives the lowest overall tunnel current for both the conduction and valence band and, therefore, it is the optimum choice for suppressing tunnel current at the 5 nm scale. Our numerical simulation shows that the finite number, random placement, and discrete nature of the dopants in the source of an InAs nanowire (NW) TFET affect both the mean value and the variance of the drive current and the inverse subthreshold slope. The discrete doping model gives an average drive current and an inverse subthreshold slope that are less than those predicted from the homogeneous doping model. The doping density required to achieve a target drive current is

  13. Velocity-Modulation Transistor (VMT) —A New Field-Effect Transistor Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakaki, Hiroyuki

    1982-06-01

    Field-effect transistors of a completely new category are proposed and analysed, in which the conductivity modulation \\varDelta G by the gate voltage Vg is brought forth mainly through the Vg-dependence of electron mobility. Since the sheet concentration of electrons in such FETs need not be modulated, the switching speed of the device is expected to be free from the transit time limitation, reaching the range of subpicosecond. As a specific example, an FET with a dual-channel configuration is discussed.

  14. A silicon carbide nanowire field effect transistor for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Fradetal, L; Bano, E; Attolini, G; Rossi, F; Stambouli, V

    2016-06-10

    This work reports on the label-free electrical detection of DNA molecules for the first time, using silicon carbide (SiC) as a novel material for the realization of nanowire field effect transistors (NWFETs). SiC is a promising semiconductor for this application due to its specific characteristics such as chemical inertness and biocompatibility. Non-intentionally n-doped SiC NWs are first grown using a bottom-up vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism, leading to the NWs exhibiting needle-shaped morphology, with a length of approximately 2 μm and a diameter ranging from 25 to 60 nm. Then, the SiC NWFETs are fabricated and functionalized with DNA molecule probes via covalent coupling using an amino-terminated organosilane. The drain current versus drain voltage (I d-V d) characteristics obtained after the DNA grafting and hybridization are reported from the comparative and simultaneous measurements carried out on the SiC NWFETs, used either as sensors or references. As a representative result, the current of the sensor is lowered by 22% after probe DNA grafting and by 7% after target DNA hybridization, while the current of the reference does not vary by more than ±0.6%. The current decrease confirms the field effect induced by the negative charges of the DNA molecules. Moreover, the selectivity, reproducibility, reversibility and stability of the studied devices are emphasized by de-hybridization, non-complementary hybridization and re-hybridization experiments. This first proof of concept opens the way for future developments using SiC-NW-based sensors.

  15. Vertical Microcavity Organic Light-emitting Field-effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yongsheng; Lin, Jie; Song, Li; Lu, Qipeng; Zhu, Wanbin; Liu, Xingyuan

    2016-01-01

    Organic light-emitting field-effect transistors (OLEFETs) are regarded as a novel kind of device architecture for fulfilling electrical-pumped organic lasers. However, the realization of OLEFETs with high external quantum efficiency (EQE) and high brightness simultaneously is still a tough task. Moreover, the design of the resonator structure in LED is far from satisfactory. Here, OLEFETs with EQE of 1.5% at the brightness of 2600 cdm−2, and the corresponding ON/OFF ratio and current efficiency reaches above 104 and 3.1 cdA−1, respectively, were achieved by introducing 1,4,5,8,9,12-hexaazatriphenylene-hexacarbonitrile (HAT-CN) as a charge generation layer. Moreover, a vertical microcavity based on distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) and Ag source/drain electrodes is successfully introduced into the high performance OLEFETs, which results in electroluminescent spectrum linewidth narrowing from 96 nm to 6.9 nm. The results manifest the superiority of the vertical microcavity as an optical resonator in OLEFETs, which sheds some light on achieving the electrically pumped organic lasers. PMID:26986944

  16. Ambipolar organic field-effect transistors on unconventional substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cosseddu, P.; Mattana, G.; Orgiu, E.; Bonfiglio, A.

    2009-04-01

    In this paper we report on the realization of flexible all-organic ambipolar field-effect transistors (FETs) realized on unconventional substrates, such as plastic films and textile yarns. A double layer pentacene-C60 heterojunction was used as the semiconductor layer. The contacts were made with poly(ethylenedioxythiophene)/poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and patterned by means of soft lithography microcontact printing (μCP). Very interestingly growing C60 on a predeposited pentacene buffer layer leads to a clear improvement in the morphology and crystallinity of the film so it obtains n-type conduction despite the very high electron injection barrier at the interface between PEDOT:PSS and C60. As a result, it was possible to obtain all-organic ambipolar FETs and to optimize their electrical properties by tuning the thicknesses of the two employed active layers. Moreover, it will be shown that modifying the triple interface between dielectric/semiconductor/electrodes is a crucial point for optimizing and balancing injection and transport of both kinds of charge carriers. In particular, we demonstrate that using a middle contact configuration in which source and drain electrodes are sandwiched between pentacene and C60 layers allows significantly improving the electrical performance in planar ambipolar devices. These findings are very important because they pave the way for the realization of low-cost, fully flexible and stretchable organic complementary circuits for smart wearable and textile electronics applications.

  17. Demonstration of Complementary Ternary Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, So-Young; Noh, Jinwoo; Shim, Chang Hoo; Jung, Ukjin; Lee, Sang Kyung; Chang, Kyoung Eun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2016-01-01

    Strong demand for power reduction in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices calls for novel devices and architectures. Since ternary logic architecture can perform the same function as binary logic architecture with a much lower device density and higher information density, a switch device suitable for the ternary logic has been pursued for several decades. However, a single device that satisfies all the requirements for ternary logic architecture has not been demonstrated. We demonstrated a ternary graphene field-effect transistor (TGFET), showing three discrete current states in one device. The ternary function was achieved by introducing a metal strip to the middle of graphene channel, which created an N-P-N or P-N-P doping pattern depending on the work function of the metal. In addition, a standard ternary inverter working at room temperature has been achieved by modulating the work function of the metal in a graphene channel. The feasibility of a ternary inverter indicates that a general ternary logic architecture can be realized using complementary TGFETs. This breakthrough will provide a key stepping-stone for an extreme-low-power computing technology. PMID:27991594

  18. Epitaxially-Grown GaN Junction Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Baca, A.G.; Chang, P.C.; Denbaars, S.P.; Lester, L.F.; Mishra, U.K.; Shul, R.J.; Willison, C.G.; Zhang, L.; Zolper, J.C.

    1999-05-19

    Junction field effect transistors (JFET) are fabricated on a GaN epitaxial structure grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The DC and microwave characteristics of the device are presented. A junction breakdown voltage of 56 V is obtained corresponding to the theoretical limit of the breakdown field in GaN for the doping levels used. A maximum extrinsic transconductance (gm) of 48 mS/mm and a maximum source-drain current of 270 mA/mm are achieved on a 0.8 µ m gate JFET device at VGS= 1 V and VDS=15 V. The intrinsic transconductance, calculated from the measured gm and the source series resistance, is 81 mS/mm. The fT and fmax for these devices are 6 GHz and 12 GHz, respectively. These JFETs exhibit a significant current reduction after a high drain bias is applied, which is attributed to a partially depleted channel caused by trapped hot-electrons in the semi-insulating GaN buffer layer. A theoretical model describing the current collapse is described, and an estimate for the length of the trapped electron region is given.

  19. Bioinspired peptide nanostructures for organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Cipriano, Thiago; Knotts, Grant; Laudari, Amrit; Bianchi, Roberta C; Alves, Wendel A; Guha, Suchismita

    2014-12-10

    Peptide-based nanostructures derived from natural amino acids are superior building blocks for biocompatible devices as they can be used in a bottom-up process without the need for expensive lithography. A dense nanostructured network of l,l-diphenylalanine (FF) was synthesized using the solid-vapor-phase technique. Formation of the nanostructures and structure-phase relationship were investigated by electron microscopy and Raman scattering. Thin films of l,l-diphenylalanine micro/nanostructures (FF-MNSs) were used as the dielectric layer in pentacene-based field-effect transistors (FETs) and metal-insulator-semiconductor diodes both in bottom-gate and in top-gate structures. Bias stress studies show that FF-MNS-based pentacene FETs are more resistant to degradation than pentacene FETs using FF thin film (without any nanostructures) as the dielectric layer when both are subjected to sustained electric fields. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the FF-MNSs can be functionalized for detection of enzyme-analyte interactions. This work opens up a novel and facile route toward scalable organic electronics using peptide nanostructures as scaffolding and as a platform for biosensing.

  20. Demonstration of Complementary Ternary Graphene Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yun Ji; Kim, So-Young; Noh, Jinwoo; Shim, Chang Hoo; Jung, Ukjin; Lee, Sang Kyung; Chang, Kyoung Eun; Cho, Chunhum; Lee, Byoung Hun

    2016-12-19

    Strong demand for power reduction in state-of-the-art semiconductor devices calls for novel devices and architectures. Since ternary logic architecture can perform the same function as binary logic architecture with a much lower device density and higher information density, a switch device suitable for the ternary logic has been pursued for several decades. However, a single device that satisfies all the requirements for ternary logic architecture has not been demonstrated. We demonstrated a ternary graphene field-effect transistor (TGFET), showing three discrete current states in one device. The ternary function was achieved by introducing a metal strip to the middle of graphene channel, which created an N-P-N or P-N-P doping pattern depending on the work function of the metal. In addition, a standard ternary inverter working at room temperature has been achieved by modulating the work function of the metal in a graphene channel. The feasibility of a ternary inverter indicates that a general ternary logic architecture can be realized using complementary TGFETs. This breakthrough will provide a key stepping-stone for an extreme-low-power computing technology.

  1. Understanding charge transport in organometal halide field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P.; Yang, Bingyan; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard, Prof. _., Sir; Sirrnighaus, Henning, , Prof.

    Organometal halide based perovskite are emerging materials for wide range of electronic applications. A range of optoelectronic applications like high efficiency solar cells, color pure LEDs and optical pumped lasers have been demonstrated. Here, we report the demonstration of a high performance field effect transistor fabricated from iodide perovskite material at room temperature. The devices exhibit clean saturation behavior with electron μFET >3 cm2V-1s-1 and current modulation in the range of 106 - 107 which are till date the best performance achieved with these class of materials. This high performance is attributed to a combination of novel film fabrication technique and device engineering strategies. Detailed understanding of the observed band-like transport phenomenon is developed by tuning the different sources of dynamic and static disorder prevalent in the system. These finding are expected to pave way for developing next generation electronic application from perovskite materials. Authors acknowledge EPSRC for funding and SPS acknowledges Royal Society Newton Fellowship.

  2. Simulation Model of A Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen; Russell, Larry W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An electronic simulation model has been developed of a ferroelectric field effect transistor (FFET). This model can be used in standard electrical circuit simulation programs to simulate the main characteristics of the FFET. The model uses a previously developed algorithm that incorporates partial polarization as a basis for the design. The model has the main characteristics of the FFET, which are the current hysterisis with different gate voltages and decay of the drain current when the gate voltage is off. The drain current has values matching actual FFET's, which were measured experimentally. The input and output resistance in the model is similar to that of the FFET. The model is valid for all frequencies below RF levels. A variety of different ferroelectric material characteristics can be modeled. The model can be used to design circuits using FFET'S with standard electrical simulation packages. The circuit can be used in designing non-volatile memory circuits and logic circuits and is compatible with all SPICE based circuit analysis programs. The model is a drop in library that integrates seamlessly into a SPICE simulation. A comparison is made between the model and experimental data measured from an actual FFET.

  3. Boron doped simulated graphene field effect transistor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Preetika; Kaur, Inderpreet; Gupta, Shuchi; Singh, Sukhbir

    2016-05-01

    Graphene based electronic devices due to its unique properties has transformed electronics. A Graphene Field Effect Transistor (GNRFET) model is simulated in Virtual Nano Lab (VNL) and the calculations are based on density functional theory (DFT). Simulations were performed on this pristine GNRFET model and the transmission spectrum was observed. The graph obtained showed a uniform energy gap of +1 to -1eV and the highest transmission peak at -1.75 eV. To this pristine model of GNRFET, doping was introduced and its effect was seen on the Fermi level obtained in the transmission spectrum. Boron as a dopant was used which showed variations in both the transmission peaks and the energy gap. In this model, first the single boron was substituted in place of carbon and Fermi level showed an energy gap of 1.5 to -0.5eV with the highest transmission peak at -1.3 eV. In another variation in the model, two carbon atoms were replaced by two boron atoms and Fermi level shifted from 2 to 0.25eV. In this observation, the highest transmission peak was observed at -1(approx.). The use of nanoelectronic devices have opened many areas of applications as GFET is an excellent building block for electronic circuits, and is being used in applications such as high-performance frequency doublers and mixers, digital modulators, phase detectors, optoelectronics and spintronics.

  4. Mixed Carrier Conduction in Modulation-doped Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schacham, S. E.; Haugland, E. J.; Mena, R. A.; Alterovitz, S. A.

    1995-01-01

    The contribution of more than one carrier to the conductivity in modulation-doped field effect transistors (MODFET) affects the resultant mobility and complicates the characterization of these devices. Mixed conduction arises from the population of several subbands in the two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG), as well as the presence of a parallel path outside the 2DEG. We characterized GaAs/AlGaAs MODFET structures with both delta and continuous doping in the barrier. Based on simultaneous Hall and conductivity analysis we conclude that the parallel conduction is taking place in the AlGaAs barrier, as indicated by the carrier freezeout and activation energy. Thus, simple Hall analysis of these structures may lead to erroneous conclusions, particularly for real-life device structures. The distribution of the 2D electrons between the various confined subbands depends on the doping profile. While for a continuously doped barrier the Shubnikov-de Haas analysis shows superposition of two frequencies for concentrations below 10(exp 12) cm(exp -2), for a delta doped structure the superposition is absent even at 50% larger concentrations. This result is confirmed by self-consistent analysis, which indicates that the concentration of the second subband hardly increases.

  5. Dynamic Charge Carrier Trapping in Quantum Dot Field Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yingjie; Chen, Qian; Alivisatos, A Paul; Salmeron, Miquel

    2015-07-08

    Noncrystalline semiconductor materials often exhibit hysteresis in charge transport measurements whose mechanism is largely unknown. Here we study the dynamics of charge injection and transport in PbS quantum dot (QD) monolayers in a field effect transistor (FET). Using Kelvin probe force microscopy, we measured the temporal response of the QDs as the channel material in a FET following step function changes of gate bias. The measurements reveal an exponential decay of mobile carrier density with time constants of 3-5 s for holes and ∼10 s for electrons. An Ohmic behavior, with uniform carrier density, was observed along the channel during the injection and transport processes. These slow, uniform carrier trapping processes are reversible, with time constants that depend critically on the gas environment. We propose that the underlying mechanism is some reversible electrochemical process involving dissociation and diffusion of water and/or oxygen related species. These trapping processes are dynamically activated by the injected charges, in contrast with static electronic traps whose presence is independent of the charge state. Understanding and controlling these processes is important for improving the performance of electronic, optoelectronic, and memory devices based on disordered semiconductors.

  6. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics.

  7. Radiation effects on junction field-effect transistors (JFETS), MOSFETs, and bipolar transistors, as related to SSC circuit design

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, E.J. Oak Ridge National Lab., TN ); Alley, G.T.; Britton, C.L. Jr. ); Skubic, P.L. ); Gray, B.; Wu, A. )

    1990-01-01

    Some results of radiation effects on selected junction field-effect transistors, MOS field-effect transistors, and bipolar junction transistors are presented. The evaluations include dc parameters, as well as capacitive variations and noise evaluations. The tests are made at the low current and voltage levels (in particular, at currents {le}1 mA) that are essential for the low-power regimes required by SSC circuitry. Detailed noise data are presented both before and after 5-Mrad (gamma) total-dose exposure. SPICE radiation models for three high-frequency bipolar processes are compared for a typical charge-sensitive preamplifier.

  8. Low-frequency noise in MoSe2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Suprem R.; Kwon, Jiseok; Prakash, Abhijith; Delker, Collin J.; Das, Saptarshi; Janes, David B.

    2015-02-01

    One of the important performance metrics of emerging nanoelectronic devices, including low dimensional Field Effect Transistors (FETs), is the magnitude of the low-frequency noise. Atomically thin 2D semiconductor channel materials such as MoX2 (X ≡ S, Se) have shown promising transistor characteristics such as ION/IOFF ratio exceeding 106 and low IOFF, making them attractive as channel materials for next generation nanoelectronic devices. However, MoS2 FETs demonstrated to date exhibit high noise levels under ambient conditions. In this letter, we report at least two orders of magnitude smaller values of Hooge parameter in a back-gated MoSe2 FET (10 atomic layers) with nickel S/D contacts and measured at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The channel dominated regime of noise was extracted from the total noise spectrum and is shown to follow a mobility fluctuation model with 1/f dependence. The low noise in MoSe2 FETs is comparable to other 1D nanoelectronic devices such as carbon nanotube FETs (CNT-FETs) and paves the way for use in future applications in precision sensing and communications.

  9. Low-frequency noise in MoSe{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Suprem R. E-mail: janes@purdue.edu; Kwon, Jiseok; Prakash, Abhijith; Janes, David B. E-mail: janes@purdue.edu; Delker, Collin J.; Das, Saptarshi

    2015-02-23

    One of the important performance metrics of emerging nanoelectronic devices, including low dimensional Field Effect Transistors (FETs), is the magnitude of the low-frequency noise. Atomically thin 2D semiconductor channel materials such as MoX{sub 2} (X ≡ S, Se) have shown promising transistor characteristics such as I{sub ON}/I{sub OFF} ratio exceeding 10{sup 6} and low I{sub OFF}, making them attractive as channel materials for next generation nanoelectronic devices. However, MoS{sub 2} FETs demonstrated to date exhibit high noise levels under ambient conditions. In this letter, we report at least two orders of magnitude smaller values of Hooge parameter in a back-gated MoSe{sub 2} FET (10 atomic layers) with nickel S/D contacts and measured at atmospheric pressure and temperature. The channel dominated regime of noise was extracted from the total noise spectrum and is shown to follow a mobility fluctuation model with 1/f dependence. The low noise in MoSe{sub 2} FETs is comparable to other 1D nanoelectronic devices such as carbon nanotube FETs (CNT-FETs) and paves the way for use in future applications in precision sensing and communications.

  10. Controlled deposition or organic semiconductor single crystals and its application in field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhong

    single crystals are selectively nucleated on patterned templates of carbon nanotube (CNT) bundles. Several organic semiconductor materials are successfully patterned, including p-type pentacene, tetracene, sexiphenylene, and sexithiophene, as well as n-type tetracyanoquinodimethane. This study suggests that the selective growth of crystals onto patterned carbon nanotubes is most likely due to the coarse topography of the CNT bundles. Moreover, I observe that the crystals nucleate from CNT bundles and grow onto CNT bundles in a conformal fashion. The crystal growth can be directly applied onto transistor source-drain electrodes and arrays of organic single-crystal field effect transistors are demonstrated. To investigate the impact of CNTs on device performance, CNT bundles are incorporated into thin-film FETs and a mobility enhancement of organic semiconductors is observed. In the third approach, organic single crystals with well controlled sizes and shapes are successfully grown using patterned Au films as templates. It is observed that sexithiophene crystals nucleate from the edge or the top surface of Au films and then grow two dimensionally on SiO2 surface. The sizes and shapes of sexithiophene crystals are precisely determined by that of the Au patterns. After removing Au templates, large arrays of sexithiophene crystals with controlled sizes and various shapes such as stripes, squares, hexagons, etc. are achieved. Top-contact FETs made of sexithiophene ribbons are demonstrated. Besides organic single crystals, Au templates can also act as templates to pattern vapor- and solution-deposited organic semiconductor thin films. Patterned organic thin-film FETs exhibit superior performance compared to unpatterned devices. Finally, oriented growth of organic semiconductor single crystals on templates with various features is studied. On substrates with aligned features, such as friction-transferred poly(tetrafluoroethylene) thin films, organic semiconductor thin films

  11. Scaling carbon nanotube complementary transistors to 5-nm gate lengths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Chenguang; Zhang, Zhiyong; Xiao, Mengmeng; Yang, Yingjun; Zhong, Donglai; Peng, Lian-Mao

    2017-01-01

    High-performance top-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (CNT FETs) with a gate length of 5 nanometers can be fabricated that perform better than silicon complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) FETs at the same scale. A scaling trend study revealed that the scaled CNT-based devices, which use graphene contacts, can operate much faster and at much lower supply voltage (0.4 versus 0.7 volts) and with much smaller subthreshold slope (typically 73 millivolts per decade). The 5-nanometer CNT FETs approached the quantum limit of FETs by using only one electron per switching operation. In addition, the contact length of the CNT CMOS devices was also scaled down to 25 nanometers, and a CMOS inverter with a total pitch size of 240 nanometers was also demonstrated.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  13. Intracellular recordings of action potentials by an extracellular nanoscale field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Xiaojie; Gao, Ruixuan; Xie, Ping; Cohen-Karni, Tzahi; Qing, Quan; Choe, Hwan Sung; Tian, Bozhi; Jiang, Xiaocheng; Lieber, Charles M.

    2012-03-01

    The ability to make electrical measurements inside cells has led to many important advances in electrophysiology. The patch clamp technique, in which a glass micropipette filled with electrolyte is inserted into a cell, offers both high signal-to-noise ratio and temporal resolution. Ideally, the micropipette should be as small as possible to increase the spatial resolution and reduce the invasiveness of the measurement, but the overall performance of the technique depends on the impedance of the interface between the micropipette and the cell interior, which limits how small the micropipette can be. Techniques that involve inserting metal or carbon microelectrodes into cells are subject to similar constraints. Field-effect transistors (FETs) can also record electric potentials inside cells, and because their performance does not depend on impedance, they can be made much smaller than micropipettes and microelectrodes. Moreover, FET arrays are better suited for multiplexed measurements. Previously, we have demonstrated FET-based intracellular recording with kinked nanowire structures, but the kink configuration and device design places limits on the probe size and the potential for multiplexing. Here, we report a new approach in which a SiO2 nanotube is synthetically integrated on top of a nanoscale FET. This nanotube penetrates the cell membrane, bringing the cell cytosol into contact with the FET, which is then able to record the intracellular transmembrane potential. Simulations show that the bandwidth of this branched intracellular nanotube FET (BIT-FET) is high enough for it to record fast action potentials even when the nanotube diameter is decreased to 3 nm, a length scale well below that accessible with other methods. Studies of cardiomyocyte cells demonstrate that when phospholipid-modified BIT-FETs are brought close to cells, the nanotubes can spontaneously penetrate the cell membrane to allow the full-amplitude intracellular action potential to be

  14. Field-effect transistor replaces bulky transformer in analog-gate circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor /MOSFET/ analog-gate circuit adapts well to integrated circuits. It provides better system isolation than a transformer, while size and weight are appreciably reduced.

  15. Low Temperature Noise and Electrical Characterization of the Company Heterojunction Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Gee, Russell C.; Fossum, Eric R.; Baier, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the electrical properties of the complementary heterojunction field-effect transistor (CHFET) at 4K, including the gate leakage current, the subthreshold transconductance, and the input-referred noise voltage.

  16. Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective reversible ion detection.

    PubMed

    Schmoltner, Kerstin; Kofler, Johannes; Klug, Andreas; List-Kratochvil, Emil J W

    2013-12-17

    An ion-sensitive electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective and reversible detection of sodium (Na(+) ) down to 10(-6) M is presented. The inherent low voltage - high current operation of these transistors in combination with a state-of-the-art ion-selective membrane proves to be a novel, versatile modular sensor platform.

  17. Comparison between Field Effect Transistors and Bipolar Junction Transistors as Transducers in Electrochemical Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zafar, Sufi; Lu, Minhua; Jagtiani, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Field effect transistors (FET) have been widely used as transducers in electrochemical sensors for over 40 years. In this report, a FET transducer is compared with the recently proposed bipolar junction transistor (BJT) transducer. Measurements are performed on two chloride electrochemical sensors that are identical in all details except for the transducer device type. Comparative measurements show that the transducer choice significantly impacts the electrochemical sensor characteristics. Signal to noise ratio is 20 to 2 times greater for the BJT sensor. Sensitivity is also enhanced: BJT sensing signal changes by 10 times per pCl, whereas the FET signal changes by 8 or less times. Also, sensor calibration curves are impacted by the transducer choice. Unlike a FET sensor, the calibration curve of the BJT sensor is independent of applied voltages. Hence, a BJT sensor can make quantitative sensing measurements with minimal calibration requirements, an important characteristic for mobile sensing applications. As a demonstration for mobile applications, these BJT sensors are further investigated by measuring chloride levels in artificial human sweat for potential cystic fibrosis diagnostic use. In summary, the BJT device is demonstrated to be a superior transducer in comparison to a FET in an electrochemical sensor.

  18. Comparison between Field Effect Transistors and Bipolar Junction Transistors as Transducers in Electrochemical Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Zafar, Sufi; Lu, Minhua; Jagtiani, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Field effect transistors (FET) have been widely used as transducers in electrochemical sensors for over 40 years. In this report, a FET transducer is compared with the recently proposed bipolar junction transistor (BJT) transducer. Measurements are performed on two chloride electrochemical sensors that are identical in all details except for the transducer device type. Comparative measurements show that the transducer choice significantly impacts the electrochemical sensor characteristics. Signal to noise ratio is 20 to 2 times greater for the BJT sensor. Sensitivity is also enhanced: BJT sensing signal changes by 10 times per pCl, whereas the FET signal changes by 8 or less times. Also, sensor calibration curves are impacted by the transducer choice. Unlike a FET sensor, the calibration curve of the BJT sensor is independent of applied voltages. Hence, a BJT sensor can make quantitative sensing measurements with minimal calibration requirements, an important characteristic for mobile sensing applications. As a demonstration for mobile applications, these BJT sensors are further investigated by measuring chloride levels in artificial human sweat for potential cystic fibrosis diagnostic use. In summary, the BJT device is demonstrated to be a superior transducer in comparison to a FET in an electrochemical sensor. PMID:28134275

  19. Comparison between Field Effect Transistors and Bipolar Junction Transistors as Transducers in Electrochemical Sensors.

    PubMed

    Zafar, Sufi; Lu, Minhua; Jagtiani, Ashish

    2017-01-30

    Field effect transistors (FET) have been widely used as transducers in electrochemical sensors for over 40 years. In this report, a FET transducer is compared with the recently proposed bipolar junction transistor (BJT) transducer. Measurements are performed on two chloride electrochemical sensors that are identical in all details except for the transducer device type. Comparative measurements show that the transducer choice significantly impacts the electrochemical sensor characteristics. Signal to noise ratio is 20 to 2 times greater for the BJT sensor. Sensitivity is also enhanced: BJT sensing signal changes by 10 times per pCl, whereas the FET signal changes by 8 or less times. Also, sensor calibration curves are impacted by the transducer choice. Unlike a FET sensor, the calibration curve of the BJT sensor is independent of applied voltages. Hence, a BJT sensor can make quantitative sensing measurements with minimal calibration requirements, an important characteristic for mobile sensing applications. As a demonstration for mobile applications, these BJT sensors are further investigated by measuring chloride levels in artificial human sweat for potential cystic fibrosis diagnostic use. In summary, the BJT device is demonstrated to be a superior transducer in comparison to a FET in an electrochemical sensor.

  20. Advances in NO2 sensing with individual single-walled carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Chikkadi, Kiran; Muoth, Matthias; Roman, Cosmin; Haluska, Miroslav; Hierold, Christofer

    2014-01-01

    The charge carrier transport in carbon nanotubes is highly sensitive to certain molecules attached to their surface. This property has generated interest for their application in sensing gases, chemicals and biomolecules. With over a decade of research, a clearer picture of the interactions between the carbon nanotube and its surroundings has been achieved. In this review, we intend to summarize the current knowledge on this topic, focusing not only on the effect of adsorbates but also the effect of dielectric charge traps on the electrical transport in single-walled carbon nanotube transistors that are to be used in sensing applications. Recently, contact-passivated, open-channel individual single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors have been shown to be operational at room temperature with ultra-low power consumption. Sensor recovery within minutes through UV illumination or self-heating has been shown. Improvements in fabrication processes aimed at reducing the impact of charge traps have reduced the hysteresis, drift and low-frequency noise in carbon nanotube transistors. While open challenges such as large-scale fabrication, selectivity tuning and noise reduction still remain, these results demonstrate considerable progress in transforming the promise of carbon nanotube properties into functional ultra-low power, highly sensitive gas sensors.

  1. Organic light emitting field effect transistors based on an ambipolar p-i-n layered structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maiorano, V.; Bramanti, A.; Carallo, S.; Cingolani, R.; Gigli, G.

    2010-03-01

    A bottom contact/top gate ambipolar "p-i-n" layered light emitting field effect transistor with the active medium inserted between two doped transport layers, is reported. The doping profile results crucial to the capability of emitting light, as well as to the electrical characteristics of the device. In this sense, high output current at relative low applied gate/drain voltage and light emission along the whole large area transistor channel are observed, putting the basis to full integration of organic light emitting field effect transistors in planar complex devices.

  2. Theory of the field-effect mobility in amorphous organic transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vissenberg, M. C. J. M.; Matters, M.

    1998-05-01

    The field-effect mobility in an organic thin-film transistor is studied theoretically. From a percolation model of hopping between localized states and a transistor model an analytic expression for the field-effect mobility is obtained. The theory is applied to describe the experiments by Brown et al. [Synth. Met. 88, 37 (1997)] on solution-processed amorphous organic transistors, made from a polymer (polythienylene vinylene) and from a small molecule (pentacene). Good agreement is obtained, with respect to both the gate voltage and the temperature dependence of the mobility.

  3. Plasma wave oscillations in nanometer field effect transistors for terahertz detection and emission.

    PubMed

    Knap, W; Teppe, F; Dyakonova, N; Coquillat, D; Lusakowski, J

    2008-09-24

    The channel of a field effect transistor can act as a resonator for plasma waves propagating in a two-dimensional electron gas. The plasma frequency increases with reduction of the channel length and can reach the terahertz (THz) range for nanometer size transistors. Recent experimental results show these transistors can be potential candidates for a new class of THz detectors and emitters. This work gives an overview of our recent relevant experimental results. We also outline unresolved problems and questions concerning THz detection and emission by nanometer transistors.

  4. Light Scattering Studies of Organic Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adil, Danish

    Organic semiconductors hold a great promise of enabling new technology based on low cost and flexible electronic devices. While much work has been done in the field of organic semiconductors, the field is still quite immature when compared to that of traditional inorganic based devices. More work is required before the full potential of organic field effect transistors (OFETs), organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), and organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is realized. Among such work, a further development of diagnostic tools that characterize charge transport and device robustness more efficiently is required. Charge transport in organic semiconductors is limited by the nature of the metal-semiconductor interfaces where charge is injected into the semiconductor film and the semiconductor-dielectric interface where the charge is accumulated and transported. This, combined with that fact that organic semiconductors are especially susceptible to having structural defects induced via oxidation, charge transport induced damage, and metallization results in a situation where a semiconductor film's ability to conduct charge can degrade over time. This degradation manifests itself in the electrical device characteristics of organic based electronic devices. OFETs, for example, may display changes in threshold voltage, lowering of charge carrier mobilities, or a decrease in the On/Off ratio. All these effects sum together to result in degradation in device performance. The work begins with a study where matrix assisted pulsed laser deposition (MAPLE), an alternative organic semiconductor thin film deposition method, is used to fabricate OFETs with improved semiconductor-dielectric interfaces. MAPLE allows for the controlled layer-by-layer growth of the semiconductor film. Devices fabricated using this technique are shown to exhibit desirable characteristics that are otherwise only achievable with additional surface treatments. MAPLE is shown to be viable alternative to other

  5. Electrical coupling of single cardiac rat myocytes to field-effect and bipolar transistors.

    PubMed

    Kind, Thomas; Issing, Matthias; Arnold, Rüdiger; Müller, Bernt

    2002-12-01

    A novel bipolar transistor for extracellular recording the electrical activity of biological cells is presented, and the electrical behavior compared with the field-effect transistor (FET). Electrical coupling is examined between single cells separated from the heart of adults rats (cardiac myocytes) and both types of transistors. To initiate a local extracellular voltage, the cells are periodically stimulated by a patch pipette in voltage clamp and current clamp mode. The local extracellular voltage is measured by the planar integrated electronic sensors: the bipolar and the FET. The small signal transistor currents correspond to the local extracellular voltage. The two types of sensor transistors used here were developed and manufactured in the laboratory of our institute. The manufacturing process and the interfaces between myocytes and transistors are described. The recordings are interpreted by way of simulation based on the point-contact model and the single cardiac myocyte model.

  6. A high sensitivity field effect transistor biosensor for methylene blue detection utilize graphene oxide nanoribbon.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ting-Chun; Li, Yan-Sheng; Chiang, Wei-Hung; Pei, Zingway

    2017-03-15

    In this work, we developed a field effect transistor (FET) biosensor utilizing solution-processed graphene oxide nanoribbon (GONR) for methylene blue (MB) sensing. MB is a unique material; one of its crucial applications is as a marker in the detection of biomaterials. Therefore, a highly sensitive biosensor with a low detection limit that can be fabricated simply in a noncomplex detection scheme is desirable. GONR is made by unzipping multiwall carbon nanotubes, which can be mass-produced at low temperature. The GONR-FET biosensor demonstrated a sensitivity of 12.5μA/mM (determined according to the drain current difference caused by the MB concentration change). The Raman spectra indicate that the materials quality of the GONR and the domain size for the C=C sp(2) bonding were both improved after MB detection. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that the hydroxyl groups on the GONR were removed by the reductive MB. According to XPS and Raman, the positive charge is proposed to transfer from MB to GONR during sensing. This transfer causes charge in-neutrality in the GONR which is compensated by releasing •OH functional groups. With high sensitivity, a low detection limit, and a simple device structure, the GONR-FET sensor is suitable for sensing biomaterials.

  7. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-10-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces.

  8. Biologically templated assembly of hybrid semiconducting nanomesh for high performance field effect transistors and sensors

    PubMed Central

    Byeon, Hye-Hyeon; Lee, Seung-Woo; Lee, Eun-Hee; Kim, Woong; Yi, Hyunjung

    2016-01-01

    Delicately assembled composites of semiconducting nanomaterials and biological materials provide an attractive interface for emerging applications, such as chemical/biological sensors, wearable health monitoring devices, and therapeutic agent releasing devices. The nanostructure of composites as a channel and a sensing material plays a critical role in the performance of field effect transistors (FETs). Therefore, it is highly desirable to prepare elaborate composite that can allow the fabrication of high performance FETs and also provide high sensitivity and selectivity in detecting specific chemical/biological targets. In this work, we demonstrate that high performance FETs can be fabricated with a hydrodynamically assembled composite, a semiconducting nanomesh, of semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (S-SWNTs) and a genetically engineered M13 phage to show strong binding affinity toward SWNTs. The semiconducting nanomesh enables a high on/off ratio (~104) of FETs. We also show that the threshold voltage and the channel current of the nanomesh FETs are sensitive to the change of the M13 phage surface charge. This biological gate effect of the phage enables the detection of biologically important molecules such as dopamine and bisphenol A using nanomesh-based FETs. Our results provide a new insight for the preparation of composite material platform for highly controllable bio/electronics interfaces. PMID:27762315

  9. Feasibility Study of Extended-Gate-Type Silicon Nanowire Field-Effect Transistors for Neural Recording.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongki; Kim, Jee-Yeon; Choi, Yang-Kyu; Nam, Yoonkey

    2017-03-28

    In this research, a high performance silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (transconductance as high as 34 µS and sensitivity as 84 nS/mV) is extensively studied and directly compared with planar passive microelectrode arrays for neural recording application. Electrical and electrochemical characteristics are carefully characterized in a very well-controlled manner. We especially focused on the signal amplification capability and intrinsic noise of the transistors. A neural recording system using both silicon nanowire field-effect transistor-based active-type microelectrode array and platinum black microelectrode-based passive-type microelectrode array are implemented and compared. An artificial neural spike signal is supplied as input to both arrays through a buffer solution and recorded simultaneously. Recorded signal intensity by the silicon nanowire transistor was precisely determined by an electrical characteristic of the transistor, transconductance. Signal-to-noise ratio was found to be strongly dependent upon the intrinsic 1/f noise of the silicon nanowire transistor. We found how signal strength is determined and how intrinsic noise of the transistor determines signal-to-noise ratio of the recorded neural signals. This study provides in-depth understanding of the overall neural recording mechanism using silicon nanowire transistors and solid design guideline for further improvement and development.

  10. Electrical Performance of Monolayer MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors Prepared by Chemical Vapor Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-05-16

    REPORT Electrical performance of monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors prepared by chemical vapor deposition 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION...OF: Molybdenum disulfide ( MoS2 ) field effect transistors (FET) were fabricated on atomically smooth large-area single layers grown by chemical vapor...Standard Form 298 (Rev 8/98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - Electrical performance of monolayer MoS2 field-effect transistors prepared by chemical

  11. Field-effect transistors fabricated from diluted magnetic semiconductor colloidal nanowires.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhen; Du, Ai Jun; Sun, Qiao; Aljada, Muhsen; Zhu, Zhong Hua; Lu, Gao Qing Max

    2012-02-21

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated from undoped and Co(2+)-doped CdSe colloidal nanowires show typical n-channel transistor behaviour with gate effect. Exposed to microscope light, a 10 times current enhancement is observed in the doped nanowire-based devices due to the significant modification of the electronic structure of CdSe nanowires induced by Co(2+)-doping, which is revealed by theoretical calculations from spin-polarized plane-wave density functional theory.

  12. Exploring graphene field effect transistor devices to improve spectral resolution of semiconductor radiation detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Howell, Stephen Wayne; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Hamilton, Allister B.

    2013-12-01

    Graphene, a planar, atomically thin form of carbon, has unique electrical and material properties that could enable new high performance semiconductor devices. Graphene could be of specific interest in the development of room-temperature, high-resolution semiconductor radiation spectrometers. Incorporating graphene into a field-effect transistor architecture could provide an extremely high sensitivity readout mechanism for sensing charge carriers in a semiconductor detector, thus enabling the fabrication of a sensitive radiation sensor. In addition, the field effect transistor architecture allows us to sense only a single charge carrier type, such as electrons. This is an advantage for room-temperature semiconductor radiation detectors, which often suffer from significant hole trapping. Here we report on initial efforts towards device fabrication and proof-of-concept testing. This work investigates the use of graphene transferred onto silicon and silicon carbide, and the response of these fabricated graphene field effect transistor devices to stimuli such as light and alpha radiation.

  13. Determination of optimal ionic liquid for organic single-crystal field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, S.; Miwa, K.; Seki, S.

    2016-02-01

    We investigate organic single-crystal field-effect transistors with various ionic liquids as gate dielectric. We find that the mobility of the field-effect transistors for both p-type and n-type organic semiconductors increases with decreasing total capacitance of the ionic liquid. However, it does not depend on the ion species at the interface between the organic semiconductor and the ionic liquid. By choosing an appropriate ionic liquid, a high carrier mobility of 12.4 cm2/V s in rubrene single crystals (p-type) and 0.13 cm2/V s in 7.7.8.8-Tetracyanoquinodimethane single crystals (n-type) are achieved. This study clarifies the influence of ionic liquids on the device performance of organic field-effect transistors and shows a way to maximize carrier mobility at the solid/liquid interface.

  14. Improvement of terahertz field effect transistor detectors by substrate thinning and radiation losses reduction.

    PubMed

    Coquillat, Dominique; Marczewski, Jacek; Kopyt, Pawel; Dyakonova, Nina; Giffard, Benoit; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-01-11

    Phenomena of the radiation coupling to the field effect transistors based terahertz (THz) detectors are studied. We show that in the case of planar metal antennas a significant portion of incoming radiation, instead of being coupled to the transistors, is coupled to an antenna substrate leading to responsivity losses and/or cross-talk effects in the field effect based THz detector arrays. Experimental and theoretical investigations of the responsivity versus substrate thickness are performed. They clearly show how to minimize the losses by the detector/ array substrate thinning. In conclusion simple quantitative rules of losses minimization by choosing a proper substrate thickness of field effect transistor THz detectors are presented for common materials (Si, GaAs, InP, GaN) used in semiconductor technologies.

  15. Highly stable organic polymer field-effect transistor sensor for selective detection in the marine environment.

    PubMed

    Knopfmacher, Oren; Hammock, Mallory L; Appleton, Anthony L; Schwartz, Gregor; Mei, Jianguo; Lei, Ting; Pei, Jian; Bao, Zhenan

    2014-01-01

    In recent decades, the susceptibility to degradation in both ambient and aqueous environments has prevented organic electronics from gaining rapid traction for sensing applications. Here we report an organic field-effect transistor sensor that overcomes this barrier using a solution-processable isoindigo-based polymer semiconductor. More importantly, these organic field-effect transistor sensors are stable in both freshwater and seawater environments over extended periods of time. The organic field-effect transistor sensors are further capable of selectively sensing heavy-metal ions in seawater. This discovery has potential for inexpensive, ink-jet printed, and large-scale environmental monitoring devices that can be deployed in areas once thought of as beyond the scope of organic materials.

  16. Photosensitive field-effect transistor based on a composite film of polyvinylcarbazole with nickel nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleshin, A. N.; Shcherbakov, I. P.; Fedichkin, F. S.

    2012-08-01

    The electronic and optoelectronic properties of field-effect transistor structures with an active layer based on composite films of a semiconducting polymer, namely, polyvinylcarbazole (PVC), with nickel nanoparticles have been investigated. It has been shown that these structures at low nickel concentrations (5-10 wt %) possess current-voltage characteristics that indicate an ambipolar transport. For the field-effect transistor structures based on PVC: Ni (Ni ˜ 5 wt %) films, the mobilities of electrons and holes are found to be ˜1.3 and ˜1.9 cm2/V s, respectively. It has been established that the photosensitivity observed in these structures is associated with the specific features of transport in the film of the polymer with nickel nanoparticles. The mechanism of this transport is determined by the modulation of electrical conductivity of the working channel of the field-effect transistor by applying a combination of incident light and gate voltages.

  17. Field-Effect Transistors: Ultrathin MXene-Micropattern-Based Field-Effect Transistor for Probing Neural Activity (Adv. Mater. 17/2016).

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingzhe; Zhu, Minshen; Zhang, Wencong; Zhen, Xu; Pei, Zengxia; Xue, Qi; Zhi, Chunyi; Shi, Peng

    2016-05-01

    A field-effect transistor (FET) based on ultrathin Ti3 C2 -MXene micropatterns is developed by C. Zhi, P. Shi, and co-workers, as described on page 3333. The FET can be utilized for label-free probing of small molecules in typical biological environments, e.g., for fast detection of action potentials in primary neurons. This device is produced with a microcontact printing technique, harnessing the unique advantages for easy fabrication.

  18. A Novel Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor Memory Cell Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Bailey, Mark; Ho, Fat Duen

    2004-01-01

    The use of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (MFSFET) in a resistive-load SRAM memory cell has been investigated A typical two-transistor resistive-load SRAM memory cell architecture is modified by replacing one of the NMOS transistors with an n-channel MFSFET. The gate of the MFSFET is connected to a polling voltage pulse instead of the other NMOS transistor drain. The polling voltage pulses are of sufficient magnitude to saturate the ferroelectric gate material and force the MFSFET into a particular logic state. The memory cell circuit is further modified by the addition of a PMOS transistor and a load resistor in order to improve the retention characteristics of the memory cell. The retention characteristics of both the "1" and "0" logic states are simulated. The simulations show that the MFSFET memory cell design can maintain both the "1" and "0" logic states for a long period of time.

  19. All-electric all-semiconductor spin field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuang, Pojen; Ho, Sheng-Chin; Smith, L. W.; Sfigakis, F.; Pepper, M.; Chen, Chin-Hung; Fan, Ju-Chun; Griffiths, J. P.; Farrer, I.; Beere, H. E.; Jones, G. A. C.; Ritchie, D. A.; Chen, Tse-Ming

    2015-01-01

    The spin field-effect transistor envisioned by Datta and Das opens a gateway to spin information processing. Although the coherent manipulation of electron spins in semiconductors is now possible, the realization of a functional spin field-effect transistor for information processing has yet to be achieved, owing to several fundamental challenges such as the low spin-injection efficiency due to resistance mismatch, spin relaxation and the spread of spin precession angles. Alternative spin transistor designs have therefore been proposed, but these differ from the field-effect transistor concept and require the use of optical or magnetic elements, which pose difficulties for incorporation into integrated circuits. Here, we present an all-electric and all-semiconductor spin field-effect transistor in which these obstacles are overcome by using two quantum point contacts as spin injectors and detectors. Distinct engineering architectures of spin-orbit coupling are exploited for the quantum point contacts and the central semiconductor channel to achieve complete control of the electron spins (spin injection, manipulation and detection) in a purely electrical manner. Such a device is compatible with large-scale integration and holds promise for future spintronic devices for information processing.

  20. Organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories utilizing sputtered C nanoparticles as nano-floating-gate

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jie; Liu, Chang-Hai; She, Xiao-Jian; Sun, Qi-Jun; Gao, Xu; Wang, Sui-Dong

    2014-10-20

    High-performance organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories have been achieved using sputtered C nanoparticles as the nano-floating-gate. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate is prepared with low-cost material and simple process, forming uniform and discrete charge trapping sites covered by a smooth and complete polystyrene layer. The devices show large memory window, excellent retention capability, and programming/reading/erasing/reading endurance. The sputtered C nano-floating-gate can effectively trap both holes and electrons, and it is demonstrated to be suitable for not only p-type but also n-type organic field-effect transistor nonvolatile memories.

  1. Hall and field-effect mobilities in few layered p-WSe2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, N. R.; Rhodes, D.; Memaran, S.; Poumirol, J. M.; Smirnov, D.; Talapatra, S.; Feng, S.; Perea-Lopez, N.; Elias, A. L.; Terrones, M.; Ajayan, P. M.; Balicas, L.

    2015-03-01

    Here, we present a temperature (T) dependent comparison between field-effect and Hall mobilities in field-effect transistors based on few-layered WSe2 exfoliated onto SiO2. Without dielectric engineering and beyond a T-dependent threshold gate-voltage, we observe maximum hole mobilities approaching 350 cm2/Vs at T = 300 K. The hole Hall mobility reaches a maximum value of 650 cm2/Vs as T is lowered below ~150 K, indicating that insofar WSe2-based field-effect transistors (FETs) display the largest Hall mobilities among the transition metal dichalcogenides. The gate capacitance, as extracted from the Hall-effect, reveals the presence of spurious charges in the channel, while the two-terminal sheet resistivity displays two-dimensional variable-range hopping behavior, indicating carrier localization induced by disorder at the interface between WSe2 and SiO2. We argue that improvements in the fabrication protocols as, for example, the use of a substrate free of dangling bonds are likely to produce WSe2-based FETs displaying higher room temperature mobilities, i.e. approaching those of p-doped Si, which would make it a suitable candidate for high performance opto-electronics.

  2. Bisacenaphthopyrazinoquinoxaline derivatives: synthesis, physical properties and applications as semiconductors for n-channel field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Tong, Chenhua; Chang, Jingjing; Tan, Jun Min; Dai, Gaole; Huang, Kuo-Wei; Chan, Hardy Sze On; Chi, Chunyan

    2013-09-14

    Several bisacenaphthopyrazinoquinoxaline (BAPQ) based derivatives 1-3 were synthesized by condensation between the acenaphthenequinones and 1,2,4,5-tetraaminobenzene tetrahydrochloride. Their optical, electrochemical and self-assembling properties are tuned by different substituents. Among them, compound 3 possesses a homogeneously distributed low-lying LUMO due to the peripheral substitution with four cyano groups. The corresponding n-channel field effect transistors showed a field effect electron mobility of 5 × 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1).

  3. A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube transistor.

    PubMed

    Chen, C-L; Kim, K; Truong, Q; Shen, A; Li, Z; Chen, Y

    2012-07-11

    A spiking neuron circuit based on a carbon nanotube (CNT) transistor is presented in this paper. The spiking neuron circuit has a crossbar architecture in which the transistor gates are connected to its row electrodes and the transistor sources are connected to its column electrodes. An electrochemical cell is incorporated in the gate of the transistor by sandwiching a hydrogen-doped poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether (PEG) electrolyte between the CNT channel and the top gate electrode. An input spike applied to the gate triggers a dynamic drift of the hydrogen ions in the PEG electrolyte, resulting in a post-synaptic current (PSC) through the CNT channel. Spikes input into the rows trigger PSCs through multiple CNT transistors, and PSCs cumulate in the columns and integrate into a 'soma' circuit to trigger output spikes based on an integrate-and-fire mechanism. The spiking neuron circuit can potentially emulate biological neuron networks and their intelligent functions.

  4. Benzocyclobutene (BCB) Polymer as Amphibious Buffer Layer for Graphene Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yun; Zou, Jianjun; Huo, Shuai; Lu, Haiyan; Kong, Yuecan; Chen, Tangshen; Wu, Wei; Xu, Jingxia

    2015-08-01

    Owing to the scattering and trapping effects, the interfaces of dielectric/graphene or substrate/graphene can tailor the performance of field-effect transistor (FET). In this letter, the polymer of benzocyclobutene (BCB) was used as an amphibious buffer layer and located at between the layers of substrate and graphene and between the layers of dielectric and graphene. Interestingly, with the help of nonpolar and hydrophobic BCB buffer layer, the large-scale top-gated, chemical vapor deposited (CVD) graphene transistors was prepared on Si/SiO2 substrate, its cutoff frequency (fT) and the maximum cutoff frequency (fmax) of the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) can be reached at 12 GHz and 11 GHz, respectively.

  5. Localized heating on silicon field effect transistors: device fabrication and temperature measurements in fluid.

    PubMed

    Elibol, Oguz H; Reddy, Bobby; Nair, Pradeep R; Dorvel, Brian; Butler, Felice; Ahsan, Zahab S; Bergstrom, Donald E; Alam, Muhammad A; Bashir, Rashid

    2009-10-07

    We demonstrate electrically addressable localized heating in fluid at the dielectric surface of silicon-on-insulator field-effect transistors via radio-frequency Joule heating of mobile ions in the Debye layer. Measurement of fluid temperatures in close vicinity to surfaces poses a challenge due to the localized nature of the temperature profile. To address this, we developed a localized thermometry technique based on the fluorescence decay rate of covalently attached fluorophores to extract the temperature within 2 nm of any oxide surface. We demonstrate precise spatial control of voltage dependent temperature profiles on the transistor surfaces. Our results introduce a new dimension to present sensing systems by enabling dual purpose silicon transistor-heaters that serve both as field effect sensors as well as temperature controllers that could perform localized bio-chemical reactions in Lab on Chip applications.

  6. A hydrogel capsule as gate dielectric in flexible organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Dumitru, L. M.; Manoli, K.; Magliulo, M.; Torsi, L.; Ligonzo, T.; Palazzo, G.

    2015-01-01

    A jellified alginate based capsule serves as biocompatible and biodegradable electrolyte system to gate an organic field-effect transistor fabricated on a flexible substrate. Such a system allows operating thiophene based polymer transistors below 0.5 V through an electrical double layer formed across an ion-permeable polymeric electrolyte. Moreover, biological macro-molecules such as glucose-oxidase and streptavidin can enter into the gating capsules that serve also as delivery system. An enzymatic bio-reaction is shown to take place in the capsule and preliminary results on the measurement of the electronic responses promise for low-cost, low-power, flexible electronic bio-sensing applications using capsule-gated organic field-effect transistors.

  7. Ensemble Monte Carlo Simulation of a Velocity-Modulation Field Effect Transistor (VMT)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kizilyalli, I. C.; Hess, K.

    1987-09-01

    We present numerical simulations of velocity modulated field effect transistors as proposed by Sakaki. Using self-consistent particle-field Monte Carlo analysis, we assess possible advantages of these novel device structures with respect to switching speed and show the qualitative correctness of Sakaki’s ideas. Quantitatively, delays are introduced by the redistribution of electrons in the separated channels.

  8. Terahertz 3D printed diffractive lens matrices for field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays.

    PubMed

    Szkudlarek, Krzesimir; Sypek, Maciej; Cywiński, Grzegorz; Suszek, Jarosław; Zagrajek, Przemysław; Feduniewicz-Żmuda, Anna; Yahniuk, Ivan; Yatsunenko, Sergey; Nowakowska-Siwińska, Anna; Coquillat, Dominique; But, Dmytro B; Rachoń, Martyna; Węgrzyńska, Karolina; Skierbiszewski, Czesław; Knap, Wojciech

    2016-09-05

    We present the concept, the fabrication processes and the experimental results for materials and optics that can be used for terahertz field-effect transistor detector focal plane arrays. More specifically, we propose 3D printed arrays of a new type - diffractive multi-zone lenses of which the performance is superior to that of previously used mono-zone diffractive or refractive elements and evaluate them with GaN/AlGaN field-effect transistor terahertz detectors. Experiments performed in the 300-GHz atmospheric window show that the lens arrays offer both a good efficiency and good uniformity, and may improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the terahertz field-effect transistor detectors by more than one order of magnitude. In practice, we tested 3 × 12 lens linear arrays with printed circuit board THz detector arrays used in postal security scanners and observed significant signal-to-noise improvements. Our results clearly show that the proposed technology provides a way to produce cost-effective, reproducible, flat optics for large-size field-effect transistor THz-detector focal plane arrays.

  9. Silicon-on-insulator field effect transistor with improved body ties for rad-hard applications

    DOEpatents

    Schwank, James R.; Shaneyfelt, Marty R.; Draper, Bruce L.; Dodd, Paul E.

    2001-01-01

    A silicon-on-insulator (SOI) field-effect transistor (FET) and a method for making the same are disclosed. The SOI FET is characterized by a source which extends only partially (e.g. about half-way) through the active layer wherein the transistor is formed. Additionally, a minimal-area body tie contact is provided with a short-circuit electrical connection to the source for reducing floating body effects. The body tie contact improves the electrical characteristics of the transistor and also provides an improved single-event-upset (SEU) radiation hardness of the device for terrestrial and space applications. The SOI FET also provides an improvement in total-dose radiation hardness as compared to conventional SOI transistors fabricated without a specially prepared hardened buried oxide layer. Complementary n-channel and p-channel SOI FETs can be fabricated according to the present invention to form integrated circuits (ICs) for commercial and military applications.

  10. Carbon nanotube transistor based high-frequency electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schroter, Michael

    At the nanoscale carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have higher carrier mobility and carrier velocity than most incumbent semiconductors. Thus CNT based field-effect transistors (FETs) are being considered as strong candidates for replacing existing MOSFETs in digital applications. In addition, the predicted high intrinsic transit frequency and the more recent finding of ways to achieve highly linear transfer characteristics have inspired investigations on analog high-frequency (HF) applications. High linearity is extremely valuable for an energy efficient usage of the frequency spectrum, particularly in mobile communications. Compared to digital applications, the much more relaxed constraints for CNT placement and lithography combined with already achieved operating frequencies of at least 10 GHz for fabricated devices make an early entry in the low GHz HF market more feasible than in large-scale digital circuits. Such a market entry would be extremely beneficial for funding the development of production CNTFET based process technology. This talk will provide an overview on the present status and feasibility of HF CNTFET technology will be given from an engineering point of view, including device modeling, experimental results, and existing roadblocks.

  11. High performance transistors via aligned polyfluorene-sorted carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, Gerald J.; Joo, Yongho; Singha Roy, Susmit; Gopalan, Padma; Arnold, Michael S.

    2014-02-24

    We evaluate the performance of exceptionally electronic-type sorted, semiconducting, aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) in field effect transistors (FETs). High on-conductance and high on/off conductance modulation are simultaneously achieved at channel lengths which are both shorter and longer than individual s-SWCNTs. The s-SWCNTs are isolated from heterogeneous mixtures using a polyfluorene-derivative as a selective agent and aligned on substrates via dose-controlled, floating evaporative self-assembly at densities of ∼50 s-SWCNTs μm{sup −1}. At a channel length of 9 μm the s-SWCNTs percolate to span the FET channel, and the on/off ratio and charge transport mobility are 2.2 × 10{sup 7} and 46 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1}, respectively. At a channel length of 400 nm, a large fraction of the s-SWCNTs directly span the channel, and the on-conductance per width is 61 μS μm{sup −1} and the on/off ratio is 4 × 10{sup 5}. These results are considerably better than previous solution-processed FETs, which have suffered from poor on/off ratio due to spurious metallic nanotubes that bridge the channel. 4071 individual and small bundles of s-SWCNTs are tested in 400 nm channel length FETs, and all show semiconducting behavior, demonstrating the high fidelity of polyfluorenes as selective agents and the promise of assembling s-SWCNTs from solution to create high performance semiconductor electronic devices.

  12. Highly stretchable carbon nanotube transistors enabled by buckled ion gel gate dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Ma, Zhenqiang; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Feng; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-08-03

    Deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) are expected to facilitate new technologies like stretchable displays, conformal devices, and electronic skins. We previously demonstrated stretchable FETs based on buckled thin films of polyfluorene-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as the channel, buckled metal films as electrodes, and unbuckled flexible ion gel films as the dielectric. The FETs were stretchable up to 50% without appreciable degradation in performance before failure of the ion gel film. Here, we show that by buckling the ion gel, the integrity and performance of the nanotube FETs are extended to nearly 90% elongation, limited by the stretchability of the elastomer substrate. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >10{sup 4} and a field-effect mobility of 5 cm{sup 2} V{sup −1} s{sup −1} under elongation and demonstrate invariant performance over 1000 stretching cycles.

  13. Highly stretchable carbon nanotube transistors enabled by buckled ion gel gate dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Meng-Yin; Zhao, Juan; Xu, Feng; Chang, Tzu-Hsuan; Jacobberger, Robert M.; Ma, Zhenqiang; Arnold, Michael S.

    2015-08-01

    Deformable field-effect transistors (FETs) are expected to facilitate new technologies like stretchable displays, conformal devices, and electronic skins. We previously demonstrated stretchable FETs based on buckled thin films of polyfluorene-wrapped semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes as the channel, buckled metal films as electrodes, and unbuckled flexible ion gel films as the dielectric. The FETs were stretchable up to 50% without appreciable degradation in performance before failure of the ion gel film. Here, we show that by buckling the ion gel, the integrity and performance of the nanotube FETs are extended to nearly 90% elongation, limited by the stretchability of the elastomer substrate. The FETs maintain an on/off ratio of >104 and a field-effect mobility of 5 cm2 V-1 s-1 under elongation and demonstrate invariant performance over 1000 stretching cycles.

  14. Simulation-based design of a strained graphene field effect transistor incorporating the pseudo magnetic field effect

    SciTech Connect

    Souma, Satofumi Ueyama, Masayuki; Ogawa, Matsuto

    2014-05-26

    We present a numerical study on the performance of strained graphene-based field-effect transistors. A local strain less than 10% is applied over a central channel region of the graphene to induce the shift of the Dirac point in the channel region along the transverse momentum direction. The left and the right unstrained graphene regions are doped to be either n-type or p-type. By using the atomistic tight-binding model and a Green's function method, we predict that the gate voltage applied to the central strained graphene region can switch the drain current on and off with an on/off ratio of more than six orders of magnitude at room temperature. This is in spite of the absence of a bandgap in the strained channel region. Steeper subthreshold slopes below 60 mV/decade are also predicted at room temperature because of a mechanism similar to the band-to-band tunneling field-effect transistors.

  15. Tunable electrical properties of multilayer HfSe2 field effect transistors by oxygen plasma treatment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Moonshik; Rathi, Servin; Lee, Inyeal; Li, Lijun; Khan, Muhammad Atif; Lim, Dongsuk; Lee, Yoontae; Park, Jinwoo; Yun, Sun Jin; Youn, Doo-Hyeb; Jun, Chungsam; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2017-01-26

    HfSe2 field effect transistors are systematically studied in order to selectively tune their electrical properties by optimizing layer thickness and oxygen plasma treatment. The optimized plasma-treated HfSe2 field effect transistors showed a high on/off ratio improvement of four orders of magnitude, from 27 to 10(5), a field effect mobility increase from 2.16 to 3.04 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), a subthreshold swing improvement from 30.6 to 4.8 V dec(-1), and a positive threshold voltage shift between depletion mode and enhancement mode, from -7.02 to 11.5 V. The plasma-treated HfSe2 photodetector also demonstrates a reasonable photoresponsivity from the visible to the near-infrared region of light.

  16. Nanoscale organic and polymeric field-effect transistors as chemical sensors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Liang; Fine, Daniel; Sharma, Deepak; Torsi, Luisa; Dodabalapur, Ananth

    2006-01-01

    This article reviews recently published work concerning improved understanding of, and advancements in, organic and polymer semiconductor vapor-phase chemical sensing. Thin-film transistor sensors ranging in size from hundreds of microns down to a few nanometers are discussed, with comparisons made of sensing responses recorded at these different channel-length scales. The vapor-sensing behavior of nanoscale organic transistors is different from that of large-scale devices, because electrical transport in a nanoscale organic thin-film transistor depends on its morphological structure and interface properties (for example injection barrier) which could be modulated by delivery of analyte. Materials used in nanoscale devices, for example nanoparticles, nanotubes, and nanowires, are also briefly summarized in an attempt to introduce other relevant nano-transducers.

  17. Resonant subgap current transport in Josephson field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bezuglyi, E. V.; Bratus', E. N.; Shumeiko, V. S.

    2017-01-01

    We study theoretically the current-voltage characteristics (IVCs) of the Josephson field effect transistor—a ballistic SNINS junction with superconducting (S) electrodes confining a planar normal-metal region (N), which is controlled by the gate-induced potential barrier (I). Using the computation technique developed earlier for long single-channel junctions in the coherent multiple Andreev reflection (MAR) regime, we find a significant difference of the subgap current structure compared to the subharmonic gap structure in tunnel junctions and atomic-size point contacts. For long junctions, whose lengths significantly exceed the coherence length, the IVC exhibits current peaks at multiples (harmonics) of the distance δm between the static Andreev levels e Vn=n δm . Moreover, the averaged IVC follows the powerlike behavior rather than the exponential one and has a universal scaling with the junction transparency. This result is qualitatively understood using an analytical approach based on the concept of resonant MAR trajectories. In shorter junctions having lengths comparable to the coherence length, the IVC has an exponential form common for point contacts, however the current structures appear at the subharmonics of the interlevel distance e Vn=δm/n rather than the gap subharmonics 2 Δ /n .

  18. Carbon Nanotube Thin Film Transistors for Flat Panel Display Application.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xuelei; Xia, Jiye; Dong, Guodong; Tian, Boyuan; Peng, Lianmao

    2016-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are promising materials for both high performance transistors for high speed computing and thin film transistors for macroelectronics, which can provide more functions at low cost. Among macroelectronics applications, carbon nanotube thin film transistors (CNT-TFT) are expected to be used soon for backplanes in flat panel displays (FPDs) due to their superior performance. In this paper, we review the challenges of CNT-TFT technology for FPD applications. The device performance of state-of-the-art CNT-TFTs are compared with the requirements of TFTs for FPDs. Compatibility of the fabrication processes of CNT-TFTs and current TFT technologies are critically examined. Though CNT-TFT technology is not yet ready for backplane production line of FPDs, the challenges can be overcome by close collaboration between research institutes and FPD manufacturers in the short term.

  19. Thin film transistors of single-walled carbon nanotubes grown directly on glass substrates.

    PubMed

    Bae, Eun Ju; Min, Yo-Sep; Kim, Un Jeong; Park, Wanjun

    2007-12-12

    We report a transistor of randomly networked single-walled carbon nanotubes on a glass substrate. The carbon nanotube networks acting as the active components of the thin film transistor were selectively formed on the transistor channel areas that were previously patterned with catalysts to avoid the etching process for isolating nanotubes. The nanotube density was more than 50 microm(-2), which is much larger than the percolation threshold. Transistors were successfully fabricated with a conducting and transparent ZnO for the back-side gate and the top-side gate. This allows the transparent electronics or suggests thin film applications of nanotubes for future opto-electronics.

  20. One-volt operation of high-current vertical channel polymer semiconductor field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Danvers E; Yager, Kevin G; Nam, Chang-Yong; Ocko, Benjamin M; Black, Charles T

    2012-08-08

    We realize a vertical channel polymer semiconductor field effect transistor architecture by confining the organic material within gratings of interdigitated trenches. The geometric space savings of a perpendicular channel orientation results in devices sourcing areal current densities in excess of 40 mA/cm(2), using a one-volt supply voltage, and maintaining near-ideal device operating characteristics. Vertical channel transistors have a similar electronic mobility to that of planar devices using the same polymer semiconductor, consistent with a molecular reorientation within confining trenches we understand through X-ray scattering measurements.

  1. Direct probing of Schottky barriers in Si nanowire Schottky barrier field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dominik; Heinzig, Andre; Grube, Matthias; Geelhaar, Lutz; Mikolajick, Thomas; Riechert, Henning; Weber, Walter M

    2011-11-18

    This work elucidates the role of the Schottky junction in the electronic transport of nanometer-scale transistors. In the example of Schottky barrier silicon nanowire field effect transistors, an electrical scanning probe technique is applied to examine the charge transport effects of a nanometer-scale local top gate during operation. The results prove experimentally that Schottky barriers control the charge carrier transport in these devices. In addition, a proof of concept for a reprogrammable nonvolatile memory device based on band bending at the Schottky barriers will be shown.

  2. Light quasiparticles dominate electronic transport in molecular crystal field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Z. Q.; Podzorov, V.; Sai, N.; Martin, Michael C.; Gershenson, M. E.; Di Ventra, M.; Basov, D. N.

    2007-03-01

    We report on an infrared spectroscopy study of mobile holes in the accumulation layer of organic field-effect transistors based on rubrene single crystals. Our data indicate that both transport and infrared properties of these transistors at room temperature are governed by light quasiparticles in molecular orbital bands with the effective masses m[small star, filled]comparable to free electron mass. Furthermore, the m[small star, filled]values inferred from our experiments are in agreement with those determined from band structure calculations. These findings reveal no evidence for prominent polaronic effects, which is at variance with the common beliefs of polaron formation in molecular solids.

  3. High-hole-mobility organic-inorganic perovskite field-effect transistors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Toshinori; Hwang, Sun Bin; Sandanayaka, Atula D.; Qin, Chuanjiang; Fujihara, Takashi; Yahiro, Masayuki; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-11-01

    We have recently focused our attention on the application of perovskite materials to a semiconducting layer in field-effect transistors. Because perovskite materials are expected to promise the processability and flexibility inherent to organic semiconductors as well as the superior carrier transport inherent to inorganic semiconductors, we believe that organic semiconductor-like cost-effective, flexible transistors with inorganic semiconductor-like high carrier mobility can be realized using perovskite semiconductors in future. In this study, we have prepared the tin iodide-based perovskite as a semiconducting layer on silicon dioxide layers treated with a self-assembled monolayer containing ammonium iodide terminal groups by spin coating and, then, source-drain electrodes on the perovskite layer by vacuum deposition for the fabrication of a top-contact perovskite transistor. Because of a well-developed perovskite layer formed on the treated substrate and reduced contact resistance resulting from the top-contact structure, we have obtained a new record hole mobility of up to 12 cm2 V-1 s-1 in our perovskite transistors, which is about five times higher than a previous record hole mobility and is considered to be a very good value when compared with widely investigated organic transistors. Along with the high hole mobility, we have demonstrated that this surface treatment leads to smaller hysteresis in output and transfer characteristics and better stress stability under constant gate voltage application. These findings open the way for huge advances in solution-processable high-mobility transistors.

  4. Fundamental performance limits of carbon nanotube thin-film transistors achieved using hybrid molecular dielectrics.

    PubMed

    Sangwan, Vinod K; Ortiz, Rocio Ponce; Alaboson, Justice M P; Emery, Jonathan D; Bedzyk, Michael J; Lauhon, Lincoln J; Marks, Tobin J; Hersam, Mark C

    2012-08-28

    In the past decade, semiconducting carbon nanotube thin films have been recognized as contending materials for wide-ranging applications in electronics, energy, and sensing. In particular, improvements in large-area flexible electronics have been achieved through independent advances in postgrowth processing to resolve metallic versus semiconducting carbon nanotube heterogeneity, in improved gate dielectrics, and in self-assembly processes. Moreover, controlled tuning of specific device components has afforded fundamental probes of the trade-offs between materials properties and device performance metrics. Nevertheless, carbon nanotube transistor performance suitable for real-world applications awaits understanding-based progress in the integration of independently pioneered device components. We achieve this here by integrating high-purity semiconducting carbon nanotube films with a custom-designed hybrid inorganic-organic gate dielectric. This synergistic combination of materials circumvents conventional design trade-offs, resulting in concurrent advances in several transistor performance metrics such as transconductance (6.5 μS/μm), intrinsic field-effect mobility (147 cm(2)/(V s)), subthreshold swing (150 mV/decade), and on/off ratio (5 × 10(5)), while also achieving hysteresis-free operation in ambient conditions.

  5. Controlling signal transport in a carbon nanotube opto-transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jinjin; Chu, Yanhui; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2016-11-01

    With the highly competitive development of communication technologies, modern information manufactures place high importance on the ability to control the transmitted signal using easy miniaturization materials. A controlled and miniaturized optical information device is, therefore, vital for researchers in information and communication fields. Here we propose a controlled signal transport in a doubly clamped carbon nanotube system, where the transmitted signal can be controlled by another pump beam. Pump off results in the transmitted signal off, while pump on results in the transmitted signal on. The more pump, the more amplified output signal transmission. Analogous with traditional cavity optomechanical system, the role of optical cavity is played by a localized exciton in carbon nanotube while the role of the mechanical element is played by the nanotube vibrations, which enables the realization of an opto-transistor based on carbon nanotube. Since the signal amplification and attenuation have been observed in traditional optomechanical system, and the nanotube optomechanical system has been realized in laboratory, the proposed carbon nanotube opto-transistor could be implemented in current experiments and open the door to potential applications in modern optical networks and future quantum networks.

  6. Controlling signal transport in a carbon nanotube opto-transistor

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinjin; Chu, Yanhui; Zhu, Ka-Di

    2016-01-01

    With the highly competitive development of communication technologies, modern information manufactures place high importance on the ability to control the transmitted signal using easy miniaturization materials. A controlled and miniaturized optical information device is, therefore, vital for researchers in information and communication fields. Here we propose a controlled signal transport in a doubly clamped carbon nanotube system, where the transmitted signal can be controlled by another pump beam. Pump off results in the transmitted signal off, while pump on results in the transmitted signal on. The more pump, the more amplified output signal transmission. Analogous with traditional cavity optomechanical system, the role of optical cavity is played by a localized exciton in carbon nanotube while the role of the mechanical element is played by the nanotube vibrations, which enables the realization of an opto-transistor based on carbon nanotube. Since the signal amplification and attenuation have been observed in traditional optomechanical system, and the nanotube optomechanical system has been realized in laboratory, the proposed carbon nanotube opto-transistor could be implemented in current experiments and open the door to potential applications in modern optical networks and future quantum networks. PMID:27849016

  7. Silicon field-effect transistors as radiation detectors for the Sub-THz range

    SciTech Connect

    But, D. B. Golenkov, O. G.; Sakhno, N. V.; Sizov, F. F.; Korinets, S. V.; Gumenjuk-Sichevska, J. V.; Reva, V. P.; Bunchuk, S. G.

    2012-05-15

    The nonresonance response of silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (Si-MOSFETs) with a long channel (1-20 {mu}m) to radiation in the frequency range 43-135 GHz is studied. The transistors are fabricated by the standard CMOS technology with 1-{mu}m design rules. The volt-watt sensitivity and the noise equivalent power (NEP) for such detectors are estimated with the calculated effective area of the detecting element taken into account. It is shown that such transistors can operate at room temperature as broadband direct detectors of sub-THz radiation. In the 4-5 mm range of wavelengths, the volt-watt sensitivity can be as high as tens of kV/W and the NEP can amount to 10{sup -11} - 10{sup -12}W/{radical}Hz . The parameters of detectors under study can be improved by the optimization of planar antennas.

  8. Unidirectional coating technology for organic field-effect transistors: materials and methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Huabin; Wang, Qijing; Qian, Jun; Yin, Yao; Shi, Yi; Li, Yun

    2015-05-01

    Solution-processed organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are essential for developing organic electronics. The encouraging development in solution-processed OFETs has attracted research interest because of their potential in low-cost devices with performance comparable to polycrystalline-silicon-based transistors. In recent years, unidirectional coating technology, featuring thin-film coating along only one direction and involving specific materials as well as solution-assisted fabrication methods, has attracted intensive interest. Transistors with organic semiconductor layers, which are deposited via unidirectional coating methods, have achieved high performance. In particular, carrier mobility has been greatly enhanced to values much higher than 10 cm2 V-1 s-1. Such significant improvement is mainly attributed to better control in morphology and molecular packing arrangement of organic thin film. In this review, typical materials that are being used in OFETs are discussed, and demonstrations of unidirectional coating methods are surveyed.

  9. Low-voltage operation of n-type organic field-effect transistors with ionic liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, T.; Yamagishi, M.; Ono, S.; Takeya, J.

    2009-09-01

    High performance n-type organic field-effect transistors are developed to achieve high transconductance and low-threshold voltage using ionic-liquid electrolyte for intense electrostatic gating. Tetracyanoquinodimethane single crystals and C60 thin films are interfaced with ionic liquid of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide known for its low viscosity and high ionic conductivity, so that high-density electrons are rapidly accumulated in the semiconductor surfaces with the application of minimum gate voltages, forming 1-nm thick electric double layers to concentrate electric field as high as 1 MV/cm. The C60 transistor shows the highest normalized transconductance among reported n-type organic transistors, together with minimum threshold voltage.

  10. Ferroelectric Material Application: Modeling Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor Characteristics from Micro to Nano

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd, C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    2006-01-01

    All present ferroelectric transistors have been made on the micrometer scale. Existing models of these devices do not take into account effects of nanoscale ferroelectric transistors. Understanding the characteristics of these nanoscale devices is important in developing a strategy for building and using future devices. This paper takes an existing microscale ferroelectric field effect transistor (FFET) model and adds effects that become important at a nanoscale level, including electron velocity saturation and direct tunneling. The new model analyzed FFETs ranging in length from 40,000 nanometers to 4 nanometers and ferroelectric thickness form 200 nanometers to 1 nanometer. The results show that FFETs can operate on the nanoscale but have some undesirable characteristics at very small dimensions.

  11. Reducing flicker noise in chemical vapor deposition graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, Heather N.; Sangwan, Vinod K.; Schmucker, Scott W.; Cress, Cory D.; Luck, Kyle A.; Friedman, Adam L.; Robinson, Jeremy T.; Marks, Tobin J.; Hersam, Mark C.

    2016-02-01

    Single-layer graphene derived from chemical vapor deposition (CVD) holds promise for scalable radio frequency (RF) electronic applications. However, prevalent low-frequency flicker noise (1/f noise) in CVD graphene field-effect transistors is often up-converted to higher frequencies, thus limiting RF device performance. Here, we achieve an order of magnitude reduction in 1/f noise in field-effect transistors based on CVD graphene transferred onto silicon oxide substrates by utilizing a processing protocol that avoids aqueous chemistry after graphene transfer. Correspondingly, the normalized noise spectral density (10-7-10-8 μm2 Hz-1) and noise amplitude (4 × 10-8-10-7) in these devices are comparable to those of exfoliated and suspended graphene. We attribute the reduction in 1/f noise to a decrease in the contribution of fluctuations in the scattering cross-sections of carriers arising from dynamic redistribution of interfacial disorder.

  12. Steep switching characteristics of single-gated feedback field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Minsuk; Kim, Yoonjoong; Lim, Doohyeok; Woo, Sola; Cho, Kyoungah; Kim, Sangsig

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we propose newly designed feedback field-effect transistors that utilize the positive feedback of charge carriers in single-gated silicon channels to achieve steep switching behaviors. The band diagram, I-V characteristics, subthreshold swing, and on/off current ratio are analyzed using a commercial device simulator. Our proposed feedback field-effect transistors exhibit subthreshold swings of less than 0.1 mV dec-1, an on/off current ratio of approximately 1011, and an on-current of approximately 10-4 A at room temperature, demonstrating that the switching characteristics are superior to those of other silicon-based devices. In addition, the device parameters that affect the device performance, hysteresis characteristics, and temperature-dependent device characteristics are discussed in detail.

  13. Extended Gate Field-Effect Transistor Biosensors for Point-Of-Care Testing of Uric Acid.

    PubMed

    Guan, Weihua; Reed, Mark A

    2017-01-01

    An enzyme-free redox potential sensor using off-chip extended-gate field effect transistor (EGFET) with a ferrocenyl-alkanethiol modified gold electrode has been used to quantify uric acid concentration in human serum and urine. Hexacyanoferrate (II) and (III) ions are used as redox reagent. The potentiometric sensor measures the interface potential on the ferrocene immobilized gold electrode, which is modulated by the redox reaction between uric acid and hexacyanoferrate ions. The device shows a near Nernstian response to uric acid and is highly specific to uric acid in human serum and urine. The interference that comes from glucose, bilirubin, ascorbic acid, and hemoglobin is negligible in the normal concentration range of these interferents. The sensor also exhibits excellent long term reliability and is regenerative. This extended gate field effect transistor based sensor is promising for point-of-care detection of uric acid due to the small size, low cost, and low sample volume consumption.

  14. Ionic-Liquid Gated Bilayer MoS2 Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madusanka Perera, Meeghage; Chuang, Hsun-Jen; Lin, Ming-Wei; Chamlagain, Bhim; Tan, Xuebin; Ming-Cheng Cheng, Mark; Zhou, Zhixian

    2012-10-01

    We report the electrical characterization of ionic-liquid-gated bilayer MoS2 field-effect transistors. An On-Off current ratio greater than 10^6 is achieved for hole transport, while that for electron transport exceeds 10^8. The subthreshold swing of our bilayer MoS2 devices reaches as low as 47 mV/dec at 230 K, approaching the theoretical limit. We also demonstrate that 1) the extrinsic mobility of back-gated MoS2 field-effect transistors is largely limited by the contact resistance; and 2) the extremely large electrical-double-layer capacitance of ionic liquid significantly reduces the Schottky contact barrier leading up to three orders of magnitude mobility increase for electron transport.

  15. A review for compact model of graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Nianduan; Wang, Lingfei; Li, Ling; Liu, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Graphene has attracted enormous interests due to its unique physical, mechanical, and electrical properties. Specially, graphene-based field-effect transistors (FETs) have evolved rapidly and are now considered as an option for conventional silicon devices. As a critical step in the design cycle of modern IC products, compact model refers to the development of models for integrated semiconductor devices for use in circuit simulations. The purpose of this review is to provide a theoretical description of current compact model of graphene field-effect transistors. Special attention is devoted to the charge sheet model, drift-diffusion model, Boltzmann equation, density of states (DOS), and surface-potential-based compact model. Finally, an outlook of this field is briefly discussed.

  16. Towards a cleaner graphene surface in graphene field effect transistor via N,N-Dimethylacetamide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Da-Cheng; Peng, Song-Ang; Wang, Shao-Qing; Zhang, Da-Yong; Shi, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xinnan; Jin, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional material with a high surface to volume ratio and the fabrication process of graphene field effect transistors always introduces unintended contaminates like photoresidues on the surface of graphene. These contaminations are difficult to remove by conventional acetone solvent and suppress the intrinsic properties of graphene. To address the problem, a wet-chemical approach employing N,N-Dimethylacetamide (C4H9NO) was developed in this study, which shows an increase of the carrier mobility and a reduction of minimum conductance point in our devices. Raman spectroscopy and atomic force microscope were carried out to verify the cleaning effect of the approach. Our method provides a simple and effective way to enhance the electrical performance of graphene field effect transistors and can be readily integrated into the CMOS fabrication pilot line.

  17. Mobility enhancement of organic field-effect transistor based on guanine trap-neutralizing layer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wei; Zheng, Yifan; Yu, Junsheng; Taylor, André D.; Katz, Howard E.

    2016-10-01

    We introduced a nucleic acid component guanine as a trap-neutralizing layer between silicon dioxide gate dielectric and a pentacene semiconducting layer to obtain increased field-effect mobility in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs). A tripling of the field-effect mobility, from 0.13 to 0.42 cm2/V s, was achieved by introducing a 2 nm guanine layer. By characterizing the surface morphology of pentacene films grown on guanine, we found that the effect of guanine layer on the topography of pentacene film was not responsible for the mobility enhancement of the OFETs. The increased field-effect mobility was mainly attributed to the hydrogen bonding capacity of otherwise unassociated guanine molecules, which enabled them to neutralize trapping sites on the silicon dioxide surface.

  18. Field-effect transistors fabricated from diluted magnetic semiconductor colloidal nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhen; Du, Ai Jun; Sun, Qiao; Aljada, Muhsen; Zhu, Zhong Hua; Lu, Gao Qing (Max)

    2012-02-01

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated from undoped and Co2+-doped CdSe colloidal nanowires show typical n-channel transistor behaviour with gate effect. Exposed to microscope light, a 10 times current enhancement is observed in the doped nanowire-based devices due to the significant modification of the electronic structure of CdSe nanowires induced by Co2+-doping, which is revealed by theoretical calculations from spin-polarized plane-wave density functional theory.Field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated from undoped and Co2+-doped CdSe colloidal nanowires show typical n-channel transistor behaviour with gate effect. Exposed to microscope light, a 10 times current enhancement is observed in the doped nanowire-based devices due to the significant modification of the electronic structure of CdSe nanowires induced by Co2+-doping, which is revealed by theoretical calculations from spin-polarized plane-wave density functional theory. Z. Li gratefully acknowledges the support from Queensland Smart Futures Fellowship, UQ early-career-research grant and UQ new staff research startup grant. Support from the Australian Research Council (through its centres program) to the ARC Centre of Excellence for Functional Nanomaterials is also gratefully acknowledged.

  19. Multifunctional Self-Assembled Monolayers for Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cernetic, Nathan

    Organic field effect transistors (OFETs) have the potential to reach commercialization for a wide variety of applications such as active matrix display circuitry, chemical and biological sensing, radio-frequency identification devices and flexible electronics. In order to be commercially competitive with already at-market amorphous silicon devices, OFETs need to approach similar performance levels. Significant progress has been made in developing high performance organic semiconductors and dielectric materials. Additionally, a common route to improve the performance metric of OFETs is via interface modification at the critical dielectric/semiconductor and electrode/semiconductor interface which often play a significant role in charge transport properties. These metal oxide interfaces are typically modified with rationally designed multifunctional self-assembled monolayers. As means toward improving the performance metrics of OFETs, rationally designed multifunctional self-assembled monolayers are used to explore the relationship between surface energy, SAM order, and SAM dipole on OFET performance. The studies presented within are (1) development of a multifunctional SAM capable of simultaneously modifying dielectric and metal surface while maintaining compatibility with solution processed techniques (2) exploration of the relationship between SAM dipole and anchor group on graphene transistors, and (3) development of self-assembled monolayer field-effect transistor in which the traditional thick organic semiconductor is replaced by a rationally designed self-assembled monolayer semiconductor. The findings presented within represent advancement in the understanding of the influence of self-assembled monolayers on OFETs as well as progress towards rationally designed monolayer transistors.

  20. Correlation between morphology and ambipolar transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Th. B.; Günes, S.; Marjanović, N.; Sariciftci, N. S.; Menon, R.

    2005-06-01

    Attaining ambipolar charge transport in organic field-effect transistors (OFET) is highly desirable from both fundamental understanding and application points of view. We present the results of an approach to obtain ambipolar OFET with an active layer of organic semiconductor blends using semiconducting polymers in composite with fullerene derivatives. Clear features of forming the superposition of both hole and electron-enhanced channels for an applied gate field are observed. The present studies suggest a strong correlation of thin-film nanomorphology and ambipolar transport in field-effect devices.

  1. Ultrathin MXene-Micropattern-Based Field-Effect Transistor for Probing Neural Activity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bingzhe; Zhu, Minshen; Zhang, Wencong; Zhen, Xu; Pei, Zengxia; Xue, Qi; Zhi, Chunyi; Shi, Peng

    2016-05-01

    A field-effect transistor (FET) based on ultrathin Ti3 C2 -MXene micropatterns is developed and utilized as a highly sensitive biosensor. The device is produced with the microcontact printing technique, making use of its unique advantages for easy fabrication. Using the MXene-FET device, label-free probing of small molecules in typical biological environments and fast detection of action potentials in primary neurons is demonstrated.

  2. Highly transparent and stretchable field-effect transistor sensors using graphene-nanowire hybrid nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Joohee; Lee, Mi-Sun; Jeon, Sangbin; Kim, Minji; Kim, Sungwon; Kim, Kukjoo; Bien, Franklin; Hong, Sung You; Park, Jang-Ung

    2015-06-03

    Transparent and stretchable electronics with remarkable bendability, conformability, and lightness are the key attributes for sensing or wearable devices. Transparent and stretchable field-effect transistor sensors using graphene-metal nanowire hybrid nanostructures have high mobility (≈3000 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) ) with low contact resistance, and they are transferrable onto a variety of substrates. The integration of these sensors for RLC circuits enables wireless monitoring.

  3. Charge carrier transport in polycrystalline organic thin film based field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rani, Varsha; Sharma, Akanksha; Ghosh, Subhasis

    2016-05-01

    The charge carrier transport mechanism in polycrystalline thin film based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) has been explained using two competing models, multiple trapping and releases (MTR) model and percolation model. It has been shown that MTR model is most suitable for explaining charge carrier transport in grainy polycrystalline organic thin films. The energetic distribution of traps determined independently using Mayer-Neldel rule (MNR) is in excellent agreement with the values obtained by MTR model for copper phthalocyanine and pentacene based OFETs.

  4. The hysteresis-free negative capacitance field effect transistors using non-linear poly capacitance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, S.-T.; Yan, J.-Y.; Lai, D.-C.; Liu, C. W.

    2016-08-01

    A gate structure design for negative capacitance field effect transistors (NCFETs) is proposed. The hysteresis loop in current-voltage performances is eliminated by the nonlinear C-V dependence of polysilicon in the gate dielectrics. Design considerations and optimizations to achieve the low SS and hysteresis-free transfer were elaborated. The effects of gate-to-source/drain overlap, channel length scaling, interface trap states and temperature impact on SS are also investigated.

  5. Multidomain ferroelectricity as a limiting factor for voltage amplification in ferroelectric field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cano, A.; Jiménez, D.

    2010-09-01

    We revise the possibility of having an amplified surface potential in ferroelectric field-effect transistors pointed out by [S. Salahuddin and S. Datta, Nano Lett. 8, 405 (2008)]. We show that the negative-capacitance regime that allows for such amplification is actually bounded by the appearance of multidomain ferroelectricity. This imposes a severe limit to the maximum step-up of the surface potential obtainable in the device. We indicate new device design rules taking into account this scenario.

  6. Gate-induced carrier delocalization in quantum dot field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Turk, Michael E; Choi, Ji-Hyuk; Oh, Soong Ju; Fafarman, Aaron T; Diroll, Benjamin T; Murray, Christopher B; Kagan, Cherie R; Kikkawa, James M

    2014-10-08

    We study gate-controlled, low-temperature resistance and magnetotransport in indium-doped CdSe quantum dot field effect transistors. We show that using the gate to accumulate electrons in the quantum dot channel increases the "localization product" (localization length times dielectric constant) describing transport at the Fermi level, as expected for Fermi level changes near a mobility edge. Our measurements suggest that the localization length increases to significantly greater than the quantum dot diameter.

  7. Measuring bi-directional current through a field-effect transistor by virtue of drain-to-source voltage measurement

    DOEpatents

    Turner, Steven Richard

    2006-12-26

    A method and apparatus for measuring current, and particularly bi-directional current, in a field-effect transistor (FET) using drain-to-source voltage measurements. The drain-to-source voltage of the FET is measured and amplified. This signal is then compensated for variations in the temperature of the FET, which affects the impedance of the FET when it is switched on. The output is a signal representative of the direction of the flow of current through the field-effect transistor and the level of the current through the field-effect transistor. Preferably, the measurement only occurs when the FET is switched on.

  8. Hydrothermally Processed Photosensitive Field-Effect Transistor Based on ZnO Nanorod Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashish; Bhargava, Kshitij; Dixit, Tejendra; Palani, I. A.; Singh, Vipul

    2016-11-01

    Formation of a stable, reproducible zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorod-network-based photosensitive field-effect transistor using a hydrothermal process at low temperature has been demonstrated. K2Cr2O7 additive was used to improve adhesion and facilitate growth of the ZnO nanorod network over the SiO2/Si substrate. Transistor characteristics obtained in the dark resemble those of the n-channel-mode field-effect transistor (FET). The devices showed I on/ I off ratio above 8 × 102 under dark condition, field-effect mobility of 4.49 cm2 V-1 s-1, and threshold voltage of -12 V. Further, under ultraviolet (UV) illumination, the FET exhibited sensitivity of 2.7 × 102 in off-state (-10 V) versus 1.4 in on-state (+9.7 V) of operation. FETs based on such nanorod networks showed good photoresponse, which is attributed to the large surface area of the nanorod network. The growth temperature for ZnO nanorod networks was kept at 110°C, enabling a low-temperature, cost-effective, simple approach for high-performance ZnO-based FETs for large-scale production. The role of network interfaces in the FET performance is also discussed.

  9. Photon-number-discriminating detection using a quantum-dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, E. J.; Rowe, M. A.; Greene, M. B.; Rosenberg, D.; Harvey, T. E.; Su, M. Y.; Hadfield, R. H.; Nam, S. W.; Mirin, R. P.

    2007-10-01

    Detectors with the capability to directly measure the photon number of a pulse of light enable linear optics quantum computing, affect the security of quantum communications, and can be used to characterize and herald non-classical states of light. Here, we demonstrate the photon-number-resolving capabilities of a quantum-dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor that uses quantum dots as optically addressable floating gates in a GaAs/Al0.2Ga0.8As δ-doped field-effect transistor. When the active area of the detector is illuminated, photo-generated carriers trapped by quantum dots screen the gate field, causing a persistent change in the channel current that is proportional to the number of confined carriers. Using weak laser pulses, we show that discrete numbers of trapped carriers produce well resolved changes in the channel current. We demonstrate that for a mean photon number of 1.1, decision regions can be defined such that the field-effect transistor determines the number of detected photons with a probability of accuracy greater than 83%.

  10. Novel Field-Effect Schottky Barrier Transistors Based on Graphene-MoS2 Heterojunctions

    PubMed Central

    Tian, He; Tan, Zhen; Wu, Can; Wang, Xiaomu; Mohammad, Mohammad Ali; Xie, Dan; Yang, Yi; Wang, Jing; Li, Lain-Jong; Xu, Jun; Ren, Tian-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Recently, two-dimensional materials such as molybdenum disulphide (MoS2) have been demonstrated to realize field effect transistors (FET) with a large current on-off ratio. However, the carrier mobility in backgate MoS2 FET is rather low (typically 0.5–20 cm2/V·s). Here, we report a novel field-effect Schottky barrier transistors (FESBT) based on graphene-MoS2 heterojunction (GMH), where the characteristics of high mobility from graphene and high on-off ratio from MoS2 are properly balanced in the novel transistors. Large modulation on the device current (on/off ratio of 105) is achieved by adjusting the backgate (through 300 nm SiO2) voltage to modulate the graphene-MoS2 Schottky barrier. Moreover, the field effective mobility of the FESBT is up to 58.7 cm2/V·s. Our theoretical analysis shows that if the thickness of oxide is further reduced, a subthreshold swing (SS) of 40 mV/decade can be maintained within three orders of drain current at room temperature. This provides an opportunity to overcome the limitation of 60 mV/decade for conventional CMOS devices. The FESBT implemented with a high on-off ratio, a relatively high mobility and a low subthreshold promises low-voltage and low-power applications for future electronics. PMID:25109609

  11. Multiscale modeling of nanowire-based Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors for sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Nozaki, D; Kunstmann, J; Zörgiebel, F; Weber, W M; Mikolajick, T; Cuniberti, G

    2011-08-12

    We present a theoretical framework for the calculation of charge transport through nanowire-based Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors that is conceptually simple but still captures the relevant physical mechanisms of the transport process. Our approach combines two approaches on different length scales: (1) the finite element method is used to model realistic device geometries and to calculate the electrostatic potential across the Schottky barrier by solving the Poisson equation, and (2) the Landauer-Büttiker approach combined with the method of non-equilibrium Green's functions is employed to calculate the charge transport through the device. Our model correctly reproduces typical I-V characteristics of field-effect transistors, and the dependence of the saturated drain current on the gate field and the device geometry are in good agreement with experiments. Our approach is suitable for one-dimensional Schottky-barrier field-effect transistors of arbitrary device geometry and it is intended to be a simulation platform for the development of nanowire-based sensors.

  12. Current crowding mediated large contact noise in graphene field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Karnatak, Paritosh; Sai, T. Phanindra; Goswami, Srijit; Ghatak, Subhamoy; Kaushal, Sanjeev; Ghosh, Arindam

    2016-01-01

    The impact of the intrinsic time-dependent fluctuations in the electrical resistance at the graphene–metal interface or the contact noise, on the performance of graphene field-effect transistors, can be as adverse as the contact resistance itself, but remains largely unexplored. Here we have investigated the contact noise in graphene field-effect transistors of varying device geometry and contact configuration, with carrier mobility ranging from 5,000 to 80,000 cm2 V−1 s−1. Our phenomenological model for contact noise because of current crowding in purely two-dimensional conductors confirms that the contacts dominate the measured resistance noise in all graphene field-effect transistors in the two-probe or invasive four-probe configurations, and surprisingly, also in nearly noninvasive four-probe (Hall bar) configuration in the high-mobility devices. The microscopic origin of contact noise is directly linked to the fluctuating electrostatic environment of the metal–channel interface, which could be generic to two-dimensional material-based electronic devices. PMID:27929087

  13. Current crowding mediated large contact noise in graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnatak, Paritosh; Sai, T. Phanindra; Goswami, Srijit; Ghatak, Subhamoy; Kaushal, Sanjeev; Ghosh, Arindam

    2016-12-01

    The impact of the intrinsic time-dependent fluctuations in the electrical resistance at the graphene-metal interface or the contact noise, on the performance of graphene field-effect transistors, can be as adverse as the contact resistance itself, but remains largely unexplored. Here we have investigated the contact noise in graphene field-effect transistors of varying device geometry and contact configuration, with carrier mobility ranging from 5,000 to 80,000 cm2 V-1 s-1. Our phenomenological model for contact noise because of current crowding in purely two-dimensional conductors confirms that the contacts dominate the measured resistance noise in all graphene field-effect transistors in the two-probe or invasive four-probe configurations, and surprisingly, also in nearly noninvasive four-probe (Hall bar) configuration in the high-mobility devices. The microscopic origin of contact noise is directly linked to the fluctuating electrostatic environment of the metal-channel interface, which could be generic to two-dimensional material-based electronic devices.

  14. Fabrication of graphene field-effect transistor on top of ferroelectric single-crystal substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee; Kang, Haeyong; Lee, Yourack; Kim, Jeong-Gyun; Kim, Joong-Gyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Park, Jeongmin; Kim, Taesoo; Kim, Jung Ho; Jin, Youngjo; Shin, Yong Seon; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2015-03-01

    In the analysis of Graphene field-effect transistor, the substrate material which has the direct contact with Graphene layer plays an important in the device performance. In this presentation, we have tested PMN-PT(i.e.(1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3-xPbTiO3) substrate as a gate dielectric of Graphene field-effect transistor. Unlike the case of previously used substrates such as silicon oxide or hexagonal Boron-Nitride(h-BN), the PMN-PT substrate can induce giant amount of surface charge that is directly injected to the attached Graphene layer due to its ferroelectric property. And the hysteresis of polarization versus electric field of PMN-PT can cause the device to show the ferroelectric nonvolatile memory operation. We had successfully fabricated Graphene field-effect transistor using the mechanically exfoliated Graphene layer transferred on the PMN-PT(001) substrate. Unlike the case of mechanical exfoliation on the surface of silicon-oxide or the Poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA), the weak adhesion properties between graphene and PMNPT required the pretreatment on PMMA before the exfoliation process. The device performance is analyzed in terms of the effect of ferro- and piezo-electric effect of PMNPT substrate.

  15. Measurement and Analysis of a Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor NAND Gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeond, Todd C.; Sayyah, Rana; Ho, Fat Duen

    2009-01-01

    Previous research investigated expanding the use of Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistors (FFET) to other electronic devices beyond memory circuits. Ferroelectric based transistors possess unique characteris tics that give them interesting and useful properties in digital logic circuits. The NAND gate was chosen for investigation as it is one of the fundamental building blocks of digital electronic circuits. In t his paper, NAND gate circuits were constructed utilizing individual F FETs. N-channel FFETs with positive polarization were used for the standard CMOS NAND gate n-channel transistors and n-channel FFETs with n egative polarization were used for the standard CMOS NAND gate p-chan nel transistors. The voltage transfer curves were obtained for the NA ND gate. Comparisons were made between the actual device data and the previous modeled data. These results are compared to standard MOS logic circuits. The circuits analyzed are not intended to be fully opera tional circuits that would interface with existing logic circuits, bu t as a research tool to look into the possibility of using ferroelectric transistors in future logic circuits. Possible applications for th ese devices are presented, and their potential benefits and drawbacks are discussed.

  16. Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor NAND Gate Switching Time Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; Macleod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2006-01-01

    Previous research investigated the modeling of a N Wga te constructed of Metal-Ferroelectric- Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MFSFETs) to obtain voltage transfer curves. The NAND gate was modeled using n-channel MFSFETs with positive polarization for the standard CMOS n-channel transistors and n-channel MFSFETs with negative polarization for the standard CMOS p-channel transistors. This paper investigates the MFSFET NAND gate switching time propagation delay, which is one of the other important parameters required to characterize the performance of a logic gate. Initially, the switching time of an inverter circuit was analyzed. The low-to-high and high-to-low propagation time delays were calculated. During the low-to-high transition, the negatively polarized transistor pulls up the output voltage, and during the high-to-low transition, the positively polarized transistor pulls down the output voltage. The MFSFETs were simulated by using a previously developed model which utilized a partitioned ferroelectric layer. Then the switching time of a 2-input NAND gate was analyzed similarly to the inverter gate. Extension of this technique to more complicated logic gates using MFSFETs will be studied.

  17. High-performance partially aligned semiconductive single-walled carbon nanotube transistors achieved with a parallel technique.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yilei; Pillai, Suresh Kumar Raman; Chan-Park, Mary B

    2013-09-09

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are widely thought to be a strong contender for next-generation printed electronic transistor materials. However, large-scale solution-based parallel assembly of SWNTs to obtain high-performance transistor devices is challenging. SWNTs have anisotropic properties and, although partial alignment of the nanotubes has been theoretically predicted to achieve optimum transistor device performance, thus far no parallel solution-based technique can achieve this. Herein a novel solution-based technique, the immersion-cum-shake method, is reported to achieve partially aligned SWNT networks using semiconductive (99% enriched) SWNTs (s-SWNTs). By immersing an aminosilane-treated wafer into a solution of nanotubes placed on a rotary shaker, the repetitive flow of the nanotube solution over the wafer surface during the deposition process orients the nanotubes toward the fluid flow direction. By adjusting the nanotube concentration in the solution, the nanotube density of the partially aligned network can be controlled; linear densities ranging from 5 to 45 SWNTs/μm are observed. Through control of the linear SWNT density and channel length, the optimum SWNT-based field-effect transistor devices achieve outstanding performance metrics (with an on/off ratio of ~3.2 × 10(4) and mobility 46.5 cm(2) /Vs). Atomic force microscopy shows that the partial alignment is uniform over an area of 20 × 20 mm(2) and confirms that the orientation of the nanotubes is mostly along the fluid flow direction, with a narrow orientation scatter characterized by a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of <15° for all but the densest film, which is 35°. This parallel process is large-scale applicable and exploits the anisotropic properties of the SWNTs, presenting a viable path forward for industrial adoption of SWNTs in printed, flexible, and large-area electronics.

  18. Recent Progress in Obtaining Semiconducting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Islam, Ahmad E; Rogers, John A; Alam, Muhammad A

    2015-12-22

    High purity semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotubes (s-SWCNTs) with a narrow diameter distribution are required for high-performance transistors. Achieving this goal is extremely challenging because the as-grown material contains mixtures of s-SWCNTs and metallic- (m-) SWCNTs with wide diameter distributions, typically inadequate for integrated circuits. Since 2000, numerous ex situ methods have been proposed to improve the purity of the s-SWCNTs. The majority of these techniques fail to maintain the quality and integrity of the s-SWCNTs with a few notable exceptions. Here, the progress in realizing high purity s-SWCNTs in as-grown and post-processed materials is highlighted. A comparison of transistor parameters (such as on/off ratio and field-effect mobility) obtained from test structures establishes the effectiveness of various methods and suggests opportunities for future improvements.

  19. Memory operation devices based on light-illumination ambipolar carbon-nanotube thin-film-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Aïssa, B.; Nedil, M.; Kroeger, J.; Haddad, T.; Rosei, F.

    2015-09-28

    We report the memory operation behavior of a light illumination ambipolar single-walled carbon nanotube thin film field-effect transistors devices. In addition to the high electronic-performance, such an on/off transistor-switching ratio of 10{sup 4} and an on-conductance of 18 μS, these memory devices have shown a high retention time of both hole and electron-trapping modes, reaching 2.8 × 10{sup 4} s at room temperature. The memory characteristics confirm that light illumination and electrical field can act as an independent programming/erasing operation method. This could be a fundamental step toward achieving high performance and stable operating nanoelectronic memory devices.

  20. Solution Deposition Methods for Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    solution prior to spin - coating . A comparison of the results for each deposition method will help to determine which conditions are useful for producing CNT devices for chemical sensing and electronic applications.

  1. Effects of Differing Carbon Nanotube Field-effect Transistor Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    the CNTFET properties of noise, hysteresis, sub-threshold slope, and threshold voltage. Results show that some properties of the CNTFET , such as...hysteresis and noise can be modified; other properties, however, are intrinsic to the CNT. 15. SUBJECT TERMS CNTFET 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...4 2.2.1 Back-gated CNTFETs with Differing Gate Oxides ............................................4 2.2.2 Back

  2. 3D simulation of coaxial carbon nanotube field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hien, Dinh Sy; Thi Luong, Nguyen; Tuan, Thi Tran Anh; Viet Nga, Dinh

    2009-09-01

    We provide a model of coaxial CNTFET geometry. Coaxial devices are of special interest because their geometry allows for better electrostatics. We explore the possibilities of using non-equilibrium Green's function method to get I-V characteristics for CNTFETs. This simulator also includes a graphic user interface (GUI) of Matlab. We review the capabilities of the simulator, and give examples of typical CNTFET's 3D simulations (current-voltage characteristics are a function of parameters such as the length of CNTFET, gate thickness and temperature). The obtained I-V characteristics of the CNTFET are also presented by analytical equations.

  3. Advances in organic transistor-based biosensors: from organic electrochemical transistors to electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Kergoat, Loïg; Piro, Benoît; Berggren, Magnus; Horowitz, Gilles; Pham, Minh-Chau

    2012-02-01

    Organic electronics have, over the past two decades, developed into an exciting area of research and technology to replace classic inorganic semiconductors. Organic photovoltaics, light-emitting diodes, and thin-film transistors are already well developed and are currently being commercialized for a variety of applications. More recently, organic transistors have found new applications in the field of biosensors. The progress made in this direction is the topic of this review. Various configurations are presented, with their detection principle, and illustrated by examples from the literature.

  4. Extrinsic limiting factors of carrier transport in organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masakazu; Ohguri, Hirokazu; Goto, Naoyuki; Tomii, Hiroshi; Xu, Mingsheng; Miyamoto, Takashi; Matsubara, Ryousuke; Ohashi, Noboru; Sakai, Masaaki; Kudo, Kazuhiro

    2009-04-01

    Extrinsic factors to disturb the carrier transport in pentacene field-effect transistors (FETs), as a representative of the high-mobility organic FETs (OFETs), have been comprehensively analyzed by using atomic-force-microscope potentiometry (AFMP), microscopic four-point-probe field-effect transistor (MFPP-FET) measurement, and other techniques. In the first part, by mainly using AFMP as a powerful tool to reveal the potential distribution in working OFETs, we show how and how much the formation of source/drain electrodes influences the apparent field-effect mobility both for top- and bottom-contact configurations. In the second part, we show the influence of irregular grain structures and regular grain boundaries. The films grown both at very low and high temperature ranges contain distinctive insulating parts, which make the apparent mobility very low. Within the moderate growth temperature range, the intrinsic field-effect mobility obtained by MFPP-FET measurement is proportional to the average grain size. This behavior is well explained by the polycrystalline model with the diffusion theory. According to the observations in this work, it is obvious that these extrinsic limiting factors must be carefully excluded to discuss the intrinsic mechanism of the carrier transport in OFETs.

  5. Atomic layer deposition of aluminum oxide films for carbon nanotube network transistor passivation.

    PubMed

    Grigoras, Kestutis; Zavodchikova, Marina Y; Nasibulin, Albert G; Kauppinen, Esko I; Ermolov, Vladimir; Franssila, Sami

    2011-10-01

    Ultra-thin (2-5 nm thick) aluminum oxide layers were grown on non-functionalized individual single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) and their bundles by atomic layer deposition (ALD) technique in order to investigate the mechanism of the coating process. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to examine the uniformity and conformality of the coatings grown at different temperatures (80 degrees C or 220 degrees C) and with different precursors for oxidation (water and ozone). We found that bundles of SWCNTs were coated continuously, but at the same time, bare individual nanotubes remained uncoated. The successful coating of bundles was explained by the formation of interstitial pores between the individual SWCNTs constituting the bundle, where the precursor molecules can adhere, initiating the layer growth. Thicker alumina layers (20-35 nm thick) were used for the coating of bottom-gated SWCNT-network based field effect transistors (FETs). ALD layers, grown at different conditions, were found to influence the performance of the SWCNT-network FETs: low temperature ALD layers caused the ambipolarity of the channel and pronounced n-type conduction, whereas high temperature ALD processes resulted in hysteresis suppression in the transfer characteristics of the SWCNT transistors and preserved p-type conduction. Fixed charges in the ALD layer have been considered as the main factor influencing the conduction change of the SWCNT network based transistors.

  6. Fabrication and characterization of single-grain organic field-effect transistor of pentacene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minari, Takeo; Nemoto, Takashi; Isoda, Seiji

    2004-07-01

    A single-grain pentacene field-effect transistor with ordinary top-contact structure is fabricated, and its electrical properties are characterized at various temperatures. The device exhibits field-effect mobility as high as 2 cm2/V s at 300 K, although mobility is dependent on gate voltage. This value for field-effect mobility is about one order of magnitude higher than that of a polycrystalline device made from the same pentacene film. The activation energy obtained from an Arrhenius plot of mobility is nearly constant with varying gate voltage, whereas the activation energy of the polycrystalline device decreases as gate voltage increases. Such behavior of the activation energy suggests that intrinsic carrier transport in an organic grain can be described by thermally activated hopping of molecular polarons while extrinsic transport across grain boundaries can be described by the trap model.

  7. Patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystal field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yun; Sun, Huabin; Shi, Yi; Tsukagoshi, Kazuhito

    2014-04-01

    Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are fundamental building blocks for various state-of-the-art electronic devices. Solution-processed organic crystals are appreciable materials for these applications because they facilitate large-scale, low-cost fabrication of devices with high performance. Patterning organic crystal transistors into well-defined geometric features is necessary to develop these crystals into practical semiconductors. This review provides an update on recent development in patterning technology for solution-processed organic crystals and their applications in field-effect transistors. Typical demonstrations are discussed and examined. In particular, our latest research progress on the spin-coating technique from mixture solutions is presented as a promising method to efficiently produce large organic semiconducting crystals on various substrates for high-performance OFETs. This solution-based process also has other excellent advantages, such as phase separation for self-assembled interfaces via one-step spin-coating, self-flattening of rough interfaces, and in situ purification that eliminates the impurity influences. Furthermore, recommendations for future perspectives are presented, and key issues for further development are discussed.

  8. Mobility overestimation due to gated contacts in organic field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Bittle, Emily G.; Basham, James I.; Jackson, Thomas N.; Jurchescu, Oana D.; Gundlach, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Parameters used to describe the electrical properties of organic field-effect transistors, such as mobility and threshold voltage, are commonly extracted from measured current–voltage characteristics and interpreted by using the classical metal oxide–semiconductor field-effect transistor model. However, in recent reports of devices with ultra-high mobility (>40 cm2 V−1 s−1), the device characteristics deviate from this idealized model and show an abrupt turn-on in the drain current when measured as a function of gate voltage. In order to investigate this phenomenon, here we report on single crystal rubrene transistors intentionally fabricated to exhibit an abrupt turn-on. We disentangle the channel properties from the contact resistance by using impedance spectroscopy and show that the current in such devices is governed by a gate bias dependence of the contact resistance. As a result, extracted mobility values from d.c. current–voltage characterization are overestimated by one order of magnitude or more. PMID:26961271

  9. Deep-submicron Graphene Field-Effect Transistors with State-of-Art fmax.

    PubMed

    Lyu, Hongming; Lu, Qi; Liu, Jinbiao; Wu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jinyu; Li, Junfeng; Niu, Jiebin; Yu, Zhiping; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He

    2016-10-24

    In order to conquer the short-channel effects that limit conventional ultra-scale semiconductor devices, two-dimensional materials, as an option of ultimate thin channels, receive wide attention. Graphene, in particular, bears great expectations because of its supreme carrier mobility and saturation velocity. However, its main disadvantage, the lack of bandgap, has not been satisfactorily solved. As a result, maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) which indicates transistors' power amplification ability has been disappointing. Here, we present submicron field-effect transistors with specially designed low-resistance gate and excellent source/drain contact, and therefore significantly improved fmax. The fabrication was assisted by the advanced 8-inch CMOS back-end-of-line technology. A 200-nm-gate-length GFET achieves fT/fmax = 35.4/50 GHz. All GFET samples with gate lengths ranging from 200 nm to 400 nm possess fmax 31-41% higher than fT, closely resembling Si n-channel MOSFETs at comparable technology nodes. These results re-strengthen the promise of graphene field-effect transistors in next generation semiconductor electronics.

  10. N-channel field-effect transistors with an organic-inorganic layered perovskite semiconductor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, Toshinori; Mathevet, Fabrice; Heinrich, Benoît; Terakawa, Shinobu; Fujihara, Takashi; Qin, Chuanjiang; Sandanayaka, Atula S. D.; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Adachi, Chihaya

    2016-12-01

    Large electron injection barriers and electrode degradation are serious issues that need to be overcome to obtain n-channel operation in field-effect transistors with an organic-inorganic layered perovskite (C6H5C2H4NH3)2SnI4 semiconductor. By employing low-work-function Al source/drain electrodes and by inserting C60 layers between the perovskite semiconductor and the Al electrodes to reduce the injection barrier and to suppress the electrode degradation, we demonstrate n-channel perovskite transistors with electron mobilities of up to 2.1 cm2/V s, the highest value ever reported in spin-coated perovskite transistors. The n-channel transport properties of these transistors are relatively stable in vacuum but are very sensitive to oxygen, which works as electron traps in perovskite and C60 layers. In addition, grazing-incidence X-ray scattering and thermally stimulated current measurements revealed that crystallite size and electron traps largely affect the n-channel transport properties.

  11. Modeling of a Metal-Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor NAND Gate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Thomas A.; MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat Duen

    2005-01-01

    Considerable research has been performed by several organizations in the use of the Metal- Ferroelectric-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistors (MFSFET) in memory circuits. However, research has been limited in expanding the use of the MFSFET to other electronic circuits. This research project investigates the modeling of a NAND gate constructed from MFSFETs. The NAND gate is one of the fundamental building blocks of digital electronic circuits. The first step in forming a NAND gate is to develop an inverter circuit. The inverter circuit was modeled similar to a standard CMOS inverter. A n-channel MFSFET with positive polarization was used for the n-channel transistor, and a n-channel MFSFET with negative polarization was used for the p-channel transistor. The MFSFETs were simulated by using a previously developed current model which utilized a partitioned ferroelectric layer. The inverter voltage transfer curve was obtained over a standard input of zero to five volts. Then a 2-input NAND gate was modeled similar to the inverter circuit. Voltage transfer curves were obtained for the NAND gate for various configurations of input voltages. The resultant data shows that it is feasible to construct a NAND gate with MFSFET transistors.

  12. Current steering detection scheme of three terminal antenna-coupled terahertz field effect transistor detectors.

    PubMed

    Földesy, Péter

    2013-08-01

    An antenna-coupled field effect transistor (FET) as a plasma wave terahertz detector is used with the current steering to record separately the gate-source and gate-drain photoresponses and their phase sensitive combination. This method is based on the observation that the plasmon-terminal coupling is cut off in saturation, resulting in only one-sided sensitivity. A polarimetric example is presented with intensity and polarization angle reconstruction using a single three-terminal antenna-coupled Si-metal-oxide semiconductor FET (MOSFET). The technique is applicable to various detection schemes and technologies (high electron mobility transistors and GaAs-, GaN-, and Si-MOSFETs), and other application possibilities are discussed.

  13. Highly end-doped silicon nanowires for field-effect transistors on flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celle, Caroline; Carella, Alexandre; Mariolle, Denis; Chevalier, Nicolas; Rouvière, Emmanuelle; Simonato, Jean-Pierre

    2010-05-01

    We report on the VLS (vapour-liquid-solid) fabrication and characterization of in situ axially doped silicon nanowires (SiNWs) at both ends, and on their integration into a bottom gate-top contact geometry on both rigid and flexible substrates to realize field-effect transistors (FETs). To improve contact resistance between SiNWs and source/drain electrodes, we axially tuned the level of doping at both ends of the SiNWs by sequential in situ addition of PH3. Characterisation of SiNWs by scanning spreading resistance microscopy in the device configuration allowed us to determine precisely the different sections of the SiNWs. The transfer to flexible substrates still allowed for workable FET structures. Transistors with electron mobilities exceeding 120 cm2 V-1 s-1, Ion/Ioff ratios greater than 107 and ambipolar behaviour were achieved.

  14. Plasmon Field Effect Transistor for Plasmon to Electric Conversion and Amplification.

    PubMed

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein; Yun, Ju-Hyung; Paik, Younghun; Kim, Joondong; Anderson, Wayne A; Kim, Sung Jin

    2016-01-13

    Direct coupling of electronic excitations of optical energy via plasmon resonances opens the door to improving gain and selectivity in various optoelectronic applications. We report a new device structure and working mechanisms for plasmon resonance energy detection and electric conversion based on a thin film transistor device with a metal nanostructure incorporated in it. This plasmon field effect transistor collects the plasmonically induced hot electrons from the physically isolated metal nanostructures. These hot electrons contribute to the amplification of the drain current. The internal electric field and quantum tunneling effect at the metal-semiconductor junction enable highly efficient hot electron collection and amplification. Combined with the versatility of plasmonic nanostructures in wavelength tunability, this device architecture offers an ultrawide spectral range that can be used in various applications.

  15. High performance MoS2-based field-effect transistor enabled by hydrazine doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Dongsuk; Kannan, E. S.; Lee, Inyeal; Rathi, Servin; Li, Lijun; Lee, Yoontae; Atif Khan, Muhammad; Kang, Moonshik; Park, Jinwoo; Kim, Gil-Ho

    2016-06-01

    We investigated the n-type doping effect of hydrazine on the electrical characteristics of a molybdenum disulphide (MoS2)-based field-effect transistor (FET). The threshold voltage of the MoS2 FET shifted towards more negative values (from -20 to -70 V) on treating with 100% hydrazine solution with the channel current increasing from 0.5 to 25 μA at zero gate bias. The inverse subthreshold slope decreased sharply on doping, while the ON/OFF ratio increased by a factor of 100. Gate-channel coupling improved with doping, which facilitates the reduction of channel length between the source and drain electrodes without compromising on the transistor performance, making the MoS2-based FET easily scalable.

  16. Depletion-mode ZnO nanowire field-effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Y.W.; Tien, L.C.; Kwon, Y.; Norton, D.P.; Pearton, S.J.; Kang, B.S.; Ren, F.

    2004-09-20

    Single ZnO nanowire metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) were fabricated using nanowires grown by site selective molecular-beam epitaxy. When measured in the dark at 25 deg. C, he depletion-mode transistors exhibit good saturation behavior, a threshold voltage of {approx}-3 V, and a maximum transconductance of order 0.3 mS/mm. Under ultraviolet (366 nm) illumination, the drain-source current increase by approximately a factor of 5 and the maximum transconductance is {approx}5 mS/mm. The channel mobility is estimated to be {approx}3 cm{sup 2}/V s, which is comparable to that reported for thin film ZnO enhancement mode MOSFETs, and the on/off ratio was {approx}25 in the dark and {approx}125 under UV illumination.

  17. Field-effect transistors based on self-organized molecular nanostripes.

    PubMed

    Cavallini, Massimiliano; Stoliar, Pablo; Moulin, Jean-François; Surin, Mathieu; Leclère, Philippe; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Breiby, Dag Werner; Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Nielsen, Martin M; Sonar, Prashant; Grimsdale, Andrew C; Müllen, Klaus; Biscarini, Fabio

    2005-12-01

    Charge transport properties in organic semiconductors depend strongly on molecular order. Here we demonstrate field-effect transistors where drain current flows through a precisely defined array of nanostripes made of crystalline and highly ordered molecules. The molecular stripes are fabricated across the channel of the transistor by a stamp-assisted deposition of the molecular semiconductors from a solution. As the solvent evaporates, the capillary forces drive the solution to form menisci under the stamp protrusions. The solute precipitates only in the regions where the solution is confined by the menisci once the critical concentration is reached and self-organizes into molecularly ordered stripes 100-200 nm wide and a few monolayers high. The charge mobility measured along the stripes is 2 orders of magnitude larger than the values measured for spin-coated thin films.

  18. A novel Tunneling Graphene Nano Ribbon Field Effect Transistor with dual material gate: Numerical studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghoreishi, Seyed Saleh; Saghafi, Kamyar; Yousefi, Reza; Moravvej-farshi, Mohammad Kazem

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we present Dual Material Gate Tunneling Graphene Nano-Ribbon Field Effect Transistors (DMG-T-GNRFET) mainly to suppress the am-bipolar current with assumption that sub-threshold swing which is one of the important characteristics of tunneling transistors must not be degraded. In the proposed structure, dual material gates with different work functions are used. Our investigations are based on numerical simulations which self-consistently solves the 2D Poisson based on an atomistic mode-space approach and Schrodinger equations, within the Non-Equilibrium Green's (NEGF). The proposed device shows lower off-current and on-off ratio becomes 5order of magnitude greater than the conventional device. Also two different short channel effects: Drain Induced Barrier Shortening (DIBS) and hot-electron effect are improved in the proposed device compare to the main structure.

  19. Self-aligned, full solution process polymer field-effect transistor on flexible substrates

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yan; Huang, Long-Biao; Zhou, Ye; Han, Su-Ting; Zhou, Li; Zhuang, Jiaqing; Xu, Zong-Xiang; Roy, V. A. L.

    2015-01-01

    Conventional techniques to form selective surface energy regions on rigid inorganic substrates are not suitable for polymer interfaces due to sensitive and soft limitation of intrinsic polymer properties. Therefore, there is a strong demand for finding a novel and compatible method for polymeric surface energy modification. Here, by employing the confined photo-catalytic oxidation method, we successfully demonstrate full polymer filed-effect transistors fabricated through four-step spin-coating process on a flexible polymer substrate. The approach shows negligible etching effect on polymeric film. Even more, the insulating property of polymeric dielectric is not affected by the method, which is vital for polymer electronics. Finally, the self-aligned full polymer field-effect transistors on the flexible polymeric substrate are fabricated, showing good electrical properties and mechanical flexibility under bending tests. PMID:26497412

  20. Effect of Temperature on GaGdO/GaN Metal Oxide Semiconductor Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Abernathy, C.R.; Baca, A.; Chu, S.N.G.; Hong, M.; Lothian, J.R.; Marcus, M.A.; Pearton, S.J.; Ren, F.; Schurman, M.J.

    1998-10-14

    GaGdO was deposited on GaN for use as a gate dielectric in order to fabricate a depletion metal oxide semiconductor field effect transistor (MOSFET). This is the fmt demonstration of such a device in the III-Nitride system. Analysis of the effect of temperature on the device shows that gate leakage is significantly reduced at elevated temperature relative to a conventional metal semiconductor field effeet transistor (MESFET) fabricated on the same GaN layer. MOSFET device operation in fact improved upon heating to 400 C. Modeling of the effeet of temperature on contact resistance suggests that the improvement is due to a reduction in the parasitic resistances present in the device.

  1. Tunnel field-effect transistors as energy-efficient electronic switches.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Adrian M; Riel, Heike

    2011-11-16

    Power dissipation is a fundamental problem for nanoelectronic circuits. Scaling the supply voltage reduces the energy needed for switching, but the field-effect transistors (FETs) in today's integrated circuits require at least 60 mV of gate voltage to increase the current by one order of magnitude at room temperature. Tunnel FETs avoid this limit by using quantum-mechanical band-to-band tunnelling, rather than thermal injection, to inject charge carriers into the device channel. Tunnel FETs based on ultrathin semiconducting films or nanowires could achieve a 100-fold power reduction over complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) transistors, so integrating tunnel FETs with CMOS technology could improve low-power integrated circuits.

  2. Tunnel Dielectric Field-Effect Transistors with High Peak-to-Valley Current Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi; Zhuang, Yiqi; Li, Cong; Wang, Ping

    2017-02-01

    We present silicon-compatible tunnel dielectric field-effect transistors with strong negative differential resistance. On-state tunneling currents have been improved and fully suppressed ambipolarity with lowest subthreshold slope (SS) 10 mV/dec. In addition to the TFET mode, our device works as the negative transconductance characteristic that produces a high current peak-to-valley current ratio (PVR) (up to 107). Numerical simulations demonstrate the impact of tunnel dielectric layer thickness, gate oxide thickness and temperature on the PVR. With the significant improvement in SS, on-state current and high PVR, this tunnel dielectric transistor provides an effective technique for enhancing the drive current, and realizes its applications in logic and memory circuits.

  3. The study of ambipolar behavior in phosphorene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Cheng; Wang, Lin; Xing, Huaizhong; Chen, Xiaoshuang

    2016-12-01

    The electrical characteristics of phosphorene field effect transistors (FETs) were investigated with the two-dimensional (2D) numerical simulation. In this study, it is found that the Schottky barrier plays an important role in the ambipolar transfer characteristics of phosphorene-based FETs. It is demonstrated that when the barrier heights are equal between electron and hole doping, the ambipolar current output dominates across the whole bias range. In the meantime, the saturation leakage current output of the transfer characteristic is only determined by the number of phosphorene layers or the bandgap rather than the Schottky barrier height between phosphorene and metal contact. The ambipolar behaviors become more pronounced as the channel lengths of transistors are decreased, all the geometric and material parameters are taken into account to improve the ambipolar output and understanding its underlying mechanisms. The presented results open the path to design phosphorene-based logic device, photo detector with low dark current for both electronic and optoelectronic applications.

  4. Facile fabrication of electrolyte-gated single-crystalline cuprous oxide nanowire field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoesser, Anna; von Seggern, Falk; Purohit, Suneeti; Nasr, Babak; Kruk, Robert; Dehm, Simone; Wang, Di; Hahn, Horst; Dasgupta, Subho

    2016-10-01

    Oxide semiconductors are considered to be one of the forefront candidates for the new generation, high-performance electronics. However, one of the major limitations for oxide electronics is the scarcity of an equally good hole-conducting semiconductor, which can provide identical performance for the p-type metal oxide semiconductor field-effect transistors as compared to their electron conducting counterparts. In this quest, here we present a bulk synthesis method for single crystalline cuprous oxide (Cu2O) nanowires, their chemical and morphological characterization and suitability as active channel material in electrolyte-gated, low-power, field-effect transistors (FETs) for portable and flexible logic circuits. The bulk synthesis method used in the present study includes two steps: namely hydrothermal synthesis of the nanowires and the removal of the surface organic contaminants. The surface treated nanowires are then dispersed on a receiver substrate where the passive electrodes are structured, followed by printing of a composite solid polymer electrolyte (CSPE), chosen as the gate insulator. The characteristic electrical properties of individual nanowire FETs are found to be quite interesting including accumulation-mode operation and field-effect mobility of 0.15 cm2 V-1 s-1.

  5. 25th anniversary article: organic field-effect transistors: the path beyond amorphous silicon.

    PubMed

    Sirringhaus, Henning

    2014-03-05

    Over the past 25 years, organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) have witnessed impressive improvements in materials performance by 3-4 orders of magnitude, and many of the key materials discoveries have been published in Advanced Materials. This includes some of the most recent demonstrations of organic field-effect transistors with performance that clearly exceeds that of benchmark amorphous silicon-based devices. In this article, state-of-the-art in OFETs are reviewed in light of requirements for demanding future applications, in particular active-matrix addressing for flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays. An overview is provided over both small molecule and conjugated polymer materials for which field-effect mobilities exceeding > 1 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) have been reported. Current understanding is also reviewed of their charge transport physics that allows reaching such unexpectedly high mobilities in these weakly van der Waals bonded and structurally comparatively disordered materials with a view towards understanding the potential for further improvement in performance in the future.

  6. Strong Coulomb scattering effects on low frequency noise in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joo, Min-Kyu; Yun, Yoojoo; Yun, Seokjoon; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    2016-10-01

    When atomically thin semiconducting transition metal dichalcogenides are used as a channel material, they are inevitably exposed to supporting substrates. This situation can lead to masking of intrinsic properties by undesired extrinsic doping and/or additional conductance fluctuations from the largely distributed Coulomb impurities at the interface between the channel and the substrate. Here, we report low-frequency noise characteristics in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistors on silicon/silicon-oxide substrate. To mitigate the effect of extrinsic low-frequency noise sources, a nitrogen annealing was carried out to provide better interface quality and to suppress the channel access resistance. The carrier number fluctuation and the correlated mobility fluctuation (CNF-CMF) model was better than the sole CNF one to explain our low-frequency noise data, because of the strong Coulomb scattering effect on the effective mobility caused by carrier trapping/detrapping at oxide traps. The temperature-dependent field-effect mobility in the four-probe configuration and the Coulomb scattering parameters are presented to support this strong Coulomb scattering effect on carrier transport in monolayer WS2 field-effect transistor.

  7. Silicon on ferroelectic insulator field effect transistor (SOF-FET) a new device for the next generation ultra low power circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es-Sakhi, Azzedin D.

    Field effect transistors (FETs) are the foundation for all electronic circuits and processors. These devices have progressed massively to touch its final steps in sub-nanometer level. Left and right proposals are coming to rescue this progress. Emerging nano-electronic devices (resonant tunneling devices, single-atom transistors, spin devices, Heterojunction Transistors rapid flux quantum devices, carbon nanotubes, and nanowire devices) took a vast share of current scientific research. Non-Si electronic materials like III-V heterostructure, ferroelectric, carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and other nanowire based designs are in developing stage to become the core technology of non-classical CMOS structures. FinFET present the current feasible commercial nanotechnology. The scalability and low power dissipation of this device allowed for an extension of silicon based devices. High short channel effect (SCE) immunity presents its major advantage. Multi-gate structure comes to light to improve the gate electrostatic over the channel. The new structure shows a higher performance that made it the first candidate to substitute the conventional MOSFET. The device also shows a future scalability to continue Moor's Law. Furthermore, the device is compatible with silicon fabrication process. Moreover, the ultra-low-power (ULP) design required a subthreshold slope lower than the thermionic-emission limit of 60mV/ decade (KT/q). This value was unbreakable by the new structure (SOI-FinFET). On the other hand most of the previews proposals show the ability to go beyond this limit. However, those pre-mentioned schemes have publicized a very complicated physics, design difficulties, and process non-compatibility. The objective of this research is to discuss various emerging nano-devices proposed for ultra-low-power designs and their possibilities to replace the silicon devices as the core technology in the future integrated circuit. This thesis proposes a novel design that exploits the

  8. Operation of SOI P-Channel Field Effect Transistors, CHT-PMOS30, under Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard; Hammoud, Ahmad

    2009-01-01

    Electronic systems are required to operate under extreme temperatures in NASA planetary exploration and deep space missions. Electronics on-board spacecraft must also tolerate thermal cycling between extreme temperatures. Thermal management means are usually included in today s spacecraft systems to provide adequate temperature for proper operation of the electronics. These measures, which may include heating elements, heat pipes, radiators, etc., however add to the complexity in the design of the system, increases its cost and weight, and affects its performance and reliability. Electronic parts and circuits capable of withstanding and operating under extreme temperatures would reflect in improvement in system s efficiency, reducing cost, and improving overall reliability. Semiconductor chips based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology are designed mainly for high temperature applications and find extensive use in terrestrial well-logging fields. Their inherent design offers advantages over silicon devices in terms of reduced leakage currents, less power consumption, faster switching speeds, and good radiation tolerance. Little is known, however, about their performance at cryogenic temperatures and under wide thermal swings. Experimental investigation on the operation of SOI, N-channel field effect transistors under wide temperature range was reported earlier [1]. This work examines the performance of P-channel devices of these SOI transistors. The electronic part investigated in this work comprised of a Cissoid s CHT-PMOS30, high temperature P-channel MOSFET (metal-oxide semiconductor field-effect transistor) device [2]. This high voltage, medium-power transistor is designed for geothermal well logging applications, aerospace and avionics, and automotive industry, and is specified for operation in the temperature range of -55 C to +225 C. Table I shows some specifications of this transistor [2]. The CHT-PMOS30 device was characterized at various temperatures

  9. A subthermionic tunnel field-effect transistor with an atomically thin channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Deblina; Xie, Xuejun; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wei; Kang, Jiahao; Gong, Yongji; Kraemer, Stephan; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2015-10-01

    The fast growth of information technology has been sustained by continuous scaling down of the silicon-based metal-oxide field-effect transistor. However, such technology faces two major challenges to further scaling. First, the device electrostatics (the ability of the transistor's gate electrode to control its channel potential) are degraded when the channel length is decreased, using conventional bulk materials such as silicon as the channel. Recently, two-dimensional semiconducting materials have emerged as promising candidates to replace silicon, as they can maintain excellent device electrostatics even at much reduced channel lengths. The second, more severe, challenge is that the supply voltage can no longer be scaled down by the same factor as the transistor dimensions because of the fundamental thermionic limitation of the steepness of turn-on characteristics, or subthreshold swing. To enable scaling to continue without a power penalty, a different transistor mechanism is required to obtain subthermionic subthreshold swing, such as band-to-band tunnelling. Here we demonstrate band-to-band tunnel field-effect transistors (tunnel-FETs), based on a two-dimensional semiconductor, that exhibit steep turn-on; subthreshold swing is a minimum of 3.9 millivolts per decade and an average of 31.1 millivolts per decade for four decades of drain current at room temperature. By using highly doped germanium as the source and atomically thin molybdenum disulfide as the channel, a vertical heterostructure is built with excellent electrostatics, a strain-free heterointerface, a low tunnelling barrier, and a large tunnelling area. Our atomically thin and layered semiconducting-channel tunnel-FET (ATLAS-TFET) is the only planar architecture tunnel-FET to achieve subthermionic subthreshold swing over four decades of drain current, as recommended in ref. 17, and is also the only tunnel-FET (in any architecture) to achieve this at a low power-supply voltage of 0.1 volts. Our

  10. Combining axial and radial nanowire heterostructures: radial Esaki diodes and tunnel field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Dey, Anil W; Svensson, Johannes; Ek, Martin; Lind, Erik; Thelander, Claes; Wernersson, Lars-Erik

    2013-01-01

    The ever-growing demand on high-performance electronics has generated transistors with very impressive figures of merit (Radosavljevic et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2009, 1-4 and Cho et al., IEEE Int. Devices Meeting 2011, 15.1.1-15.1.4). The continued scaling of the supply voltage of field-effect transistors, such as tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs), requires the implementation of advanced transistor architectures including FinFETs and nanowire devices. Moreover, integration of novel materials with high electron mobilities, such as III-V semiconductors and graphene, are also being considered to further enhance the device properties (del Alamo, Nature 2011, 479, 317-323, and Liao et al., Nature 2010, 467, 305-308). In nanowire devices, boosting the drive current at a fixed supply voltage or maintaining a constant drive current at a reduced supply voltage may be achieved by increasing the cross-sectional area of a device, however at the cost of deteriorated electrostatics. A gate-all-around nanowire device architecture is the most favorable electrostatic configuration to suppress short channel effects; however, the arrangement of arrays of parallel vertical nanowires to address the drive current predicament will require additional chip area. The use of a core-shell nanowire with a radial heterojunction in a transistor architecture provides an attractive means to address the drive current issue without compromising neither chip area nor device electrostatics. In addition to design advantages of a radial transistor architecture, we in this work illustrate the benefit in terms of drive current per unit chip area and compare the experimental data for axial GaSb/InAs Esaki diodes and TFETs to their radial counterparts and normalize the electrical data to the largest cross-sectional area of the nanowire, i.e. the occupied chip area, assuming a vertical device geometry. Our data on lateral devices show that radial Esaki diodes deliver almost 7 times higher peak

  11. A subthermionic tunnel field-effect transistor with an atomically thin channel.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Deblina; Xie, Xuejun; Liu, Wei; Cao, Wei; Kang, Jiahao; Gong, Yongji; Kraemer, Stephan; Ajayan, Pulickel M; Banerjee, Kaustav

    2015-10-01

    The fast growth of information technology has been sustained by continuous scaling down of the silicon-based metal-oxide field-effect transistor. However, such technology faces two major challenges to further scaling. First, the device electrostatics (the ability of the transistor's gate electrode to control its channel potential) are degraded when the channel length is decreased, using conventional bulk materials such as silicon as the channel. Recently, two-dimensional semiconducting materials have emerged as promising candidates to replace silicon, as they can maintain excellent device electrostatics even at much reduced channel lengths. The second, more severe, challenge is that the supply voltage can no longer be scaled down by the same factor as the transistor dimensions because of the fundamental thermionic limitation of the steepness of turn-on characteristics, or subthreshold swing. To enable scaling to continue without a power penalty, a different transistor mechanism is required to obtain subthermionic subthreshold swing, such as band-to-band tunnelling. Here we demonstrate band-to-band tunnel field-effect transistors (tunnel-FETs), based on a two-dimensional semiconductor, that exhibit steep turn-on; subthreshold swing is a minimum of 3.9 millivolts per decade and an average of 31.1 millivolts per decade for four decades of drain current at room temperature. By using highly doped germanium as the source and atomically thin molybdenum disulfide as the channel, a vertical heterostructure is built with excellent electrostatics, a strain-free heterointerface, a low tunnelling barrier, and a large tunnelling area. Our atomically thin and layered semiconducting-channel tunnel-FET (ATLAS-TFET) is the only planar architecture tunnel-FET to achieve subthermionic subthreshold swing over four decades of drain current, as recommended in ref. 17, and is also the only tunnel-FET (in any architecture) to achieve this at a low power-supply voltage of 0.1 volts. Our

  12. Antibody-Functionalized Carbon Nanotube Transistors as Biosensors for the Detection of Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    1-0206 TITLE: ANTIBODY-FUNCTIONALIZED CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS AS BIOSENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF PROSTATE CANCER PRINCIPAL...FUNCTIONALIZED CARBON NANOTUBE TRANSISTORS AS BIOSENSORS FOR THE DETECTION OF PROSTATE CANCER 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-09-1-0206...Approved for public release; distribution unlimited 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Prostate cancer (CaP) is the most commonly diagnosed

  13. Limit of detection of field effect transistor biosensors: Effects of surface modification and size dependence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Nitin K.; Brower, Kara; Duan, Xuexin; Reed, Mark A.

    2014-02-01

    Field-effect transistor biosensors have shown great promise in the detection of biomolecules. However, a quantitative understanding of what limits the smallest measurable concentration of analyte (limit of detection or LOD) is still missing. By considering the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), extracted from a combination of noise and I-V characterization, we are able to accurately predict and experimentally confirm a LOD of 0.01 pH. Our results also show that devices with larger area and with amine functionalized surfaces have larger SNR. We are able to extract the associated oxide trap densities and, thus, quantify the improvements in LOD.

  14. Extended-gate organic field-effect transistor for the detection of histamine in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Minamiki, Tsukuru; Minami, Tsuyoshi; Yokoyama, Daisuke; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-04-01

    As part of our ongoing research program to develop health care sensors based on organic field-effect transistor (OFET) devices, we have attempted to detect histamine using an extended-gate OFET. Histamine is found in spoiled or decayed fish, and causes foodborne illness known as scombroid food poisoning. The new OFET device possesses an extended gate functionalized by carboxyalkanethiol that can interact with histamine. As a result, we have succeeded in detecting histamine in water through a shift in OFET threshold voltage. This result indicates the potential utility of the designed OFET devices in food freshness sensing.

  15. Graphene field-effect transistors for label-free chemical and biological sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-06-01

    Electrical detection of solution pH, protein adsorption and specific biomolecules were demonstrated by using graphene field-effect transistors (G-FETs). The monolayer graphene flakes were used as channel, which were obtained by conventional mechanical exfoliation from bulk graphite. The transport characteristics shifted to the positive voltage direction with increasing solution pH. The drain current changed by desorption of the charged protein. Moreover, we immobilized aptamers on the graphene surface. As a result, specific immunoglobulin sensing can be carried out using aptamer-modified G-FETs. These results strongly suggested that the G-FETs have high potentials for chemical and biological sensors.

  16. Plasmon-controlled optimum gate bias for GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šimukovič, A.; Matulionis, A.; Liberis, J.; Šermukšnis, E.; Sakalas, P.; Zhang, F.; Leach, J. H.; Avrutin, V.; Morkoç, H.

    2013-05-01

    Electron density-dependent dc, rf and power characteristics are investigated for nearly lattice-matched InAlN/AlN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors (HFETs). The best performance in respect to transconductance and cutoff frequency is demonstrated at the optimal gate bias of -8 V for the devices with electron sheet density of 3 × 1013 cm-2 (measured on Hall bars of as-grown heterostructures). The results are in fair agreement with the universal bias-density relation controlled by the plasmon-assisted ultrafast decay of nonequilibrium optical phonons launched by hot electrons.

  17. Organic Electrodes Consisting of Dianthratetrathiafulvalene and Fullerene and Their Application in Organic Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kato, Takuji; Origuchi, Chikako; Shinoda, Masato; Adachi, Chihaya

    2011-05-01

    A double layer of dianthratetrathiafulvalene (DATTF) and fullerene (C60) on an n++-Si wafer pretreated with n-octyltrichlorosilane exhibited a high electrical conductivity of σ= 0.12 S/cm and was used as source-drain electrodes in organic field effect transistors (OFETs). A simplified OFET device architecture composed of an organic semiconducting active layer and an organic electrode layer was easily fabricated by successive vacuum deposition of organic donor and acceptor layers. It was confirmed that this device configuration is applicable for both p- and n-type FET operation.

  18. Organic field-effect transistor-based biosensors functionalized with protein receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddalena, Francesco; Kuiper, Marjon J.; Poolman, Bert; Brouwer, Frank; Hummelen, Jan C.; de Leeuw, Dago M.; De Boer, Bert; Blom, Paul W. M.

    2010-12-01

    An organic field-effect transistor with integrated proteins (Bio-FET) for sensing of sulfate ions is presented. A sulfate receptor was engineered to contain a thiol group for surface-anchoring without affecting its binding activity. The modified receptor was covalently coupled to a maleimide-functionalized polystyrene layer, and integrated as gate dielectric in a dual-gate transducer. The binding of sulfate ions in dry conditions was detected by a shift in the threshold voltage. Combined with surface density measurements by atomic force microscopy , an effective charge of -1.7q per protein was found, as expected from the Bio-FET operation model.

  19. Quantum Dot Channel (QDC) Field Effect Transistors (FETs) and Floating Gate Nonvolatile Memory Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondo, J.; Lingalugari, M.; Chan, P.-Y.; Heller, E.; Jain, F.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents silicon quantum dot channel (QDC) field effect transistors (FETs) and floating gate nonvolatile memory structures. The QDC-FET operation is explained by carrier transport in narrow mini-energy bands which are manifested in an array of SiO x -cladded silicon quantum dot layers. For nonvolatile memory structures, simulations of electron charge densities in the floating quantum dot layers are presented. Experimental threshold voltage shift in I D- V G characteristics is presented after the `Write' cycle. The QDC-FETs and nonvolatile memory due to improved threshold voltage variations by incorporating the lattice-matched II-VI layer as the gate insulator.

  20. Metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor humidity sensor using surface conductance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seok-Ho; Yang, Hyun-Ho; Han, Chang-Hoon; Ko, Seung-Deok; Lee, Seok-Hee; Yoon, Jun-Bo

    2012-03-01

    This letter presents a metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor based humidity sensor which does not use any specific materials to sense the relative humidity. We simply make use of the low pressure chemical vapor deposited (LPCVD) silicon dioxide's surface conductance change. When the gate is biased and then floated, the electrical charge in the gate is dissipated through the LPCVD silicon dioxide's surface to the surrounding ground with a time constant depending on the surface conductance which, in turn, varies with humidity. With this method, extremely high sensitivity was achieved—the charge dissipation speed increased thousand times as the relative humidity increased.

  1. Characterization of reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistor and its application to biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Masaki; Hirayama, Yuki; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2014-01-01

    We confirmed the specific detection of immunoglobulin E (IgE) using an aptamer-immobilized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) field effect transistor (FET). The detection limit and dynamic range were estimated to be 8.1 ng/ml and 104, respectively. These characteristics are comparable with these of current fluorescent markers. Although the mobility of rGO-FET was around 6 cm2 V-1 s-1, which is two to three orders lower than that of mechanically exfoliated pristine graphene FET, its sensitivity to IgE was only one order lower than that of pristine graphene FET.

  2. (AASERT-93) Field-Effect-Controlled, Coulomb-BlocKage Single-Electron Transistor in Silicon.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    imludCigdibei m , f lei reviewingI Ifistrctflnfl iiv thing~ rIUrmg Ol a m"su’e. gi~wr~ng LrIs fl Ifanil fbe data needed, and c~fO atingbl aw~d...AASERT-93) Field-Effect-Controlled, Coulomb -Blockage Single-Electron Transistor in Silicon .61103D 1-. AUTHO-R(S) 3484/TS Professor Dimitri.Antoniadis...limits of X-ray nanolithography for real devices was found. Novel I coulomb -blockade devices have been fabricated using this modified process

  3. Encapsulated gate-all-around InAs nanowire field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Sasaki, Satoshi Tateno, Kouta; Zhang, Guoqiang; Suominen, Henri; Harada, Yuichi; Saito, Shiro; Fujiwara, Akira; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Muraki, Koji

    2013-11-18

    We report the fabrication of lateral gate-all-around InAs nanowire field-effect transistors whose gate overlaps the source and drain electrodes and thus fully encapsulates the nanowire channel. They feature large drive current and transconductance that surpass those of conventional non-gate-overlap devices. The improved device characteristics can be attributed to the elimination of access resistance associated with ungated segments between the gate and source/drain electrodes. Our data also reveal a correlation between the normalized transconductance and the threshold voltage, which points to a beneficial effect of our wet-etching procedure performed prior to the atomic-layer-deposition of the gate dielectric.

  4. Integrated materials design of organic semiconductors for field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Mei, Jianguo; Diao, Ying; Appleton, Anthony L; Fang, Lei; Bao, Zhenan

    2013-05-08

    The past couple of years have witnessed a remarkable burst in the development of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), with a number of organic semiconductors surpassing the benchmark mobility of 10 cm(2)/(V s). In this perspective, we highlight some of the major milestones along the way to provide a historical view of OFET development, introduce the integrated molecular design concepts and process engineering approaches that lead to the current success, and identify the challenges ahead to make OFETs applicable in real applications.

  5. Surface-potential-based physical compact model for graphene field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lingfei; Peng, Songang; Wang, Wei; Xu, Guangwei; Ji, Zhuoyu; Lu, Nianduan; Li, Ling; Jin, Zhi; Liu, Ming

    2016-08-01

    A surface potential based physical compact model for a graphene field effect transistor is proposed, including Boltzmann transport and thermally activated transport. We verified it by the experiments and Gummel symmetry test, showing good accuracy and continuity over a wide range of operation regions. Coded in Verilog-A, this model provides physics-based consistent DC and AC characteristics, which can be easily embedded into a vendor CAD tool to simulate circuits. Based on this model, a direct insight into the relationship between physical parameters and circuit performances can be achieved.

  6. Impact of graphene polycrystallinity on the performance of graphene field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Jiménez, David; Chaves, Ferney; Cummings, Aron W.; Van Tuan, Dinh; Kotakoski, Jani; Roche, Stephan

    2014-01-27

    We have used a multi-scale physics-based model to predict how the grain size and different grain boundary morphologies of polycrystalline graphene will impact the performance metrics of graphene field-effect transistors. We show that polycrystallinity has a negative impact on the transconductance, which translates to a severe degradation of the maximum and cutoff frequencies. On the other hand, polycrystallinity has a positive impact on current saturation, and a negligible effect on the intrinsic gain. These results reveal the complex role played by graphene grain boundaries and can be used to guide the further development and optimization of graphene-based electronic devices.

  7. Low voltage vertical organic field-effect transistor with polyvinyl alcohol as gate insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Lucieli; Seidel, Keli F.; Machado, Wagner S.; Hümmelgen, Ivo A.

    2011-11-01

    We report the preparation of low gate leakage current organic field effect transistors in vertical architecture using polyvinyl alcohol as gate insulator and C60 fullerene as n-type semiconductor in devices with gate, source, and drain electrodes of Al. Intermediate electrode and top electrode operate, respectively, as source and drain, or vice-versa, depending on polarity. In these devices the intermediate electrode (source or drain) is permeable to the electric field produced by the gate so that increased drain current is obtained at either increasingly negative gate voltage when the source is the intermediate electrode or increasingly positive gate voltage when the drain is the intermediate electrode.

  8. Investigation of defect-induced abnormal body current in fin field-effect-transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Kuan-Ju; Tsai, Jyun-Yu; Lu, Ying-Hsin; Liu, Xi-Wen; Chang, Ting-Chang; Chen, Ching-En; Yang, Ren-Ya; Cheng, Osbert; Huang, Cheng-Tung

    2015-08-24

    This letter investigates the mechanism of abnormal body current at the linear region in n-channel high-k/metal gate stack fin field effect transistors. Unlike body current, which is generated by impact ionization at high drain voltages, abnormal body current was found to increase with decreasing drain voltages. Notably, the unusual body leakage only occurs in three-dimensional structure devices. Based on measurements under different operation conditions, the abnormal body current can be attributed to fin surface defect-induced leakage current, and the mechanism is electron tunneling to the fin via the defects, resulting in holes left at the body terminal.

  9. Electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistors for detecting pH and protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Yamashiro, Yusuke; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2009-09-01

    We investigated electrolyte-gated graphene field-effect transistors (GFETs) for electrical detecting pH and protein adsorptions. Nonfunctionalized single-layer graphene was used as a channel. GFETs immersed in an electrolyte showed transconductances 30 times higher than those in a vacuum and their conductances exhibited a direct linear increase with electrolyte pH, indicating their potential for use in pH sensor applications. We also attempted to direct surface-protein adsorption and showed that the conductance of GFETs increased with exposure to a protein at several hundred picomolar. The GFETs thus acted as highly sensitive electrical sensors for detecting pH and biomolecule concentrations.

  10. Linearly Fused Azaacenes: Novel Approaches and New Applications Beyond Field-Effect Transistors (FETs).

    PubMed

    Li, Junbo; Zhang, Qichun

    2015-12-30

    Replacing the CH groups in the backbones of acenes with heteroatoms offers scientists greater opportunities to tune their properties, as the type, position, number, and the valence of the introduced heteroatoms have strong effects on the frontier orbital energy levels. When the heteroatoms are nitrogen atoms, all of the resulting materials are called azaacenes. Recently, the synthesis, structure, physical properties, and applications of azaacene derivatives have been intensively investigated. This review focuses on recent synthetic efforts (since 2013) toward making novel azaacenes as well as their potential applications beyond field-effect transistors (FETs) including organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), memory devices, phototransistors, solar cells, photoelectrical chemical cells, sensors, and conductors.

  11. Heteroatom substituted organic/polymeric semiconductors and their applications in field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weifeng; Liu, Yunqi; Yu, Gui

    2014-10-29

    Organic/polymeric semiconductors are mainly composed of aromatic systems including phenyl, vinyl, alkynyl, thienyl, and other isoelectric groups, which are constructed of carbon, hydrogen, and so-called 'hereroatoms' including chalcogen, nitrogen, and halogen atoms etc. The introduction of heteroatoms could yield different electronic properties by influencing the molecular geometry, the HOMO and LUMO energy levels, intermolecular interactions and so on. In this Research News article, we provide a brief review of the effect of heteroatoms and recent developments in heteroatom substituted organic/polymeric semiconductors, focusing especially on their application in field-effect transistors.

  12. Modelling of Drain Current in Tunnelling Field-Effect Transistor Based on Strained Armchair Graphene Nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suhendi, E.; Syariati, R.; Noor, F. A.; Khairurrijal

    2017-03-01

    A tunnelling field-effect transistor (TFET) based armchair graphenenanoribbons (AGNRs) with variation of uniaxial strain has been modeled. Bandgap of strained AGNR estimated by an extended tight binding method is applied to obtain electrical characteristics of a TFET under the quantum capacitance limit device approximation. Furthermore, the electron transmittance is calculated by utilizing the WKB (Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin) approach. The obtained transmittance is then used to calculate the drain current by employing the Landauer formula. The results show that strain parameter has significant effect on the current. In other words, the electrical characteristics of AGNR TFET can be tuned by the strain of AGNR.

  13. Producing smart sensing films by means of organic field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Manunza, Ileana; Orgiu, Emanuele; Caboni, Alessandra; Barbaro, Massimo; Bonfiglio, Annalisa

    2006-01-01

    We have fabricated the first example of totally flexible field effect device for chemical detection based on an organic field effect transistor (OFET) made by pentacene films grown on flexible plastic structures. The ion sensitivity is achieved by employing a thin Mylar foil as gate dielectric. A sensitivity of the device to the pH of the electrolyte solution has been observed A similar structure can be used also for detecting mechanical deformations on flexible surfaces. Thanks to the flexibility of the substrate and the low cost of the employed technology, these devices open the way for the production of flexible chemical and strain gauge sensors that can be employed in a variety of innovative applications such as wearable electronics, e-textiles, new man-machine interfaces.

  14. Solution-processed organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors on ultra-flexible substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Min Gee; Han, Dae Hee; Park, Kyung Eun; Park, Byung-Eun

    2016-10-01

    We fabricated ultra-flexible organic non-volatile ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) with poly(vinylidene fluoride-trifluoroethylene) [P(VDF-TrFE)] on polyimide substrates, which adopted a solution-based top-contact/bottom-gate structure for low cost process without patterning. P(VDF-TrFE) gate dielectric layers and regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) active layers were formed by the spin-coating method. The field-effect mobility (μFE) was ˜0.28 cm2/V s, the on/off ratio was approximately 5.6 × 103, and the memory window (threshold voltage shift) was approximately 7 V. In addition, FeFETs were operated even at small bend radii without considerable changes in these values.

  15. Understanding charge transport in lead iodide perovskite thin-film field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P.; Yang, Bingyan; Thomas, Tudor H.; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Huang, Wenchao; Gann, Eliot; Nair, Bhaskaran; Goedel, Karl; Guha, Suchi; Moya, Xavier; McNeill, Christopher R.; Docampo, Pablo; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H.; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of the charge transport physics of hybrid lead halide perovskite semiconductors is important for advancing their use in high-performance optoelectronics. We use field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe the charge transport mechanism in thin films of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). We show that through optimization of thin-film microstructure and source-drain contact modifications, it is possible to significantly minimize instability and hysteresis in FET characteristics and demonstrate an electron field-effect mobility (μFET) of 0.5 cm2/Vs at room temperature. Temperature-dependent transport studies revealed a negative coefficient of mobility with three different temperature regimes. On the basis of electrical and spectroscopic studies, we attribute the three different regimes to transport limited by ion migration due to point defects associated with grain boundaries, polarization disorder of the MA+ cations, and thermal vibrations of the lead halide inorganic cages. PMID:28138550

  16. Trap states and transport characteristics in picene thin film field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawasaki, Naoko; Kubozono, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Hideki; Fujiwara, Akihiko; Yamaji, Minoru

    2009-01-01

    Transport characteristics and trap states are investigated in picene thin film field-effect transistor under O2 atmosphere on the basis of multiple shallow trap and release (MTR) model. The channel transport is dominated by MTR below 300 K. It has been clarified on the basis of MTR model that the O2-exposure induces a drastic reduction in shallow trap density to increase both the field-effect mobility μ and on-off ratio. We also found that the O2-exposure never caused an increase in hole carrier density. Actually, a very high μ value of 3.2 cm2 V-1 s-1 is realized under 500 Torr of O2.

  17. Understanding charge transport in lead iodide perovskite thin-film field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Yang, Bingyan; Thomas, Tudor H; Giesbrecht, Nadja; Huang, Wenchao; Gann, Eliot; Nair, Bhaskaran; Goedel, Karl; Guha, Suchi; Moya, Xavier; McNeill, Christopher R; Docampo, Pablo; Sadhanala, Aditya; Friend, Richard H; Sirringhaus, Henning

    2017-01-01

    Fundamental understanding of the charge transport physics of hybrid lead halide perovskite semiconductors is important for advancing their use in high-performance optoelectronics. We use field-effect transistors (FETs) to probe the charge transport mechanism in thin films of methylammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3). We show that through optimization of thin-film microstructure and source-drain contact modifications, it is possible to significantly minimize instability and hysteresis in FET characteristics and demonstrate an electron field-effect mobility (μFET) of 0.5 cm(2)/Vs at room temperature. Temperature-dependent transport studies revealed a negative coefficient of mobility with three different temperature regimes. On the basis of electrical and spectroscopic studies, we attribute the three different regimes to transport limited by ion migration due to point defects associated with grain boundaries, polarization disorder of the MA(+) cations, and thermal vibrations of the lead halide inorganic cages.

  18. Polymer/metal oxide hybrid dielectrics for low voltage field-effect transistors with solution-processed, high-mobility semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Held, Martin; Schießl, Stefan P.; Gannott, Florentina; Miehler, Dominik; Zaumseil, Jana

    2015-08-24

    Transistors for future flexible organic light-emitting diode (OLED) display backplanes should operate at low voltages and be able to sustain high currents over long times without degradation. Hence, high capacitance dielectrics with low surface trap densities are required that are compatible with solution-processable high-mobility semiconductors. Here, we combine poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) and atomic layer deposition hafnium oxide (HfO{sub x}) into a bilayer hybrid dielectric for field-effect transistors with a donor-acceptor polymer (DPPT-TT) or single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) as the semiconductor and demonstrate substantially improved device performances for both. The ultra-thin PMMA layer ensures a low density of trap states at the semiconductor-dielectric interface while the metal oxide layer provides high capacitance, low gate leakage and superior barrier properties. Transistors with these thin (≤70 nm), high capacitance (100–300 nF/cm{sup 2}) hybrid dielectrics enable low operating voltages (<5 V), balanced charge carrier mobilities and low threshold voltages. Moreover, the hybrid layers substantially improve the bias stress stability of the transistors compared to those with pure PMMA and HfO{sub x} dielectrics.

  19. Coupling between electrolyte and organic semiconductor in electrolyte-gated organic field effect transistors (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biscarini, Fabio; Di Lauro, Michele; Berto, Marcello; Bortolotti, Carlo A.; Geerts, Yves H.; Vuillaume, Dominique

    2016-11-01

    Organic field effect transistors (OFET) operated in aqueous environments are emerging as ultra-sensitive biosensors and transducers of electrical and electrochemical signals from a biological environment. Their applications range from detection of biomarkers in bodily fluids to implants for bidirectional communication with the central nervous system. They can be used in diagnostics, advanced treatments and theranostics. Several OFET layouts have been demonstrated to be effective in aqueous operations, which are distinguished either by their architecture or by the respective mechanism of doping by the ions in the electrolyte solution. In this work we discuss the unification of the seemingly different architectures, such as electrolyte-gated OFET (EGOFET), organic electrochemical transistor (OECT) and dual-gate ion-sensing FET. We first demonstrate that these architectures give rise to the frequency-dependent response of a synapstor (synapse-like transistor), with enhanced or depressed modulation of the output current depending on the frequency of the time-dependent gate voltage. This behavior that was reported for OFETs with embedded metal nanoparticles shows the existence of a capacitive coupling through an equivalent network of RC elements. Upon the systematic change of ions in the electrolyte and the morphology of the charge transport layer, we show how the time scale of the synapstor is changed. We finally show how the substrate plays effectively the role of a second bottom gate, whose potential is actually fixed by the pH/composition of the electrolyte and the gate voltage applied.

  20. Electric-double-layer field-effect transistors with ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Fujimoto, Takuya; Awaga, Kunio

    2013-06-21

    Charge carrier control is a key issue in the development of electronic functions of semiconductive materials. Beyond the simple enhancement of conductivity, high charge carrier accumulation can realize various phenomena, such as chemical reaction, phase transition, magnetic ordering, and superconductivity. Electric double layers (EDLs), formed at solid-electrolyte interfaces, induce extremely large electric fields. This results in a high charge carrier accumulation in the solid, much more effectively than solid dielectric materials. In the present review, we describe recent developments in the field-effect transistors (FETs) with gate dielectrics of ionic liquids, which have attracted much attention due to their wide electrochemical windows, low vapor pressures, and high chemical and physical stability. We explain the capacitance effects of ionic liquids, and describe the various combinations of ionic liquids and organic and inorganic semiconductors that are used to achieve such effects as high transistor performance, insulator-metal transitions, superconductivity, and ferromagnetism, in addition to the applications of the ionic-liquid EDL-FETs in logic devices. We discuss the factors controlling the mobility and threshold voltage in these types of FETs, and show the ionic liquid dependence of the transistor performance.

  1. SnTe field effect transistors and the anomalous electrical response of structural phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haitao Zhu, Hao; Yuan, Hui; Li, Qiliang; You, Lin; Kopanski, Joseph J.; Richter, Curt A.; Zhao, Erhai

    2014-07-07

    SnTe is a conventional thermoelectric material and has been newly found to be a topological crystalline insulator. In this work, back-gate SnTe field-effect transistors have been fabricated and fully characterized. The devices exhibit n-type transistor behaviors with excellent current-voltage characteristics and large on/off ratio (>10{sup 6}). The device threshold voltage, conductance, mobility, and subthreshold swing have been studied and compared at different temperatures. It is found that the subthreshold swings as a function of temperature have an apparent response to the SnTe phase transition between cubic and rhombohedral structures at 110 K. The abnormal and rapid increase in subthreshold swing around the phase transition temperature may be due to the soft phonon/structure change which causes the large increase in SnTe dielectric constant. Such an interesting and remarkable electrical response to phase transition at different temperatures makes the small SnTe transistor attractive for various electronic devices.

  2. Gate-Sensing Coherent Charge Oscillations in a Silicon Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Zalba, M Fernando; Shevchenko, Sergey N; Barraud, Sylvain; Johansson, J Robert; Ferguson, Andrew J; Nori, Franco; Betz, Andreas C

    2016-03-09

    Quantum mechanical effects induced by the miniaturization of complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) technology hamper the performance and scalability prospects of field-effect transistors. However, those quantum effects, such as tunneling and coherence, can be harnessed to use existing CMOS technology for quantum information processing. Here, we report the observation of coherent charge oscillations in a double quantum dot formed in a silicon nanowire transistor detected via its dispersive interaction with a radio frequency resonant circuit coupled via the gate. Differential capacitance changes at the interdot charge transitions allow us to monitor the state of the system in the strong-driving regime where we observe the emergence of Landau-Zener-Stückelberg-Majorana interference on the phase response of the resonator. A theoretical analysis of the dispersive signal demonstrates that quantum and tunneling capacitance changes must be included to describe the qubit-resonator interaction. Furthermore, a Fourier analysis of the interference pattern reveals a charge coherence time, T2 ≈ 100 ps. Our results demonstrate charge coherent control and readout in a simple silicon transistor and open up the possibility to implement charge and spin qubits in existing CMOS technology.

  3. Charge injection in solution-processed organic field-effect transistors: physics, models and characterization methods.

    PubMed

    Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2012-03-15

    A high-mobility organic semiconductor employed as the active material in a field-effect transistor does not guarantee per se that expectations of high performance are fulfilled. This is even truer if a downscaled, short channel is adopted. Only if contacts are able to provide the device with as much charge as it needs, with a negligible voltage drop across them, then high expectations can turn into high performances. It is a fact that this is not always the case in the field of organic electronics. In this review, we aim to offer a comprehensive overview on the subject of current injection in organic thin film transistors: physical principles concerning energy level (mis)alignment at interfaces, models describing charge injection, technologies for interface tuning, and techniques for characterizing devices. Finally, a survey of the most recent accomplishments in the field is given. Principles are described in general, but the technologies and survey emphasis is on solution processed transistors, because it is our opinion that scalable, roll-to-roll printing processing is one, if not the brightest, possible scenario for the future of organic electronics. With the exception of electrolyte-gated organic transistors, where impressively low width normalized resistances were reported (in the range of 10 Ω·cm), to date the lowest values reported for devices where the semiconductor is solution-processed and where the most common architectures are adopted, are ∼10 kΩ·cm for transistors with a field effect mobility in the 0.1-1 cm(2)/Vs range. Although these values represent the best case, they still pose a severe limitation for downscaling the channel lengths below a few micrometers, necessary for increasing the device switching speed. Moreover, techniques to lower contact resistances have been often developed on a case-by-case basis, depending on the materials, architecture and processing techniques. The lack of a standard strategy has hampered the progress of the

  4. Bipolar transport in organic field-effect transistors: organic semiconductor blends versus contact modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Opitz, Andreas; Kraus, Michael; Bronner, Markus; Wagner, Julia; Brütting, Wolfgang

    2008-07-01

    The achievement of bipolar transport is an important feature of organic semiconductors, both for a fundamental understanding of transport properties and for applications such as complementary electronic devices. We have investigated two routes towards organic field-effect transistors exhibiting bipolar transport characteristics. As a first step, ambipolar field-effect transistors are realized by mixtures of p-conducting copper-phthalocyanine (CuPc) and n-conducting buckminsterfullerene (C60). As a second step, bipolar transport in copper-phthalocyanine is achieved by a modification of the gate dielectric in combination with a controlled variation of the electrode materials used for carrier injection. The analysis involves the determination of charge-carrier mobilities and contact resistances by a single curve analysis and by the transfer length method. Comparison of both types of samples indicates that percolation is a crucial feature in mixtures of both materials to achieve ambipolar carrier flow, whereas in neat films of one single material suitable contact modification allows for bipolar charge-carrier transport. In the latter case, the obtained electron and hole mobilities differ by less than one order of magnitude.

  5. Selenium-Containing Fused Bicyclic Heterocycle Diselenolodiselenole: Field Effect Transistor Study and Structure-Property Relationship.

    PubMed

    Debnath, Sashi; Chithiravel, Sundaresan; Sharma, Sagar; Bedi, Anjan; Krishnamoorthy, Kothandam; Zade, Sanjio S

    2016-07-20

    The first application of the diselenolodiselenole (C4Se4) heterocycle as an active organic field effect transistor materials is demonstrated here. C4Se4 derivatives (2a-2d) were obtained by using a newly developed straightforward diselenocyclization protocol, which includes the reaction of diynes with selenium powder at elevated temperature. C4Se4 derivatives exhibit strong donor characteristics and planar structure (except 2d). The atomic force microscopic analysis and thin-film X-ray diffraction pattern of compounds 2a-2d indicated the formation of distinct crystalline films that contain large domains. A scanning electron microscopy study of compound 2b showed development of symmetrical grains with an average diameter of 150 nm. Interestingly, 2b exhibited superior hole mobility, approaching 0.027 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) with a transconductance of 9.2 μS. This study correlate the effect of π-stacking, Se···Se intermolecular interaction, and planarity with the charge transport properties and performance in the field effect transistor devices. We have shown that the planarity in C4Se4 derivatives was achieved by varying the end groups attached to the C4Se4 core. In turn, optoelectronic properties can also be tuned for all these derivatives by end-group variation.

  6. Transport studies of quantum dots sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sapkota, Keshab R.; Maloney, Francis Scott; Rimal, Gaurab; Poudyal, Uma; Tang, Jinke; Wang, Wenyong

    We present opto-electrical transport properties of Mn-CdSe quantum dots (QDs) sensitized single Mn-ZnO nanowire (NW) field effect transistors (FET). The ZnO NWs with 2 atomic % of Mn doping are grown by chemical vapor deposition. The NWs are ferromagnetic at low temperature. The as grown nanowires are transferred to clean SiO2/Si substrate and single nanowire field effect transistors (FET) are fabricated by standard e-beam lithography. Mobility and carrier concentration of Mn-ZnO NWs are estimated from FET device measurement which shows NWs are n-type semiconductors. Pulse laser deposition of Mn-CdSe QDs on the single NW FET significantly increases carrier concentration of the QD-NW system in dark where the QD monolayer conduction is negligibly small. The photoconductivity study of QD sensitized NW FET enlightens the conduction spectrum of QD-NW system and QD to NW carrier transfer mechanism. This work has been supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Division of Materials Sciences and Engineering under Award DE-FG02-10ER46728.

  7. Utilizing self-assembled-monolayer-based gate dielectrics to fabricate molybdenum disulfide field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Kawanago, Takamasa Oda, Shunri

    2016-01-25

    In this study, we apply self-assembled-monolayer (SAM)-based gate dielectrics to the fabrication of molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors. A simple fabrication process involving the selective formation of a SAM on metal oxides in conjunction with the dry transfer of MoS{sub 2} flakes was established. A subthreshold slope (SS) of 69 mV/dec and no hysteresis were demonstrated with the ultrathin SAM-based gate dielectrics accompanied by a low gate leakage current. The small SS and no hysteresis indicate the superior interfacial properties of the MoS{sub 2}/SAM structure. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy revealed a sharp and abrupt interface of the MoS{sub 2}/SAM structure. The SAM-based gate dielectrics are found to be applicable to the fabrication of low-voltage MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors and can also be extended to various layered semiconductor materials. This study opens up intriguing possibilities of SAM-based gate dielectrics in functional electronic devices.

  8. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS₂ field-effect transistors

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; ...

    2015-05-07

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS₂) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS₂ field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~10⁷) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconductingmore » materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS₂ anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications.« less

  9. Photon-number discrimination using a semiconductor quantum dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gansen, Eric J.; Rowe, Mary A.; Greene, Marion B.; Rosenberg, Danna; Harvey, Todd E.; Su, Mark Y.; Nam, Sae Woo; Mirin, Richard P.

    2007-09-01

    We demonstrate photon-number discrimination using a novel semiconductor detector that utilizes a layer of self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) as an optically addressable floating gate in a GaAs/AlGaAs δ-doped field-effect transistor. When the QDOGFET (quantum dot, optically gated, field-effect transistor) is illuminated, the internal gate field directs the holes generated in the dedicated absorption layer of the structure to the QDs, where they are trapped. The positively charged holes are confined to the dots and screen the internal gate field, causing a persistent change in the channel current that is proportional to the total number of holes trapped in the QD ensemble. We use highly attenuated laser pulses to characterize the response of the QDOGFET cooled to 4 K. We demonstrate that different photon-number states produce well resolved changes in the channel current, where the responses of the detector reflect the Poisson statistics of the laser light. For a mean photon number of 1.1, we show that decision regions can be defined such that the QDOGFET determines the number (0, 1, 2, or >=3) of detected photons with a probability of accuracy >=83 % in a single-shot measurement.

  10. Metal oxide-graphene field-effect transistor: interface trap density extraction model

    PubMed Central

    Najam, Faraz; Lau, Kah Cheong; Lim, Cheng Siong; Yu, Yun Seop

    2016-01-01

    Summary A simple to implement model is presented to extract interface trap density of graphene field effect transistors. The presence of interface trap states detrimentally affects the device drain current–gate voltage relationship I ds–V gs. At the moment, there is no analytical method available to extract the interface trap distribution of metal-oxide-graphene field effect transistor (MOGFET) devices. The model presented here extracts the interface trap distribution of MOGFET devices making use of available experimental capacitance–gate voltage C tot–V gs data and a basic set of equations used to define the device physics of MOGFET devices. The model was used to extract the interface trap distribution of 2 experimental devices. Device parameters calculated using the extracted interface trap distribution from the model, including surface potential, interface trap charge and interface trap capacitance compared very well with their respective experimental counterparts. The model enables accurate calculation of the surface potential affected by trap charge. Other models ignore the effect of trap charge and only calculate the ideal surface potential. Such ideal surface potential when used in a surface potential based drain current model will result in an inaccurate prediction of the drain current. Accurate calculation of surface potential that can later be used in drain current model is highlighted as a major advantage of the model. PMID:27826511

  11. Plasmon field effect transistor: A novel sensing platform for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shokri Kojori, Hossein

    The interest in plasmons, associated with nanostructured metals, has remarkably increased in the past decade. A Recent improvement in fabrication techniques to create well-controlled nanostructures also contributed to the rapid development of plasmonic applications, such as meta-materials, nonlinear optics, photovoltaic devices, biomedical sensors, medical therapies and spectroscopy. The surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor is one of the successful applications, which is widely used in biomedical research. On the other hand, localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) is also widely studied in a broad range of applications. The distinct property of LSPR is a tailored and sharp absorption/scattering peaks depending on the shape and sizes of the metal nanostructures. In addition, plasmonics can enable integration of high speed optical circuit by taking the advantages from the current electronics and optics technologies. Thus, plasmonics is considered as a solution for the next generation systems that offers ultra-high speed data processing. In this dissertation, we will introduce a novel plasmon field effect transistor (FET) that enables direct detection and efficient amplification of plasmon energy. This FET has several advantages such as electrical isolation of plasmon absorber nanostructures from a sensing and drug screening. Currently, we have proof of concept for the antigen-antibody bonding using the plasmon field effect transistor. We will develop a multiplexing capable plasmon FET sensing platform by integrating an array of plasmon FETs with microfluidic channels to detect cancer biomarkers.

  12. Strain-induced modulation on phonon and electronic properties of suspended black phosphorus field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo; Si, Naichao; Xie, Guoxin; Wang, Quan

    2017-02-01

    Black phosphorus has recently appeared as a promising two-dimensional material for applications in high performance nanoelectronics. Its single- and few-atomic layer forms in field-effect transistors have attracted a lot of attention due to the tunable bandgap (0.3-2.0 eV), high carrier mobility (1000 cm2 V-1 s-1) and decent on-off ratios (105). Here, we demonstrate a suspended black phosphorus field effect transistor (BP-FET) and utilize Raman spectroscope to characterize the strain on the effects of Raman phonon. We find that red shifts appear in all the three vibrational modes (Ag1 , B2g and Ag2) in different degrees. Among them, Ag1 mode is most sensitive to the tensile strain. We further investigate the electronic properties with a Cascade semi-automatic probe station. The linear relationships in the output curves indicate the contacts between black phosphorus and electrodes are ohmic contacts. The transfer characteristic curves declare the drain current modulation is ∼ 7.6 ×103 for the hole conduction and ∼57 for the electron conduction. Mobility of this device is found to be 347.5 cm2 V-1 s-1 and 4.9 cm2 V-1 s-1 for the hole and electron conduction, respectively. These results provide a theoretical basis for the coordination of high-performance black phosphorus electronic components.

  13. Integrated digital inverters based on two-dimensional anisotropic ReS₂ field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Erfu; Fu, Yajun; Wang, Yaojia; Feng, Yanqing; Liu, Huimei; Wan, Xiangang; Zhou, Wei; Wang, Baigeng; Shao, Lubin; Ho, Ching -Hwa; Huang, Ying -Sheng; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Laiguo; Li, Aidong; Zeng, Junwen; Song, Fengqi; Wang, Xinran; Shi, Yi; Yuan, Hongtao; Hwang, Harold Y.; Cui, Yi; Miao, Feng; Xing, Dingyu

    2015-05-07

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal dichalcogenides are emerging as top candidates for post-silicon electronics. While most of them exhibit isotropic behaviour, lowering the lattice symmetry could induce anisotropic properties, which are both scientifically interesting and potentially useful. Here we present atomically thin rhenium disulfide (ReS₂) flakes with unique distorted 1T structure, which exhibit in-plane anisotropic properties. We fabricated monolayer and few-layer ReS₂ field-effect transistors, which exhibit competitive performance with large current on/off ratios (~10⁷) and low subthreshold swings (100 mV per decade). The observed anisotropic ratio along two principle axes reaches 3.1, which is the highest among all known two-dimensional semiconducting materials. Furthermore, we successfully demonstrated an integrated digital inverter with good performance by utilizing two ReS₂ anisotropic field-effect transistors, suggesting the promising implementation of large-scale two-dimensional logic circuits. Our results underscore the unique properties of two-dimensional semiconducting materials with low crystal symmetry for future electronic applications.

  14. A Micro-Machined Microphone Based on a Combination of Electret and Field-Effect Transistor

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Kumjae; Jeon, Junsik; West, James Edward; Moon, Wonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Capacitive-type transduction is now widely used in MEMS microphones. However, its sensitivity decreases with reducing size, due to decreasing air gap capacitance. In the present study, we proposed and developed the Electret Gate of Field Effect Transistor (ElGoFET) transduction based on an electret and FET (field-effect-transistor) as a novel mechanism of MEMS microphone transduction. The ElGoFET transduction has the advantage that the sensitivity is dependent on the ratio of capacitance components in the transduction structure. Hence, ElGoFET transduction has high sensitivity even with a smaller air gap capacitance, due to a miniaturization of the transducer. A FET with a floating-gate electrode embedded on a membrane was designed and fabricated and an electret was fabricated by ion implantation with Ga+ ions. During the assembly process between the FET and the electret, the operating point of the FET was characterized using the static response of the FET induced by the electric field due to the trapped positive charge at the electret. Additionally, we evaluated the microphone performance of the ElGoFET by measuring the acoustic response in air using a semi-anechoic room. The results confirmed that the proposed transduction mechanism has potential for microphone applications. PMID:26295231

  15. Deep-submicron Graphene Field-Effect Transistors with State-of-Art fmax

    PubMed Central

    Lyu, Hongming; Lu, Qi; Liu, Jinbiao; Wu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jinyu; Li, Junfeng; Niu, Jiebin; Yu, Zhiping; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He

    2016-01-01

    In order to conquer the short-channel effects that limit conventional ultra-scale semiconductor devices, two-dimensional materials, as an option of ultimate thin channels, receive wide attention. Graphene, in particular, bears great expectations because of its supreme carrier mobility and saturation velocity. However, its main disadvantage, the lack of bandgap, has not been satisfactorily solved. As a result, maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) which indicates transistors’ power amplification ability has been disappointing. Here, we present submicron field-effect transistors with specially designed low-resistance gate and excellent source/drain contact, and therefore significantly improved fmax. The fabrication was assisted by the advanced 8-inch CMOS back-end-of-line technology. A 200-nm-gate-length GFET achieves fT/fmax = 35.4/50 GHz. All GFET samples with gate lengths ranging from 200 nm to 400 nm possess fmax 31–41% higher than fT, closely resembling Si n-channel MOSFETs at comparable technology nodes. These results re-strengthen the promise of graphene field-effect transistors in next generation semiconductor electronics. PMID:27775009

  16. Inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor with normally off characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Tsubasa; Kato, Hiromitsu; Oyama, Kazuhiro; Makino, Toshiharu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Inokuma, Takao; Tokuda, Norio; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2016-08-01

    We fabricated inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with normally off characteristics. At present, Si MOSFETs and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) with inversion channels are widely used because of their high controllability of electric power and high tolerance. Although a diamond semiconductor is considered to be a material with a strong potential for application in next-generation power devices, diamond MOSFETs with an inversion channel have not yet been reported. We precisely controlled the MOS interface for diamond by wet annealing and fabricated p-channel and planar-type MOSFETs with phosphorus-doped n-type body on diamond (111) substrate. The gate oxide of Al2O3 was deposited onto the n-type diamond body by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. The drain current was controlled by the negative gate voltage, indicating that an inversion channel with a p-type character was formed at a high-quality n-type diamond body/Al2O3 interface. The maximum drain current density and the field-effect mobility of a diamond MOSFET with a gate electrode length of 5 μm were 1.6 mA/mm and 8.0 cm2/Vs, respectively, at room temperature.

  17. Inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor with normally off characteristics.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Tsubasa; Kato, Hiromitsu; Oyama, Kazuhiro; Makino, Toshiharu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Inokuma, Takao; Tokuda, Norio; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2016-08-22

    We fabricated inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with normally off characteristics. At present, Si MOSFETs and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) with inversion channels are widely used because of their high controllability of electric power and high tolerance. Although a diamond semiconductor is considered to be a material with a strong potential for application in next-generation power devices, diamond MOSFETs with an inversion channel have not yet been reported. We precisely controlled the MOS interface for diamond by wet annealing and fabricated p-channel and planar-type MOSFETs with phosphorus-doped n-type body on diamond (111) substrate. The gate oxide of Al2O3 was deposited onto the n-type diamond body by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. The drain current was controlled by the negative gate voltage, indicating that an inversion channel with a p-type character was formed at a high-quality n-type diamond body/Al2O3 interface. The maximum drain current density and the field-effect mobility of a diamond MOSFET with a gate electrode length of 5 μm were 1.6 mA/mm and 8.0 cm(2)/Vs, respectively, at room temperature.

  18. Multibit ferroelectric field-effect transistor with epitaxial-like Pb(Zr,Ti)O3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jae Hyo; Kim, Hyung Yoon; Seok, Ki Hwan; Kiaee, Zohreh; Lee, Sol Kyu; Joo, Seung Ki

    2016-03-01

    Being able to control grain boundaries during the phase transformation when processing a ferroelectric thin-film is crucial for the successful development of practical multibit ferroelectric memory. A novel development of ferroelectric thin-film crystallization processing for realizing epitaxial-like single crystals via artificial nucleation by Pt-seeding is reported here. Dividing the nucleation and growth mechanism by Pt-seeding, it is possible to obtain large and uniform rectangular-shaped ferroelectric grains, large enough to fabricate a field-effect transistor (FET) in the inside of the crystal grain. The fabricated ferroelectric FET, Pt/Pb(Zr,Ti)O3/ZrTiO4/Si, showed a large memory window (˜2.2 V), a low operation voltage (˜6 V), and an ultra-fast program/erase speed (˜10-6 s). Moreover, there was no degradation after 1015 cycles of bipolar fatigue testing and the sample even showed a long retention time after 1 yr. All of these characteristics correspond to the best performance among all types of ferroelectric field-effect transistors reported thus far.

  19. Inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor with normally off characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Tsubasa; Kato, Hiromitsu; Oyama, Kazuhiro; Makino, Toshiharu; Ogura, Masahiko; Takeuchi, Daisuke; Inokuma, Takao; Tokuda, Norio; Yamasaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    We fabricated inversion channel diamond metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) with normally off characteristics. At present, Si MOSFETs and insulated gate bipolar transistors (IGBTs) with inversion channels are widely used because of their high controllability of electric power and high tolerance. Although a diamond semiconductor is considered to be a material with a strong potential for application in next-generation power devices, diamond MOSFETs with an inversion channel have not yet been reported. We precisely controlled the MOS interface for diamond by wet annealing and fabricated p-channel and planar-type MOSFETs with phosphorus-doped n-type body on diamond (111) substrate. The gate oxide of Al2O3 was deposited onto the n-type diamond body by atomic layer deposition at 300 °C. The drain current was controlled by the negative gate voltage, indicating that an inversion channel with a p-type character was formed at a high-quality n-type diamond body/Al2O3 interface. The maximum drain current density and the field-effect mobility of a diamond MOSFET with a gate electrode length of 5 μm were 1.6 mA/mm and 8.0 cm2/Vs, respectively, at room temperature. PMID:27545201

  20. A Micro-Machined Microphone Based on a Combination of Electret and Field-Effect Transistor.

    PubMed

    Shin, Kumjae; Jeon, Junsik; West, James Edward; Moon, Wonkyu

    2015-08-18

    Capacitive-type transduction is now widely used in MEMS microphones. However, its sensitivity decreases with reducing size, due to decreasing air gap capacitance. In the present study, we proposed and developed the Electret Gate of Field Effect Transistor (ElGoFET) transduction based on an electret and FET (field-effect-transistor) as a novel mechanism of MEMS microphone transduction. The ElGoFET transduction has the advantage that the sensitivity is dependent on the ratio of capacitance components in the transduction structure. Hence, ElGoFET transduction has high sensitivity even with a smaller air gap capacitance, due to a miniaturization of the transducer. A FET with a floating-gate electrode embedded on a membrane was designed and fabricated and an electret was fabricated by ion implantation with Ga(+) ions. During the assembly process between the FET and the electret, the operating point of the FET was characterized using the static response of the FET induced by the electric field due to the trapped positive charge at the electret. Additionally, we evaluated the microphone performance of the ElGoFET by measuring the acoustic response in air using a semi-anechoic room. The results confirmed that the proposed transduction mechanism has potential for microphone applications.

  1. Temperature sensitivity analysis of polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Kaushal; Pandey, Sunil; Kondekar, P. N.; Sharma, Dheeraj

    2016-09-01

    The conventional tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) have shown potential to scale down in sub-22 nm regime due to its lower sub-threshold slope and robustness against short-channel effects (SCEs), however, sensitivity towards temperature variation is a major concern. Therefore, for the first time, we investigate temperature sensitivity analysis of a polarity controlled electrostatically doped tunnel field-effect transistor (ED-TFET). Different performance metrics and analog/RF figure-of-merits were considered and compared for both devices, and simulations were performed using Silvaco ATLAS device tool. We found that the variation in ON-state current in ED-TFET is almost temperature independent due to electrostatically doped mechanism, while, it increases in conventional TFET at higher temperature. Above room temperature, the variation in ION, IOFF, and SS sensitivity in ED-TFET are only 0.11%/K, 2.21%/K, and 0.63%/K, while, in conventional TFET the variations are 0.43%/K, 2.99%/K, and 0.71%/K, respectively. However, below room temperature, the variation in ED-TFET ION is 0.195%/K compared to 0.27%/K of conventional TFET. Moreover, it is analysed that the incomplete ionization effect in conventional TFET severely affects the drive current and the threshold voltage, while, ED-TFET remains unaffected. Hence, the proposed ED-TFET is less sensitive towards temperature variation and can be used for cryogenics as well as for high temperature applications.

  2. Band gap engineered nano perforated graphene microstructures for field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palla, Penchalaiah; Tiwari, Durgesh Laxman; Ansari, Hasan Raza; Babu, Taraprasanna Saha; Ethiraj, Anita Sagadevan; Raina, J. P.

    2016-05-01

    To make use of exceptional properties of graphene in Field effect Transistor (FETs) for switching devices a band gap must be introduced in order to switch -off the device. Through periodic nano perforations a semi-metallic graphene is converted into semiconducting graphene. To understand the device physics behind the reported experiments theoretical simulations has been carried out. The present paper illustrates nano perforated semiconducting graphene Field effect Transistor (FETs) with micron scale dimensions. The simulation has been performed using drift-diffusion semi-classical and tight-binding based non-equilibrium green's function (NEGF) methods. The obtained simulation results are compared with previously reported experimental work. The device dimensions considered for simulations and the experiment are similar with neck width, hole periodicity and channel length of 6.3 nm, 16.3 nm and 1 µm respectively. The interesting and new finding in this work is the p-type I-V characteristics for small band gap devices and n-type behavior for large band gap devices.

  3. Simulation of field-effect transistors and resonant tunneling diodes based on graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramov, Igor I.; Labunov, Vladimir A.; Kolomejtseva, Natali V.; Romanova, Irina A.

    2016-12-01

    Graphene is a nanomaterial that due to unique properties has attracted great interest for various applications, in particular, for development of nanoelectronic devices. In the paper the graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) and resonant tunneling diodes (RTD) are analyzed with the use of proposed models. First, simulation of dual-gate field-effect transistor based on monolayer graphene with the use of proposed combined model is considered. In the model the following important factors such as quantum capacitance, hole and electron mobility difference, drain and source resistances are taken into account. Investigations of dependence of a drain current on drain voltage for various top-gate-to-source voltages are performed. Influence of channel length, source and drain resistances on output characteristics of the device is analyzed. Comparison of calculation results with simulation ones obtained with the known models was carried out. Secondly, simulation of graphene-based nanostructures on hexagonal boron nitride, silicon carbide and silicon dioxide substrates was performed using proposed self-consistent numerical model, based on effective wave function formalism. The developed models in detail were described in our previous works. The possibility of using a proposed self-consistent model for double- and triple-barrier graphene-based RTD simulation was illustrated. As well as it was investigated the influence of different parameters on IV-characteristics of graphene-based RTDs. It was shown that it is necessary to take into account extended (passive) regions for adequate simulation of these devices.

  4. Silicon nanowire biologically sensitive field effect transistors: electrical characteristics and applications.

    PubMed

    Rim, Taiuk; Baek, Chang-Ki; Kim, Kihyun; Jeong, Yoon-Ha; Lee, Jeong-Soo; Meyyappan, M

    2014-01-01

    The interest in biologically sensitive field effect transistors (BioFETs) is growing explosively due to their potential as biosensors in biomedical, environmental monitoring and security applications. Recently, adoption of silicon nanowires in BioFETs has enabled enhancement of sensitivity, device miniaturization, decreasing power consumption and emerging applications such as the 3D cell probe. In this review, we describe the device physics and operation of the silicon nanowire BioFETs along with recent advances in the field. The silicon nanowire BioFETs are basically the same as the conventional field-effect transistors (FETs) with the exceptions of nanowire channel instead of thin film and a liquid gate instead of the conventional gate. Therefore, the silicon device physics is important to understand the operation of the BioFETs. Herein, physical characteristics of the silicon nanowire FETs are described and the operational principles of the BioFETs are classified according to the number of gates and the analysis domain of the measured signal. Even the bottom-up process has merits on low-cost fabrication; the top-down process technique is highlighted here due to its reliability and reproducibility. Finally, recent advances in the silicon nanowire BioFETs in the literature are described and key features for commercialization are discussed.

  5. Deep-ultraviolet-light-driven reversible doping of WS2 field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Iqbal, Muhammad Waqas; Iqbal, Muhammad Zahir; Khan, Muhammad Farooq; Shehzad, Muhammad Arslan; Seo, Yongho; Eom, Jonghwa

    2015-01-14

    Improvement of the electrical and photoelectric characteristics is essential to achieve an advanced performance of field-effect transistors and optoelectronic devices. Here we have developed a doping technique to drastically improve electrical and photoelectric characteristics of single-layered, bi-layered and multi-layered WS2 field-effect transistors (FET). After illuminating with deep ultraviolet (DUV) light in a nitrogen environment, WS2 FET shows an enhanced charge carrier density, mobility and photocurrent response. The threshold voltage of WS2 FET shifted toward the negative gate voltage, and the positions of E and A1g peaks in Raman spectra shifted toward lower wavenumbers, indicating the n-type doping effect of the WS2 FET. The doping effect is reversible. The pristine characteristics of WS2 FET can be restored by DUV light illumination in an oxygen environment. The DUV-driven doping technique in a gas environment provides a very stable, effective, easily applicable way to enhance the performance of WS2 FET.

  6. Biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors for determination of some substrates and inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Dzyadevych, Sergei V; Soldatkin, Alexey P; Korpan, Yaroslav I; Arkhypova, Valentyna N; El'skaya, Anna V; Chovelon, Jean-Marc; Martelet, Claude; Jaffrezic-Renault, Nicole

    2003-10-01

    This paper is a review of the authors' publications concerning the development of biosensors based on enzyme field-effect transistors (ENFETs) for direct substrates or inhibitors analysis. Such biosensors were designed by using immobilised enzymes and ion-selective field-effect transistors (ISFETs). Highly specific, sensitive, simple, fast and cheap determination of different substances renders them as promising tools in medicine, biotechnology, environmental control, agriculture and the food industry. The biosensors based on ENFETs and direct enzyme analysis for determination of concentrations of different substrates (glucose, urea, penicillin, formaldehyde, creatinine, etc.) have been developed and their laboratory prototypes were fabricated. Improvement of the analytical characteristics of such biosensors may be achieved by using a differential mode of measurement, working solutions with different buffer concentrations and specific agents, negatively or positively charged additional membranes, or genetically modified enzymes. These approaches allow one to decrease the effect of the buffer capacity influence on the sensor response in an aim to increase the sensitivity of the biosensors and to extend their dynamic ranges. Biosensors for the determination of concentrations of different toxic substances (organophosphorous pesticides, heavy metal ions, hypochlorite, glycoalkaloids, etc.) were designed on the basis of reversible and/or irreversible enzyme inhibition effect(s). The conception of an enzymatic multibiosensor for the determination of different toxic substances based on the enzyme inhibition effect is also described. We will discuss the respective advantages and disadvantages of biosensors based on the ENFETs developed and also demonstrate their practical application.

  7. Environmental Effects on Hysteresis of Transfer Characteristics in Molybdenum Disulfide Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimazu, Yoshihiro; Tashiro, Mitsuki; Sonobe, Satoshi; Takahashi, Masaki

    2016-07-01

    Molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) has recently received much attention for nanoscale electronic and photonic applications. To explore the intrinsic properties and enhance the performance of MoS2-based field-effect transistors, thorough understanding of extrinsic effects such as environmental gas and contact resistance of the electrodes is required. Here, we report the effects of environmental gases on the transport properties of back-gated multilayered MoS2 field-effect transistors. Comparisons between different gases (oxygen, nitrogen, and air and nitrogen with varying relative humidities) revealed that water molecules acting as charge-trapping centers are the main cause of hysteresis in the transfer characteristics. While the hysteresis persisted even after pumping out the environmental gas for longer than 10 h at room temperature, it disappeared when the device was cooled to 240 K, suggesting a considerable increase in the time constant of the charge trapping/detrapping at these modestly low temperatures. The suppression of the hysteresis or instability in the easily attainable temperature range without surface passivation is highly advantageous for the device application of this system. The humidity dependence of the threshold voltages in the transfer curves indicates that the water molecules dominantly act as hole-trapping centers. A strong dependence of the on-state current on oxygen pressure was also observed.

  8. Deep-submicron Graphene Field-Effect Transistors with State-of-Art fmax

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Hongming; Lu, Qi; Liu, Jinbiao; Wu, Xiaoming; Zhang, Jinyu; Li, Junfeng; Niu, Jiebin; Yu, Zhiping; Wu, Huaqiang; Qian, He

    2016-10-01

    In order to conquer the short-channel effects that limit conventional ultra-scale semiconductor devices, two-dimensional materials, as an option of ultimate thin channels, receive wide attention. Graphene, in particular, bears great expectations because of its supreme carrier mobility and saturation velocity. However, its main disadvantage, the lack of bandgap, has not been satisfactorily solved. As a result, maximum oscillation frequency (fmax) which indicates transistors’ power amplification ability has been disappointing. Here, we present submicron field-effect transistors with specially designed low-resistance gate and excellent source/drain contact, and therefore significantly improved fmax. The fabrication was assisted by the advanced 8-inch CMOS back-end-of-line technology. A 200-nm-gate-length GFET achieves fT/fmax = 35.4/50 GHz. All GFET samples with gate lengths ranging from 200 nm to 400 nm possess fmax 31–41% higher than fT, closely resembling Si n-channel MOSFETs at comparable technology nodes. These results re-strengthen the promise of graphene field-effect transistors in next generation semiconductor electronics.

  9. Metal oxide-graphene field-effect transistor: interface trap density extraction model.

    PubMed

    Najam, Faraz; Lau, Kah Cheong; Lim, Cheng Siong; Yu, Yun Seop; Tan, Michael Loong Peng

    2016-01-01

    A simple to implement model is presented to extract interface trap density of graphene field effect transistors. The presence of interface trap states detrimentally affects the device drain current-gate voltage relationship Ids-Vgs. At the moment, there is no analytical method available to extract the interface trap distribution of metal-oxide-graphene field effect transistor (MOGFET) devices. The model presented here extracts the interface trap distribution of MOGFET devices making use of available experimental capacitance-gate voltage Ctot-Vgs data and a basic set of equations used to define the device physics of MOGFET devices. The model was used to extract the interface trap distribution of 2 experimental devices. Device parameters calculated using the extracted interface trap distribution from the model, including surface potential, interface trap charge and interface trap capacitance compared very well with their respective experimental counterparts. The model enables accurate calculation of the surface potential affected by trap charge. Other models ignore the effect of trap charge and only calculate the ideal surface potential. Such ideal surface potential when used in a surface potential based drain current model will result in an inaccurate prediction of the drain current. Accurate calculation of surface potential that can later be used in drain current model is highlighted as a major advantage of the model.

  10. Novel poly-silicon nanowire field effect transistor for biosensing application.

    PubMed

    Hsiao, Cheng-Yun; Lin, Chih-Heng; Hung, Cheng-Hsiung; Su, Chun-Jung; Lo, Yen-Ren; Lee, Cheng-Che; Lin, Horng-Chin; Ko, Fu-Hsiang; Huang, Tiao-Yuan; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2009-01-01

    A simple and low-cost method to fabricate poly-silicon nanowire field effect transistor (poly-Si NW FET) for biosensing application was demonstrated. The poly-silicon nanowire (poly-Si NW) channel was fabricated by employing the poly-silicon (poly-Si) sidewall spacer technique, which approach was comparable with current commercial semiconductor process and forsaken expensive E-beam lithography tools. The electronic properties of the poly-Si NW FET in aqueous solution were found to be similar to those of single-crystal silicon nanowire field effect transistors reported in the literature. A model biotin and avidin/streptavidin sensing system was used to demonstrate the biosensing capacity of poly-Si NW FET. The changes of I(D)-V(G) curves were consistent with an n-type FET affected by a nearby negatively (streptavidin) and positively (avidin) charged molecules, respectively. Specific electric changes were observed for streptavidin and avidin sensing when nanowire surface of poly-Si NW FET was modified with biotin and streptavidin at sub pM to nM range could be distinguished. With its excellent electric properties and the potential for mass commercial production, poly-Si NW FET can be a very useful transducer for a variety of biosensing applications.

  11. Position sensitivity of graphene field effect transistors to X-rays

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward Moore, Michael E.; Jovanovic, Igor; Sarker, Biddut K.; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.

    2015-06-01

    Device architectures that incorporate graphene to realize detection of electromagnetic radiation typically utilize the direct absorbance of radiation by graphene. This limits their effective area to the size of the graphene and their applicability to lower-energy, less penetrating forms of radiation. In contrast, graphene-based transistor architectures that utilize the field effect as the detection mechanism can be sensitive to interactions of radiation not only with graphene but also with the surrounding substrate. Here, we report the study of the position sensitivity and response of a graphene-based field effect transistor (GFET) to penetrating, well-collimated radiation (micro-beam X-rays), producing ionization in the substrate primarily away from graphene. It is found that responsivity and response speed are strongly dependent on the X-ray beam distance from graphene and the gate voltage applied to the GFET. To develop an understanding of the spatially dependent response, a model is developed that incorporates the volumetric charge generation, transport, and recombination. The model is in good agreement with the observed spatial response characteristics of the GFET and predicts a greater response potential of the GFET to radiation interacting near its surface. The study undertaken provides the necessary insight into the volumetric nature of the GFET response, essential for development of GFET-based detectors for more penetrating forms of ionizing radiation.

  12. Topological field-effect quantum transistors in HgTe nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Fu, Hua-Hua; Gao, Jin-Hua; Yao, Kai-Lun

    2014-06-06

    We propose practical designs to realize topological field-effect quantum transistors in an HgTe nanoribbon with an inverted band structure. Our theoretical calculations show that, as a strip-shape top gate is placed on the HgTe nanoribbon and with an increasing gate voltage, two new conductance channels develop in the HgTe nanoribbon and are localized to the lattice sites neighboring the boundaries of the gate, leading to an additional quantization of the conductance of 2e(2)/h. The quantum states in the new channels are not only robust against a short-range Anderson disorder, but can also couple with the intrinsic helical edge states in the boundaries of the HgTe nanoribbon to open a gap in the energy spectrum, indicating their topological characteristics. More importantly, the newly developed conductance channels can be turned on or off easily by adjusting the gate voltage. The proposal of controllable topological edge states produced by the gate voltage opens a new route for future topological field-effect quantum transistors in nanoelectronics and spintronics.

  13. Probing top-gated field effect transistor of reduced graphene oxide monolayer made by dielectrophoresis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasu, K. S.; Chakraborty, Biswanath; Sampath, S.; Sood, A. K.

    2010-08-01

    We demonstrate a top-gated field effect transistor made of a reduced graphene oxide (RGO) monolayer (graphene) by dielectrophoresis. The Raman spectrum of RGO flakes of typical size of 5 μm×5 μm shows a single 2D band at 2687 cm -1, characteristic of single-layer graphene. The two-probe current-voltage measurements of RGO flakes, deposited in between the patterned electrodes with a gap of 2.5 μm using ac dielectrophoresis, show ohmic behavior with a resistance of ˜37 kΩ. The temperature dependence of the resistance (R) of RGO measured between 305 K and 393 K yields a temperature coefficient of resistance [dR/dT]/R˜-9.5×10-4/K, the same as that of mechanically exfoliated single-layer graphene. The field-effect transistor action was obtained by electrochemical top-gating using a solid polymer electrolyte (PEO+LiClO 4) and Pt wire. The ambipolar nature of graphene flakes is observed up to a doping level of ˜6×1012/cm and carrier mobility of ˜50 cm 2/V s. The source-drain current characteristics show a tendency of current saturation at high source-drain voltage which is analyzed quantitatively by a diffusive transport model.

  14. The interface between ferroelectric and 2D material for a Ferroelectric Field-Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Nahee; Kang, Haeyong; Lee, Sang-Goo; Lee, Young Hee; Suh, Dongseok

    We have studied electrical property of ferroelectric field-effect transistor which consists of graphene on hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) gated by a ferroelectric, PMN-PT (i.e. (1-x)Pb(Mg1/3Nb2/3) O3-xPbTiO3) single-crystal substrate. The PMN-PT was expected to have an effect on polarization field into the graphene channel and to induce a giant amount of surface charge. The hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) flake was directly exfoliated on the PMN-PT substrate for preventing graphene from directly contacting on the PMN-PT substrate. It can make us to observe the effect of the interface between ferroelectric and 2D material on the device operation. Monolayer graphene as 2D channel material, which was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy, was transferred on top of the hexagonal Boron-Nitride (h-BN) by using the conventional dry-transfer method. Here, we can demonstrate that the structure of graphene/hexagonal-BN/ferroelectric field-effect transistor makes us to clearly understand the device operation as well as the interface between ferroelectric and 2D materials by inserting h-BN between them. The phenomena such as anti-hysteresis, current saturation behavior, and hump-like increase of channel current, will be discussed by in terms of ferroelectric switching, polarization-assisted charge trapping.

  15. Carbon Nanotube Synaptic Transistor Network for Pattern Recognition.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sungho; Yoon, Jinsu; Kim, Hee-Dong; Choi, Sung-Jin

    2015-11-18

    Inspired by the human brain, a neuromorphic system combining complementary metal-oxide semiconductor (CMOS) and adjustable synaptic devices may offer new computing paradigms by enabling massive neural-network parallelism. In particular, synaptic devices, which are capable of emulating the functions of biological synapses, are used as the essential building blocks for an information storage and processing system. However, previous synaptic devices based on two-terminal resistive devices remain challenging because of their variability and specific physical mechanisms of resistance change, which lead to a bottleneck in the implementation of a high-density synaptic device network. Here we report that a three-terminal synaptic transistor based on carbon nanotubes can provide reliable synaptic functions that encode relative timing and regulate weight change. In addition, using system-level simulations, the developed synaptic transistor network associated with CMOS circuits can perform unsupervised learning for pattern recognition using a simplified spike-timing-dependent plasticity scheme.

  16. High-Resolution ac Measurements of the Hall Effect in Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y.; Yi, H. T.; Podzorov, V.

    2016-03-01

    We describe a high resolving power technique for Hall-effect measurements, efficient in determining Hall mobility and carrier density in organic field-effect transistors and other low-mobility systems. We utilize a small low-frequency ac magnetic field (Brms<0.25 T ) and a phase-sensitive (lock-in) detection of Hall voltage, with the necessary corrections for Faraday induction. This method significantly enhances the signal-to-noise ratio and eliminates the necessity of using high magnetic fields in Hall-effect studies. With the help of this method, we are able to obtain the Hall mobility and carrier density in organic transistors with a mobility as low as μ ˜0.3 cm2 V-1 s-1 by using a compact desktop apparatus and low magnetic fields. We find a good agreement between Hall-effect and electric-field-effect measurements, indicating that, contrary to the common belief, certain organic semiconductors with mobilities below 1 cm2 V-1 s-1 can still exhibit a fully developed, band-semiconductor-like Hall effect, with the Hall mobility and carrier density matching those obtained in longitudinal transistor measurements. This suggests that, even when μ <1 cm2 V-1 s-1 , charges in organic semiconductors can still behave as delocalized coherent carriers. This technique paves the way to ubiquitous Hall-effect studies in a wide range of low-mobility materials and devices, where it is typically very difficult to resolve the Hall effect even in very high dc magnetic fields.

  17. Enzyme-polyelectrolyte multilayer assemblies on reduced graphene oxide field-effect transistors for biosensing applications.

    PubMed

    Piccinini, Esteban; Bliem, Christina; Reiner-Rozman, Ciril; Battaglini, Fernando; Azzaroni, Omar; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2017-06-15

    We present the construction of layer-by-layer (LbL) assemblies of polyethylenimine and urease onto reduced-graphene-oxide based field-effect transistors (rGO FETs) for the detection of urea. This versatile biosensor platform simultaneously exploits the pH dependency of liquid-gated graphene-based transistors and the change in the local pH produced by the catalyzed hydrolysis of urea. The use of an interdigitated microchannel resulted in transistors displaying low noise, high pH sensitivity (20.3µA/pH) and transconductance values up to 800 µS. The modification of rGO FETs with a weak polyelectrolyte improved the pH response because of its transducing properties by electrostatic gating effects. In the presence of urea, the urease-modified rGO FETs showed a shift in the Dirac point due to the change in the local pH close to the graphene surface. Markedly, these devices operated at very low voltages (less than 500mV) and were able to monitor urea in the range of 1-1000µm, with a limit of detection (LOD) down to 1µm, fast response and good long-term stability. The urea-response of the transistors was enhanced by increasing the number of bilayers due to the increment of the enzyme surface coverage onto the channel. Moreover, quantification of the heavy metal Cu(2+)(with a LOD down to 10nM) was performed in aqueous solution by taking advantage of the urease specific inhibition.

  18. Carbon Nanostructure-Based Field-Effect Transistors for Label-Free Chemical/Biological Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Hu, PingAn; Zhang, Jia; Li, Le; Wang, Zhenlong; O’Neill, William; Estrela, Pedro

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, electrical detection of chemical and biological species using novel nanostructure-based devices has attracted significant attention for chemical, genomics, biomedical diagnostics, and drug discovery applications. The use of nanostructured devices in chemical/biological sensors in place of conventional sensing technologies has advantages of high sensitivity, low decreased energy consumption and potentially highly miniaturized integration. Owing to their particular structure, excellent electrical properties and high chemical stability, carbon nanotube and graphene based electrical devices have been widely developed for high performance label-free chemical/biological sensors. Here, we review the latest developments of carbon nanostructure-based transistor sensors in ultrasensitive detection of chemical/biological entities, such as poisonous gases, nucleic acids, proteins and cells. PMID:22399927

  19. Radio frequency analog electronics based on carbon nanotube transistors

    PubMed Central

    Kocabas, Coskun; Kim, Hoon-sik; Banks, Tony; Rogers, John A.; Pesetski, Aaron A.; Baumgardner, James E.; Krishnaswamy, S. V.; Zhang, Hong

    2008-01-01

    The potential to exploit single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in advanced electronics represents a continuing, major source of interest in these materials. However, scalable integration of SWNTs into circuits is challenging because of difficulties in controlling the geometries, spatial positions, and electronic properties of individual tubes. We have implemented solutions to some of these challenges to yield radio frequency (RF) SWNT analog electronic devices, such as narrow band amplifiers operating in the VHF frequency band with power gains as high as 14 dB. As a demonstration, we fabricated nanotube transistor radios, in which SWNT devices provide all of the key functions, including resonant antennas, fixed RF amplifiers, RF mixers, and audio amplifiers. These results represent important first steps to practical implementation of SWNTs in high-speed analog circuits. Comparison studies indicate certain performance advantages over silicon and capabilities that complement those in existing compound semiconductor technologies. PMID:18227509

  20. Molecular doping of single-walled carbon nanotube transistors: optoelectronic study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiangbin; Emelianov, Aleksei V.; Bakulin, Artem A.; Bobrinetskiy, Ivan I.

    2016-09-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) are a promising material for future optoelectronic applications, including flexible electrodes and field-effect transistors. Molecular doping of carbon nanotube surface can be an effective way to control the electronic structure and charge dynamics of these material systems. Herein, two organic semiconductors with different energy level alignment in respect to SWCNT are used to dope the channel of the SWCNT-based transistor. The effects of doping on the device performance are studied with a set of optoelectronic measurements. For the studied system, we observed an opposite change in photo-resistance, depending on the type (electron donor vs electron acceptor) of the dopants. We attribute this effect to interplay between two effects: (i) the change in the carrier concentration and (ii) the formation of trapping states at the SWCNT surface. We also observed a modest 4 pA photocurrent generation in the doped systems, which indicates that the studied system could be used as a platform for multi-pulse optoelectronic experiments with photocurrent detection.

  1. Novel gallium nitride based microwave noise and power heterostructure field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chumbes, Eduardo Martin

    With the pioneering efforts of Isamu Akasaki of Meiji University and Shuji Nakamura of Nichia Chemical Industries in the late 1980's and early 1990's, the first long-lived candela-class blue and ultraviolet light emitting devices have finally come to fruition. Their success in conquering this Holy Grail in opto-electronics is due to their development of a new technology based remarkably on a class of semiconductor materials that has been practically ignored and overlooked by almost everyone for the past twenty years---the nitrides of Al, Ga and In and their alloys. The breakthroughs made from this new technology in the last decade of the 20th century has revolutionized and revitalized worldwide research and development efforts to the point where it is feasible for other important technologies such as high-density information storage, high-resolution full-color displays and efficient white light lamps and UV sensors to come much closer to realization. Equally important is the potential that this new technology can bring toward the development of efficient ultra-high power and high-temperature electronics that will revolutionize the aerospace and high-speed communication industries. Specifically, the large bandgap and strong polar properties of the group III-nitrides has at present allowed for the realization of simple doped and remarkably undoped AlGaN/GaN transistor structures on sapphire and SiC substrates with two-dimensional electron gas sheet densities significantly greater than that of conventional transistor structures based on GaAs and InP. This dissertation will look specifically at extending undoped AlGaN/GaN heterostructure field-effect transistors or HFETs towards more advanced system applications involving the integration of these devices onto a more advanced Si technology and looking at the feasibility of this integration. It will also address important issues similar devices on semi-insulating SiC substrates have in robust microwave low noise and

  2. Terahertz signal detection in a short gate length field-effect transistor with a two-dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Vostokov, N. V. Shashkin, V. I.

    2015-11-28

    We consider the problem of non-resonant detection of terahertz signals in a short gate length field-effect transistor having a two-dimensional electron channel with zero external bias between the source and the drain. The channel resistance, gate-channel capacitance, and quadratic nonlinearity parameter of the transistor during detection as a function of the gate bias voltage are studied. Characteristics of detection of the transistor connected in an antenna with real impedance are analyzed. The consideration is based on both a simple one-dimensional model of the transistor and allowance for the two-dimensional distribution of the electric field in the transistor structure. The results given by the different models are discussed.

  3. Position-dependent performance of copper phthalocyanine based field-effect transistors by gold nanoparticles modification.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xiao; Li, Yao; Lv, Wenli; Zhao, Feiyu; Sun, Lei; Peng, Yingquan; Wen, Zhanwei; Zhong, Junkang; Zhang, Jianping

    2015-01-21

    A facile fabrication and characteristics of copper phthalocyanine (CuPc)-based organic field-effect transistor (OFET) using the gold nanoparticles (Au NPs) modification is reported, thereby achieving highly improved performance. The effect of Au NPs located at three different positions, that is, at the SiO2/CuPc interface (device B), embedding in the middle of CuPc layer (device C), and on the top of CuPc layer (device D), is investigated, and the results show that device D has the best performance. Compared with the device without Au NPs (reference device A), device D displays an improvement of field-effect mobility (μ(sat)) from 1.65 × 10(-3) to 5.51 × 10(-3) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), and threshold voltage decreases from -23.24 to -16.12 V. Therefore, a strategy for the performance improvement of the CuPc-based OFET with large field-effect mobility and saturation drain current is developed, on the basis of the concept of nanoscale Au modification. The model of an additional electron transport channel formation by FET operation at the Au NPs/CuPc interface is therefore proposed to explain the observed performance improvement. Optimum CuPc thickness is confirmed to be about 50 nm in the present study. The device-to-device uniformity and time stability are discussed for future application.

  4. Precision X-ray Measurement of the Position Sensitivity of Graphene Field Effect Transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Cazalas, Edward; Sarker, Biddut K.; Moore, Michael; Childres, Isaac; Chen, Yong P.; Jovanovic, Igor

    2015-07-01

    We have been exploring the graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) as a platform for detection of ionizing radiation, whereby the detection is achieved indirectly by use of the field effect in graphene, which is induced by the generation and transport of ionized charge carriers in the underlying undoped semiconductor substrate. An important characteristic of such a detector is scalability to large areas. Previous experimental studies suggest that the effective area significantly exceeds the size of graphene for field effect-based architectures, and this is also predicted from the operational principle of these devices. We describe the results of the experimental studies of GFETs on silicon carbide (SiC) substrates by use a microbeam Xray facility, provided by the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The results confirm that the effective area of the GFET is significantly larger than that of graphene with response measured at distances as large as 1000 μm from 10-μm size graphene. A simple transport model has been developed and is used to explain the spatial dependence of the GFET response. (authors)

  5. Group IV nanotube transistors for next generation ubiquitous computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fahad, Hossain M.; Hussain, Aftab M.; Sevilla Torres, Galo A.; Banerjee, Sanjay K.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-06-01

    Evolution in transistor technology from increasingly large power consuming single gate planar devices to energy efficient multiple gate non-planar ultra-narrow (< 20 nm) fins has enhanced the scaling trend to facilitate doubling performance. However, this performance gain happens at the expense of arraying multiple devices (fins) per operation bit, due to their ultra-narrow dimensions (width) originated limited number of charges to induce appreciable amount of drive current. Additionally arraying degrades device off-state leakage and increases short channel characteristics, resulting in reduced chip level energy-efficiency. In this paper, a novel nanotube device (NTFET) topology based on conventional group IV (Si, SiGe) channel materials is discussed. This device utilizes a core/shell dual gate strategy to capitalize on the volume-inversion properties of an ultra-thin (< 10 nm) group IV nanotube channel to minimize leakage and short channel effects while maximizing performance in an area-efficient manner. It is also shown that the NTFET is capable of providing a higher output drive performance per unit chip area than an array of gate-all-around nanowires, while maintaining the leakage and short channel characteristics similar to that of a single gate-all-around nanowire, the latter being the most superior in terms of electrostatic gate control. In the age of big data and the multitude of devices contributing to the internet of things, the NTFET offers a new transistor topology alternative with maximum benefits from performance-energy efficiency-functionality perspective.

  6. Field Effect Transistor Behavior in Electrospun Polyaniline/Polyethylene Oxide Demonstrated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, Carl H.; Theofylaktos, Onoufrios; Robinson, Daryl C.; Miranda, Felix A.

    2004-01-01

    Novel transistors and logic devices based on nanotechnology concepts are under intense development. The potential for ultra-low-power circuitry makes nanotechnology attractive for applications such as digital electronics and sensors. For NASA applications, nanotechnology offers tremendous opportunities for increased onboard data processing, and thus autonomous decisionmaking ability, and novel sensors that detect and respond to environmental stimuli with little oversight requirements. Polyaniline/polyethylene oxide (PANi/PEO) nanofibers are of interest because they have electrical conductivities that can be changed from insulating to metallic by varying the doping levels and conformations of the polymer chain. At the NASA Glenn Research Center, we have observed field effect transistor (FET) behavior in electrospun PANi/PEO nanofibers doped with camphorsulfonic acid. The nanofibers were deposited onto Au electrodes, which had been prepatterned onto oxidized silicon substrates. The preceding scanning electron image shows the device used in the transistor measurements. Saturation channel currents are observed at surprisingly low source/drain voltages (see the following graph). The hole mobility in the depletion regime is 1.4x10(exp -4)sq cm/V sec, whereas the one-dimensional charge density (at zero gate bias) is calculated to be approximately 1 hole per 50 two-ring repeat units of polyaniline, consistent with the rather high channel conductivity (approx.10(exp -3) S/cm). Reducing or eliminating the PEO content in the fiber is expected to enhance device parameters. Electrospinning is thus proposed as a simple method of fabricating one-dimensional polymer FET's.

  7. Oxygen Implant Isolation of n-GaN Field-Effect Transistor Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Dang, G.; Cao, X.A.; Ren, F.; Pearton, S.J.; Han, J.; Baca, A.G.; Shul, R.J.

    1999-07-20

    Multiple-energy (30-325 keV) O{sup +} implantation into GaN field-effect transistor structures (n {approximately} 10{sup 18} cm{sup {minus}3}, 3000 {angstrom} thick) can produce as-implanted sheet resistances of 4 x 10{sup 12} {Omega}/{open_square}, provided care is taken to ensure compensation of the region up to the projected range of the lowest energy implant. The sheet resistance remains above 10{sup 7} {Omega}/{open_square} to annealing temperatures of {approximately} 650 C and displays an activation energy of 0.29 eV. No diffusion of the implanted oxygen was observed for anneals up to 800 C.

  8. ZnO nanorods array based field-effect transistor biosensor for phosphate detection.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Rafiq; Ahn, Min-Sang; Hahn, Yoon-Bong

    2017-03-18

    A promising field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor has been fabricated based on pyruvate oxidase (PyO) functionalized ZnO nanorods (ZnO NRs) array grown on seeded SiO2/Si substrate. The direct and vertically grown ZnO NRs on the seeded SiO2/Si substrate offers high surface area for enhanced PyO immobilization, which further helps to detect phosphate with higher specificity. Under optimum conditions, the fabricated FET biosensor provided a convenient method for phosphate detection with high sensitivity (80.57μAmM(-1)cm(-2)) in a wide-linear range (0.1µM-7.0mM). Additionally, it also showed very low effect of electroactive species, stability and good reproducibility. Encouraging results suggest that this approach presents a promising method to be used for field measurements to detect phosphate.

  9. Design Architecture of field-effect transistor with back gate electrode for biosensor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md.; Hashim, U.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; M. Nuzaihan M., N.; Ayub, R. M.; Adzhri, R.; Zaki, M.; Azman, A. H.

    2016-07-01

    This paper presents the preparation method of photolithography chrome mask design used in fabrication process of field-effect transistor with back gate biasing based biosensor. Initially, the chrome masks are designed by studying the process flow of the biosensor fabrication, followed by drawing of the actual chrome mask using the AutoCAD software. The overall width and length of the device is optimized at 16 mm and 16 mm, respectively. Fabrication processes of the biosensor required five chrome masks, which included source and drain formation mask, the back gate area formation mask, electrode formation mask, front gate area formation mask, and passivation area formation mask. The complete chrome masks design will be sent for chrome mask fabrication and for future use in biosensor fabrication.

  10. An analytical model for bio-electronic organic field-effect transistor sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macchia, Eleonora; Giordano, Francesco; Magliulo, Maria; Palazzo, Gerardo; Torsi, Luisa

    2013-09-01

    A model for the electrical characteristics of Functional-Bio-Interlayer Organic Field-Effect Transistors (FBI-OFETs) electronic sensors is here proposed. Specifically, the output current-voltage characteristics of a streptavidin (SA) embedding FBI-OFET are modeled by means of the analytical equations of an enhancement mode p-channel OFET modified according to an ad hoc designed equivalent circuit that is also independently simulated with pspice. An excellent agreement between the model and the experimental current-voltage output characteristics has been found upon exposure to 5 nM of biotin. A good agreement is also found with the SA OFET parameters graphically extracted from the device transfer I-V curves.

  11. Terahertz detection by epitaxial-graphene field-effect-transistors on silicon carbide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bianco, F.; Perenzoni, D.; Convertino, D.; De Bonis, S. L.; Spirito, D.; Perenzoni, M.; Coletti, C.; Vitiello, M. S.; Tredicucci, A.

    2015-09-01

    We report on room temperature detection of terahertz radiation by means of antenna-coupled field effect transistors (FETs) fabricated using epitaxial graphene grown on silicon carbide. The achieved photoresponsivity (˜0.25 V/W) and noise equivalent power (˜80 nW/ √{ Hz } ) result from the combined effect of two independent detection mechanisms: over-damped plasma wave rectification and thermoelectric effects, the latter ascribed to the presence of carrier density junctions along the FET channel. The calculated plasmonic and thermoelectric response reproduces qualitatively well the measured photovoltages; the experimentally observed sign-switch demonstrates the stronger contribution of plasmonic detection compared to the thermoelectric one. These results unveil the potential of plasmonic detectors exploiting epitaxial graphene on silicon carbide for fast large area imaging of macroscopic samples.

  12. Influence of line-edge roughness on multiple-gate tunnel field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo Young

    2017-04-01

    The influence of fin-line-edge roughness (fin-LER) and gate-LER on multiple-gate (MG) tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs) has been investigated compared with MG MOSFETs by using full three-dimensional technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulation. From simulation results, two interesting results have been observed. First, MG TFETs show much less severe gate-LER than MG MOSFETs, which means that only fin-LER can be considered when evaluating the total LER of MG TFETs. Second, TFETs show ∼3× more LER improvement than MOSFETs when their structures are changed from double-gate (DG) to triple-gate (TG) ones. Our findings provide the useful design guidelines of variation-tolerant TFETs.

  13. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    PubMed Central

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-01-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature. PMID:27830748

  14. Field-effect transistor biosensors with two-dimensional black phosphorus nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yantao; Ren, Ren; Pu, Haihui; Chang, Jingbo; Mao, Shun; Chen, Junhong

    2017-03-15

    A black phosphorous (BP)-based field-effect transistor (FET) biosensor was fabricated by using few-layer BP nanosheets labeled with gold nanoparticle-antibody conjugates. BP nanosheets were mechanically exfoliated and used as the sensing/conducting channel in the FET, with an Al2O3 thin film as the dielectric layer for surface passivation. Antibody probes were conjugated with gold nanoparticles that were sputtered on the BP through surface functionalization. The sensor response was measured by the change in the BP's electrical resistance after antigens were introduced. The adsorbed antigens through specific antigen-antibody binding interactions induced a gate potential, thereby changing the drain-source current. The as-produced BP biosensor showed both high sensitivity (lower limit of detection ~10ng/ml) and selectivity towards human immunoglobulin G. Results from this study demonstrate the outstanding performance of BP as a sensing channel for FET biosensor applications.

  15. Selective detection of heavy metal ions by self assembled chemical field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruan, Hang; Kang, Yuhong; Gladwin, Elizabeth; Claus, Richard O.

    2015-04-01

    Multiple layer-by-layer sensor material modifications were designed and implemented to achieve selectivity of semiconductor based chemical field effect transistors (ChemFETs) to particular heavy metal ions. The ChemFET sensors were fabricated and modified in three ways, with the intent to initially target first mercury and lead ions and then chromium ions, respectively. Sensor characterization was performed with the gate regions of the sensor elements exposed to different concentrations of target heavy metal ion solutions. A minimum detection level in the range of 0.1 ppm and a 10%-90% response time of less than 10 s were demonstrated. By combining layer-by-layer gold nanoparticles and lead ionophores, a sensor is produced that is sensitive and selective not only to chromium but also to Cr3+ and Cr6+. This result supports the claim that high selectivity can be achieved by designing self-assembled bonding for lead, arsenic, chromium, cesium, mercury, and cadmium.

  16. The large-scale integration of high-performance silicon nanowire field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Li, Qiliang; Zhu, Xiaoxiao; Yang, Yang; Ioannou, Dimitris E; Xiong, Hao D; Kwon, Doo-Won; Suehle, John S; Richter, Curt A

    2009-10-14

    In this work we present a CMOS-compatible self-aligning process for the large-scale-integration of high-performance nanowire field effect transistors with well-saturated drain currents, steep subthreshold slopes at low drain voltage and a large on/off current ratio (>10(7)). The subthreshold swing is as small as 45 mV/dec, which is substantially beyond the thermodynamic limit (60 mV/dec) of conventional planar MOSFETs. These excellent device characteristics are achieved by using a clean integration process and a device structure that allows effective gate-channel-source coupling to tune the source/drain Schottky barriers at the nanoscale.

  17. Enhanced memory characteristics in organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors through thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Sugano, Ryo; Tashiro, Tomoya; Sekine, Tomohito; Fukuda, Kenjiro; Kumaki, Daisuke; Tokito, Shizuo

    2015-11-15

    We report on the memory characteristics of organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) using spin-coated poly(vinylidene difluoride/trifluoroethylene) (P(VDF/TrFE)) as a gate insulating layer. By thermal annealing the P(VDF/TrFE) layer at temperatures above its melting point, we could significantly improve the on/off current ratio to over 10{sup 4}. Considerable changes in the surface morphology and x-ray diffraction patterns were also observed in the P(VDF/TrFE) layer as a result of the annealing process. The enhanced memory effect is attributed to large polarization effects caused by rearranged ferroelectric polymer chains and improved crystallinity in the organic semiconductor layer of the FeFET devices.

  18. Terahertz responsivity of field-effect transistors under arbitrary biasing conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Földesy, Péter

    2013-09-01

    Current biased photoresponse model of long channel field-effect transistor (FET) detectors is introduced to describe the low frequency behavior in complex circuit environment. The model is applicable in all FET working regions, including subthreshold, linear, saturated modes, includes bulk potential variations, and handles the simultaneous gate-source and drain-source detection or source-driven topologies. The model is based on the phenomenological representation that links the photoresponse to the gate transconductance over drain current ratio (gm/ID) and circuit theory. A derived method is provided to analyze the detector behavior, to characterize existing antenna coupled detectors, and to predict the photoresponse in a complex circuit. The model is validated by measurements of 180 nm gate length silicon and GaAs high electron mobility FETs.

  19. High temperature study of flexible silicon-on-insulator fin field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Diab, Amer; Torres Sevilla, Galo A.; Ghoneim, Mohamed T.; Hussain, Muhammad M.

    2014-09-29

    We report high temperature electrical transport characteristics of a flexible version of the semiconductor industry's most advanced architecture: fin field-effect transistor on silicon-on-insulator with sub-20 nm fins and high-κ/metal gate stacks. Characterization from room to high temperature (150 °C) was completed to determine temperature dependence of drain current (I{sub ds}), gate leakage current (I{sub gs}), transconductance (g{sub m}), and extracted low-field mobility (μ{sub 0}). Mobility degradation with temperature is mainly caused by phonon scattering. The other device characteristics show insignificant difference at high temperature which proves the suitability of inorganic flexible electronics with advanced device architecture.

  20. Gold-coated graphene field-effect transistors for quantitative analysis of protein-antibody interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasov, Alexey; Tsai, Meng-Yen; Flynn, Erin M.; Joiner, Corey A.; Taylor, Robert C.; Vogel, Eric M.

    2015-12-01

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) based on large-area graphene and other 2D materials can potentially be used as low-cost and flexible potentiometric biological sensors. However, there have been few attempts to use these devices for quantifying molecular interactions and to compare their performance to established sensor technology. Here, gold-coated graphene FETs are used to measure the binding affinity of a specific protein-antibody interaction. Having a gold surface gives access to well-known thiol chemistry for the self-assembly of linker molecules. The results are compared with potentiometric silicon-based extended-gate sensors and a surface plasmon resonance system. The estimated dissociation constants are in excellent agreement for all sensor types as long as the active surfaces are the same (gold). The role of the graphene transducer is to simply amplify surface potential changes caused by adsorption of molecules on the gold surface.

  1. Surface-modified Diamond Field-effect Transistors for Enzyme-immobilized Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang-Soup; Degawa, Munenori; Nakamura, Yusuke; Kanazawa, Hirofumi; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2004-06-01

    The enzyme sensors using electrolyte-solution-gate diamond field effect transistors (SGFETs) have been developed for the first time. The hydrogen-terminated surface channel of the FETs was modified into partially aminated and oxygen-terminated (H-A-O-terminated) with irradiation of ultraviolet in an ammonia environment. The pH response of that is obtained about 50 mV/pH at pH 2-10. The concentration of substrates (urea or glucose) in the electrolyte solution has been detected by the pH change due to the bio-catalyzed effect of enzyme (urease or glucose oxidase), which is immobilized on the channel of SGFETs. The sensitivity of urea and glucose is approximately 30 mV/decade and 20 mV/decade respectively.

  2. Miniaturized diamond field-effect transistors for application in biosensors in electrolyte solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kwang-Soup; Hiraki, Takahiro; Umezawa, Hitoshi; Kawarada, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    The authors fabricated diamond solution-gate field-effect transistors (SGFETs) with miniaturization of the channel length to 5μm by photolithography. The channel surface was directly functionalized with amine by ultraviolet irradiation in an ammonia gas for 4h and aminated diamond SGFETs were sensitive to pH by 40mV /pH. Urease was immobilized on the amine-modified channel surface, which was sensitive to urea by 27μA/decade from 10-5M to 10-2M. The authors fabricated submicron-sized (500nm) diamond SGFETs using electron-beam lithography. The transconductance (gm) was 56mS/mm, which was 930-fold greater than that of the 500μm channel length.

  3. 100-nm-size ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistor with 108-cycle endurance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Hai, Le; Takahashi, Mitsue; Zhang, Wei; Sakai, Shigeki

    2015-08-01

    The fabrication process of 100-nm-size ferroelectric-gate field-effect transistors (FeFETs) with high endurance was reported. The FeFETs had Pt/Sr0.8Ca0.2Bi2Ta2O9 (SCBT)/HfO2/Si stacks where the Pt gate length was 100 nm. The FeFETs were successfully fabricated by integrating many technologies such as fine patterning of etching masks by electron-beam lithography, precise anisotropic etching of the gate stacks, well-controlled ion implantation for gate-self-aligned sources and drains, and the sidewall-cover process that we had developed. Good performances of the FeFETs were characterized by the endurance of 108 program-and-erase cycles with negligible threshold-voltage shift and good drain-current retention for 3.98 × 105 s.

  4. Nonvolatile memory with graphene oxide as a charge storage node in nanowire field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, David J.; Seol, Myeong-Lok; Choi, Sung-Jin; Moon, Dong-Il; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2012-02-01

    Through the structural modification of a three-dimensional silicon nanowire field-effect transistor, i.e., a double-gate FinFET, a structural platform was developed which allowed for us to utilize graphene oxide (GO) as a charge trapping layer in a nonvolatile memory device. By creating a nanogap between the gate and the channel, GO was embedded after the complete device fabrication. By applying a proper gate voltage, charge trapping, and de-trapping within the GO was enabled and resulted in large threshold voltage shifts. The employment of GO with FinFET in our work suggests that graphitic materials can potentially play a significant role for future nanoelectronic applications.

  5. First-principles simulations of a graphene-based field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Peng; Cheng, Hai-Ping

    2015-06-01

    We improvise an approach to carry out first-principles simulations of graphene-based vertical field-effect tunneling transistors that consist of a graphene|h -BN |graphene multilayer structure. Within the density functional theory framework, we exploit the effective screening medium (ESM) method to properly treat boundary conditions for electrostatic potentials and investigate the effect of gate voltage. The distribution of free carriers and the band structure of both top and bottom graphene layers are calculated self-consistently. The dielectric properties of h -BN thin films sandwiched between graphene layers are computed layer-by-layer following the theory of microscopic permittivity. We find that the permittivities of BN layers are very close to that of crystalline h -BN . The effect of interface with graphene on the dielectric properties of h -BN is weak according to an analysis on the interface charge redistribution.

  6. Si delta-doped field-effect transistors by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, N.; Carter, J.; Jackson, G. S.; Hendriks, H.; Zheng, X. L.; Kim, M. H.

    1991-07-01

    Si delta-doped GaAs field-effect transistors (FETs) are demonstrated by atmospheric pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and characterized by Hall-effect, capacitance-voltage (C-V), and Shubnikov de-Haas measurements. The Si delta doping was accomplished by interrupting the growth and flowing silane with controlled timing under an arsenic overpressure. Devices with 0.5 μm gate length (Ns=2.2×1012 cm-2) were fabricated with a maximum extrinsic transconductance of 140 mS/mm and a current gain cutoff frequency of 17 GHz. The transconductance as a function of gate voltage showed a plateau region through a range of 1.5 V further supporting spatial confinement of the electrons.

  7. Design and fabrication of high-performance diamond triple-gate field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jiangwei; Ohsato, Hirotaka; Wang, Xi; Liao, Meiyong; Koide, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    The lack of large-area single-crystal diamond wafers has led us to downscale diamond electronic devices. Here, we design and fabricate a hydrogenated diamond (H-diamond) triple-gate metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistor (MOSFET) to extend device downscaling and increase device output current. The device’s electrical properties are compared with those of planar-type MOSFETs, which are fabricated simultaneously on the same substrate. The triple-gate MOSFET’s output current (174.2 mA mm−1) is much higher than that of the planar-type device (45.2 mA mm−1), and the on/off ratio and subthreshold swing are more than 108 and as low as 110 mV dec−1, respectively. The fabrication of these H-diamond triple-gate MOSFETs will drive diamond electronic device development forward towards practical applications. PMID:27708372

  8. Label-Free Aptamer-Based Immunoglobulin Sensors Using Graphene Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-07-01

    Electrical detection of specific proteins was demonstrated using aptamer-modified graphene field-effect transistors (G-FETs). Immunoglobulin E (IgE) aptamers were immobilized onto the graphene surface with 1-pyrenebutanoic acid succinimidyl ester as a linker. From an atomic-force microscopy image, the height of the graphene channel was determined to be approximately 3 nm, indicating the successful functionalization of aptamers. The slope of the transport characteristics before and after aptamer functionalization did not change, indicating that the functionalization process was carried out without introducing defects. The aptamer-modified G-FET successfully detected only the target protein while the drain current of the bare G-FETs changed by various proteins. These results suggest that the binding of the non-target protein to the graphene channel surface was sufficiently suppressed.

  9. Microscopic origin of low frequency noise in MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Ghatak, Subhamoy; Jain, Manish; Ghosh, Arindam; Mukherjee, Sumanta; Sarma, D. D.

    2014-09-01

    We report measurement of low frequency 1/f noise in molybdenum di-sulphide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors in multiple device configurations including MoS{sub 2} on silicon dioxide as well as MoS{sub 2}-hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) heterostructures. All as-fabricated devices show similar magnitude of noise with number fluctuation as the dominant mechanism at high temperatures and density, although the calculated density of traps is two orders of magnitude higher than that at the SiO{sub 2} interface. Measurements on the heterostructure devices with vacuum annealing and dual gated configuration reveals that along with the channel, metal-MoS{sub 2} contacts also play a significant role in determining noise magnitude in these devices.

  10. Hydrogenated monolayer graphene with reversible and tunable wide band gap and its field-effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Son, Jangyup; Lee, Soogil; Kim, Sang Jin; Park, Byung Cheol; Lee, Han-Koo; Kim, Sanghoon; Kim, Jae Hoon; Hong, Byung Hee; Hong, Jongill

    2016-11-01

    Graphene is currently at the forefront of cutting-edge science and technology due to exceptional electronic, optical, mechanical, and thermal properties. However, the absence of a sizeable band gap in graphene has been a major obstacle for application. To open and control a band gap in functionalized graphene, several gapping strategies have been developed. In particular, hydrogen plasma treatment has triggered a great scientific interest, because it has been known to be an efficient way to modify the surface of single-layered graphene and to apply for standard wafer-scale fabrication. Here we show a monolayer chemical-vapour-deposited graphene hydrogenated by indirect hydrogen plasma without structural defect and we demonstrate that a band gap can be tuned as wide as 3.9 eV by varying hydrogen coverage. We also show a hydrogenated graphene field-effect transistor, showing that on/off ratio changes over three orders of magnitude at room temperature.

  11. Detection of nanosecond-scale, high power THz pulses with a field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Preu, S.; Lu, H.; Gossard, A. C.; Sherwin, M. S.

    2012-05-15

    We demonstrate detection and resolution of high power, 34 ns free electron laser pulses using a rectifying field effect transistor. The detector remains linear up to an input power of 11 {+-} 0.5 W at a pulse energy of 20 {+-} 1 {mu}J at 240 GHz. We compare its performance to a protected Schottky diode, finding a shorter intrinsic time constant. The damage threshold is estimated to be a few 100 W. The detector is, therefore, well-suited for characterizing high power THz pulses. We further demonstrate that the same detector can be used to detect low power continuous-wave THz signals with a post detection limited noise floor of 3.1 {mu}W/{radical}(Hz). Such ultrafast, high power detectors are important tools for high power and high energy THz facilities such as free electron lasers.

  12. TCAD Simulations of graphene field-effect transistors based on the quantum capacitance effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafsi, Bilel; Boubaker, Aïmen; Ismaïl, Naoufel; Kalboussi, Adel; Lmimouni, Kamal

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, the results of a comparative study between experimental measurements and technology computer-aided design (TCAD) simulations of graphene field-effect transistors (GFET) are presented. Our simulations were performed to study the electrical properties of few-layer graphene, and the physical approach to the simulation tools is described by using the basics of band theory, Poisson's equation, the continuity equation and the drift diffusion equations that are suitable for devices with small active regions. A correct formulation of the carrier density was performed to take into account the quantum capacitance. The modeled current was compared to the measured results for a prototype and was shown to be accurate and to have a predictive behavior.

  13. Organic-inorganic proximity effect in the magneto-conductance of vertical organic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, B.; Greenman, M.; Devir-Wolfman, A. H.; Tessler, N.; Ehrenfreund, E.

    2016-07-01

    Vertical organic field effect transistors having a patterned source electrode and an a-SiO2 insulation layer show high performance as a switching element with high transfer characteristics. By measuring the low field magneto-conductance under ambient conditions at room temperature, we show here that the proximity of the inorganic a-SiO2 insulation to the organic conducting channel affects considerably the magnetic response. We propose that in n-type devices, electrons in the organic conducting channel and spin bearing charged defects in the inorganic a-SiO2 insulation layer (e.g., O2 = Si+.) form oppositely charged spin pairs whose singlet-triplet spin configurations are mixed through the relatively strong hyperfine field of 29Si. By increasing the contact area between the insulation layer and the conducting channel, the ˜2% magneto-conductance response may be considerably enhanced.

  14. Threshold voltage roll-off modelling of bilayer graphene field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saeidmanesh, M.; Ismail, Razali; Khaledian, M.; Karimi, H.; Akbari, E.

    2013-12-01

    An analytical model is presented for threshold voltage roll-off of double gate bilayer graphene field-effect transistors. To this end, threshold voltage models of short- and long-channel states have been developed. In the short-channel case, front and back gate potential distributions have been modelled and used. In addition, the tunnelling probability is modelled and its effect is taken into consideration in the potential distribution model. To evaluate the accuracy of the potential model, FlexPDE software is employed with proper boundary conditions and a good agreement is observed. Using the proposed models, the effect of several structural parameters on the threshold voltage and its roll-off are studied at room temperature.

  15. The Effect of Gas Absorption on Multilayer Black Phosphorus Field Effect Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xue; Hu, Jin; Yue, Chunlei; Della Fera, Nicholas; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang

    2015-03-01

    Multilayer black phosphorus (BP) is drawing much attention recently due to its reported high mobility (up to 1000 cm2V-1s-1) and on/off ratio (up to 105) as the channel material for field effect transistor (FET). We investigated the interplay between the electrical response of high performing BPFET and gas adsorbate introduced to its surrounding environment. Different type of gas including CO2, H2O, Ethanol, CO, NO, NH3, etc. has been tested. We observed that the absorption of gas molecules generally reduces the overall on-state conductance of the device with an order of 10 ~ 100. And such reduction can be fully recovered by purging with inert gas or baking at mild temperature (about 100°C). The absorption dynamics and detailed mechanism are also been investigated. We conclude that multilayer black phosphorus is an excellent material for chemical sensing.

  16. Field-effect transistor having a superlattice channel and high carrier velocities at high applied fields

    DOEpatents

    Chaffin, R.J.; Dawson, L.R.; Fritz, I.J.; Osbourn, G.C.; Zipperian, T.E.

    1987-06-08

    A field effect transistor comprises a semiconductor having a source, a drain, a channel and a gate in operational relationship. The semiconductor is a strained layer superlattice comprising alternating quantum well and barrier layers, the quantum well layers and barrier layers being selected from the group of layer pairs consisting of InGaAs/AlGaAs, InAs/InAlGaAs, and InAs/InAlAsP. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well and barrier layers are sufficiently thin that the alternating layers constitute a superlattice which has a superlattice conduction band energy level structure in k-vector space. The layer thicknesses of the quantum well layers are selected to provide a superlattice L/sub 2D/-valley which has a shape which is substantially more two-dimensional than that of said bulk L-valley. 2 figs.

  17. Method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from graphene field-effect transistors using a physical model

    SciTech Connect

    Boscá, A.; Pedrós, J.; Martínez, J.; Calle, F.

    2015-01-28

    Due to its intrinsic high mobility, graphene has proved to be a suitable material for high-speed electronics, where graphene field-effect transistor (GFET) has shown excellent properties. In this work, we present a method for extracting relevant electrical parameters from GFET devices using a simple electrical characterization and a model fitting. With experimental data from the device output characteristics, the method allows to calculate parameters such as the mobility, the contact resistance, and the fixed charge. Differentiated electron and hole mobilities and direct connection with intrinsic material properties are some of the key aspects of this method. Moreover, the method output values can be correlated with several issues during key fabrication steps such as the graphene growth and transfer, the lithographic steps, or the metalization processes, providing a flexible tool for quality control in GFET fabrication, as well as a valuable feedback for improving the material-growth process.

  18. Compound Semiconductors for Low-Power p-Channel Field-Effect Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    63 (1997). 8. J.H. Tsai, K.P. Zhu, Y.C. Chu, S.Y. Chiu, Electron. Lett. 39, 1611 (2003). 9. Y.J. Chan, D . Pavlidis , IEEE Trans. Electron Devices 39...diagram for p-channel field-effect transistor with a strained GaSb channel.22 S, source; G, gate; D , drain; EC, conduction band energy; EF, Fermi energy...EF EV In 0. 2A I 0 .8 S b A IA s 0 .2 5S b 0. 75 A IA s 0 .2 5S b 0. 75 300 K B e- do pe d b a S G D In0.2AI0.8Sb AIAs0.25Sb0.75 top barrier

  19. Manipulation of transport hysteresis on graphene field effect transistors with Ga ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Quan; Liu, Shuai; Ren, Naifei

    2014-09-29

    We have studied the effect of Ga ion irradiation on the controllable hysteretic behavior of graphene field effect transistors fabricated on Si/SO{sub 2} substrates. The various densities of defects in graphene were monitored by Raman spectrum. It was found that the Dirac point shifted to the positive gate voltage constantly, while the hysteretic behavior was enhanced first and then weakened, with the dose of ion irradiation increasing. By contrasting the trap charges density induced by dopant and the total density of effective trap charges, it demonstrated that adsorbate doping was not the decisive factor that induced the hysteretic behavior. The tunneling between the defect sites induced by ion irradiation was also an important cause for the hysteresis.

  20. Suppression of tunneling rate fluctuations in tunnel field-effect transistors by enhancing tunneling probability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Takahiro; Migita, Shinji; Fukuda, Koichi; Asai, Hidehiro; Morita, Yukinori; Mizubayashi, Wataru; Liu, Yongxun; O’uchi, Shin-ichi; Fuketa, Hiroshi; Otsuka, Shintaro; Yasuda, Tetsuji; Masahara, Meishoku; Ota, Hiroyuki; Matsukawa, Takashi

    2017-04-01

    This paper discusses the impact of the tunneling probability on the variability of tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). Isoelectronic trap (IET) technology, which enhances the tunneling current in TFETs, is used to suppress the variability of the ON current and threshold voltage. The simulation results show that suppressing the tunneling rate fluctuations results in suppression of the variability. In addition, a formula describing the relationship between the tunneling rate fluctuations and the electric field strength is derived based on Kane’s band-to-band tunneling model. This formula indicates that the magnitude of the tunneling rate fluctuations is proportional to the magnitude of the fluctuations in the electric field strength and a higher tunneling probability results in a lower variability. The derived relationship is universally valid for any technologies that exploit enhancement of the tunneling probability, including IET technology, channel material engineering, heterojunctions, strain engineering, etc.

  1. Bio-inspired photoresponse of porphyrin-attached gold nanoparticles on a field-effect transistor.

    PubMed

    Miyachi, Mariko; Yamanoi, Yoshinori; Nakazato, Kazuo; Nishihara, Hiroshi

    2014-09-01

    A bio-inspired photoresponse was engineered in porphyrin-attached Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) on a field-effect transistor (FET). The system mimics photosynthetic electron transfer, using porphyrin derivatives as photosensitizers and AuNPs as photoelectron counting devices. Porphyrin-protected AuNPs were immobilized onto the gate of an FET via the formation of self-assembled monolayers. Photoinduced electron transfer from the porphyrin led to single electron transfer at the Au nanoparticles, which was monitored via a changing gate voltage on the FET in the presence of organic electrolyte. The further attachment of other functional molecules to this system should enable various other potential functionalities. This article is part of a special issue entitled: photosynthesis research for sustainability: keys to produce clean energy.

  2. Zinc oxide nanorod field effect transistor for long-time cellular force measurement

    PubMed Central

    Zong, Xianli; Zhu, Rong

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical forces generated by cells are known to influence a vast range of cellular functions ranging from receptor signaling and transcription to differentiation and proliferation. We report a novel measurement approach using zinc oxide nanorods as a peeping transducer to monitor dynamic mechanical behavior of cellular traction on surrounding substrate. We develop a ZnO nanorod field effect transistor (FET) as an ultrasensitive force sensor to realize long-time, unstained, and in-situ detection of cell cycle phases, including attachment, spread, and mitosis. Excellent biocompatibility and ultra-sensitivity of the biomechanical measurement is ensured by coating a parylene film on the FET sensor as a concealment, which provides complete electronic isolation between the sensor and cell. With unique features of ultra-sensitivity, label-free, easy handling, and good biocompatibility, the force sensor allows feasible for tracking cellular dynamics in physiological contexts and understanding their contribution to biological processes. PMID:28272551

  3. Contact-dependent performance variability of monolayer MoS{sub 2} field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Gyuchull; Yoon, Youngki

    2014-11-24

    Using self-consistent quantum transport simulations, we investigate the performance variability of monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS{sub 2}) field-effect transistors (FETs) with various contact properties. Varying the Schottky barrier in MoS{sub 2} FETs affects the output characteristics more significantly than the transfer characteristics. If doped contacts are realized, the performance variation due to non-ideal contacts becomes negligible; otherwise, channel doping can effectively suppress the performance variability in metal-contact devices. Our scaling study also reveals that for sub-10-nm channels, doped-contact devices can be more robust in terms of switching, while metal-contact MoS{sub 2} FETs can undergo the smaller penalty in output conductance.

  4. Leakage and field emission in side-gate graphene field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Bartolomeo, A.; Giubileo, F.; Iemmo, L.; Romeo, F.; Russo, S.; Unal, S.; Passacantando, M.; Grossi, V.; Cucolo, A. M.

    2016-07-01

    We fabricate planar graphene field-effect transistors with self-aligned side-gate at 100 nm from the 500 nm wide graphene conductive channel, using a single lithographic step. We demonstrate side-gating below 1 V with conductance modulation of 35% and transconductance up to 0.5 mS/mm at 10 mV drain bias. We measure the planar leakage along the SiO2/vacuum gate dielectric over a wide voltage range, reporting rapidly growing current above 15 V. We unveil the microscopic mechanisms driving the leakage, as Frenkel-Poole transport through SiO2 up to the activation of Fowler-Nordheim tunneling in vacuum, which becomes dominant at higher voltages. We report a field-emission current density as high as 1 μA/μm between graphene flakes. These findings are important for the miniaturization of atomically thin devices.

  5. Cryogenically cooled broad-band GaAs field-effect transistor preamplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo, C. C.; Leskovar, B.

    1983-10-01

    The antiproton source will be capable of accumulating a total of 4.3 x 10(11) antiprotons in 4 hours when a wideband feedback system for stochastic beam cooling is used. The feedback system detects and corrects at every revolution, the statistical fluctuations of the beam position and momentum. One of the essential components of such a system is a low noise broadband preamplifier. A cryogenically cooled 1 to 2 GHz low noise broadband prototype preamplifier utilizing GaAs field effect transistors is described for this application. The optimum preamplifier operating conditions for a minimum noise figure at temperatures of 2930K, 800K and 180K are given and are discussed. The phase shift characteristics, the input and output voltage standing wave ratio as a function of frequency and intermodulation products content as a function of the input power level are also measured.

  6. ON current enhancement of nanowire Schottky barrier tunnel field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takei, Kohei; Hashimoto, Shuichiro; Sun, Jing; Zhang, Xu; Asada, Shuhei; Xu, Taiyu; Matsukawa, Takashi; Masahara, Meishoku; Watanabe, Takanobu

    2016-04-01

    Silicon nanowire Schottky barrier tunnel field effect transistors (NW-SBTFETs) are promising structures for high performance devices. In this study, we fabricated NW-SBTFETs to investigate the effect of nanowire structure on the device characteristics. The NW-SBTFETs were operated with a backgate bias, and the experimental results demonstrate that the ON current density is enhanced by narrowing the width of the nanowire. We confirmed using the Fowler-Nordheim plot that the drain current in the ON state mainly comprises the quantum tunneling component through the Schottky barrier. Comparison with a technology computer aided design (TCAD) simulation revealed that the enhancement is attributed to the electric field concentration at the corners of cross-section of the NW. The study findings suggest an effective approach to securing the ON current by Schottky barrier width modulation.

  7. Graphene field-effect transistors as room-temperature terahertz detectors.

    PubMed

    Vicarelli, L; Vitiello, M S; Coquillat, D; Lombardo, A; Ferrari, A C; Knap, W; Polini, M; Pellegrini, V; Tredicucci, A

    2012-10-01

    The unique optoelectronic properties of graphene make it an ideal platform for a variety of photonic applications, including fast photodetectors, transparent electrodes in displays and photovoltaic modules, optical modulators, plasmonic devices, microcavities, and ultra-fast lasers. Owing to its high carrier mobility, gapless spectrum and frequency-independent absorption, graphene is a very promising material for the development of detectors and modulators operating in the terahertz region of the electromagnetic spectrum (wavelengths in the hundreds of micrometres), still severely lacking in terms of solid-state devices. Here we demonstrate terahertz detectors based on antenna-coupled graphene field-effect transistors. These exploit the nonlinear response to the oscillating radiation field at the gate electrode, with contributions of thermoelectric and photoconductive origin. We demonstrate room temperature operation at 0.3 THz, showing that our devices can already be used in realistic settings, enabling large-area, fast imaging of macroscopic samples.

  8. Theoretical study of electrolyte gate AlGaN /GaN field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayer, M.; Uhl, C.; Vogl, P.

    2005-02-01

    We predict the sensitivity of solution gate AlGaN /GaN field effect transistors to pH values of the electrolyte and to charged adsorbates at the semiconductor-electrolyte interface. Invoking the site-binding model for the chemical reactions at the oxidic semiconductor-electrolyte interface and taking into account the large polarization fields within the nitride heterostructure, the spatial charge and potential distribution have been calculated self-consistently both in the semiconductor and the electrolyte. In addition, the source-drain current is calculated and its sensitivity to the electrolyte's pH value is studied systematically. Comparison with experiment shows good agreement. A significantly enhanced resolution is predicted for AlGaN /GaN structures of N-face polarity.

  9. Inkjet printed arrays of pressure sensors based on all-organic field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Basirico, Laura; Cosseddu, Piero; Bonfiglio, Annalisa; Neelgund, Rohan; Tyrer, Harry W

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we propose totally flexible organic field effect transistors (OFETs) assembled on plastic films as sensors for mechanical variables. First mechanical sensors for pressure and bending detection are presented. A sharp and reversible sensitivity of the output current of the device to an elastic deformation induced by means of a mechanical stimulus on the device channel has been observed and suggested the idea of employing arrays of such sensors for detecting the deformation applied onto a planar surface. Second the possibility of using similar devices for bio- and chemo-detection is described. By exploiting the properties of the basic structure, the device can be combined with any kind of substrate to detect for instance the pressure applied by people walking or standing on a functionalized carpet. This emerging technology seems to be promising for applications in the field of remote and non invasive monitoring of elderly and disabled people.

  10. Controlled doping of silicon nanocrystals investigated by solution-processed field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Gresback, Ryan; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Ding, Yi; Chen, Ting; Kortshagen, Uwe R; Nozaki, Tomohiro

    2014-06-24

    The doping of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs), which is vital for the optimization of NC-based devices, remains a significant challenge. While gas-phase plasma approaches have been successful in incorporating dopant atoms into NCs, little is known about their electronic activation. Here, we investigate the electronic properties of doped silicon NC thin films cast from solution by field effect transistor analysis. We find that, analogous to bulk silicon, boron and phosphorus electronically dope Si NC thin films; however, the dopant activation efficiency is only ∼10(-2)-10(-4). We also show that surface doping of Si NCs is an effective way to alter the carrier concentrations in Si NC films.

  11. Ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors by using catalytic oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, J. H.; Jang, H.-K.; Jin, J. E.; Shin, J. M.; Kim, D.-H.; Kim, G.-T.

    2016-10-01

    Modulation of electrical properties in MoS2 flakes is an attractive issue from the point of view of device applications. In this work, we demonstrate that an ambipolar behavior in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs) can be easily obtained by heating MoS2 flakes under air atmosphere in the presence of cobalt oxide catalyst (MoS2 + O2 → MoOx + SOx). The catalytic oxidation of MoS2 flakes between source-drain electrodes resulted in lots of MoOx nanoparticles (NPs) on MoS2 flakes with thickness reduction from 64 nm to 17 nm. Consequently, N-type behavior of MoS2 FETs was converted into ambipolar transport characteristics by MoOx NPs which inject hole carriers to MoS2 flakes.

  12. Lateral energy band profile modulation in tunnel field effect transistors based on gate structure engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Ning; Liang, Renrong; Wang, Jing; Xu, Jun

    2012-06-01

    Choosing novel materials and structures is important for enhancing the on-state current in tunnel field-effect transistors (TFETs). In this paper, we reveal that the on-state performance of TFETs is mainly determined by the energy band profile of the channel. According to this interpretation, we present a new concept of energy band profile modulation (BPM) achieved with gate structure engineering. It is believed that this approach can be used to suppress the ambipolar effect. Based on this method, a Si TFET device with a symmetrical tri-material-gate (TMG) structure is proposed. Two-dimensional numerical simulations demonstrated that the special band profile in this device can boost on-state performance, and it also suppresses the off-state current induced by the ambipolar effect. These unique advantages are maintained over a wide range of gate lengths and supply voltages. The BPM concept can serve as a guideline for improving the performance of nanoscale TFET devices.

  13. An underlap field-effect transistor for electrical detection of influenza

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kwang-Won; Choi, Sung-Jin; Ahn, Jae-Hyuk; Moon, Dong-Il; Park, Tae Jung; Lee, Sang Yup; Choi, Yang-Kyu

    2010-01-01

    An underlap channel-embedded field-effect transistor (FET) is proposed for label-free biomolecule detection. Specifically, silica binding protein fused with avian influenza (AI) surface antigen and avian influenza antibody (anti-AI) were designed as a receptor molecule and a target material, respectively. The drain current was significantly decreased after the binding of negatively charged anti-AI on the underlap channel. A set of control experiments supports that only the biomolecules on the underlap channel effectively modulate the drain current. With the merits of a simple fabrication process, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor compatibility, and enhanced sensitivity, the underlap FET could be a promising candidate for a chip-based biosensor.

  14. Recovery Based Nanowire Field-Effect Transistor Detection of Pathogenic Avian Influenza DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Heng; Chu, Chia-Jung; Teng, Kang-Ning; Su, Yi-Jr; Chen, Chii-Dong; Tsai, Li-Chu; Yang, Yuh-Shyong

    2012-02-01

    Fast and accurate diagnosis is critical in infectious disease surveillance and management. We proposed a DNA recovery system that can easily be adapted to DNA chip or DNA biosensor for fast identification and confirmation of target DNA. This method was based on the re-hybridization of DNA target with a recovery DNA to free the DNA probe. Functionalized silicon nanowire field-effect transistor (SiNW FET) was demonstrated to monitor such specific DNA-DNA interaction using high pathogenic strain virus hemagglutinin 1 (H1) DNA of avian influenza (AI) as target. Specific electric changes were observed in real-time for AI virus DNA sensing and device recovery when nanowire surface of SiNW FET was modified with complementary captured DNA probe. The recovery based SiNW FET biosensor can be further developed for fast identification and further confirmation of a variety of influenza virus strains and other infectious diseases.

  15. High-performance integrated field-effect transistor-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Adzhri, R; Md Arshad, M K; Gopinath, Subash C B; Ruslinda, A R; Fathil, M F M; Ayub, R M; Nor, M Nuzaihan Mohd; Voon, C H

    2016-04-21

    Field-effect transistors (FETs) have succeeded in modern electronics in an era of computers and hand-held applications. Currently, considerable attention has been paid to direct electrical measurements, which work by monitoring changes in intrinsic electrical properties. Further, FET-based sensing systems drastically reduce cost, are compatible with CMOS technology, and ease down-stream applications. Current technologies for sensing applications rely on time-consuming strategies and processes and can only be performed under recommended conditions. To overcome these obstacles, an overview is presented here in which we specifically focus on high-performance FET-based sensor integration with nano-sized materials, which requires understanding the interaction of surface materials with the surrounding environment. Therefore, we present strategies, material depositions, device structures and other characteristics involved in FET-based devices. Special attention was given to silicon and polyaniline nanowires and graphene, which have attracted much interest due to their remarkable properties in sensing applications.

  16. Self-aligned multi-channel silicon nanowire field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hao; Li, Qiliang; Yuan, Hui; Baumgart, Helmut; Ioannou, Dimitris E.; Richter, Curt A.

    2012-12-01

    Si nanowire field effect transistors (SiNW FETs) with multiple nanowire channels and different gate lengths have been fabricated by using a directed assembly approach combined with a standard photolithographic process. The electrical characteristics of SiNW FETs containing different numbers of nanowire channels were measured and compared. The multi-channel SiNW FETs show excellent performance: small subthreshold slope (≈75 mV/dec), large ON/OFF ratio (≈108), good break-down voltage (>30 V) and good carrier mobility (μp ≈ 100 cm2 V-1s-1). These excellent device properties were achieved by using a clean self-alignment process and an improved device structure with Schottky barriers at the source and drain contacts. Such high-performance multi-nanowire FETs are attractive for logic, memory, and sensor applications.

  17. Electrical properties of high density arrays of silicon nanowire field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hye-Young; Lee, Kangho; Lee, Jae Woo; Kim, Sangwook; Kim, Gyu-Tae; Duesberg, Georg S.

    2013-10-01

    Proximity effect corrected e-beam lithography of hydrogen silsesquioxane on silicon on insulator was used to fabricate multi-channel silicon nanowire field-effect transistors (SiNW FETs). Arrays of 15-channels with a line width of 18 nm and pitch as small as 50 nm, the smallest reported for electrically functional devices, were fabricated. These high density arrays were back-gated by the substrate and allowed for investigation of the effects of scaling on the electrical performance of this multi-channel SiNW FET. It was revealed that the drain current and the transconductance (gm) are both reduced with decreasing pitch size. The drain induced barrier lowering and the threshold voltage (Vth) are also decreased, whereas the subthreshold swing (S) is increased. The results are in agreement with our simulations of the electric potential profile of the devices. The study contains valuable information on SiNW FET integration and scaling for future devices.

  18. Controlling the on/off current ratio of ferroelectric field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Katsouras, Ilias; Zhao, Dong; Spijkman, Mark-Jan; Li, Mengyuan; Blom, Paul W M; de Leeuw, Dago M; Asadi, Kamal

    2015-07-10

    The on/off current ratio in organic ferroelectric field-effect transistors (FeFETs) is largely determined by the position of the threshold voltage, the value of which can show large device-to-device variations. Here we show that by employing a dual-gate layout for the FeFET, we can gain full control over the on/off ratio. In the resulting dual-gate FeFET the ferroelectric gate provides the memory functionality and the second, non-ferroelectric, control gate is advantageously used to set the threshold voltage. The on/off ratio can thus be maximized at the readout bias. The operation is explained by the quantitative analysis of charge transport in a dual-gate FeFET.

  19. Using gapped topological surface states of Bi2Se3 films in a field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Jifeng; Singh, David J.

    2017-02-01

    Three dimensional topological insulators are insulators with topologically protected surface states that can have a high band velocity and high mobility at room temperature. This suggests electronic applications that exploit these surface states, but the lack of a band gap poses a fundamental difficulty. We report a first principles study based on density functional theory for thin Bi2Se3 films in the context of a field effect transistor. It is known that a gap is induced in thin layers due to hybridization between the top and bottom surfaces, but it is not known whether it is possible to use the topological states in this type of configuration. In particular, it is unclear whether the benefits of topological protection can be retained to a sufficient degree. We show that there is a thickness regime in which the small gap induced by hybridization between the two surfaces is sufficient to obtain transistor operation at room temperature, and furthermore, that the band velocity and spin texture that are important for the mobility are preserved for Fermi levels of relevance to device application.

  20. High performance field-effect transistor based on multilayer tungsten disulfide.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xue; Hu, Jin; Yue, Chunlei; Della Fera, Nicholas; Ling, Yun; Mao, Zhiqiang; Wei, Jiang

    2014-10-28

    Semiconducting two-dimensional transition metal chalcogenide crystals have been regarded as the promising candidate for the future generation of transistor in modern electronics. However, how to fabricate those crystals into practical devices with acceptable performance still remains as a challenge. Employing tungsten disulfide multilayer thin crystals, we demonstrate that using gold as the only contact metal and choosing appropriate thickness of the crystal, high performance transistor with on/off ratio of 10(8) and mobility up to 234 cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) at room temperature can be realized in a simple device structure. Furthermore, low temperature study revealed that the high performance of our device is caused by the minimized Schottky barrier at the contact and the existence of a shallow impurity level around 80 meV right below the conduction band edge. From the analysis on temperature dependence of field-effect mobility, we conclude that strongly suppressed phonon scattering and relatively low charge impurity density are the key factors leading to the high mobility of our tungsten disulfide devices.

  1. Nb-doped single crystalline MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Saptarshi E-mail: das@anl.gov; Demarteau, Marcellinus; Roelofs, Andreas

    2015-04-27

    We report on the demonstration of a p-type, single crystalline, few layer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistor (FET) using Niobium (Nb) as the dopant. The doping concentration was extracted and determined to be ∼3 × 10{sup 19}/cm{sup 3}. We also report on bilayer Nb-doped MoS{sub 2} FETs with ambipolar conduction. We found that the current ON-OFF ratio of the Nb-doped MoS{sub 2} FETs changes significantly as a function of the flake thickness. We attribute this experimental observation to bulk-type electrostatic effect in ultra-thin MoS{sub 2} crystals. We provide detailed analytical modeling in support of our claims. Finally, we show that in the presence of heavy doping, even ultra-thin 2D-semiconductors cannot be fully depleted and may behave as a 3D material when used in transistor geometry. Our findings provide important insights into the doping constraints of 2D materials, in general.

  2. Ion-selective electrolyte-gated field-effect transistors: prerequisites for proper functioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kofler, Johannes; Schmoltner, Kerstin; List-Kratochvil, Emil J. W.

    2014-10-01

    Electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors (EGOFETs) used as transducers and amplifiers in potentiometric sensors have recently attracted a significant amount of scientific interest. For that reason, the fundamental prerequisites to achieve a proper potentiometric signal amplification and transduction are examined. First, polarizable as well as non-polarizable semiconductor- and gate-electrolyte- interface combinations are investigated by normal pulse voltammetry. The results of these measurements are correlated with the corresponding transistor characteristics, clarifying the functional principle of EGOFETs and the requirements for high signal amplification. In addition to a good electrical performance, the EGOFET-transducers should also be compatible with the targeted sensing application. Accordingly, the influence of different gate materials and electrolytes on the sensing abilities, are discussed. Even though all physical requirements are met, EGOFETs typically exhibit irreversible degradation, if the gate potential exceeds a certain level. For that reason, EGOFETs have to be operated using a constant source-drain operation mode which is presented by means of an H+ (pH) sensitive ion-sensor.

  3. Investigation of the dimensionality of charge transport in organic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Hassan; Fabiano, Simone; Kemerink, Martijn

    2017-02-01

    Ever since the first experimental investigations of organic field effect transistors (OFETs) the dimensionality of charge transport has alternately been described as two dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D). More recently, researchers have turned to an analytical analysis of the temperature-dependent transfer characteristics to classify the dimensionality as either 2D or 3D as well as to determine the disorder of the system, thereby greatly simplifying dimensionality investigations. We applied said analytical analysis to the experimental results of our OFETs comprising molecularly well-defined polymeric layers as the active material as well as to results obtained from kinetic Monte Carlo simulations and found that it was not able to correctly distinguish between 2D and 3D transports or give meaningful values for the disorder and should only be used for quasiquantitative and comparative analysis. We conclude to show that the dimensionality of charge transport in OFETs is a function of the interplay between transistor physics and morphology of the organic material.

  4. Ambipolar Small-Molecule:Polymer Blend Semiconductors for Solution-Processable Organic Field-Effect Transistors.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minji; Hwang, Hansu; Park, Won-Tae; Khim, Dongyoon; Yeo, Jun-Seok; Kim, Yunseul; Kim, Yeon-Ju; Noh, Yong-Young; Kim, Dong-Yu

    2017-01-25

    We report on the fabrication of an organic thin-film semiconductor formed using a blend solution of soluble ambipolar small molecules and an insulating polymer binder that exhibits vertical phase separation and uniform film formation. The semiconductor thin films are produced in a single step from a mixture containing a small molecular semiconductor, namely, quinoidal biselenophene (QBS), and a binder polymer, namely, poly(2-vinylnaphthalene) (PVN). Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on QBS/PVN blend semiconductor are then assembled using top-gate/bottom-contact device configuration, which achieve almost four times higher mobility than the neat QBS semiconductor. Depth profile via secondary ion mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy images indicate that the QBS domains in the films made from the blend are evenly distributed with a smooth morphology at the bottom of the PVN layer. Bias stress test and variable-temperature measurements on QBS-based OFETs reveal that the QBS/PVN blend semiconductor remarkably reduces the number of trap sites at the gate dielectric/semiconductor interface and the activation energy in the transistor channel. This work provides a one-step solution processing technique, which makes use of soluble ambipolar small molecules to form a thin-film semiconductor for application in high-performance OFETs.

  5. Fast and broadband photoresponse of few-layer black phosphorus field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Buscema, Michele; Groenendijk, Dirk J; Blanter, Sofya I; Steele, Gary A; van der Zant, Herre S J; Castellanos-Gomez, Andres

    2014-06-11

    Few-layer black phosphorus, a new elemental two-dimensional (2D) material recently isolated by mechanical exfoliation, is a high-mobility layered semiconductor with a direct bandgap that is predicted to strongly depend on the number of layers, from 0.35 eV (bulk) to 2.0 eV (single layer). Therefore, black phosphorus is an appealing candidate for tunable photodetection from the visible to the infrared part of the spectrum. We study the photoresponse of field-effect transistors (FETs) made of few-layer black phosphorus (3-8 nm thick), as a function of excitation wavelength, power, and frequency. In the dark state, the black phosphorus FETs can be tuned both in hole and electron doping regimes allowing for ambipolar operation. We measure mobilities in the order of 100 cm(2)/V s and a current ON/OFF ratio larger than 10(3). Upon illumination, the black phosphorus transistors show a response to excitation wavelengths from the visible region up to 940 nm and a rise time of about 1 ms, demonstrating broadband and fast detection. The responsivity reaches 4.8 mA/W, and it could be drastically enhanced by engineering a detector based on a PN junction. The ambipolar behavior coupled to the fast and broadband photodetection make few-layer black phosphorus a promising 2D material for photodetection across the visible and near-infrared part of the electromagnetic spectrum.

  6. Room-temperature amorphous alloy field-effect transistor exhibiting particle and wave electronic transport

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuhara, M.; Kawarada, H.

    2015-02-28

    The realization of room-temperature macroscopic field effect transistors (FETs) will lead to new epoch-making possibilities for electronic applications. The I{sub d}-V{sub g} characteristics of the millimeter-sized aluminum-oxide amorphous alloy (Ni{sub 0.36}Nb{sub 0.24}Zr{sub 0.40}){sub 90}H{sub 10} FETs were measured at a gate-drain bias voltage of 0–60 μV in nonmagnetic conditions and under a magnetic fields at room temperature. Application of dc voltages to the gate electrode resulted in the transistor exhibiting one-electron Coulomb oscillation with a period of 0.28 mV, Fabry-Perot interference with a period of 2.35 μV under nonmagnetic conditions, and a Fano effect with a period of 0.26 mV for Vg and 0.2 T under a magnetic field. The realization of a low-energy controllable device made from millimeter-sized Ni-Nb-Zr-H amorphous alloy throws new light on cluster electronics.

  7. Boron δ-doped (111) diamond solution gate field effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Edgington, Robert; Ruslinda, A Rahim; Sato, Syunsuke; Ishiyama, Yuichiro; Tsuge, Kyosuke; Ono, Tasuku; Kawarada, Hiroshi; Jackman, Richard B

    2012-03-15

    A solution gate field effect transistor (SGFET) using an oxidised boron δ-doped channel on (111) diamond is presented for the first time. Employing an optimised plasma chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) recipe to deposit δ-layers, SGFETs show improved current-voltage (I-V) characteristics in comparison to previous similar devices fabricated on (100) and polycrystalline diamond, where the device is shown to operate in the enhancement mode of operation, achieving channel pinch-off and drain-source current saturation within the electrochemical window of diamond. A maximum gain and transconductance of 3 and 200μS/mm are extracted, showing comparable figures of merit to hydrogen-based SGFET. The oxidised device shows a site-binding model pH sensitivity of 36 mV/pH, displaying fast temporal responses. Considering the biocompatibility of diamond towards cells, the device's highly mutable transistor characteristics, pH sensitivity and stability against anodic oxidation common to hydrogen terminated diamond SGFET, oxidised boron δ-doped diamond SGFETs show promise for the recording of action potentials from electrogenic cells.

  8. High-mobility solution-processed copper phthalocyanine-based organic field-effect transistors.

    PubMed

    Chaure, Nandu B; Cammidge, Andrew N; Chambrier, Isabelle; Cook, Michael J; Cain, Markys G; Murphy, Craig E; Pal, Chandana; Ray, Asim K

    2011-04-01

    Solution-processed films of 1,4,8,11,15,18,22,25-octakis(hexyl) copper phthalocyanine (CuPc6) were utilized as an active semiconducting layer in the fabrication of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) in the bottom-gate configurations using chemical vapour deposited silicon dioxide (SiO2) as gate dielectrics. The surface treatment of the gate dielectric with a self-assembled monolayer of octadecyltrichlorosilane (OTS) resulted in values of 4×10(-2) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) and 10(6) for saturation mobility and on/off current ratio, respectively. This improvement was accompanied by a shift in the threshold voltage from 3 V for untreated devices to -2 V for OTS treated devices. The trap density at the interface between the gate dielectric and semiconductor decreased by about one order of magnitude after the surface treatment. The transistors with the OTS treated gate dielectrics were more stable over a 30-day period in air than untreated ones.

  9. Metrology solutions for high performance germanium multi-gate field-effect transistors using optical scatterometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chin, Hock-Chun; Ling, Moh-Lung; Liu, Bin; Zhang, Xingui; Li, Jie; Liu, Yongdong; Hu, Jiangtao; Yeo, Yee-Chia

    2013-04-01

    In this work, we report the first demonstration of scatterometry Optical Critical Dimension (OCD) characterization on advanced Ge Multi-Gate Field-Effect Transistor (MuGFET) or FinFET formed on a Germanium-on-Insulator (GeOI) substrate. Two critical process steps in the Ge MuGFET process flow were investigated, i.e. after Ge Fin formation, and after TaN gate stack etching process. All key process variations in the test structures were successfully monitored by the floating or fitting parameters in the OCD models. In addition, excellent static repeatability, with 3σ lower than 0.12 nm, was also achieved. The measurement results from OCD were also compared with both Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM) measurements. Excellent correlation with both SEM and TEM was achieved by employing OCD characterization, confirming scatterometry OCD as a promising metrology technique for next generation multi-gate transistor with an advanced channel material.

  10. Graphene field-effect transistor array with integrated electrolytic gates scaled to 200 mm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieira, N. C. S.; Borme, J.; Machado, G., Jr.; Cerqueira, F.; Freitas, P. P.; Zucolotto, V.; Peres, N. M. R.; Alpuim, P.

    2016-03-01

    Ten years have passed since the beginning of graphene research. In this period we have witnessed breakthroughs both in fundamental and applied research. However, the development of graphene devices for mass production has not yet reached the same level of progress. The architecture of graphene field-effect transistors (FET) has not significantly changed, and the integration of devices at the wafer scale has generally not been sought. Currently, whenever an electrolyte-gated FET (EGFET) is used, an external, cumbersome, out-of-plane gate electrode is required. Here, an alternative architecture for graphene EGFET is presented. In this architecture, source, drain, and gate are in the same plane, eliminating the need for an external gate electrode and the use of an additional reservoir to confine the electrolyte inside the transistor active zone. This planar structure with an integrated gate allows for wafer-scale fabrication of high-performance graphene EGFETs, with carrier mobility up to 1800 cm2 V-1 s-1. As a proof-of principle, a chemical sensor was achieved. It is shown that the sensor can discriminate between saline solutions of different concentrations. The proposed architecture will facilitate the mass production of graphene sensors, materializing the potential of previous achievements in fundamental and applied graphene research.

  11. Spearhead Nanometric Field-Effect Transistor Sensors for Single-Cell Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Ainara López; Ali, Tayyibah; Shevchuk, Andrew; Takahashi, Yasufumi; Novak, Pavel; Edwards, Christopher; Lab, Max; Gopal, Sahana; Chiappini, Ciro; Anand, Uma; Magnani, Luca; Coombes, R. Charles; Gorelik, Julia; Matsue, Tomokazu; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Klenerman, David; Sviderskaya, Elena V.; Korchev, Yuri

    2016-01-01

    Nanometric field-effect-transistor (FET) sensors are made on the tip of spear-shaped dual carbon nanoelectrodes derived from carbon deposition inside double-barrel nanopipettes. The easy fabrication route allows deposition of semiconductors or conducting polymers to comprise the transistor channel. A channel from electrodeposited poly pyrrole (PPy) exhibits high sensitivity toward pH changes. This property is exploited by immobilizing hexokinase on PPy nano-FETs to give rise to a selective ATP biosensor. Extracellular pH and ATP gradients are key biochemical constituents in the microenvironment of living cells; we monitor their real-time changes in relation to cancer cells and cardiomyocytes. The highly localized detection is possible because of the high aspect ratio and the spear-like design of the nano-FET probes. The accurately positioned nano-FET sensors can detect concentration gradients in three-dimensional space, identify biochemical properties of a single living cell, and after cell membrane penetration perform intracellular measurements. PMID:26816294

  12. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Hwajeong; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu; Kim, Youngkyoo

    2014-09-01

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 μm thick LC layer (4-cyano-4'-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 μl/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm2/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (VD) and gate (VG) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of VD and VG. The best voltage combination was VD = -0.2 V and VG = -1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  13. Electron and hole photoemission detection for band offset determination of tunnel field-effect transistor heterojunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Zhang, Qin; Kirillov, Oleg A.; Levin, Igor; Richter, Curt A.; Gundlach, David J.; Nguyen, N. V. E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn; Bijesh, R.; Datta, S.; Liang, Yiran; Peng, Lian-Mao; Liang, Xuelei E-mail: liangxl@pku.edu.cn

    2014-11-24

    We report experimental methods to ascertain a complete energy band alignment of a broken-gap tunnel field-effect transistor based on an InAs/GaSb hetero-junction. By using graphene as an optically transparent electrode, both the electron and hole barrier heights at the InAs/GaSb interface can be quantified. For a Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}/InAs/GaSb layer structure, the barrier height from the top of the InAs and GaSb valence bands to the bottom of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} conduction band is inferred from electron emission whereas hole emissions reveal the barrier height from the top of the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} valence band to the bottom of the InAs and GaSb conduction bands. Subsequently, the offset parameter at the broken gap InAs/GaSb interface is extracted and thus can be used to facilitate the development of predicted models of electron quantum tunneling efficiency and transistor performance.

  14. Uncovering edge states and electrical inhomogeneity in MoS2 field-effect transistors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiao; Luan, Lan; Wu, Xiaoyu; Li, Wei; Yogeesh, Maruthi N.; Ghosh, Rudresh; Chu, Zhaodong; Akinwande, Deji; Niu, Qian; Lai, Keji

    2016-01-01

    The understanding of various types of disorders in atomically thin transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDs), including dangling bonds at the edges, chalcogen deficiencies in the bulk, and charges in the substrate, is of fundamental importance for TMD applications in electronics and photonics. Because of the imperfections, electrons moving on these 2D crystals experience a spatially nonuniform Coulomb environment, whose effect on the charge transport has not been microscopically studied. Here, we report the mesoscopic conductance mapping in monolayer and few-layer MoS2 field-effect transistors by microwave impedance microscopy (MIM). The spatial evolution of the insulator-to-metal transition is clearly resolved. Interestingly, as the transistors are gradually turned on, electrical conduction emerges initially at the edges before appearing in the bulk of MoS2 flakes, which can be explained by our first-principles calculations. The results unambiguously confirm that the contribution of edge states to the channel conductance is significant under the threshold voltage but negligible once the bulk of the TMD device becomes conductive. Strong conductance inhomogeneity, which is associated with the fluctuations of disorder potential in the 2D sheets, is also observed in the MIM images, providing a guideline for future improvement of the device performance. PMID:27444021

  15. Inkjet Printing of Polymeric Field-Effect Transistors and Its Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawase, Takeo; Moriya, Soichi; Newsome, Christopher J.; Shimoda, Tatsuya

    2005-06-01

    In this paper, the inkjet printing of polymeric field-effect transistors (FETs), inverters and active-matrix backplanes will be reviewed. Inkjet printing, which is characterized as an additive and noncontact patterning method, is an efficient method of fabricating organic devices. All-solution-processed FETs were prepared in ambient air by inkjet-printing the liquid sources of a conductor or a semiconductor, and exhibited a high on-off current ratio of more than 105. This stability is attributed to the high ionization potential (5.4 eV) of the fluorene-bithiophene copolymer used in our work. Channel lengths of less than 20 μm were also achieved by depositing an aqueous dispersion of a conducting polymer along a prepatterned strip that exhibited a hydrophobic surface, thus defining the transistor channel. Partially-solution-processed FETs were also obtained by combining conventional vacuum processes and the inkjet printing of solutions. This approach is considered to be efficient for producing actual devices, and flexible active-matrix backplanes were fabricated using this structure. A flexible electrophoretic display has been achieved by laminating an inkjet-printed active-matrix backplane with an electrophoretic device.

  16. Improved Drain Current Saturation and Voltage Gain in Graphene-on-Silicon Field Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seung Min; Bong, Jae Hoon; Hwang, Wan Sik; Cho, Byung Jin

    2016-05-01

    Graphene devices for radio frequency (RF) applications are of great interest due to their excellent carrier mobility and saturation velocity. However, the insufficient current saturation in graphene field effect transistors (FETs) is a barrier preventing enhancements of the maximum oscillation frequency and voltage gain, both of which should be improved for RF transistors. Achieving a high output resistance is therefore a crucial step for graphene to be utilized in RF applications. In the present study, we report high output resistances and voltage gains in graphene-on-silicon (GoS) FETs. This is achieved by utilizing bare silicon as a supporting substrate without an insulating layer under the graphene. The GoSFETs exhibit a maximum output resistance of 2.5 MΩ•μm, maximum intrinsic voltage gain of 28 dB, and maximum voltage gain of 9 dB. This method opens a new route to overcome the limitations of conventional graphene-on-insulator (GoI) FETs and subsequently brings graphene electronics closer to practical usage.

  17. External-Noise-Induced Small-Signal Detection with Solution-Gated Carbon Nanotube Transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakamata, Yasufumi; Ohno, Yasuhide; Maehashi, Kenzo; Inoue, Koichi; Matsumoto, Kazuhiko

    2011-04-01

    A solution-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistor (CNTFET) based on stochastic resonance (SR) was investigated in order to enhance small-signal detection under ambient noise conditions. When noise of optimal intensity was introduced at the reference electrode in a nonlinear CNTFET, the electric double layer in the solution was modulated, resulting in SR behavior. Moreover, when the CNTFET was used as a pH sensor, high sensitivity was achieved, which enabled the detection of small differences in pH. The best results were obtained in a noisy environment; therefore, a solution-gated SR-based CNTFET operated in the subthreshold regime is a promising high-sensitivity sensor.

  18. Novel attributes and design considerations of source and drain regions in carbon nanotube transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orouji, Ali A.; Ahmadmiri, S. A.

    2010-03-01

    Source and drain regions are inseparable sections of carbon nanotube field effect transistor (CNTFET) whose parameters are effective for CNTFET performance. For the first time in this paper, design considerations of source and drain regions are presented by developing a two-dimensional (2-D) full quantum simulation. The simulations have been done by the self-consistent solution of 2-D Poisson-Schrödinger equations, within the nonequilibrium Green’s function (NEGF) formalism. The effects of varying the source and drain parameters are investigated in terms of on-off current ratio, transconductance characteristics, drain conductance, and subthreshold swing. Simulation results demonstrate that we could improve the CNTFET performance with proper selection of the source and drain parameters.

  19. Charge transport mechanisms in organic and microcrystalline silicon field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konezny, S. J.; Bussac, M. N.; Geiser, A.; Zuppiroli, L.

    2007-09-01

    Several organic and inorganic materials have emerged as promising candidates for the active layer of field-effect transistors (FETs) fabricated on flexible substrates. The charge transport models necessary for device optimization in these systems are at different stages of development. The understanding of charge transport in single-crystal and thin-film FETs based on organic materials such as pentacene, rubrene, and other related compounds has advanced considerably in recent years and a clear picture of the relevant transport mechanisms is forming. In contrast, the theoretical description of transport in hydrogenated microcrystalline silicon (μc-Si:H) is not as well known and the published results and theories are often contradictory. We review the paradigms we feel are useful in describing the current understanding of transport in organic and μc-Si:H field-effect transistors. In the case of organic materials these include the polarization and transfer integral fluctuation model [A. Troisi and G. Orlandi, Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 086601 (2006), J.-D. Picon et al., Phys. Rev. B 75, 235106 (2007)], the Frölich polaron model [I.N. Hulea et al., Nat. Mater. 5, 982 (2006), H. Houilli et al., J. Appl. Phys. 100, 033702 (2006)], and several trapping models [M.E. Gershenson et al., Rev. Mod. Phys. 78, 973 (2006), V. Podzorov et al., Phys Rev. Lett. 95, 226601 (2005)]. Given the heterogeneous composition and structure of microcrystalline silicon thin films, a variety of theories to describe dark conductivity have been applied to μc-Si:H including those based on percolation theory [H. Overhof et al., J. Non-Cryst. Solids 227-230, 992 (1998)], hopping models [A. Dussan and R. H. Buitrago, J. Appl. Phys. 97, 043711 (2005)], thermionic emission, and tunneling. We give a brief overview of these models and present a fluctuation-induced tunneling model that we are developing to describe charge transport in microcrystalline silicon.

  20. Sensitizing Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Single Molecule Sensor Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Philip G.; Akhterov, Maxim; Sims, Patrick C.; Fuller, Elliot J.; Gul, O. Tolga; Pan, Deng

    2015-03-01

    Recent work has demonstrated single-charge sensitivity in two types of carbon nanotube transistors. In one case, a two-level system near the nanotube or noncovalently attached to the nanotube perturbs the current electrostatically. In a second case, a sidewall defect or other covalent modification sensitizes one site along the conductor. Comparative research has helped reveal differences in the transduction mechanisms of the two cases and provides design rules for maximizing reliable signals for sensing applications. The covalent modifications are not mere perturbations and they are far more sensitive than noncovalent attachments, for example. However, the new degrees of freedom that accompany covalent disorder often have similar energy scales, leading to multiple independent fluctuations that degrade the overall signal-to-noise. Noncovalent sensitization generally produces a smaller signal amplitude in a background of other low-energy fluctuators, but a well-designed noncovalent linker can result in a highly predictable signal amplitudes. Furthermore, noncovalent fabrication methods are scalable, so that wafer-scale arrays of molecular sensors are most likely to follow this path. This work was supported by NSF (ECCS-1231910).

  1. Improvement of graphene field-effect transistors by hexamethyldisilazane surface treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, Sk. Fahad; Sonde, Sushant; Rahimi, Somayyeh; Tao, Li; Banerjee, Sanjay; Akinwande, Deji

    2014-07-21

    We report the improvement of the electrical characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors (FETs) by hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) treatment. Both electron and hole field-effect mobilities are increased by 1.5 × –2×, accompanied by effective residual carrier concentration reduction. Dirac point also moves closer to zero Volt. Time evolution of mobility data shows that mobility improvement saturates after a few hours of HMDS treatment. Temperature-dependent transport measurements show small mobility variation between 77 K and room temperature (295 K) before HMDS application. But mobility at 77 K is almost 2 times higher than mobility at 295 K after HMDS application, indicating reduced carrier scattering. Performance improvement is also observed for FETs made on hydrophobic substrate–an HMDS-graphene-HMDS sandwich structure. Raman spectroscopic analysis shows that G peak width is increased, G peak position is down shifted, and intensity ratio between 2D and G peaks is increased after HMDS application. We attribute the improvements in electronic transport mainly to enhanced screening and mitigation of adsorbed impurities from graphene surface upon HMDS treatment.

  2. Field effect transistor with HfO2/Parylene-C bilayer hybrid gate insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Neeraj; Kito, Ai; Inoue, Isao

    2015-03-01

    We have investigated the electric field control of the carrier density and the mobility at the surface of SrTiO3, a well known transition-metal oxide, in a field effect transistor (FET) geometry. We have used a Parylene-C (8 nm)/HfO2 (20 nm) double-layer gate insulator (GI), which can be a potential candidate for a solid state GI for the future Mott FETs. So far, only examples of the Mott FET used liquid electrolyte or ferroelectric oxides for the GI. However, possible electrochemical reaction at the interface causes damage to the surface of the Mott insulator. Thus, an alternative GI has been highly desired. We observed that even an ultra thin Parylene-C layer is effective for keeping the channel surface clean and free from oxygen vacancies. The 8 nm Parylene-C film has a relatively low resistance and consequentially its capacitance does not dominate the total capacitance of the Parylene-C/HfO2 GI. The breakdown gate voltage at 300 K is usually more than 10 V (~ 3.4 MV/cm). At gate voltage of 3 V the carrier density measured by the Hall effect is about 3 ×1013 cm-2, competent to cause the Mott transition. Moreover, the field effect mobility reaches in the range of 10 cm2/Vs indicating the Parylene-C passivated surface is actually very clean.

  3. A sub kBT/q semimetal nanowire field effect transistor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, L.; Fagas, G.; Gity, F.; Greer, J. C.

    2016-08-01

    The key challenge for nanoelectronics technologies is to identify the designs that work on molecular length scales, provide reduced power consumption relative to classical field effect transistors (FETs), and that can be readily integrated at low cost. To this end, a FET is introduced that relies on the quantum effects arising for semimetals patterned with critical dimensions below 5 nm, that intrinsically has lower power requirements due to its better than a "Boltzmann tyranny" limited subthreshold swing (SS) relative to classical field effect devices, eliminates the need to form heterojunctions, and mitigates against the requirement for abrupt doping profiles in the formation of nanowire tunnel FETs. This is achieved through using a nanowire comprised of a single semimetal material while providing the equivalent of a heterojunction structure based on shape engineering to avail of the quantum confinement induced semimetal-to-semiconductor transition. Ab initio calculations combined with a non-equilibrium Green's function formalism for charge transport reveals tunneling behavior in the OFF state and a resonant conduction mechanism for the ON state. A common limitation to tunnel FET (TFET) designs is related to a low current in the ON state. A discussion relating to the semimetal FET design to overcome this limitation while providing less than 60 meV/dec SS at room temperature is provided.

  4. Scaling behavior of hysteresis in multilayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Tao; Du, Gang; Zhang, Baoshun; Zeng, Zhongming

    2014-09-01

    Extrinsic hysteresis effects are often observed in MoS{sub 2} field effect devices due to adsorption of gas molecules on the surface of MoS{sub 2} channel. Scaling is a common method used in ferroics to quantitatively study the hysteresis. Here, the scaling behavior of hysteresis in multilayer MoS{sub 2} field effect transistors with a back-gated configuration was investigated. The power-law scaling relations were obtained for hysteresis area (〈A〉) and memory window (ΔV) with varying the region of back-gate voltage (V{sub bg,max}). It is interesting to find that the transition voltage in the forward sweep (V{sub FW}) and in the backward sweep (V{sub BW}) shifted to the opposite directions of back-gate voltage (V{sub bg}) with increasing V{sub bg,max}. However, when decreasing V{sub bg,max}, V{sub FW} shifted to positive and reversibly recovered, but V{sub BW} almost kept unchanged. The evolution of 〈A〉, ΔV, V{sub FW,} and V{sub BW} with V{sub bg,max} were discussed by the electrons transferring process between the adsorbate and MoS{sub 2} channel.

  5. Top-Down Fabricated Silicon Nanochannel Field-Effect Transistors for Biosensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu; Wang, Xihua; Erramilli, Shyamsunder; Mohanty, Pritiraj

    2009-03-01

    Silicon nanochannel field-effect transistors have great promise for biomolecular sensing. The sensitivity is enhanced at the nanoscale due to the large surface-to-volume ratio. Specificity is achieved by functionalizing the devices with selected antibodies or complimentary target molecules. These devices are important as building blocks for high density bionanoelectronics. Top-down fabrication of these devices is compatible with advanced microfabrication processes. We show top-down fabricated silicon nanochannel devices with 3-dimensional relief can serve as a platform for biosensing applications. Three sides of the silicon nanowire are covered with a thin Al2O3 layer using Atomic Layer Deposition to form an insulating layer. When the surface is modified for binding to specific biomarkers, the device conductance change can be used to detect binding events through a field effect. Applications include building immunosensors to detect the breast cancer antigen 15-3 and other protein biomarkers, and constructing enzyme-based sensors to detect metabolites like glucose and urea.

  6. Three-Dimensional Percolation and Performance of Nanocrystal Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aigner, Willi; Wiesinger, Markus; Wiggers, Hartmut; Stutzmann, Martin; Pereira, Rui N.

    2016-05-01

    The understanding of charge transport through films of semiconductor nanocrystals (NCs) is fundamental for most applications envisaged for these materials, e.g., light-emitting diodes, solar cells, and thin-film field-effect transistors (FETs). In this work, we show that three-dimensional film-thickness-dependent percolation effects taking place above the percolation threshold strongly affect the charge transport in NC films and greatly determine the performance of NC devices such as NC FETs. We use thin films of Si NCs with a wide range of thicknesses controllable by spray coating of NC inks to thoroughly investigate the electronic properties and charge transport in thin NC films. We find a steep (superlinear) increase of the electrical conductivity with increasing film thickness, which is not observed in bulk semiconductor thin films with bandlike charge transport. We explain this increase by an exponentially increasing number of charge percolation paths in a system dominated by hopping charge transport. Thin-film NC FETs reveal thickness-independent field-effect mobilities and threshold voltages, whereas on:off current ratios decrease quickly with increasing film thickness. We show that the steep enhancement of electrical conductivity with increasing film thickness provided by three-dimensional percolation effects is, in fact, responsible for the dramatic degradation of NC FET performance observed with increasing film thickness. Our work demonstrates that the performance of NC FETs is much more critically sensitive to film thickness than in conventional FET-based bulk semiconductor materials.

  7. Organic/inorganic interfaced field-effect transistor properties with a novel organic semiconducting material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demir, Ahmet; Atahan, Alparslan; Bağcı, Sadık; Aslan, Metin; Saif Islam, M.

    2016-01-01

    A novel 1,3,4-oxadiazole-substituted benzo[b]triphenylene was synthesized by three-step synthetic procedure and OFET device design was successfully designed after theoretical calculations made using Gaussian software. For investigating the field-effect properties of designed organic electronic device, a SiO2 (300 nm) was thermally grown on p-Si wafer at 1000 °C as a dielectric layer and gate, source and drain contacts have been deposited using Au metal with physical vapour deposition. 1,3,4-Oxadiazole-substituted benzo[b]triphenylene was spin coated on the source and drain electrodes of our device, forming organic/inorganic interfaced field-effect transistors. Surface morphology and thin film properties were investigated using AFM. All electrical measurements were done in air ambient. The device showed a typical p-type channel behaviour with increasing negative gate bias voltage values. Our results have surprisingly shown that the saturation regime of this device has high mobility (μFET), excellent on/off ratio (Ion/Ioff), high transconductance (gm) and a small threshold voltage (VTh). The values of μFET, Ion/Ioff, gm and VTh were found as 5.02 cm2/Vs, 0.7 × 103, 5.64 μS/mm and 1.37 V, respectively. These values show that our novel organic material could be a potential candidate for organic electronic device applications in the future.

  8. Method for manufacturing compound semiconductor field-effect transistors with improved DC and high frequency performance

    DOEpatents

    Zolper, John C.; Sherwin, Marc E.; Baca, Albert G.

    2000-01-01

    A method for making compound semiconductor devices including the use of a p-type dopant is disclosed wherein the dopant is co-implanted with an n-type donor species at the time the n-channel is formed and a single anneal at moderate temperature is then performed. Also disclosed are devices manufactured using the method. In the preferred embodiment n-MESFETs and other similar field effect transistor devices are manufactured using C ions co-implanted with Si atoms in GaAs to form an n-channel. C exhibits a unique characteristic in the context of the invention in that it exhibits a low activation efficiency (typically, 50% or less) as a p-type dopant, and consequently, it acts to sharpen the Si n-channel by compensating Si donors in the region of the Si-channel tail, but does not contribute substantially to the acceptor concentration in the buried p region. As a result, the invention provides for improved field effect semiconductor and related devices with enhancement of both DC and high-frequency performance.

  9. Large-signal model of the bilayer graphene field-effect transistor targeting radio-frequency applications: Theory versus experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Pasadas, Francisco Jiménez, David

    2015-12-28

    Bilayer graphene is a promising material for radio-frequency transistors because its energy gap might result in a better current saturation than the monolayer graphene. Because the great deal of interest in this technology, especially for flexible radio-frequency applications, gaining control of it requires the formulation of appropriate models for the drain current, charge, and capacitance. In this work, we have developed them for a dual-gated bilayer graphene field-effect transistor. A drift-diffusion mechanism for the carrier transport has been considered coupled with an appropriate field-effect model taking into account the electronic properties of the bilayer graphene. Extrinsic resistances have been included considering the formation of a Schottky barrier at the metal-bilayer graphene interface. The proposed model has been benchmarked against experimental prototype transistors, discussing the main figures of merit targeting radio-frequency applications.

  10. Improved field-effect transistor performance of a benzotrithiophene polymer through ketal cleavage in the solid state.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Christian B; Sohn, Eun-Ho; Cho, Dong-Jun; Schroeder, Bob C; Smith, Jeremy; Lee, Mongryong; Anthopoulos, Thomas D; Song, Kigook; McCulloch, Iain

    2013-03-13

    A benzotrithiophene polymer with a new thermally cleavable ketal substituent is reported. It is shown how this functional group can be used to facilitate solvent processing and, subsequently, how it can be removed by a thermal annealing process to generate a structurally ordered and crystalline thin film with significantly improved field-effect transistor properties.

  11. Bio Organic-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor (BioFET) Based on Deoxyribonucleic Acid (DNA) Gate Dielectric

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-31

    floating gate devices and metal-insulator-oxide-semiconductor (MIOS) devices. First attempts to use polarizable gate insulators in combination with...organic semiconductors. The field effect transistors showed floating gate effects, but the potential for organic memories was not realized. Recently...

  12. High I on/I off current ratio graphene field effect transistor: the role of line defect.

    PubMed

    Tajarrod, Mohammad Hadi; Saghai, Hassan Rasooli

    2015-01-01

    The present paper casts light upon the performance of an armchair graphene nanoribbon (AGNR) field effect transistor in the presence of one-dimensional topological defects. The defects containing 5-8-5 sp(2)-hybridized carbon rings were placed in a perfect graphene sheet. The atomic scale behavior of the transistor was investigated in the non-equilibrium Green's function (NEGF) and tight-binding Hamiltonian frameworks. AGNRFET basic terms such as the on/off current, transconductance and subthreshold swing were investigated along with the extended line defect (ELD). The results indicated that the presence of ELDs had a significant effect on the parameters of the GNRFET. Compared to conventional transistors, the increase of the I on/I off ratio in graphene transistors with ELDs enhances their applicability in digital devices.

  13. Very Low-Voltage Operation of Ionic Liquid-Gated n-Type Organic Field-Effect Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uemura, Takafumi; Yamagishi, Masakazu; Ono, Shimpei; Takeya, Jun

    2010-01-01

    n-Type organic field-effect transistors are operated with high transconductance at very low gate voltage using ionic-liquid electrolyte for the gating layers. Tetracyanoquinodimethane single crystals and C60 thin films are respectively interfaced with ionic liquid of 1-ethyl-3-methyl-imidazolium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide known for its low viscosity and high ionic conductivity, so that high-density electrons are rapidly accumulated in the semiconductor surfaces. The transistors are gated by high electric field confined to a molecular scale Helmholtz layer with the application of minimum gate voltages. The high-transconductance single-crystal device exhibits excellent air stability and the C60 thin-film transistor has realized the highest normalized transconductance among reported n-type organic transistors, together with remarkable improvement in threshold voltage as compared with that in conventional SiO2 devices.

  14. Computational study of exciton generation in suspended carbon nanotube transistors.

    PubMed

    Koswatta, Siyuranga O; Perebeinos, Vasili; Lundstrom, Mark S; Avouris, Phaedon

    2008-06-01

    Optical emission from carbon nanotube transistors (CNTFETs) has recently attracted significant attention due to its potential applications. In this paper, we use a self-consistent numerical solution of the Boltzmann transport equation in the presence of both phonon and exciton scattering to present a detailed study of the operation of a partially suspended CNTFET light emitter, which has been discussed in a recent experiment. We determine the energy distribution of hot carriers in the CNTFET and, as reported in the experiment, observe localized generation of excitons near the trench-substrate junction and an exponential increase in emission intensity with a linear increase in current versus gate voltage. We further provide detailed insight into device operation and propose optimization schemes for efficient exciton generation; a deeper trench increases the generation efficiency, and use of high-k substrate oxides could lead to even larger enhancements.

  15. Lifetime of Poly(triaryl amine) Based Organic Field Effect Transistors under Different Environmental Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, Tobias; Lorenz, Enno; Koyuncu, Metin

    2013-04-01

    Characterization of reliability and lifetime is a key issue on the way to commercialization of products based on organic electronics. Prediction of the lifetime requires the understanding of failure mechanisms and the circumstances leading to failure. In this work the stability of poly(triaryl amine) (PTAA) based organic field effect transistors (OFETs) on a poly(ethylene naphthalate) (PEN) substrate is investigated under environmental stressing. PTAA is known to form amorphous thin films after spin coating and to be air stable for extended periods of time. This inherent air stability makes it a good candidate for testing of environmental influences. The samples were electrically characterized regularly between storage cycles at 85 °C and 85 °C/85% relative humidity (RH). Samples stored under dry atmosphere and inert gas were used as reference. More than 1700 OFETs were produced in multiple batches and measured using an automated measurement system to collect statistically significant data. Circuit-relevant OFET parameters such as on- and off-current, mobility, threshold voltage and gate leakage current were extracted applying a thin film transistor (TFT) device model to the measured transfer and output curves. The threshold voltage is found to be the most sensitive parameter especially for the samples stored at 85 °C. The effect of storage under 85 °C/85%RH is observed to be comparably small. Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) measurements of the aged OFET samples indicate a correlation between the shift of the electrical parameters and the appearance of carbonyl groups in the dielectric layer of the devices. Possible degradation mechanisms are discussed based on this observation.

  16. Touch sensors based on planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Seo, Jooyeok; Lee, Chulyeon; Han, Hyemi; Lee, Sooyong; Nam, Sungho; Kim, Youngkyoo; Kim, Hwajeong; Lee, Joon-Hyung; Park, Soo-Young; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2014-09-15

    We report a tactile touch sensor based on a planar liquid crystal-gated-organic field-effect transistor (LC-g-OFET) structure. The LC-g-OFET touch sensors were fabricated by forming the 10 μm thick LC layer (4-cyano-4{sup ′}-pentylbiphenyl - 5CB) on top of the 50 nm thick channel layer (poly(3-hexylthiophene) - P3HT) that is coated on the in-plane aligned drain/source/gate electrodes (indium-tin oxide - ITO). As an external physical stimulation to examine the tactile touch performance, a weak nitrogen flow (83.3 μl/s) was employed to stimulate the LC layer of the touch device. The LC-g-OFET device exhibited p-type transistor characteristics with a hole mobility of 1.5 cm{sup 2}/Vs, but no sensing current by the nitrogen flow touch was measured at sufficiently high drain (V{sub D}) and gate (V{sub G}) voltages. However, a clear sensing current signal was detected at lower voltages, which was quite sensitive to the combination of V{sub D} and V{sub G}. The best voltage combination was V{sub D} = −0.2 V and V{sub G} = −1 V for the highest ratio of signal currents to base currents (i.e., signal-to-noise ratio). The change in the LC alignment upon the nitrogen flow touch was assigned as the mechanism for the present LC-g-OFET touch sensors.

  17. Enzyme-modified electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buth, Felix; Donner, Andreas; Stutzmann, Martin; Garrido, Jose A.

    2012-10-01

    Organic solution-gated field-effect transistors (SGFETs) can be operated at low voltages in aqueous environments, paving the way to the use of organic semiconductors in bio-sensing applications. However, it has been shown that these devices exhibit only a rather weak sensitivity to standard electrolyte parameters such as pH and ionic strength. In order to increase the sensitivity and to add specificity towards a given analyte, the covalent attachment of functional groups and enzymes to the device surface would be desirable. In this contribution we demonstrate that enzyme modified organic SGFETs can be used for the in-situ detection of penicillin in the low μM regime. In a first step, silane molecules with amine terminal groups are grafted to α-sexithiophene-based thin film transistors. Surface characterization techniques like X-ray photoemission confirm the modification of the surface with these functional groups, which are stable in standard aqueous electrolytes. We show that the presence of surface-bound amphoteric groups (e.g. amino or carboxylic moieties) increases the pH-sensitivity of the organic SGFETs. In addition, these groups serve as anchoring sites for the attachment of the enzyme penicillinase. The resulting enzyme-FETs are used for the detection of penicillin, enabling the study of the influence of the buffer strength and the pH of the electrolyte on the enzyme kinetics. The functionalization of the organic FETs shown here can be extended to a large variety of enzymes, allowing the specific detection of different chemical and biochemical analytes.

  18. Ferroelectric Field Effect Transistor Model Using Partitioned Ferroelectric Layer and Partial Polarization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd C.; Ho, Fat D.

    2004-01-01

    A model of an n-channel ferroelectric field effect transistor has been developed based on both theoretical and empirical data. The model is based on an existing model that incorporates partitioning of the ferroelectric layer to calculate the polarization within the ferroelectric material. The model incorporates several new aspects that are useful to the user. It takes into account the effect of a non-saturating gate voltage only partially polarizing the ferroelectric material based on the existing remnant polarization. The model also incorporates the decay of the remnant polarization based on the time history of the FFET. A gate pulse of a specific voltage; will not put the ferroelectric material into a single amount of polarization for that voltage, but instead vary with previous state of the material and the time since the last change to the gate voltage. The model also utilizes data from FFETs made from different types of ferroelectric materials to allow the user just to input the material being used and not recreate the entire model. The model also allows the user to input the quality of the ferroelectric material being used. The ferroelectric material quality can go from a theoretical perfect material with little loss and no decay to a less than perfect material with remnant losses and decay. This model is designed to be used by people who need to predict the external characteristics of a FFET before the time and expense of design and fabrication. It also allows the parametric evaluation of quality of the ferroelectric film on the overall performance of the transistor.

  19. The intrinsic origin of hysteresis in MoS2 field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Jiapei; Wu, Gongtao; Guo, Yao; Liu, Bo; Wei, Xianlong; Chen, Qing

    2016-01-01

    We investigate the hysteresis and gate voltage stress effect in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs). We observe that both the suspended and the SiO2-supported FETs have large hysteresis in their transfer curves under vacuum which cannot be attributed to the traps at the interface between the MoS2 and the SiO2 or in the SiO2 substrate or the gas adsorption/desorption effect. Our findings indicate that the hysteresis we observe comes from the MoS2 itself, revealing an intrinsic origin of the hysteresis besides some extrinsic factors. The fact that the FETs based on thinner MoS2 have larger hysteresis than that with thicker MoS2 suggests that the surface of MoS2 plays a key role in the hysteresis. The gate voltage sweep range, sweep direction, sweep time and loading history all affect the hysteresis observed in the transfer curves.We investigate the hysteresis and gate voltage stress effect in MoS2 field effect transistors (FETs). We observe that both the suspended and the SiO2-supported FETs have large hysteresis in their transfer curves under vacuum which cannot be attributed to the traps at the interface between the MoS2 and the SiO2 or in the SiO2 substrate or the gas adsorption/desorption effect. Our findings indicate that the hysteresis we observe comes from the MoS2 itself, revealing an intrinsic origin of the hysteresis besides some extrinsic factors. The fact that the FETs based on thinner MoS2 have larger hysteresis than that with thicker MoS2 suggests that the surface of MoS2 plays a key role in the hysteresis. The gate voltage sweep range, sweep direction, sweep time and loading history all affect the hysteresis observed in the transfer curves. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr07336g

  20. Design and synthesis of organic semiconductors for use in organic field effect transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, Amanda Ruth

    In the past ten years, much progress has been made in producing organic semiconductors with properties that rival amorphous silicon. Organic semiconductors are sought for low-cost or large-area electronic devices such as organic field-effect transistors (OFETs), light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells, sensors, and radio frequency identification (RFID) tags. Low temperature processing options and the ductility of organic materials also allow flexible plastics or fabrics to be used as substrates. However, the majority of the newly developed materials are insoluble requiring the use of thermal evaporation to obtain thin films. In order for these organic semiconductors to compete as 'low cost' alternatives to silicon, manufacturers must be able to use large-area, continuous, reel-to-reel methods for production, which would likely involve the solution-based deposition methods such as spin coating, stamping, or printing. Therefore, our work has focused on methods for solubilizing and controlling the self-assembly of conjugated oligomers in order to maximize the semiconducting properties from solution-based processes. Chapter 1 gives a general overview of charge transfer in organic semiconductors, and describes how devices are fabricated and tested. An extensive review of the literature on solution processed p- and n-type oligomers is also given. Chapter 2 and 3 discuss our initial attempts to produce soluble oligothiophenes capable of self-assembly. Chapter 2 focuses on beta-functionalized heptathiophene oligomers, while Chapter 3 deals with (x-(x'-substituted oligothiophene derivatives. A synthetic method for incorporating thermally removable solubilizing groups into organic semiconductors is outlined in Chapter 4, and demonstrated using a sexithiophene oligomer. The synthesis, chemical characterization, as well as an in-depth characterization of solution-processed films of this oligomer using AFM and NEXAFS spectroscopy is given. This theme is carried over