Science.gov

Sample records for nanotubes baytubes approach

  1. Epitaxial Approaches to Carbon Nanotube Organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ismach, Ariel

    Carbon nanotubes have unique electronic, mechanical, optical and thermal properties, which make them ideal candidates as building blocks in nano-electronic and electromechanical systems. However, their organization into well-defined geometries and arrays on surfaces remains a critical challenge for their integration into functional nanosystems. In my PhD, we developed a new approach for the organization of carbon nanotubes directed by crystal surfaces. The principle relies on the guided growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) by atomic features presented on anisotropic substrates. We identified three different modes of surface-directed growth (or 'nanotube epitaxy'), in which the growth of carbon nanotubes is directed by crystal substrates: We first observed the nanotube unidirectional growth along atomic steps ('ledge-directed epitaxy') and nanofacets ('graphoepitaxy') on the surface of miscut C-plane sapphire and quartz. The orientation along crystallographic directions ('lattice-directed epitaxy') was subsequently observed by other groups on different crystals. We have proposed a "wake growth" mechanism for the nanotube alignment along atomic steps and nanofacets. In this mechanism, the catalyst nanoparticle slides along the step or facet, leaving the nanotube behind as a wake. In addition, we showed that the combination of surface-directed growth with external forces, such as electric-field and gas flow, can lead to the simultaneous formation of complex nanotube structures, such as grids and serpentines. The "wake growth" model, which explained the growth of aligned nanotubes, could not explain the formation of nanotube serpentines. For the latter, we proposed a "falling spaghetti" mechanism, in which the nanotube first grows by a free-standing process, aligned in the direction of the gas flow, then followed by absorption on the stepped surface in an oscillatory manner, due to the competition between the drag force caused by the gas flow on the suspended

  2. General solvothermal approach to synthesize telluride nanotubes for thermoelectric applications.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuai; Peng, Nan; Bai, Yu; Xu, Huiyan; Ma, D Y; Ma, Fei; Xu, Kewei

    2017-03-27

    One-dimensional tellurides are good candidates for thermoelectric applications, but the fabrication of telluride nanotubes is still challenging. To this end, the solvothermal approach is proposed to synthesize Bi2Te3, PbTe, CuxTe and Ag2Te nanotubes. In this scheme, single-crystal Te nanotubes are produced first and then used as the sacrificed template for epitaxial growth of metal telluride. It was demonstrated that polycrystalline telluride nanotubes are produced. Considering Bi2Te3 nanotubes as an example, the pellets are prepared by spark plasma sintering, and the thermoelectric properties are measured. Compared to the nanowire counterpart, the higher-energy barrier to electrons at the grain boundaries (GBs) leads to an optimized power factor of 1.04 mW m(-1) K(-2) at 373 K in the nanotube samples. Furthermore, the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is in the range of 0.503-0.617 W m(-1) K(-1), which is much smaller than that of the nanowires. The ultralow thermal conductivity could be attributed to both the higher potential barrier of GBs and the additional scattering of phonons at the side walls of the nanotubes. In all, a ZT value of 0.74 was obtained at 373 K, which is much higher than that of nanowires. This synthesis route is ready to be extended to other telluride nanotubes.

  3. Melting and superheating of nanowires--a nanotube approach.

    PubMed

    Sar, Dillip Kumar; Nanda, Karuna Kar

    2010-05-21

    We have investigated the size-dependent melting of nanotubes based on a thermodynamic approach and shown that the melting temperature of nanotubes depends on the outer radius and on the inner radius through the thickness of the nanotubes. Size-dependent melting of nanowires and thin films has been derived from that of nanotubes. We validate the size-dependent melting of nanotubes, nanowires and thin films by comparing the results with available molecular dynamic simulations and experimental results. It has also been inferred that superheating occurs when the melting starts from the inner surface and proceeds towards the outer surface, while melting point depression occurs when the melting starts from the outer surface and proceeds towards the inner surface.

  4. Structure of ordered coaxial and scroll nanotubes: general approach.

    PubMed

    Khalitov, Zufar; Khadiev, Azat; Valeeva, Diana; Pashin, Dmitry

    2016-01-01

    The explicit formulas for atomic coordinates of multiwalled coaxial and cylindrical scroll nanotubes with ordered structure are developed on the basis of a common oblique lattice. According to this approach, a nanotube is formed by transfer of its bulk analogue structure onto a cylindrical surface (with a circular or spiral cross section) and the chirality indexes of the tube are expressed in the number of unit cells. The monoclinic polytypic modifications of ordered coaxial and scroll nanotubes are also discussed and geometrical conditions of their formation are analysed. It is shown that tube radii of ordered multiwalled coaxial nanotubes are multiples of the layer thickness, and the initial turn radius of the orthogonal scroll nanotube is a multiple of the same parameter or its half.

  5. Cohesive Zone Approach to Multiscale Modeling of Nanotube Reinforced Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-18

    2007 FINAL Aug 1, 2004 to July 31 , 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Cohesive Zone Approach to Multiscale Modeling of Nanotube Reinforced... 8050 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT ~ NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION I AVAILABILITY STATEMENT Unlimited AFRL-SR-AR-TR-07_0 43 6 13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14...been applied to study CNTs and CNT based composites, which are essentially nanoscale systems. For example, Yakobson [ 5 ] has shown that predictions of

  6. A new route of synthesizing perovskite nanotubes by templating approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Habiballah, Anisah Shafiqah; Osman, Nafisah; Jani, Abdul Mutalib Md

    2017-09-01

    A perovskite oxide for example Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ (BSCF) has attracted growing attention due to its high catalytic activity and mixed ionic/electronic conductivity. Recent research of BSCF is more comprehensively based on a remarkable trajectory of innovation, in particular with regards to the synthesis of perovskite structures in one-dimensional (1-D) nanometric scales as they promote not only to increase an active electrode area for the oxygen reduction reaction, but also allow the tailoring of electrode's architecture. Nevertheless, achieving the desired 1-D structure by a conventional method such as hydrothermal, solvothermal, or sonochemical are far from satisfactory. Herein, the aim of this work is to synthesize the BSCF perovskite nanotubes via soft templating approach, particularly using anodic aluminium oxide (AAO) as a template, focusing on the morphology, composition and structural properties were demonstrated. After the AAO template was anodized at 80 V, the fabricated template was clamped between apair of spectroscopic cells containing BSCF sol and deionized water (with a hole of both sides) for 24 hours. After that, the sample was removed from the cells followed by heat treatment process. The FESEM images showed that BSCF nanotubes were successfully achieved, with the diameter of the nanotubes' approximately 80 nm. The EDX result also confirmed the nominal stoichiometry of Ba0.5Sr0.5Co0.8Fe0.2O3-δ. Meanwhile, the XRD pattern confirmed a single crystalline phase of BSCF nanotubes was successfully obtained and congruent to a cubic perovskite structure of BSCF. Possible formation mechanism,as well as the schematic illustration of BSCF nanotubes inside the template was also discussed in this paper.

  7. CMOS-analogous wafer-scale nanotube-on-insulator approach for submicrometer devices and integrated circuits using aligned nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Wang, Chuan; Lin, Albert; Patil, Nishant; Gomez, Lewis; Kumar, Akshay; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H-S Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-01-01

    Massive aligned carbon nanotubes hold great potential but also face significant integration/assembly challenges for future beyond-silicon nanoelectronics. We report a wafer-scale processing of aligned nanotube devices and integrated circuits, including progress on essential technological components such as wafer-scale synthesis of aligned nanotubes, wafer-scale transfer of nanotubes to silicon wafers, metallic nanotube removal and chemical doping, and defect-tolerant integrated nanotube circuits. We have achieved synthesis of massive aligned nanotubes on complete 4 in. quartz and sapphire substrates, which were then transferred to 4 in. Si/SiO(2) wafers. CMOS analogous fabrication was performed to yield transistors and circuits with features down to 0.5 mum, with high current density approximately 20 muA/mum and good on/off ratios. In addition, chemical doping has been used to build fully integrated complementary inverter with a gain approximately 5, and a defect-tolerant design has been employed for NAND and NOR gates. This full-wafer approach could serve as a critical foundation for future integrated nanotube circuits.

  8. Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, C N; Satishkumar, B C; Govindaraj, A; Nath, M

    2001-02-16

    Carbon nanotubes were discovered soon after the successful laboratory synthesis of fullerenes. Since their discovery in 1991, there has been intensive research activity in the area of carbon nanotubes, not only because of their fascinating structural features and properties, but also because of their potential technological applications. There is increasing experimental evidence to show that carbon nanotubes may find use in nanoelectronic devices, displays, and in hydrogen storage. In this article, we discuss various important aspects related to the synthesis, structure, characterization, and mechanism of formation of multi-walled and single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a presentation of the important electronic, mechanical, hydrogen storage, and other properties of the nanotubes. Doping, as well as other chemical manipulations with boron and nitrogen, bring about significant changes in the properties of the nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes also serve as useful templates to make other nanostructures. Layered metal chalcogenides, boron nitride, and other materials form nanotubes and provide considerable scope for study.

  9. A simple approach to covalent functionalization of boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni; Genchi, Giada Graziana; Liakos, Ioannis; Athanassiou, Athanassia; Dinucci, Dinuccio; Chiellini, Federica; Mattoli, Virgilio

    2012-05-15

    A novel and simple method for the preparation of chemically functionalized boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) is presented. Thanks to a strong oxidation followed by the silanization of the surface through 3-aminopropyl-triethoxysilane (APTES), BNNTs exposing amino groups on their surface were successfully obtained. The efficacy of the procedure was assessed with EDS and XPS analyses, which demonstrated a successful functionalization of ~15% boron sites. This approach opens interesting perspectives for further modification of BNNTs with several kinds of molecules. Since, in particular, biomedical applications are envisaged, we also demonstrated in vitro biocompatibility and cellular up-take of the functionalized BNNTs.

  10. Synthetic approach from polypyrrole nanotubes to nitrogen doped pyrolyzed carbon nanotubes for asymmetric supercapacitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubal, Deepak P.; Chodankar, Nilesh R.; Caban-Huertas, Zahilia; Wolfart, Franciele; Vidotti, Marcio; Holze, Rudolf; Lokhande, Chandrakant D.; Gomez-Romero, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    Pseudocapacitive materials are highly capable to achieve high energy density integrated with high power electrostatic capacitive materials. However, finding a suitable electrostatic capacitive material to integrate with pseudocapacitive material in order to achieve high energy density with good rate capability is still a challenge. Herein, we are providing a novel synthetic approach starting from the synthesis of polypyrrole nanotubes (PPy-NTs) and ending up at the carbonization of PPy-NTs to obtain N-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs). With highly porous nature of PPy-NTs and great graphitic texture with copious heteroatom functionalities, N-CNTs significantly promoted the faradic pseudo-capacitors, demonstrating high single-electrode capacitance over 332 F/g(PPy-NTs) and 228 F/g(N-CNTs) in 1 M H2SO4 aqueous solution. Further, a novel asymmetric supercapacitor with PPy-NTs as positive and N-CNTs as negative electrode has been fabricated. This PPy-NTs//N-CNTs cell effectively provides high operation voltage (1.4 V) and hence high energy density over 28.95 W h/kg (0.41 mW h/cm3) with a high power density of 7.75 kW/kg (113 mW/cm3) and cyclic stability of 89.98% after 2000 cycles.

  11. Nanotube

    SciTech Connect

    LEONARD, FRANCOIS; KIENLE, DIEGO; & STEWART, DEREK

    2007-09-13

    This is a source code to calculate the current-voltage characteristics, the charge distribution and the electrostatic potential in carbon nanotube devices. The code utilizes the non-equilibrium Green's function method, implemented in a tight-binding scheme, to calculate the charge distribution and the energy-dependent transmission function, from which the current or the conductance are obtained. The electrostatic potential is obtained by solving Poisson's equation on a grid with boundary conditions on the electrodes, and at other interfaces. Self-consistency between the charge and the electrostatic potential is achieved using a linear mixing method. Different versions of the code allow the modeling of different types of nanotube devices: Version 1.0: Modeling of carbon nanotube electronic devices with cylindrical symmetry Version 1.1: Modeling of planar carbon nanotube electronic devices Version 1.2: Modeling of photocurrent in carbon nanotube devices

  12. Alternative approaches to fabrication of gold-modified TiO{sub 2} nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu Baolin; Sui Zhenming; Wang Shurong; Chen Xiao; Zhang Shoumin; Wu Shihua; Huang, Weiping . E-mail: huangw@eyou.com

    2006-06-15

    Three approaches, impregnation-reduction, deposition and direct assembly, are used to fabricate gold-modified TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. Prepared materials are characterized with powder X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), UV-visible absorption spectroscopy and BET, etc. The gold-modified TiO{sub 2} nanotubes prepared via various procedures exhibit distinct difference in structure. By impregnation-reduction approach, gold-modified TiO{sub 2} nanotubes with large gold particles are fabricated. The gold particles are either deposited on or encapsulated in TiO{sub 2} nanotubes. However, by using gold hydrophilic colloidal dispersion as gold precursor, gold particles in the modified TiO{sub 2} nanotubes are very small. Gold particles only adhere to the outer surface of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes after deposition process, whereas adhere to not only the outer but also the inner walls of TiO{sub 2} nanotubes after direct assembly process. A possible mechanism is proposed to illustrate the formation of gold-modified nanotubes that are prepared by direct assembly process.

  13. Chemical approaches towards single-species single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cai-Hong; Zhang, Hao-Li

    2010-10-01

    Small variations in diameter and chirality could bring striking changes in the electronic and optical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). Therefore, SWCNTs of a specific diameter/chirality are required for many applications. In this review we provide an overview of the recent progress in various chemical approaches towards producing specific nanotubes. Issues regarding the structure of SWCNTs, characterization tools and various separation techniques are presented in this article. The benefits and limits of current chemical approaches are discussed and the perspectives of emerging strategies for achieving identical single-walled carbon nanotubes are highlighted.

  14. Soft Materials Approaches to Carbon Nanotubes: from Gels to Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, Mohammad

    2013-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes combine low density with exceptional mechanical, electrical and optical properties. Unfortunately, these nanoscale properties have not been retained in bulk structures. I will describe surface modification assisted self-assembly of single wall carbon nanotube into macroscopic nanotube networks - hydrogels and aerogels. The nanotube networks are ultra-lightweight, electrically conducting and thermally insulating. The shapes and sizes of these nanotube networks are readily tunable and is a tremendous strength of our fabrication method. The interesting properties and structure of these nanotube networks make them suitable for diverse applications. For example, we have used these networks as scaffolds to enhance elastic modulus of polymers by 36,000%. The porous nanotube networks also show high capacitance, and can be impregnated with catalysts nanoparticles at high loading, which can then be simultaneously used as electrodes and catalysts supports in electrochemical cells. A weakness of the nanotube networks is their fragility - but we have recently developed a method to transform these inelastic networks into superelastic materials by coating them with between one and five layers of graphene nanoplates. This work has been supported by the NSF (DMR-0645596, DMR-0619424 and CBET-0933510), Sloan Foundation, ACS-PRF, the Korea Institute of Energy Research, DARPA, and Bayer Materials.

  15. Facile approach to prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene nanoplatelets hybrid materials

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    A facile approach was developed to prepare multi-walled carbon nanotubes/graphene nanoplatelets hybrid materials through covalent bond formation. First, poly(acryloyl chloride) was grafted onto oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes through the reaction between the acyl chloride groups of poly and the hydroxyl groups of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes. Second, the remaining acyl chloride groups of poly were allowed to react with the hydroxyl groups of hydroxylated graphene nanoplatelets. Scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy data showed that the multi-walled carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets were effectively connected with each other. And Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy data indicated the formation of covalent bonds between carbon nanotubes and graphene nanoplatelets. Conformational changes were monitored by Raman spectroscopy. This novel kind of carbon hybrid materials may have the potential application in a wide field, especially in increasing the toughness and strength of the matrix resin. PMID:23680189

  16. Trends in nanoscience, nanotechnology, and carbon nanotubes: a bibliometric approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munoz-Sandoval, Emilio

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are currently one of the most important materials due to their strong mechanical resistance, light weight, and transport properties. Since the publication of Ijima's paper on tubular carbon structures (Iijima, Nature 354:56-58, 1991), approximately 80,000 research articles have been published according to the ISI web of science (WOS) database, using "carbon nanotube*" as the search criterion in the search by topic option. In this work, the development and impact of nanoscience and nanotechnology (N&N) and carbon nanotubes on several research areas, journals, specific papers, and emerging research areas are analyzed and discussed. Considering the production of papers in these areas from 1997 to 2012, quantitatively speaking, the People's Republic of China is emerging as the leading country in N&N and carbon nanotube research, passing the United States of America. WOS data analysis of nanoscience, nanotechnology, and carbon nanotube research in developed and developing countries is discussed, and some ideas for accelerating the progress in these important research areas are proposed.

  17. Thermodynamic approach to boron nitride nanotube solubility and dispersion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-02-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa1/2 for δd, δp, and δh, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa1/2.Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to

  18. Thermodynamic Approach to Boron Nitride Nanotube Solubility and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(exp 1/2) for delta d, delta p, and delta h, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa)exp 1/2).

  19. Thermodynamic approach to boron nitride nanotube solubility and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Tiano, A L; Gibbons, L; Tsui, M; Applin, S I; Silva, R; Park, C; Fay, C C

    2016-02-21

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(1/2) for δd, δp, and δh, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa(1/2).

  20. Thermodynamic Approach to Boron Nitride Nanotube Solubility and Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tiano, A. L.; Gibbons, L.; Tsui, M.; Applin, S. I.; Silva, R.; Park, C.; Fay, C. C.

    2016-01-01

    Inadequate dispersion of nanomaterials is a critical issue that significantly limits the potential properties of nanocomposites and when overcome, will enable further enhancement of material properties. The most common methods used to improve dispersion include surface functionalization, surfactants, polymer wrapping, and sonication. Although these approaches have proven effective, they often achieve dispersion by altering the surface or structure of the nanomaterial and ultimately, their intrinsic properties. Co-solvents are commonly utilized in the polymer, paint, and art conservation industries to selectively dissolve materials. These co-solvents are utilized based on thermodynamic interaction parameters and are chosen so that the original materials are not affected. The same concept was applied to enhance the dispersion of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) to facilitate the fabrication of BNNT nanocomposites. Of the solvents tested, dimethylacetamide (DMAc) exhibited the most stable, uniform dispersion of BNNTs, followed by N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), acetone, and N-methyl-2-pyrrolidone (NMP). Utilizing the known Hansen solubility parameters of these solvents in comparison to the BNNT dispersion state, a region of good solubility was proposed. This solubility region was used to identify co-solvent systems that led to improved BNNT dispersion in poor solvents such as toluene, hexane, and ethanol. Incorporating the data from the co-solvent studies further refined the proposed solubility region. From this region, the Hansen solubility parameters for BNNTs are thought to lie at the midpoint of the solubility sphere: 16.8, 10.7, and 9.0 MPa(exp 1/2) for delta d, delta p, and delta h, respectively, with a calculated Hildebrand parameter of 21.8 MPa)exp 1/2).

  1. A general approach towards carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial architecture and its lithium storage capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ling; Ni, Jiangfeng; Wang, Wencong; Li, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Coaxial architectures consisting of metal oxide and carbon nanotube are promising for many energy applications due to their synergetic interaction. The engineering and development of coaxial structures through a simple approach are highly desirable but remain a challenge. Herein, we present a general and facile ethylene glycol bath approach to fabricate coaxial architectures in which the metal oxide component is sandwiched by carbon nanotube and amorphous carbon. These unique architectures can serve as efficient electrode for lithium storage. The internal carbon nanotube allows rapid electron transport, while the external amorphous carbon acts as flexible buffer to accommodate volume variation upon lithium uptake. When evaluated in lithium cells, the carbon nanotube and iron oxide coaxial material exhibits a remarkable electrochemical lithium storage. It affords a capacity of 1083 mAh g-1 over 60 cycles, and retains 529 mAh g-1 at a high rate of 5 A g-1, drastically outperforming the pure iron oxide counterpart. This facile approach is in principle applicable to constructing other coaxial electrodes, and thus holds great potential in the manipulation of battery materials for lithium storage application.

  2. Investigations on the antiretroviral activity of carbon nanotubes using computational molecular approach.

    PubMed

    Krishnaraj, R Navanietha; Chandran, Saravanan; Pal, Parimal; Berchmans, Sheela

    2014-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the interesting class of materials with wide range of applications. They have excellent physical, chemical and electrical properties. Numerous reports were made on the antiviral activities of carbon nanotubes. However the mechanism of antiviral action is still in infancy. Herein we report, our recent novel findings on the molecular interactions of carbon nanotubes with the three key target proteins of HIV using computational chemistry approach. Armchair, chiral and zigzag CNTs were modeled and used as ligands for the interaction studies. The structure of the key proteins involved in HIV mediated infection namely HIV- Vpr, Nef and Gag proteins were collected from the PDB database. The docking studies were performed to quantify the interaction of the CNT with the three different disease targets. Results showed that the carbon nanotubes had high binding affinity to these proteins which confirms the antagonistic molecular interaction of carbon nanotubes to the disease targets. The modeled armchair carbon nanotubes had the binding affinities of -12.4 Kcal/mole, -20 Kcal/mole and -11.7 Kcal/mole with the Vpr, Nef and Gag proteins of HIV. Chiral CNTs also had the maximum affinity of -16.4 Kcal/mole to Nef. The binding affinity of chiral CNTs to Vpr and Gag was found to be -10.9 Kcal/mole and -10.3 Kcal/mole respectively. The zigzag CNTs had the binding affinity of -11.1 Kcal/mole with Vpr, -18.3 Kcal/mole with Nef and -10.9 with Gag respectively. The strong molecular interactions suggest the efficacy of CNTs for targeting the HIV mediated retroviral infections.

  3. DNA Linked To Single Wall Carbon Nanotubes: Covalent Versus Non-Covalent Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, C.-L.; Nguyen, K.; Lyonnais, S.; Streiff, S.; Campidelli, S.; Goux-Capes, L.; Bourgoin, J.-P.; Filoramo, A.

    2008-10-01

    Nanometer-scale structures represent a novel and intriguing field, where scientists and engineers manipulate materials at the atomic and molecular scale levels to produce innovative materials. Carbon nanotubes constitute a relatively new class of materials exhibiting exceptional mechanical and electronic properties and were found to be promising candidates for molecular electronics, sensing or biomedical applications. Considering the bottom-up strategy in nanotechnology, the combination of the recognition properties of DNA with the electronic properties of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) seems to be a promising approach for the future of electronics. With the aim to assemble DNA with SWNTs, two complementary strategies have been envisioned: the covalent linkage of DNA on carboxylic groups of SWNTs under classical coupling condition and the non-covalent approach based on biotin-streptavidin molecular recognition properties. Here, we present and compare the results that we obtained with these two different methods; we want to objectively show the advantages and disadvantages of each approach.

  4. An Experimental Approach to the Percolation of Sticky Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigolo, B.; Coulon, C.; Maugey, M.; Zakri, C.; Poulin, P.

    2005-08-01

    Percolation is a statistical concept that describes the formation of an infinite cluster of connected particles or pathways. Lowering the percolation threshold is a critical issue to achieve light and low-cost conductive composites made of an insulating matrix loaded with conductive particles. This has interest for applications where charge dissipation and electrical conductivity are sought in films, coatings, paints, or composite materials. One route to decreasing the loading required for percolation is to use rod-like particles. Theoretical predictions indicate that this may also be achieved by altering the interaction potential between the particles. Although percolation may not always respond monotonically to interactions, the use of adhesive rods can be expected to be an ideal combination. By using a system made of carbon nanotubes in an aqueous surfactant solution, we find that very small attraction can markedly lower the percolation threshold. The strength of this effect can thereby have direct technological interest and explain the large variability of experimental results in the literature dealing with the electrical behavior of composites loaded with conducting rods.

  5. A single-molecule approach to explore binding, uptake and transport of cancer cell targeting nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamprecht, C.; Plochberger, B.; Ruprecht, V.; Wieser, S.; Rankl, C.; Heister, E.; Unterauer, B.; Brameshuber, M.; Danzberger, J.; Lukanov, P.; Flahaut, E.; Schütz, G.; Hinterdorfer, P.; Ebner, A.

    2014-03-01

    In the past decade carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been widely studied as a potential drug-delivery system, especially with functionality for cellular targeting. Yet, little is known about the actual process of docking to cell receptors and transport dynamics after internalization. Here we performed single-particle studies of folic acid (FA) mediated CNT binding to human carcinoma cells and their transport inside the cytosol. In particular, we employed molecular recognition force spectroscopy, an atomic force microscopy based method, to visualize and quantify docking of FA functionalized CNTs to FA binding receptors in terms of binding probability and binding force. We then traced individual fluorescently labeled, FA functionalized CNTs after specific uptake, and created a dynamic ‘roadmap’ that clearly showed trajectories of directed diffusion and areas of nanotube confinement in the cytosol. Our results demonstrate the potential of a single-molecule approach for investigation of drug-delivery vehicles and their targeting capacity.

  6. Electrical conductivity of nanocomposites based on carbon nanotubes: a 3D multiscale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grabowski, Krzysztof; Zbyrad, Paulina; Staszewski, Wieslaw J.; Uhl, Tadeusz; Wiatr, Kazimierz; Packo, Pawel

    2016-04-01

    Remarkable electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNT) have lead to increased interest in studying CNT- based devices. Many of current researches are devoted to using all kinds of carbon nanomaterials in the con- struction of sensory elements. One of the most common applications is the development of high performance, large scale sensors. Due to the remarkable conductivity of CNT's such devices represent very high sensitivity. However, there are no sufficient tools for studying and designing such sensors. The main objective of this paper is to develop and validate a multiscale numerical model for a carbon nanotubes based sensor. The device utilises the change of electrical conductivity of a nanocomposite material under applied deformation. The nanocomposite consists of a number of CNTs dispersed in polymer matrix. The paper is devoted to the analysis of the impact of spatial distribution of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrix on electrical conductivity of the sensor. One of key elements is also to examine the impact of strain on electric charge ow in such anisotropic composite structures. In the following work a multiscale electro-mechanical model for CNT - based nanocomposites is proposed. The model comprises of two length scales, namely the meso- and the macro-scale for mechanical and electrical domains. The approach allows for evaluation of macro-scale mechanical response of a strain sensor. Electrical properties of polymeric material with certain CNT fractions were derived considering electrical properties of CNTs, their contact and the tunnelling effect.

  7. Excluded Volume Approach for Ultrathin Carbon Nanotube Network Stabilization: A Mesoscopic Distinct Element Method Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuezhou; Drozdov, Grigorii; Hobbie, Erik K; Dumitrica, Traian

    2017-04-04

    Ultrathin carbon nanotube films have gathered attention for flexible electronics applications. Unfortunately, their network structure changes significantly even under small applied strains. We perform mesoscopic distinct element method simulations and develop an atomic-scale picture of the network stress relaxation. On this basis, we put forward the concept of mesoscale design by the addition of excluded-volume interactions. We integrate silicon nanoparticles into our model and show that the nanoparticle-filled networks present superior stability and mechanical response relative to those of pure films. The approach opens new possibilities for tuning the network microstructure in a manner that is compatible with flexible electronics applications.

  8. CMOS-analogous wafer-scale nanotube-on-insulator approach for submicron devices and integrated circuits using aligned nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Wang, Chuan; Zhou, Chongwu

    2009-03-01

    Massive aligned carbon nanotubes hold great potential but also face significant integration / assembly challenge for future beyond-silicon nanoelectronics. We report our recent advance on full wafer-scale processing of massively aligned carbon nanotube arrays for high performance submicron channel transistors and integrated nanotube circuits, including the following essential components. 1) The massively highly aligned nanotubes were successfully grown on 4 inch quartz and sapphire wafers via meticulous temperature control, and then transferred onto Si/SiO2 wafers using our facile transfer printing method. 2) Wafer-scale device fabrication was performed on 4 inch Si/SiO2 wafer to yield submicron channel transistors and circuits with high on-current density ˜ 20 μA/μm and good on/off ratio. 3) Chemical doping methods were successfully demonstrated to get CMOS inverters with a gain ˜5. 4) Defect-tolerant circuit design for NAND and NOR was proposed and demonstrated to guarantee the correct operation of logic circuit, regardless of the presence of mis-aligned or mis-positioned nanotubes.

  9. Novel approaches towards developing composite architectures based on carbon nanotubes and polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raravikar, Nachiket R.

    The goal of the present thesis is to exploit the potential of nanotube-polymer composites from two perspectives: (1) for achieving multi-functionality through the development bulk nano-composites, (2) for constructing nanotube-polymer architectures having unique properties and potential applications. New synthesis strategies are proposed as alternate means of developing composites and functional architectures based on nanotubes and polymers. In order to optimize the properties of bulk carbon nanotube-polymer composites, it is important to control nanotube dispersion and alignment in the polymer matrix, in addition to controlling the nanotube-polymer interface. It is proposed that one of the ways to achieve such a control could be by (1) growing homogeneous, well-aligned arrays of carbon nanotubes using chemical vapor deposition and (2) infiltration of polymer or monomer into these aligned nanotube arrays followed by in situ polymerization. The resulting composite films have the nanotubes well-dispersed and typically aligned in the third direction in a polymer matrix. Thus, the advantages of the present synthesis method over conventional nano-composite synthesis methods are that the alignment and dispersion of nanotubes can be controlled prior to mixing with polymer, by controlling the CVD process. The infiltration of monomer or polymer into aligned nanotube arrays occurs by capillary filling, which is largely controlled by the wetting of liquids against the nanotube walls and the viscosity of liquid. It is observed that the nanotube dispersions strongly influence the thermal stability of the polymer. Better dispersions, obtained using the above synthesis technique, significantly improve the thermal stability of the polymer. Also, it is observed that nanotubes embedded in polymers show resistance to buckling under compressive loads, leading to an improvement in the effective surface stiffness of the nanotube-reinforced polymer surface over a pure polymer surface. In

  10. Alkalescent nanotube films on a titanium-based implant: A novel approach to enhance biocompatibility.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanxian; Dong, Chaofang; Yang, Sefei; Wu, Junsheng; Xiao, Kui; Huang, Yunhua; Li, Xiaogang

    2017-03-01

    The interfacial pH value has a marked effect on cell viability because the pro-mineralization activity of osteoblasts increases at alkaline extracellular pH, whereas the pro-resorptive activity of osteoclasts increases under more acidic conditions. To obtain the more favorable alkaline interface, we developed a novel nanotube layer that was incorporated with magnesium oxide on a titanium implant substrate (MgO/NT/Ti) via ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid (EDTA) chelation. This facile immersion-annealing process successfully created a homogeneous magnesium oxide layer with sustained release kinetics and superior hydrophilicity according to the surface characterization and microenvironment measurement. The titania nanotubes on the substrate with an anatase phase exhibited a lower passivation current and a more positive corrosion potential compared with pure titanium, which guaranteed a reasonable corrosion resistance, even when it was wrapped with a magnesium oxide layer. In vitro cell cultures showed that MgO/NT/Ti significantly increased cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. The resulting alkalescent microenvironment created by the MgO layer encouraged the cells to spread into polygonal shapes, accelerated the differentiation stage to osteoblast and induced a higher expression of vinculin. In summary, the incorporated alkalescent microenvironment of MgO/NT/Ti provided a viable approach to stimulate cell proliferation, adhesion, and differentiation and to improve the implant osseointegration.

  11. A supramolecular approach for the facile solubilization and separation of covalently functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bosch, Sebastian; Zeininger, Lukas; Hauke, Frank; Hirsch, Andreas

    2014-02-24

    Through a combination of an electronic-type selective diazonium-based attachment of a Hamilton receptor unit onto the carbon nanotube framework and a supramolecular recognition approach of a cyanuric acid derivative, we herein introduce a highly promising strategy for the tuning of carbon nanotube solubility and, directly related to that, a solution-based easy and straightforward separation of covalently functionalized carbon nanotube derivatives with respect to their unfunctionalized counterparts. The supramolecular complexation of the cyanuric acid derivative provides the driving force for the dramatically increased dispersibility and for the long-time stability of the individualized single-walled carbon nanotube derivatives in chloroform. The selective covalent functionalization of metallic carbon nanotubes can easily be analyzed with the aid of scanning Raman microscopy techniques. The functional derivatives have furthermore been characterized by UV/Vis-NIR and fluorescence spectroscopy as well as by mass spectrometric coupled thermogravimetric analysis. The investigation of the supramolecular complexation is based on an in-depth UV/Vis-NIR analysis and atomic force microscopy investigations.

  12. Hydrogen storage capacity characterization of carbon nanotubes by a microgravimetrical approach.

    PubMed

    Lan, Aidong; Mukasyan, Alexander

    2005-08-25

    An accurate gravimetric apparatus based on a contactless magnetic suspension microbalance was developed. This unit was used to measure the hydrogen storage capacity for a variety of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) at room temperature and hydrogen pressures up to 11.5 MPa. The results show that regardless of their synthesis methods, purities, and nanostructures all investigated CNT products possess relatively low hydrogen storage capacities (<0.2 wt %). For comparison, the adsorption characteristics of theses samples were also measured at a pressure of 0.1 MPa and liquid nitrogen temperature (approximately 77 K) by a conventional volumetric approach. The methodological aspects related to the accuracy of the hydrogen uptake measurements are also discussed.

  13. Acute toxicity of functionalized single wall carbon nanotubes: A biochemical, histopathologic and proteomics approach.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Homa; Ramezani, Mohammad; Yazdian-Robati, Rezvan; Behnam, Behzad; Razavi Azarkhiavi, Kamal; Hashem Nia, Azadeh; Mokhtarzadeh, Ahad; Matbou Riahi, Maryam; Razavi, Bibi Marjan; Abnous, Khalil

    2017-09-25

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) showed promising potentials in different biomedical applications but their safe use in humans and probable toxicities are still challenging. The aim of this study was to determine the acute toxicity of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). In this project, PEGylated and Tween functionalized SWCNTs were prepared. BALB/c mice were randomly divided into nine groups, including PEGylated SWCNTs (75,150μg/mouse) and PEG, Tween80 suspended SWCNTs, Tween 80 and a control group (intact mice). One or 7 days after intravenous injection, the mice were killed and serum and livers were collected. The oxidative stress markers, biochemical and histopathological changes were studied. Subsequently, proteomics approach was used to investigate the alterations of protein expression profiles in the liver. Results showed that there were not any significant differences in malondealdehyde (MDA), glutathione (GSH) levels and biochemical enzymes (ALT and AST) between groups, while the histopathological observations of livers showed some injuries. The results of proteomics analysis revealed indolethylamine N-Methyltransferase (INMT), glycine N-Methyltransferase (GNMT), selenium binding protein (Selenbp), thioredoxin peroxidase (TPx), TNF receptor associated protein 1(Trap1), peroxiredoxin-6 (Prdx6), electron transport flavoprotein (Etf-α), regucalcin (Rgn) and ATP5b proteins were differentially expressed in functionalized SWCNTs groups. Western blot analyses confirmed that the changes in Prdx6 were consistent with 2-DE gel analysis. In summary, acute toxicological study on two functionalized SWCNTs did not show any significant toxicity at selected doses. Proteomics analysis also showed that following exposure to functionalized SWCNTs, the expression of some proteins with antioxidant activity and detoxifying properties were increased in liver tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Designing new surfactant peptides for binding to carbon nanotubes via computational approaches.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Alireza; Mahnam, Karim

    2017-03-14

    The non-covalent interaction between single-walled carbon nanotube and surfactant peptides makes them soluble in biological media to be used in nano-medicine, drug delivery and gene therapy. Pervious study has shown that two important parameters in binding peptides into nanotubes are hydrophobic effect and the number of aromatic amino acids. Ten surfactant peptides with the length of eight residue, including Lys, Trp, Tyr, Phe and Val, were designed to investigate the important parameters in binding peptides to a (6, 6) carbon nanotube. 500ns MD simulation was performed for free surfactant peptides in water or near to a nanotube. Our results have indicated that the binding affinity of peptides to nanotube increases with the increase of aromatic residue content. Also, among aromatic residues, the peptides containing Trp residues have higher binding affinity to nanotube compared to the peptides with Phe or Tyr residue. Steric hindrance between bulky aromatic residues in peptide sequence has negative influence in binding peptide to nanotube, and in designing a surfactant peptide, the number and distance of aromatic residue and polarity of them should be taken into account. Our results also show that in docking peptides to nanotube, full-flexible docking leads to incorrect results.

  15. Effects of Electron-phonon scattering on Conductance of Carbon nanotubes using Time-dependent wave-packet approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishii, Hiroyuki; Kobayashi, Nobuhiko; Hirose, Kenji

    2007-03-01

    The application of single-walled carbon nanotubes as the ideal ballistic conductors is expected. However, the electronic current saturates at the high-bias regime due to electron-phonon scattering. In order to improve the conductivity, understanding of the scattering mechanism is highly required. We investigated the electron-phonon coupling effect on the conductance in single-walled carbon nanotubes using the time-dependent wave-packet approach under a tight-binding approximation [1]. The vibrational atomic displacements in real space are introduced through the time-dependent change of the transfer energies. We solve the time-dependent Schr"odinger equation and obtain the time-dependent diffusion coefficients of the electronic wave packets. From these data, we can extract the coherence length and then the conductance. We found that the optical phonon decreases the conductance of metallic carbon nanotubes, because the propagating speed of electron is reduced by the electron-phonon scattering. Furthermore, we clarify the difference of the scattering effects on the conductivity of the metallic nanotube and the semiconducting one. [1] S. Roche et al., PRL 95 (2005) 076803

  16. A Substrate-Integrated and Scalable Templated Approach Based on Rusted Steel for the Fabrication of Polypyrrole Nanotube Arrays

    SciTech Connect

    J Velazquez; A Gaikwad; T Rout; J Rzayev; S Banerjee

    2011-12-31

    We report here a facile, generalizable, and entirely scalable approach for the fabrication of vertically aligned arrays of Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3}/polypyrrole core-shell nanostructures and polypyrrole nanotubes. Our 'all electrochemical' approach is based on the fabrication of {alpha}-Fe{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanowire arrays by the simple heat treatment of commodity low carbon steel substrates, followed by electropolymerization of conformal polypyrrole sheaths around the nanowires. Subsequently, electrochemical etching of the nanowires yields large-area vertically aligned polypyrrole nanotube arrays on the steel substrate. The developed methodology is generalizable to functionalized pyrrole monomers and represents a significant practical advance of relevance to the technological implementation of conjugated polymer nanostructures in electrochromics, electrochemical energy storage, and sensing.

  17. A two-enzyme immobilization approach using carbon nanotubes/silica as support.

    PubMed

    Du, Kun; Sun, Jian; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Feng, Wei; Jiang, Xia; Ji, Peijun

    2015-01-01

    Multiple enzyme mixtures are attractive for the production of many compounds at an industrial level. We report a practical and novel approach for coimmobilization of two enzymes. The system consists of a silica microsphere core coated with two layers of individually immobilized enzymes. The model enzymes α-amylase (AA) and glucoamylase (GluA) were individually immobilized on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A CNT-GluA layer was formed by adsorbing CNT-GluA onto silica microsphere. A sol-gel layer with entrapped CNT-AA was then formed outside the CNT-GluA/silica microsphere conjugate. The coimmobilized α-amylase and glucoamylase exhibited 95.1% of the activity of the mixture of free α-amylase and glucoamylase. The consecutive use exhibited a good stability of the coimmobilized enzymes. The developed approach demonstrates advantages, including controlling the ratio of coimmobilized enzymes in an easy way, facilitating diffusion of small molecules in and out of the matrix, and preventing the leaching of enzymes.

  18. Screen printing as a scalable and low-cost approach for rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xuan; Chen, Haitian; Gu, Xiaofei; Liu, Bilu; Wang, Wenli; Cao, Yu; Wu, Fanqi; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-12-23

    Semiconducting single-wall carbon nanotubes are very promising materials in printed electronics due to their excellent mechanical and electrical property, outstanding printability, and great potential for flexible electronics. Nonetheless, developing scalable and low-cost approaches for manufacturing fully printed high-performance single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistors remains a major challenge. Here we report that screen printing, which is a simple, scalable, and cost-effective technique, can be used to produce both rigid and flexible thin-film transistors using separated single-wall carbon nanotubes. Our fully printed top-gated nanotube thin-film transistors on rigid and flexible substrates exhibit decent performance, with mobility up to 7.67 cm2 V(-1) s(-1), on/off ratio of 10(4)∼10(5), minimal hysteresis, and low operation voltage (<10 V). In addition, outstanding mechanical flexibility of printed nanotube thin-film transistors (bent with radius of curvature down to 3 mm) and driving capability for organic light-emitting diode have been demonstrated. Given the high performance of the fully screen-printed single-wall carbon nanotube thin-film transistors, we believe screen printing stands as a low-cost, scalable, and reliable approach to manufacture high-performance nanotube thin-film transistors for application in display electronics. Moreover, this technique may be used to fabricate thin-film transistors based on other materials for large-area flexible macroelectronics, and low-cost display electronics.

  19. Phenol-stacked carbon nanotubes: A new approach to genomic DNA isolation from plants.

    PubMed

    Nazarian-Firouzabadi, Farhad; Ismaili, Ahmad; Zabeti, Sayed Mahmoud

    2014-09-01

    Extraction of intact quality DNA from plant tissues, especially those rich in secondary metabolites, is often challenging. Literally, hundreds of different DNA isolation protocols from various plant species have been published over the last decades. Although many commercial DNA isolation kits are convenient and designed to be safe, their cost and availability cause limitations in small molecular labs in many developing countries. In nearly all protocols and DNA isolation kits, phenol and chloroform are used to precipitate various classes of impurities. However, phenol is partially soluble in water, resulting in the co-existence of proteins in upper (aqueous) phases. This phenomenon results in the contamination of the nucleic acids and low quality DNA. Nanotechnology advances have helped many areas of molecular biology such as the development of new diagnosis and purification kits. In this study, for the first time, we report a different approach to isolate DNA from plants based on carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The results show that the phenol reagent stack on CNTs can effectively remove proteins, polysaccharides and other polyphenol constituents. The A260/A280nm absorbance ratios of isolated DNA samples were 1.9 and 1.8 for chamomile and opium plants, respectively, indicating the high purity of the isolated DNA. DNA yield was more than two times the standard Doyle and Doyle method. Furthermore, the isolated DNA proved amenable to PCR amplification, using Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD) analysis.

  20. Pulse-induced nonequilibrium dynamics of acetylene inside carbon nanotube studied by an ab initio approach.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki; Zhang, Hong; Rubio, Angel

    2012-06-05

    Nanoscale molecular confinement substantially modifies the functionality and electronic properties of encapsulated molecules. Many works have approached this problem from the perspective of quantifying ground-state molecular changes, but little is known about the nonequilibrium dynamics of encapsulated molecular system. In this letter, we report an analysis of the nonequilibrium dynamics of acetylene (C(2)H(2)) inside a semiconducting carbon nanotube (CNT). An ultrashort high-intense laser pulse (2 fs width and 10(15) W/cm(2) intensity) brings the systems out of equilibrium. This process is modeled by comprehensive first-principles time-dependent density-functional simulations. When encapsulated, acetylene dimer, unlike a single acetylene molecule, exhibits correlated vibrational dynamics (C-C bond rotation and H-C-C bending) that is markedly different from the dynamics observed in the gas phase. This result highlights the role of CNT in modulating the optical electric field within the tube. At longer simulation timescales (> 20 fs) in the largest-diameter tube studied here [CNT(14,0)], we observe synchronized rotation about the C-C axes in the dimer and ultimately ejection of one of the four hydrogen atoms. Our results illustrate the richness of photochemical phenomena in confined geometries.

  1. Lagrangian Approach to Jet Mixing and Optimization of the Reactor for Production of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Povitsky, Alex; Salas, Manuel D.

    2001-01-01

    This study was motivated by an attempt to optimize the High Pressure carbon oxide (HiPco) process for the production of carbon nanotubes from gaseous carbon oxide, The goal is to achieve rapid and uniform heating of catalyst particles by an optimal arrangement of jets. A mixed Eulerian and Lagrangian approach is implemented to track the temperature of catalyst particles along their trajectories as a function of time. The FLUENT CFD software with second-order upwind approximation of convective terms and an algebraic multigrid-based solver is used. The poor performance of the original reactor configuration is explained in terms of features of particle trajectories. The trajectories most exposed to the hot jets appear to be the most problematic for heating because they either bend towards the cold jet interior or rotate upwind of the mixing zone. To reduce undesirable slow and/or oscillatory heating of catalyst particles, a reactor configuration with three central jets is proposed and the optimal location of the central and peripheral nozzles is determined.

  2. A facile approach for imprinting protein on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ren; Sha, Mo; Jiang, Sisi; Luo, Jing; Liu, Xiaoya

    2014-03-01

    This study describes a green, facile and low cost approach for imprinting protein on the surface of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) using papain as the template, dopamine as the functional monomer. By simply mixing MWNTs, dopamine, template protein in weak alkaline aqueous solution, a thin adherent polydopamine (PDA) film imprinted with protein was spontaneously obtained on the surface of MWNTs to produce the imprinted nanomaterials (MWNTs@MIPs). The obtained MWNTs@MIPs were characterized with Fourier transform infrared spectrometer (FT-IR), Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The adsorption process of the MWNTs@MIPs towards template protein was investigated in detail. The effects of the concentration of the monomer and template, polymerization time, extraction process were optimized. The prepared MWNTs@MIPs show fast binding kinetics, high binding capacity and acceptable specific recognition behavior towards template proteins. Furthermore, the stability and regeneration were also investigated, which indicated that the MWNTs@MIPs had good reusability. The good recognizing behavior coupled to the low cost and facile one-step preparation make the MWNTs@MIPs attractive for separation and specific protein recognition.

  3. Temperature dependence of strain energy and thermodynamic properties of V2 O5 -based single-walled nanotubes: Zone-folding approach.

    PubMed

    Porsev, Vitaly V; Bandura, Andrei V; Evarestov, Robert A

    2016-06-15

    A zone-folding approach is applied to estimate the thermodynamic properties of V2 O5 -based nanotubes. The results obtained are compared with those from the direct calculations. It is shown that the zone-folding approximation allows an accurate estimation of nanotube thermodynamic properties and gives a gain in computation time compared to their direct calculations. Both approaches show that temperature effects do not change the relative stability of V2 O5 free layers and nanotubes derived from the α- and γ-phase. The internal energy thermal contributions into the strain energy of nanotubes are small and can be ignored. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Meador, Michael A.; Hull, David R.; Scheiman, Daniel A.; Willis, Peter; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have created a great deal of excitement in the Materials Science community because of their outstanding mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. Use of carbon nanotubes as reinforcements for polymers could lead to a new class of composite materials with properties, durability, and performance far exceeding that of conventional fiber reinforced composites. Organized arrays of carbon nanotubes, e.g., nanotube monolayers, could find applications as thermal management materials, light emitting devices, and sensor arrays. Carbon nanotubes could also be used as templates upon which nanotubes from other materials could be constructed. Successful use of carbon nanotubes in any of these potential applications requires the ability to control the interactions of nanotubes with each other and with other materials, e.g., a polymer matrix. One approach to achieving this control is to attach certain chemical groups to the ends and/or side-walls of the nanotubes. The nature of these chemical groups can be varied to achieve the desired result, such as better adhesion between the nanotubes and a polymer. Under a joint program between NASA Glenn, Clark Atlanta University, and Rice University researchers are working on developing a chemistry "tool-kit" that will enable the functionalization of carbon nanotubes with a variety of chemical groups. Recent results of this effort will be discussed.

  5. Filling carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ugarte, D.; Stöckli, T.; Bonard, J. M.; Châtelain, A.; de Heer, W. A.

    Filling hollow carbon nanotubes with chosen materials opens new possibilities of generating nearly one-dimensional nanostrutures. One simple approach to fill nanotubes is to use capillarity forces. Here, we have studied the wetting and capillarity by metal salts. First, nanotubes were opened by oxidation in air; subsequently, nanotubes were immersed in molten salts. We have observed a size-dependence filling indicating a lowering of the cavity-salt interface energy with decreasing diameter. By expressing the wetting conditions as a function of polarizabilities, it is possible to predict the threshold diameter for capillary filling of different materials.

  6. Thermodynamic Approach to Enhanced Dispersion and Physical Properties in a Carbon Nanotube/Polypeptide Nanocomposite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, Conrad S.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Kim, Jae-Woo; Lillehei, Peter T.; Harrison, Joycelyn S.; Park, Cheol

    2009-01-01

    A high molecular weight synthetic polypeptide has been designed which exhibits favorable interactions with single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). The enthalpic and entropic penalties of mixing between these two molecules are reduced due to the polypeptide's aromatic sidechains and helical secondary structure, respectively. These enhanced interactions result in a well dispersed SWCNT/Poly (L-Leucine-ran-L-Phenylalanine) nanocomposite with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties using only shear mixing and sonication. At 0.5 wt% loading of SWCNT filler, the nanocomposite exhibits simultaneous increases in the Young's modulus, failure strain, and toughness of 8%, 120%, and 144%, respectively. At one kHz, the same nanotube loading level also enhances the dielectric constant from 2.95 to 22.81, while increasing the conductivity by four orders of magnitude.

  7. Towards large scale aligned carbon nanotube composites: an industrial safe-by-design and sustainable approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulanger, P.; Belkadi, L.; Descarpentries, J.; Porterat, D.; Hibert, E.; Brouzes, A.; Mille, M.; Patel, S.; Pinault, M.; Reynaud, C.; Mayne-L'Hermite, M.; Decamps, J. M.

    2013-04-01

    We present the main results demonstrating the feasibility of high surface (> A4 format size) semi-industrial fabrication of composites embedding VACNT in organic matrices. The process of growing VACNT exhibits several advantages regarding safety issues: integrating de facto a safe collecting procedure on the substrate, avoiding additional preparation steps and simplifying handling and protection by impregnation into a matrix. The following steps of the overall process: VACNT carpet functionalization, alignment control and impregnation, can be processed on-line in a closed and safe continuous process and lead to dramatically reduced direct nanotube exposure for workers and users. This project opens the route to a continuous, roll-to-roll, safer, cost-effective and green industrial process to manufacture composites with controlled and aligned greener "black" carbon nanotubes.

  8. Phonon Spectra Prediction in Carbon Nanotubes Using a Manifold-Based Continuum Finite Element Approach

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-11

    flywheels Discovery Channel – 10 Uses for Carbon Nanotubes Page 6 “Theoretically 100 times stronger than steel and six times lighter.” CBCNews...fibers could be the material of choice for better, lighter body armor. 10. Faster flywheels A flywheel is like a battery in that it stores energy. But... Flywheels offer certain advantages over batteries. But a flywheel , if spun too fast, can shatter because of the strength limits of its material. Because of

  9. Influence of radial and tangential anisotropy components in single wall magnetic nanotubes. A Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agudelo-Giraldo, J. D.; Morales-Rojas, S.; Hurtado-Marín, V. A.; Restrepo-Parra, E.

    2017-01-01

    Magnetic behaviour of nanotubes with square cell has been studied by the Monte Carlo Method, under the Metropolis algorithm and Heisenberg model. The Hamiltonian used includes nearest neighbour exchange interaction and radial and tangential direction for uniaxial anisotropy. Periodic boundary conditions were implemented at the sample's edges. Simulations were carried out varying the nanotube's diameter by changing the number of magnetic moments per ring and anisotropy values. Two transition temperatures were identified corresponding to states where moments were aligned as either ferromagnetic type or anisotropy direction. At low temperatures and low anisotropy values, the system exhibited a ferromagnetic alignment; as the anisotropy was increased, and continued in the low temperature range, spins were aligned in the anisotropy (radial or tangential) direction. As the temperature was increased, spins were reoriented in the ferromagnetic direction, generating a radial (tangential) anisotropy to ferromagnetic transition temperature. When the temperature continued increasing, the system transited toward the paramagnetic phase, appearing a ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition phase temperature. In several cases studied here, between these two transition temperatures (anisotropy to ferromagnetic and ferromagnetic to paramagnetic transition phases), the magnetization of the system exhibited instabilities. These instabilities are caused because of the influence of the anisotropy values and the diameter of the nanotubes on the magnetic domains formation. As a consequence, there exist anisotropy values and diameters where metastable states were formed.

  10. Vibrational behavior of single-walled carbon nanotubes based on cylindrical shell model using wave propagation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Muzamal; Naeem, M. Nawaz; Shahzad, Aamir; He, Maogang

    2017-04-01

    The vibration analysis, based on the Donnell thin shell theory, of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) has been investigated. The wave propagation approach in standard eigenvalue form has been employed in order to derive the characteristic frequency equation describing the natural frequencies of vibration in SWCNTs. The complex exponential functions, with the axial modal numbers that depend on the boundary conditions stated at edges of a carbon nanotube, have been used to compute the axial modal dependence. In our new investigations, the vibration frequency spectra are obtained and calculated for various physical parameters like length-to-diameter ratios for armchair and zigzag SWCNTs for different modes and in-plane rigidity and mass density per unit lateral area for armchair and zigzag SWCNTs on the vibration frequencies. The computer software MATLAB is used in order to compute these frequencies of the SWCNTs. The results obtained from wave propagation method are found to be in satisfactory agreement with that obtained through the previously known numerical molecular dynamics simulations.

  11. Modeling the Dispersibility of Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes in Organic Solvents by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Approach

    PubMed Central

    Yilmaz, Hayriye; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Leszczynski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    The knowledge of physico-chemical properties of carbon nanotubes, including behavior in organic solvents is very important for design, manufacturing and utilizing of their counterparts with improved properties. In the present study a quantitative structure-activity/property relationship (QSAR/QSPR) approach was applied to predict the dispersibility of single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in various organic solvents. A number of additive descriptors and quantum-chemical descriptors were calculated and utilized to build QSAR models. The best predictability is shown by a 4-variable model. The model showed statistically good results (R2training = 0.797, Q2 = 0.665, R2test = 0.807), with high internal and external correlation coefficients. Presence of the X0Av descriptor and its negative term suggest that small size solvents have better SWCNTs solubility. Mass weighted descriptor ATS6m also indicates that heavier solvents (and small in size) most probably are better solvents for SWCNTs. The presence of the Dipole Z descriptor indicates that higher polarizability of the solvent molecule increases the solubility. The developed model and contributed descriptors can help to understand the mechanism of the dispersion process and predictorganic solvents that improve the dispersibility of SWNTs.

  12. Magnetic nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Matsui, Hiroshi; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-11-16

    A magnetic nanotube includes bacterial magnetic nanocrystals contacted onto a nanotube which absorbs the nanocrystals. The nanocrystals are contacted on at least one surface of the nanotube. A method of fabricating a magnetic nanotube includes synthesizing the bacterial magnetic nanocrystals, which have an outer layer of proteins. A nanotube provided is capable of absorbing the nanocrystals and contacting the nanotube with the nanocrystals. The nanotube is preferably a peptide bolaamphiphile. A nanotube solution and a nanocrystal solution including a buffer and a concentration of nanocrystals are mixed. The concentration of nanocrystals is optimized, resulting in a nanocrystal to nanotube ratio for which bacterial magnetic nanocrystals are immobilized on at least one surface of the nanotubes. The ratio controls whether the nanocrystals bind only to the interior or to the exterior surfaces of the nanotubes. Uses include cell manipulation and separation, biological assay, enzyme recovery, and biosensors.

  13. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Purification and Functionalization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebron, Marisabel; Mintz, Eric; Smalley, Richard E.; Meador, Michael A.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have the potential to significantly enhance the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of polymers. However, dispersion of carbon nanotubes in a polymer matrix is hindered by the electrostatic forces that cause them to agglomerate. Chemical modification of the nanotubes is necessary to minimize these electrostatic forces and promote adhesion between the nanotubes and the polymer matrix. In a collaborative research program between Clark Atlanta University, Rice University, and NASA Glenn Research Center several approaches are being explored to chemically modify carbon nanotubes. The results of this research will be presented.

  15. A new approach to produce amino-carbon nanotubes as plasmid transfection vector by [2 + 1] cycloaddition of nitrenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yongjian; Jin, Chen; Yang, Feng; Yu, Xianjun; Wang, Guojian; Cheng, Si; Di, Yang; Li, Ji; Fu, Deliang; Ni, Quanxing

    2011-01-01

    Amino-carbon nanotubes (amino-CNTs) can conjugate with the DNA by electrostatic interactions and shuttle the DNA to the cell cytoplasm or even the nucleus. Here we report a new approach to produce amino-CNTs by cycloaddition of nitrenes. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy was used to verify the success of the functionalization, and the functionalization degree was calculated by thermal gravity analysis. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) was used to observe the solubility of the CNTs and the interactions of the amino-CNTs with the plasmids. Cell ultrathin sections were made and observed under the TEM to confirm the amino-CNTs enter the cells. Transfection experiments ultimately verify the amino-CNTs produced through cycloadditions of nitrenes can serve as plasmid vector.

  16. A convenient catalytic approach to synthesize straight boron nitride nanotubes using synergic nitrogen source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Jun; Xu, Liqiang; Fang, Zengli; Sheng, Daopeng; Guo, Qingfeng; Ren, Zeyu; Wang, Kang; Qian, Yitai

    2007-06-01

    Straight boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) with pure hexagonal phase were conveniently prepared by heating the mixture of Mg(BO 2) 2 · H 2O, NH 4Cl, NaN 3 and Mg powder in an autoclave at 600 °C for 20-60 h. These BNNTs had diameters mainly ranging 30-300 nm and lengths up to ˜5 μm, and a majority of them had at least one closed end. Besides the traditional end tips, additional cone-like tips were frequently found to be attached on the BNNTs. The effects of temperature, reactants and the possible mechanism of the catalytic formation of the BNNTs are discussed.

  17. Effective approach to strengthening TiO2 nanotube arrays by using double or triple reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Mengwei; Yu, Dongliang; Lu, Linfeng; Ma, Weihua; Song, Ye; Zhu, Xufei

    2015-08-01

    Porous anodic TiO2 nanotube arrays (TNTAs) are fragile and also susceptible to be damaged during physical manipulation. Few studies have involved the improvement of the poor interfacial adhesion of TNTAs to the Ti substrate. Here, the poor adhesion of TNTAs was dramatically improved by appending an additional compact layer (ACL) formed at the interface between TNTAs and the Ti substrate. The adhesion of TNTAs with single-ACL increased with the increase of the ACL thickness. Furthermore, the reinforced TNTAs with double-ACL and triple-ACL have been successfully developed for the first time. The experimental results indicated that the critical load of the TNTAs with triple-ACL is roughly 5.8 times higher than that of the untreated TNTAs. The present results may be helpful to assemble less brittle and large area TNTAs for extensive applications.

  18. Magnon specific heat and free energy of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes: Green's function approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mi, Bin-Zhou; Zhai, Liang-Jun; Hua, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    The effect of magnetic spin correlation on the thermodynamic properties of Heisenberg ferromagnetic single-walled nanotubes are comprehensively investigated by use of the double-time Green's function method. The influence of temperature, spin quantum number, diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength and external magnetic field to internal energy, free energy, and magnon specific heat are carefully calculated. Compared to the mean field approximation, the consideration of the magnetic correlation effect significantly improves the internal energy values at finite temperature, while it does not so near zero temperature, and this effect is related to the diameter of the tube, anisotropy strength, and spin quantum number. The magnetic correlation effect lowers the internal energy at finite temperature. As a natural consequence of the reduction of the internal energy, the specific heat is reduced, and the free energy is elevated.

  19. Adsorption of triclosan on single wall carbon nanotubes: A first principle approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, S. M.; Araújo, A. B.; Nogueira, R. F. P.; Guerini, S.

    2017-05-01

    The interaction of triclosan on (8,0) and (5,5) single wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) was investigated using density functional calculations. The results show that the adsorption of triclosan modifies the electronic properties of pristine (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT and induced changes in the electronic properties are dependent on the triclosan adsorption site. It was observed through binding energy that triclosan molecule interacts mainly via chemical process in parallel configuration to (8,0) SWCNT, while interaction via physical process was observed with both (8,0) and (5,5) SWCNT. It is proposed that these SWCNTs are a potential filter device due to reasonable physical interaction with triclosan molecule. Furthermore, this type of filter could be reusable, therefore after the filtering, the SWCNTs could be separated from triclosan molecule.

  20. Single Nanotube Spectral Imaging To Determine Molar Concentrations of Isolated Carbon Nanotube Species.

    PubMed

    Galassi, Thomas V; Jena, Prakrit V; Roxbury, Daniel; Heller, Daniel A

    2017-01-17

    Electronic and biological applications of carbon nanotubes can be highly dependent on the species (chirality) of nanotube, purity, and concentration. Existing bulk methods, such as absorbance spectroscopy, can quantify sp(2) carbon based on spectral bands, but nanotube length distribution, defects, and carbonaceous impurities can complicate quantification of individual particles. We present a general method to relate the optical density of a photoluminescent nanotube sample to the number of individual nanotubes. By acquiring 3-dimensional images of nanotubes embedded in a gel matrix with a reducing environment, we quantified all emissive nanotubes in a volume. Via spectral imaging, we assessed structural impurities and precisely determined molar concentrations of the (8,6) and (9,4) nanotube species. We developed an approach to obtain the molarity of any structurally enriched semiconducting single-walled carbon nanotube preparation on a per-nanotube basis.

  1. Large-Scale Processing of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finn, John; Sridhar, K. R.; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scale-up difficulties and high energy costs are two of the more important factors that limit the availability of various types of nanotube carbon. While several approaches are known for producing nanotube carbon, the high-powered reactors typically produce nanotubes at rates measured in only grams per hour and operate at temperatures in excess of 1000 C. These scale-up and energy challenges must be overcome before nanotube carbon can become practical for high-consumption structural and mechanical applications. This presentation examines the issues associated with using various nanotube production methods at larger scales, and discusses research being performed at NASA Ames Research Center on carbon nanotube reactor technology.

  2. Individual dispersion of carbon nanotubes in epoxy via a novel dispersion-curing approach using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Hameed, Nishar; Salim, Nisa V; Hanley, Tracey L; Sona, Mrunali; Fox, Bronwyn L; Guo, Qipeng

    2013-07-28

    The effective dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in a thermoset was achieved using ionic liquid as the dispersion-curing agent. We preferentially dispersed multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) down to individual tube levels in epoxy resin. Here the dispersion is ruled by the depletion of physical bundles within the MWCNT networks, for which molecular ordering of ionic liquids is considered responsible. The quantitative analyses using ultra small angle X-ray scattering (USAXS) confirmed the dispersion of individual MWCNTs in the matrix. The distance between the dispersed nanotubes was calculated at different nanotube loadings using the power law fitting of the USAXS data. The fine dispersion and subsequent curing, both controlled by ionic liquid, lead to composites with substantially enhanced fracture mechanical and thermomechanical properties with no reduction in thermal properties. Merging processing techniques of nanocomposites with ionic liquid for efficient dispersion of nanotubes and preferential curing of thermosets facilitates the development of new, high performance materials.

  3. Duality of two pairs of double-walled nanotubes consisting of S=1 and S=3/2 spins probed by means of a quantum simulation approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaosen; Ian, Hou

    2017-01-01

    Using a quantum simulation approach, we investigate in the present work the spontaneous magnetic properties of two pairs of double-walled cylindrical nanotubes consisting of different spins. Our simulated magnetic and thermodynamic properties for each pair of them are precisely identical, exhibiting a fascinating property of the nature world and demonstrating the correctness of our simulation approach. The second pair of nanotubes are frustrated, two magnetic phases of distinct spin configurations appear in the low temperature region, but only the inner layer consisting of small spins is frustrated evidently, its magnetization is considerably suppressed in the high temperature phase. Moreover, the nanosystems exhibit typical Ising-like behavior due to the uniaxial anisotropy along the z-direction, and evident finite-size effects as well.

  4. Solution chemistry approach to fabricate vertically aligned carbon nanotubes on gold wires: towards vertically integrated electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flavel, Benjamin S.; Yu, Jingxian; Ellis, Amanda V.; Quinton, Jamie S.; Shapter, Joseph G.

    2008-11-01

    A monolayer of hexadecyltrichlorosilane, 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane or 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane was self-assembled onto a p-type silicon (100) substrate to provide a resist for electrochemical anodization with an atomic force microscope cantilever. Silane treatment of the oxide nanostructures created by anodization lithography allowed for the creation of a chemically heterogeneous surface, containing regions of -NH2 or -SH surrounded by -CH3 functionality. These patterned regions of -NH2 or -SH provided the point of attachment for citrate-stabilized gold colloid nanoparticles, which act as 'seed' particles for the electro-less deposition of gold. This has allowed the creation of gold wires on a silicon surface. Carbon nanotubes, with high carboxylic acid functionality, were vertically immobilized on the patterned gold wires with the use of a cysteamine monolayer and a condensation reaction. Such a material may prove useful in the creation of future vertically integrated electronic devices where it is desirable for electron transport to be in three dimensions and this electron transport is demonstrated with cyclic voltammetry.

  5. Biosafety of multiwalled carbon nanotube in mice: a behavioral toxicological approach.

    PubMed

    Ivani, Saeed; Karimi, Isaac; Tabatabaei, Seyed Reza Fatemi

    2012-01-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with unique chemical and electromechanical properties are ideal candidates for the development of drug delivery platforms. The scarce knowledge for the effects of exposure to MWCNTs during pregnancy on postnatal outcomes motivated us to investigate whether intraperitoneal injections (i.p.) of MWCNTs during mating and early pregnancy affect on reproductive and neurobehavioral endpoints and psychobiological status of pups. Thirty virgin female mice were divided to three groups (n = 10 for each); two treated groups injected i.p. with 1 and 10 mg of MWCNTs suspended in 1 ml of phosphate buffered saline solution (PBS) in both mating day and gestation day 3, respectively. The control group was injected i.p. with an equal volume of PBS as a vehicle. MWCNT-treated dams did not exhibit considerable changes in their reproductive performance in gestation and lactation periods. MWCNT-treated pups exhibited similar ontogenetic expressions of neurobehavioral and physical endpoints as compared with control group. Most notably, exposure to MWCNTs was increased depressive and anxious behaviors of treated pups in parallel to adverse effect on their internal organ weights. The absolute thymus weight was declined in MWCNT-treated groups while absolute weights of liver and spleen decreased in group treated by 1 mg of MWCNT as compared to control group. Relative organ weights in MWCNT-treated groups were almost similar to control group.

  6. Multilayer Film Assembly of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cassell, Alan M.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie; Arnold, J. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    An approach to assemble multilayers of carbon nanotubes on a substrate is presented. Chemical vapor deposition using a transition metal catalyst formulation is used to grow the nanotubes. Results show a bilayer assembly of nanotubes each with a different density of tubes.

  7. Exploring the sensitivity of ZnO nanotubes to tyrosine nitration: A DFT approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddahi, Pari Sadat; Shahtahmassebi, Nasser; Rezaee Roknabadi, Mahmood; Moosavi, Fatemeh

    2016-05-01

    Due to association of protein tyrosine nitration (PTN) with development of some serious human disorders and diseases, in this paper, the possible applications of ZnO-based nanobiosensors in nitrated tyrosine (nTyr) detection were explored within the density functional framework. With this motivation, the interaction of nTyr with ZnO single walled nanotubes via all possible active sites of nTyr was investigated. The results show the tendency of nTyr to interact through its nitro site (forming nitro-site configuration) with ZnO SWNTs as it has the highest binding energy; while, the charge-solvent configuration involving the interaction of nTyr's phenolic ring has the second place in terms of binding energy magnitude. Regardless of which active site contributes in interaction, the binding energies exhibit an ascending trend with decrease of SWNTs' curvature. Electronic properties analysis indicates that nTyr interaction via its nitro group results in formation of some flat bands inside the band gap region leading to significant reduction of overall band gap energy. Similar behavior is also observed in charge-solvent configuration but the band gap energy is larger. These red shifts are mainly attributed to contribution of 2p orbitals of species present in nTyr. Also, the hybridization of 3d orbital of Zn atom with 2p orbitals of nitro group atomic species is found responsible for bonding formation in bioconjugated system possessing the highest binding energy. Comparison of the electronic band structure of ZnO SWNT-Tyr with that of ZnO SWNT-nTyr indicates the sensitivity of ZnO SWNTs toward tyrosine nitration hence, a considerable change in its optical spectra is expectable. This introduces ZnO SWNTs as a promising candidate for PTN detection.

  8. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalte

    2004-12-28

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  9. Nanotube junctions

    DOEpatents

    Crespi, Vincent Henry; Cohen, Marvin Lou; Louie, Steven Gwon Sheng; Zettl, Alexander Karlwalter

    2003-01-01

    The present invention comprises a new nanoscale metal-semiconductor, semiconductor-semiconductor, or metal-metal junction, designed by introducing topological or chemical defects in the atomic structure of the nanotube. Nanotubes comprising adjacent sections having differing electrical properties are described. These nanotubes can be constructed from combinations of carbon, boron, nitrogen and other elements. The nanotube can be designed having different indices on either side of a junction point in a continuous tube so that the electrical properties on either side of the junction vary in a useful fashion. For example, the inventive nanotube may be electrically conducting on one side of a junction and semiconducting on the other side. An example of a semiconductor-metal junction is a Schottky barrier. Alternatively, the nanotube may exhibit different semiconductor properties on either side of the junction. Nanotubes containing heterojunctions, Schottky barriers, and metal-metal junctions are useful for microcircuitry.

  10. Improved Process for Fabricating Carbon Nanotube Probes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stevens, R.; Nguyen, C.; Cassell, A.; Delzeit, L.; Meyyappan, M.; Han, Jie

    2003-01-01

    An improved process has been developed for the efficient fabrication of carbon nanotube probes for use in atomic-force microscopes (AFMs) and nanomanipulators. Relative to prior nanotube tip production processes, this process offers advantages in alignment of the nanotube on the cantilever and stability of the nanotube's attachment. A procedure has also been developed at Ames that effectively sharpens the multiwalled nanotube, which improves the resolution of the multiwalled nanotube probes and, combined with the greater stability of multiwalled nanotube probes, increases the effective resolution of these probes, making them comparable in resolution to single-walled carbon nanotube probes. The robust attachment derived from this improved fabrication method and the natural strength and resiliency of the nanotube itself produces an AFM probe with an extremely long imaging lifetime. In a longevity test, a nanotube tip imaged a silicon nitride surface for 15 hours without measurable loss of resolution. In contrast, the resolution of conventional silicon probes noticeably begins to degrade within minutes. These carbon nanotube probes have many possible applications in the semiconductor industry, particularly as devices are approaching the nanometer scale and new atomic layer deposition techniques necessitate a higher resolution characterization technique. Previously at Ames, the use of nanotube probes has been demonstrated for imaging photoresist patterns with high aspect ratio. In addition, these tips have been used to analyze Mars simulant dust grains, extremophile protein crystals, and DNA structure.

  11. Electronic interaction in composites of a conjugated polymer and carbon nanotubes: first-principles calculation and photophysical approaches

    PubMed Central

    Wéry, Jany; Duvail, Jean-Luc; Lefrant, Serge; Yaya, Abu; Ewels, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Summary The mechanisms that control the photophysics of composite films made of a semiconducting conjugated polymer (poly(paraphenylene vinylene), PPV) mixed with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) up to a concentration of 64 wt % are determined by using photoexcitation techniques and density functional theory. Charge separation is confirmed experimentally by rapid quenching of PPV photoluminescence and changes in photocurrent starting at relatively low concentrations of SWNT. Calculations predict strong electronic interaction between the polymer and the SWNT network when nanotubes are semiconducting. PMID:26171290

  12. A novel covalent approach to bio-conjugate silver coated single walled carbon nanotubes with antimicrobial peptide.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Atul A; Ashmore, D'andrea; Nath, Subrata Deb; Kate, Kunal; Dennis, Vida; Singh, Shree R; Owen, Don R; Palazzo, Chris; Arnold, Robert D; Miller, Michael E; Pillai, Shreekumar R

    2016-07-13

    Due to increasing antibiotic resistance, the use of silver coated single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs-Ag) and antimicrobial peptides (APs) is becoming popular due to their antimicrobial properties against a wide range of pathogens. However, stability against various conditions and toxicity in human cells are some of the major drawbacks of APs and SWCNTs-Ag, respectively. Therefore, we hypothesized that APs-functionalized SWCNTs-Ag could act synergistically. Various covalent functionalization protocols described previously involve harsh treatment of carbon nanotubes for carboxylation (first step in covalent functionalization) and the non-covalently functionalized SWCNTs are not satisfactory. The present study is the first report wherein SWCNTs-Ag were first carboxylated using Tri sodium citrate (TSC) at 37 °C and then subsequently functionalized covalently with an effective antimicrobial peptide from Therapeutic Inc., TP359 (FSWCNTs-Ag). SWCNTs-Ag were also non covalently functionalized with TP359 by simple mixing (SWCNTs-Ag-M) and both, the FSWCNTs-Ag (covalent) and SWCNTs-Ag-M (non-covalent), were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), Ultraviolet visualization (UV-VIS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Further the antibacterial activity of both and TP359 were investigated against two gram positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pyogenes) and two gram negative (Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and Escherichia coli) pathogens and the cellular toxicity of TP359 and FSWCNTs-Ag was compared with plain SWCNTs-Ag using murine macrophages and lung carcinoma cells. FT-IR analysis revealed that treatment with TSC successfully resulted in carboxylation of SWCNTs-Ag and the peptide was indeed attached to the SWCNTs-Ag evidenced by TEM images. More importantly, the present study results further showed that the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of FSWCNTs-Ag were much lower (~7.8-3.9 µg/ml with IC50: ~4-5

  13. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdalla, Ahmed M.; Sahu, Rakesh P.; Wallar, Cameron J.; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K.

    2017-02-01

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g-1 and an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm-2 at a scan rate of 2 mV s-1 is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm-2.

  14. Nickel oxide nanotube synthesis using multiwalled carbon nanotubes as sacrificial templates for supercapacitor application.

    PubMed

    Abdalla, Ahmed M; Sahu, Rakesh P; Wallar, Cameron J; Chen, Ri; Zhitomirsky, Igor; Puri, Ishwar K

    2017-02-17

    A novel approach for the fabrication of nickel oxide nanotubes based on multiwalled carbon nanotubes as a sacrificial template is described. Electroless deposition is employed to deposit nickel onto carbon nanotubes. The subsequent annealing of the product in the presence of air oxidizes nickel to nickel oxide, and carbon is released as gaseous carbon dioxide, leaving behind nickel oxide nanotubes. Electron microscopy and elemental mapping confirm the formation of nickel oxide nanotubes. New chelating polyelectrolytes are used as dispersing agents to achieve high colloidal stability for both the nickel-coated carbon nanotubes and the nickel oxide nanotubes. A gravimetric specific capacitance of 245.3 F g(-1) and  an areal capacitance of 3.28 F cm(-2) at a scan rate of 2 mV s(-1) is achieved, with an electrode fabricated using nickel oxide nanotubes as the active element with a mass loading of 24.1 mg cm(-2).

  15. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  16. Nanotube Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEuen, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    Under this project, we explored the feasibility of utilizing carbon nanotubes in sensing applications. The grant primarily supported a graduate student, who worked on a number of aspects of the electrical properties of carbon nanotubes in collaboration with other researchers in my group. The two major research accomplishments are described below. The first accomplishment is the demonstration that solution carbon nanotube transistors functioned well in an electrolyte environment. This was important for two reasons. First, it allowed us to explore the ultimate limits of nanotube electronic performance by using the electrolyte as a highly effective gate, with a dielectric constant of approximately 80 and an effective insulator thickness of approximately 1 nm. Second, it showed that nanotubes function well under biologically relevant conditions (salty water) and therefore offer great promise as biological sensors. The second accomplishment was the demonstration that a voltage pulse applied to an AFM tip could be used to electrically cut carbon nanotubes. We also showed that a carefully applied pulse could also 'nick' a nanotube, creating a tunnel barrier without completely breaking the tube. Nicking was employed to make, for example, a quantum dot within a nanotube.

  17. Graphenylene Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Koch, Andrew T; Khoshaman, Amir H; Fan, Harrison D E; Sawatzky, George A; Nojeh, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    A new type of carbon nanotube, based on the graphenylene motif, is investigated using density functional and tight-binding methods. Analogous to conventional graphene-based nanotubes, a two-dimensional graphenylene sheet can be "rolled" into a seamless cylinder in armchair, zigzag, or chiral orientations. The resulting nanotube can be described using the familiar (n,m) nomenclature and possesses 4-, 6-, and 12-membered rings, with three distinct bond lengths, indicating a nonuniform distribution of the electron density. The dodecagonal rings form pores, 3.3 Å in diameter in graphenylene, which become saddle-shaped paraboloids in smaller-diameter nanotubes. Density functional theory predicts zigzag nanotubes to be small-band gap semiconductors, with a generally decreasing band gap as the diameter increases. Interestingly, the calculations predict metallic characteristics for armchair nanotubes with small diameters (<2 nm), and small-band gap semiconducting characteristics for larger-diameter ones. Graphenylene nanotubes with indices mod(n-m,3) = 0 exhibit a band gap approximately equal to that of armchair graphenylene nanotubes with comparable diameter.

  18. Constitutive Modeling of Crosslinked Nanotube Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Frankland, S. J. V.; Herzog, M. N.; Gates, T. S.; Fay, C. C.

    2004-01-01

    A non-linear, continuum-based constitutive model is developed for carbon nanotube materials in which bundles of aligned carbon nanotubes have varying amounts of crosslinks between the nanotubes. The model accounts for the non-linear elastic constitutive behavior of the material in terms of strain, and is developed using a thermodynamic energy approach. The model is used to examine the effect of the crosslinking on the overall mechanical properties of variations of the crosslinked carbon nanotube material with varying degrees of crosslinking. It is shown that the presence of the crosslinks has significant effects on the mechanical properties of the carbon nanotube materials. An increase in the transverse shear properties is observed when the nanotubes are crosslinked. However, this increase is accompanied by a decrease in axial mechanical properties of the nanotube material upon crosslinking.

  19. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2007-05-29

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  20. Heteroporphyrin nanotubes and composites

    DOEpatents

    Shelnutt, John A.; Medforth, Craig J.; Wang, Zhongchun

    2006-11-07

    Heteroporphyrin nanotubes, metal nanostructures, and metal/porphyrin-nanotube composite nanostructures formed using the nanotubes as photocatalysts and structural templates, and the methods for forming the nanotubes and composites.

  1. Inorganic nanotube nanofluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong

    The ability to manipulate charge carriers (electrons and holes) in metal-oxide semiconductor field effect transistors (MOSFETs) has revolutionized how information is processed and stored, and created the modern digital age. Introducing direct field effect modulation in fluidic systems would enable the manipulation of ionic and molecular species at a similar level and even logic operation. Due to strong Debye screening in aqueous solutions, field effect manipulation of ion transport arises only in systems whose dimensions are comparable to the critical Debye Length, i.e. in nanofluidic systems. Nanofluidics has already been explored in various cases, e.g. biological channel proteins and artificial solid-state nanopores. All these two terminal systems usually transport the ions the same way as passive electron conduction in a resistor. My work is aimed at developing nanotube nanofluidic units with a third terminal that can electrically turn on/off and control ion and biomolecule transport. Moreover, the systematic study on "doping" and transient phenomena can provide rich information to assess the electrokinetics theory and fluidic physics in nanoscale. Silica nanotubes were synthesized by oxidation/etching approach using vertical silicon nanowires as templates. A single nanotube was integrated into a metal-oxide-solution field effect transistor (MOSolFET) by interfacing with two microfluidic channels and a metallic gate electrode. Concentration dependence of ionic conductance through single nanotubes revealed the emergence of unipolar environment at low ionic strength regime. In this case, ionic conductance is only associated with majority ions and governed by surface potentials and charge densities. By applying a gate voltage, the ionic conductance can be quickly modulated. The gate voltages alter the surface potential of the silica nanotubes via capacitive coupling through the nanotube wall and the electrical double layer. In a negatively charged silica nanotube

  2. Green and facile approach for enhancing the inherent magnetic properties of carbon nanotubes for water treatment applications.

    PubMed

    Ateia, Mohamed; Koch, Christian; Jelavić, Stanislav; Hirt, Ann; Quinson, Jonathan; Yoshimura, Chihiro; Johnson, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    Current methods for preparing magnetic composites with carbon nanotubes (MCNT) commonly include extensive use of treatment with strong acids and result in massive losses of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). In this study we explore the potential of taking advantage of the inherent magnetic properties associated with the metal (alloy or oxide) incorporated in CNTs during their production. The as-received CNTs are refined by applying a permanent magnet to a suspension of CNTs to separate the high-magnetic fraction; the low-magnetic fraction is discarded with the solvent. The collected MCNTs were characterized by a suite of 10 diffraction and spectroscopic techniques. A key discovery is that metallic nano-clusters of Fe and/or Ni located in the interior cavities of the nanotubes give MCNTs their ferromagnetic character. After refinement using our method, the MCNTs show saturation magnetizations up to 10 times that of the as-received materials. In addition, we demonstrate the ability of these MCNTs to repeatedly remove atrazine from water in a cycle of dispersion into a water sample, adsorption of the atrazine onto the MCNTs, collection by magnetic attraction and regeneration by ethanol. The resulting MCNTs show high adsorption capacities (> 40 mg-atrazine/g), high magnetic response, and straightforward regeneration. The method presented here is simpler, faster, and substantially reduces chemical waste relative to current techniques and the resulting MCNTs are promising adsorbents for organic/chemical contaminants in environmental waters.

  3. A semi-analytical approach for calculating the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, J.; Thompson, L.; Li, G.

    2016-12-01

    A semi-analytical model for determining the equilibrium configuration and the radial breathing mode (RBM) frequency of single-wall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is presented. By taking advantage of the symmetry characteristics, a CNT structure is represented by five independent variables. A line search optimization procedure is employed to determine the equilibrium values of these variables by minimizing the potential energy. With the equilibrium configuration obtained, the semi-analytical model enables an efficient calculation of the RBM frequency of the CNTs. The radius and radial breathing mode frequency results obtained from the semi-analytical approach are compared with those from molecular dynamics (MD) and ab initio calculations. The results demonstrate that the semi-analytical approach offers an efficient and accurate way to determine the equilibrium structure and radial breathing mode frequency of CNTs.

  4. Application of zone-folding approach to the first-principles estimation of thermodynamic properties of carbon and ZrS2 -based nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bandura, Andrei V; Porsev, Vitaly V; Evarestov, Robert A

    2016-03-15

    A zone-folding (ZF) approach is applied for the estimation of the phonon contributions to thermodynamic properties of carbon-and ZrS2 -based nanotubes (NTs) of hexagonal morphology with different chiralities. The results obtained are compared with those from the direct calculation of the thermodynamic properties of NTs using PBE0 hybrid exchange-correlation functional. The phonon contribution to the stability of NTs proved to be negligible for the internal energy and small for the Helmholtz free energy. It is found that the ZF approach allows us an accurate estimation of phonon contributions to internal energy, but slightly overestimates the phonon contributions to entropy. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Effects of high energy electrons on the properties of polyethylene / multiwalled carbon nanotubes composites: Comparison of as-grown and oxygen-functionalised MWCNT

    SciTech Connect

    Krause, B. E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de Pötschke, P. E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de Gohs, U. E-mail: poe@ipfdd.de

    2014-05-15

    Polymer modification with high energy electrons (EB) is well established in different applications for many years. It is used for crosslinking, curing, degrading, grafting of polymeric materials and polymerisation of monomers. In contrast to this traditional method, electron induced reactive processing (EIReP) combines the polymer modification with high energy electrons and the melt mixing process. This novel reactive method was used to prepare polymer blends and composites. In this study, both methods were used for the preparation of polyethylene (PE)/ multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) composites in the presence of a coupling agent. The influence of MWCNT and type of electron treatment on the gel content, the thermal conductivity, rheological, and electrical properties was investigated whereby as-grown and oxidised MWCNT were used. In the presence of a coupling agent and at an absorbed dose of 40 kGy, the gel content increased from 57 % for the pure PE to 74 % or 88 % by the addition of as-grown (Baytubes® C150P) or oxidised MWCNT, respectively. In comparison to the composites containing the as-grown MWCNTs, the use of the oxidised MWCNTs led to higher melt viscosity and higher storage modulus due to higher yield of filler polymer couplings. The melt viscosity increased due to the addition of MWCNT and crosslinking of PE. The thermal conductivity increased to about 150 % and showed no dependence on the kind of MWCNT and the type of electron treatment. In contrast, the lowest value of electrical volume resistivity was found for the non-irradiated samples and after state of the art electron treatment without any influence of the type of MWCNT. In the case of EIReP, the volume resistivity increased by 2 (as-grown MWCNT) or 3 decades (oxidised MWCNT) depending on the process parameters.

  6. Self-assembled TiO(2) nanotube arrays by anodization of titanium in diethylene glycol: approach to extended pore widening.

    PubMed

    Yoriya, Sorachon; Grimes, Craig A

    2010-01-05

    We report on the formation of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays having the largest known pore size, approximately 350 nm diameter. The nanotube arrays are synthesized by Ti foil anodization in a diethylene glycol electrolyte containing low (0.5-2%) concentrations of hydrofluoric acid. The large pore size nanotube arrays are achieved with extended anodization durations of approximately 120 h, with the anodization duration showing a more significant effect on pore diameter than the anodization voltage. It appears that the combined effects of hydrofluoric acid content and anodization duration determine the lateral etching rate of the nanotubes, leading to the larger pore size nanotubes.

  7. Segmentation and additive approach: A reliable technique to study noncovalent interactions of large molecules at the surface of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Torres, Ana M; Scheiner, Steve; Roy, Ajit K; Garay-Tapia, Andrés M; Bustamante, John; Kar, Tapas

    2016-08-05

    This investigation explores a new protocol, named Segmentation and Additive approach (SAA), to study exohedral noncovalent functionalization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with large molecules, such as polymers and biomolecules, by segmenting the entire system into smaller units to reduce computational cost. A key criterion of the segmentation process is the preservation of the molecular structure responsible for stabilization of the entire system in smaller segments. Noncovalent interaction of linoleic acid (LA, C18 H32 O2 ), a fatty acid, at the surface of a (10,0) zigzag nanotube is considered for test purposes. Three smaller segmented models have been created from the full (10,0)-LA system and interaction energies were calculated for these models and compared with the full system at different levels of theory, namely ωB97XD, LDA. The success of this SAA is confirmed as the sum of the interaction energies is in very good agreement with the total interaction energy. Besides reducing computational cost, another merit of SAA is an estimation of the contributions from different sections of the large system to the total interaction energy which can be studied in-depth using a higher level of theory to estimate several properties of each segment. On the negative side, bulk properties, such as HOMO-LUMO (highest occupied molecular orbital - lowest occupied molecular orbital) gap, of the entire system cannot be estimated by adding results from segment models. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Nanotube radio.

    PubMed

    Jensen, K; Weldon, J; Garcia, H; Zettl, A

    2007-11-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  9. Nanotube Radio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Weldon, Jeff; Garcia, Henry; Zettl, Alex

    2008-03-01

    We have constructed a fully functional, fully integrated radio receiver from a single carbon nanotube. The nanotube serves simultaneously as all essential components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A direct current voltage source, as supplied by a battery, powers the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, we demonstrate successful music and voice reception.

  10. Nanotube networks in liquid crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Urbanski, Martin; Lagerwall, Jan Peter F.; Scalia, Giusy

    2016-03-01

    Liquid crystals (LCs) are very attractive hosts for the organization of anisotropic nanoparticles such as carbon nanotubes (CNTs) because of the macroscopic organization resulting in properties of nanoparticles manifest at a macroscopic scale. Different types of LCs have demonstrated the ability to organize nanotubes, showing the generality of the approach, i.e., that the liquid crystallinity per se is the driving factor for the organization. Compared to standard nanotube composites (e.g. with disordered polymer hosts) the introduction of carbon nanotubes into an LC allows not only the transfer of the outstanding CNT properties to the macroscopic phase, providing strength and conductivity, but these properties also become anisotropic, following the transfer of the orientational order from the LC to the CNTs. The LC molecular structure plays an important even if ancillary role since it enters in the surface interactions, fulfilling a mediating action between the particle and the bulk of the LC. Isolated nanotubes can be obtained by optimized dispersions at lower concentrations and this process requires the use or development of tailored strategies like using solvents or even another LC for pre-dispersing CNTs. Aggregates or networks can be observed in poor dispersions and at higher nanoparticle concentrations. In those, due to surface interactions, the LC behaviour can be strongly affected with changes in phase sequences or transition temperatures and the effect is expected to be more pronounced as the concentration of nanotubes increases. We present preliminary investigations and observations on nanotube - LC systems based on a smectic LC host.

  11. Graphane nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wen, Xiao-Dong; Yang, Tao; Hoffmann, Roald; Ashcroft, N W; Martin, Richard L; Rudin, Sven P; Zhu, Jian-Xin

    2012-08-28

    In this work, one-dimensional graphane nanotubes (GN, stoichiometry CH), built from 2D single-sheet graphanes, are explored theoretically. Zigzag type GN(10,0) and armchair type GN(10,10) structures with varying surface termination were investigated in detail. GN(10,10)-A is found to be the most stable configuration among the GN structures considered. An annealing analysis indicates that graphane-A and GN(10,10)-A are likely to be stable at elevated temperature. A possible reaction path to GN(10,10)-A is suggested by the reaction of single-walled carbon nanotube (10,10) + H(2); the indications are that the GN(10,10)-A can be made at low temperature and high partial pressure of H(2) gas from the corresponding nanotube. The graphane nanotubes are predicted to be wide band gap insulators. A study of the effect of the diameter of GN structures shows, unexpectedly, that the gap increases on reducing the diameter of the graphane nanotubes. We also investigated several partially hydrogenated graphenes and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT); the greater hydrogenation is, the more stable is the resulting structure. The band gap of graphene or SWNT can be tuned via hydrogenation.

  12. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube/Polymer Composites with Various Nanotube Orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) with various orientations with respect to the bulk material coordinates. A nanotube, the local polymer adjacent to the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface have been modeled as an equivalent-continuum fiber by using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The equivalent-continuum fiber accounts for the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composite. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of a SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite system, with aligned nanotubes, three-dimensionally randomly oriented nanotubes, and nanotubes oriented with varying degrees of axisymmetry. It is shown that the Young s modulus is highly dependent on the SWNT orientation distribution.

  13. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D.; Amaratunga, Gehan A. J.

    2013-05-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  14. Computer generated holograms for carbon nanotube arrays.

    PubMed

    Montelongo, Yunuen; Butt, Haider; Butler, Tim; Wilkinson, Timothy D; Amaratunga, Gehan A J

    2013-05-21

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes are highly diffractive structures in the optical regime. Their metallic character and large scattering cross-section allow their usage as diffractive elements in Fraunhofer holograms. This work elaborates some important features of the far field diffraction patterns produced from periodic arrays of nanotubes. A theoretical approach for the interaction of arrays of nanotubes with light is presented and a computer generated hologram is calculated by means of periodical patterns. Based on the results, fabrication of carbon nanotube arrays (in holographic patterns) was performed. Experimentally measured diffraction patterns were in good agreement with the calculations.

  15. Thermoelectric properties of WS2 nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawai, Hideki; Sugahara, Mitsunari; Okada, Ryotaro; Maniwa, Yutaka; Yomogida, Yohei; Yanagi, Kazuhiro

    2017-01-01

    We report the thermoelectric properties of WS2 nanotube networks. By using electrolyte-gating techniques, we turned on a conducting channel in the macroscopic networks of WS2 nanotubes in both the hole and electron regions and evaluated the thermoelectric properties of the networks. We manipulated the P- and N-type Seebeck coefficients in the WS2 nanotube networks by changing the shifts in the gate voltage potentials. The power factor of the WS2 nanotube networks increased as the gate voltage shifted and exhibited a high thermoelectric performance approaching that of single-crystalline WS2 flakes.

  16. Computational Validation of Protein Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Buch, Idit; Brooks, Bernard R.; Wolfson, Haim J.; Nussinov, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    We present a novel generic computational method to assess protein nanotubes with variable diameter sizes, at the atomic level, given their low resolution protomeric structures. The method is based on the symmetrical assembly of a repeating protein subunit into a nanotube. Given the protein unit-cell, and the tube diameter and helicity, we carry out all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, combined with a unique mathematical transformation. This allows us to mimic nanotubes of even huge sizes, without end or edge effects. All our simulation setups attempt to explicitly adhere to the conditions under which the experiments were conducted. Thus, we are able to obtain high resolution atomic-scale structures at reasonable computational costs. We expect that our approach would prove useful in assessing protein nanotubes, as well as in silico constructions of novel nano-biomaterials. PMID:19199488

  17. Nanotube cathodes.

    SciTech Connect

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  18. An analytical approach to evaluate the performance of graphene and carbon nanotubes for NH3 gas sensor applications

    PubMed Central

    Akbari, Elnaz; Enzevaee, Aria; Ahmadi, Mohamad T; Saeidmanesh, Mehdi; Khaledian, Mohsen; Karimi, Hediyeh; Yusof, Rubiyah

    2014-01-01

    Summary Carbon, in its variety of allotropes, especially graphene and carbon nanotubes (CNTs), holds great potential for applications in variety of sensors because of dangling π-bonds that can react with chemical elements. In spite of their excellent features, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and graphene have not been fully exploited in the development of the nanoelectronic industry mainly because of poor understanding of the band structure of these allotropes. A mathematical model is proposed with a clear purpose to acquire an analytical understanding of the field-effect-transistor (FET) based gas detection mechanism. The conductance change in the CNT/graphene channel resulting from the chemical reaction between the gas and channel surface molecules is emphasized. NH3 has been used as the prototype gas to be detected by the nanosensor and the corresponding current–voltage (I–V) characteristics of the FET-based sensor are studied. A graphene-based gas sensor model is also developed. The results from graphene and CNT models are compared with the experimental data. A satisfactory agreement, within the uncertainties of the experiments, is obtained. Graphene-based gas sensor exhibits higher conductivity compared to that of CNT-based counterpart for similar ambient conditions. PMID:24991510

  19. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-14

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1), compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m(-2) h(-1) bar(-1) reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  20. A carbon nanotube wall membrane for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Byeongho; Baek, Youngbin; Lee, Minwoo; Jeong, Dae Hong; Lee, Hong H.; Yoon, Jeyong; Kim, Yong Hyup

    2015-05-01

    Various forms of carbon nanotubes have been utilized in water treatment applications. The unique characteristics of carbon nanotubes, however, have not been fully exploited for such applications. Here we exploit the characteristics and corresponding attributes of carbon nanotubes to develop a millimetre-thick ultrafiltration membrane that can provide a water permeability that approaches 30,000 l m-2 h-1 bar-1, compared with the best water permeability of 2,400 l m-2 h-1 bar-1 reported for carbon nanotube membranes. The developed membrane consists only of vertically aligned carbon nanotube walls that provide 6-nm-wide inner pores and 7-nm-wide outer pores that form between the walls of the carbon nanotubes when the carbon nanotube forest is densified. The experimental results reveal that the permeance increases as the pore size decreases. The carbon nanotube walls of the membrane are observed to impede bacterial adhesion and resist biofilm formation.

  1. Atomic layer deposition assisted template approach for electrochemical synthesis of Au crescent-shaped half-nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Qin, Yong; Pan, Anlian; Liu, Lifeng; Moutanabbir, Oussama; Yang, Ren Bin; Knez, Mato

    2011-02-22

    This paper reports on a novel and versatile method to synthesize sharp-edged crescent-shaped half-nanotubes (HNTs) using a flexible template-based nanofabrication method assisted by atomic layer deposition. This was achieved by electrodeposition inside crescent-shaped nanochannels created by a controlled removal of a sacrificial layer, which was deposited by atomic layer deposition onto the pore walls of an anodic aluminum oxide template. This method provides a high degree of freedom in the manipulation of the morphological properties of HNTs such as the edge sharpness, opening, gap size, and the wall thickness. Initial optical investigations of the HNTs reveal distinct surface plasmon resonance by dark field scattering spectra and surface enhanced Raman spectrum.

  2. Nanotube phonon waveguide

    DOEpatents

    Chang, Chih-Wei; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2013-10-29

    Disclosed are methods and devices in which certain types of nanotubes (e.g., carbon nanotubes and boron nitride nanotubes conduct heat with high efficiency and are therefore useful in electronic-type devices.

  3. Modelling water molecules inside cyclic peptide nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiangtrong, Prangsai; Thamwattana, Ngamta; Baowan, Duangkamon

    2016-03-01

    Cyclic peptide nanotubes occur during the self-assembly process of cyclic peptides. Due to the ease of synthesis and ability to control the properties of outer surface and inner diameter by manipulating the functional side chains and the number of amino acids, cyclic peptide nanotubes have attracted much interest from many research areas. A potential application of peptide nanotubes is their use as artificial transmembrane channels for transporting ions, biomolecules and waters into cells. Here, we use the Lennard-Jones potential and a continuum approach to study the interaction of a water molecule in a cyclo[(- D-Ala- L-Ala)_4-] peptide nanotube. Assuming that each unit of a nanotube comprises an inner and an outer tube and that a water molecule is made up of a sphere of two hydrogen atoms uniformly distributed over its surface and a single oxygen atom at the centre, we determine analytically the interaction energy of the water molecule and the peptide nanotube. Using this energy, we find that, independent of the number of peptide units, the water molecule will be accepted inside the nanotube. Once inside the nanotube, we show that a water molecule prefers to be off-axis, closer to the surface of the inner nanotube. Furthermore, our study of two water molecules inside the peptide nanotube supports the finding that water molecules form an array of a 1-2-1-2 file inside peptide nanotubes. The theoretical study presented here can facilitate thorough understanding of the behaviour of water molecules inside peptide nanotubes for applications, such as artificial transmembrane channels.

  4. Integration of suspended carbon nanotube arrays into electronic devices and electromechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, Nathan R.; Wang, Qian; Tombler, Thomas W.; Javey, Ali; Shim, Moonsub; Dai, Hongjie

    2002-07-01

    A synthetic strategy is devised for reliable integration of long suspended single-walled carbon nanotubes into electrically addressable devices. The method involves patterned growth of nanotubes to bridge predefined molybdenum electrodes, and is versatile in yielding various microstructures comprised of suspended nanotubes that are electrically wired up. The approach affords single-walled nanotube devices without any postgrowth processing, and will find applications in scalable nanotube transistors (mobility up to 10 000 cm2/V s) and nanoelectromechanical systems based on nanowires.

  5. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  6. Nanotube News

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Smaller, faster computers, bullet-proof t-shirts, and itty-bitty robots--such are the promises of nanotechnology and the cylinder-shaped collection of carbon molecules known as nanotubes. But for these exciting ideas to become realities, scientists must understand how these miracle molecules perform under all sorts of conditions. This brief…

  7. Carbon Nanotubes for Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, Carl D.; Files, Brad; Yowell, Leonard

    2003-01-01

    Single-wall carbon nanotubes offer the promise of a new class of revolutionary materials for space applications. The Carbon Nanotube Project at NASA Johnson Space Center has been actively researching this new technology by investigating nanotube production methods (arc, laser, and HiPCO) and gaining a comprehensive understanding of raw and purified material using a wide range of characterization techniques. After production and purification, single wall carbon nanotubes are processed into composites for the enhancement of mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties. This "cradle-to-grave" approach to nanotube composites has given our team unique insights into the impact of post-production processing and dispersion on the resulting material properties. We are applying our experience and lessons-learned to developing new approaches toward nanotube material characterization, structural composite fabrication, and are also making advances in developing thermal management materials and electrically conductive materials in various polymer-nanotube systems. Some initial work has also been conducted with the goal of using carbon nanotubes in the creation of new ceramic materials for high temperature applications in thermal protection systems. Human space flight applications such as advanced life support and fuel cell technologies are also being investigated. This discussion will focus on the variety of applications under investigation.

  8. Polymer grafted single-walled carbon nanotube composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viswanathan, Gunaranjan

    The quasi one-dimensional structure, aspect ratio, mechanical strength and electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes make them ideal fillers for incorporation into composite systems for the development of advanced multifunctional materials. But several issues, including dispersion of nanotubes within the matrix, exfoliation of nanotube bundles and interaction of nanotubes with the host polymer, have to be addressed in order to realize the true potential of these composites. Especially for applications as structural reinforcements, the interface between the nanotubes and the polymer has to be engineered in order to maximize load transfer. The best way of ensuring favorable matrix-nanotube interactions is by chemical functionalization of the nanotube surface with suitable groups to promote adhesion with the polymer matrix. Functionalizing nanotubes with the polymer of the matrix provides the ideal case scenario by offering the best possible interface with the host polymer. The work presented in this thesis involves the development of a novel methodology based on an anionic polymerization approach, for the synthesis of polymer-grafted nanotube based composites, with the aim of improving the dispersion of nanotubes and the interfacial adhesion between the nanotubes and the matrix polymer. This technique enables single-step synthesis, requires no nanotube pretreatment and preserves the original nanotube structure. Significant improvements in the mechanical properties of composites containing polymer-grafted nanotubes (when compared to both pure polymer and composites containing unfunctionalized nanotubes) were observed even at low nanotube loadings (1 wt.%). Melt-state rheological studies revealed changes in the terminal and entanglement plateau regions due to interactions between the free and grafted polymer chains. The improved load transfer across the fiber-matrix interface was confirmed using Raman spectroscopy.

  9. A bio-based, facile approach for the preparation of covalently functionalized carbon nanotubes aqueous suspensions and their potential as heat transfer fluids.

    PubMed

    Sadri, Rad; Hosseini, Maryam; Kazi, S N; Bagheri, Samira; Zubir, Nashrul; Solangi, K H; Zaharinie, Tuan; Badarudin, A

    2017-10-15

    In this study, we propose an innovative, bio-based, environmentally friendly approach for the covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes using clove buds. This approach is innovative because we do not use toxic and hazardous acids which are typically used in common carbon nanomaterial functionalization procedures. The MWCNTs are functionalized in one pot using a free radical grafting reaction. The clove-functionalized MWCNTs (CMWCNTs) are then dispersed in distilled water (DI water), producing a highly stable CMWCNT aqueous suspension. The CMWCNTs are characterized using Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy. The electrostatic interactions between the CMWCNT colloidal particles in DI water are verified via zeta potential measurements. UV-vis spectroscopy is also used to examine the stability of the CMWCNTs in the base fluid. The thermo-physical properties of the CMWCNT nano-fluids are examined experimentally and indeed, this nano-fluid shows remarkably improved thermo-physical properties, indicating its superb potential for various thermal applications. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  10. A morphological and structural approach to evaluate the electromagnetic performances of composites based on random networks of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Vivo, B.; Lamberti, P.; Spinelli, G.; Tucci, V.

    2014-04-01

    Small quantities of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in polymer resins allow to obtain new lightweight nanocomposites suitable for microwave applications, such as efficient electromagnetic shielding or radar absorbing materials. The availability of appropriate simulation models taking into account the morphological and physical features of such very interesting composites is very important for design and performance optimization of devices and systems. In this study, a 3-dimensional (3D) numerical structure modeling the morphology of a CNT-based composite is considered in order to carry out a computational analysis of their electromagnetic performances. The main innovative features of the proposed model consists in the identification of a resistance and capacitance network whose values depend on the filler geometry and loading and whose complexity is associated with the percolation paths. Tunneling effect and capacitive interactions between the individual conductive particles are properly taken into account. The obtained network allows an easy calculation in a wide frequency range of the complex permittivity and others electromagnetic parameters. Moreover, a reliable sensitivity analysis concerning the impact of some crucial parameters, such as the CNTs properties and the dielectric permittivity of the neat resin, on the electromagnetic features of the resulting composites can be carried out. The model predictions are in good agreement with existing experimental data, suggesting that the proposed model can be a useful tool for their design and performance optimization in the microwave range.

  11. A facile approach to prepare porous cup-stacked carbon nanotube with high performance in adsorption of methylene blue.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jiang; Liu, Jie; Jiang, Zhiwei; Wen, Xin; Mijowska, Ewa; Tang, Tao; Chen, Xuecheng

    2015-05-01

    Novel porous cup-stacked carbon nanotube (P-CSCNT) with special stacked morphology consisting of many truncated conical graphene layers was synthesized by KOH activating CSCNT from polypropylene. The morphology, microstructure, textural property, phase structure, surface element composition and thermal stability of P-CSCNT were investigated by field-emission scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope (TEM), high-resolution TEM, N2 sorption, X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermal gravimetric analysis. A part of oblique graphitic layers were etched by KOH, and many holes with a diameter of several to a doze of nanometers connecting inner tube with outside were formed, which endowed P-CSCNT with high specific surface area (558.7 m(2)/g), large pore volume (1.993 cm(3)/g) and abundant surface functional groups. Subsequently, P-CSCNT was used for adsorption of methylene blue (MB) from wastewater. Langmuir model closely fitted the adsorption results, and the maximum adsorption capacity of P-CSCNT was as high as 319.1mg/g. This was ascribed to multiple adsorption mechanisms including pore filling, hydrogen bonding, π-π and electrostatic interactions. Pseudo second-order kinetic model was more valid to describe the adsorption behavior. Besides, P-CSCNT showed good recyclablity and reusability. These results demonstrated that P-CSCNT had potential application in wastewater treatment.

  12. Carbon nanotube composite materials

    DOEpatents

    O'Bryan, Gregory; Skinner, Jack L; Vance, Andrew; Yang, Elaine Lai; Zifer, Thomas

    2015-03-24

    A material consisting essentially of a vinyl thermoplastic polymer, un-functionalized carbon nanotubes and hydroxylated carbon nanotubes dissolved in a solvent. Un-functionalized carbon nanotube concentrations up to 30 wt % and hydroxylated carbon nanotube concentrations up to 40 wt % can be used with even small concentrations of each (less than 2 wt %) useful in producing enhanced conductivity properties of formed thin films.

  13. Hybridization-modulated ion fluxes through peptide-nucleic-acid- functionalized gold nanotubes. A new approach to quantitative label-free DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Jágerszki, Gyula; Gyurcsányi, Róbert E; Höfler, Lajos; Pretsch, Ernö

    2007-06-01

    The inner walls of gold nanotubes, prepared by template synthesis in the nanopores of polycarbonate track etch membranes, have been chemically modified with peptide nucleic acid (PNA) and used for label-free quantification of complementary DNA sequences. Selective binding of DNA to the PNA-modified nanotubes is shown to decrease the flux of optically detected anionic markers through the nanotubes in a concentration-dependent manner. The strong dependence of the biorecognition-modulated ion transport through the nanopores on the ionic strength suggests a dominantly electrostatic exclusion mechanism of the ion flux decrease as a result of DNA binding to the PNA-modified nanopores.

  14. A facile approach towards increasing the nitrogen-content in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via halogenated catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ombaka, L. M.; Ndungu, P. G.; Omondi, B.; McGettrick, J. D.; Davies, M. L.; Nyamori, V. O.

    2016-03-01

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been synthesized at 850 °C via a CVD deposition technique by use of three ferrocenyl derivative catalysts, i.e. para-CN, -CF3 and -Cl substituted-phenyl rings. The synthesized catalysts have been characterized by NMR, IR, HR-MS and XRD. The XRD analysis of the para-CF3 catalyst indicates that steric factors influence the X-ray structure of 1,1‧-ferrocenylphenyldiacrylonitriles. Acetonitrile or pyridine was used as carbon and nitrogen sources to yield mixtures of N-CNTs and carbon spheres (CS). The N-CNTs obtained from the para-CF3 catalysts, in pyridine, have the highest nitrogen-doping level, show a helical morphology and are less thermally stable compared with those synthesized by use of the para-CN and -Cl as catalyst. This suggests that fluorine heteroatoms enhance nitrogen-doping in N-CNTs and formation of helical-N-CNTs (H-N-CNTs). The para-CF3 and para-Cl catalysts in acetonitrile yielded iron-filled N-CNTs, indicating that halogens promote encapsulation of iron into the cavity of N-CNT. The use of acetonitrile, as carbon and nitrogen source, with the para-CN and -Cl as catalysts also yielded a mixture of N-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), with less abundance of CNFs in the products obtained using para-Cl catalysts. However, para-CF3 catalyst in acetonitrile gave N-CNTs as the only shaped carbon nanomaterials.

  15. Oscillating carbon nanotori along carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilder, Tamsyn A.; Hill, James M.

    2007-03-01

    The discovery of carbon nanostructures, such as nanotubes and C60 fullerenes, has given rise to a number of potential nanoscale devices. One such device is the gigahertz oscillator, comprising an inner shell sliding inside an outer shell of a multiwalled carbon nanotube, and which, at least theoretically, generates oscillatory frequencies in the gigahertz range. Following the concept of these gigahertz oscillators and the recent discovery of “fullerene crop circles,” here we propose the notion of a nanotorus-nanotube oscillator comprising a carbon nanotorus which is sucked by the van der Waals force onto the carbon nanotube, and subsequently oscillates along the nanotube axis due to the equal and opposite pulselike forces acting at either end of the nanotube. Assuming a continuum approach, where the interatomic interactions are replaced by uniform atomic surface densities, and assuming that the geometry of the nanotube and nanotorus is such that the nanotorus always remains symmetrically situated around the nanotube, we present the basic mechanics of such a system, including the determination of the suction and acceptance energies, and the frequency of the resulting oscillatory motion. In contrast to the previously studied gigahertz nanoscale oscillators, here the oscillatory frequencies are shown to be in the megahertz range. Our study, although purely theoretical must necessarily precede any experimental implementation of such oscillatory systems.

  16. Sacrificial template method of fabricating a nanotube

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yi-Ying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2007-05-01

    Methods of fabricating uniform nanotubes are described in which nanotubes were synthesized as sheaths over nanowire templates, such as using a chemical vapor deposition process. For example, single-crystalline zinc oxide (ZnO) nanowires are utilized as templates over which gallium nitride (GaN) is epitaxially grown. The ZnO templates are then removed, such as by thermal reduction and evaporation. The completed single-crystalline GaN nanotubes preferably have inner diameters ranging from 30 nm to 200 nm, and wall thicknesses between 5 and 50 nm. Transmission electron microscopy studies show that the resultant nanotubes are single-crystalline with a wurtzite structure, and are oriented along the <001> direction. The present invention exemplifies single-crystalline nanotubes of materials with a non-layered crystal structure. Similar "epitaxial-casting" approaches could be used to produce arrays and single-crystalline nanotubes of other solid materials and semiconductors. Furthermore, the fabrication of multi-sheath nanotubes are described as well as nanotubes having multiple longitudinal segments.

  17. Effective reinforcement in carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Ciselli, P; Kuznetsov, E; Peijs, T; Barber, A H

    2008-05-13

    Carbon nanotubes have mechanical properties that are far in excess of conventional fibrous materials used in engineering polymer composites. Effective reinforcement of polymers using carbon nanotubes is difficult due to poor dispersion and alignment of the nanotubes along the same axis as the applied force during composite loading. This paper reviews the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes and their polymer composites to highlight how many previously prepared composites do not effectively use the excellent mechanical behaviour of the reinforcement. Nanomechanical tests using atomic force microscopy are carried out on simple uniaxially aligned carbon nanotube-reinforced polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fibres prepared using electrospinning processes. Dispersion of the carbon nanotubes within the polymer is achieved using a surfactant. Young's modulus of these simple composites is shown to approach theoretically predicted values, indicating that the carbon nanotubes are effective reinforcements. However, the use of dispersant is also shown to lower Young's modulus of the electrospun PVA fibres.

  18. Interactions of End-Functionalized Nanotubes with Lipid Vesicles: Spontaneous Insertion and Nanotube Self-organization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutt, Meenakshi; Kuksenok, Olga; Nayhouse, Michael; Little, Steven R.; Balazs, Anna C.

    2011-03-01

    Via Dissipative Particle Dynamics (DPD) approach, we study the self-assembly of amphiphilic nanotubes into a lipid vesicle, which is immersed in a hydrophilic solvent. Individual lipids are composed of a hydrophilic head group and two hydrophobic tails. Each nanotube encompasses an ABA architecture, with a hydrophobic shaft (B) and two hydrophilic ends (A). To allow controlled transport through the nanotube, we also introduce hydrophilic tethers at one end of the tube. We show that nanotubes initially located in the outer solvent spontaneously penetrate the vesicle's membrane and assume a trans-membrane position, with the hydrophilic tethers extending from the surface of the vesicle. We add nanotubes one at a time after the previous nanotube has been inserted. We characterize the interactions among the nanotubes that have self-assembled into the vesicles' membrane and focus on their clustering within the membrane. We also show that the nanotube insertion and clustering within the vesicle strongly affects the vesicle shape in cases of a sufficiently large number of tubes. Ultimately, these nanotube-lipid systems can be used for making hybrid controlled release vesicles.

  19. New Approach to Create TiO2(B)/Carbon Core/Shell Nanotubes: Ideal Structure for Enhanced Lithium Ion Storage.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xiaoyi; Yang, Xianfeng; Lv, Chunxiao; Guo, Shaojun; Li, Jianjiang; Zheng, Zhanfeng; Zhu, Huaiyong; Yang, Dongjiang

    2016-07-27

    To achieve uniform carbon coating on TiO2 nanomaterials, high temperature (>500 °C) annealing treatment is a necessity. However, the annealing treatment inevitably leads to the strong phase transformation from TiO2(B) with high lithium ion storage (LIS) capacity to anatase with low LIS one as well as the damage of nanostructures. Herein, we demonstrate a new approach to create TiO2(B)/carbon core/shell nanotubes (C@TBNTs) using a long-chain silane polymethylhydrosiloxane (PMHS) to bind the TBNTs by forming Si-O-Ti bonds. The key feature of this work is that the introduction of PMHS onto TBNTs can afford TBNTs with very high thermal stability at higher than 700 °C and inhibit the phase transformation from TiO2(B) to anatase. Such a high thermal property of PMHS-TBNTs makes them easily coated with highly graphitic carbon shell via CVD process at 700 °C. The as-prepared C@TBNTs deliver outstanding rate capability and electrochemical stability, i.e., reversible capacity above 250 mAh g(-1) at 10 C and a high specific capacity of 479.2 mAh g(-1) after 1000 cycles at 1 C. As far as we know, the LIS performance of our sample is the highest among the previously reported TiO2(B) anode materials.

  20. A facile approach for the fabrication of highly stable superhydrophobic cotton fabric with multi-walled carbon nanotubes-azide polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Li, Guang; Wang, Hu; Zheng, Haiting; Bai, Ruke

    2010-05-18

    Homogeneous dispersion and functionalization of pristine multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs) in various organic solvents was achieved by a simple ultrasonic process in the presence of an azide copolymer, poly(4-azidophenyl methacrylate-co-methyl acrylate)(P(APM-co-MA)). The copolymes were noncovalently attached to the surface of the MWNTs via pi-pi interactions to form MWNT-P(APM-co-MA) composites. The composites were characterized by transmission electron microscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, Raman spectra and UV-vis spectra. The solution dispersion of the MWNT-P(APM-co-MA) composites were used to prepare superhydrophobic cotton fabric by a facile dip-coating approach. MWNTs were covalently attached to the surface of the cotton fabric through the chemical reactions between the azide groups of P(APM-co-MA) with both MWNTs and cotton fibers. The reactions are based on UV-activated nitrene chemistry. Owing to the nanoscale roughness introduced by the attachment of MWNTs, the cotton fabric surface was transformed from hydrophilic to superhydrophobic with an apparent water contact angle of 154 degrees . Since MWNTs were covalently attached on the surface of the cotton fabric, the superhydrophobicity possesses high stability and chemical durability.

  1. A facile approach towards increasing the nitrogen-content in nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes via halogenated catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Ombaka, L.M.; Ndungu, P.G.; Omondi, B.; McGettrick, J.D.; Davies, M.L.; Nyamori, V.O.

    2016-03-15

    Nitrogen-doped carbon nanotubes (N-CNTs) have been synthesized at 850 °C via a CVD deposition technique by use of three ferrocenyl derivative catalysts, i.e. para-CN, -CF{sub 3} and -Cl substituted-phenyl rings. The synthesized catalysts have been characterized by NMR, IR, HR-MS and XRD. The XRD analysis of the para-CF{sub 3} catalyst indicates that steric factors influence the X-ray structure of 1,1′-ferrocenylphenyldiacrylonitriles. Acetonitrile or pyridine was used as carbon and nitrogen sources to yield mixtures of N-CNTs and carbon spheres (CS). The N-CNTs obtained from the para-CF{sub 3} catalysts, in pyridine, have the highest nitrogen-doping level, show a helical morphology and are less thermally stable compared with those synthesized by use of the para-CN and -Cl as catalyst. This suggests that fluorine heteroatoms enhance nitrogen-doping in N-CNTs and formation of helical-N-CNTs (H-N-CNTs). The para-CF{sub 3} and para-Cl catalysts in acetonitrile yielded iron-filled N-CNTs, indicating that halogens promote encapsulation of iron into the cavity of N-CNT. The use of acetonitrile, as carbon and nitrogen source, with the para-CN and -Cl as catalysts also yielded a mixture of N-CNTs and carbon nanofibres (CNFs), with less abundance of CNFs in the products obtained using para-Cl catalysts. However, para-CF{sub 3} catalyst in acetonitrile gave N-CNTs as the only shaped carbon nanomaterials. - Graphical abstract: Graphical abstract showing the synthesis of N-CNTs using halogenated-ferrocenyl derivatives as catalyst with pyridine or acetonitrile as nitrogen and carbon sources via the chemical vapour deposition technique. - Highlights: • N-CNTs were synthesized from halogenated ferrocenyl catalysts. • Halogenated catalysts promote nitrogen-doping and pyridinic nitrogen in N-CNTs. • Halogenated catalysts facilitate iron filling of N-CNTs.

  2. Facile approach to prepare porous CaSnO₃ nanotubes via a single spinneret electrospinning technique as anodes for lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Li, Linlin; Peng, Shengjie; Wang, Jin; Cheah, Yan Ling; Teh, Peifen; Ko, Yahwen; Wong, Chuiling; Srinivasan, Madhavi

    2012-11-01

    CaSnO₃ nanotubes are successfully prepared by a single spinneret electrospinning technique. The characterized results indicate that the well-crystallized one-dimensional (1D) CaSnO₃ nanostructures consist of about 10 nm nanocrystals, which interconnect to form nanofibers, nanotubes, and ruptured nanobelts after calcination. The diameter and wall thickness of CaSnO₃ nanotubes are about 180 and 40 nm, respectively. It is demonstrated that CaSnO₃ nanofiber, nanotubes, and ruptured nanobelts can be obtained by adjusting the calcination temperature in the range of 600-800 °C. The effect of calcination temperature on the morphologies of electrospun 1D CaSnO₃ nanostructures and the formation mechanism leading to 1D CaSnO₃ nanostructures are investigated. As anodes for lithium ion batteries, CaSnO₃ nanotubes exhibit superior electrochemical performance and deliver 1168 mAh g⁻¹ of initial discharge capacity and 565 mAh g⁻¹ of discharge capacity up to the 50th cycle, which is ascribed to the hollow interior structure of 1D CaSnO₃ nanotubes. Such porous nanotubular structure provides both buffer spaces for volume change during charging/discharging and rapid lithium ion transport, resulting in excellent electrochemical performance.

  3. Functionalized boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Sainsbury, Toby; Ikuno, Takashi; Zettl, Alexander K

    2014-04-22

    A plasma treatment has been used to modify the surface of BNNTs. In one example, the surface of the BNNT has been modified using ammonia plasma to include amine functional groups. Amine functionalization allows BNNTs to be soluble in chloroform, which had not been possible previously. Further functionalization of amine-functionalized BNNTs with thiol-terminated organic molecules has also been demonstrated. Gold nanoparticles have been self-assembled at the surface of both amine- and thiol-functionalized boron nitride Nanotubes (BNNTs) in solution. This approach constitutes a basis for the preparation of highly functionalized BNNTs and for their utilization as nanoscale templates for assembly and integration with other nanoscale materials.

  4. Implementation of a safe-by-design approach in the development of new open pilot lines for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López de Ipiña, Jesús M.; Hernan, Angel; Cenigaonaindia, Xabier; Insunza, Mario; Florez, Sonia; Seddon, Richard; Vavouliotis, Antonios; Kostopoulos, Vasilios; Latko, Paulina; Durałek, Paweł; Kchit, Nadir

    2017-06-01

    The project PLATFORM (H2020, GA 646307) aims to develop three new pilot lines (PPLs) for the manufacture of carbon nanotube-based nano-enabled products (buckypapers, treated prepregs, doped veils), for the European aeronautics and automotive industries (a Technology Readiness Level 6 - TRL6 - is expected at the end of the project). The Machinery Directive 2006/42/EC (MD) - transposed into the respective national legislations - is the European regulatory framework for the design and construction of new machinery, as the future PPLs. PPLs are not required to comply with the provisions of the MD until they are put into service - expected in 2020, after project completion - but then, the MD will be fully applicable. In this regulatory context, the project PLATFORM is aligning the design of the PPLs according to the MD requirements, in order to facilitate the CE marking in 2020 (TRL9) and avoid potential economic costs associated with future re-adaptations or modifications needed to ensure compliance with the MD. This paper discusses the methodological approach followed by the project PLATFORM to integrate all the nanosafety aspects in the design of the PPLs, in order to achieve safe designs in conformity with the relevant Essential Health and Safety Requirements (EHSRs) of the MD. Since machinery must be designed and constructed taking into account the results of the risk assessment (RA), this paper describes the systematic and iterative approach for RA and risk reduction followed to eliminate hazards as far practicable and to adequately reduce risks by the implementation of protective measures. This process has been guided by the harmonized standards EN ISO 12100 and EN ISO 14123, taking the relevant phases of life cycle, expected uses and operation modes of the PPLs into account. A specific tool to guide the safe design of the PPLs and facilitate the RA process has also been produced by the project (PLATFORM - SbD toolkit).

  5. Carbon nanotubes: Synthesis, integration and properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Jing

    Ever since their discovery in 1991, carbon nanotubes have captured the attention of researchers worldwide due to their remarkable structural, electrical and mechanical properties. They not only offer an ideal playground for fundamental research but also render great potential for all kinds of applications, including future electronic devices, sensors, exceptionally strong materials, flat-panel displays, hydrogen fuel cells, and so on. This thesis reports the study of nanotube properties and some of its applications. It is divided into three parts: (1) The chemical synthesis of individual single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) via chemical vapor deposition of methane; (2) the integration of individual SWNT into electronic circuits; (3) The studies on the electrical properties of these nanotubes, and the exploration of their potential applications. In order to facilitate the studies and applications of nanotubes, great efforts have been made towards their synthesis and production. Our approach is the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method, through which we can produce individual SWNTs with high quality and high yield. However, the nanotubes produced directly using CVD (and other methods like laser ablation and arc discharge) are always tangled and bundled up together, and buried inside the graphitized bulk catalyst, which renders the manipulation and characterization a difficult task. We solved this problem by combining the chemical synthesis and conventional nanofabrication techniques together with selectively growing nanotubes at specific sites. Therefore, individual carbon nanotubes can be easily integrated into electrical circuits. Theoretical studies have shown nanotubes possess unique electronic properties; a SWNT be metallic, semiconducting or semi-metallic depending on its helicity. In our experimental studies we have observed all the 3 types of behaviors and confirmed the theoretical predictions. We also investigated the realization of various nanotube functional

  6. Direct synthesis of single-walled aminoaluminosilicate nanotubes with enhanced molecular adsorption selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dun-Yen; Brunelli, Nicholas A.; Yucelen, G. Ipek; Venkatasubramanian, Anandram; Zang, Ji; Leisen, Johannes; Hesketh, Peter J.; Jones, Christopher W.; Nair, Sankar

    2014-02-01

    Internal functionalization of single-walled nanotubes is an attractive, yet difficult challenge in nanotube materials chemistry. Here we report single-walled metal oxide nanotubes with covalently bonded primary amine moieties on their inner wall, synthesized through a one-step approach. Conclusive molecular-level structural information on the amine-functionalized nanotubes is obtained through multiple solid-state techniques. The amine-functionalized nanotubes maintain a high carbon dioxide adsorption capacity while significantly suppressing the adsorption of methane and nitrogen, thereby leading to a large enhancement in adsorption selectivity over unfunctionalized nanotubes (up to four-fold for carbon dioxide/methane and ten-fold for carbon dioxide/nitrogen). The successful synthesis of single-walled nanotubes with functional, covalently-bound organic moieties may open up possibilities for new nanotube-based applications that are currently inaccessible to carbon nanotubes and other related materials.

  7. Chemical functionalization of carbon nanotubes for the mechanical reinforcement of polystyrene composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Michele T.; McNamee, William P.; Gun'ko, Yurii K.

    2008-10-01

    An organometallic approach was used to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes with n-butyllithium. This procedure was repeated two more times to achieve a higher degree of multiwalled carbon nanotube functionalization. The functionalized nanotubes have been characterized by Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, thermogravimetrical analysis, scanning electron microscopy and sedimentation studies. It was possible to form stable suspensions of the functionalized nanotubes in tetrahydrofuran and they were used to make nanotube polymer composites. The mechanical properties of these new nanotube polymer composites were tested and they were found to show an increase of up to 25% in their Young's moduli and up to 50% in their tensile strength over pure polystyrene.

  8. A multi-wall carbon nanotube tower electrochemical actuator.

    PubMed

    Yun, YeoHeung; Shanov, Vesselin; Tu, Yi; Schulz, Mark J; Yarmolenko, Sergey; Neralla, Sudhir; Sankar, Jag; Subramaniam, Srinivas

    2006-04-01

    Patterned multiwall carbon nanotube arrays up to four millimeters long were synthesized using chemical vapor deposition. Electrochemical actuation of a nanotube array tower was demonstrated in a 2 M NaCl solution at frequencies up to 10 Hz with 0.15% strain using a 2 V square wave excitation. The synthesis and electrochemical modeling approach outlined in the paper provide a foundation for the design of nanotube smart materials that actuate and are load bearing.

  9. Single-crystal gallium nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Goldberger, Joshua; He, Rongrui; Zhang, Yanfeng; Lee, Sangkwon; Yan, Haoquan; Choi, Heon-Jin; Yang, Peidong

    2003-04-10

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes in 1991 (ref. 1), there have been significant research efforts to synthesize nanometre-scale tubular forms of various solids. The formation of tubular nanostructure generally requires a layered or anisotropic crystal structure. There are reports of nanotubes made from silica, alumina, silicon and metals that do not have a layered crystal structure; they are synthesized by using carbon nanotubes and porous membranes as templates, or by thin-film rolling. These nanotubes, however, are either amorphous, polycrystalline or exist only in ultrahigh vacuum. The growth of single-crystal semiconductor hollow nanotubes would be advantageous in potential nanoscale electronics, optoelectronics and biochemical-sensing applications. Here we report an 'epitaxial casting' approach for the synthesis of single-crystal GaN nanotubes with inner diameters of 30-200 nm and wall thicknesses of 5-50 nm. Hexagonal ZnO nanowires were used as templates for the epitaxial overgrowth of thin GaN layers in a chemical vapour deposition system. The ZnO nanowire templates were subsequently removed by thermal reduction and evaporation, resulting in ordered arrays of GaN nanotubes on the substrates. This templating process should be applicable to many other semiconductor systems.

  10. Structure, stability and elasticity of DNA nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Himanshu; Dwaraknath, Anjan; Maiti, Prabal K

    2015-01-14

    DNA nanotubes are tubular structures composed of DNA crossover molecules. We present a bottom up approach for the construction and characterization of these structures. Various possible topologies of nanotubes are constructed such as 6-helix, 8-helix and tri-tubes with different sequences and lengths. We have used fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations to study the structure, stability and elasticity of these structures. Several nanosecond long MD simulations give the microscopic details about DNA nanotubes. Based on the structural analysis of simulation data, we show that 6-helix nanotubes are stable and maintain their tubular structure; while 8-helix nanotubes are flattened to stabilize themselves. We also comment on the sequence dependence and the effect of overhangs. These structures are approximately four times more rigid having a stretch modulus of ∼4000 pN compared to the stretch modulus of 1000 pN of a DNA double helix molecule of the same length and sequence. The stretch moduli of these nanotubes are also three times larger than those of PX/JX crossover DNA molecules which have stretch moduli in the range of 1500-2000 pN. The calculated persistence length is in the range of a few microns which is close to the reported experimental results on certain classes of DNA nanotubes.

  11. Nanotube-grafted polyacrylamide hydrogels for electrophoretic protein separation.

    PubMed

    Gunavadhi, Murugappan; Maria, Lourdusamy Arul Antony; Chamundeswari, Vidya N; Parthasarathy, Meera

    2012-04-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotube-modified polyacrylamide gels have been employed for the electrophoretic separation of proteins. Two approaches are compared in this investigation, one using nanotubes only as fillers inside the gel matrix and the other using nanotubes as catalyst for polymerization of acrylamide. In both the cases, polymerization of acryl-amide/bisacrylamide has been carried out in situ in the presence of nanotubes dispersed in the gel buffer containing monomer and cross-linker. In the former case, initiator and catalyst have been added after ultrasonication of nanotubes in the gel buffer mixture where the nanotubes play the role of filler. On the other hand, the second approach precludes use of catalyst and involves addition of initiator alone during ultrasonication of nanotubes in the gel buffer containing monomer and cross-linker, which leads to the formation of nanotube-grafted gel after 25 min. When nanotubes are used as a catalyst instead of N,N,N',N'-tetramethylethylenediamine, pore size distribution of the gel matrix and linearity of molecular weight calibration plots are found to be improved. In addition, other issues associated with the use of an external catalyst like handling the moisture-sensitive and corrosive reagent and associated irreproducibility are addressed in this approach.

  12. Self-standing silicon-carbon nanotube/graphene by a scalable in situ approach from low-cost Al-Si alloy powder for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Hongyan; Han, Kai; Jiang, Heng; Wang, Jingwen; Liu, Hui

    2017-10-01

    Silicon/carbon (Si/C) composite shows great potential to replace graphite as lithium-ion battery (LIB) anode owing to its high theoretical capacity. Exploring low-cost scalable approach for synthesizing Si/C composites with excellent electrochemical performance is critical for practical application of Si/C anodes. In this study, we rationally applied a scalable in situ approach to produce Si-carbon nanotube (Si-CNT) composite via acid etching of commercial inexpensive micro-sized Al-Si alloy powder and CNT mixture. In the Si-CNT composite, ∼10 nm Si particles were uniformly deposited on the CNT surface. After combining with graphene sheets, a flexible self-standing Si-CNT/graphene paper was fabricated with three-dimensional (3D) sandwich-like structure. The in situ presence of CNT during acid-etching process shows remarkable two advantages: providing deposition sites for Si atoms to restrain agglomeration of Si nanoparticles after Al removal from Al-Si alloy powder, increasing the cross-layer conductivity of the paper anode to provide excellent conductive contact sites for each Si nanoparticles. When used as binder-free anode for LIBs without any further treatment, in situ addition of CNT especially plays important role to improve the initial electrochemical activity of Si nanoparticles synthesized from low-cost Al-Si alloy powder, thus resulting in about twice higher capacity than Si/G paper anode. The self-standing Si-CNT/graphene paper anode exhibited a high specific capacity of 1100 mAh g-1 even after 100 cycles at 200 mA g-1 current density with a Coulombic efficiency of >99%. It also showed remarkable rate capability improvement compared to Si/G paper without CNT. The present work demonstrates a low-cost scalable in situ approach from commercial micro-sized Al-Si alloy powder for Si-based composites with specific nanostructure. The Si-CNT/graphene paper is a promising anode candidate with high capacity and cycling stability for LIBs, especially for the

  13. Carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifeng; Lin, Yuehe; Yantasee, Wassana; Liu, Guodong; Lu, Fang; Tu, Yi

    2008-11-18

    The present invention relates to microelectode arrays (MEAs), and more particularly to carbon nanotube nanoelectrode arrays (CNT-NEAs) for chemical and biological sensing, and methods of use. A nanoelectrode array includes a carbon nanotube material comprising an array of substantially linear carbon nanotubes each having a proximal end and a distal end, the proximal end of the carbon nanotubes are attached to a catalyst substrate material so as to form the array with a pre-determined site density, wherein the carbon nanotubes are aligned with respect to one another within the array; an electrically insulating layer on the surface of the carbon nanotube material, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the electrically insulating layer; a second adhesive electrically insulating layer on the surface of the electrically insulating layer, whereby the distal end of the carbon nanotubes extend beyond the second adhesive electrically insulating layer; and a metal wire attached to the catalyst substrate material.

  14. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korneva, Guzeliya

    Carbon nanotubes have unique properties that make them attractive for different engineering applications. However, because of their chemical inertness, carbon nanotubes have to be functionalized in order to acquire additional physico-chemical properties. Large multiwalled carbon nanotubes are different from fullerenes and singlewalled nanotubes because the stresses in their walls are almost relaxed while most chemical methods for fullerene functionalization exploit this effect of stressed bonds. The objective of this work is to develop new methods for functionalization of multiwalled carbon nanotubes. This work is dedicated to study two functionalization methods. The first deals with physico-chemical functionalization by filling the nanotube interior with colloidal suspensions. Irreversible adsorption of functional nanoparticles on the nanotube wall leads to the nanotube functionalization. The second method is purely chemical functionalization, which uses the reaction of cyclopropanation to break pi-bonds in the benzene rings of the nanotubes with formation of new σ-bonds with deprotonated malonate. This so-called Bingel reaction has been used in fullerene chemistry and in this work was applied for the first time to functionalize multiwalled carbon nanotubes. While capillary filling of carbon nanotubes was known long ago, the research community was skeptical about possibility of engulfing nanoparticles into nanotubes by capillary forces. We developed and implemented capillary method to fill nanotubes with different nanoparticles. Using this method, magnetic carbon nanotubes were produced for the first time. Synthesized nanotubes have very high magnetic moment and allow to manipulate them by magnetic field. These magnetic nanotubes have been successfully used in fabrication of carbon nanotube-tipped pipettes for biological probes. The Bingel reaction was studied on three sets of multiwalled carbon nanotubes with diameters: 20nm, 100nm, and 300nm. To estimate the

  15. Preformed nanoporous carbon nanotube scaffold-based multifunctional polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Oh, Youngseok; Islam, Mohammad F

    2015-04-28

    Multifunctional polymer nanocomposites that simultaneously possess high modulus and strength, high thermal stability, novel optical responses, and high electrical and thermal conductivity have been actively researched. Carbon nanotubes are considered an ideal additive for composites because of their superlative physical, electronic and optical properties. While nanotubes have successfully added electrical conductivity, thermal stability, and novel optical responses to polymers, mechanical reinforcements, although substantial, have been well below any theoretical estimations. Here, we integrated preformed hydrogels and aerogels of individually dispersed nanotubes with polymer to increase elastic modulus of composites according to Halpin-Tsai model up to at least 25 vol % of nanotubes. Our solution-based fabrication method allowed us to create bulk composites with tunable form-factors, and with polymers that were incompatible with nanotubes. Further, in this approach, nanotubes were not covalently linked among themselves and to the polymer, so intrinsic optical, electrical, and thermal properties of nanotubes could be exploited. The optically active nanotubes, for example, added a strain-dependent, spatially resolved fluorescence to these composites. Finally, the nanoporous nanotube networks suppressed the polymer glass transition and extended the mechanical integrity of polymer well above its polymer melting point, and both the nanotubes and polymer remained thermally stable above their decomposition temperatures.

  16. Increased metallicity of Carbon nanotubes because of incorporation of extended Stone-Wales' defects: an ab-initio real space approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Sujoy; Sadhukhan, Banasree; Chaudhuri, Chhanda Basu; Chakrabarty, Srabani; Mookerjee, Abhijit

    2017-03-01

    We propose an ab-initio combination of the Linear Muffin-Tin Orbital and the Recursion Methods to study the effect of extended Stone-Wales defects in single layer Carbon nanotubes. We have successfully applied this to zigzag and armchair tubes. The methodology involves no intrinsic mean-field like assumptions or external parameter fitting. As defects proliferate, the low density of states near the Fermi levels of the pristine tubes is filled with defect states. The increase of DOS at the Fermi level leads to enhanced conduction, which indicates enhanced metallicity due to SW defects in the nanotubes.

  17. Engineered Carbon Nanotube Materials for High-Q Nanomechanical Resonators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Daniel S.; Hunt, Brian; Bronikowski, Mike; Epp, Larry; Hoenk, Michael; Hoppe, Dan; Kowalczyk, Bob; Wong, Eric; Xu, Jimmy; Adam, Douglas; Young, Rob

    2003-01-01

    This document represents a presentation offered by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, with assistance from researchers from Brown University and Northrop Grumman. The presentation took place in Seoul, Korea in July 2003 and attempted to demonstrate the fabrication approach regarding the development of high quality factor (high-Q) mechanical oscillators (in the forms of a tunable nanotube resonator and a nanotube array radio frequency [RF] filter) aimed at signal processing and based on carbon nanotubes. The presentation also addressed parallel efforts to develop both in-plane single nanotube resonators as well as vertical array power devices.

  18. Carbon nanotube catalysts: recent advances in synthesis, characterization and applications.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yibo; Miao, Jianwei; Yang, Zhihong; Xiao, Fang-Xing; Yang, Hong Bin; Liu, Bin; Yang, Yanhui

    2015-05-21

    Carbon nanotubes are promising materials for various applications. In recent years, progress in manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes has been made to achieve the control of bulk and surface properties including the wettability, acid-base properties, adsorption, electric conductivity and capacitance. In order to gain the optimal benefit of carbon nanotubes, comprehensive understanding on manufacturing and functionalizing carbon nanotubes ought to be systematically developed. This review summarizes methodologies of manufacturing carbon nanotubes via arc discharge, laser ablation and chemical vapor deposition and functionalizing carbon nanotubes through surface oxidation and activation, doping of heteroatoms, halogenation, sulfonation, grafting, polymer coating, noncovalent functionalization and nanoparticle attachment. The characterization techniques detecting the bulk nature and surface properties as well as the effects of various functionalization approaches on modifying the surface properties for specific applications in catalysis including heterogeneous catalysis, photocatalysis, photoelectrocatalysis and electrocatalysis are highlighted.

  19. Automated manipulation of carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Wu, Sen; Fu, Xing

    2013-01-01

    The manipulation of carbon nanotubes is an important and essential step for carbon-based nanodevice or nanocircuit assembly. However, the conventional push-and-image approach of manipulating carbon nanotubes using atomic force microscopy has low efficiency on account of the reduplicated scanning process during manipulation. In this article, an automated manipulation system is designed and tested. This automated manipulation system, which includes an atomic force microscope platform and a self-developed computer program for one-dimensional manipulation, is capable of automatically moving any assigned individual carbon nanotube to a defined target location without any intermediate scanning procedure. To demonstrate the high-efficiency of this automated manipulation system and its potential applications in nanoassembly, two experiments were conducted. The first experiment used this system to manipulate a carbon nanotube to a defined target location. In the second experiment, this system was used to automatically manipulate several carbon nanotubes for generating and translating a defined pattern of nanotubes.

  20. Fast readout of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meerwaldt, Harold; Singh, Vibhor; Schneider, Ben; Schouten, Raymond; van der Zant, Herre; Steele, Gary

    2013-03-01

    We perform fast readout measurements of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators. Using an electronic mixing scheme, we can detect the amplitude of the mechanical motion with an intermediate frequency (IF) of 46 MHz and a timeconstant of 1 us, up to 5 orders of magnitude faster than before. Previous measurements suffered from a low bandwidth due to the combination of the high resistance of the carbon nanotube and a large stray capacitance. We have increased the bandwidth significantly by using a high-impedance, close-proximity HEMT amplifier. The increased bandwidth should allow us to observe the nanotube's thermal motion and its transient response, approaching the regime of real-time detection of the carbon nanotube's mechanical motion.

  1. Self-Cleaning Glass of Photocatalytic Anatase TiO2@Carbon Nanotubes Thin Film by Polymer-Assisted Approach.

    PubMed

    Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Cong, Shan; Cao, Yingjie; Wang, Yun; Sun, Yinghui; Lou, Yanhui; Zhao, Jie; Wu, Jiang; Zou, Guifu

    2016-12-01

    Due to the good photocatalytic activity, the TiO2@CNTs thin film is highly desirable to apply to the self-cleaning glass for green intelligent building. Here, the TiO2@CNTs thin film has been successfully achieved by polymer-assisted approach of an aqueous chemical solution method. The polymer, polyethylenimine, aims to combine the Ti(4+) with CNTs for film formation of TiO2@CNTs. The resultant thin film was uniform, highly transparent, and super-hydrophilic. Owing to fast electron transport and effectively hindering electron-hole recombination, the TiO2@CNTs thin film has nearly twofold photocatalytic performance than pure TiO2. The TiO2@CNTs thin films show a good application for self-cleaning glasses.

  2. Self-Cleaning Glass of Photocatalytic Anatase TiO2@Carbon Nanotubes Thin Film by Polymer-Assisted Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Qinghua; Wang, Hao; Cong, Shan; Cao, Yingjie; Wang, Yun; Sun, Yinghui; Lou, Yanhui; Zhao, Jie; Wu, Jiang; Zou, Guifu

    2016-10-01

    Due to the good photocatalytic activity, the TiO2@CNTs thin film is highly desirable to apply to the self-cleaning glass for green intelligent building. Here, the TiO2@CNTs thin film has been successfully achieved by polymer-assisted approach of an aqueous chemical solution method. The polymer, polyethylenimine, aims to combine the Ti4+ with CNTs for film formation of TiO2@CNTs. The resultant thin film was uniform, highly transparent, and super-hydrophilic. Owing to fast electron transport and effectively hindering electron-hole recombination, the TiO2@CNTs thin film has nearly twofold photocatalytic performance than pure TiO2. The TiO2@CNTs thin films show a good application for self-cleaning glasses.

  3. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2004-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  4. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composite Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, Gregory M.; Harik, Vasyl M.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Gates, Thomas S.

    2001-01-01

    In this study, a technique has been proposed for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Since the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties of the SWNT/polymer composites can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber retains the local molecular structure and bonding information and serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube sizes and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyethylene composite systems, one with continuous and aligned SWNT and the other with discontinuous and randomly aligned nanotubes.

  5. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube shapes, sizes, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/LaRC-SI (with a PmPV interface) composite systems, one with aligned SWNTs and the other with three-dimensionally randomly oriented SWNTs. The Young's modulus and shear modulus have been calculated for the two systems for various nanotube lengths and volume fractions.

  6. Surface oxidation study of single wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebrón-Colón, M.; Meador, M. A.; Lukco, D.; Solá, F.; Santos-Pérez, J.; McCorkle, L. S.

    2011-11-01

    Functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) is desirable to enhance their ability to be incorporated into polymers and enhance their bonding with the matrix. One approach to carbon nanotube functionalization is by oxidation via a strong oxidizing agent or refluxing in strong acids. However, this approach can damage the nanotubes, leading to the introduction of defects and/or shorter nanotubes. Such damage can adversely affect the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties. A more benign approach to nanotube functionalization has been developed involving photo-oxidation. Chemical analysis by XPS revealed that the oxygen content of the photo-oxidized SWCNTs was 11.3 at.% compared to 6.7 at.% for SWCNTs oxidized by acid treatment. The photo-oxidized SWCNTs produced by this method can be used directly in various polymer matrices or can be further modified by additional chemical reactions.

  7. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buranova, Yu. S.; Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-01

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  8. Structure of boron nitride nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Buranova, Yu. S. Kulnitskiy, B. A.; Perezhogin, I. A.; Blank, V. D.

    2015-01-15

    The crystallographic structure of boron nitride nanotubes has been investigated. Various defects that may arise during nanotube synthesis are revealed by electron microscopy. Nanotubes with different numbers of walls and different diameters are modeled by molecular dynamics methods. Structural features of single-wall nanotubes are demonstrated. The causes of certain defects in multiwall nanotubes are indicated.

  9. Advanced carbon nanotubes functionalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setaro, A.

    2017-10-01

    Similar to graphene, carbon nanotubes are materials made of pure carbon in its sp2 form. Their extended conjugated π-network provides them with remarkable quantum optoelectronic properties. Frustratingly, it also brings drawbacks. The π–π stacking interaction makes as-produced tubes bundle together, blurring all their quantum properties. Functionalization aims at modifying and protecting the tubes while hindering π–π stacking. Several functionalization strategies have been developed to circumvent this limitation in order for nanotubes applications to thrive. In this review, we summarize the different approaches established so far, emphasizing the balance between functionalization efficacy and the preservation of the tubes’ properties. Much attention will be given to a functionalization strategy overcoming the covalent–noncovalent dichotomy and to the implementation of two advanced functionalization schemes: (a) conjugation with molecular switches, to yield hybrid nanosystems with chemo-physical properties that can be tuned in a controlled and reversible way, and; (b) plasmonic nanosystems, whose ability to concentrate and enhance the electromagnetic fields can be taken advantage of to enhance the optical response of the tubes.

  10. High frequency nanotube oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Peng, Haibing [Houston, TX; Zettl, Alexander K [Kensington, TX

    2012-02-21

    A tunable nanostructure such as a nanotube is used to make an electromechanical oscillator. The mechanically oscillating nanotube can be provided with inertial clamps in the form of metal beads. The metal beads serve to clamp the nanotube so that the fundamental resonance frequency is in the microwave range, i.e., greater than at least 1 GHz, and up to 4 GHz and beyond. An electric current can be run through the nanotube to cause the metal beads to move along the nanotube and changing the length of the intervening nanotube segments. The oscillator can operate at ambient temperature and in air without significant loss of resonance quality. The nanotube is can be fabricated in a semiconductor style process and the device can be provided with source, drain, and gate electrodes, which may be connected to appropriate circuitry for driving and measuring the oscillation. Novel driving and measuring circuits are also disclosed.

  11. Nanoprocessing and nanomeasurements of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Xiwei

    A piezoelectric nanomanipulator inside a Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) specimen holder has been developed, which is capable of manipulating a probe three-dimensionally in translation ranges wider than 40 mum with a positional control precision better than 0.4 nm, and meanwhile allows applying electrical potential across the probe and a sample. The nanomanipulator in TEM permits handling objects of small size with nanometer resolution under real-time TEM inspection, measuring the mechanical and electrical properties of the sample at specified locations, and, at the same time, analyzing the structures of the sample using various TEM techniques. The nanomanipulator in TEM was exploited as an effective tool to measure the electron transport properties of individual carbon nanotubes in contact with a copper probe, and to process multi-walled carbon nanotubes precisely by varieties of approaches, such as nano-welding, nano-cutting, peeling off the outer shells of multi-walled nanotubes. These approaches provide a controllable and reliable method to tailor carbon nanotubes into highly desirable geometry with an ideal number of the shells for many practical applications. The nanomanipulator in TEM was also used to study the field emission of carbon nanotubes by mounting single characterized nanotubes on the probe as the field emitters. It was found that the effective energy barrier for emitting electrons from nanotube tips is lower than the work function of graphite, which is responsible for the good field emission characteristics of carbon nanotubes as well as their high aspect ratio. The strong attractive interaction between carbon nanotube tips and in-situ carbon nanowire growth induced by a high electrical field were first observed using the nanomanipulator in TEM. Electron holography was employed to investigate the nanoscale features of carbon nanotubes and their particulate derivatives. Reconstructed phase images of holograms offer a quantitative means to

  12. TOPICAL REVIEW: Carbon nanotubes for biological and biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wenrong; Thordarson, Pall; Gooding, J. Justin; Ringer, Simon P.; Braet, Filip

    2007-10-01

    Ever since the discovery of carbon nanotubes, researchers have been exploring their potential in biological and biomedical applications. The recent expansion and availability of chemical modification and bio-functionalization methods have made it possible to generate a new class of bioactive carbon nanotubes which are conjugated with proteins, carbohydrates, or nucleic acids. The modification of a carbon nanotube on a molecular level using biological molecules is essentially an example of the 'bottom-up' fabrication principle of bionanotechnology. The availability of these biomodified carbon nanotube constructs opens up an entire new and exciting research direction in the field of chemical biology, finally aiming to target and to alter the cell's behaviour at the subcellular or molecular level. This review covers the latest advances of bio-functionalized carbon nanotubes with an emphasis on the development of functional biological nano-interfaces. Topics that are discussed herewith include methods for biomodification of carbon nanotubes, the development of hybrid systems of carbon nanotubes and biomolecules for bioelectronics, and carbon nanotubes as transporters for a specific delivery of peptides and/or genetic material to cells. All of these current research topics aim at translating these biotechnology modified nanotubes into potential novel therapeutic approaches.

  13. Fluorescent single walled carbon nanotube/silica composite materials.

    PubMed

    Satishkumar, B C; Doorn, Stephen K; Baker, Gary A; Dattelbaum, Andrew M

    2008-11-25

    We present a new approach for the preparation of single walled carbon nanotube silica composite materials that retain the intrinsic fluorescence characteristics of the encapsulated nanotubes. Incorporation of isolated nanotubes into optically transparent matrices, such as sol-gel prepared silica, to take advantage of their near-infrared emission properties for applications like sensing has been a challenging task. In general, the alcohol solvents and acidic conditions required for typical sol-gel preparations disrupt the nanotube/surfactant assembly and cause the isolated nanotubes to aggregate leading to degradation of their fluorescence properties. To overcome these issues, we have used a sugar alcohol modified silica precursor molecule, diglycerylsilane, for encapsulation of nanotubes in silica under aqueous conditions and at neutral pH. The silica/nanotube composite materials have been prepared as monoliths, at least 5 mm thick, or as films (<1 mm) and were characterized using fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy. In the present work we have investigated the fluorescence characteristics of the silica encapsulated carbon nanotubes by means of redox doping studies as well as demonstrated their potential for biosensing applications. Such nanotube/silica composite systems may allow for new sensing and imaging applications that are not currently achievable.

  14. A New Approach to the Characteristics and Short-Channel Effects of Double-Gate Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect Transistors using MATLAB: A Numerical Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Alireza; Heidari, Niloofar; Jahromi, Foad Khademi; Amiri, Roozbeh; Ghorbani, Mohammadali

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, first, the impact of different gate arrangements on the short-channel effects of carbon nanotube field-effect transistors with doped source and drain with the self-consistent solution of the three-dimensional Poisson equation and the Schr¨odinger equation with open boundary conditions, within the non-equilibrium Green function, is investigated. The results indicate that the double-gate structure possesses a quasi-ideal subthreshold oscillation and an acceptable decrease in the drain induced barrier even for a relatively thick gate oxide (5 nm). Afterward, the electrical characteristics of the double-gate carbon nanotube field-effect transistors (DG-CNTFET) are investigated. The results demonstrate that an increase in diameter and density of the nanotubes in the DG-CNTFET increases the on-state current. Also, as the drain voltage increases, the off-state current of the DG-CNTFET decreases. In addition, regarding the negative gate voltages, for a high drain voltage, increasing in the drain current due to band-to-band tunnelling requires a larger negative gate voltage, and for a low drain voltage, resonant states appear

  15. Decoration of multi-walled carbon nanotubes with metal nanoparticles in supercritical carbon dioxide medium as a novel approach for the modification of screen-printed electrodes.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Virginia; Llorent-Martínez, Eulogio J; Zougagh, Mohammed; Ríos, Angel

    2016-12-01

    A supercritical carbon dioxide medium was used for the decoration of functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) with metallic nanoparticles. This procedure allowed the rapid and simple decoration of carbon nanotubes with the selected metallic nanoparticles. The prepared nanomaterials were used to modify screen-printed electrodes, improving their electrochemical properties and allowing to obtain a wide range of working electrodes based on carbon nanotubes. These electrodes were applied to the amperometric determination of vitamin B6 in food and pharmaceutical samples as an example of the analytical potentiality of the electrodes thus prepared. Using Ru-nanoparticles-MWCNTs as the working electrode, a linear dynamic range between 2.6×10(-6) and 2×10(-4)molL(-1) and a limit of detection of 0.8×10(-6)molL(-1) were obtained. These parameters represented a minimum 3-fold increase in sensitivity compared to the use of bare MWCNTs or other carbon-based working electrodes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Working Toward Nanotube Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arepalli, Sivaram; Nikolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga; Hadjiev, Victor G.; Scott, Carl D.; Files, Bradley S.

    2001-01-01

    One of the most attractive applications of single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) is found in the area of structural materials. Nanotubes have a unique combination of high strength, modulus, and elongation to failure, and therefore have potential to significantly enhance the mechanical properties of today's composites. This is especially attractive for the aerospace industry looking for any chance to save weight. This is why NASA has chosen to tackle this difficult application of SWNT. Nanotube properties differ significantly from that of conventional carbon fibers, and a whole new set of problems, including adhesion and dispersion in the adhesive polymer matrix, must be resolved in order to engineer superior composite materials. From recent work on a variety of applications it is obvious that the wide range of research in nanotubes will lead to advances in physics, chemistry, and engineering. However, the possibility of ultralightweight structures is what causes dreamers to really get excited. One of the important issues in composite engineering is aspect ratio of the fibers, since it affects load transfer in composites. Nanotube length was a gray area for years, since they are formed in bundles, making it impossible to monitor individual nanotube length. Even though bundles are observed to be tens and hundreds of microns long, they can be built of relatively short tubes weakly bound by Van der Waals forces. Nanotube length can be affected by subsequent purification and ultrasound processing, which has been necessary in order to disperse nanotubes and introduce them into a polymer matrix. Some calculations show that nanotubes with 10(exp 5) aspect ratio may be necessary to achieve good load transfer. We show here that nanotubes produced in our laser system are as much as tens of microns long and get cut into lengths of hundreds of nanometers during ultrasound processing. Nanotube length was measured by AFM on pristine nanotube specimens as well, as after sonication

  17. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-02-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity--unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  18. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube

    PubMed Central

    Qin, F.; Shi, W.; Ideue, T.; Yoshida, M.; Zak, A.; Tenne, R.; Kikitsu, T.; Inoue, D.; Hashizume, D.; Iwasa, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity—unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures. PMID:28205518

  19. Superconductivity in a chiral nanotube.

    PubMed

    Qin, F; Shi, W; Ideue, T; Yoshida, M; Zak, A; Tenne, R; Kikitsu, T; Inoue, D; Hashizume, D; Iwasa, Y

    2017-02-16

    Chirality of materials are known to affect optical, magnetic and electric properties, causing a variety of nontrivial phenomena such as circular dichiroism for chiral molecules, magnetic Skyrmions in chiral magnets and nonreciprocal carrier transport in chiral conductors. On the other hand, effect of chirality on superconducting transport has not been known. Here we report the nonreciprocity of superconductivity-unambiguous evidence of superconductivity reflecting chiral structure in which the forward and backward supercurrent flows are not equivalent because of inversion symmetry breaking. Such superconductivity is realized via ionic gating in individual chiral nanotubes of tungsten disulfide. The nonreciprocal signal is significantly enhanced in the superconducting state, being associated with unprecedented quantum Little-Parks oscillations originating from the interference of supercurrent along the circumference of the nanotube. The present results indicate that the nonreciprocity is a viable approach toward the superconductors with chiral or noncentrosymmetric structures.

  20. Applications of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Zhou, Otto Z.

    Carbon nanotubes have attracted the fancy of many scientists worldwide. The small dimensions, strength and the remarkable physical properties of these structures make them a very unique material with a whole range of promising applications. In this review we describe some of the important materials science applications of carbon nanotubes. Specifically we discuss the electronic and electrochemical applications of nanotubes, nanotubes as mechanical reinforcements in high performance composites, nanotube-based field emitters, and their use as nanoprobes in metrology and biological and chemical investigations, and as templates for the creation of other nanostructures. Electronic properties and device applications of nanotubes are treated elsewhere in the book. The challenges that ensue in realizing some of these applications are also discussed from the point of view of manufacturing, processing, and cost considerations.

  1. Constitutive Modeling of Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odegard, G. M.; Gates, T. S.; Wise, K. E.; Park, C.; Siochi, E. J.; Bushnell, Dennis M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In this study, a technique is presented for developing constitutive models for polymer composite systems reinforced with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT). Because the polymer molecules are on the same size scale as the nanotubes, the interaction at the polymer/nanotube interface is highly dependent on the local molecular structure and bonding. At these small length scales, the lattice structures of the nanotube and polymer chains cannot be considered continuous, and the bulk mechanical properties can no longer be determined through traditional micromechanical approaches that are formulated by using continuum mechanics. It is proposed herein that the nanotube, the local polymer near the nanotube, and the nanotube/polymer interface can be modeled as an effective continuum fiber using an equivalent-continuum modeling method. The effective fiber serves as a means for incorporating micromechanical analyses for the prediction of bulk mechanical properties of SWNT/polymer composites with various nanotube lengths, concentrations, and orientations. As an example, the proposed approach is used for the constitutive modeling of two SWNT/polyimide composite systems.

  2. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-01

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  3. Water-assisted chemical vapor deposition synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and their photoluminescence property.

    PubMed

    Li, Juan; Li, Jianbao; Yin, Yanchun; Chen, Yongjun; Bi, Xiaofan

    2013-09-13

    A novel water-assisted chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method for the efficient synthesis of boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is demonstrated. The replacement of metal oxide by water vapor could continuously generate intermediate boron oxide vapor and enhance the production of BN nanotubes. The nanotubes synthesized when an appropriate amount of water vapor was introduced had an average diameter of about 80 nm and lengths of several hundred μm. The diameter and yield of nanotubes could be controlled by tuning the amount of water vapor. This simple water-assisted CVD approach paves a new path to the fabrication of BN nanotubes in large quantities.

  4. Reinforced Carbon Nanotubes.

    DOEpatents

    Ren, Zhifen; Wen, Jian Guo; Lao, Jing Y.; Li, Wenzhi

    2005-06-28

    The present invention relates generally to reinforced carbon nanotubes, and more particularly to reinforced carbon nanotubes having a plurality of microparticulate carbide or oxide materials formed substantially on the surface of such reinforced carbon nanotubes composite materials. In particular, the present invention provides reinforced carbon nanotubes (CNTs) having a plurality of boron carbide nanolumps formed substantially on a surface of the reinforced CNTs that provide a reinforcing effect on CNTs, enabling their use as effective reinforcing fillers for matrix materials to give high-strength composites. The present invention also provides methods for producing such carbide reinforced CNTs.

  5. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kis, Andras; Zettl, Alex

    2008-05-13

    Some of the most important potential applications of carbon nanotubes are related to their mechanical properties. Stiff sp2 bonds result in a Young's modulus close to that of diamond, while the relatively weak van der Waals interaction between the graphitic shells acts as a form of lubrication. Previous characterization of the mechanical properties of nanotubes includes a rich variety of experiments involving mechanical deformation of nanotubes using scanning probe microscopes. These results have led to promising prototypes of nanoelectromechanical devices such as high-performance nanomotors, switches and oscillators based on carbon nanotubes.

  6. Gallium nitride nanotube lasers

    DOE PAGES

    Li, Changyi; Liu, Sheng; Hurtado, Antonio; ...

    2015-01-01

    Lasing is demonstrated from gallium nitride nanotubes fabricated using a two-step top-down technique. By optically pumping, we observed characteristics of lasing: a clear threshold, a narrow spectral, and guided emission from the nanotubes. In addition, annular lasing emission from the GaN nanotube is also observed, indicating that cross-sectional shape control can be employed to manipulate the properties of nanolasers. The nanotube lasers could be of interest for optical nanofluidic applications or application benefitting from a hollow beam shape.

  7. Single-walled metal oxide nanotubes and nanotube membranes for molecular separations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Dun-Yen

    Single-walled nanotubes have been considered essential “building-blocks” in nanotechnology and emerging materials for molecular recognition-based applications, such as molecular sensing, catalysis, and separations. Two critical obstacles in the development of functional nanotube-based devices are: (a) the difficulty of creating diverse functionality at the interior surfaces of single-walled nanotubes, and (b) the lack of effective approaches for fabricating scalable technological platforms with nanotube materials. This thesis describes my work addressing key fundamental issues in nanotube science and technology; particularly regarding the synthesis, characterization, and functionalization of single-walled metal oxide nanotubes (SWNTs) (Chapters 2, 3, 4),and approaches for applying SWNTs in scalable separation platforms for potentially achieving high performance (Chapters 5, 6, 7). The above, rather ambitious, objectives were addressed in a step-wise manner in this work. First, I acquired a detailed fundamental understanding of the inner surface properties of aluminosilicate SWNTs (Chapter 2). The investigations included elucidating molecular level details of dehydration and dehydroxylation phenomena in aluminosilicate single-walled nanotubes with a combination of several temperature-dependent solid-state characterization techniques. Critical information from this study enables a number of subsequent processes such as interior modification, molecular transport, and controlled delivery of molecules. In Chapter 3, a successful post-synthesis interior functionalization methodology is discussed, with the appropriately dehydrated or dehydroxylated nanotubes as the starting materials. Through surface reactions involving organosilane precursors and the inner wall of the nanotube, diverse organic entities can be immobilized at the inner surface of aluminosilicate nanotubes and thereby the hydrophilicity and interior surface properties can be tailored. This study was the

  8. Excitonic absorption intensity of semiconducting and metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Verdenhalven, Eike; Malić, Ermin

    2013-06-19

    The knowledge of the intrinsic absorption intensity of each carbon nanotube is of crucial importance for the optical assignment of nanotube species and the estimation of their abundance in a sample. Based on a microscopic approach, we calculate excitonic absorption spectra for a variety of semiconducting and metallic nanotubes, revealing a clear diameter, chirality, and family dependence of the absorption intensity. In particular, we also study the appearance of excited excitonic transitions, which are shown to be well pronounced for semiconducting nanotubes, reaching intensities of up to 10% of the main transition. We find that nanotubes with large diameters show the most pronounced absorption intensities, confirming well the experimentally observed trend. Depending on the CNT family and transition, the absorption is enhanced or reduced with the chiral angle. This behavior reflects well the qualitative chirality dependence of the analytically derived optical matrix element.

  9. Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes using nonlocal elasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arda, Mustafa; Aydogdu, Metin

    2016-03-01

    Torsional wave propagation in multiwalled carbon nanotubes is studied in the present work. Governing equation of motion of multiwalled carbon nanotube is obtained using Eringen's nonlocal elasticity theory. The effect of van der Waals interaction coefficient is considered between inner and outer nanotubes. Dispersion relations are obtained and discussed in detail. Effect of nonlocal parameter and van der Waals interaction to the torsional wave propagation behavior of multiwalled carbon nanotubes is investigated. It is obtained that torsional van der Waals interaction between adjacent tubes can change the rotational direction of multiwalled carbon nanotube as in-phase or anti-phase. The group and escape velocity of the waves converge to a limit value in the nonlocal elasticity approach.

  10. Photocurrent spectroscopy of dye-sensitized carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Alam, Asiful; Dehm, Simone; Hennrich, Frank; Zakharko, Yuriy; Graf, Arko; Pfohl, Moritz; Hossain, Ihteaz M; Kappes, Manfred M; Zaumseil, Jana; Krupke, Ralph; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2017-08-10

    Monochiral (7,5) single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) are integrated into a field effect transistor device in which the built-in electric field at the nanotube/metal contact allows for exciton separation under illumination. Variable wavelength spectroscopy and 2D surface mapping of devices consisting of 10-20 nanotubes are performed in the visible region and a strong correlation between the nanotube's second optical transition (S22) and the photocurrent is found. After integration, the SWCNTs are non-covalently modified with three different fluorescent dye molecules with off-resonant absorption maxima at 532 nm, 565 nm, and 610 nm. The dyes extend the absorption properties of the nanotube and contribute to the photocurrent. This approach holds promise for the development of photo-detectors and for applications in photovoltaics and biosensing.

  11. Template synthesized gold nanotube membranes for chemical separations and sensing.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Marc; Yu, Shufang; Martin, Charles R

    2002-07-01

    We have developed a new class of synthetic membranes that consist of a porous polymeric support that contains an ensemble of gold nanotubes that span the thickness of the support membrane. The support is a commercially-available microporous polycarbonate filter with cylindrical nanoscopic pores. The gold nanotubes are prepared via electroless deposition of Au onto the pore walls; i.e., the pores acts as templates for the nanotubes. We have shown that by controlling the Au deposition time, Au nanotubes that have effective inside diameters of molecular dimensions (< 1 nm) can be prepared. These membranes are a new class of molecular sieves and can be used to separate both small molecules and proteins on the basis of molecular size. In addition, the use of these membranes in new approaches to electrochemical sensing is reviewed here. In this case, a current is forced through the nanotubes, and analyte molecules present in a contacting solution phase modulate the value of this transmembrane current.

  12. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra.

    PubMed

    Pfohl, Moritz; Tune, Daniel D; Graf, Arko; Zaumseil, Jana; Krupke, Ralph; Flavel, Benjamin S

    2017-03-31

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton-phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton-phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions.

  13. Fitting Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Optical Spectra

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    In this work, a comprehensive methodology for the fitting of single-walled carbon nanotube absorption spectra is presented. Different approaches to background subtraction, choice of line profile, and calculation of full width at half-maximum are discussed both in the context of previous literature and the contemporary understanding of carbon nanotube photophysics. The fitting is improved by the inclusion of exciton–phonon sidebands, and new techniques to improve the individualization of overlapped nanotube spectra by exploiting correlations between the first- and second-order optical transitions and the exciton–phonon sidebands are presented. Consideration of metallic nanotubes allows an analysis of the metallic/semiconducting content, and a process of constraining the fit of highly congested spectra of carbon nanotube solid films according to the spectral weights of each (n, m) species in solution is also presented, allowing for more reliable resolution of overlapping peaks into single (n, m) species contributions. PMID:28393134

  14. Atomic Entanglement in Carbon Nanotubes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bondarev, Igor; Vlahovic, Branislav

    2006-03-01

    The development of materials that may host quantum coherent states is a critical research problem for the nearest future. Recent progress in the growth of centimeter-long small-diameter single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNs)[1] and successful experiments on the encapsulation of single atoms into CNs[2], stimulate the study of dynamical quantum processes in atomically doped CN systems. We have recently shown[3] that atomic states may be strongly coupled to vacuum surface photonic modes in the CN, thus forming quasi-1D cavity polaritons similar to those observed for quantum dots in semiconductor nanocavities[4], which were recently suggested to be a possible way to produce the excitonic qubit entanglement[5]. Here, we show that, being strongly coupled to the (resonator-like) cylindrical nanotube environment, the two atomic quasi-1D polaritons can be easily entangled as well, thus challenging a novel alternative approach towards quantum information transfer over centimeter-long distances. [1]L.X.Zheng et al, Proc. Nanotech 2005 (May 8-12, 2005, Anaheim, CA, USA), vol.3, p.126. [2]G.-H.Jeong et al, Phys. Rev. B68,075410(2003). [3]I.V.Bondarev and Ph.Lambin, in: Trends in Nanotubes Reasearch (NovaScience, NY, 2005); Phys. Rev. B70,035407(2004); Phys. Rev. B72,035451(2005). [4]T.Yoshie et al, Nature 432,200(2004). [5]S.Hughes, Phys. Rev. Lett.94,227402(2005).

  15. Industrially Feasible Approach to Transparent, Flexible, and Conductive Carbon Nanotube Films: Cellulose-Assisted Film Deposition Followed by Solution and Photonic Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeji; Chikamatsu, Masayuki; Azumi, Reiko; Saito, Takeshi; Minami, Nobutsugu

    2013-02-01

    We report that single-walled nanotube (SWNT) films with precisely controlled thicknesses and transmittances can be produced through the doctor-blade method using SWNT-polymer inks. The matrix polymer around SWNTs were successfully removed by either solution curing or photonic curing at room temperature, which are advantageous processes enabling direct film formation on plastic substrates. Sheet resistances as low as 68-240 Ω/sq at T=89-98% were obtained. Furthermore, the SWNT film on poly(ethylene naphthalate) exhibited superior flexibility and stability in a flexure endurance test. The method may open a wide range of opportunities for flexible electrical devices.

  16. "Drawing with nanotubes": creating nanowires with complex geometries by pulsed electrodeposition on self-organized carbon nanotube patterns.

    PubMed

    Yarden, Tohar S; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2010-11-10

    We present a new approach for the creation of nanowires with well-defined complex geometries by electrodeposition onto self-organized single-walled carbon nanotubes. The concept is demonstrated by generation of continuous Au nanowires with various geometries, including parallel arrays, serpentines, and coils. The generality of this approach is further illustrated by synthesizing Bi(2)Te(3) nanowires. Our concept of "drawing with nanotubes" offers to combine different material properties with complex geometries on the route to new functional nanosystems.

  17. Phonon spectra, electronic, and thermodynamic properties of WS2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Evarestov, Robert A; Bandura, Andrei V; Porsev, Vitaly V; Kovalenko, Alexey V

    2017-08-21

    Hybrid density functional theory calculations are performed for the first time on the phonon dispersion and thermodynamic properties of WS2 -based single-wall nanotubes. Symmetry analysis is presented for phonon modes in nanotubes using the standard (crystallographic) factorization for line groups. Symmetry and the number of infra-red and Raman active modes in achiral WS2 nanotubes are given for armchair and zigzag chiralities. It is demonstrated that a number of infrared and Raman active modes is independent on the nanotube diameter. The zone-folding approach is applied to find out an impact of curvature on electron and phonon band structure of nanotubes rolled up from the monolayer. Phonon frequencies obtained both for layers and nanotubes are used to compute the thermal contributions to their thermodynamic functions. The temperature dependences of energy, entropy, and heat capacity of nanotubes are estimated with respect to those of the monolayer. The role of phonons in the stability estimation of nanotubes is discussed based on Helmholtz free energy calculations. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Filling of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres

    PubMed Central

    Gately, Reece D

    2015-01-01

    Summary The reliable production of carbon nanotubes and nanofibres is a relatively new development, and due to their unique structure, there has been much interest in filling their hollow interiors. In this review, we provide an overview of the most common approaches for filling these carbon nanostructures. We highlight that filled carbon nanostructures are an emerging material for biomedical applications. PMID:25821693

  19. Hemotoxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bussy, Cyrill; Methven, Laura; Kostarelos, Kostas

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes may enter into the bloodstream and interact with blood components indirectly via translocation following unintended exposure or directly after an intended administration for biomedical purposes. Once introduced into systemic circulation, nanotubes will encounter various proteins, biomolecules or cells which have specific roles in the homeostasis of the circulatory system. It is therefore essential to determine whether those interactions will lead to adverse effects or not. Advances in the understanding of how carbon nanotubes interact with blood proteins, the complement system, red blood cells and the hemostatic system are reviewed in this article. While many studies on carbon nanotube health risk assessment and their biomedical applications have appeared in the last few years, reports on the hemocompatibility of these nanomaterials remain surprisingly limited. Yet, defining the hemotoxicological profile is a mandatory step toward the development of clinically-relevant medications or contrast agents based on carbon nanotubes.

  20. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2010-01-10

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  1. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong [Berkeley, CA; He, Rongrui [El Cerrito, CA; Goldberger, Joshua [Berkeley, CA; Fan, Rong [El Cerrito, CA; Wu, Yiying [Albany, CA; Li, Deyu [Albany, CA; Majumdar, Arun [Orinda, CA

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  2. Fluidic nanotubes and devices

    DOEpatents

    Yang, Peidong; He, Rongrui; Goldberger, Joshua; Fan, Rong; Wu, Yiying; Li, Deyu; Majumdar, Arun

    2008-04-08

    Fluidic nanotube devices are described in which a hydrophilic, non-carbon nanotube, has its ends fluidly coupled to reservoirs. Source and drain contacts are connected to opposing ends of the nanotube, or within each reservoir near the opening of the nanotube. The passage of molecular species can be sensed by measuring current flow (source-drain, ionic, or combination). The tube interior can be functionalized by joining binding molecules so that different molecular species can be sensed by detecting current changes. The nanotube may be a semiconductor, wherein a tubular transistor is formed. A gate electrode can be attached between source and drain to control current flow and ionic flow. By way of example an electrophoretic array embodiment is described, integrating MEMs switches. A variety of applications are described, such as: nanopores, nanocapillary devices, nanoelectrophoretic, DNA sequence detectors, immunosensors, thermoelectric devices, photonic devices, nanoscale fluidic bioseparators, imaging devices, and so forth.

  3. Low-Scaling Quantum Chemistry Approach to Excited-State Properties via an ab Initio Exciton Model: Application to Excitation Energy Transfer in a Self-Assembled Nanotube.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Adrian F; Herbert, John M

    2015-11-05

    We introduce a charge-embedding scheme for an excited-state quantum chemistry method aimed at weakly interacting molecular aggregates. The Hamiltonian matrix for the aggregate is constructed in a basis of direct products of configuration-state functions for the monomers, and diagonalization of this matrix affords excitation energies within ∼0.2 eV of the corresponding supersystem calculation. Both the basis states and the coupling matrix elements can be computed in a distributed way, resulting in an algorithm whose time-to-solution is independent of the number of chromophores, and we report calculations on systems with almost 55 000 basis functions using fewer than 450 processors. In a semiconducting organic nanotube, we find evidence of ultrafast, coherent dynamics followed by energy localization driven by static disorder. Truncation of the model system has a qualitative effect on the energy-transfer dynamics, demonstrating the importance of simulating an extended portion of the nanotube, which is not feasible using traditional quantum chemistry.

  4. Buckling of Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Polymer Laminated Composite Materials Subjected to Axial Compression and Shear Loadings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddick, J. C.; Gates, T. S.; Frankland, S.-J. V.

    2005-01-01

    A multi-scale method to predict the stiffness and stability properties of carbon nanotube-reinforced laminates has been developed. This method is used in the prediction of the buckling behavior of laminated carbon nanotube-polyethylene composites formed by stacking layers of carbon nanotube-reinforced polymer with the nanotube alignment axes of each layer oriented in different directions. Linking of intrinsic, nanoscale-material definitions to finite scale-structural properties is achieved via a hierarchical approach in which the elastic properties of the reinforced layers are predicted by an equivalent continuum modeling technique. Solutions for infinitely long symmetrically laminated nanotube-reinforced laminates with simply-supported or clamped edges subjected to axial compression and shear loadings are presented. The study focuses on the influence of nanotube volume fraction, length, orientation, and functionalization on finite-scale laminate response. Results indicate that for the selected laminate configurations considered in this study, angle-ply laminates composed of aligned, non-functionalized carbon nanotube-reinforced lamina exhibit the greatest buckling resistance with 1% nanotube volume fraction of 450 nm uniformly-distributed carbon nanotubes. In addition, hybrid laminates were considered by varying either the volume fraction or nanotube length through-the-thickness of a quasi-isotropic laminate. The ratio of buckling load-to-nanotube weight percent for the hybrid laminates considered indicate the potential for increasing the buckling efficiency of nanotube-reinforced laminates by optimizing nanotube size and proportion with respect to laminate configuration.

  5. Quenching of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Fluorescence by Dissolved Oxygen Reveals Selective Single-Stranded DNA Affinities.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yu; Bachilo, Sergei M; Weisman, R Bruce

    2017-04-13

    The selective interactions between short oligomers of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and specific structures of single-walled carbon nanotubes have been exploited in powerful methods for nanotube sorting. We report here that nanotubes coated with ssDNA also display selective interactions through the selective quenching of nanotube fluorescence by dissolved oxygen. In aqueous solutions equilibrated under 1 atm of O2, emission intensity from semiconducting nanotubes is reduced by between 9 and 40%, varying with the combination of ssDNA sequence and nanotube structure. This quenching reverses promptly and completely on removal of dissolved O2 and may be due to physisorption on nanotube surfaces. Fluorescence quenching offers a simple, nondestructive approach for studying the structure-selective interactions of ssDNA with single-walled carbon nanotubes and identifying recognition sequences.

  6. Filled carbon nanotubes in biomedical imaging and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Martincic, Markus; Tobias, Gerard

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been advocated as promising candidates in the biomedical field in the areas of diagnosis and therapy. In terms of drug delivery, the use of carbon nanotubes can overcome some limitations of 'free' drugs by improving the formulation of poorly water-soluble drugs, allowing targeted delivery and even enabling the co-delivery of two or more drugs for combination therapy. Two different approaches are currently being explored for the delivery of diagnostic and therapeutic agents by carbon nanotubes, namely attachment of the payload to the external sidewalls or encapsulation into the inner cavities. Although less explored, the latter confers additional stability to the chosen diagnostic or therapeutic agents, and leaves the backbone structure of the nanotubes available for its functionalization with dispersing and targeting moieties. Several drug delivery systems and diagnostic agents have been developed in the last years employing the inner tubular cavities of carbon nanotubes. The research discussed in this review focuses on the use of carbon nanotubes that contain in their interior drug molecules and diagnosis-related compounds. The approaches employed for the development of such nanoscale vehicles along with targeting and releasing strategies are discussed. The encapsulation of both biomedical contrast agents and drugs inside carbon nanotubes is further expanding the possibilities to allow an early diagnosis and treatment of diseases.

  7. Carbon Nanotube Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W. Ch.

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement. PMID:22655070

  8. Carbon nanotube solar cells.

    PubMed

    Klinger, Colin; Patel, Yogeshwari; Postma, Henk W Ch

    2012-01-01

    We present proof-of-concept all-carbon solar cells. They are made of a photoactive side of predominantly semiconducting nanotubes for photoconversion and a counter electrode made of a natural mixture of carbon nanotubes or graphite, connected by a liquid electrolyte through a redox reaction. The cells do not require rare source materials such as In or Pt, nor high-grade semiconductor processing equipment, do not rely on dye for photoconversion and therefore do not bleach, and are easy to fabricate using a spray-paint technique. We observe that cells with a lower concentration of carbon nanotubes on the active semiconducting electrode perform better than cells with a higher concentration of nanotubes. This effect is contrary to the expectation that a larger number of nanotubes would lead to more photoconversion and therefore more power generation. We attribute this to the presence of metallic nanotubes that provide a short for photo-excited electrons, bypassing the load. We demonstrate optimization strategies that improve cell efficiency by orders of magnitude. Once it is possible to make semiconducting-only carbon nanotube films, that may provide the greatest efficiency improvement.

  9. Structure of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celik-Aktas, Ayten; Tao, Jing; Zuo, Jian-Min

    2004-03-01

    Boron nitride (BN) nanotubes have been the subject of intensive scientific study in recent years due to their unique properties. BN nanotubes have uniform wide gap semiconducting properties regardless of their chirality and diameter [1]. On the other hand electrical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) depend on their chirality. This unique difference between BN and CNTs makes BN nanotubes a better candidate for nano electronics and/or other nano technology applications. HRTEM and nano area electron diffraction (NAD) studies have been conducted to better understand the microstructure of BN nanotubes. In addition to TEM analysis we would like to present the results of image simulations and compare the NAD patterns with the simulated diffraction patterns. Preliminary results suggest that the BN nanotubes that have been investigated in this study showed overwhelmingly near zigzag chirality. Average diameter of the BN tubes are about 35-40 nm. Regular patches of perfect crystals have been observed along the length of the tubes except tubes with very large diameters (Dng 150 nm). Other regions of the BN nanotubes were quite defective. CNT templates have been employed in the synthesis of our samples. [1] X. Blasé, A. Rubio, S.G. Louie, M.L. Cohen, Europhysics Letters, 28 (1994) 335.

  10. Capture and manipulation of hybrid DNAs by carbon nanotube bundles.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenhai; Yang, Wei

    2010-05-14

    When approached from both sides, a piece of single-duplex-single DNA may be drawn into the inlets of two bundles of carbon nanotubes. This provides opportunities to manipulate the DNA by two bundles of nanotubes. The capture and manipulation processes envisaged above are simulated by molecular dynamics in this work. The radius of the carbon nanotube and the ambient temperature show the effects on the spontaneous insertion of DNA strands. This procedure, if successful, could be used for capturing expectant sdsDNAs, with subsequent manipulation to pull or to unzip the captured DNA.

  11. Tellurium nanotubes synthesized with microwave-assisted monosaccharide reduction method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tao; Zhang, Gang; Su, Xu; Chen, Xingguo; Wang, Dahai; Qin, Jingui

    2007-07-01

    A microwave-assisted monosaccharide reducing approach has been developed in the preparation of tellurium nanotubes. The as-prepared tellurium nanotubes have the sizes of 50 - 100 nm in diameter, and a few micrometers in length. A series of contrastive experiments have illustrated that microwave-heating contributed a lot in the synthesis, and the decomposition of H2TeO3 to TeO2 and low reducibility of the monosaccharide played a key role in the process. The possible mechanism of the synthesis of the nanotubes has been preliminarily discussed.

  12. Growth of carbon nanotubes from titanium dioxide nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Qiran; Hu, Yali; Liu, Yunyun; Huang, Shaoming

    2012-08-01

    We have demonstrated that titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticle is an efficient catalyst for the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). TiO2 nanoparticles can be generated either by sol-gel method or sputtering. Highly dense single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and/or multi-walled CNTs can be produced by ethanol-chemical vapor deposition (EtOH-CVD) using those TiO2 nanoparticles as catalysts. XPS measurements further prove that the TiO2 nanoparticles are responsible for the nanotube growth. Sputtering approach for generating TiO2 nanoparticles provide a facile way for patterning SWNTs for various applications.

  13. Mesoscopic modeling of cancer photothermal therapy using single-walled carbon nanotubes and near infrared radiation: insights through an off-lattice Monte Carlo approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Feng; Hongyan, Zhang; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.; Bui, Khoa; Lim, Christina; Duong, Hai M.

    2014-05-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are promising heating agents in cancer photothermal therapy when under near infrared radiation, yet few efforts have been focused on the quantitative understanding of the photothermal energy conversion in biological systems. In this article, a mesoscopic study that takes into account SWNT morphologies (diameter and aspect ratio) and dispersions (orientation and concentration), as well as thermal boundary resistance, is performed by means of an off-lattice Monte Carlo simulation. Results indicate that SWNTs with orientation perpendicular to the laser, smaller diameter and better dispersion have higher heating efficiency in cancer photothermal therapy. Thermal boundary resistances greatly inhibit thermal energy transfer away from SWNTs, thereby affecting their heating efficiency. Through appropriate interfacial modification around SWNTs, compared to the surrounding healthy tissue, a higher temperature of the cancer cell can be achieved, resulting in more effective cancer photothermal therapy. These findings promise to bridge the gap between macroscopic and microscopic computational studies of cancer photothermal therapy.

  14. Relationships among the structural topology, bond strength, and mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liou, Kai-Hsin; Tsou, Nien-Ti; Kang, Dun-Yen

    2015-10-21

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are regarded as small but strong due to their nanoscale microstructure and high mechanical strength (Young's modulus exceeds 1000 GPa). A longstanding question has been whether there exist other nanotube materials with mechanical properties as good as those of CNTs. In this study, we investigated the mechanical properties of single-walled aluminosilicate nanotubes (AlSiNTs) using a multiscale computational method and then conducted a comparison with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs). By comparing the potential energy estimated from molecular and macroscopic material mechanics, we were able to model the chemical bonds as beam elements for the nanoscale continuum modeling. This method allowed for simulated mechanical tests (tensile, bending, and torsion) with minimum computational resources for deducing their Young's modulus and shear modulus. The proposed approach also enabled the creation of hypothetical nanotubes to elucidate the relative contributions of bond strength and nanotube structural topology to overall nanotube mechanical strength. Our results indicated that it is the structural topology rather than bond strength that dominates the mechanical properties of the nanotubes. Finally, we investigated the relationship between the structural topology and the mechanical properties by analyzing the von Mises stress distribution in the nanotubes. The proposed methodology proved effective in rationalizing differences in the mechanical properties of AlSiNTs and SWCNTs. Furthermore, this approach could be applied to the exploration of new high-strength nanotube materials.

  15. Nanotube resonator devices

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Zettl, Alexander K; Weldon, Jeffrey A

    2014-05-06

    A fully-functional radio receiver fabricated from a single nanotube is being disclosed. Simultaneously, a single nanotube can perform the functions of all major components of a radio: antenna, tunable band-pass filter, amplifier, and demodulator. A DC voltage source, as supplied by a battery, can power the radio. Using carrier waves in the commercially relevant 40-400 MHz range and both frequency and amplitude modulation techniques, successful music and voice reception has been demonstrated. Also disclosed are a radio transmitter and a mass sensor using a nanotube resonator device.

  16. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Jensen, Kenneth J; Girit, Caglar O; Mickelson, William E; Zettl, Alexander K; Grossman, Jeffrey C

    2013-11-05

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  17. Tunable multiwalled nanotube resonator

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex K [Kensington, CA; Jensen, Kenneth J [Berkeley, CA; Girit, Caglar [Albany, CA; Mickelson, William E [San Francisco, CA; Grossman, Jeffrey C [Berkeley, CA

    2011-03-29

    A tunable nanoscale resonator has potential applications in precise mass, force, position, and frequency measurement. One embodiment of this device consists of a specially prepared multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWNT) suspended between a metal electrode and a mobile, piezoelectrically controlled contact. By harnessing a unique telescoping ability of MWNTs, one may controllably slide an inner nanotube core from its outer nanotube casing, effectively changing its length and thereby changing the tuning of its resonance frequency. Resonant energy transfer may be used with a nanoresonator to detect molecules at a specific target oscillation frequency, without the use of a chemical label, to provide label-free chemical species detection.

  18. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Tortorich, Ryan P.; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-01-01

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  19. Inkjet Printing of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Tortorich, Ryan P; Choi, Jin-Woo

    2013-07-29

    In an attempt to give a brief introduction to carbon nanotube inkjet printing, this review paper discusses the issues that come along with preparing and printing carbon nanotube ink. Carbon nanotube inkjet printing is relatively new, but it has great potential for broad applications in flexible and printable electronics, transparent electrodes, electronic sensors, and so on due to its low cost and the extraordinary properties of carbon nanotubes. In addition to the formulation of carbon nanotube ink and its printing technologies, recent progress and achievements of carbon nanotube inkjet printing are reviewed in detail with brief discussion on the future outlook of the technology.

  20. Dispersionless propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rosati, Roberto; Rossi, Fausto; Dolcini, Fabrizio

    2015-06-15

    We investigate the propagation of electron wavepackets in single-walled carbon nanotubes via a Lindblad-based density-matrix approach that enables us to account for both dissipation and decoherence effects induced by various phonon modes. We show that, while in semiconducting nanotubes the wavepacket experiences the typical dispersion of conventional materials, in metallic nanotubes its shape remains essentially unaltered, even in the presence of the electron-phonon coupling, up to micron distances at room temperature.

  1. Excited State Dynamics in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Yoshiyuki

    2004-03-01

    Carbon nanotube, one of the most promising materials for nano-technology, still suffers from its imperfection in crystalline structure that will make performance of nanotube behind theoretical limit. From the first-principles simulations, I propose efficient methods to overcome the imperfection. I show that photo-induced ion dynamics can (1) identify defects in nanotubes, (2) stabilize defected nanotubes, and (3) purify contaminated nanotubes. All of these methods can be alternative to conventional heat treatments and will be important techniques for realizing nanotube-devices. Ion dynamics under electronic excitation has been simulated with use of the computer code FPSEID (First-Principles Simulation tool for Electron Ion Dynamics) [1], which combines the time-dependent density functional method [2] to classical molecular dynamics. This very challenging approach is time-consuming but can automatically treat the level alternation of differently occupied states, and can observe initiation of non-adiabatic decay of excitation. The time-dependent Kohn-Sham equation has been solved by using the Suzuki-Trotter split operator method [3], which is a numerically stable method being suitable for plane wave basis, non-local pseudopotentials, and parallel computing. This work has been done in collaboration with Prof. Angel Rubio, Prof. David Tomanek, Dr. Savas Berber and Mina Yoon. Most of present calculations have been done by using the SX5 Vector-Parallel system in the NEC Fuchu-plant, and the Earth Simulator in Yokohama Japan. [1] O. Sugino and Y. Miyamoto, Phys. Rev. B59, 2579 (1999); ibid, B66 089901(E) (2001) [2] E. Runge and E. K. U. Gross, Phys. Rev. Lett. 52, 997 (1984). [3] M. Suzuki, J. Phys. Soc. Jpn. 61, L3015 (1992).

  2. Synthesis of Carbon Nanotube (CNT) Composite Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Altalhi, Tariq; Ginic-Markovic, Milena; Han, Ninghui; Clarke, Stephen; Losic, Dusan

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes are attractive approach for designing of new membranes for advanced molecular separation because of their unique transport properties and ability to mimic biological protein channels. In this work the synthetic approach for fabrication of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) composite membranes is presented. The method is based on growth of multi walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) using chemical vapour deposition (CVD) on the template of nanoporous alumina (PA) membranes. The influence of experimental conditions including carbon precursor, temperature, deposition time, and PA template on CNT growth process and quality of fabricated membranes was investigated. The synthesis of CNT/PA composites with controllable nanotube dimensions such as diameters (30–150 nm), and thickness (5–100 μm), was demonstrated. The chemical composition and morphological characteristics of fabricated CNT/PA composite membranes were investigated by various characterisation techniques including scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDXS), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) and x-ray diffraction (XRD). Transport properties of prepared membranes were explored by diffusion of dye (Rose Bengal) used as model of hydrophilic transport molecule. PMID:24957494

  3. Polymer composites containing nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    The present invention relates to polymer composite materials containing carbon nanotubes, particularly to those containing singled-walled nanotubes. The invention provides a polymer composite comprising one or more base polymers, one or more functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers and carbon nanotubes. The invention also relates to functionalized m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers, particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having side chain functionalization, and more particularly to m-phenylenevinylene-2,5-disubstituted-p-phenylenevinylene polymers having olefin side chains and alkyl epoxy side chains. The invention further relates to methods of making polymer composites comprising carbon nanotubes.

  4. Transport in Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, S.; Xue, Yong-Qinag; Anantram, M. P.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discusses coupling between carbon nanotubes (CNT), simple metals (FEG) and a graphene sheet. The graphene sheet did not couple well with FEG, but the combination of a graphene strip and CNT did couple well with most simple metals.

  5. Carbon nanotubes: Fibrillar pharmacology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostarelos, Kostas

    2010-10-01

    The mechanisms by which chemically functionalized carbon nanotubes flow in blood and are excreted through the kidneys illustrate the unconventional behaviour of these fibrillar nanostructures, and the opportunities they offer as components for the design of advanced delivery vehicles.

  6. Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Michael W. (Inventor); Jordan, Kevin (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Michael W [Newport News, VA; Jordan, Kevin [Newport News, VA; Park, Cheol [Yorktown, VA

    2012-06-06

    Boron nitride nanotubes are prepared by a process which includes: (a) creating a source of boron vapor; (b) mixing the boron vapor with nitrogen gas so that a mixture of boron vapor and nitrogen gas is present at a nucleation site, which is a surface, the nitrogen gas being provided at a pressure elevated above atmospheric, e.g., from greater than about 2 atmospheres up to about 250 atmospheres; and (c) harvesting boron nitride nanotubes, which are formed at the nucleation site.

  8. First-principles modeling of hafnia-based nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Evarestov, Robert A; Bandura, Andrei V; Porsev, Vitaly V; Kovalenko, Alexey V

    2017-09-15

    Hybrid density functional theory calculations were performed for the first time on structure, stability, phonon frequencies, and thermodynamic functions of hafnia-based single-wall nanotubes. The nanotubes were rolled up from the thin free layers of cubic and tetragonal phases of HfO2 . It was shown that the most stable HfO2 single-wall nanotubes can be obtained from hexagonal (111) layer of the cubic phase. Phonon frequencies have been calculated for different HfO2 nanolayers and nanotubes to prove the local stability and to find the thermal contributions to their thermodynamic functions. The role of phonons in stability of nanotubes seems to be negligible for the internal energy and noticeable for the Helmholtz free energy. Zone folding approach has been applied to estimate the connection between phonon modes of the layer and nanotubes and to approximate the nanotube thermodynamic properties. It is found that the zone-folding approximation is sufficiently accurate for heat capacity, but less accurate for entropy. The comparison has been done between the properties of TiO2 , ZrO2 , and HfO2 . © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Surface functionalization of aluminosilicate nanotubes with organic molecules

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wei; Yah, Weng On; Otsuka, Hideyuki

    2012-01-01

    Summary The surface functionalization of inorganic nanostructures is an effective approach for enriching the potential applications of existing nanomaterials. Inorganic nanotubes attract great research interest due to their one-dimensional structure and reactive surfaces. In this review paper, recent developments in surface functionalization of an aluminosilicate nanotube, “imogolite”, are introduced. The functionalization processes are based on the robust affinity between phosphate groups of organic molecules and the aluminol (AlOH) surface of imogolite nanotubes. An aqueous modification process employing a water soluble ammonium salt of alkyl phosphate led to chemisorption of molecules on imogolite at the nanotube level. Polymer-chain-grafted imogolite nanotubes were prepared through surface-initiated polymerization. In addition, the assembly of conjugated molecules, 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-yl)ethylphosphonic acid (HT3P) and 2-(5’’-hexyl-2,2’:5’,2’’-terthiophen-5-yl)ethylphosphonic acid 1,1-dioxide (HT3OP), on the imogolite nanotube surface was achieved by introducing a phosphonic acid group to the corresponding molecules. The optical and photophysical properties of these conjugated-molecule-decorated imogolite nanotubes were characterized. Moreover, poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) chains were further hybridized with HT3P modified imogolite to form a nanofiber hybrid. PMID:22428100

  10. Carbon nanotube filters.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, A; Srivastava, O N; Talapatra, S; Vajtai, R; Ajayan, P M

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus ( approximately 25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  11. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled.

    PubMed

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  12. Carbon nanotube filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A.; Srivastava, O. N.; Talapatra, S.; Vajtai, R.; Ajayan, P. M.

    2004-09-01

    Over the past decade of nanotube research, a variety of organized nanotube architectures have been fabricated using chemical vapour deposition. The idea of using nanotube structures in separation technology has been proposed, but building macroscopic structures that have controlled geometric shapes, density and dimensions for specific applications still remains a challenge. Here we report the fabrication of freestanding monolithic uniform macroscopic hollow cylinders having radially aligned carbon nanotube walls, with diameters and lengths up to several centimetres. These cylindrical membranes are used as filters to demonstrate their utility in two important settings: the elimination of multiple components of heavy hydrocarbons from petroleum-a crucial step in post-distillation of crude oil-with a single-step filtering process, and the filtration of bacterial contaminants such as Escherichia coli or the nanometre-sized poliovirus (~25 nm) from water. These macro filters can be cleaned for repeated filtration through ultrasonication and autoclaving. The exceptional thermal and mechanical stability of nanotubes, and the high surface area, ease and cost-effective fabrication of the nanotube membranes may allow them to compete with ceramic- and polymer-based separation membranes used commercially.

  13. Multiwalled nanotube faceting unravelled

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leven, Itai; Guerra, Roberto; Vanossi, Andrea; Tosatti, Erio; Hod, Oded

    2016-12-01

    Nanotubes show great promise for miniaturizing advanced technologies. Their exceptional physical properties are intimately related to their morphological and crystal structure. Circumferential faceting of multiwalled nanotubes reinforces their mechanical strength and alters their tribological and electronic properties. Here, the nature of this important phenomenon is fully rationalized in terms of interlayer registry patterns. Regardless of the nanotube identity (that is, diameter, chirality, chemical composition), faceting requires the matching of the chiral angles of adjacent layers. Above a critical diameter that corresponds well with experimental results, achiral multiwalled nanotubes display evenly spaced extended axial facets whose number equals the interlayer difference in circumferential unit cells. Elongated helical facets, commonly observed in experiment, appear in nanotubes that exhibit small interlayer chiral angle mismatch. When the wall chiralities are uncorrelated, faceting is suppressed and outer layer corrugation, which is induced by the Moiré superlattice, is obtained in agreement with experiments. Finally, we offer an explanation for the higher incidence of faceting in multiwalled boron nitride nanotubes with respect to their carbon-based counterparts.

  14. Nitrogen doping in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Ewels, C P; Glerup, M

    2005-09-01

    Nitrogen doping of single and multi-walled carbon nanotubes is of great interest both fundamentally, to explore the effect of dopants on quasi-1D electrical conductors, and for applications such as field emission tips, lithium storage, composites and nanoelectronic devices. We present an extensive review of the current state of the art in nitrogen doping of carbon nanotubes, including synthesis techniques, and comparison with nitrogen doped carbon thin films and azofullerenes. Nitrogen doping significantly alters nanotube morphology, leading to compartmentalised 'bamboo' nanotube structures. We review spectroscopic studies of nitrogen dopants using techniques such as X-ray photoemission spectroscopy, electron energy loss spectroscopy and Raman studies, and associated theoretical models. We discuss the role of nanotube curvature and chirality (notably whether the nanotubes are metallic or semiconducting), and the effect of doping on nanotube surface chemistry. Finally we review the effect of nitrogen on the transport properties of carbon nanotubes, notably its ability to induce negative differential resistance in semiconducting tubes.

  15. Templated Growth of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochik Emilie J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of growing carbon nanotubes uses a synthesized mesoporous si lica template with approximately cylindrical pores being formed there in. The surfaces of the pores are coated with a carbon nanotube precu rsor, and the template with the surfaces of the pores so-coated is th en heated until the carbon nanotube precursor in each pore is convert ed to a carbon nanotube.

  16. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Letant, Sonia [Livermore, CA; Stadermann, Michael [Dublin, CA; Artyukhin, Alexander B [Menlo Park, CA

    2009-06-09

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  17. Lipid nanotube or nanowire sensor

    DOEpatents

    Noy, Aleksandr [Belmont, CA; Bakajin, Olgica [San Leandro, CA; Letant, Sonia [Livermore, CA; Stadermann, Michael [Dublin, CA; Artyukhin, Alexander B [Menlo Park, CA

    2010-06-29

    A sensor apparatus comprising a nanotube or nanowire, a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer. Also a biosensor apparatus comprising a gate electrode; a source electrode; a drain electrode; a nanotube or nanowire operatively connected to the gate electrode, the source electrode, and the drain electrode; a lipid bilayer around the nanotube or nanowire, and a sensing element connected to the lipid bilayer.

  18. Carbon nanotube array based sensor

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Christopher L.; Noy, Aleksandr; Swierkowski, Stephan P.; Fisher, Karl A.; Woods, Bruce W.

    2005-09-20

    A sensor system comprising a first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and a second electrode. The first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode are positioned to produce an air gap between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode. A measuring device is provided for sensing changes in electrical capacitance between the first electrode with an array of carbon nanotubes and the second electrode.

  19. Structure reconstruction of TiO2-based multi-wall nanotubes: first-principles calculations.

    PubMed

    Bandura, A V; Evarestov, R A; Lukyanov, S I

    2014-07-28

    A new method of theoretical modelling of polyhedral single-walled nanotubes based on the consolidation of walls in the rolled-up multi-walled nanotubes is proposed. Molecular mechanics and ab initio quantum mechanics methods are applied to investigate the merging of walls in nanotubes constructed from the different phases of titania. The combination of two methods allows us to simulate the structures which are difficult to find only by ab initio calculations. For nanotube folding we have used (1) the 3-plane fluorite TiO2 layer; (2) the anatase (101) 6-plane layer; (3) the rutile (110) 6-plane layer; and (4) the 6-plane layer with lepidocrocite morphology. The symmetry of the resulting single-walled nanotubes is significantly lower than the symmetry of initial coaxial cylindrical double- or triple-walled nanotubes. These merged nanotubes acquire higher stability in comparison with the initial multi-walled nanotubes. The wall thickness of the merged nanotubes exceeds 1 nm and approaches the corresponding parameter of the experimental patterns. The present investigation demonstrates that the merged nanotubes can integrate the two different crystalline phases in one and the same wall structure.

  20. Exploring growth kinetics of carbon nanotube arrays by in situ optical diagnostics and modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Puretzky, Alexander A; Geohegan, David B; Pannala, Sreekanth; Rouleau, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    Simple kinetic models of carbon nanotube growth have been able to successfully link together many experimental parameters involved in the growth of carbon nanotubes for practical applications including the prediction of growth rates, terminal lengths, number of walls, activation energies, and their dependences on the growth environment. The implications of recent experiments utilizing in situ monitoring of carbon nanotube growth on our past kinetic model are first reviewed. Then, sub-second pulsed feedstock gas introduction is discussed to explore the nucleation and initial growth of carbon nanotubes in the context of the kinetic model. Moreover, kinetic effects in "pulsed CVD" - using repeated pulsed gas introduction to stop and restart nanotube growth - are explored to understand renucleation, the origin of alignment in nanotube arrays, and incremental growth. Time-resolved reflectivity of the surface is used to remotely understand the kinetics of nucleation and the coordinated growth of arrays. This approach demonstrates that continuous vertically aligned single wall carbon nanotubes can be grown incrementally by pulsed CVD, and that the first exposure of fresh catalyst to feedstock gas is critical to nanotubes site density required for coordinated growth. Aligned nanotube arrays (as short as 60 nm) are shown to nucleate and grow within single, sub-second gas pulses. The multiple-pulse growth experiments (> 100 pulses) show that a high fraction of nanotubes renucleate on subsequent gas pulses.

  1. Chirality-dependent vapor-phase epitaxial growth and termination of single-wall carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bilu; Liu, Jia; Tu, Xiaomin; Zhang, Jialu; Zheng, Ming; Zhou, Chongwu

    2013-09-11

    Structurally uniform and chirality-pure single-wall carbon nanotubes are highly desired for both fundamental study and many of their technological applications, such as electronics, optoelectronics, and biomedical imaging. Considerable efforts have been invested in the synthesis of nanotubes with defined chiralities by tuning the growth recipes but the approach has only limited success. Recently, we have shown that chirality-pure short nanotubes can be used as seeds for vapor-phase epitaxial cloning growth, opening up a new route toward chirality-controlled carbon nanotube synthesis. Nevertheless, the yield of vapor-phase epitaxial growth is rather limited at the present stage, due in large part to the lack of mechanistic understanding of the process. Here we report chirality-dependent growth kinetics and termination mechanism for the vapor-phase epitaxial growth of seven single-chirality nanotubes of (9, 1), (6, 5), (8, 3), (7, 6), (10, 2), (6, 6), and (7, 7), covering near zigzag, medium chiral angle, and near armchair semiconductors, as well as armchair metallic nanotubes. Our results reveal that the growth rates of nanotubes increase with their chiral angles while the active lifetimes of the growth hold opposite trend. Consequently, the chirality distribution of a nanotube ensemble is jointly determined by both growth rates and lifetimes. These results correlate nanotube structures and properties with their growth behaviors and deepen our understanding of chirality-controlled growth of nanotubes.

  2. Electrode distance regulates the anodic growth of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Rong; Wan, Jiandi

    2017-06-01

    Electrochemical anodization of titanium has been used widely to produce self-organized TiO2 nanotube arrays. Many experimental parameters, such as anodizing voltage and electrolyte composition, have been investigated extensively in the anodic growth of TiO2 nanotubes. The effect of electrode distance on the anodic growth of TiO2 nanotube arrays, however, remains elusive. This could be an important problem when in situ growth of TiO2 nanotubes is required in microdevices. Here, we show that decreasing the electrode distance at a constant anodizing voltage enhances the anodic growth of TiO2 nanotubes and the change of nanotube structures becomes more sensitive to the electrode distance at high voltages. We further demonstrate the correlation between electrode distance and current density during the anodic growth of TiO2 nanotubes and suggest that the change of current density regulated by electrode distance controls the growth of TiO2 nanotubes. The present study offers an effective approach to enhance the production of TiO2 nanotube arrays without changing the anodizing voltage and electrolyte composition and thus provides useful insights to the anodic growth of TiO2 nanotubes at reduced electrode distances.

  3. Passive approach for the improved dispersion of polyvinyl alcohol-based functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes/Nafion membranes for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    PubMed

    Abu Sayeed, M D; Talukdar, Krishan; Kim, Hee Jin; Park, Younjin; Gopalan, A I; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Kwang-Pill; Choi, Sang-June

    2014-12-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are regarded as ideal fillers for Nafion polymer electrolyte membranes (PEMs) for fuel cell applications. The highly aggregated properties of MWCNTs can be overcome by the successful cross-linking with polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) into the MWCNTs/Nafion membrane. In this study, a series of nanocomposite membranes were fabricated with the PVA-influenced functionalized MWCNTs reinforced into the Nafion polymer matrix by a solution casting method. Several different PVA contents were blended to f-MWCNTs/Nafion nanocomposite membranes followed by successful cross-linking by annealing. The surface morphologies and the inner structures of the resulting PVA-MWCNTs/Nafion nanocomposite membranes were then observed by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) to investigate the dispersion of MWCNTs into the PVA/Nafion composite membranes. After that, the nanocomposite membranes were characterized by thermo-gravimetric analysis (TGA) to observe the thermal enhancement caused by effective cross-linking between the f-MWCNTs with the composite polymer matrixes. Improved water uptake with reduced methanol uptake revealed the successful fabrication of PVA-blended f-MWCNTs/Nafion membranes. In addition, the ion exchange capacity (IEC) was evaluated for PEM fuel cell (PEMFC) applications.

  4. Mechanical integrity of a carbon nanotube/copper-based through-silicon via for 3D integrated circuits: a multi-scale modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awad, Ibrahim; Ladani, Leila

    2015-12-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper (Cu) composite material is proposed to replace Cu-based through-silicon vias (TSVs) in micro-electronic packages. The proposed material is believed to offer extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties and the presence of CNTs in Cu is believed to overcome issues associated with miniaturization of Cu interconnects, such as electromigration. This study introduces a multi-scale modeling of the proposed TSV in order to evaluate its mechanical integrity under mechanical and thermo-mechanical loading conditions. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to determine CNT/Cu interface adhesion properties. A cohesive zone model (CZM) was found to be most appropriate to model the interface adhesion, and CZM parameters at the nanoscale were determined using MD simulation. CZM parameters were then used in the finite element analysis in order to understand the mechanical and thermo-mechanical behavior of composite TSV at micro-scale. From the results, CNT/Cu separation does not take place prior to plastic deformation of Cu in bending, and separation does not take place when standard thermal cycling is applied. Further investigation is recommended in order to alleviate the increased plastic deformation in Cu at the CNT/Cu interface in both loading conditions.

  5. Supercritical-assistant liquid crystal template approach to synthesize mesoporous titania/multiwalled carbon nanotube composites with high visible-light driven photocatalytic performance

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chen; Li, Youji Xu, Peng; Li, Ming; Huo, Pingxiang

    2014-12-15

    Graphical abstract: We investigate the influence of mesoporous titania content upon the visible-light driven photocatalytic performance of MPT/MWCNTs in phenol degradation. - Highlights: • MPT/MWCNTs were fabricated by liquid-crystal template in supercritical CO{sub 2}. • MPT/MWCNTs show high visible-light driven photoactivity for phenol degradation. • MPT/MWCNTs also show high reusable photoactivity under visible irradiation. • MPT content can control visible-light driven photoactivity of MPT/MWCNTs. • MPT is not easily broken away from from MPT/MWCNT composites. - Abstract: Mesoporous titania (MPT) was deposited onto multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) by deposition of titanium sol containing liquid-crystal template with assistant of supercritical CO{sub 2}. The products were characterized with various analytical techniques to determine their structural, morphological, optical absorption and photocatalytic properties. The results indicate that in photocatalytic degradation of phenol under visible light, the mixtures or composites of MPT and MWCNT show the high efficiency because of synergies between absorbing visible light, releasing electrons and facilitating transfer of charge carriers of MWCNTs and providing activated centers of MPT. Because of the mutual constraint between MPT and MWCNTs on the photocatalytic efficiency, the optimal loading of MPT in MPT/MWCNT-3 for phenol degradation is 48%. Because the intimate contact between MWCNTs and MPT is more beneficial to electron transformation, photoactivity of mixture is lower than that of composites with high reusable performance. The optimum conditions of phenol degradation were obtained.

  6. A multiscale approach for modeling the early stage growth of single and multiwall carbon nanotubes produced by a metal-catalyzed synthesis process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, James A.; Hamm, Marc; Shibuta, Yasushi

    2009-01-01

    A parametrized mesoscale model for the early stage growth of isolated single or multiwall carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has been developed in order to investigate the effects of metal catalyst particle size and composition on CNT growth mechanism during synthesis via a substrate-supported, catalytic chemical vapor deposition process. The model is based on a coarse-grained graphene sheet, represented by a two-dimensional simply connected triangular mesh, with parameters for the surface curvature, bond stretching, carbon-carbon interaction, and carbon-catalyst interaction determined by classical molecular dynamics simulations using a bond-order potential derived from ab initio calculations. The mesoscale simulations show that the initial type of CNT growth is strongly influenced by the surface interaction energy between the graphene sheet and metal catalyst particle, rate of carbon deposition, and particle size. As expected, single wall tubes are produced from small catalyst particles at low deposition rates, but increasing the strength of carbon-catalyst interaction energy or carbon deposition rate results in double or even multiwall CNT structures, formed by folding or involution of the graphene sheet. For the range of model parameters investigated, all single wall CNTs with a diameter greater than 6.6 nm exhibited a kink-collapse transition once a certain critical tube length was reached.

  7. Mechanical integrity of a carbon nanotube/copper-based through-silicon via for 3D integrated circuits: a multi-scale modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Awad, Ibrahim; Ladani, Leila

    2015-12-04

    Carbon nanotube (CNT)/copper (Cu) composite material is proposed to replace Cu-based through-silicon vias (TSVs) in micro-electronic packages. The proposed material is believed to offer extraordinary mechanical and electrical properties and the presence of CNTs in Cu is believed to overcome issues associated with miniaturization of Cu interconnects, such as electromigration. This study introduces a multi-scale modeling of the proposed TSV in order to evaluate its mechanical integrity under mechanical and thermo-mechanical loading conditions. Molecular dynamics (MD) simulation was used to determine CNT/Cu interface adhesion properties. A cohesive zone model (CZM) was found to be most appropriate to model the interface adhesion, and CZM parameters at the nanoscale were determined using MD simulation. CZM parameters were then used in the finite element analysis in order to understand the mechanical and thermo-mechanical behavior of composite TSV at micro-scale. From the results, CNT/Cu separation does not take place prior to plastic deformation of Cu in bending, and separation does not take place when standard thermal cycling is applied. Further investigation is recommended in order to alleviate the increased plastic deformation in Cu at the CNT/Cu interface in both loading conditions.

  8. Fast and Universal Approach to Encapsulating Transition Bimetal Oxide Nanoparticles in Amorphous Carbon Nanotubes under an Atmospheric Environment Based on the Marangoni Effect.

    PubMed

    Li, Shuoyu; Liu, Yuyi; Guo, Peisheng; Wang, Chengxin

    2017-09-13

    Transition metal oxide nanoparticles capsuled in amorphous carbon nanotubes (ACNTs) are attractive anode materials of lithium-ion batteries (LIBs). Here, we first designed a fast and universal method with a hydromechanics conception which is called Marangoni flow to fabricate transition bimetal oxides (TBOs) in the ACNT composite with a better electrochemistry performance. Marangoni flows can produce a liquid column with several centimeters of height in a tube with one side immersed in the liquid. The key point to induce a Marangoni flow is to make a gradient of the surface tension between the surface and the inside of the solution. With our research, we control the gradient of the surface tension by controlling the viscosity of a solution. To show how our method could be generally used, we synthesize two anode materials such as (a) CoFe2O4@ACNTs, and (b) NiFe2O4@ACNTs. All of these have a similar morphology which is ∼20 μm length with a diameter of 80-100 nm for the ACNTs, and the particles (inside the ACNTs) are smaller than 5 nm. In particular, there are amorphous carbons between the nanoparticles. All of the composite materials showed an outstanding electrochemistry performance which includes a high capacity and cycling stability so that after 600 cycles the capacity changed by less than 3%.

  9. An efficient approach to selective electromembrane extraction of naproxen by means of molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes-reinforced hollow fibers.

    PubMed

    Tahmasebi, Zeinab; Davarani, Saied Saeed Hosseiny; Asgharinezhad, Ali Akbar

    2016-10-28

    In this work, a novel microextraction technique using molecularly imprinted polymer-coated multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MIP-MWCNTs) in electromembrane extraction (EME) procedure is described. The method in combination with HPLC-UV was utilized to determine naproxen, as an acidic model drug, in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. For this purpose, MIP-MWCNTs were placed in the pores of polypropylene hollow fiber. The MIP-MWCNTs-EME method has the advantages of high selectivity and cleanup of MIP along with high enrichment ability of the EME in a single step extraction. Continuing with the research, optimization of the factors affecting the migration of naproxen from sample solutions to MIP-MWCNTs sites and then into the lumen of hollow fiber was explored. Under the optimized conditions, the limit of detection (LOD) of the developed method was calculated to be 0.3μgL(-1). All relative standard deviations (RSDs) were lower than 3%. Linearity of the method was obtained within the range of 1-1000μgL(-1) with the coefficient of determination (r(2)) being higher than 0.999. Under the optimized conditions, an extraction recovery of 66% was obtained, which corresponded to a preconcentration factor of 88. Finally, the developed method was satisfactorily used to determine naproxen in urine, plasma and wastewater samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation deals with the use of carbon nanotubes as a transport system. Contact, defects, tubular bend, phonons, and mechanical deformations all contribute to reflection within the nanotube wire. Bragg reflection, however, is native to an ideal energy transport system. Transmission resistance depends primarily on the level of energy present. Finally, the details regarding coupling between carbon nanotubes and simple metals are presented.

  11. Underwater Acoustic Carbon Nanotube Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300042 1 of 10 UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC CARBON NANOTUBE THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube underwater acoustic source which acts as a thermophone...development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An

  12. Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Thermophone

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-23

    Attorney Docket No. 300009 1 of 8 A CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC THERMOPHONE STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The...the Invention [0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube thermophone. (2) Description of the Prior Art [0004...amplitude of the resulting sound waves. [0006] Recently, there has been development of underwater acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable

  13. Near-ideal strength in metal nanotubes revealed by atomistic simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Mingfei; Xiao, Fei; Deng, Chuang

    2013-12-02

    Here we report extraordinary mechanical properties revealed by atomistic simulations in metal nanotubes with hollow interior that have been long overlooked. Particularly, the yield strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotubes is found to be up to 60% higher than the corresponding solid Au nanowire, which approaches the theoretical ideal strength in Au. Furthermore, a remarkable transition from sharp to smooth yielding is observed in Au nanotubes with decreasing wall thickness. The ultrahigh tensile strength in [1 1 1] Au nanotube might originate from the repulsive image force exerted by the interior surface against dislocation nucleation from the outer surface.

  14. Nano-sensors based on nanotubes: deformed-nanotubes transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farajian, Amir A.; Yakobson, Boris I.; Mizuseki, Hiroshi; Kawazoe, Yoshiyuki

    2003-03-01

    The main purpose of the present work is to establishing a correspondence between mechanical deformation and transport properties, which is presumably useful in nano-sensor applications. As a byproduct of this study, the potential differences in the mechanical behavior of armchair and zigzag tubes, as well as that of armchair-zigzag junctions, are also revealed. We use a tight-binding model to describe the nanotubes. Two different nanotubes are considered here, namely an armchair (6,6) and a zigzag (10,0). A relatively long portion of each of these tubes, as well as a portion of their junction, is considered, and the relaxed structures for different bending angles are derived. After obtaining the relaxed structures, the GreenÂ's function approach is employed in order to obtain the conductance of the systems under consideration. The current-voltage characteristics are then determined using the Landauer-Büttiker formalism. It is concluded that a large change in conductance usually is accompanied by severe deformations. For large bending angles a slight gap widening is observed for both the semiconducting and kink structures. It is observed that I-V characteristics indeed depend on the bending angle, hence the possibility of usage as nano-sensor.

  15. High-density integration of carbon nanotubes via chemical self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Hongsik; Afzali, Ali; Han, Shu-Jen; Tulevski, George S.; Franklin, Aaron D.; Tersoff, Jerry; Hannon, James B.; Haensch, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have potential in the development of high-speed and power-efficient logic applications. However, for such technologies to be viable, a high density of semiconducting nanotubes must be placed at precise locations on a substrate. Here, we show that ion-exchange chemistry can be used to fabricate arrays of individually positioned carbon nanotubes with a density as high as 1 × 109 cm-2--two orders of magnitude higher than previous reports. With this approach, we assembled a high density of carbon-nanotube transistors in a conventional semiconductor fabrication line and then electrically tested more than 10,000 devices in a single chip. The ability to characterize such large distributions of nanotube devices is crucial for analysing transistor performance, yield and semiconducting nanotube purity.

  16. Optically- and thermally-responsive programmable materials based on carbon nanotube-hydrogel polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaobo; Pint, Cary L; Lee, Min Hyung; Schubert, Bryan Edward; Jamshidi, Arash; Takei, Kuniharu; Ko, Hyunhyub; Gillies, Andrew; Bardhan, Rizia; Urban, Jeffrey J; Wu, Ming; Fearing, Ronald; Javey, Ali

    2011-08-10

    A simple approach is described to fabricate reversible, thermally- and optically responsive actuators utilizing composites of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (pNIPAM) loaded with single-walled carbon nanotubes. With nanotube loading at concentrations of 0.75 mg/mL, we demonstrate up to 5 times enhancement to the thermal response time of the nanotube-pNIPAM hydrogel actuators caused by the enhanced mass transport of water molecules. Additionally, we demonstrate the ability to obtain ultrafast near-infrared optical response in nanotube-pNIPAM hydrogels under laser excitation enabled by the strong absorption properties of nanotubes. The work opens the framework to design complex and programmable self-folding materials, such as cubes and flowers, with advanced built-in features, including tunable response time as determined by the nanotube loading.

  17. Strategy for the Co-Assembly of Co-Axial Nanotube-Polymer Hybrids.

    PubMed

    Ji, Mingyang; Dawadi, Mahesh B; LaSalla, Alexandria R; Sun, Yuan; Modarelli, David A; Parquette, Jon R

    2017-09-12

    Nanostructured materials having multiple, discrete domains of sorted components are particularly important to create efficient optoelectronics. The construction of multicomponent nanostructures from self-assembled components is exceptionally challenging due to the propensity of noncovalent materials to undergo structural reorganization in the presence of excipient polymers. This work demonstrates that polymer-nanotube composites comprised of a self-assembled nanotube wrapped with two conjugated polymers could be assembled using a layer-by-layer approach. The polymer-nanotube nanostructures arrange polymer layers coaxially on the nanotube surface. Femtosecond transient absorption (TA) studies indicated that the polymer-nanotube composites undergo photoinduced charge separation upon excitation of the NDI chromophore within the nanotube.

  18. Weaving Nanotechnology Dreams with Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Tomanek, David

    2003-01-15

    The continuous reduction of device sizes, which is rapidly approaching the atomic level, calls for new approaches to design and test future building blocks of nanotechnology. Computers will become the most powerful tools to interpret what happens on the nanometer scale, where as I will illustrate, structures of carbon may become stronger than steel, yet turn into quantum conductors or even efficient heat conductors. In nanostructures that form during a hierarchical self-assembly process, even defects may play a different, often helpful role. An efficient self-healing process may convert less stable atomic assemblies into other, more perfect structures, thus answering an important concern in molecular electronics. Defects may even be used in nano-scale engineering to form complex systems such as carbon foam or nanotube peapods. I will show how some of these challenging problems can be most efficiently addressed in simulations on recently available massively parallel supercomputers.

  19. Facile synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes and improved electrical conductivity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongjun; Luo, Lijie; Zhou, Longchang; Mo, Libin; Tong, Zhangfa

    2010-02-01

    A layer of catalyst film on substrate is usually required during the vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) growth of one-dimensional (1D) nanomaterials. In this work, however, a novel approach for synthesizing high-purity bamboo-like boron nitride (BN) nanotubes directly on commercial stainless steel foils was demonstrated. Synthesis was realized by heating boron and zinc oxide (ZnO) powders at 1200 degrees C under a mixture gas flow of nitrogen and hydrogen. The stainless steel foils played an additional role of catalyst besides the substrate during the VLS growth of the nanotubes. In addition, the electrical conductivity of the BN nanotubes was efficiently improved in a simple way by coating with Au and Pd nanoparticles. The decorated BN nanotubes may find potential applications in catalysts, sensors and nanoelectronics.

  20. Noncovalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes for highly specific electronic biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Robert J.; Bangsaruntip, Sarunya; Drouvalakis, Katerina A.; Wong Shi Kam, Nadine; Shim, Moonsub; Li, Yiming; Kim, Woong; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2003-04-01

    Novel nanomaterials for bioassay applications represent a rapidly progressing field of nanotechnology and nanobiotechnology. Here, we present an exploration of single-walled carbon nanotubes as a platform for investigating surface-protein and protein-protein binding and developing highly specific electronic biomolecule detectors. Nonspecific binding on nanotubes, a phenomenon found with a wide range of proteins, is overcome by immobilization of polyethylene oxide chains. A general approach is then advanced to enable the selective recognition and binding of target proteins by conjugation of their specific receptors to polyethylene oxide-functionalized nanotubes. This scheme, combined with the sensitivity of nanotube electronic devices, enables highly specific electronic sensors for detecting clinically important biomolecules such as antibodies associated with human autoimmune diseases.

  1. Integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micro-fabricated devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karp, Gabriel A.; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; David-Pur, Moshe; Ioffe, Zvi; Cheshnovsky, Ori; Krylov, Slava; Hanein, Yael

    2009-08-01

    The integration of suspended carbon nanotubes into micron-scale silicon-based devices offers many exciting advantages in the realm of nano-scale sensing and micro- and nano-electromechanical systems (MEMS and NEMS). To realize such devices, simple fabrication schemes are needed. Here we present a new method to integrate carbon nanotubes into silicon-based devices by applying conventional micro-fabrication methods combined with a guided chemical vapor deposition growth of single-wall carbon nanotubes. The described procedure yields clean, long, taut and well-positioned tubes in electrical contact to conducting electrodes. The positioning, alignment and tautness of the tubes are all controlled by the structural and chemical features of the micro-fabricated substrate. As the approach described consists of common micro-fabrication and chemical vapor deposition growth procedures, it offers a viable route toward MEMS-NEMS integration and commercial utilization of carbon nanotubes as nano-electromechanical transducers.

  2. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R. Nanney, Warren A.; Maddux, Cassandra J.A.; Martínez, Hernán L.; Malone, Marvin A.; Coe, James V.

    2014-12-15

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (napproach. Those values were used to study the relationship between the thermodynamic potentials and the diameter of the nanotube. Results of this study led to the proposal of a single equation for the thermodynamical potential of ΔH{sub AB}{sup 298 K} or ΔG{sub AB}{sup 298 K} (assembly of nanotubes from atoms) versus the chiral vector indexes n and m for any given nanotube. The equations show a good level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic potentials for practical applications.

  3. Carbon nanotube heterojunctions: unusual deformations and mechanical vibration properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarpa, F.; Narojczyk, J.; Wojciechowski, K. W.; Inman, D. J.

    2011-04-01

    The mechanical deformation and dynamics properties of single wall carbon nanotube heterojunctions (HJ) oscillators are investigated using an hybrid finite element atomistic-continuum approach. The nanotube HJs provide a peculiar deformation pattern, with combined bending and axial stretching of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), and a broad agreement of their axial stiffness with spring series continuum mechanics and existing molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. We show also peculiar distributions of the natural frequencies and modes of the hetero-junctions compared to classical single-wall nanotube configurations, and the mass-sensor capability of (5,5)-(10,10) SWCNT HJ structures, with frequency shifts highly depending on the heterojunction section subjected to the mass loading.

  4. Generalizing thermodynamic properties of bulk single-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Kenneth R; Malone, Marvin A; Nanney, Warren A; A Maddux, Cassandra J; Coe, James V; Martínez, Hernán L

    2014-12-01

    The enthalpy and Gibbs free energy thermodynamical potentials of single walled carbon nanotubes were studied of all types (armchairs, zig-zags, chirals (n>m), and chiral (napproach. Those values were used to study the relationship between the thermodynamic potentials and the diameter of the nanotube. Results of this study led to the proposal of a single equation for the thermodynamical potential of [Formula: see text] or [Formula: see text] (assembly of nanotubes from atoms) versus the chiral vector indexes n and m for any given nanotube. The equations show a good level of accuracy in predicting thermodynamic potentials for practical applications.

  5. Functionalization of vertically aligned carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Snyders, Rony; Colomer, Jean-François

    2013-01-01

    Summary This review focuses and summarizes recent studies on the functionalization of carbon nanotubes oriented perpendicularly to their substrate, so-called vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (VA-CNTs). The intrinsic properties of individual nanotubes make the VA-CNTs ideal candidates for integration in a wide range of devices, and many potential applications have been envisaged. These applications can benefit from the unidirectional alignment of the nanotubes, the large surface area, the high carbon purity, the outstanding electrical conductivity, and the uniformly long length. However, practical uses of VA-CNTs are limited by their surface characteristics, which must be often modified in order to meet the specificity of each particular application. The proposed approaches are based on the chemical modifications of the surface by functionalization (grafting of functional chemical groups, decoration with metal particles or wrapping of polymers) to bring new properties or to improve the interactions between the VA-CNTs and their environment while maintaining the alignment of CNTs. PMID:23504581

  6. Pathogen identification using peptide nanotube biosensors and impedance AFM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maccuspie, Robert I.

    Pathogen identification at highly sensitive levels is crucial to meet urgent needs in fighting the spread of disease or detecting bioterrorism events. Toward that end, a new method for biosensing utilizing fluorescent antibody nanotubes is proposed. Fundamental studies on the self-assembly of these peptide nanotubes are performed, as are applications of aligning these nanotubes on surfaces. As biosensors, these nanotubes incorporate recognition units with antibodies at their ends and fluorescent signaling units at their sidewalls. When viral pathogens were mixed with these antibody nanotubes in solution, the nanotubes rapidly aggregated around the viruses. The size of the aggregates increased as the concentration of viruses increased, as detected by flow cytometry on the order of attomolar concentrations by changes in fluorescence and light scattering intensities. This enabled determination of the concentrations of viruses at trace levels (102 to 106 pfu/mL) within 30 minutes from the receipt of samples to the final quantitative data analysis, as demonstrated on Adenovirus, Herpes Simplex Virus, Influenza, and Vaccinia virus. As another separate approach, impedance AFM is used to study the electrical properties of individual viruses and nanoparticles used as model systems. The design, development, and implementation of the impedance AFM for an Asylum Research platform is described, as well as its application towards studying the impedance of individual nanoparticles as a model system for understanding the fundamental science of how the life cycle of a virus affects its electrical properties. In combination, these approaches fill a pressing need to quantify viruses both rapidly and sensitively.

  7. Carbon nanotubes on a substrate

    DOEpatents

    Gao, Yufei [Kennewick, WA; Liu, Jun [West Richland, WA

    2002-03-26

    The present invention includes carbon nanotubes whose hollow cores are 100% filled with conductive filler. The carbon nanotubes are in uniform arrays on a conductive substrate and are well-aligned and can be densely packed. The uniformity of the carbon nanotube arrays is indicated by the uniform length and diameter of the carbon nanotubes, both which vary from nanotube to nanotube on a given array by no more than about 5%. The alignment of the carbon nanotubes is indicated by the perpendicular growth of the nanotubes from the substrates which is achieved in part by the simultaneous growth of the conductive filler within the hollow core of the nanotube and the densely packed growth of the nanotubes. The present invention provides a densely packed carbon nanotube growth where each nanotube is in contact with at least one nearest-neighbor nanotube. The substrate is a conductive substrate coated with a growth catalyst, and the conductive filler can be single crystals of carbide formed by a solid state reaction between the substrate material and the growth catalyst. The present invention further provides a method for making the filled carbon nanotubes on the conductive substrates. The method includes the steps of depositing a growth catalyst onto the conductive substrate as a prepared substrate, creating a vacuum within a vessel which contains the prepared substrate, flowing H2/inert (e.g. Ar) gas within the vessel to increase and maintain the pressure within the vessel, increasing the temperature of the prepared substrate, and changing the H2/Ar gas to ethylene gas such that the ethylene gas flows within the vessel. Additionally, varying the density and separation of the catalyst particles on the conductive substrate can be used to control the diameter of the nanotubes.

  8. Hyperspectral Microscopy of Near-Infrared Fluorescence Enables 17-Chirality Carbon Nanotube Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Roxbury, Daniel; Jena, Prakrit V.; Williams, Ryan M.; Enyedi, Balázs; Niethammer, Philipp; Marcet, Stéphane; Verhaegen, Marc; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    The intrinsic near-infrared photoluminescence (fluorescence) of single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibits unique photostability, narrow bandwidth, penetration through biological media, environmental sensitivity, and both chromatic variety and range. Biomedical applications exploiting this large family of fluorophores will require the spectral and spatial resolution of individual (n,m) nanotube species’ fluorescence and its modulation within live cells and tissues, which is not possible with current microscopy methods. We present a wide-field hyperspectral approach to spatially delineate and spectroscopically measure single nanotube fluorescence in living systems. This approach resolved up to 17 distinct (n,m) species (chiralities) with single nanotube spatial resolution in live mammalian cells, murine tissues ex vivo, and zebrafish endothelium in vivo. We anticipate that this approach will facilitate multiplexed nanotube imaging in biomedical applications while enabling deep-tissue optical penetration, and single-molecule resolution in vivo. PMID:26387482

  9. Near-infrared hyperspectral microscopy of carbon nanotube photoluminescence enables 17-color imaging (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Daniel A.; Roxbury, Daniel; Jena, Prakrit V.; Williams, Ryan M.; Enyedi, Balázs; Niethammer, Philipp; Marcet, Stéphane; Mangiarini, Francesca; Verhaegen, Marc; Blais-Ouellette, Sébastien

    2016-03-01

    The intrinsic near-infrared photoluminescence (fluorescence) of single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibits unique photostability, narrow bandwidth, penetration through biological media, environmental sensitivity, and both chromatic variety and range. Biomedical applications exploiting this large family of fluorophores will require the spectral and spatial resolution of individual (n,m) nanotube species' fluorescence and its modulation within live cells and tissues, which is not possible with current microscopy methods. We present a wide-field hyperspectral approach to spatially delineate and spectroscopically measure single nanotube fluorescence in living systems. This approach resolved up to 17 distinct (n,m) species (chiralities) with single nanotube spatial resolution in live mammalian cells, murine tissues ex vivo, and zebrafish endothelium in vivo. We anticipate that this approach will facilitate multiplexed nanotube imaging in biomedical applications while enabling deep-tissue optical penetration, exceptional photostability, and single-molecule resolution in vivo.

  10. Simulating magnetic nanotubes using a chain of ellipsoid-rings model with a magnetization reversal process by fanning rotation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jieqiong; Yang, Sen; Gong, Junfeng; Xu, Minwei; Adil, Murtaza; Wang, Yu; Zhang, Yin; Song, Xiaoping; Zeng, Hao

    2015-04-21

    Recently, magnetic nanotubes have attracted great attention owing to the advantages of tubular geometry. Of all the physical properties of magnetic nanotubes, the magnetic behavior plays a pivotal role in potential applications, particularly in biotechnology. Modeling magnetic nanotubes provides an effective way to determine the geometry dependent magnetic properties. In the present article, we model the nanotube as a chain of ellipsoid-rings; thus the magnetic behavior of nanotubes is simulated by the fanning rotation of magnetic moments. Based on this model, we further discuss the influence of tubular geometric parameters on the magnetic properties. The calculated magnetic properties of Fe, Co, Ni, Fe3O4 and CoFe2O4 nanotubes are all consistent with their experimental data. Consequently, our model provides an easy and general approach to magnetic nanotubes.

  11. Specific features of low-frequency vibrational dynamics and low-temperature heat capacity of double-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avramenko, M. V.; Roshal, S. B.

    2016-05-01

    A continuous model has been constructed for low-frequency dynamics of a double-walled carbon nanotube. The formation of the low-frequency part of the phonon spectrum of a double-walled nanotube from phonon spectra of its constituent single-walled nanotubes has been considered in the framework of the proposed approach. The influence of the environment on the phonon spectrum of a single double-walled carbon nanotube has been analyzed. A combined method has been proposed for estimating the coefficients of the van der Waals interaction between the walls of the nanotube from the spectroscopic data and the known values of the elastic moduli of graphite. The low-temperature specific heat has been calculated for doublewalled carbon nanotubes, which in the field of applicability of the model ( T < 35 K) is substantially less than the sum of specific heats of two individual single-walled nanotubes forming it.

  12. Thermal rectification in inhomogeneous nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budaev, Bair V.; Bogy, David B.

    2016-12-01

    Heat transfer in axially inhomogeneous nanotubes is known to be asymmetric with respect to the direction of transfer. This phenomenon is known as the thermal rectification. We demonstrate that thermal rectification in such nanotubes arises due to the interference of phonons excited in the different parts of the nanotube. It is shown that the rectification does not vanish when the thickness of nanotube increases, but it vanishes as the external diameter of nanotubes decreases to a few nanometers. The understanding of the origin of thermal rectification opens a way to the design of devices controlling heat flows that could perform as efficiently as their electronic counterparts controlling electric currents.

  13. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  14. Carbon nanotubes as liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shanju; Kumar, Satish

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are the best of known materials with a combination of excellent mechanical, electronic, and thermal properties. To fully exploit individual nanotube properties for various applications, the grand challenge is to fabricate macroscopic ordered nanotube assemblies. Liquid-crystalline behavior of the nanotubes provides a unique opportunity toward reaching this challenge. In this Review, the recent developments in this area are critically reviewed by discussing the strategies for fabricating liquid-crystalline phases, addressing the solution properties of liquid-crystalline suspensions, and exploiting the practical techniques of liquid-crystal routes to prepare macroscopic nanotube fibers and films.

  15. Carbon Nanotubes Based Quantum Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lu, Jian-Ping

    1999-01-01

    This document represents the final report for the NASA cooperative agreement which studied the application of carbon nanotubes. The accomplishments are reviewed: (1) Wrote a review article on carbon nanotubes and its potentials for applications in nanoscale quantum devices. (2) Extensive studies on the effects of structure deformation on nanotube electronic structure and energy band gaps. (3) Calculated the vibrational spectrum of nanotube rope and the effect of pressure. and (4) Investigate the properties of Li intercalated nanotube ropes and explore their potential for energy storage materials and battery applications. These studies have lead to four publications and seven abstracts in international conferences.

  16. Redox-induced synthesis and encapsulation of metal nanoparticles in shell-cross-linked organometallic nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Song; Wang, Hai; Coombs, Neil; Winnik, Mitchell A; Manners, Ian

    2005-06-29

    A new approach to encapsulate silver nanoparticles inside block copolymer nanotubes is reported and involves an in situ redox reaction between a polyferrocenylsilane (PFS) inner wall and silver ions. Partial preoxidation of the PFS domains was found to be a key step for the efficient formation of one-dimensional arrays of silver nanoparticles confined within the nanotubes.

  17. Adhered Supported Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Dale F.; Craft, Benjamin J.; Jaffe, Stephen M.

    2001-02-01

    Carbon nanotubes (NTs) in excess of 200 μm long are grown by catalytic pyrolysis of hydrocarbon vapors. The nanotubes grow continuously without the typical extinction due to catalyst encapsulation. A woven metal mesh supports the nanotubes creating a metal supported nanotube (MSNT) structure. The 140 μm wide mesh openings are completely filled by 70 nm diameter multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs). The MWNTs are straight, uniform and highly crystalline. Their wall thickness is about 10 nm (30 graphite layers). The adherent NTs are not removed from the support in a Scotch tape pull test. A 12.5 cm2 capacitor made from two MSNT structures immersed in 1 M KCl has a capacitance of 0.35 F and an equivalent series resistance of 0.18 Ω. Water flows through the MSNT at a flow velocity of 1 cm/min with a pressure drop of 15 inches of water. With the support removed, the MWNTs naturally form a carbon nanocomposite (CNC) paper with a specific area of 80 m2/gm, a bulk density of 0.21 g/cm3, an open pore fraction of 0.81, and a resistivity of 0.16 Ω-cm.

  18. Sorting Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Sorting of single-wall carbon nanotubes by their electronic and atomic structures in liquid phases is reviewed in this chapter. We first introduce the sorting problem, and then provide an overview of several sorting methodologies, following roughly the chronological order of their development over the past 15 years or so. Major methods discussed include ion-exchange chromatography, density-gradient ultracentrifugation, selective extraction in organic solvents, gel chromatography, and aqueous two-phase extraction. A main focus of the review is on the common mechanisms underlining all sorting processes. We propose that differences in solvation among different nanotube species are the ultimate driving force of sorting, and we corroborate this proposal by presenting analysis on how the differences are realized in electronic-structure-based sorting and atomic-structure-based sorting. In the end, we offer some suggestions on future directions that may grow out of carbon nanotube sorting. In particular, the prospect of expanding the function of DNA/carbon nanotube hybrid to control inter-particle interactions both inside and outside the nanotube is discussed.

  19. Transport in Carbon Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoo, K. H.; Chelikowsky, James R.

    2008-03-01

    There is growing interest in the use of carbon nanotube thin films as transparent electrical conductors and thin-film transistors owing to their high optical transmittance, low sheet resistivity, and ease of fabrication. [1,2] A major contribution to the sheet resistivity originates at nanotube junctions, as electrical contact is typically poor between adjacent nanotubes. It is thus important to characterize carbon nanotube junctions in order to understand the conduction properties of nanotube thin films. To this end, we have performed ab initio density functional theory calculations to investigate the structural, electronic and transport properties of carbon nanotube junctions as a function of nanotube chirality and contact geometry [1] Z. Wu et al., Science 305, 1273 (2004) [2] E. S. Snow, J. P. Novak, P. M. Campbell, and D. Park, Appl. Phys. Lett. 82, 2145 (2003).

  20. Carbon nanotubes: opportunities and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hongjie

    2002-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are graphene sheets rolled-up into cylinders with diameters as small as one nanometer. Extensive work carried out worldwide in recent years has revealed the intriguing electrical and mechanical properties of these novel molecular scale wires. It is now well established that carbon nanotubes are ideal model systems for studying the physics in one-dimensional solids and have significant potential as building blocks for various practical nanoscale devices. Nanotubes have been shown to be useful for miniaturized electronic, mechanical, electromechanical, chemical and scanning probe devices and materials for macroscopic composites. Progress in nanotube growth has facilitated the fundamental study and applications of nanotubes. Gaining control over challenging nanotube growth issues is critical to the future advancement of nanotube science and technology, and is being actively pursued by researchers.

  1. Copper-philic carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgamwar, Sachin U.; Sharma, Niti Nipun

    2016-04-01

    Carbon nanotube is having poor wet-ability with copper metal. Wet-ability of carbon nanotube was improved by exposing and creating more active sites on the surface of carbon nanotube. Carbon nanotubes were subjected to the prolong ultrasonication treatment of 20×103 Hz and 500W, which helped in disentanglement of carbon nanotube agglomerates and in breaking the weak bonds like pentagonal or heptagonal structure on the surface and on the CNT cap. Disentanglement of the carbon nanotube, resulted in exposing the defective sites on the surface and breaking of weak bonds, which assisted in creating the new defects on the surface. This process results in generates more active sites on the surface and it helps in improving the wet-ability of the carbon nanotube in copper.

  2. Nanotechnology with Carbon Nanotubes: Mechanics, Chemistry, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the Nanotechnology of carbon nanotubes. The contents include: 1) Nanomechanics examples; 2) Experimental validation of nanotubes in composites; 3) Anisotropic plastic collapse; 4) Spatio-temporal scales, yielding single-wall nanotubes; 5) Side-wall functionalization of nanotubes; 6) multi-wall Y junction carbon nanotubes; 7) Molecular electronics with Nanotube junctions; 8) Single-wall carbon nanotube junctions; welding; 9) biomimetic dendritic neurons: Carbon nanotube, nanotube electronics (basics), and nanotube junctions for Devices,

  3. Single crystalline magnetite nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zuqin; Zhang, Daihua; Han, Song; Li, Chao; Lei, Bo; Lu, Weigang; Fang, Jiye; Zhou, Chongwu

    2005-01-12

    We descried a method to synthesize single crystalline Fe3O4 nanotubes by wet-etching the MgO inner cores of MgO/Fe3O4 core-shell nanowires. Homogeneous Fe3O4 nanotubes with controllable length, diameter, and wall thickness have been obtained. Resistivity of the Fe3O4 nanotubes was estimated to be approximately 4 x 10-2 Omega cm at room temperature. Magnetoresistance of approximately 1% was observed at T = 77 K when a magnetic field of B = 0.7 T was applied. The synthetic strategy presented here may be extended to a variety of materials such as YBCO, PZT, and LCMO which should provide ideal candidates for fundamental studies of superconductivity, piezoelectricity, and ferromagnetism in nanoscale structures.

  4. Conductance of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Datta, Supriyo; Anatram, M. P.

    1998-01-01

    The recent report of quantized conductance in a 4 m long multiwalled nanotube (MWNT) raises the exciting possibility of ballistic transport at room temperature over relatively long distances. We argue that this is made possible by the special symmetry of the eigenstates of the lowest propagating modes in metallic nanotubes which suppresses backscattering. This unusual effect is absent for the higher propagating modes so that transport is not ballistic once the bias exceeds the cut-off energy for the higher modes, which is estimated to be approximately 75 meV for nanotubes of diameter approximately 15 nm. Also, we show that the symmetry of the eigenstates can significantly affect their coupling to the reservoir and hence the contact resistance. A simple model is presented that can be used to understand the observed conductance-voltage characteristics.

  5. Nematic Nanotubes Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yodh, A. G.; Islam, M. F.; Alsayed, A. M.; Dogic, Z.; Zhang, J.; Lubensky, T. C.

    2003-03-01

    Composites of aligned single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) are among the most sought after materials in nanotube science. We report the production of one such medium, containing large domains of oriented SWNTs. We call these materials nematic nanotube gels. We have created them by first dispersing SWNTs at low volume fraction in a gel, and then inducing a volume-compression transition of the gel. We identify hallmark liquid crystalline defects in these materials, as well as a novel buckling of the walls accompanying defect formation. Quantitative measurements of the tube order parameter reveal a concentration-dependent crossover from isotropic to nematic phases. This work has been partially supported by the NSF through the MRSEC grant DMR 00-79909, DMR-0203378, and by NASA through grant NAG8-2172.

  6. Optically driven nanotube actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Shaoxin; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-11-01

    Optically driven actuators have been fabricated from single-wall carbon nanotube-polymer composite sheets. Like natural muscles, the millimetre-scale actuators are assemblies of millions of individual nanotube actuators processed into macroscopic length scales and bonded to an acrylic elastomer sheet to form an actuator that have been shown to generate higher stress than natural muscles and higher strains than high-modulus piezoelectric materials. Strain measurements revealed 0.01%-0.3% elastic strain generated due to electrostatic and thermal effects under visible light intensities of 5-120 mW cm-2. An optically actuated nanotube gripper is demonstrated to show manipulation of small objects. This actuation technology overcomes some of the fundamental limitations such as the use of high voltages or electrochemical solutions for actuation, opening up possibilities for remote light-induced actuation technologies.

  7. Non-equilibrium Dynamics of DNA Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hariadi, Rizal Fajar

    nanotubes with an irreversible energy consumption reaction, analogous to nucleotide hydrolysis in actin and microtubule polymerization. Finally, we integrated the DNA strand displacement circuits with DNA nanotube polymerization to achieve programmable kinetic control of behavior within artificial cytoskeleton. Our synthetic approach may provide insights into natural cytoskeleton dynamics, such as minimal architectural or reaction mechanism requirements for non-equilibrium behaviors including treadmilling and dynamic instability. The outgrowth of DNA nanotechnology beyond its own boundaries, serving as a general model system for biomolecular dynamics, can lead to an understanding of molecular processes that advances both basic and applied sciences.

  8. Indium telluride nanotubes: Solvothermal synthesis, growth mechanism, and properties

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Liyan; Yan, Shancheng; Lu, Tao; Shi, Yi; Wang, Jianyu; Yang, Fan

    2014-03-15

    A convenient solvothermal approach was applied for the first time to synthesize In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes. The morphology of the resultant nanotubes was studied by scanning electron microscopy and transmission electron microscopy. Nanotubes with a relatively uniform diameter of around 500 nm, tube wall thickness of 50–100 nm, and average length of tens of microns were obtained. X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Raman spectroscopy were used to study the crystal structures, composition, and optical properties of the products. To understand the growth mechanism of the In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes, we studied the influences of temperature, reaction time, and polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) and ethylene diamine (EDA) dosages on the final products. Based on the experimental results, a possible growth mechanism of In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes was proposed. In this mechanism, TeO{sub 3}{sup −2} is first reduced to allow nucleation. Circumferential edges of these nucleated molecules attract further deposition, and nanotubes finally grow rapidly along the c-axis and relatively slowly along the circumferential direction. The surface area of the products was determined by BET and found to be 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. This large surface area indicates that the nanotubes may be suitable for gas sensing and hydrogen storage applications. The nanotubes also showed broad light detection ranging from 300 nm to 1100 nm, which covers the UV–visible–NIR regions. Such excellent optical properties indicate that In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes may enable significant advancements in new photodetection and photosensing applications. -- Graphical abstract: A convenient solvothermal approach was applied to synthesize In{sub 2}Te{sub 3} nanotubes, which has not been reported in the literature for our knowledge. Surface area of this material is 137.85 m{sup 2} g{sup −1} from the BET testing, and such a high value makes it probably suitable for gas sensing and

  9. Facile Preparation of Octadecyl Monoliths with Incorporated Carbon Nanotubes and Neutral Monoliths with Coated Carbon Nanotubes Stationary Phases for HPLC of Small and Large Molecules by Hydrophobic and π-π Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Mayadunne, Erandi; Rassi, Ziad El

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches for incorporating carbon nanotubes into monolithic columns for HPLC are described in this report. They pertain to the investigation of carbon nanotubes either (i) as entities to modulate solute retention on monolithic columns bearing well defined retentive ligands or (ii) as entities that constitute the stationary phase responsible for solute retention and separation. Approach (i) involved the incorporation of carbon nanotubes into octadecyl monolithic columns while approach (ii) concerns the preparation and evaluation of an ideal monolithic support and coating it with carbon nanotubes to yield a real “carbon nanotube stationary phase” for the HPLC separation of a wide range of solutes. First, an octadecyl monolithic column based on the in situ polymerization of octadecyl acrylate and trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate was optimized for use in HPLC separations of small and large solutes (e.g., proteins). To further modulate the retention and separation of proteins, small amounts of carbon nanotubes were incorporated into the octadecyl monolith column. In approach (ii), an inert, relatively polar monolith based on the in situ polymerization of glyceryl monomethacrylate (GMM) and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EDMA) proved to be the most suitable support for the preparation of “carbon nanotube stationary phase”. This carbon nanotube “coated” monolith proved useful in the HPLC separation of a wide range of small solutes including enantiomers. In approach (ii), a more homogeneous incorporation of carbon nanotubes into the diol monolithic columns (i.e., GMM/EDMA) was achieved when hydroxyl functionalized carbon nanotubes were incorporated into the GMM/EDMA monolithic support. In addition, high power sonication for a short time enhanced further the homogeneity of the monolith incorporated with nanotubes. In all cases, nonpolar and π interactions were responsible for solute retention on the monolith incorporated carbon nanotubes. PMID:25127634

  10. Applications of Quantum Chemistry to the Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    For several years, scientists at NASA Ames have been studying the properties of carbon nanotubes using various experimental and computational methods. In this talk, I will compare different strategies for using quantum chemistry calculations to describe the electronic structure, deformation and chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the physisorption of small molecules on nanotube surfaces. The SWNT can be treated as an infinite (periodic) or finite length carbon cylinder or as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule with an imposed curvature maintained by external constraints (as if it were cut out of the SWNT surface). Calculations are carried out using DFT and MP2 methods and a variety of atomic orbital basis sets from minimal (STO-3G) to valence triple zeta. The optimal approach is based on the particular SWNT property of interest. Examples to be discussed include: nanotube fluorination and other functionalization reactions; coating of nanotubes by water vapor and low-molecular weight organic molecules; and the nature of the interface between SWNT and liquids such as water and amines. In many cases, the quantum chemistry calculations are used to parameterize or validate force fields for molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these calculations have helped explain experimental data and contributed to the design of novel materials and sensors based on carbon nanotubes. Some of this research is described in the following papers:

  11. Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes at the Interface of Pickering Emulsions.

    PubMed

    Briggs, Nicholas M; Weston, Javen S; Li, Brian; Venkataramani, Deepika; Aichele, Clint P; Harwell, Jeffrey H; Crossley, Steven P

    2015-12-08

    Carbon nanotubes exhibit very unique properties in biphasic systems. Their interparticle attraction leads to reduced droplet coalescence rates and corresponding improvements in emulsion stability. Here we use covalent and noncovalent techniques to modify the hydrophilicity of multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and study their resulting behavior at an oil-water interface. By using both paraffin wax/water and dodecane/water systems, the thickness of the layer of MWNTs at the interface and resulting emulsion stability are shown to vary significantly with the approach used to modify the MWNTs. Increased hydrophilicity of the MWNTs shifts the emulsions from water-in-oil to oil-in-water. The stability of the emulsion is found to correlate with the thickness of nanotubes populating the oil-water interface and relative strength of the carbon nanotube network. The addition of a surfactant decreases the thickness of nanotubes at the interface and enhances the overall interfacial area stabilized at the expense of increased droplet coalescence rates. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time the interfacial thickness of modified carbon nanotubes has been quantified and correlated to emulsion stability.

  12. Multifunctional composites using reinforced laminae with carbon-nanotube forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veedu, Vinod P.; Cao, Anyuan; Li, Xuesong; Ma, Kougen; Soldano, Caterina; Kar, Swastik; Ajayan, Pulickel M.; Ghasemi-Nejhad, Mehrdad N.

    2006-06-01

    Traditional fibre-reinforced composite materials with excellent in-plane properties fare poorly when out-of-plane through-thickness properties are important. Composite architectures with fibres designed orthogonal to the two-dimensional (2D) layout in traditional composites could alleviate this weakness in the transverse direction, but all of the efforts so far have only produced limited success. Here, we unveil an approach to the 3D composite challenge, without altering the 2D stack design, on the basis of the concept of interlaminar carbon-nanotube forests that would provide enhanced multifunctional properties along the thickness direction. The carbon-nanotube forests allow the fastening of adjacent plies in the 3D composite. We grow multiwalled carbon nanotubes on the surface of micro-fibre fabric cloth layouts, normal to the fibre lengths, resulting in a 3D effect between plies under loading. These nanotube-coated fabric cloths serve as building blocks for the multilayered 3D composites, with the nanotube forests providing much-needed interlaminar strength and toughness under various loading conditions. For the fabricated 3D composites with nanotube forests, we demonstrate remarkable improvements in the interlaminar fracture toughness, hardness, delamination resistance, in-plane mechanical properties, damping, thermoelastic behaviour, and thermal and electrical conductivities making these structures truly multifunctional.

  13. Phonon engineering of electronic transport in hybrid nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balandin, Alexander A.; Fonoberov, Vladimir A.

    2006-03-01

    Recently, a number of biological nanoscale objects, including tobacco mosaic viruses (TMV), have been employed as templates for assembly of inorganic nanostructures. This approach can potentially lead to a new method of fabrication of nanoelectronic circuits beyond conventional CMOS. Here we theoretically demonstrate that in addition to their role as nano-templates [1], the elastically soft TMVs can improve electron transport in the nanotubes grown on them [2]. In the simulated hybrid nanostructures, which consist of silicon or silica nanotubes on TMVs, the confined acoustic phonons are found to be redistributed between the nanotube shell and the acoustically soft virus enclosure. As a result, the low-temperature electron mobility in the hybrid TMV-silicon nanotube can increase up to a factor of four compared to that of an empty silicon nanotube [2]. Our estimates also indicate an enhancement of the low-temperature thermal conductivity in the TMV-silicon nanotube, which can lead to improvements in heat removal from the hybrid nanostructure-based circuits. The authors acknowledge the support of MARCO and its Functional Engineered Nano Architectonics (FENA) Focus Center. [1] W.L. Liu, K. Alim, A.A. Balandin et al., Appl. Phys. Lett. 86, 253108 (2005); [2] V.A. Fonoberov and A.A. Balandin, Nano Lett. 5, 1920 (2005).

  14. Applications of Quantum Chemistry to the Study of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    For several years, scientists at NASA Ames have been studying the properties of carbon nanotubes using various experimental and computational methods. In this talk, I will compare different strategies for using quantum chemistry calculations to describe the electronic structure, deformation and chemical functionalization of single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and the physisorption of small molecules on nanotube surfaces. The SWNT can be treated as an infinite (periodic) or finite length carbon cylinder or as a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) molecule with an imposed curvature maintained by external constraints (as if it were cut out of the SWNT surface). Calculations are carried out using DFT and MP2 methods and a variety of atomic orbital basis sets from minimal (STO-3G) to valence triple zeta. The optimal approach is based on the particular SWNT property of interest. Examples to be discussed include: nanotube fluorination and other functionalization reactions; coating of nanotubes by water vapor and low-molecular weight organic molecules; and the nature of the interface between SWNT and liquids such as water and amines. In many cases, the quantum chemistry calculations are used to parameterize or validate force fields for molecular dynamics simulations. The results of these calculations have helped explain experimental data and contributed to the design of novel materials and sensors based on carbon nanotubes. Some of this research is described in the following papers:

  15. Switching and Rectification in Carbon-Nanotube Junctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Andriotis, Antonis N.; Menon, Madhu; Chernozatonskii, Leonid

    2003-01-01

    Multi-terminal carbon-nanotube junctions are under investigation as candidate components of nanoscale electronic devices and circuits. Three-terminal "Y" junctions of carbon nanotubes (see Figure 1) have proven to be especially interesting because (1) it is now possible to synthesize them in high yield in a controlled manner and (2) results of preliminary experimental and theoretical studies suggest that such junctions could exhibit switching and rectification properties. Following the preliminary studies, current-versus-voltage characteristics of a number of different "Y" junctions of single-wall carbon nanotubes connected to metal wires were computed. Both semiconducting and metallic nanotubes of various chiralities were considered. Most of the junctions considered were symmetric. These computations involved modeling of the quantum electrical conductivity of the carbon nanotubes and junctions, taking account of such complicating factors as the topological defects (pentagons, heptagons, and octagons) present in the hexagonal molecular structures at the junctions, and the effects of the nanotube/wire interfaces. A major component of the computational approach was the use of an efficient Green s function embedding scheme. The results of these computations showed that symmetric junctions could be expected to support both rectification and switching. The results also showed that rectification and switching properties of a junction could be expected to depend strongly on its symmetry and, to a lesser degree, on the chirality of the nanotubes. In particular, it was found that a zigzag nanotube branching at a symmetric "Y" junction could exhibit either perfect rectification or partial rectification (asymmetric current-versus-voltage characteristic, as in the example of Figure 2). It was also found that an asymmetric "Y" junction would not exhibit rectification.

  16. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes: Characterization, modeling and composite applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiren

    Carbon nanotubes have demonstrated exceptional mechanical, thermal and electrical properties, and are regarded as one of the most promising reinforcement materials for the next generation of high performance structural and multifunctional composites. However, to date, most application attempts have been hindered by several technical roadblocks, such as poor dispersion and weak interfacial bonding. In this dissertation, several innovative functionalization methods were proposed, studied to overcome these technical issues in order to realize the full potential of nanotubes as reinforcement. These functionalization methods included precision sectioning of nanotubes using an ultra-microtome, electron-beam irradiation, amino and epoxide group grafting. The characterization results of atomic force microscope, transmission electronic microscope and Raman suggested that aligned carbon nanotubes can be precisely sectioned with controlled length and minimum sidewall damage. This study also designed and demonstrated new covalent functionalization approaches through unique epoxy-grafting and one-step amino-grafting, which have potential of scale-up for composite applications. In addition, the dissertation also successfully tailored the structure and properties of the thin nanotube film through electron beam irradiation. Significant improvement of both mechanical and electrical conducting properties of the irradiated nanotube films or buckypapers was achieved. All these methods demonstrated effectiveness in improving dispersion and interfacial bonding in the epoxy resin, resulting in considerable improvements in composite mechanical properties. Modeling of functionalization methods also provided further understanding and offered the reasonable explanations of SWNTs length distribution as well as carbon nanostructure transformation upon electron-beam irradiation. Both experimental and modeling results provide important foundations for the further comprehensively investigation of

  17. Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes obtained by high density plasma chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousinho, A. P.; Mansano, R. D.

    2015-03-01

    Patterned growth of carbon nanotubes by chemical vapor deposition represents an assembly approach to place and orient nanotubes at a stage as early as when they are synthesized. In this work, the carbon nanotubes were obtained at room temperature by High Density Plasmas Chemical Vapor Deposition (HDPCVD) system. This CVD system uses a new concept of plasma generation, where a planar coil coupled to an RF system for plasma generation was used with an electrostatic shield for plasma densification. In this mode, high density plasmas are obtained. We also report the patterned growth of carbon nanotubes on full 4-in Si wafers, using pure methane plasmas and iron as precursor material (seed). Photolithography processes were used to pattern the regions on the silicon wafers. The carbon nanotubes were characterized by micro-Raman spectroscopy, the spectra showed very single-walled carbon nanotubes axial vibration modes around 1590 cm-1 and radial breathing modes (RBM) around 120-400 cm-1, confirming that high quality of the carbon nanotubes obtained in this work. The carbon nanotubes were analyzed by atomic force microscopy and scanning electron microscopy too. The results showed that is possible obtain high-aligned carbon nanotubes with patterned growth on a silicon wafer with high reproducibility and control.

  18. INTERDISCIPLINARY PHYSICS AND RELATED AREAS OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: Interaction of Methane with Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes: Role of Defects, Curvature and Nanotubes Type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganji, M. D.; Asghary, M.; Najafi, A. A.

    2010-05-01

    We investigate the interaction of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and methane molecule from the first principles. Adsorption energies are calculated, and methane affinities for the typical semiconducting and metallic nanotubes are compared. We also discuss role of the structural defects and nanotube curvature on the adsorption capability of the SWCNTs. We could observe larger adsorption energies for the metallic CNTs in comparison with the semiconducting CNTs. The obtained results for the zig zag nanotubes with various diameters reveal that the adsorption energy is higher for nanotubes with larger diameters. For defected tubes the adsorption energies are calculated for various configurations such as methane molecule approaching to the defect sites pentagon, hexagon, and heptagon in the tube surface. The results show that the introduce defects have an important contribution to the adsorption mechanism of the methane on SWNTs.

  19. Free-standing arrays of isolated TiO2 nanotubes through supercritical fluid drying.

    PubMed

    Deneault, James R; Xiao, Xiaoyin; Kang, Tae-Sik; Wang, Joanna S; Wai, Chien M; Brown, Gail J; Durstock, Michael F

    2012-01-16

    A common complication in fabricating arrays of TiO(2) nanotubes is that they agglomerate into tightly packed bundles during the inevitable solvent evaporation step. This problem is particularly acute for template-fabricated TiO(2) nanotubes, as the geometric tunability of this technique enables relatively large inter-pore spacings or, from another perspective, more space for lateral displacement. Our work showed that agglomeration results from the surface tension forces that are present as the ambient solvent is evaporated from the nanotube film. Herein, we report a processing and fabrication approach that utilizes supercritical fluid drying (CO(2)) to prepare arrays of template-fabricated TiO(2) nanotubes that are free-standing and spatially isolated. This approach could be beneficial to many emerging technologies, such as solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells and vertically-oriented carbon nanotube electrodes.

  20. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  1. The Toxicology of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donaldson, Ken; Poland, Craig; Duffin, Rodger; Bonner, James

    2012-06-01

    1. Carbon nanotube structure, synthesis and applications C. Singh and W. Song; 2. The aerodynamic behaviour and pulmonary deposition of carbon nanotubes A. Buckley, R. Smith and R Maynard; 3. Utilising the concept of the biologically effective dose to define the particle and fibre hazards of carbon nanotubes K. Donaldson, R. Duffin, F. Murphy and C. Poland; 4. CNT, biopersistence and the fibre paradigm D. Warheit and M. DeLorme; 5. Length-dependent retention of fibres in the pleural space C. Poland, F. Murphy and K. Donaldson; 6. Experimental carcinogenicity of carbon nanotubes in the context of other fibres K. Unfried; 7. Fate and effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. Ryman-Rasmussen, M. Andersen and J. Bonner; 8. Responses to pulmonary exposure to carbon nanotubes V. Castranova and R. Mercer; 9. Genotoxicity of carbon nanotubes R. Schins, C. Albrecht, K. Gerloff and D. van Berlo; 10. Carbon nanotube-cellular interactions; macrophages, epithelial and mesothelial cells V. Stone, M. Boyles, A. Kermanizadeh, J. Varet and H. Johnston; 11. Systemic health effects of carbon nanotubes following inhalation J. McDonald; 12. Dosimetry and metrology of carbon nanotubes L. Tran, L. MacCalman and R. Aitken; Index.

  2. Controlling The Position And Morphology of Nanotubes For Device Fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiff, Emer; Leahy, Rory; Minett, Andrew I.; Blau, Werner J.

    2004-09-01

    In producing nanotube based devices as diverse as composite materials and sensing platforms, the in-situ growth of carbon nanotubes is most advantageous. Obtaining growth from organo-metallic catalysts pre-patterned on silicon wafers, precise structured nanotube patterns have then easily been incorporated into flexible stand-alone composites. In an alternative approach, aligned and sometimes ultra-long (>40μm) nanotubes have been obtained from catalytic growth in porous alumina membranes. Three-way (T) and now four-way (X) interconnects have been observed during the growth process, which can be incorporated into nanoscale electronic devices. Current approaches are for use as on-chip interconnects and single tube devices that can be used as the transducer in small scale bio- and chemical-sensors. In both these approaches, the density, morphology and position of the nanotubes can be controlled. This provides more precise placement of conduction channels in composites or devices, resulting in more efficient fabrication over conventional device formation.

  3. Nanotube electronics: large-scale assembly of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Rao, Saleem G; Huang, Ling; Setyawan, Wahyu; Hong, Seunghun

    2003-09-04

    Nanoscale electronic devices made from carbon nanotubes, such as transistors and sensors, are much smaller and more versatile than those that rely on conventional microelectronic chips, but their development for mass production has been thwarted by difficulties in aligning and integrating the millions of nanotubes required. Inspired by biomolecular self-assembly processes, we have created chemically functionalized patterns on a surface, to which pre-grown nanotubes in solution can align themselves in huge numbers. This method allows wafer-scale fabrication of millions of carbon-nanotube circuits with single-nanotube precision, and may enable nanotube-based devices, such as computer chips and high-density sensor arrays, to be produced industrially.

  4. Torsional Resonators Based on Inorganic Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Divon, Yiftach; Levi, Roi; Garel, Jonathan; Golberg, Dmitri; Tenne, Reshef; Ya'akobovitz, Assaf; Joselevich, Ernesto

    2017-01-11

    We study for the first time the resonant torsional behaviors of inorganic nanotubes, specifically tungsten disulfide (WS2) and boron nitride (BN) nanotubes, and compare them to that of carbon nanotubes. We have found WS2 nanotubes to have the highest quality factor (Q) and torsional resonance frequency, followed by BN nanotubes and carbon nanotubes. Dynamic and static torsional spring constants of the various nanotubes were found to be different, especially in the case of WS2, possibly due to a velocity-dependent intershell friction. These results indicate that inorganic nanotubes are promising building blocks for high-Q nanoelectromechanical systems (NEMS).

  5. Modeling of carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube-polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, G.; Kumar, S.

    2016-01-01

    In order to meet stringent environmental, safety and performance requirements from respective regulatory bodies, various technology-based industries are promoting the use of advanced carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced lightweight and high strength polymer nanocomposites (PNCs) as a substitute to conventional materials both in structural and non-structural applications. The superior mechanical properties of PNCs made up of CNTs or bundles of CNTs can be attributed to the interfacial interaction between the CNTs and matrix, CNT's morphologies and to their uniform dispersion in the matrix. In PNCs, CNTs physically bond with polymeric matrix at a level where the assumption of continuum level interactions is not applicable. Modeling and prediction of mechanical response and failure behavior of CNTs and their composites becomes a complex task and is dealt with the help of up-scale modeling strategies involving multiple spatial and temporal scales in hierarchical or concurrent manner. Firstly, the article offers an insight into various modeling techniques in studying the mechanical response of CNTs; namely, equivalent continuum approach, quasi-continuum approach and molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. In the subsequent steps, these approaches are combined with analytical and numerical micromechanics models in a multiscale framework to predict the average macroscopic response of PNCs. The review also discusses the implementation aspects of these computational approaches, their current status and associated challenges with a future outlook.

  6. Carbon nanotubes for microelectronics?

    PubMed

    Graham, Andrew P; Duesberg, Georg S; Seidel, Robert V; Liebau, Maik; Unger, Eugen; Pamler, Werner; Kreupl, Franz; Hoenlein, Wolfgang

    2005-04-01

    Despite all prophecies of its end, silicon-based microelectronics still follows Moore's Law and continues to develop rapidly. However, the inherent physical limits will eventually be reached. Carbon nanotubes offer the potential for further miniaturization as long as it is possible to selectively deposit them with defined properties.

  7. Synthetic single-nanopore and nanotube membranes.

    PubMed

    Harrell, C Chad; Lee, Sang Bok; Martin, Charles R

    2003-12-15

    There is increasing interest in investigating transport and electrochemical phenomena in synthetic membrane samples that contain a single pore of nanoscopic diameter. Approaches used to date for preparing such single-nanopore membranes include microfabrication-based methods, the track-etch method, and a method based on the incorporation of a single fullerene nanotube within a synthetic membrane. We describe here an alternative approach that we believe is easier and more accessible than the previously described methods. This method is based on a very low pore density track-etch membrane obtained from commercial sources. Fluorescence microscopy is used to identify and isolate a single nanopore in this membrane. Membrane samples containing single nanopores with diameters as small as 30 nm have been prepared. Furthermore, we show here that an electroless plating method can be used to deposit a gold nanotube within the single nanopore, and this provides a route for further decreasing the inside diameter of the pore. A single-nanotube membrane with an electrochemically determined inside diameter of approximately 2 nm was prepared and evaluated.

  8. Interconnecting Gold Islands with DNA Origami Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Baoquan; Wu, Hao; Xu, Wei; Zhao, Zhao; Liu, Yan; Yu, Hongbin; Yan, Hao

    2012-01-01

    Scaffolded DNA origami has recently emerged as a versatile, programmable method to fold DNA into arbitrarily shaped nanostructures that are spatially addressable, with sub-10 nm resolution. Toward functional DNA nanotechnology, one of the key challenges is to integrate the bottom up self-assembly of DNA origami with the top-down lithographic methods used to generate surface patterning. In this report we demonstrate that fixed length DNA origami nanotubes, modified with multiple thiol groups near both ends, can be used to connect surface patterned gold islands (tens of nanometers in diameter) fabricated by electron beam lithography (EBL). Atomic force microscopic imaging verified that the DNA origami nanotubes can be efficiently aligned between gold islands with various inter-island distances and relative locations. This development represents progress toward the goal of bridging bottom up and top down assembly approaches. PMID:21070012

  9. Arc process parameters for single-walled carbon nanotube growth and production: experiments and modeling.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Samir; Hinkov, Ivaylo; Scott, Carl D

    2004-04-01

    Collarets rich in single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have been grown using a direct current arc method. Arc process parameters such as current, pressure, and anode to cathode distance were varied experimentally and by modeling to provide an optimal working window. The best collaret yields were obtained when helium was used as a buffer gas. Mixing helium with argon in the buffer permits controlling nanotube diameters. In addition to an experimental study, a modeling approach was developed assuming local thermal equilibrium and homogenous and heterogeneous neutral chemistry. The gas-phase chemical model involves 81 neutral carbon species (C1, C2, . . ., C79, C60F, C70F) and 554 reactions with rates taken from data of Krestinin and Moravsky. Axial profiles of temperature, C atom, C2 radical, and fullerene distributions in the reactor are predicted as a function of process parameters. Carbon nanotube growth is considered by a set of surface reactions simulating open nanotube growth. Because nanotube surface chemistry is controlled by the local terminated bond and not by the bulk nanotube bond, a mechanistic approach based on the formal resemblance between the bonding and the structure of open nanotube and other carbon surfaces is proposed to explain nanotube growth. Predicted growth rates are in the range of 100 to 1000 microm/min.

  10. Atomic transportation via carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Quan

    2009-01-01

    The transportation of helium atoms in a single-walled carbon nanotube is reported via molecular dynamics simulations. The efficiency of the atomic transportation is found to be dependent on the type of the applied loading and the loading rate as well as the temperature in the process. Simulations show the transportation is a result of the van der Waals force between the nanotube and the helium atoms through a kink propagation initiated in the nanotube.

  11. Strong and Conductive Dry Carbon Nanotube Films by Microcombing.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Liwen; Wang, Xin; Xu, Weizong; Zhang, Yongyi; Li, Qingwen; Bradford, Philip D; Zhu, Yuntian

    2015-08-01

    In order to maximize the carbon nanotube (CNT) buckypaper properties, it is critical to improve their alignment and reduce their waviness. In this paper, a novel approach, microcombing, is reported to fabricate aligned CNT films with a uniform structure. High level of nanotube alignment and straightness was achieved using sharp surgical blades with microsized features at the blade edges to comb single layer of CNT sheet. These microcombs also reduced structural defects within the film and enhanced the nanotube packing density. Following the microcombing approach, the as-produced CNT films demonstrated a tensile strength of up to 3.2 GPa, Young's modulus of up to 172 GPa, and electrical conductivity of up to 1.8 × 10(5) S m(-1) , which are much superior to previously reported CNT films or buckypapers. More importantly, this novel technique requires less rigorous process control and can construct CNT films with reproducible properties.

  12. Micro-solid phase equilibrium extraction with highly ordered TiO2 nanotube arrays: a new approach for the enrichment and measurement of organochlorine pesticides at trace level in environmental water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Huang, Yunrui; Xiao, Junping; Xie, Guohong

    2011-04-01

    Ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays have been widely used in many fields such as photocatalysis, self-cleaning, solar cells, gas sensing, and catalysis. This present study exploited a new functional application of the ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays. A micro-solid phase equilibrium extraction using ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays was developed for the enrichment and measurement of organochlorine pesticides prior to gas chromatography-electron capture detection. Ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays exhibited excellent merits on the pre-concentration of organochlorine pesticides and lower detection limits of 0.10, 0.10, 0.10, 0.098, 0.0076, 0.0097, 0.016, and 0.023 μg L(-1) for α-HCH, β-HCH, γ-HCH, δ-HCH, p,p'-DDE, p,p'-DDD, o,p'-DDT, and p,p'-DDT, respectively, were achieved. Four real water samples were used for validation, and the spiked recoveries were in the range of 78-102.8%. These results demonstrated that the developed micro-solid phase equilibrium extraction using ordered TiO(2) nanotube arrays would be very constructive and have a great beginning with a brand new prospect in the analysis of environmental pollutants.

  13. Carbon nanotube IR detectors (SV)

    SciTech Connect

    Leonard, F. L.

    2012-03-01

    Sandia National Laboratories (Sandia) and Lockheed Martin Corporation (LMC) collaborated to (1) evaluate the potential of carbon nanotubes as channels in infrared (IR) photodetectors; (2) assemble and characterize carbon nanotube electronic devices and measure the photocurrent generated when exposed to infrared light;(3) compare the performance of the carbon nanotube devices with that of traditional devices; and (4) develop and numerically implement models of electronic transport and opto-electronic behavior of carbon nanotube infrared detectors. This work established a new paradigm for photodetectors.

  14. Fabricating Copper Nanotubes by Electrodeposition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, E. H.; Ramsey, Christopher; Bae, Youngsam; Choi, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Copper tubes having diameters between about 100 and about 200 nm have been fabricated by electrodeposition of copper into the pores of alumina nanopore membranes. Copper nanotubes are under consideration as alternatives to copper nanorods and nanowires for applications involving thermal and/or electrical contacts, wherein the greater specific areas of nanotubes could afford lower effective thermal and/or electrical resistivities. Heretofore, copper nanorods and nanowires have been fabricated by a combination of electrodeposition and a conventional expensive lithographic process. The present electrodeposition-based process for fabricating copper nanotubes costs less and enables production of copper nanotubes at greater rate.

  15. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Amit; Punyani, Supriya; Bale, Shyam Sundhar; Yang, Hoichang; Borca-Tasciuc, Theodorian; Kane, Ravi S.

    2008-01-01

    Conjugating proteins onto carbon nanotubes has numerous applications in biosensing, imaging and cellular delivery. However, remotely controlling the activity of proteins in these conjugates has never been demonstrated. Here we show that upon near-infrared irradiation, carbon nanotubes mediate the selective deactivation of proteins in situ by photochemical effects. We designed nanotube-peptide conjugates to selectively destroy the anthrax toxin, and also optically transparent coatings that can self-clean following either visible or near-infrared irradiation. Nanotube-assisted protein deactivation may be broadly applicable to the selective destruction of pathogens and cells, and will have applications ranging from antifouling coatings to functional proteomics.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes for Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    The potential of nanotube technology for NASA missions is significant and is properly recognized by NASA management. Ames has done much pioneering research in the last five years on carbon nanotube growth, characterization, atomic force microscopy, sensor development and computational nanotechnology. NASA Johnson Space Center has focused on laser ablation production of nanotubes and composites development. These in-house efforts, along with strategic collaboration with academia and industry, are geared towards meeting the agency's mission requirements. This viewgraph presentation (including an explanation for each slide) outlines the research focus for Ames nanotechnology, including details on carbon nanotubes' properties, applications, and synthesis.

  17. Accelerated dynamics simulations of nanotubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Uberuaga, B. P.; Stuart, S. J.; Voter, A. F.

    2002-01-01

    We report on the application of accelerated dynamics techniques to the study of carbon nanotubes. We have used the parallel replica method and temperature accelerated dynamics simulations are currently in progress. In the parallel replica study, we have stretched tubes at a rate significantly lower than that used in previous studies. In these preliminary results, we find that there are qualitative differences in the rupture of the nanotubes at different temperatures. We plan on extending this investigation to include nanotubes of various chiralities. We also plan on exploring unique geometries of nanotubes.

  18. Application of the Hansen solubility Parameters theory to carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Detriche, S; Zorzini, G; Colomer, J F; Fonseca, A; Nagy, J B

    2008-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) are very promising nano-objects due to their exceptional properties. However, their tendency to form bundles as well as their insolubility in common solvents makes them difficult to handle. The main way to solve the problem is chemical or physical CNTs functionalisations, with all the problems inherent to the methods. In this contribution, we present a new approach that allows predicting the solubility of carbon nanotubes in many solvents but also predicting the most appropriate solvents to use for given samples of CNTs. Solubilisation and dispersion being directly connected, the present approach of solubilisation proves also to be efficient in dispersing the CNTs bundles. This contribution is a first step toward the control of carbon nanotube's dispersion in polymers and their homogenous functionalisation. Moreover, we also report here a new method, based on solvents, to separate carbon nanotubes by size, the use of mixture of non-solvents in order to obtain good solvents and the use of mixture of good solvents to obtain higher solubility. The use of mixture of good solvents allowed us to obtain high solubility, up to three times higher then that reported in literature. We have also measured and analysed the solubility of some functionalised carbon nanotubes.

  19. Composition Based Strategies for Controlling Radii in Lipid Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Kurczy, Michael E.; Mellander, Lisa J.; Najafinobar, Neda; Cans, Ann-Sofie

    2014-01-01

    Nature routinely carries out small-scale chemistry within lipid bound cells and organelles. Liposome–lipid nanotube networks are being developed by many researchers in attempt to imitate these membrane enclosed environments, with the goal to perform small-scale chemical studies. These systems are well characterized in terms of the diameter of the giant unilamellar vesicles they are constructed from and the length of the nanotubes connecting them. Here we evaluate two methods based on intrinsic curvature for adjusting the diameter of the nanotube, an aspect of the network that has not previously been controllable. This was done by altering the lipid composition of the network membrane with two different approaches. In the first, the composition of the membrane was altered via lipid incubation of exogenous lipids; either with the addition of the low intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylcholine (soy-PC) or the high intrinsic curvature lipid soy phosphatidylethanolamine (soy-PE). In the second approach, exogenous lipids were added to the total lipid composition during liposome formation. Here we show that for both lipid augmentation methods, we observed a decrease in nanotube diameter following soy-PE additions but no significant change in size following the addition of soy-PC. Our results demonstrate that the effect of soy-PE on nanotube diameter is independent of the method of addition and suggests that high curvature soy-PE molecules facilitate tube membrane curvature. PMID:24392077

  20. Carbon Nanotube Membranes: Carbon Nanotube Membranes for Energy-Efficient Carbon Sequestration

    SciTech Connect

    2010-03-01

    Broad Funding Opportunity Announcement Project: Porifera is developing carbon nanotube membranes that allow more efficient removal of CO2 from coal plant exhaust. Most of today’s carbon capture methods use chemical solvents, but capture methods that use membranes to draw CO2 out of exhaust gas are potentially more efficient and cost effective. Traditionally, membranes are limited by the rate at which they allow gas to flow through them and the amount of CO2 they can attract from the gas. Smooth support pores and the unique structure of Porifera’s carbon nanotube membranes allows them to be more permeable than other polymeric membranes, yet still selective enough for CO2 removal. This approach could overcome the barriers facing membrane-based approaches for capturing CO2 from coal plant exhausts.

  1. Facile Synthesis of Highly Aligned Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes from Polymer Precursors

    DOE PAGES

    Han, Catherine Y.; Xiao, Zhi-Li; Wang, H. Hau; ...

    2009-01-01

    We report a facile one-step approach which involves no flammable gas, no catalyst, and no in situ polymerization for the preparation of well-aligned carbon nanotube array. A polymer precursor is placed on top of an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) membrane containing regular nanopore arrays, and slow heating under Ar flow allows the molten polymer to wet the template through adhesive force. The polymer spread into the nanopores of the template to form polymer nanotubes. Upon carbonization the resulting multi-walled carbon nanotubes duplicate the nanopores morphology precisely. The process is demonstrated for 230, 50, and 20 nm pore membranes. The synthesized carbonmore » nanotubes are characterized with scanning/transmission electron microscopies, Raman spectroscopy, and resistive measurements. Convenient functionalization of the nanotubes with this method is demonstrated through premixing CoPt nanoparticles in the polymer precursors.« less

  2. Lipid nanotube formation using space-regulated electric field above interdigitated electrodes.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongmei; Fu, Dingguo; Wang, Lei; Han, Xiaojun

    2014-04-22

    Lipid nanotubes have great potential in biology and nanotechnology. Here we demonstrate a method to form lipid nanotubes using space-regulated AC electric fields above coplanar interdigitated electrodes. The AC electric field distribution can be regulated by solution height above the electrodes. The ratio of field component in x axis (Ex) to field component in z axis (Ez) increases dramatically at solution height below 50 μm; therefore, at lower solution height, the force from Ex predominantly drives lipids to form lipid nanotubes along with the electric field direction. The forces exerted on the lipid nanotube during its formation were analyzed in detail, and an equation was obtained to describe the relationship among nanotube length and field frequency, amplitude, and time. We believe that the presented approach opens a way to design and prepare nanoscale materials with unique structural and functional properties using space-regulated electric fields.

  3. Flexible symmetric supercapacitors based on vertical TiO2 and carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chien, C. J.; Chang, Pai-Chun; Lu, Jia G.

    2010-03-01

    Highly conducting and porous carbon nanotubes are widely used as electrodes in double-layer-effect supercapacitors. In this presentation, vertical TiO2 nanotube array is fabricated by anodization process and used as supercapacitor electrode utilizing its compact density, high surface area and porous structure. By spin coating carbon nanotube networks on vertical TiO2 nanotube array as electrodes with 1M H2SO4 electrolyte in between, the specific capacitance can be enhanced by 30% compared to using pure carbon nanotube network alone because of the combination of double layer effect and redox reaction from metal oxide materials. Based on cyclic voltammetry and galvanostatic charge-discharge measurements, this type of hybrid electrode has proven to be suitable for high performance supercapacitor application and maintain desirable cycling stability. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy technique shows that the electrode has good electrical conductivity. Furthermore, we will discuss the prospect of extending this energy storage approach in flexible electronics.

  4. TRANSPORT SPECTROSCOPY OF CHEMICAL NANOSTRUCTURES: The Case of Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenjie; Bockrath, Marc; Park, Hongkun

    2005-05-01

    Transport spectroscopy, a technique based on current-voltage measurements of individual nanostructures in a three-terminal transistor geometry, has emerged as a powerful new tool to investigate the electronic properties of chemically derived nanostructures. In this review, we discuss the utility of this approach using the recent studies of single-nanotube transistors as an example. Specifically, we discuss how transport measurements can be used to gain detailed insight into the electronic motion in metallic single-walled carbon nanotubes in several distinct regimes, depending on the coupling strength of the contacts to the nanotubes. Measurements of nanotube devices in these different conductance regimes have enabled a detailed analysis of the transport properties, including the experimental determination of all Hartree-Fock parameters that govern the electronic structure of metallic nanotubes and the demonstration of Fabry-Perot resonators based on the interference of electron waves.

  5. Controlling activation barrier by carbon nanotubes as nano-chemical reactors.

    PubMed

    Méjri, Alia; Picaud, Fabien; El Khalifi, Mohammed; Gharbi, Tijani; Tangour, Bahoueddine

    2017-08-01

    The oxidative addition of primary amine on a monocyclic phospholane was studied in confined conditions. This one-step chemical reaction has been investigated using the DFT technique to elucidate the role of confinement in carbon nanotubes on the reaction. Calculations were carried out by a progressive increase of the nanotube diameters from 10 Å to 15 Å in order to highlight the dependence of the reactivity on the nanotube diameter. First, single point investigations were dedicated to the study of reactants, transition states, and products placed in the different nanotubes while keeping their optimized structure as free compounds. Second, all studied compounds were relaxed inside nanotubes and their geometries were fully optimized. Within these approaches, we proved that the activation barrier could be controlled depending on the confinement, generating a well-controlled catalysis process.

  6. Multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement for advanced epoxy composites.

    PubMed

    Bekyarova, E; Thostenson, E T; Yu, A; Kim, H; Gao, J; Tang, J; Hahn, H T; Chou, T-W; Itkis, M E; Haddon, R C

    2007-03-27

    We report an approach to the development of advanced structural composites based on engineered multiscale carbon nanotube-carbon fiber reinforcement. Electrophoresis was utilized for the selective deposition of multi- and single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) on woven carbon fabric. The CNT-coated carbon fabric panels were subsequently infiltrated with epoxy resin using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM) to fabricate multiscale hybrid composites in which the nanotubes were completely integrated into the fiber bundles and reinforced the matrix-rich regions. The carbon nanotube/carbon fabric/epoxy composites showed approximately 30% enhancement of the interlaminar shear strength as compared to that of carbon fiber/epoxy composites without carbon nanotubes and demonstrate significantly improved out-of-plane electrical conductivity.

  7. Nanopattern formation using localized plasma for growth of single-standing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Javadi, Mohammad; Abdi, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    We report a novel method for formation of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes by customizing a plasma-based process. The growth of carbon nanotubes by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition provides suitable grounds to utilize plasma-solid interactions for nanopatterning. The bulk plasma is utilized to fabricate carbon nanotubes on the prepatterned Ni catalyst which in turn can confine the plasma to the growth region. The plasma localization leads to a dielectrophoretic force exerted on Ni atoms and can be engineered in order to grow a specific pattern of self-organized single-standing carbon nanotubes. Numerical simulations based on the plasma localization and dielectrophoretic force confirmed the experimental results. This method provides a simple and cost-effective approach to obtain nanopatterned arrays of carbon nanotubes which can be used for fabrication of photonic and phononic crystals, self-gated field emission-based transistors and displays.

  8. Carbon nanotube-polymer composite actuators

    DOEpatents

    Gennett, Thomas; Raffaelle, Ryne P.; Landi, Brian J.; Heben, Michael J.

    2008-04-22

    The present invention discloses a carbon nanotube (SWNT)-polymer composite actuator and method to make such actuator. A series of uniform composites was prepared by dispersing purified single wall nanotubes with varying weight percents into a polymer matrix, followed by solution casting. The resulting nanotube-polymer composite was then successfully used to form a nanotube polymer actuator.

  9. Carbon nanotube Archimedes screws.

    PubMed

    Oroszlány, László; Zólyomi, Viktor; Lambert, Colin J

    2010-12-28

    Recently, nanomechanical devices composed of a long stationary inner carbon nanotube and a shorter, slowly rotating outer tube have been fabricated. In this paper, we study the possibility of using such devices as nanoscale transducers of motion into electricity. When the outer tube is chiral, we show that such devices act like quantum Archimedes screws, which utilize mechanical energy to pump electrons between reservoirs. We calculate the pumped charge from one end of the inner tube to the other, driven by the rotation of a chiral outer nanotube. We show that the pumped charge can be greater than one electron per 360° rotation, and consequently, such a device operating with a rotational frequency of 10 MHz, for example, would deliver a current of ≈1 pAmp.

  10. Engineering carbon nanotubes and nanotube circuits using electrical breakdown.

    PubMed

    Collins, P G; Arnold, M S; Avouris, P

    2001-04-27

    Carbon nanotubes display either metallic or semiconducting properties. Both large, multiwalled nanotubes (MWNTs), with many concentric carbon shells, and bundles or "ropes" of aligned single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), are complex composite conductors that incorporate many weakly coupled nanotubes that each have a different electronic structure. Here we demonstrate a simple and reliable method for selectively removing single carbon shells from MWNTs and SWNT ropes to tailor the properties of these composite nanotubes. We can remove shells of MWNTs stepwise and individually characterize the different shells. By choosing among the shells, we can convert a MWNT into either a metallic or a semiconducting conductor, as well as directly address the issue of multiple-shell transport. With SWNT ropes, similar selectivity allows us to generate entire arrays of nanoscale field-effect transistors based solely on the fraction of semiconducting SWNTs.

  11. Ultrasound aided photochemical synthesis of Ag loaded TiO2 nanotube arrays to enhance photocatalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Sun, Lan; Li, Jing; Wang, Chenglin; Li, Sifang; Lai, Yuekun; Chen, Hongbo; Lin, Changjian

    2009-11-15

    This work presents a novel approach for preparing TiO(2) nanotube array photocatalyst loaded with highly dispersed Ag nanoparticles through an ultrasound aided photochemical route. The Ag content loaded on the array was controlled by changing the concentration of AgNO(3) solution. The Ag-TiO(2) nanotube arrays were characterized by SEM, XRD, XPS and UV-vis absorption. The effects of Ag content on the photoelectrochemical (PEC) property and photocatalytic activity of TiO(2) nanotube array electrode were studied. The results showed that Ag loading significantly enhanced the photocurrent and photocatalytic degradation rate of TiO(2) nanotube array under UV-light irradiation. The photocurrent and photocatalytic degradation rate of Ag-TiO(2) nanotube array prepared in 0.006 M AgNO(3) solution were about 1.2 and 3.7 times as that of pure TiO(2) nanotube array, respectively.

  12. Electron transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide: first-principles analysis.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Anurag; Sharma, Vikash; Kaur, Kamalpreet; Khan, Md Shahzad; Ahuja, Rajeev; Rao, V K

    2015-07-01

    First-principles analysis based on density functional theory was performed to compute the electronic and transport properties of a single-walled carbon nanotube in the presence of hydrogen cyanide. A chiral (4,1) carbon nanotube was found to become less metallic as the number of hydrogen cyanide molecules nearby increased. When there were a sufficient number of hydrogen cyanide molecules close to the nanotube, it became semiconducting. This metallic to semiconducting transformation of the nanotube was verified by analyzing its conductance and current as a function of the number of molecules of hydrogen cyanide present. The conductivity of the carbon nanotube was very high when no hydrogen cyanide molecules were present, but decreased considerably when even just a single hydrogen cyanide molecule approached the surface of the nanotube.

  13. Virus-templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electron collection in photovoltaic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dang, Xiangnan; Yi, Hyunjung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Yun, Dong Soo; Ladewski, Rebecca; Strano, Michael S.; Hammond, Paula T.; Belcher, Angela M.

    2011-06-01

    The performance of photovoltaic devices could be improved by using rationally designed nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. Single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit very high electron mobility, but the incorporation of such nanotubes into nanocomposites to create efficient photovoltaic devices is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube-TiO2 nanocrystal core-shell nanocomposites using a genetically engineered M13 virus as a template. By using the nanocomposites as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, we demonstrate that even small fractions of nanotubes improve the power conversion efficiency by increasing the electron collection efficiency. We also show that both the electronic type and degree of bundling of the nanotubes in the nanotube/TiO2 complex are critical factors in determining device performance. With our approach, we achieve a power conversion efficiency in the dye-sensitized solar cells of 10.6%.

  14. Virus-templated self-assembled single-walled carbon nanotubes for highly efficient electron collection in photovoltaic devices.

    PubMed

    Dang, Xiangnan; Yi, Hyunjung; Ham, Moon-Ho; Qi, Jifa; Yun, Dong Soo; Ladewski, Rebecca; Strano, Michael S; Hammond, Paula T; Belcher, Angela M

    2011-04-24

    The performance of photovoltaic devices could be improved by using rationally designed nanocomposites with high electron mobility to efficiently collect photo-generated electrons. Single-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit very high electron mobility, but the incorporation of such nanotubes into nanocomposites to create efficient photovoltaic devices is challenging. Here, we report the synthesis of single-walled carbon nanotube-TiO(2) nanocrystal core-shell nanocomposites using a genetically engineered M13 virus as a template. By using the nanocomposites as photoanodes in dye-sensitized solar cells, we demonstrate that even small fractions of nanotubes improve the power conversion efficiency by increasing the electron collection efficiency. We also show that both the electronic type and degree of bundling of the nanotubes in the nanotube/TiO(2) complex are critical factors in determining device performance. With our approach, we achieve a power conversion efficiency in the dye-sensitized solar cells of 10.6%.

  15. Nanorods and nanotubes for solar cells.

    PubMed

    Kislyuk, V V; Dimitriev, O P

    2008-01-01

    Nanorods and nanotubes as photoactive materials as well as electrodes in photovoltaic cells have been launched a few years ago, and the literature in this field started to appear only recently. The first steps have shown both advantages and disadvantages of their application, and the main expectation associated with their effective charge transport has not been realized completely. This article aims to review both the first and the recent tendencies in the development and application of nanorod and nanotube materials in photovoltaic cells. Two basic techniques of synthesis of crystalline nanorod structures are described, the top-down and bottom-up approaches, respectively. Design and photovoltaic performance of solar cells based on various semiconductor nanorod materials, such as TiO2, ZnO, CdS, CdSe, CdTe, CuO, Si are presented and compared with respective solar cells based on semiconductor nanoparticles. Specific of synthesis and application of carbon nanotubes in photovoltaic devices is also reviewed.

  16. Carbon Nanotubes Toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellucci, Stefano

    We describe current and possible future developments in nanotechnology for biological and medical applications. Nanostructured, composite materials for drug delivery, biosensors, diagnostics and tumor therapy are reviewed as examples, placing special emphasis on silica composites. Carbon nanotubes are discussed as a primary example of emerging nanomaterials for many of the above-mentioned applications. Toxicity effects of this novel nanomaterial are discussed and the need for further study of potential hazards for human health, professionally exposed workers and the environment is motivated.

  17. Morphing Carbon Nanotube Microstructures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-02-20

    would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the CNTs. This shape change, in combination with the mechanical... materials and active surfaces. 15.  SUBJECT TERMS Morphing Structures, Plant-mimetic Design, Cabon Nanotube, Active Polymers 16.  SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...and it was proposed that morphing CNT microstructures would operate by swelling of an active material in a direction locally perpendicular to the

  18. Boron nitride nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Chopra, N G; Luyken, R J; Cherrey, K; Crespi, V H; Cohen, M L; Louie, S G; Zettl, A

    1995-08-18

    The successful synthesis of pure boron nitride (BN) nanotubes is reported here. Multi-walled tubes with inner diameters on the order of 1 to 3 nanometers and with lengths up to 200 nanometers were produced in a carbon-free plasma discharge between a BN-packed tungsten rod and a cooled copper electrode. Electron energy-loss spectroscopy on individual tubes yielded B:N ratios of approximately 1, which is consistent with theoretical predictions of stable BN tube structures.

  19. Carbon nanotube network varactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Generalov, A. A.; Anoshkin, I. V.; Erdmanis, M.; Lioubtchenko, D. V.; Ovchinnikov, V.; Nasibulin, A. G.; Räisänen, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    Microelectromechanical system (MEMS) varactors based on a freestanding layer of single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) films were designed, fabricated and tested. The freestanding SWCNT film was employed as a movable upper patch in the parallel plate capacitor of the MEMS. The measurements of the SWCNT varactors show very high tunability, nearly 100%, of the capacitance with a low actuation voltage of 10 V. The functionality of the varactor is improved by implementing a flexible nanocellulose aerogel filling.

  20. Nanotubes in biological applications.

    PubMed

    Mundra, Ruchir V; Wu, Xia; Sauer, Jeremy; Dordick, Jonathan S; Kane, Ravi S

    2014-08-01

    Researchers over the last few years have recognized carbon nanotubes (CNTs) as promising materials for a number of biological applications. CNTs are increasingly being explored as potent drug carriers for cancer treatment, for biosensing, and as scaffolds for stem cell culture. Moreover, the integration of CNTs with proteins has led to the development of functional nanocomposites with antimicrobial properties. This review aims at understanding the critical role of CNTs in biological applications with a particular emphasis on more recent studies.

  1. Silicon Carbide Nanotube Synthesized

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lienhard, Michael A.; Larkin, David J.

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have generated a great deal of scientific and commercial interest because of the countless envisioned applications that stem from their extraordinary materials properties. Included among these properties are high mechanical strength (tensile and modulus), high thermal conductivity, and electrical properties that make different forms of single-walled CNTs either conducting or semiconducting, and therefore, suitable for making ultraminiature, high-performance CNT-based electronics, sensors, and actuators. Among the limitations for CNTs is their inability to survive in high-temperature, harsh-environment applications. Silicon carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs) are being developed for their superior material properties under such conditions. For example, SiC is stable in regards to oxidation in air to temperatures exceeding 1000 C, whereas carbon-based materials are limited to 600 C. The high-temperature stability of SiCNTs is envisioned to enable high-temperature, harsh-environment nanofiber- and nanotube-reinforced ceramics. In addition, single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors are being developed for hightemperature, high-power electronics, and by analogy to CNTs with silicon semiconductors, SiCNTs with single-crystal SiC-based semiconductors may allow high-temperature harsh-environment nanoelectronics, nanosensors, and nanoactuators to be realized. Another challenge in CNT development is the difficulty of chemically modifying the tube walls, which are composed of chemically stable graphene sheets. The chemical substitution of the CNTs walls will be necessary for nanotube self-assembly and biological- and chemical-sensing applications. SiCNTs are expected to have a different multiple-bilayer wall structure, allowing the surface Si atoms to be functionalized readily with molecules that will allow SiCNTs to undergo self-assembly and be compatible with a variety of materials (for biotechnology applications and high-performance fiber-reinforced ceramics).

  2. Combining Portable Raman Probes with Nanotubes for Theranostic Applications

    PubMed Central

    Bhirde, Ashwinkumar A.; Liu, Gang; Jin, Albert; Iglesias-Bartolome, Ramiro; Sousa, Alioscka A.; Leapman, Richard D.; Gutkind, J. Silvio; Lee, Seulki; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Recently portable Raman probes have emerged along with a variety of applications, including carbon nanotube (CNT) characterization. Aqueous dispersed CNTs have shown promise for biomedical applications such as drug/gene delivery vectors, photo-thermal therapy, and photoacoustic imaging. In this study we report the simultaneous detection and irradiation of carbon nanotubes in 2D monolayers of cancer cells and in 3D spheroids using a portable Raman probe. A portable handheld Raman instrument was utilized for dual purposes: as a CNT detector and as an irradiating laser source. Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) and multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) were dispersed aqueously using a lipid-polymer (LP) coating, which formed highly stable dispersions both in buffer and cell media. The LP coated SWCNT and MWCNT aqueous dispersions were characterized by atomic force microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The cellular uptake of the LP-dispersed SWCNTs and MWCNTs was observed using confocal microscopy, and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-nanotube conjugates were found to be internalized by ovarian cancer cells by using Z-stack fluorescence confocal imaging. Biocompatibility of SWCNTs and MWCNTs was assessed using a cell viability MTT assay, which showed that the nanotube dispersions did not hinder the proliferation of ovarian cancer cells at the dosage tested. Ovarian cancer cells treated with SWCNTs and MWCNTs were simultaneously detected and irradiated live in 2D layers of cancer cells and in 3D environments using the portable Raman probe. An apoptotic terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay carried out after laser irradiation confirmed that cell death occurred only in the presence of nanotube dispersions. We show for the first time that both SWCNTs and MWCNTs can be selectively irradiated and detected in cancer cells using a simple

  3. Electrical and optical characterization of carbon nanotube diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malapanis, Argyrios

    Carbon nanotubes are good candidates for future applications, including nanoelectronic and nanophotonic devices. Their quasi-one dimensional (1D) character offers appealing device properties. These include reduced carrier scattering, carrier mobility up to two orders of magnitude higher than that of materials used in state-of-the-art computer chips today, current densities rivaling those of the best semiconductors, enhanced optical absorption, and band gaps tunable with tube diameter and doping. Recent breakthroughs in research point to the possibility of placing nanotubes precisely on substrates with densities approaching that of transistors on today's computer chips in a way that's integratable with existing Si-based technology. Such advances may accelerate the day when high-speed and power-efficient applications using carbon nanotubes as the transistor channel can become a reality. Thus the need to explore the fundamental properties of carbon nanotubes becomes more pressing. Using single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) p-n diodes as the medium, the purpose of this work is to examine SWNT fundamental properties that little experimental work has dealt with measuring. These properties include the band-gap of a SWNT, band-gap renormalization (shrinkage) as a function of doping, and optical absorption in the infrared region of the spectrum. This dissertation also shows the extreme sensitivity of carbon nanotubes to their environment (i.e. exposure to air). In addition, it demonstrates a new technique---current annealing---that can reverse the degradation of the electrical and optical properties of carbon nanotube diodes due to ambient exposure

  4. Teslaphoresis of Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Bornhoeft, Lindsey R; Castillo, Aida C; Smalley, Preston R; Kittrell, Carter; James, Dustin K; Brinson, Bruce E; Rybolt, Thomas R; Johnson, Bruce R; Cherukuri, Tonya K; Cherukuri, Paul

    2016-04-26

    This paper introduces Teslaphoresis, the directed motion and self-assembly of matter by a Tesla coil, and studies this electrokinetic phenomenon using single-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Conventional directed self-assembly of matter using electric fields has been restricted to small scale structures, but with Teslaphoresis, we exceed this limitation by using the Tesla coil's antenna to create a gradient high-voltage force field that projects into free space. CNTs placed within the Teslaphoretic (TEP) field polarize and self-assemble into wires that span from the nanoscale to the macroscale, the longest thus far being 15 cm. We show that the TEP field not only directs the self-assembly of long nanotube wires at remote distances (>30 cm) but can also wirelessly power nanotube-based LED circuits. Furthermore, individualized CNTs self-organize to form long parallel arrays with high fidelity alignment to the TEP field. Thus, Teslaphoresis is effective for directed self-assembly from the bottom-up to the macroscale.

  5. Controlled growth and assembly of single-walled carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrane, Badr

    carbon nanotube growth and applications, was demonstrated. Chemical vapor deposition growth of the patterned regions shows individual and bundles of single-walled carbon nanotubes. This was confirmed by Raman spectroscopy of the samples, giving single-walled carbon nanotubes ˜1-2 nm in diameter. The capabilities of the nanowriting process were also explored for direct-writing of carbon based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and C 60 molecules. Finally, a brief survey on carbon nanotube field-effect transistor modeling tools has been presented, followed by two-terminal current-voltage measurements on colloidal lithography and nanowriting samples. Results show primarily ohmic behavior with conductances of ˜0.86-16.5 muS for the hexagonal catalyst array patterned samples for various geometries and ˜0.27-1 muS for the nanowriting samples. In addition, compact models have been used to gain insights into the device performance and the unique advantages of the hexagonal array approach over devices fabricated using parallel or randomly distributed SWCNTs. Device performance appears to be determined primarily by the contact resistance which includes both Schottky barrier resistances and an interface resistance. In summary, colloidal lithography and direct-writing of single-walled carbon nanotube catalyst have been used to achieve the controlled growth and assembly of carbon nanotubes. Electronic transport of carbon nanotube devices fabricated using these two methods showed near ohmic behavior with device performance modeled primarily by the contact resistance. The approaches developed in this thesis allow nanoscale control over catalyst deposition and nanotube growth which makes them promising for the fabrication of future carbon nanotube electronic devices.

  6. Carbon nanotube materials for hydrogen storage

    SciTech Connect

    Dillon, A.C.; Jones, K.M.; Heben, M.J.

    1996-10-01

    Hydrogen burns pollution-free and may be produced from renewable energy resources. It is therefore an ideal candidate to replace fossil fuels as an energy carrier. However, the lack of a convenient and cost-effective hydrogen storage system greatly impedes the wide-scale use of hydrogen in both domestic and international markets. Although several hydrogen storage options exist, no approach satisfies all of the efficiency, size, weight, cost and safety requirements for transportation or utility use. A material consisting exclusively of micropores with molecular dimensions could simultaneously meet all of the requirements for transportation use if the interaction energy for hydrogen was sufficiently strong to cause hydrogen adsorption at ambient temperatures. Small diameter ({approx}1 mm) carbon single-wall nanotubes (SWNTs) are elongated micropores of molecular dimensions, and materials composed predominantly of SWNTs may prove to be the ideal adsorbent for ambient temperature storage of hydrogen. Last year the authors reported that hydrogen could be adsorbed on arc-generated soots containing 12{Angstrom} diameter nanotubes at temperatures in excess of 285K. In this past year they have learned that such adsorption does not occur on activated carbon materials, and that the cobalt nanoparticles present in their arc-generated soots are not responsible for the hydrogen which is stable at 285 K. These results indicate that enhanced adsorption forces within the internal cavities of the SWNTs are active in stabilizing hydrogen at elevated temperatures. This enhanced stability could lead to effective hydrogen storage under ambient temperature conditions. In the past year the authors have also demonstrated that single-wall carbon nanotubes in arc-generated soots may be selectively opened by oxidation in H{sub 2}O resulting in improved hydrogen adsorption, and they have estimated experimentally that the amount of hydrogen stored is {approximately}10% of the nanotube weight.

  7. Modeling the effects of interfacial characteristics on gas permeation behavior of nanotube- mixed matrix membranes.

    PubMed

    Chehrazi, Ehsan; Sharif, Alireza; Omidkhah, Mohammadreza; Karimi, Mohammad

    2017-10-06

    Theoretical approaches, which accurately predict gas permeation behavior of nanotube containing mixed matrix membranes (nanotube-MMMs) are scarce. This is mainly due to ignoring the effects of nanotube/matrix interfacial characteristics in the existing theories. In this paper, based on the analogy of thermal conduction in polymer composites containing nanotubes, we develop a model to describe gas permeation through nanotube-MMMs. Two new parameters: "interfacial thickness" (aint) and "interfacial permeation resistance" (Rint) are introduced to account for the role of nanotube/matrix interfacial interactions in the proposed model. The obtained values of aint, independent of the nature of the permeate gas, increased by increasing both the nanotubes aspect ratio and polymer-nanotube interfacial strength. An excellent correlation between the values of aint and polymer-nanotube interaction parameters, χ, helped to accurately reproduce the existing experimental data from the literature without a need to resort to any adjustable parameter. The data includes 10 sets of CO2/CH4 permeation, 12 sets of CO2/N2 permeation, 3 sets of CO2/O2 permeation and 2 sets of CO2/H2 permeation through different nanotube-MMMs. Moreover, the average absolute relative errors between the experimental data and the predicted values of the proposed model are very small (less than 5%) in comparison with those of the existing models in the literature. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study where such a systematic comparison between model predictions and such extensive experimental data is presented. Finally, the new way of assessing gas permeation data, presented in the current work, would be a simple alternative to complex approaches, which are usually utilized to estimate interfacial thickness in polymer composites.

  8. Derivatization of single-walled carbon nanotubes with redox mediator for biocatalytic oxygen electrodes.

    PubMed

    Sadowska, K; Stolarczyk, K; Biernat, J F; Roberts, K P; Rogalski, J; Bilewicz, R

    2010-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were covalently modified with a redox mediator derived from 2,2'-azino-bis-(3-ethylbenzothiazoline)-6-sulfonic acid (ABTS), and implemented in the construction of electrodes for biocatalytic oxygen reduction. The procedure is based on: covalent bonding of mediator to nanotubes, placing the nanotubes directly on the carbon electrode surface and covering the nanostructured electrode with a Nafion film containing laccase as the biocatalyst. The modified electrode is stable and the problem of mediator (ABTS) leaking from the film is eliminated by binding it covalently to the nanotubes. Three different synthetic approaches were used to obtain ABTS-modified carbon nanotubes. Nanotubes were modified at ends/defect sites or on the nanotube sidewalls and characterized by Raman spectroscopy, TGA and electrochemistry. The accessibility of differently located ABTS units by the laccase active center and mediation of electron transfer were studied by cyclic voltammetry. The surface concentrations of ABTS groups electrically connected with the electrode were compared for each of the electrodes based on the charges of the voltammetric peaks recorded in the deaerated solution. The nanotube modification procedure giving the best parameters of the catalytic process was selected.

  9. Arrays of single-walled carbon nanotubes with full surface coverage for high-performance electronics.

    PubMed

    Cao, Qing; Han, Shu-jen; Tulevski, George S; Zhu, Yu; Lu, Darsen D; Haensch, Wilfried

    2013-03-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes have exceptional electronic properties and have been proposed as a replacement for silicon in applications such as low-cost thin-film transistors and high-performance logic devices. However, practical devices will require dense, aligned arrays of electronically pure nanotubes to optimize performance, maximize device packing density and provide sufficient drive current (or power output) for each transistor. Here, we show that aligned arrays of semiconducting carbon nanotubes can be assembled using the Langmuir-Schaefer method. The arrays have a semiconducting nanotube purity of 99% and can fully cover a surface with a nanotube density of more than 500 tubes/µm. The nanotube pitch is self-limited by the diameter of the nanotube plus the van der Waals separation, and the intrinsic mobility of the nanotubes is preserved after array assembly. Transistors fabricated using this approach exhibit significant device performance characteristics with a drive current density of more than 120 µA µm(-1), transconductance greater than 40 µS µm(-1) and on/off ratios of ∼1 × 10(3).

  10. An efficient growth of silver and copper nanoparticles on multiwalled carbon nanotube with enhanced antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Mohan, Raja; Shanmugharaj, A M; Sung Hun, Ryu

    2011-01-01

    Transition metal nanoparticles (NPs) such as silver (Ag) and copper (Cu) have been grafted onto carbon nanotube surface through wet chemical approach leading to the development of densely packed NP decorated carbon nanotubes. Chemically active surface and high-temperature stability are the basic attributes to use carbon nanotubes as the template for the growth of NPs. Ag NP-grafted carbon nanotubes (Ag-MWCNT) are prepared by complexing Ag ion with acid functionalized carbon nanotubes followed by the reduction method. Alternatively, Cu-grafted carbon nanotubes (Cu-MWCNT) are prepared by simple chemical reduction method. X-ray diffraction results reveal that the Ag or Cu NPs formed on the surface of carbon nanotubes are determined to be face centered cubic crystals. The morphology and chemical structure of NP-grafted carbon nanotubes are investigated using transmission electron spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy. The antimicrobial properties of acid-treated MWCNT (MWCNT-COOH), Ag-MWCNT, and Cu-MWCNT are investigated against gram negative Escherichia coli bacteria. Ag-MWCNT and Cu-MWCNT (97% kill vs. 75% kill), whereas MWCNT-COOH only killed 20% of this bacteria. Possible mechanisms are proposed to explain the higher antimicrobial activity by NP-coated MWCNT. These findings suggest that Ag-MWCNT and Cu-MWCNT may be used as effective antimicrobial materials that find applications in biomedical devices and antibacterial controlling system.

  11. Half-metallic carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2012-04-17

    Half-metallicity in carbon nanotubes is achieved and controlled by hydrogen adsorption patterns. The edge states in carbon nanotubes are unstable under an electric field due to the spin-conserving electron transfer between the edges, but a large enough transfer barrier between the edge states, obtained by controlling the adsorption patterns, renders the CNTs half-metallic.

  12. Anisotropic Plasticity of BN Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhu, Menon; Srivastava, Deepak; Woo, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Plastic collapse of compressed BN nanotubes are investigated and compared with carbon nanotubes of similar nature. Using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GTBMD) method for system containing B, N and C atoms we compute stiffness and plastic collapse of BN and C nanotubes under axial compression. For small compressional strain, BN nanotubes are found to be about 92% as stiff as similar C nanotubes. Due to BN bond buckling effect, however, the elastic limit of BN nanotubes is found to be more than C nanotubes. A route to plasticity is explored in which we find that at elastic limit the accumulated strain is released by a local plastic deformation of the nanotube. The mechanism of strain release and the resulting plastic deformation, however. are anisotropic in nature. The strain is released preferentially towards N as leading edge of a buckled BN bond and the tube, compressed at both ends, plastically collapses preferentially towards one end. Details of the anisotropic plasticity and prospective applications will be discussed in this presentation.

  13. Magnetic nanotubes for drug delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    Magnetic nanotubes hold the potential for neuroscience applications because of their capability to deliver chemicals or biomolecules and the feasibility of controlling the orientation or movement of these magnetic nanotubes by an external magnetic field thus facilitating directed growth of neurites. Therefore, we sought to investigate the effects of laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and external alternating magnetic fields on the growth of dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons in cell culture. Magnetic nanotubes were synthesized by a hydrothermal method and characterized to confirm their hollow structure, the hematite and maghemite phases, and the magnetic properties. DRG neurons were cultured in the presence of magnetic nanotubes under alternating magnetic fields. Electron microscopy showed a close interaction between magnetic nanotubes and the growing neurites Phase contrast microscopy revealed live growing neurons suggesting that the combination of the presence of magnetic nanotubes and the alternating magnetic field were tolerated by DRG neurons. The synergistic effect, from both laminin treated magnetic nanotubes and the applied magnetic fields on survival, growth and electrical activity of the DRG neurons are currently being investigated.

  14. Carbon Nanotube Based Flexible Supercapacitors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-01

    NOTES 14. ABSTRACT Electrochemical double layer capacitors are fabricated using carbon nanotube (CNT)/paper flexible electrodes. An extensive...TERMS Carbon nanotube, supercapacitor, electrochemical double layer capacitor 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT UU 18...layer capacitors (Supercapacitors) are expected to play a significant role in future hybrid power systems due to their high specific power, cycle

  15. Multiscale Modeling of Carbon Nanotube-Epoxy Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasanella, Nicholas A.

    Epoxy-composites are widely used in the aerospace industry. In order to improve upon stiffness and thermal conductivity; carbon nanotube additives to epoxies are being explored. This dissertation presents multiscale modeling techniques to study the engineering properties of single walled carbon nanotube (SWNT)-epoxy nanocomposites, consisting of pristine and covalently functionalized systems. Using Molecular Dynamics (MD), thermomechanical properties were calculated for a representative polymer unit cell. Finite Element (FE) and orientation distribution function (ODF) based methods were used in a multiscale framework to obtain macroscale properties. An epoxy network was built using the dendrimer growth approach. The epoxy model was verified by matching the experimental glass transition temperature, density, and dilatation. MD, via the constant valence force field (CVFF), was used to explore the mechanical and dilatometric effects of adding pristine and functionalized SWNTs to epoxy. Full stiffness matrices and linear coefficient of thermal expansion vectors were obtained. The Green-Kubo method was used to investigate the thermal conductivity as a function of temperature for the various nanocomposites. Inefficient phonon transport at the ends of nanotubes is an important factor in the thermal conductivity of the nanocomposites, and for this reason discontinuous nanotubes were modeled in addition to long nanotubes. To obtain continuum-scale elastic properties from the MD data, multiscale modeling was considered to give better control over the volume fraction of nanotubes, and investigate the effects of nanotube alignment. Two methods were considered; an FE based method, and an ODF based method. The FE method probabilistically assigned elastic properties of elements from the MD lattice results based on the desired volume fraction and alignment of the nanotubes. For the ODF method, a distribution function was generated based on the desired amount of nanotube alignment

  16. Molecular mechanics methods for individual carbon nanotubes and nanotube assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhardt, Oliver; Wallmersperger, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Since many years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been considered for a wide range of applications due to their outstanding mechanical properties. CNTs are tubular structures, showing a graphene like hexagonal lattice. Our interest in the calculation of the mechanical properties is motivated by several applications which demand the knowledge of the material behavior. One application in which the knowledge of the material behavior is vital is the CNT based fiber. Due to the excellent stiffness and strength of the individual CNTs, these fibers are expected to be a promising successor for state of the art carbon fibers. However, the mechanical properties of the fibers fall back behind the properties of individual CNTs. It is assumed that this gap in the properties is a result of the van-der-Waals interactions of the individual CNTs within the fiber. In order to understand the mechanical behavior of the fibers we apply a molecular mechanics approach. The mechanical properties of the individual CNTs are investigated by using a modified structural molecular mechanics approach. This is done by calculating the properties of a truss-beam element framework representing the CNT with the help of a chemical force field. Furthermore, we also investigate the interactions of CNTs arranged in basic CNT assemblies, mimicking the ones in a simple CNT fiber. We consider the van-der-Waals interactions in the structure and calculate the potential surface of the CNT assemblies.

  17. Chemical Sensing with Polyaniline Coated Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Mengning; Tang, Yifan; Gou, Pingping; Reber, Michael J; Star, Alexander

    2011-01-25

    Single-walled carbon nanotube/polyaniline (SWNT/PAni) nanocomposite with controlled core/shell morphology was synthesized by a noncovalent functionalization approach. Unique electron interactions between the SWNT core and the PAni shell were studied electrochemically and spectroscopically, and superior sensor performance to chemical gases and vapors was demonstrated.

  18. Nanotubes for noisy signal processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ian Yenyin

    Nanotubes can process noisy signals. We present two central results in support of this general thesis and make an informed extrapolation that uses nanotubes to improve body armor. The first result is that noise can help nanotubes detect weak signals. The finding confirmed a stochastic-resonance theoretical prediction that noise can enhance detection at the nano-level. Laboratory experiments with nanotubes showed that three types of noise improved three measures of detection. Small amounts of Gaussian, uniform, and Cauchy additive white noise increased mutual-information, cross-correlation, and bit-error-rate measures before degrading them with further increases in noise. Nanotubes can apply this noise-enhancement and nanotube electrical and mechanical properties to improve signal processing. Similar noise enhancement may benefit a proposed nanotube-array cochlear-model spectral processing. The second result is that nanotube antennas can directly detect narrowband electromagnetic (EM) signals. The finding showed that nanotube and thin-wire dipoles are similar: They are resonant and narrowband and can implement linear-array designs if the EM waves in the nanotubes propagate at or near the free-space velocity of light. The nanotube-antenna prediction is based on a Fresnel-zone or near-zone analysis of antenna impedance using a quantum-conductor model. The analysis also predicts a failure to resonate if the nanotube EM-wave propagation is much slower than free-space light propagation. We extrapolate based on applied and theoretical analysis of body armor. Field experiments used a baseball comparison and statistical and other techniques to model body-armor bruising effects. A baseball comparison showed that a large caliber handgun bullet can hit an armored chest as hard as a fast baseball can hit a bare chest. Adaptive fuzzy systems learned to predict a bruise profile directly from the experimental data and also from statistical analysis of the data. Nanotube signal

  19. Progress Toward Sequestering Carbon Nanotubes in PmPV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bley, Richard A.

    2009-01-01

    Sequestration of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) in molecules of poly(m-phenylenevinylene-co-2,5-diocty-loxy-p-phenylenevinylene) [PmPV] is a candidate means of promoting dissolution of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into epoxies for making strong, lightweight epoxy-matrix/carbon-fiber composite materials. Bare SWNTs cannot be incorporated because they are not soluble in epoxies. In the present approach, one exploits the tendency of PmPV molecules to wrap themselves around SWNTs without chemically bonding to them.

  20. Effective Growth of Boron Nitride Nanotubes by Thermal-CVD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chee Huei; Xie, Ming; Meyers, Derek; Wang, Jiesheng; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2009-03-01

    The synthesis of boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are challenging as compared to the growth of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Most of reported techniques required unique setup and temperatures >1300 ^oC. Here we show that clean and long multiwalled BNNTs can be grown by simple catalytic thermal CVD. This was obtained by a growth vapor trapping approach inspired by the whisker nucleation theory. Based on our new findings, we have achieved patterned growth of BNNTs at desired locations. High resolution TEM shows that these BNNTs are highly crystallized. Besides, the tangential vibrational mode predicted by theory was detected in our BNNTs. This vibration mode could be the fingerprint for BNNTs with high crystallinity.

  1. Exciton-plasmon interactions in carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drosdoff, David; Bondarev, Igor

    The response properties of semiconducting carbon nanotubes (CNs) allow for the excitation of both plasmons and excitons at optical frequencies, which can interact with each other to give rise to a variety of phenomena and applications. If carbon nanotubes are aligned in a periodic array, then energy bands can be formed due to the array periodicity. Using a quantum electrodynamics approach, the energy dispersion relation for the coupled exciton and plasmon excitations in the CN array is theoretically analyzed. The predicted result is the formation of photonic bands, which may give rise to tunable optoelectronic devices and other applications. Supported by NSF-ECCS-1306871.

  2. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  3. Memristive model of hysteretic field emission from carbon nanotube arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorodetskiy, Dmitriy V.; Gusel'nikov, Artem V.; Shevchenko, Sergey N.; Kanygin, Mikhail A.; Okotrub, Alexander V.; Pershin, Yuriy V.

    2016-01-01

    Some instances of electron field emitters are characterized by frequency-dependent hysteresis in their current-voltage characteristics. We argue that such emitters can be classified as memristive systems and introduce a general framework to describe their response. As a specific example of our approach, we consider field emission from a carbon nanotube array. Our experimental results demonstrate a low-field hysteresis, which is likely caused by an electrostatic alignment of some of the nanotubes in the applied field. We formulate a memristive model of such phenomena, whose results are in agreement with the experimental results.

  4. Integrated biomimetic carbon nanotube composites for in vivo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Manoj Kumar; Gracio, Jose; Leduc, Philip; Gonçalves, Paula P.; Marques, Paula A. A. P.; Gonçalves, Gil; Marques, Filipa; Silva, Virgília S.; Capela E Silva, Fernando; Reis, Joana; Potes, José; Sousa, António

    2010-12-01

    As interest in using carbon nanotubes for developing biologically compatible systems continues to grow, biological inspiration is stimulating new directions for in vivo approaches. The ability to integrate nanotechnology-based systems in the body will provide greater successes if the implanted material is made to mimic elements of the biological milieu especially through tuning physical and chemical characteristics. Here, we demonstrate the highly successful capacity for in vivo implantation of a new carbon nanotube-based composite that is, itself, integrated with a hydroxyapatite-polymethyl methacrylate to create a nanocomposite. The success of this approach is grounded in finely tailoring the physical and chemical properties of this composite for the critical demands of biological integration. This is accomplished through controlling the surface modification scheme, which affects the interactions between carbon nanotubes and the hydroxyapatite-polymethyl methacrylate. Furthermore, we carefully examine cellular response with respect to adhesion and proliferation to examine in vitro compatibility capacity. Our results indicate that this new composite accelerates cell maturation through providing a mechanically competent bone matrix; this likely facilitates osteointegration in vivo. We believe that these results will have applications in a diversity of areas including carbon nanotube, regeneration, chemistry, and engineering research.As interest in using carbon nanotubes for developing biologically compatible systems continues to grow, biological inspiration is stimulating new directions for in vivo approaches. The ability to integrate nanotechnology-based systems in the body will provide greater successes if the implanted material is made to mimic elements of the biological milieu especially through tuning physical and chemical characteristics. Here, we demonstrate the highly successful capacity for in vivo implantation of a new carbon nanotube-based composite that

  5. Stability of Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenyuk, N. P.

    2016-01-01

    An approach to the stability analysis of orthotropic two-layer shells with mechanical and electrical properties of carbon nanotubes is proposed. Van der Waals forces act between the layers. The parameters of the continuum between the layers are obtained using the Lennard-Jones potential. The governing system of equations is written for rates of sixteen variables. The loading and boundary conditions are specified for each layer separately. Numerical results are obtained using the discrete orthogonalization method. The stability of single- and double-walled nanotubes is analyzed. Numerical results are summarized in tables and analyzed

  6. Self-filtering oscillations in carbon nanotube hetero-junctions.

    PubMed

    Scarpa, F; Narojczyk, J W; Wojciechowski, K W; Inman, D J

    2011-11-18

    We evaluate the vibrational properties of single-wall carbon nanotube (SWCNT) hetero-junction (HJ) oscillators using a hybrid atomistic-continuum approach validated by molecular mechanics/molecular dynamics simulations. The SWCNT-HJs show a broken symmetry topology of their mode shapes, with striction effects caused on the bending and radial modes by the combined effect of the HJ and the tube with the thinner radius. The single-wall nanotube HJs also show selective mass sensing properties based solely on the geometry and type of the boundary conditions of the specific nanostructure. This unusual behaviour has not been observed so far in classical SWCNT systems.

  7. CVD Growth of Carbon Nanotubes: Structure, Catalyst, and Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance

    2003-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) exhibit extraordinary mechanical and unique electronic properties and hence have been receiving much attention in recent years for their potential in nanoelectronics, field emission devices, scanning probes, high strength composites and many more applications. Catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbon feedstock with the aid of supported transition metal catalysts - also known as chemical vapor deposition (CVD) - has become popular to produce single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs, MWNTs) and multiwalled nanofibers (MWNFs). The ability to grow CNTs on patterned substrates and in vertically aligned arrays, and the simplicity of the process, has made CVD growth of CNTs an attractive approach.

  8. Optoelectronics with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Megumi

    2011-12-01

    The carbon nanotube is a promising material for future micro- and nano-scale electronics because of its unique electronic properties, high carrier mobility and extraordinary capacity for high current density. In particular, semiconducting carbon nanotubes are direct bandgap materials with a typical energy gap in the order of 1 eV, which means they emit light in the near-infrared range, making them an attractive option in telecommunications applications. However, there have been few systematic investigations of electrically-induced light emission (i.e. electroluminescence) from carbon nanotubes, and their emission properties are not well understood. In this dissertation, we explore the characteristics of electroluminescence in three different types of carbon-nanotube devices. The first is a single-tube field-effect transistor (CNTFET), whose emission has previously been found to have a very broad spectral shape and low emission efficiency. We analyze the spectral shape in detail, which reveals that a high electric field near metal contacts contributes most to the bias-dependent component of broadening, in addition to smaller contributions from tube nonuniformity, inelastic scattering of phonons, high temperature, etc. In the second part of the study, single-tube light-emitting diodes are constructed by employing a split top-gate scheme. The split gate creates p- and n-doped regions electrostatically, so that electrons and holes combine between the two sections and can decay radiatively. This configuration creates electron-hole pairs under much lower electric fields and gives us a greater control over carrier distribution in the device channel, resulting in much narrower spectral linewidths and an emission intensity several orders of magnitude larger than that of CNTFETs. The much better signal-to-noise also leads to the observation of emission from defect-induced states. Finally, we extend the idea of the single-tube p-n diode and fabricate CNT film diodes from many

  9. Direct measurement of the wetting behavior of individual carbon nanotubes by polymer melts: the key to carbon nanotube-polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Tran, Michael Q; Cabral, Joao T; Shaffer, Milo S P; Bismarck, Alexander

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotube wetting is the critical parameter for the development of nanocomposites yet, due to the lack of suitable methods of qualifying and, more importantly, quantifying nanoscale wetting and adhesion phenomena, it is often overlooked. Here, we discuss a qualitative approach that provides wetting/nonwetting information and present a microfluidics method to produce "nanodroplets" of polymers on individual carbon nanotubes which enable the direct quantification of contact angles.

  10. Physically unclonable cryptographic primitives using self-assembled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zhaoying; Comeras, Jose Miguel M. Lobez; Park, Hongsik; Tang, Jianshi; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S.; Hannon, James B.; Liehr, Michael; Han, Shu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Information security underpins many aspects of modern society. However, silicon chips are vulnerable to hazards such as counterfeiting, tampering and information leakage through side-channel attacks (for example, by measuring power consumption, timing or electromagnetic radiation). Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a potential replacement for silicon as the channel material of transistors due to their superb electrical properties and intrinsic ultrathin body, but problems such as limited semiconducting purity and non-ideal assembly still need to be addressed before they can deliver high-performance electronics. Here, we show that by using these inherent imperfections, an unclonable electronic random structure can be constructed at low cost from carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are self-assembled into patterned HfO2 trenches using ion-exchange chemistry, and the width of the trench is optimized to maximize the randomness of the nanotube placement. With this approach, two-dimensional (2D) random bit arrays are created that can offer ternary-bit architecture by determining the connection yield and switching type of the nanotube devices. As a result, our cryptographic keys provide a significantly higher level of security than conventional binary-bit architecture with the same key size.

  11. "Thermal Stability of Anodic Hafnium Oxide Nanotube Arrays"

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Xiaofeng; Howe, Jane Y; Mayer, Harry A; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Tuncer, Enis

    2011-01-01

    Thermal stability of highly ordered Hafnium oxide, HfO2 nanotube arrays prepared through electrochemical anodization approach in the presence of ammonium fluoride is investigated in a temperature range of room temperature to 900 C in flowing Argon atmosphere. The formation of the HfO2 nanotube arrays was monitored by current density transient characteristics during anodization of hafnium metal foil. Morphologies of the as grown and post-annealed HfO2 nanotube arrays were analyzed by X-ray powder diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Although monoclinic HfO2 is thermally stable up to 2000K in bulk, the morphology HfO2 nanotube arrays degraded at 900 C. Detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study revealed that the thermal treatment significantly impact the composition and chemical environment of the core elements (Hf, O and F) of HfO2. Possible reasons for the degradation of the nanotube morphology were discussed based on XPS study and possible future improvements were suggested briefly.

  12. Silver nanoparticles-decorated polyphosphazene nanotubes: synthesis and applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Minghuan; Fu, Jianwei; Huang, Dandan; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Qun

    2013-09-07

    Herein, we report the preparation of poly (cyclotriphosphazene-co-4,4'-sulfonyldiphenol) (PZS) nanotubes decorated with Ag nanoparticles (NPs). The PZS nanotubes have been synthesized firstly via an in situ template approach, and then Ag nanoparticles were prepared via in situ reduction of AgNO3 with NaBH4 as the reductant, supported on the surface of the PZS nanotubes. The as-obtained PZS nanotubes and PZS@Ag NPs composites were characterized by means of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic absorption spectroscopy (AAS), thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), and UV-vis spectroscopy. Characterization results showed that Ag NPs with good dispersibility were well anchored onto the surface of the PZS nanotubes with superior thermal stability. In addition, the catalytic activities and reusability of these composites were investigated by employing the reduction of 4-nitrophenol (4-NP) into 4-aminophenol (4-AP) by NaBH4 as a model reaction.

  13. Hierarchical titania nanotubes with self-branched crystalline nanorods.

    PubMed

    Bae, Changdeuck; Yoon, Youngjin; Yoon, Won-Sub; Moon, Jooho; Kim, Jiyoung; Shin, Hyunjung

    2010-06-01

    Surface decoration strategy for one-dimensional nanostructures will improve their electrical, optical, mechanical, and electrochemical performances dramatically. Heterogeneous growth/deposition on surfaces, however, may create undesired junction interfaces in the system. Here we report a procedure during which amorphous titania nanotubes are readily self-branched with crystalline titanate nanorods at room temperature. The starting amorphous titania nanotubes were prepared by low-temperature atomic layer deposition combined with the template-directed approach. We routinely observed the self-branching phenomenon of crystalline titanate nanorods with a few nanometers in diameter onto the surfaces of the amorphous titania nanotubes in mild alkali solutions. The resulting structures were analyzed by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and electron energy loss spectroscopy. The reactivity of the hierarchical titania nanotube arrays was observed to be improved as a Li secondary battery electrode. Upon complete consumption of the amorphous body of titania nanotubes, in addition, titanate nanosheets/layers consisting of single TiO(2) layers with unit-cell thickness were obtained, elucidating the formation mechanism of layered titanate materials by alkali treatment.

  14. Superhydrogels of nanotubes capable of capturing heavy-metal ions.

    PubMed

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Haiqiao; Song, Aixin; Hao, Jingcheng

    2014-01-01

    Self-assembly regulated by hydrogen bonds was successfully achieved in the system of lithocholic acid (LCA) mixed with three organic amines, ethanolamine (EA), diethanolamine (DEA), and triethanolamine (TEA), in aqueous solutions. The mixtures of DEA/LCA exhibit supergelation capability and the hydrogels consist of plenty of network nanotubes with uniform diameters of about 60 nm determined by cryogenic TEM. Interestingly, the sample with the same concentration in a system of EA and LCA is a birefringent solution, in which spherical vesicles and can be transformed into nanotubes as the amount of LCA increases. The formation of hydrogels could be driven by the delicate balance of diverse noncovalent interactions, including electrostatic interactions, hydrophobic interactions, steric effects, van der Waals forces, and mainly hydrogen bonds. The mechanism of self-assembly from spherical bilayer vesicles into nanotubes was proposed. The dried hydrogels with nanotubes were explored to exhibit the excellent capability for capturing heavy-metal ions, for example, Cu(2+), Co(2+), Ni(2+), Pb(2+), and Hg(2+). The superhydrogels of nanotubes from the self-assembly of low-molecular-weight gelators mainly regulated by hydrogen bonds used for the removal of heavy-metal ions is simple, green, and high efficiency, and provide a strategic approach to removing heavy-metal ions from industrial sewage.

  15. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes: streptavidin as a model protein.

    PubMed

    Dang, Thanh X; Farah, Sammy J; Gast, Alice; Robertson, Channing; Carragher, Bridget; Egelman, Edward; Wilson-Kubalek, Elizabeth M

    2005-04-01

    In this study, we use streptavidin (SA) as a model system to study helical protein array formation on lipid nanotubes, an alternative to 2D studies on lipid monolayers. We demonstrate that wild-type and a mutant form of SA form helical arrays on biotinylated lipid nanotubes. 3D maps from helical arrays of wild-type and mutant SA were reconstructed using two different approaches: Fourier-Bessel methods and an iterative single particle algorithm. The maps show that wild-type and mutant streptavidin molecules order differently. The molecular packing arrangements of SA on the surface of the lipid nanotubes differ from previously reported lattice packing of SA on biotinylated monolayers. Helical crystallization on lipid nanotubes presents an alternative platform to explore fundamentals of protein ordering, intermolecular protein interaction and phase behavior. We demonstrate that lipid nanotubes offer a robust and reproducible substrate for forming helical protein arrays which present a means for studying protein structure and structure-function relationships.

  16. Physically unclonable cryptographic primitives using self-assembled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhaoying; Comeras, Jose Miguel M Lobez; Park, Hongsik; Tang, Jianshi; Afzali, Ali; Tulevski, George S; Hannon, James B; Liehr, Michael; Han, Shu-Jen

    2016-06-01

    Information security underpins many aspects of modern society. However, silicon chips are vulnerable to hazards such as counterfeiting, tampering and information leakage through side-channel attacks (for example, by measuring power consumption, timing or electromagnetic radiation). Single-walled carbon nanotubes are a potential replacement for silicon as the channel material of transistors due to their superb electrical properties and intrinsic ultrathin body, but problems such as limited semiconducting purity and non-ideal assembly still need to be addressed before they can deliver high-performance electronics. Here, we show that by using these inherent imperfections, an unclonable electronic random structure can be constructed at low cost from carbon nanotubes. The nanotubes are self-assembled into patterned HfO2 trenches using ion-exchange chemistry, and the width of the trench is optimized to maximize the randomness of the nanotube placement. With this approach, two-dimensional (2D) random bit arrays are created that can offer ternary-bit architecture by determining the connection yield and switching type of the nanotube devices. As a result, our cryptographic keys provide a significantly higher level of security than conventional binary-bit architecture with the same key size.

  17. Integrating Carbon Nanotubes For Atomic Force Microscopy Imaging Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ye, Qi; Cassell, Alan M.; Liu, Hongbing; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) related nanostructures possess remarkable electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. To produce these nanostructures for real world applications, a large-scale controlled growth of carbon nanotubes is crucial for the integration and fabrication of nanodevices and nanosensors. We have taken the approach of integrating nanopatterning and nanomaterials synthesis with traditional silicon micro fabrication techniques. This integration requires a catalyst or nanomaterial protection scheme. In this paper, we report our recent work on fabricating wafer-scale carbon nanotube AFM cantilever probe tips. We will address the design and fabrication considerations in detail, and present the preliminary scanning probe test results. This work may serve as an example of rational design, fabrication, and integration of nanomaterials for advanced nanodevice and nanosensor applications.

  18. SiC nanotubes: A novel material for hydrogen storage.

    PubMed

    Mpourmpakis, Giannis; Froudakis, George E; Lithoxoos, George P; Samios, Jannis

    2006-08-01

    A multiscale theoretical approach is used for the investigation of hydrogen storage in silicon-carbon nanotubes (SiCNTs). First, ab initio calculations at the density functional level of theory (DFT) showed an increase of 20% in the binding energy of H2 in SiCNTs compared with pure carbon nanotubes (CNTs). This is explained by the alternative charges that exist in the SiCNT walls. Second, classical Monte Carlo simulation of nanotube bundles showed an even larger increase of the storage capacity in SiCNTs, especially in low temperature and high-pressure conditions. Our results verify in both theoretical levels that SiCNTs seem to be more suitable materials for hydrogen storage than pure CNTs.

  19. Chiral phosphorus nanotubes: structure, bonding, and electronic properties.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Escamilla, H N; Quijano-Briones, J J; Tlahuice-Flores, A

    2016-05-14

    The study of black phosphorus nanotubes (PNTs) had been devoted to zigzag and armchair structures, with no consideration of chiral structures to date. In this communication, we studied the structural and electronic (band structure) properties of chiral nanotubes using a periodic plane wave-pseudopotential approach. We found that some chiral nanotubes display similar bandgaps and binding energies per atom (BEA) as armchair PNTs and Born-Oppenheimer molecular dynamics (BOMD) calculations attest their thermal stability. Interestingly, we determined that the bandgap is tuned by varying the PNTs chirality and it is not related to their diameters. This feature can be exploited in optical and electronic applications wherein a direct and sizable bandgap is required.

  20. Potential applications of boron nitride nanotubes as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Ciofani, Gianni

    2010-08-01

    In recent years, there has been an explosion of research in the 'bio-nano' field, with the discovery and introduction of ever more fascinating materials for applications as drug delivery systems, sensors, transducers, and so on. The author's group, for the first time in the literature, proposed boron nitride nanotubes as a valid alternative to carbon nanotubes and other kinds of inorganic materials, because of their improved chemical properties that theoretically guarantee better stability and compatibility in a biological context. In this paper, the bio-applications of boron nitride nanotubes that have emerged in the literature are summarized, with special attention given to their exploitation as safe drug delivery and targeting carriers. Finally, the possibility of combining their physical and chemical properties is approached, highlighting the features that render these innovative nanovectors unique and exceptional candidates for many bio-applications.

  1. Molecularly imprinted sol-gel nanotubes membrane for biochemical separations.

    PubMed

    Yang, Huang-Hao; Zhang, Shu-Qiong; Yang, Wei; Chen, Xiao-Lan; Zhuang, Zhi-Xia; Xu, Jin-Gou; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2004-04-07

    In this study, we report a simple procedure for applying molecular imprinting functional groups to the inner surfaces of the template-synthesized sol-gel nanotubes for chemical separation of estrone. The silica nanotubes were synthesized within the pores of nanopore alumina template membranes using a sol-gel method by simultaneous hydrolysis of a silica monomer-imprinted molecule complex and tetraethoxysilane (TEOS). A covalent imprinting strategy was employed by generating a sacrificial spacer through the reaction of the isocyanate group of 3-(triethoxysilyl)propyl isocyanate and a phenol moiety of estrone to form a thermally cleavable urethane bond. This allowed us to remove the imprinted estrone by simple thermal reaction and to simultaneously introduce functional groups into the cavity formed by the silica nanotubes. Experiments indicated that estrone could be bound selectively by such an approach and have a binding affinity of 864 +/- 137 (n = 3).

  2. Anomalous aharonov-bohm gap oscillations in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Sangalli, Davide; Marini, Andrea

    2011-10-12

    The gap oscillations caused by a magnetic flux penetrating a carbon nanotube represent one of the most spectacular observations of the Aharonov-Bohm effect at the nanoscale. Our understanding of this effect is, however, based on the assumption that the electrons are strictly confined on the tube surface, on trajectories that are not modified by curvature effects. Using an ab initio approach based on density functional theory, we show that this assumption fails at the nanoscale inducing important corrections to the physics of the Aharonov-Bohm effect. Curvature effects and electronic density that is spilled out of the nanotube surface are shown to break the periodicity of the gap oscillations. We predict the key phenomenological features of this anomalous Aharonov-Bohm effect in semiconductive and metallic tubes and the existence of a large metallic phase in the low flux regime of multiwalled nanotubes, also suggesting possible experiments to validate our results.

  3. Mechanical Properties of Multilayers of Carbon Nanotube Polystyrene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almutairi, Eid Ali

    In this work, we have studied the mechanical behavior multi-layered composite films comprised of single-wall carbon nanotubes and polystyrene polymer, where we focus on three targeted layer thicknesses; 10 nm, 20 nm, and 40 nm. The approach we used is the Strain-Induced Elastic Buckling Instability for Mechanical Measurements (SIEBIFMM) technique, which allows us to measure the Young modulus of the films as a function of layer thickness and the number of layers by inducing a compressive stress in the films at different strains; 1 %, 2.5 %, 5 %, 7.5 %, and 10 %. Polystyrene was added in an effort to reduce the plasticity of the carbon nanotube films by filling the pores of the nanotube network. We found that the strongest synergistic effect in this regard occurred for the composite with a layer thickness near 20 nm, while the composite films have reached bulk behavior by the sixth layer.

  4. Ferroelectric nanotubes fabricated using nanowires as positive templates

    SciTech Connect

    Alexe, M.; Hesse, D.; Schmidt, V.; Senz, S.; Fan, H. J.; Zacharias, M.; Goesele, U.

    2006-10-23

    The authors report on fabrication and electrical characterization of ferroelectric nanotubes and metal-ferroelectric-metal composite nanotubes using silicon and ZnO nanowires as positive templates. Nanotubes of high aspect ratio with a minimum inner diameter of about 100 nm and a length ranging from 0.5 {mu}m to a few microns have been obtained by magnetron sputtering and/or pulsed laser deposition. Metal-ferroelectric one-dimensional structures were characterized by piezoelectric scanning probe microscopy, showing piezoelectric hysteresis loops and ferroelectric switching. The presented fabrication approach can be used to fabricate three-dimensional capacitors for ferroelectric nonvolatile memories as well as nanosize piezoelectric scanners and actuators.

  5. Conditions for achieving invisibility of hyperbolic multilayered nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz-Aviñó, Carlos; Naserpour, Mahin; Zapata-Rodríguez, Carlos J.

    2016-12-01

    Highly anisotropic plasmonic nanotubes exhibit a dramatic drop of the scattering cross section in the transition regime from hyperbolic to elliptic dispersion. The characterization of a realistic multilayered metamaterial is typically carried out by means of an effective medium approach providing average components of the permittivity tensor and wave fields. Here, the edge effects of the metal-dielectric stratified nanotube for different combinations were thoroughly analyzed. We show how the boundary layers, which in principle remain fully irrelevant in the estimation of the effective permittivity of the nanotube, however play a critical role in the resonant scattering spectra and the near field patterns. A remarkable enhancement of the scattered wave field is unexpectedly experienced at the frequencies of interest when a dielectric layer is chosen to be in contact with the cavity core.

  6. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted amplified delivery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulvey, J. Justin; Villa, Carlos H.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Escorcia, Freddy E.; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A.

    2013-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from the circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pretargeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and are shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody-nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle-generating 225Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo.

  7. Self-assembly of carbon nanotubes and antibodies on tumours for targeted amplified delivery.

    PubMed

    Mulvey, J Justin; Villa, Carlos H; McDevitt, Michael R; Escorcia, Freddy E; Casey, Emily; Scheinberg, David A

    2013-10-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) can deliver imaging agents or drugs to tumours and offer significant advantages over approaches based on antibodies or other nanomaterials. In particular, the nanotubes can carry a substantial amount of cargo (100 times more than a monoclonal antibody), but can still be rapidly eliminated from the circulation by renal filtration, like a small molecule, due to their high aspect ratio. Here we show that SWNTs can target tumours in a two-step approach in which nanotubes modified with morpholino oligonucleotide sequences bind to cancer cells that have been pretargeted with antibodies modified with oligonucleotide strands complementary to those on the nanotubes. The nanotubes can carry fluorophores or radioisotopes, and are shown to selectively bind to cancer cells in vitro and in tumour-bearing xenografted mice. The binding process is also found to lead to antigen capping and internalization of the antibody-nanotube complexes. The nanotube conjugates were labelled with both alpha-particle and gamma-ray emitting isotopes, at high specific activities. Conjugates labelled with alpha-particle-generating (225)Ac were found to clear rapidly, thus mitigating radioisotope toxicity, and were shown to be therapeutically effective in vivo.

  8. Ultrastrong, Stiff and Multifunctional Carbon Nanotube Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Xin; Yong, Zhenzhong; Li, Qingwen; Bradford, Philip D.; Liu, Wei; Tucker, Dennis S.; Cai, Wei; Wang, Hsin; Yuan, Fuh-Gwo; Zhu, Yuntian

    2012-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are an order of magnitude stronger than any current engineering fiber. However, for the past two decades it has been a challenge to utilize their reinforcement potential in composites. Here we report CNT composites with unprecedented multifunctionalities, including record high strength (3.8 GPa), Young s modulus (293 GPa), electrical conductivity (1230 S cm-1) and thermal conductivity (41 W m-1 K-1). These superior properties are derived from the long length, high volume fraction, good alignment and reduced waviness of the CNTs, which were produced by a novel processing approach that can be easily scaled up for industrial production.

  9. Fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and nanopipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whitby, M.; Quirke, N.

    2007-02-01

    Nanoscale carbon tubes and pipes can be readily fabricated using self-assembly techniques and they have useful electrical, optical and mechanical properties. The transport of liquids along their central pores is now of considerable interest both for testing classical theories of fluid flow at the nanoscale and for potential nanofluidic device applications. In this review we consider evidence for novel fluid flow in carbon nanotubes and pipes that approaches frictionless transport. Methods for controlling such flow and for creating functional device architectures are described and possible applications are discussed.

  10. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  11. Carbon Nanotube Based Molecular Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1998-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes and the nanotube heterojunctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for nanoscale molecular electronic device components. Experimental measurements on the conductivity, rectifying behavior and conductivity-chirality correlation have also been made. While quasi-one dimensional simple heterojunctions between nanotubes with different electronic behavior can be generated by introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise all hexagon graphene sheet. Other complex 3- and 4-point junctions may require other mechanisms. Structural stability as well as local electronic density of states of various nanotube junctions are investigated using a generalized tight-binding molecular dynamics (GDBMD) scheme that incorporates non-orthogonality of the orbitals. The junctions investigated include straight and small angle heterojunctions of various chiralities and diameters; as well as more complex 'T' and 'Y' junctions which do not always obey the usual pentagon-heptagon pair rule. The study of local density of states (LDOS) reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap. The proposed three and four pointjunctions are one of the smallest possible tunnel junctions made entirely of carbon atoms. Furthermore the electronic behavior of the nanotube based device components can be taylored by doping with group III-V elements such as B and N, and BN nanotubes as a wide band gap semiconductor has also been realized in experiments. Structural properties of heteroatomic nanotubes comprising C, B and N will be discussed.

  12. Carbon Nanotubes for Polymer Photovoltaics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anctil, Annick; Dileo, Roberta; Schauerman, Chris; Landi, Brian; Raffaelle, Ryne

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotubes are being investigated for optical absorption, exciton dissociation, and carrier transport in polymer photovoltaic devices. In the present work, single wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were synthesized by an Alexandrite pulsed laser vaporization reactor at standard conditions and purified based upon our previously reported TOP procedure. The SWNTs were dispersed in polymer composites for pure MEH-PPV, pure P3HT, and [C60]-PCBM-P3HT (1:1 by weight) as a function of nanotube weight loading (0.1 -- 5% w/w). The AM0 current-voltage measurements for structures sandwiched between PEDOT/PSS coated ITO substrates and an evaporated aluminum contact demonstrate the dramatic effect of SWNT content on the short circuit current density, with conversions efficiencies consistently greater than 1%. The temperature coefficient for nanotube-containing polymer photovoltaics has been compared to conventional PCBM-P3HT devices, and the general relationship of increasing efficiency with increasing temperature is observed. However, the necessity to control nanotube percolation to prevent device shunting has led to recent developments which focus on controlling nanotube length through oxidative cutting, the deposition of intrinsic polymer layers, and the use of aligned carbon nanotube arrays for preferential charge transport.

  13. Supported lipid bilayer/carbon nanotube hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose M.; Craighead, Harold G.; McEuen, Paul L.

    2007-03-01

    Carbon nanotube transistors combine molecular-scale dimensions with excellent electronic properties, offering unique opportunities for chemical and biological sensing. Here, we form supported lipid bilayers over single-walled carbon nanotube transistors. We first study the physical properties of the nanotube/supported lipid bilayer structure using fluorescence techniques. Whereas lipid molecules can diffuse freely across the nanotube, a membrane-bound protein (tetanus toxin) sees the nanotube as a barrier. Moreover, the size of the barrier depends on the diameter of the nanotube-with larger nanotubes presenting bigger obstacles to diffusion. We then demonstrate detection of protein binding (streptavidin) to the supported lipid bilayer using the nanotube transistor as a charge sensor. This system can be used as a platform to examine the interactions of single molecules with carbon nanotubes and has many potential applications for the study of molecular recognition and other biological processes occurring at cell membranes.

  14. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes via Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition "click chemistry".

    PubMed

    Rana, Sravendra; Cho, Jae Whan

    2010-12-01

    Functionalization of carbon nanotubes is essential for achieving their mechanical, electrical, and biological functions and enhancing their dispersion in a polymer matrix. Cycloaddition reactions can play a significant role as an emerging route in this direction. This minireview focuses on covalent functionalization of carbon nanotubes using a facile approach via a Cu(I)-catalyzed Huisgen [3+2] cycloaddition reaction. Through this reaction, an enormous variety of molecules can be coupled onto carbon nanotubes in a very controlled manner, and may be utilized for many potential applications from nanoelectronics to bio-applications.

  15. On the vibration of double-walled carbon nanotubes using molecular structural and cylindrical shell models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, R.; Rouhi, S.; Aryayi, M.

    2016-01-01

    The vibrational behavior of double-walled carbon nanotubes is studied by the use of the molecular structural and cylindrical shell models. The spring elements are employed to model the van der Waals interaction. The effects of different parameters such as geometry, chirality, atomic structure and end constraint on the vibration of nanotubes are investigated. Besides, the results of two aforementioned approaches are compared. It is indicated that by increasing the nanotube side length and radius, the computationally efficient cylindrical shell model gives rational results.

  16. Carbon nanotube sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Liming

    2002-07-01

    Measurement represents one of the oldest methods used by human beings to better understand and control the world. Many measurement systems are primarily physical sensors, which measure time, temperature, weight, distance, and various other physical parameters. The need for cheaper, faster, and more accurate meansurements has been a driving force for the development of new systems and technologies for measurements of materials, both chemical and biological. In fact, chemical and biological sensors (or biosensors) are the evolved products of physical measurement technologies. Chemical sensors are measurement devices that convert a chemical or physical change of a specific analyte into a measurable signal, whose magnitude is normally proportional to the concentration of the analyte. On the other hand, biosensors are a subset of chemical sensors that employ a biological sensing element connected to a transducer to recognize the physiochemical change and to produce the measurable signal from particular analytes, which are not necessary to be biological materials themselves, although sometimes they are. Depending on the basis of the transduction principle, chemical and biological sensors can be classified into three major classes with different transducers: sensors with electrical transducers, sensors with optical transducers, and sensors with other transducers (e.g. mass change). The unique properties of carbon nanotubes have led to their use in areas as diverse as sensors, actuators, field-emitting flat panel displays, energy and gas storages (Dai and Mau, 2001). As we shall see below, the principles for carbon nanotube sensors to detect the nature of gases and to determine their concentrations are based on change in electrical properties induced by charge transfer with the gas molecules (e.g. O2, H2, CO2) or in mass due to physical adsorption. This article provides a status report on the research and development of carbon nanotube sensors.

  17. Functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H.sub.2 or F.sub.2 or C.sub.nH.sub.m) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  18. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2, or F2, or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target particles are directed toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec.

  19. Production of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Journet, C.; Bernier, P.

    Carbon nanostructures such as single-walled and multi-walled nanotubes (SWNTs and MWNTs) or graphitic polyhedral nanoparticles can be produced using various methods. Most of them are based on the sublimation of carbon under an inert atmosphere, such as the electric arc discharge process, the laser ablation method, or the solar technique. But chemical methods can also be used to synthesize these kinds of carbon materials: the catalytic decomposition of hydrocarbons, the production by electrolysis, the heat treatment of a polymer, the low temperature solid pyrolysis, or the in situ catalysis.

  20. Carbon Nanotube Interconnect

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Jun (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    Method and system for fabricating an electrical interconnect capable of supporting very high current densities ( 10(exp 6)-10(exp 10) Amps/sq cm), using an array of one or more carbon nanotubes (CNTs). The CNT array is grown in a selected spaced apart pattern, preferably with multi-wall CNTs, and a selected insulating material, such as SiOw, or SiuNv is deposited using CVD to encapsulate each CNT in the array. An exposed surface of the insulating material is planarized to provide one or more exposed electrical contacts for one or more CNTs.

  1. Fabrication of titanium dioxide nanotube arrays using organic electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoriya, Sorachon

    to ~2 microm. In comparison to DMSO electrolyte, the electrochemical anodization rates are relatively slower in DEG electrolyte; as a result, the nanotube length is typically less than 10 microm. Pore size of nanotubes grown in DEG has been extended from 150 nm up to approximately 400 nm. The approach to pore widening could be achieved by using a specific condition of low HF concentration and prolonged anodization time. The study of evolution of nanotubes grown in DEG electrolytes showed that a fibrous layer was formed in the early growth stages and then was chemically and gradually removed after a long duration, leaving behind the nanotubes with large pore size. In DEG electrolyte, the closer spacing between Ti and Pt electrodes resulted in the larger nanotube morphological parameters due to the enhanced electrode kinetics facilitating the electrode reactions. Furthermore, this dissertation showed possibilities to crystallize the titania nanotube array films at room temperature via anodization in either DMSO or DEG electrolytes. The partially crystallized films could be achieved specifically in the optimum slow growth process conditions. Due to partial crystallization of the as-anodized samples, the high temperature annealing study revealed that the temperatures of phase transformation are 260 ºC and 430°C for respectively amorphous to anatase and anatase to rutile, which are accounted as the lowest phase transformation temperatures reported to date (2010). Finally, the photoelectrochemical properties of the DMSO fabricated nanotubes were investigated. The maximum photocurrent density of ~ 11 mA cm--2 was achieved by using the 46-microm long nanotube array sample with completely open pores, and photoconversion efficiencies of 5.425 % (+/- 0.087) (under UV light) and 0.197 % (+/- 0.001) (under solar spectrum AM 1.5) have been demonstrated. Biomedical applications of the DEG fabricated nanotube arrays films such as blood clotting, hemocompatibility, and drug

  2. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V.

    2013-01-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single-and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs. PMID:23933617

  3. Multiscale Modeling with Carbon Nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Maiti, A

    2006-02-21

    Technologically important nanomaterials come in all shapes and sizes. They can range from small molecules to complex composites and mixtures. Depending upon the spatial dimensions of the system and properties under investigation computer modeling of such materials can range from equilibrium and nonequilibrium Quantum Mechanics, to force-field-based Molecular Mechanics and kinetic Monte Carlo, to Mesoscale simulation of evolving morphology, to Finite-Element computation of physical properties. This brief review illustrates some of the above modeling techniques through a number of recent applications with carbon nanotubes: nano electromechanical sensors (NEMS), chemical sensors, metal-nanotube contacts, and polymer-nanotube composites.

  4. Carbon nanotubes in hyperthermia therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ravi; Torti, Suzy V

    2013-12-01

    Thermal tumor ablation therapies are being developed with a variety of nanomaterials, including single- and multiwalled carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have attracted interest due to their potential for simultaneous imaging and therapy. In this review, we highlight in vivo applications of carbon nanotube-mediated thermal therapy (CNMTT) and examine the rationale for use of this treatment in recurrent tumors or those resistant to conventional cancer therapies. Additionally, we discuss strategies to localize and enhance the cancer selectivity of this treatment and briefly examine issues relating the toxicity and long term fate of CNTs.

  5. NASA Innovation Builds Better Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Nanotailor Inc., based in Austin, Texas, licensed Goddard Space Flight Center's unique single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) fabrication process with plans to make high-quality, low-cost SWCNTs available commercially. Carbon nanotubes are being used in a wide variety of applications, and NASA's improved production method will increase their applicability in medicine, microelectronics, advanced materials, and molecular containment. Nanotailor built and tested a prototype based on Goddard's process, and is using this technique to lower the cost and improve the integrity of nanotubes, offering a better product for use in biomaterials, advanced materials, space exploration, highway and building construction, and many other applications.

  6. Method of manufacturing carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benavides, Jeanette M. (Inventor); Leidecker, Henning W. (Inventor); Frazier, Jeffrey (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A process for manufacturing carbon nanotubes, including a step of inducing electrical current through a carbon anode and a carbon cathode under conditions effective to produce the carbon nanotubes, wherein the carbon cathode is larger than the carbon anode. Preferably, a welder is used to induce the electrical current via an arc welding process. Preferably, an exhaust hood is placed on the anode, and the process does not require a closed or pressurized chamber. The process provides high-quality, single-walled carbon nanotubes, while eliminating the need for a metal catalyst.

  7. Transport Through Carbon Nanotube Wires

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M. P.; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of the the current carrying capacity of nanotube wires. Information is given on the motivation for the research, models and assumptions, Bragg reflection and Zener tunneling effects, and the influence of defects. Results show that dI/dv versus V does not increase in a manner commensurate with the increase in the number of subbands; in small diameter nanotubes, Zener tunneling is ineffective; Zener tunneling contributes to current with increase in nanotube diameter; and the increase in dI/dV with bias is much smaller than the increase in the number of subbands.

  8. Carbon nanotubes as vaccine scaffolds

    PubMed Central

    Scheinberg, David A.; McDevitt, Michael R.; Dao, Tao; Mulvey, Justin J.; Feinberg, Evan; Alidori, Simone

    2013-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes display characteristics that are potentially useful in their development as scaffolds for vaccine compositions. These features include stability in vivo, lack of intrinsic immunogenicity, low toxicity, and the ability to be appended with multiple copies of antigens. In addition, the particulate nature of carbon nanotubes and their unusual properties of rapid entry into antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, make them especially useful as carriers of antigens. Early attempts demonstrating carbon nanotube-based vaccines can be used in both infectious disease settings and cancer are promising. PMID:23899863

  9. Synthesis of Fe2O3/TiO2 nanorod nanotube arrays by filling TiO2 nanotubes with Fe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohapatra, Susanta K.; Banerjee, Subarna; Misra, Mano

    2008-08-01

    Synthesis of hematite (α-Fe2O3) nanostructures on a titania (TiO2) nanotubular template is carried out using a pulsed electrodeposition technique. The TiO2 nanotubes are prepared by the sonoelectrochemical anodization method and are filled with iron (Fe) by pulsed electrodeposition. The Fe/TiO2 composite is then annealed in an O2 atmosphere to convert it to Fe2O3/TiO2 nanorod-nanotube arrays. The length of the Fe2O3 inside the TiO2 nanotubes can be tuned from 50 to 550 nm by changing the deposition time. The composite material is characterized by scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy and diffuse reflectance ultraviolet-visible studies to confirm the formation of one-dimensional Fe2O3/TiO2 nanorod-nanotube arrays. The present approach can be used for designing variable one-dimensional metal oxide heterostructures.

  10. Template based synthesis of gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Ballabh, R; Nara, S

    2015-12-01

    Reliable experimental protocols using green technologies to synthesize metallic nanostructures widen their applications, both biological as well as biomedical. Here, we describe a method for synthesizing gold nanotubes using biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles in a template based approach. E. coli DH5α was used as bionanofactory to synthesize gold nanoparticles. These nanoparticles were then deposited on sodium sulfate (Na2SO4) nanowires which were employed as sacrificial template for gold nanotube (Au-NT) formation. The gold nanoparticles, sodium sulphate nanowires and gold nanotubes were appropriately characterized using transmission electron microscopy. The TEM results showed that the average diameter of gold nanotubes was 72 nm and length up to 4-7 μm. The method discussed herein is better than other reported conventional chemical synthesis approaches as it uses biologically synthesized gold nanoparticles, and does not employ any harsh conditions/solvents for template removal which makes it a clean and ecofriendly method.

  11. Peel test of spinnable carbon nanotube webs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandoker, Noman; Hawkins, Stephen C.; Ibrahim, Raafat; Huynh, Chi P.

    2014-06-01

    This paper presents results of peel tests with spinnable carbon nanotube webs. Peel tests were performed to study the effect of orientation angles on interface energies between nanotubes. In absence of any binding agent the interface energy represents the Van Der Waals energies between the interacting nanotubes. Therefore, the effect of the orientations on Van Der Waals energies between carbon nanotubes is obtained through the peel test. It is shown that the energy for crossed nanotubes at 90° angle is lower than the energy for parallel nanotubes at 0° angle. This experimental observation was validated by hypothetical theoretical calculations.

  12. Functional materials based on carbon nanotubes: Carbon nanotube actuators and noncovalent carbon nanotube modification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fifield, Leonard S.

    Carbon nanotubes have attractive inherent properties that encourage the development of new functional materials and devices based on them. The use of single wall carbon nanotubes as electromechanical actuators takes advantage of the high mechanical strength, surface area and electrical conductivity intrinsic to these molecules. The work presented here investigates the mechanisms that have been discovered for actuation of carbon nanotube paper: electrostatic, quantum chemical charge injection, pneumatic and viscoelastic. A home-built apparatus for the measurement of actuation strain is developed and utilized in the investigation. An optical fiber switch, the first demonstrated macro-scale device based on the actuation of carbon nanotubes, is described and its performance evaluated. Also presented here is a new general process designed to modify the surface of carbon nanotubes in a non-covalent, non-destructive way. This method can be used to impart new functionalities to carbon nanotube samples for a variety of applications including sensing, solar energy conversion and chemical separation. The process described involves the achievement of large degrees of graphitic surface coverage with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons through the use of supercritical fluids. These molecules are bifunctional agents that anchor a desired chemical group to the aromatic surface of the carbon nanotubes without adversely disrupting the conjugated backbone that gives rise the attractive electronic and physical properties of the nanotubes. Both the nanotube functionalization work and the actuator work presented here emphasize how an understanding and control of nanoscale structure and phenomena can be of vital importance in achieving desired performance for active materials. Opportunities for new devices with improved function over current state-of-the-art can be envisioned and anticipated based on this understanding and control.

  13. Studies of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caneba, Gerard T.

    2005-01-01

    The fellowship experience for this summer for 2004 pertains to carbon nanotube coatings for various space-related applications. They involve the following projects: (a) EMI protection films from HiPco-polymers, and (b) Thermal protection nanosilica materials. EMI protection films are targeted to be eventually applied onto casings of laptop computers. These coatings are composites of electrically-conductive SWNTs and compatible polymers. The substrate polymer will be polycarbonate, since computer housings are typically made of carbon composites of this type of polymer. A new experimental copolymer was used last year to generate electrically-conductive and thermal films with HiPco at 50/50 wt/wt composition. This will be one of the possible formulations. Reference films will be base polycarbonate and neat HiPco onto polycarbonate films. Other coating materials that will be tried will be based on HiPco composites with commercial enamels (polyurethane, acrylic, polyester), which could be compatible with the polycarbonate substrate. Nanosilica fibers are planned for possible use as thermal protection tiles on the shuttle orbiter. Right now, microscale silica is used. Going to the nanoscale will increase the surface-volume-per-unit-area of radiative heat dissipation. Nanoscale carbon fibers/nanotubes can be used as templates for the generation of nanosilica. A sol-gel operation is employed for this purpose.

  14. Superconductivity in the Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ieong, Chao

    This is an experimental study of the superconductivity of the carbon nanotubes (CNTs)--more specifically the CNTs studied is 0.4 nm diameter single-wall CNTs existing inside the channels of the AFI zeolite crystal, abbreviated as CNT AFI--by probing the magnetization property of this CNT AFI system. These human engineered 4-Angstrom CNTs, which is a nanoscale and low-dimensional material, are approaching the limit set by nature, and superconductivity in the CNTs in general is theoretically (microscopic or first-principles) both interesting and challenging. Hence, empirical studies are important in providing useful guiding information. The magnetization and specific-heat studies could provide convincing evidences supporting or critiquing the electrical transport results of the CNT AFI system. But probing the superconductivity in this system, as the superconducting signal is very small in a large background, is another challenge. Therefore the high-resolution calorimetry and magnetometry techniques detailedin this thesis are invaluable. With improved method of fabrication to increase the CNTs content inside the channels of the AFI crystallites, the empirical results [Nanoscale 4, 21-41 (2012)]were markedly different from those published in 2001 [Science 292, 2462 (2001)]. The magnetization results of this thesis largely agree with the results from the electrical transport study [Phys. Rev. B 81, 174530 (2010)], but there is some result that raises doubt in the critical current interpretation there. Lastly, there is still some electrical transport result of this system that has not been explained convincingly and is of interest.

  15. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed.

  16. Nanomanufacturing of 2D Transition Metal Dichalcogenide Materials Using Self-Assembled DNA Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jungwook; Chen, Haorong; Li, Feiran; Yang, Lingming; Kim, Steve S; Naik, Rajesh R; Ye, Peide D; Choi, Jong Hyun

    2015-11-04

    2D transition metal dichalcogenides (TMDCs) are nanomanufactured using a generalized strategy with self-assembled DNA nanotubes. DNA nanotubes of various lengths serve as lithographic etch masks for the dry etching of TMDCs. The nanostructured TMDCs are studied by atomic force microscopy, photoluminescence, and Raman spectroscopy. This parallel approach can be used to manufacture 2D TMDC nanostructures of arbitrary geometries with molecular-scale precision.

  17. Method for producing carbon nanotubes

    DOEpatents

    Phillips, Jonathan; Perry, William L.; Chen, Chun-Ku

    2006-02-14

    Method for producing carbon nanotubes. Carbon nanotubes were prepared using a low power, atmospheric pressure, microwave-generated plasma torch system. After generating carbon monoxide microwave plasma, a flow of carbon monoxide was directed first through a bed of metal particles/glass beads and then along the outer surface of a ceramic tube located in the plasma. As a flow of argon was introduced into the plasma through the ceramic tube, ropes of entangled carbon nanotubes, attached to the surface of the tube, were produced. Of these, longer ropes formed on the surface portion of the tube located in the center of the plasma. Transmission electron micrographs of individual nanotubes revealed that many were single-walled.

  18. Filling carbon nanotubes with particles.

    PubMed

    Kim, Byong M; Qian, Shizhi; Bau, Haim H

    2005-05-01

    The filling of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with fluorescent particles was studied experimentally and theoretically. The fluorescent signals emitted by the particles were visible through the walls of the nanotubes, and the particles inside the tubes were observable with an electron microscope. Taking advantage of the template-grown carbon nanotubes' transparency to fluorescent light, we measured the filling rate of the tubes with particles at room conditions. Liquids such as ethylene glycol, water, and ethylene glycol/water mixtures, laden with 50 nm diameter fluorescent particles, were brought into contact with 500 nm diameter CNTs. The liquid and the particles' transport were observed, respectively, with optical and fluorescence microscopy. The CNTs were filled controllably with particles by the complementary action of capillary forces and the evaporation of the liquid. The experimental results were compared and favorably agreed with theoretical predictions. This is the first report on fluorescence studies of particle transport in carbon nanotubes.

  19. Elastic modulus of viral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yue; Ge, Zhibin; Fang, Jiyu

    2008-09-01

    We report an experimental and theoretical study of the radial elasticity of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) nanotubes. An atomic force microscope tip is used to apply small radial indentations to deform TMV nanotubes. The initial elastic response of TMV nanotubes can be described by finite-element analysis in 5nm indentation depths and Hertz theory in 1.5nm indentation depths. The derived radial Young’s modulus of TMV nanotubes is 0.92±0.15GPa from finite-element analysis and 1.0±0.2GPa from the Hertz model, which are comparable with the reported axial Young’s modulus of 1.1GPa [Falvo , Biophys. J. 72, 1396 (1997)].

  20. Carbon nanotubes: engineering biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Gualdrón, Diego A; Burgos, Juan C; Yu, Jiamei; Balbuena, Perla B

    2011-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are cylinder-shaped allotropic forms of carbon, most widely produced under chemical vapor deposition. They possess astounding chemical, electronic, mechanical, and optical properties. Being among the most promising materials in nanotechnology, they are also likely to revolutionize medicine. Among other biomedical applications, after proper functionalization carbon nanotubes can be transformed into sophisticated biosensing and biocompatible drug-delivery systems, for specific targeting and elimination of tumor cells. This chapter provides an introduction to the chemical and electronic structure and properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes, followed by a description of the main synthesis and post-synthesis methods. These sections allow the reader to become familiar with the specific characteristics of these materials and the manner in which these properties may be dependent on the specific synthesis and post-synthesis processes. The chapter ends with a review of the current biomedical applications of carbon nanotubes, highlighting successes and challenges.

  1. Selective functionalization of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strano, Michael S. (Inventor); Usrey, Monica (Inventor); Barone, Paul (Inventor); Dyke, Christopher A. (Inventor); Tour, James M. (Inventor); Kittrell, W. Carter (Inventor); Hauge, Robert H. (Inventor); Smalley, Richard E. (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The present invention is directed toward methods of selectively functionalizing carbon nanotubes of a specific type or range of types, based on their electronic properties, using diazonium chemistry. The present invention is also directed toward methods of separating carbon nanotubes into populations of specific types or range(s) of types via selective functionalization and electrophoresis, and also to the novel compositions generated by such separations.

  2. Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-01

    replacement of air space with the polymer matrix. A similar affinity is not known to exist between CNTs and aluminum , where the wetting angle between...Carbon Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites by Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna ARL-TR-5252 August 2010...Nanotube Aluminum Matrix Composites Brent J. Carey, Jerome T. Tzeng, and Shashi Karna Weapons and Materials Research Directorate, ARL

  3. Mechanisms of stem cell osteogenic differentiation on TiO2 nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqiang; Qian, Chao; Jiang, Xinquan; Zhang, Fuqiang; Weng, Weimin

    2015-12-01

    TiO2 nanotubes could stimulate osteogenic differentiation of stem cells, but the molecular mechanisms underlying the interactions between nanotubes and stem cells remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the response of bone marrow stromal cells to nanotubes of different diameters using microarray-based bioinformatics approach. Gene ontology (GO) and GO enrichment network analysis indicated that larger TiO2 nanotubes were more potent than smaller nanotubes in inducing the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, differentiation, and immune responses, and inhibiting that of genes responsible for cell adhesion. The analysis of the signaling network containing significantly affected genes suggested that Na(+)/K(+) transporting ATPases ATP1A2 (alpha 2 polypeptide) and ATP1A3 (alpha 3 polypeptide), and MAP3K11 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 11) were important for inducing osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow stromal cells without additional osteogenic stimuli. The upregulation of the ATP1A2 and MAP3K11 genes confirmed by real-time PCR indicates that the response of bone marrow stromal cells to nanotube cues may be mediated by the pathways previously implicated in transducing mechanical stress signals. Our results revealed some molecular mechanisms by which TiO2 nanotubes may direct osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Growth and characterization of boron nitride nanotubes having novel morphologies using mechanothermal process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Sunil Kumar; Srivastava, Avanish Kumar; Dilawar, Nita; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2010-08-01

    We report an effective approach to synthesize boron nitride (BN) nanotubes having novel morphologies employing a mechanothermal process. In this process, a precursor containing B-N-O-Fe was first synthesized by ball milling a 1:1 mixture of elemental boron (B) and hexagonal boron nitride (hBN) and iron oxide (about 6 wt%) for about 36 h in the presence of ammonia gas. BN nanotubes were grown by annealing this precursor in ammonia gas atmosphere at 1,250-1,350 °C for about 3 h. The nanotubes produced using this technique were found to evolve structures having Y-junctions and bamboo-like morphology with an average diameter of about 30-100 nm and length several microns. A few nanotubes with partially folded in diameter were also found to co-exist along with other nanotubes. These nanotubes were characterized using various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The growth mechanism for the formation of these novel morphologies in BN nanotubes is also discussed.

  5. Half-Metallic Properties of Single-Walled Polymeric Manganese Phthalocyanine Nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hongbin; Bai, Meilin; Wei, Peng; Sun, Lili; Shen, Ziyong; Hou, Shimin

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of single-walled manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) nanotubes which can be thought of as rolled-up ribbons of the two-dimensional (2D) polymeric MnPc sheet. Our density functional theory calculations show that all of the MnPc nanotubes investigated here are half-metals with 100% spin polarization around the Fermi level. Following the increase of the tube diameter, the number of spin-down energy bands of MnPc nanotubes is always increased while the spin-up band gap of MnPc nanotubes approaches that of the 2D MnPc sheet in an oscillatory manner. Because the half-metallic character of MnPc nanotubes is deeply rooted in the distribution of electrons in the energy bands dominated by the Mn 3d atomic orbitals, adsorption of CO molecules on the Mn ions leads to a redistribution of electrons in the Mn 3d orbitals and thus can tune precisely the spin state and electronic transport properties of MnPc nanotubes, demonstrating promising applications of MnPc nanotubes in future molecular spintronics and single-molecule sensors. PMID:23012498

  6. Carbon nanotubes: artificial nanomaterials to engineer single neurons and neuronal networks.

    PubMed

    Fabbro, Alessandra; Bosi, Susanna; Ballerini, Laura; Prato, Maurizio

    2012-08-15

    In the past decade, nanotechnology applications to the nervous system have often involved the study and the use of novel nanomaterials to improve the diagnosis and therapy of neurological diseases. In the field of nanomedicine, carbon nanotubes are evaluated as promising materials for diverse therapeutic and diagnostic applications. Besides, carbon nanotubes are increasingly employed in basic neuroscience approaches, and they have been used in the design of neuronal interfaces or in that of scaffolds promoting neuronal growth in vitro. Ultimately, carbon nanotubes are thought to hold the potential for the development of innovative neurological implants. In this framework, it is particularly relevant to document the impact of interfacing such materials with nerve cells. Carbon nanotubes were shown, when modified with biologically active compounds or functionalized in order to alter their charge, to affect neurite outgrowth and branching. Notably, purified carbon nanotubes used as scaffolds can promote the formation of nanotube-neuron hybrid networks, able per se to affect neuron integrative abilities, network connectivity, and synaptic plasticity. We focus this review on our work over several years directed to investigate the ability of carbon nanotube platforms in providing a new tool for nongenetic manipulations of neuronal performance and network signaling.

  7. Electric field-assisted deposition of nanowires on carbon nanotubes for nanoelectronics and sensor applications.

    PubMed

    Sivakumar, Kousik; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2005-02-01

    Manipulation and control of matter at the nanoscale and atomic scale levels are crucial for the success of nanoscale sensors and actuators. The ability to control and synthesize multilayer structures using carbon nanotubes that will enable the building of electronic devices within a nanotube is still in its infancy. In this paper, we present results on selective electric field-assisted deposition of metals on carbon nanotubes realizing metallic nanowire structures. Silver and platinum nanowires have been fabricated using this approach for their applications in chemical sensing as catalytic materials to sniff toxic agents and in the area of biomedical nanotechnology for construction of artificial muscles. Electric field-assisted deposition allows the deposition of metals with a high degree of selectivity on carbon nanotubes by manipulating the charges on the surface of the nanotubes and forming electrostatic double-layer supercapacitors. Deposition of metals primarily occurred due to electrochemical reduction, electrophoresis, and electro-osmosis inside the walls of the nanotube. SEM and TEM investigations revealed silver and platinum nanowires between 10 nm and 100 nm in diameter. The present technique is versatile and enables the fabrication of a host of different types of metallic and semiconducting nanowires using carbon nanotube templates for nanoelectronics and a myriad of sensor applications.

  8. Half-metallic properties of single-walled polymeric manganese phthalocyanine nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Hongbin; Bai, Meilin; Wei, Peng; Sun, Lili; Shen, Ziyong; Hou, Shimin

    2012-01-01

    We present a theoretical study of the electronic and magnetic properties of single-walled manganese phthalocyanine (MnPc) nanotubes which can be thought of as rolled-up ribbons of the two-dimensional (2D) polymeric MnPc sheet. Our density functional theory calculations show that all of the MnPc nanotubes investigated here are half-metals with 100% spin polarization around the Fermi level. Following the increase of the tube diameter, the number of spin-down energy bands of MnPc nanotubes is always increased while the spin-up band gap of MnPc nanotubes approaches that of the 2D MnPc sheet in an oscillatory manner. Because the half-metallic character of MnPc nanotubes is deeply rooted in the distribution of electrons in the energy bands dominated by the Mn 3d atomic orbitals, adsorption of CO molecules on the Mn ions leads to a redistribution of electrons in the Mn 3d orbitals and thus can tune precisely the spin state and electronic transport properties of MnPc nanotubes, demonstrating promising applications of MnPc nanotubes in future molecular spintronics and single-molecule sensors.

  9. Low temperature growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chee Huei; Xie, Ming; Wang, Jiesheng; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2008-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are promising nanostuctures that will complement the applications of carbon nanotubes in various emerging areas. However, the synthesis of BNNTs is still challenging and required high growth temperatures (1500 C to 3000 C). Here we will discuss about two approaches for low temperature growth of BNNTs. First, we have reported on the growth of pure BNNTs at 600 C by a plasma-enhanced pulsed-laser deposition (PE-PLD) technique [1]. These BNNTs were grown vertically-aligned on substrates. Latest result on the effect of catalyst, growth temperatures, ambient gas pressures, substrate bias voltages and the growth mechanism will be discussed in the meeting. Secondly, effective growth of BNNTs is recently achieved by conventional thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Our new CVD approach leads to effective growth of long and clean BNNTs at 1200 C. SEM, TEM, EELS, Raman, FTIR, and UV absorption data indicate that these BNNTs are having high structural ordered and a energy band gap > 5.6 eV. [1]. J. Wang et. al, Nano Lett. 5, 2528 (2005).

  10. Boron nitride nanotubes and nanosheets.

    PubMed

    Golberg, Dmitri; Bando, Yoshio; Huang, Yang; Terao, Takeshi; Mitome, Masanori; Tang, Chengchun; Zhi, Chunyi

    2010-06-22

    Hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) is a layered material with a graphite-like structure in which planar networks of BN hexagons are regularly stacked. As the structural analogue of a carbon nanotube (CNT), a BN nanotube (BNNT) was first predicted in 1994; since then, it has become one of the most intriguing non-carbon nanotubes. Compared with metallic or semiconducting CNTs, a BNNT is an electrical insulator with a band gap of ca. 5 eV, basically independent of tube geometry. In addition, BNNTs possess a high chemical stability, excellent mechanical properties, and high thermal conductivity. The same advantages are likely applicable to a graphene analogue-a monatomic layer of a hexagonal BN. Such unique properties make BN nanotubes and nanosheets a promising nanomaterial in a variety of potential fields such as optoelectronic nanodevices, functional composites, hydrogen accumulators, electrically insulating substrates perfectly matching the CNT, and graphene lattices. This review gives an introduction to the rich BN nanotube/nanosheet field, including the latest achievements in the synthesis, structural analyses, and property evaluations, and presents the purpose and significance of this direction in the light of the general nanotube/nanosheet developments.

  11. Biofunctionalization and capping of template synthesized nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Hillebrenner, Heather; Buyukserin, Fatih; Stewart, Jon D; Martin, Charles R

    2007-07-01

    Using alumina templates both nanotubes (open on both ends) and nano test tubes (open on only one end) have been synthesized from many different materials and these have great potential as delivery vehicles for biomedical applications. This review focuses on our recent results directed towards developing "smart" nanotubes for biomolecule delivery applications. While intensive efforts have focused on spherical nanoparticles that are easier to make, cylindrical particles or nanotubes offer many advantages. First, the tunable alumina template allows one to dictate both the pore diameter and length of the nanotube. In addition, template synthesized nanotubes can be differentially functionalized on their inner and outer surfaces. This review highlights these advantages in the contexts of drug extraction and antibody-antigen interactions, the synthesis of protein nanotubes, and recent advances in covalently capped ("corked") nanotubes designed to prevent premature payload leakage. Though diverse applications for nanotubes have already been discovered, many new and exciting paths await exploration.

  12. Computational Nanotechnology of Nanotubes, Composites, and Electronics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, D.; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation addresses carbon nanotubes, their mechanical and thermal properties, and their structure, as well as possible miniature devices which may be assembled in the future from carbon nanotubes.

  13. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  14. Oligomer functionalized nanotubes and composites formed therewith

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alexander K; Sainsbury, Toby; Frechet, Jean M.J.

    2014-03-18

    Disclosed herein is a sequential functionalization methodology for the covalent modification of nanotubes with between one and four repeat units of a polymer. Covalent attachment of oligomer units to the surface of nanotubes results in oligomer units forming an organic sheath around the nanotubes, polymer-functionalized-nanotubes (P-NTs). P-NTs possess chemical functionality identical to that of the functionalizing polymer, and thus provide nanoscale scaffolds which may be readily dispersed within a monomer solution and participate in the polymerization reaction to form a polymer-nanotube/polymer composite. Formation of polymer in the presence of P-NTs leads to a uniform dispersion of nanotubes within the polymer matrix, in contrast to aggregated masses of nanotubes in the case of pristine-NTs. The covalent attachment of oligomeric units to the surface of nanotubes represents the formation of a functional nanoscale building block which can be readily dispersed and integrated within the polymer to form a novel composite material.

  15. Probing Photosensitization by Functionalized Carbon Nanotubes

    EPA Science Inventory

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) photosensitize the production of reactive oxygen species that can damage organisms by biomembrane oxidation or mediate CNTs' environmental transformations. The photosensitized nature of derivatized carbon nanotubes from various synthetic methods, and thus ...

  16. A multi-scale electro-thermo-mechanical analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ragab, Tarek

    Carbon nanotubes are formed by folding a graphene sheet. They have gained a lot of attention during the last decade due to their extra ordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Molecular dynamics simulations have been used extensively for studying the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes. In this thesis, a quantum mechanics and molecular dynamics level multi-scale modeling and analysis of single walled carbon nanotubes is presented. This dissertation reports many findings based on these simulations such as some parameters that affect the correctness of the results obtained by molecular dynamics simulation like the boundary conditions and the displacement increment. The effects of the strain rate and the length of the nanotube on the mechanical properties of carbon nanotubes under uniaxial tension are also reported. A simplification for calculating the virial stresses with multibody potential is derived to use for calculating the stresses in carbon nanotubes and compared with the stresses calculated using continuum mechanics engineering stresses. Simulation of unraveling of carbon nanotubes during field emission is simulated using Molecular dynamics simulations. The force required to start the unraveling in carbon nanotubes with different chiralities is reported as well as the maximum force that can be sustained by the atomic chain. Due to the nonlinearity in the current-voltage relation of carbon nanotubes, the traditional Joule's law for calculating joule heating in carbon nanotubes can not be used. In this thesis, the joule heating and the electron-induced wind forces per unit length of carbon nanotubes are calculated using a quantum mechanical formulation based on the energy and momentum exchange between the electrons and the phonons. Two approaches were used in the calculations; the first one is based on formulating an integral form that makes use of the relaxation time approximation into the modified Fermi-Dirac distribution for the electron

  17. Removal of some impurities from carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yongcheng; Zhou, Gumin; Wang, Guoping; Qu, Meizhen; Yu, Zuolong

    2003-07-01

    A non-destructive mild oxidation method of removing some impurities from as-grown carbon nanotubes (CNTs), including single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) and multi-wall carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), by H 2O 2 oxidation and HCl treatment, has been investigated, and somewhat pure carbon nanotubes have been prepared. The CNTs from which some impurities were removed have been evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and temperature programmed oxidation and gas chromatography (TPO-GC).

  18. Carbon nanotubes by the metallocene route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Rahul; Govindaraj, A.; Rao, C. N. R.

    1997-03-01

    Pyrolysis of metallocenes such as ferrocene, cobaltocene and nickelocene, is shown to yield carbon nanotubes and metal-filled onion-like structures. Pyrolysis of benzene in the presence of a metallocene gives high yields of nanotubes, the wall thickness of the nanotubes depending on the metallocene content. Pyrolysis of benzene in the absence of any metal however gives monodispersed nanospheres of carbon rather than nanotubes.

  19. LDRD final report on carbon nanotube composites

    SciTech Connect

    Cahill, P.A.; Rand, P.B.

    1997-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes and their composites were examined using computational and experimental techniques in order to modify the mechanical and electrical properties of resins. Single walled nanotubes were the focus of the first year effort; however, sufficient quantities of high purity single walled nanotubes could not be obtained for mechanical property investigations. The unusually high electrical conductivity of composites loaded with <1% of multiwalled nanotubes is useful, and is the focus of continuing, externally funded, research.

  20. Imaging single carbon nanotubes with thermal radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Yuwei; Singer, Scott; Bergstrom, Raymond; Regan, B. C.

    2009-03-01

    We have constructed tiny light bulbs, visible to the naked eye, using individual carbon nanotubes as filaments. A nanotube is suspended over a hole in a solid silicon substrate, and is heated to incandescence with electrical current. Diffraction-limited optical microscopy identifies the nanotube position and orientation, and allows direct comparison with high-resolution transmission electron micrographs of the same nanotube. Our current progress toward quantitative pyrometry will be described.

  1. Carbon Nanotube Assemblies for Transparent Conducting Electrodes

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, Matthew P; Gerhardt, Rosario

    2012-01-01

    The goal of this chapter is to introduce readers to the fundamental and practical aspects of nanotube assemblies made into transparent conducting networks and discuss some practical aspects of their characterization. Transparent conducting coatings (TCC) are an essential part of electro-optical devices, from photovoltaics and light emitting devices to electromagnetic shielding and electrochromic widows. The market for organic materials (including nanomaterials and polymers) based TCCs is expected to show a growth rate of 56.9% to reach nearly 20.3billionin2015,whilethemarketfortraditionalinorganictransparentelectronicswillexperiencegrowthwithratesof6.7103 billion in 2015. Emerging flexible electronic applications have brought additional requirements of flexibility and low cost for TCC. However, the price of indium (the major component in indium tin oxide TCC) continues to increase. On the other hand, the price of nanomaterials has continued to decrease due to development of high volume, quality production processes. Additional benefits come from the low cost, nonvacuum deposition of nanomaterials based TCC, compared to traditional coatings requiring energy intensive vacuum deposition. Among the materials actively researched as alternative TCC are nanoparticles, nanowires, and nanotubes with high aspect ratio as well as their composites. The figure of merit (FOM) can be used to compare TCCs made from dissimilar materials and with different transmittance and conductivity values. In the first part of this manuscript, we will discuss the seven FOM parameters that have been proposed, including one specifically intended for flexible applications. The approach for how to measure TCE electrical properties, including frequency dependence, will also be discussed. We will relate the macroscale electrical characteristics of TCCs to the nanoscale parameters of conducting networks. The fundamental aspects of nanomaterial assemblies in conducting networks will also be addressed

  2. Functionalization of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khare, Bishun N. (Inventor); Meyyappan, Meyya (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    Method and system for functionalizing a collection of carbon nanotubes (CNTs). A selected precursor gas (e.g., H2 or F2 or CnHm) is irradiated to provide a cold plasma of selected target species particles, such as atomic H or F, in a first chamber. The target species particles are d irected toward an array of CNTs located in a second chamber while suppressing transport of ultraviolet radiation to the second chamber. A CNT array is functionalized with the target species particles, at or below room temperature, to a point of saturation, in an exposure time interval no longer than about 30 sec. *Discrimination against non-target species is provided by (i) use of a target species having a lifetime that is much greater than a lifetime of a non-target species and/or (2) use of an applied magnetic field to discriminate between charged particle trajectories for target species and for non-target species.

  3. Nanomechanics of carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramasamy, Mouli; Kumar, Prashanth S.; Varadan, Vijay K.

    2017-04-01

    This review focusses on introducing the mechanics in carbon nanotubes (CNT), and the major applications of CNT and its composites in biomedicine. It emphasizes the nanomechanics of these materials by reviewing the widely followed experimental methods, theoretical models, simulations, classification, segregation and applications the aforementioned materials. First, several mechanical properties contributing to the classification of the CNT, for various biomedicine applications, are discussed in detail to provide a cursory glance at the uses of CNT. The mechanics of CNT discussed in this paper include: elasticity, stress, tension, compression, nano-scale mechanics. In addition to these basic properties, a brief introduction about nanoscale composites is given. Second, a brief review on some of the major applications of CNT in biomedicine including drug delivery, therapeutics, diagnostics and regenerative medicine is given.

  4. Carbon nanotube biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Tîlmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May C.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical, and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites, or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we describe their structural and physical properties, functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility, and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers. PMID:26579509

  5. Carbon Nanotube based Nanotechnolgy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyyappan, M.

    2000-10-01

    Carbon nanotube(CNT) was discovered in the early 1990s and is an off-spring of C60(the fullerene or buckyball). CNT, depending on chirality and diameter, can be metallic or semiconductor and thus allows formation of metal-semiconductor and semiconductor-semiconductor junctions. CNT exhibits extraordinary electrical and mechanical properties and offers remarkable potential for revolutionary applications in electronics devices, computing and data storage technology, sensors, composites, storage of hydrogen or lithium for battery development, nanoelectromechanical systems(NEMS), and as tip in scanning probe microscopy(SPM) for imaging and nanolithography. Thus the CNT synthesis, characterization and applications touch upon all disciplines of science and engineering. A common growth method now is based on CVD though surface catalysis is key to synthesis, in contrast to many CVD applications common in microelectronics. A plasma based variation is gaining some attention. This talk will provide an overview of CNT properties, growth methods, applications, and research challenges and opportunities ahead.

  6. Carbon nanotube terahertz detector.

    PubMed

    He, Xiaowei; Fujimura, Naoki; Lloyd, J Meagan; Erickson, Kristopher J; Talin, A Alec; Zhang, Qi; Gao, Weilu; Jiang, Qijia; Kawano, Yukio; Hauge, Robert H; Léonard, François; Kono, Junichiro

    2014-07-09

    Terahertz (THz) technologies are promising for diverse areas such as medicine, bioengineering, astronomy, environmental monitoring, and communications. However, despite decades of worldwide efforts, the THz region of the electromagnetic spectrum still continues to be elusive for solid state technology. Here, we report on the development of a powerless, compact, broadband, flexible, large-area, and polarization-sensitive carbon nanotube THz detector that works at room temperature. The detector is sensitive throughout the entire range of the THz technology gap, with responsivities as high as ∼2.5 V/W and polarization ratios as high as ∼5:1. Complete thermoelectric and opto-thermal characterization together unambiguously reveal the photothermoelectric origin of the THz photosignal, triggered by plasmonic absorption and collective antenna effects, and suggest that judicious design of thermal management and quantum engineering of Seebeck coefficients will lead to further enhancement of device performance.

  7. Carbon nanotube electron gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  8. Carbon Nanotube Electron Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Cattien V. (Inventor); Ribaya, Bryan P. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An electron gun, an electron source for an electron gun, an extractor for an electron gun, and a respective method for producing the electron gun, the electron source and the extractor are disclosed. Embodiments provide an electron source utilizing a carbon nanotube (CNT) bonded to a substrate for increased stability, reliability, and durability. An extractor with an aperture in a conductive material is used to extract electrons from the electron source, where the aperture may substantially align with the CNT of the electron source when the extractor and electron source are mated to form the electron gun. The electron source and extractor may have alignment features for aligning the electron source and the extractor, thereby bringing the aperture and CNT into substantial alignment when assembled. The alignment features may provide and maintain this alignment during operation to improve the field emission characteristics and overall system stability of the electron gun.

  9. Carbon Nanotube Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tilmaciu, Carmen-Mihaela; Morris, May

    2015-10-01

    Nanomaterials possess unique features which make them particularly attractive for biosensing applications. In particular Carbon Nanotubes (CNTs) can serve as scaffolds for immobilization of biomolecules at their surface, and combine several exceptional physical, chemical, electrical and optical characteristics properties which make them one of the best suited materials for the transduction of signals associated with the recognition of analytes, metabolites or disease biomarkers. Here we provide a comprehensive review on these carbon nanostructures, in which we will describe their structural and physical properties, discuss functionalization and cellular uptake, biocompatibility and toxicity issues. We further review historical developments in the field of biosensors, and describe the different types of biosensors which have been developed over time, with specific focus on CNT-conjugates engineered for biosensing applications, and in particular detection of cancer biomarkers.

  10. Carbon nanotube biconvex microcavities

    SciTech Connect

    Butt, Haider Ahmed, Rajib; Yetisen, Ali K.; Yun, Seok Hyun; Dai, Qing

    2015-03-23

    Developing highly efficient microcavities with predictive narrow-band resonance frequencies using the least amount of material will allow the applications in nonlinear photonic devices. We have developed a microcavity array that comprised multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) organized in a biconvex pattern. The finite element model allowed designing microcavity arrays with predictive transmission properties and assessing the effects of the microarray geometry. The microcavity array demonstrated negative index and produced high Q factors. 2–3 μm tall MWCNTs were patterned as biconvex microcavities, which were separated by 10 μm in an array. The microcavity was iridescent and had optical control over the diffracted elliptical patterns with a far-field pattern, whose properties were predicted by the model. It is anticipated that the MWCNT biconvex microcavities will have implications for the development of highly efficient lenses, metamaterial antennas, and photonic circuits.

  11. Toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Xu, Yuanzhi; Yang, Zhi; Huang, Renhuan; Chen, Jing; Wang, Raorao; Lin, Yunfeng

    2013-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) find their extensive application as a promising material in medicine due to unique characteristics. However, such materials have been accompanied with potentially hazardous effects on human health. The toxicity of CNTs may vary depending on their structural characteristics, surface properties and chemical composition. To gain insight into the toxicity of CNTs in vivo and in vitro, we summarize contributing factors for the toxic effects of CNTs in this review. In addition, we elaborate on the toxic effects and mechanisms in target sites at systemic, organic, cellular, and biomacromolecule levels. Various issues are reported to be effected when exposed to CNTs including (1) blood circulation, (2) lymph circulation, (3) lung, (4) heart, (5) kidney, (6) spleen, (7) bone marrow, and (8) blood brain barrier. Though there have been published reports on the toxic effects of CNTs to date, more studies will still be needed to gain full understanding of their potential toxicity and underlying mechanisms.

  12. Carbon nanotube optical mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Peter C.; Rabin, Douglas

    2015-01-01

    We report the fabrication of imaging quality optical mirrors with smooth surfaces using carbon nanotubes (CNT) embedded in an epoxy matrix. CNT/epoxy is a multifunctional composite material that has sensing capabilities and can be made to incorporate self-actuation. Moreover, as the precursor is a low density liquid, large and lightweight mirrors can be fabricated by processes such as replication, spincasting, and three-dimensional printing. Therefore, the technology holds promise for the development of a new generation of lightweight, compact "smart" telescope mirrors with figure sensing and active or adaptive figure control. We report on measurements made of optical and mechanical characteristics, active optics experiments, and numerical modeling. We discuss possible paths for future development.

  13. Dispersions of Carbon nanotubes in Polymer Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wise, Kristopher Eric (Inventor); Park, Cheol (Inventor); Siochi, Emilie J. (Inventor); Harrison, Joycelyn S. (Inventor); Lillehei, Peter T. (Inventor); Lowther, Sharon E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Dispersions of carbon nanotubes exhibiting long term stability are based on a polymer matrix having moieties therein which are capable of a donor-acceptor complexation with carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes are introduced into the polymer matrix and separated therein by standard means. Nanocomposites produced from these dispersions are useful in the fabrication of structures, e.g., lightweight aerospace structures.

  14. Conductance Oscillations in Squashed Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehrez, H.; Anantram, M. P.; Svizhenko, A.

    2003-01-01

    A combination of molecular dynamics and electrical conductance calculations are used to probe the electromechanical properties of squashed metallic carbon nanotubes. We find that the conductance and bandgap of armchair nanotubes show oscillations upon squashing. The physical origin of these oscillations is attributed to interaction of carbon atoms with a fourth neighbor. Squashing of armchair and zigzag nanotubes ultimately leads to metallic behavior.

  15. Composite Reinforcement using Boron Nitride Nanotubes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-09

    while retaining the nanotube structure. This project involves the use of computational quantum chemistry to study interactions of aluminium (Al...small clusters of 1–4 metal atoms. The effect of varying the radius of the nanotubes and the size of aluminium and titanium clusters was considered...15. SUBJECT TERMS Boron Nitride Nanotubes, composite materials, Aluminum Alloys , Titanium Alloy , Theoretical Chemistry 16. SECURITY

  16. Passive Mode Carbon Nanotube Underwater Acoustic Transducer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-20

    300151 1 of 14 PASSIVE MODE CARBON NANOTUBE UNDERWATER ACOUSTIC TRANSDUCER STATEMENT OF GOVERNMENT INTEREST [0001] The invention described...0003] The present invention is an acoustically transparent carbon nanotube transducer that can operate in a passive acoustic mode for data...acoustic carbon nanotube (CNT) yarn sheets capable of producing high acoustic output at low frequencies with broad bandwidth. An underwater acoustic

  17. Nanotubes in Nanoelectronics: Transport, Growth and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anantram, M.; Delzeit, Lance; Cassell, Alan; Han, Jie; Meyyappan, M.; Arnold, Jim (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) baud nanotechnology appears to be promising for future Theoretical analysis and results for the ballistic current carrying capacity of nanotube wires am presented. Aspects of metal-nanotube coupling are examined. Results am also presented for chemical vapor deposition of CNT from hydrocarbon feedstock.

  18. NMR investigations of hydrogen in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmid, M.; Goze-Bac, C.; Krämer, S.; Mehring, M.; Roth, S.; Bernier, P.

    2002-10-01

    We report proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) measurements on hydrogen loaded single walled carbon nanotubes. The carbon nanotubes were produced with different kinds of catalysts and hydrogen loaded under 23 bar hydrogen pressure. The hydrogen adsorption properties of the carbon nanotube materials were investigated by temperature dependent analysis of the 1H-NMR spectra.

  19. Self-assembled regular arrays of carbon nanotube and the route toward actuation of shape memory polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haibao; Wu, Chunxia; Liu, Yanju; Gou, Jan; Leng, Jinsong

    2010-04-01

    The synthesis of massive arrays of monodispersed carbon nanotubes that are self-assembled on hydrophilic polycarbonate membrane is reported. This approach involves individual carbon nanotube manufacturing by non-ionic surfactant to aid in dispersion and nanotubes self-assembled for three-dimensional orientation by high press filtration. The inherent capability of carbon nanotube and microstructure of well-packed arrays predominate excellent conductive properties of massive arrays. These potential applications of nanometer-sized sensor, probe and energy resistor have been characterized in this study. Furthermore, the route toward application of self-assembled regular arrays, as heat transmission intermedium, has been carried out by activating shape-memory polymer. The electrical conductivity of insulating polymer is significantly improved by assembled carbon nanotubes, resulting in shape recovery behavior of nanocomposite being driven by electrical resistive heating.

  20. Development of Metal-impregnated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Toxic Gas Contaminant Control in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh A.; Fisher, John W.; Wignarajah, K.

    2002-01-01

    The success of physico-chemical waste processing and resource recovery technologies for life support application depends partly on the ability of gas clean-up systems to efficiently remove trace contaminants generated during the process with minimal use of expendables. Carbon nanotubes promise superior performance over conventional approaches to gas clean-up due to their ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controlled pore size, high surface area, ordered chemical structure that allows functionalization and their effectiveness also as catalyst support materials for toxic gas conversion. We present results and findings from a preliminary study on the effectiveness of metal impregnated single walled nanotubes as catalyst/catalyst support materials for toxic gas contaminate control. The study included the purification of single walled nanotubes, the catalyst impregnation of the purified nanotubes, the experimental characterization of the surface properties of purified single walled nanotubes and the characterization of physisorption and chemisorption of uptake molecules.

  1. Development of Metal-impregnated Single Walled Carbon Nanotubes for Toxic Gas Contaminant Control in Advanced Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pisharody, Suresh A.; Fisher, John W.; Wignarajah, K.

    2002-01-01

    The success of physico-chemical waste processing and resource recovery technologies for life support application depends partly on the ability of gas clean-up systems to efficiently remove trace contaminants generated during the process with minimal use of expendables. Carbon nanotubes promise superior performance over conventional approaches to gas clean-up due to their ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controlled pore size, high surface area, ordered chemical structure that allows functionalization and their effectiveness also as catalyst support materials for toxic gas conversion. We present results and findings from a preliminary study on the effectiveness of metal impregnated single walled nanotubes as catalyst/catalyst support materials for toxic gas contaminate control. The study included the purification of single walled nanotubes, the catalyst impregnation of the purified nanotubes, the experimental characterization of the surface properties of purified single walled nanotubes and the characterization of physisorption and chemisorption of uptake molecules.

  2. The fabrication of In2O3 toruloid nanotubes and their room temperature gas sensing properties for H2S

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Haojie; Yan, Lei; He, Yue; Li, Haiying; Liu, Li; Cheng, Yali; Du, Liting

    2017-09-01

    In2O3 nanofibers (NFs) and toruloid nanotubes (TNTs) were fabricated by conventional electrospinning process and their sensing properties toward H2S gas were researched. Thermogravimetric analysis, x-ray diffractometry, energy dispersive spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy were carefully used to investigate the structures, chemical compositions and morphologies of these samples. The novel structure (TNTs) first used nonpolar mineral oil as the control agent of morphology, and the principle of forming toruloid nanotubes was studied. Phase separation plays a critical role in the process of forming toruloid nanotubes structure automatically. The new application of phase separation provided a simple and effective approach for controlling structure. The research indicated that thin-walled toruloid nanotubes showed higher responses toward H2S compared to nanofibers or thick-walled toruloid nanotubes. Additionally, their excellent selectivity can be attributed to the special gas-sensing mechanism of In2O3 for H2S.

  3. Semiconductor Nanowires and Nanotubes for Energy Conversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fardy, Melissa Anne

    In recent years semiconductor nanowires and nanotubes have garnered increased attention for their unique properties. With their nanoscale dimensions comes high surface area and quantum confinement, promising enhancements in a wide range of applications. 1-dimensional nanostructures are especially attractive for energy conversion applications where photons, phonons, and electrons come into play. Since the bohr exciton radius and phonon and electron mean free paths are on the same length scales as nanowire diameters, optical, thermal, and electrical properties can be tuned by simple nanowire size adjustments. In addition, the high surface area inherent to nanowires and nanotubes lends them towards efficient charge separation and superior catalytic performance. In thermoelectric power generation, the nanoscale wire diameter can effectively scatter phonons, promoting reductions in thermal conductivity and enhancements in the thermoelectric figure of merit. To that end, single-crystalline arrays of PbS, PbSe, and PbTe nanowires have been synthesized by a chemical vapor transport approach. The electrical and thermal transport properties of the nanowires were characterized to investigate their potential as thermoelectric materials. Compared to bulk, the lead chalcogenide nanowires exhibit reduced thermal conductivity below 100 K by up to 3 orders of magnitude, suggesting that they may be promising thermoelectric materials. Smaller diameters and increased surface roughness are expected to give additional enhancements. The solution-phase synthesis of PbSe nanowires via oriented attachment of nanoparticles enables facile surface engineering and diameter control. Branched PbSe nanowires synthesized by this approach showed near degenerately doped charge carrier concentrations. Compared to the bulk, the PbSe nanowires exhibited a similar Seebeck coefficient and a significant reduction in thermal conductivity in the temperature range 20 K to 300 K. Thermal annealing of the Pb

  4. Water transport control in carbon nanotube arrays

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Based on a recent scaling law of the water mobility under nanoconfined conditions, we envision novel strategies for precise modulation of water diffusion within membranes made of carbon nanotube arrays (CNAs). In a first approach, the water diffusion coefficient D may be tuned by finely controlling the size distribution of the pore size. In the second approach, D can be varied at will by means of externally induced electrostatic fields. Starting from the latter strategy, switchable molecular sieves are proposed, where membranes are properly designed with sieving and permeation features that can be dynamically activated/deactivated. Areas where a precise control of water transport properties is beneficial range from energy and environmental engineering up to nanomedicine. PMID:25313305

  5. Study on a novel dosimeter based on polyethylene-carbon nanotube composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malekie, S.; Ziaie, F.

    2015-08-01

    In this research work, the electric current of polyethylene-carbon nanotube composite, in the electrical percolation threshold region, over the absorbed dose under the applied bias voltage was investigated via the finite element method. The investigated geometry was formed by a two-dimensional cross-sectional view of randomly orientated nanotubes as ellipses. The variable range hopping model developed by Mott and thermally activated hopping model was used to calculate the electrical conductivity of carbon nanotubes and polymer, respectively. Regarding the calorimetric approach, we considered the absorbed dose equal to heat capacity of polyethylene-carbon nanotube composite multiplied by temperature rise. Results showed that this kind of composite can be used for low dose rate applications for monitoring and radiation protection utilizations.

  6. Reactive template synthesis of polypyrrole nanotubes for fabricating metal/conducting polymer nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jun; Liu, Xianghong; Zhang, Lixue; Cao, Bingqiang; Wu, Shihua

    2013-03-25

    Unique nanocomposites of polypyrrole/Au and polypyrrole/Pt hybrid nanotubes are synthesized employing polypyrrole (PPy) nanotubes as an advanced support by solution reduction. The conducting polymer PPy nanotubes are fabricated by using pre-prepared MnO2 nanowires as the reactive templates. MnO2 nanowires induce the 1D polymerization of pyrrole monomers and the simultaneous dissolution of the templates affords the hollow tube-like structure. The loading content of metal nanoparticles in the nanocomposites could be adjusted by simply changing the amount of metal precursors. This work provides an efficient approach to fabricate an important kind of metal/conducting polymer hybrid nanotubes that are potentially useful for electrocatalyst and sensor materials. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Room temperature synthesis of indium tin oxide nanotubes with high precision wall thickness by electroless deposition

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Emanuel; Fu, Ganhua; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Summary Conductive nanotubes consisting of indium tin oxide (ITO) were fabricated by electroless deposition using ion track etched polycarbonate templates. To produce nanotubes (NTs) with thin walls and small surface roughness, the tubes were generated by a multi-step procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below yields open end nanotubes with well defined outer diameter and wall thickness. In the past, zinc oxide films were mostly preferred and were synthesized using electroless deposition based on aqueous solutions. All these methods previously developed, are not adaptable in the case of ITO nanotubes, even with modifications. In the present work, therefore, we investigated the necessary conditions for the growth of ITO-NTs to achieve a wall thickness of around 10 nm. In addition, the effects of pH and reductive concentrations for the formation of ITO-NTs are also discussed. PMID:21977422

  8. Room temperature synthesis of indium tin oxide nanotubes with high precision wall thickness by electroless deposition.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Mario; Ionescu, Emanuel; Fu, Ganhua; Ensinger, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Conductive nanotubes consisting of indium tin oxide (ITO) were fabricated by electroless deposition using ion track etched polycarbonate templates. To produce nanotubes (NTs) with thin walls and small surface roughness, the tubes were generated by a multi-step procedure under aqueous conditions. The approach reported below yields open end nanotubes with well defined outer diameter and wall thickness. In the past, zinc oxide films were mostly preferred and were synthesized using electroless deposition based on aqueous solutions. All these methods previously developed, are not adaptable in the case of ITO nanotubes, even with modifications. In the present work, therefore, we investigated the necessary conditions for the growth of ITO-NTs to achieve a wall thickness of around 10 nm. In addition, the effects of pH and reductive concentrations for the formation of ITO-NTs are also discussed.

  9. Horseradish peroxidase-driven fluorescent labeling of nanotubes with quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Didenko, Vladimir V; Baskin, David S

    2006-03-01

    We describe the first enzyme-driven technique for fluorescent labeling of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs). The labeling was performed via enzymatic biotinylation of nanotubes in the tyramide-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) reaction. Both direct and indirect fuorescent labeling of SWNTs was achieved using either biotinyl tyramide or fluorescently tagged tyramides. Biotinylated SWNTs later reacted with streptavidin-conjugated fluorophores. Linking semiconductor nanocrystals, quantum dots (Q-dots), to the surface of nanotubes resulted in their fluorescent visualization, whereas conventional fluorophores bound to SWNTs directly or through biotin-streptavidin linkage, were completely quenched. Enzymatic biotinylation permits fluorescent visualization of carbon nanotubes, which could be useful for a number of biomedical applications. In addition, other organic molecules such as proteins, antibodies, or DNA can be conjugated to biotinylated SWNTs using this approach.

  10. Magnetic Property Measurements on Single Wall Carbon Nanotube-Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Keun J.; Wincheski, Russell A.; Park, Cheol

    2008-01-01

    Temperature and magnetic field dependent magnetization measurements were performed on polyimide nanocomposite samples, synthesized with various weight percentages of single wall carbon nanotubes. It was found that the magnetization of the composite, normalized to the mass of nanotube material in the sample, decreased with increasing weight percentage of nanotubes. It is possible that the interfacial coupling between the carbon nanotube (CNT) fillers and the polyimide matrix promotes the diamagnetic response from CNTs and reduces the total magnetization of the composite. The coercivity of the samples, believed to originate from the residual magnetic catalyst particles, was enhanced and had a stronger temperature dependence as a result of the composite synthesis. These changes in magnetic properties can form the basis of a new approach to investigate the interfacial properties in the CNT nanocomposites through magnetic property measurements.

  11. Giant Surface Conductivity Enhancement in a Carbon Nanotube Composite by Ultraviolet Light Exposure.

    PubMed

    Long, Christian J; Orloff, Nathan D; Twedt, Kevin A; Lam, Thomas; Vargas-Lara, Fernando; Zhao, Minhua; Natarajan, Bharath; Scott, Keana C; Marksz, Eric; Nguyen, Tinh; Douglas, Jack F; McClelland, Jabez; Garboczi, Edward; Obrzut, Jan; Liddle, J Alexander

    2016-09-07

    Carbon nanotube composites are lightweight, multifunctional materials with readily adjustable mechanical and electrical properties-relevant to the aerospace, automotive, and sporting goods industries as high-performance structural materials. Here, we combine well-established and newly developed characterization techniques to demonstrate that ultraviolet (UV) light exposure provides a controllable means to enhance the electrical conductivity of the surface of a commercial carbon nanotube-epoxy composite by over 5 orders of magnitude. Our observations, combined with theory and simulations, reveal that the increase in conductivity is due to the formation of a concentrated layer of nanotubes on the composite surface. Our model implies that contacts between nanotube-rich microdomains dominate the conductivity of this layer at low UV dose, while tube-tube transport dominates at high UV dose. Further, we use this model to predictably pattern conductive traces with a UV laser, providing a facile approach for direct integration of lightweight conductors on nanocomposite surfaces.

  12. Shape transition of unstrained flattest single-walled carbon nanotubes under pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Mu, Weihua E-mail: muwh@itp.ac.cn; Cao, Jianshu; Ou-Yang, Zhong-can

    2014-01-28

    Single walled carbon nanotube's (SWCNT's) cross section can be flattened under hydrostatic pressure. One example is the cross section of a single walled carbon nanotube successively deforms from the original round shape to oval shape, then to peanut-like shape. At the transition point of reversible deformation between convex shape and concave shape, the side wall of nanotube is flattest. This flattest tube has many attractive properties. In the present work, an approximate approach is developed to determine the equilibrium shape of this unstrained flattest tube and the curvature distribution of this tube. Our results are in good agreement with recent numerical results, and can be applied to the study of pressure controlled electric properties of single walled carbon nanotubes. The present method can also be used to study other deformed inorganic and organic tube-like structures.

  13. Self-assembly of linear arrays of semiconductor nanoparticles on carbon single-walled nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Engtrakul, Chaiwat; Kim, Yong-Hyun; Nedeljković, Jovan M; Ahrenkiel, S Phil; Gilbert, Katherine E H; Alleman, Jeff L; Zhang, S B; Mićić, Olga I; Nozik, Arthur J; Heben, Michael J

    2006-12-21

    Ligand-stabilized nanocrystals (NCs) were strongly bound to the nanotube surfaces by simple van der Waals forces. Linear arrays of CdSe and InP quantum dots were formed by self-assembly using the grooves in bundles of carbon single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs) as a one-dimensional template. A simple geometrical model explains the ordering in terms of the anisotropic properties of the nanotube surface. CdSe quantum rods were also observed to self-organize onto SWNTs with their long axis parallel to the nanotube axis. This approach offers a route to the formation of ordered NC/SWNT architectures that avoids problems associated with surface derivatization.

  14. Direct Measurement of Polarized Absorption Cross-Section of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Islam, M. F.; Milkie, D. E.; Kane, C. L.; Yodh, A. Y.; Kikkawa, J. M.

    2004-03-01

    We use a combination of polarized Raman scattering and linear optical absorption to infer optical absorption cross-sections of single-wall carbon nanotube ensembles for visible light co- and cross-polarized with respect to the nanotube axes. These data reveal a strong linear absorption anisotropy, and provide a rapid method by which linear absorption spectra can be used to quantitatively measure the orientation of dispersed nanotubes, even in strongly absorbing media for which Raman approaches are complicated by anisotropic re-absorption processes. Comparison with theory demonstrates that local field depolarization plays a crucial role in affecting optical spectra of the nanotubes. This work supported by NSF through DMR-0203378, DMR-079909 and DGE-0221664, NASA through NAG8-2172, DARPA/ONR through N00014-01-1-0831, and SENS.

  15. Self-assembly of a parallelogram black phosphorus ribbon into a nanotube.

    PubMed

    Shi, Jiao; Cai, Kun; Liu, Ling-Nan; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2017-10-11

    A nanotube from single-layer black phosphorus (BP) has never been discovered in experiments. The present study proposed a method for the fabrication of a BP nanotube (BPNT) from a parallelogram nanoribbon self-assembled on a carbon nanotube (CNT). The nanoribbon has a pair of opposite sides along the third principal direction. According to the numerical simulation via molecular dynamics approach, we discover that a wider BP nanoribbon can form into a series of chiral nanotube by self-assembly upon CNTs with different radii. The radius of a BPNT from the same ribbon has a wide range, and depends on both geometry of the ribbon and the CNT. One can obtain a BPNT with the specified radius by placing the ribbon nearby a given CNT. The method provides a clue for potential fabrication of BPNTs.

  16. Oscillation control of carbon nanotube mechanical resonator by electrostatic interaction induced retardation

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Masaaki; Takei, Kuniharu; Arie, Takayuki; Akita, Seiji

    2016-01-01

    Despite the superb intrinsic properties of carbon nanotube mechanical resonators, the quality factors at room temperature are 1,000 or less, even in vacuum, which is much lower than that of mechanical resonators fabricated using a top-down approach. This study demonstrates the improvement of the quality factor and the control of nonlinearity of the mechanical resonance of the cantilevered nanotube by electrostatic interaction. The apparent quality factor of the nanotube supported by insulator is improved drastically from approximately 630 to 3200 at room temperature. Results show that retardation of the electrostatic force induced by the contact resistance between the nanotube and the insulator support improves the quality factor. Finite element method calculation reveals that the nonuniform pileup charge on the insulator support strongly influences the nonlinearity of the resonance. PMID:26935657

  17. Buckling behaviour of composites with double walled nanotubes from carbon and phosphorus.

    PubMed

    Cai, Kun; Wan, Jing; Yang, Likui; Wei, Ning; Shi, Jiao; Qin, Qing-Hua

    2017-04-12

    Due to weak interactions among phosphorus atoms in black phosphorene, a nanotube obtained by curling single-layer black phosphorus is not as stable as a carbon nanotube (CNT) at finite temperature. In the present work, we recommend a new 1D composite material with a double-walled nanotube (DWNT) from a black phosphorus nanotube (BPNT) and a CNT. The dynamic response of the composite DWNTs is simulated using a molecular dynamics approach. Effects of the factors including temperature, slenderness and configurations of DWNTs on dynamic behavior of the composite are discussed. Compared with a single-walled BPNT, the composite DWNTs under uniaxial compression show some unique properties. When a BPNT is embedded in a CNT which will not only isolate the BPNT from the ambient conditions, but also improve the capability of axial deformation of the BPNT, the system will not collapse rapidly even if the BPNT has been buckled.

  18. Selective breakdown of metallic pathways in double-walled carbon nanotube networks.

    PubMed

    Ng, Allen L; Sun, Yong; Powell, Lyndsey; Sun, Chuan-Fu; Chen, Chien-Fu; Lee, Cheng S; Wang, YuHuang

    2015-01-07

    Covalently functionalized, semiconducting double-walled carbon nanotubes exhibit remarkable properties and can outperform their single-walled carbon nanotube counterparts. In order to harness their potential for electronic applications, metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes must be separated from the semiconductors. However, the inner wall is inaccessible to current separation techniques which rely on the surface properties. Here, the first approach to address this challenge through electrical breakdown of metallic double-walled carbon nanotubes, both inner and outer walls, within networks of mixed electronic types is described. The intact semiconductors demonstrate a ∼62% retention of the ON-state conductance in thin film transistors in response to covalent functionalization. The selective elimination of the metallic pathways improves the ON/OFF ratio, by more than 360 times, to as high as 40 700, while simultaneously retaining high ON-state conductance.

  19. Device study, chemical doping, and logic circuits based on transferred aligned single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chuan; Ryu, Koungmin; Badmaev, Alexander; Patil, Nishant; Lin, Albert; Mitra, Subhasish; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Zhou, Chongwu

    2008-07-01

    In this paper, high-performance back-gated carbon nanotube field-effect transistors based on transferred aligned carbon nanotubes were fabricated and studies found that the on/off ratio can reach 107 and the current density can reach 1.6μA/μm after electrical breakdown. In addition, chemical doping with hydrazine was used to convert the p-type aligned nanotube devices into n-type. These devices were further utilized to demonstrate various logic circuits, including p-type metal-oxide-semiconductor inverters, diode-loaded inverters, complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor inverters, NAND, and NOR gates. This approach could work as the platform for future nanotube-based nanoelectronics.

  20. Microwave Spectroscopy of a Carbon Nanotube Charge Qubit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penfold-Fitch, Z. V.; Sfigakis, F.; Buitelaar, M. R.

    2017-05-01

    Carbon nanotube quantum dots allow accurate control of electron charge, spin, and valley degrees of freedom in a material which is atomically perfect and can be grown isotopically pure. These properties underlie the unique potential of carbon nanotubes for quantum information processing, but developing nanotube charge, spin, or spin-valley qubits requires efficient readout techniques as well as understanding and extending quantum coherence in these devices. Here, we report on microwave spectroscopy of a carbon nanotube charge qubit in which quantum information is encoded in the spatial position of an electron. We combine radio-frequency reflectometry measurements of the quantum capacitance of the device with microwave manipulation to drive transitions between the qubit states. This approach simplifies charge-state readout and allows us to operate the device at an optimal point where the qubit is first-order insensitive to charge noise. From these measurements, we are able to quantify the degree of charge noise experienced by the qubit and obtain an inhomogeneous charge coherence of 5 ns. We use a chopped microwave signal whose duty-cycle period is varied to measure the decay of the qubit states, yielding a charge relaxation time of 48 ns.

  1. Photoluminescent carbon nanotubes interrogate the permeability of multicellular tumor spheroids

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Janki; Roxbury, Daniel; Paknejad, Navid; Heller, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    Nanomaterials have been extensively investigated for cancer drug delivery and imaging applications. Nanoparticles that show promise in two-dimensional cell culture systems often fail in more complex environments, possibly due to the lack of penetration in dense, three-dimensional structures. Multicellular tumor spheroids are an emerging model system to investigate interactions of nanoparticles with 3D in vitro cell culture environments. Using the intrinsic near-infrared emission of semiconducting carbon nanotubes to optically reconstruct their localization within a three-dimensional volume, we resolved the relative permeability of two different multicellular tumor spheroids. Nanotube photoluminescence revealed that nanotubes rapidly internalized into MCF-7 breast cancer cell-derived spheroids, whereas they exhibited little penetration into spheroids derived from SK-136, a cell line that we developed from murine liver cancer. Characterization of the spheroids by electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed large differences in the extracellular matrix and interstitial spacing, which correlated directly with nanotube penetration. This platform portends a new approach to characterize the permeability of living multicellular environments. PMID:26456974

  2. Electron beam detection of a Nanotube Scanning Force Microscope.

    PubMed

    Siria, Alessandro; Niguès, Antoine

    2017-09-14

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows to probe matter at atomic scale by measuring the perturbation of a nanomechanical oscillator induced by near-field interaction forces. The quest to improve sensitivity and resolution of AFM forced the introduction of a new class of resonators with dimensions at the nanometer scale. In this context, nanotubes are the ultimate mechanical oscillators because of their one dimensional nature, small mass and almost perfect crystallinity. Coupled to the possibility of functionalisation, these properties make them the perfect candidates as ultra sensitive, on-demand force sensors. However their dimensions make the measurement of the mechanical properties a challenging task in particular when working in cavity free geometry at ambient temperature. By using a focused electron beam, we show that the mechanical response of nanotubes can be quantitatively measured while approaching to a surface sample. By coupling electron beam detection of individual nanotubes with a custom AFM we image the surface topography of a sample by continuously measuring the mechanical properties of the nanoresonators. The combination of very small size and mass together with the high resolution of the electron beam detection method offers unprecedented opportunities for the development of a new class of nanotube-based scanning force microscopy.

  3. DNA Nanotubes for NMR Structure Determination of Membrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bellot, Gaëtan; McClintock, Mark A.; Chou, James J; Shih, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Structure determination of integral membrane proteins by solution NMR represents one of the most important challenges of structural biology. A Residual-Dipolar-Coupling-based refinement approach can be used to solve the structure of membrane proteins up to 40 kDa in size, however, a weak-alignment medium that is detergent-resistant is required. Previously, availability of media suitable for weak alignment of membrane proteins was severely limited. We describe here a protocol for robust, large-scale synthesis of detergent-resistant DNA nanotubes that can be assembled into dilute liquid crystals for application as weak-alignment media in solution NMR structure determination of membrane proteins in detergent micelles. The DNA nanotubes are heterodimers of 400nm-long six-helix bundles each self-assembled from a M13-based p7308 scaffold strand and >170 short oligonucleotide staple strands. Compatibility with proteins bearing considerable positive charge as well as modulation of molecular alignment, towards collection of linearly independent restraints, can be introduced by reducing the negative charge of DNA nanotubes via counter ions and small DNA binding molecules. This detergent-resistant liquid-crystal media offers a number of properties conducive for membrane protein alignment, including high-yield production, thermal stability, buffer compatibility, and structural programmability. Production of sufficient nanotubes for 4–5 NMR experiments can be completed in one week by a single individual. PMID:23518667

  4. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Cinke, Martin; Wignarajab, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is the release of effluent gases and contaminants that are in gaseous formed from the processes. A number of other gases, in particular NO(x), SO2, NH3, Hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present hazards to the crew in space habitats. Reduction of mass, power, volume and resupply can be achieved by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes as compared to other catalytic systems. The development and characterization of an innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches. This is due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controllable pore size, high adsorptive capacity and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. For example, SWNTs have high adsorptive capacity for NO and the adsorbed NO can be decomposed to N2 and O2 . Experimental results showing the decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube technology for removing NO(x). The potential for methane decomposition using carbon nanotubes catalysts is also discussed.

  5. Improved Thermal Conductivity in Carbon Nanotubes-Reinforced Syntactic Foam Achieved by a New Dispersing Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P.; Zegeye, E.; Ghamsari, A. K.; Woldesenbet, E.

    2015-12-01

    Syntactic foams are composite materials in which the matrix phase is reinforced with hollow micro-particles. Traditionally, syntactic foams are used for many high strength applications and as insulating materials. However, for applications demanding better heat dissipation, such as thermal management of electronic packaging, conductive fillers need to be added to syntactic foam. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs), although extremely conductive, have issues of agglomeration in the matrix. In this research, CNT-reinforced syntactic foam was developed based on our approach through which CNTs were dispersed throughout the matrix by growing them on the surface of glass microballoons. The thermal conductivity of nanotube-grown syntactic foam was tested with a Flashline® thermal analyzer. For comparison purposes, plain and nanotube-mixed syntactic foams were also fabricated and tested. Nanotube-grown microballoons improved the thermal conductivity of syntactic foam by 86% and 92% (at 50°C) compared to plain and nanotube-mixed syntactic foams, respectively. The improved thermal conductivity as well as the microstructural analysis proved the effectiveness of this approach for dispersing the carbon nanotubes in syntactic foams.

  6. A computational analysis of the insertion of carbon nanotubes into cellular membranes.

    PubMed

    Höfinger, Siegfried; Melle-Franco, Manuel; Gallo, Tommaso; Cantelli, Andrea; Calvaresi, Matteo; Gomes, José A N F; Zerbetto, Francesco

    2011-10-01

    Carbon nanotubes have been proposed to serve as nano-vehicles to deliver genetic or therapeutic material into the interior of cells because of their capacity to cross the cell membrane. A detailed picture of the molecular mode of action of such a delivery is, however, difficult to obtain because of the concealing effects of the cell membrane. Here we report a systematic computational study of membrane insertion of individual carbon nanotubes and carbon nanotube bundles using two entirely different and unrelated techniques. First a static scan of the environmental free energy is carried out based on a membrane mimicry approach and different insertion geometries are assessed. Then the dynamics is investigated with a coarse-grained approach that was previously used in the study of the integration dynamics of nanoparticles into the bilayer. The results of both models point, for unfunctionalized carbon nanotubes, at a preference for the horizontal orientation inside the internal hydrophobic layer of the cell membrane. Finally, the energetics of the formation of bundles of carbon nanotubes is studied. The cellular membrane promotes aggregation of carbon nanotubes in its hydrophobic core and modifies the structural stability of the bundles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Ultralong In2S3 Nanotubes on Graphene Substrate with Enhanced Electrocatalytic Activity.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng-qi; Chen, Xue; Hu, Fang-zhong; Zhang, Qi-chun; Liu, Lu

    2015-09-16

    Ultralong one-dimensional (1D) nanostructures including nanowires or nanotubes have been extensively studied because of their widespread applications in many fields. Although a lot of methods have been reported to prepare In2S3 nanotubes, approaching these nanotubes through one-pot solution synthesis is still extremely difficult, probably because of the intrinsic isotropic crystal growth characteristic of In2S3. In this article, we demonstrated a self-assembly approach for hydrothermal synthesis of In2S3 nanotubes/graphene composites, which contain ultralong (up to 10 μm) In2S3 nanotubes on graphene substrate. The influence of several important synthetic parameters on the final products has been systematically investigated. Importantly, the as-prepared In2S3 nanotubes/graphene composites can be easily cast on FTO to form a film, which can be used as a counter electrode. Our research indicates that the as-fabricated counter electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity toward the iodide species (I-/I3-) reduction reaction and very high energy conversion efficiency (8.01%) in dye-sensitized solar cells.

  8. Improvement of the identification of multiwall carbon nanotubes carpet thermal conductivity by pulsed photothermal method

    SciTech Connect

    Amin-Chalhoub, E.; Wattieaux, G.; Semmar, N.; Gaillard, M.; Petit, A.; Leborgne, C.

    2012-11-01

    Thermal properties in multiwall carbon nanotubes carpets and micro-devices are investigated using a nanosecond photothermal method. Gradually, the identification model and experimental protocol are performed to increase the method accuracy for the thermal conductivity determination. In the experimental protocol, a nanosecond UV monopulse laser beam is used to heat the surface of a multilayer (600 nm of Ti/20 {mu}m of carbon nanotube carpet) sample. In the 1D identification model with two layers and a thermal contact resistance, the effect of the laser excitation temporal shape is taken into account. In this study, this first approach allows to improve the accuracy of apparent thermal conductivity measurements of multiwall carbon nanotubes carpet. The carbon nanotubes carpet apparent thermal conductivity value went from being to 180 {+-} 5 W Multiplication-Sign m{sup -1} Multiplication-Sign K{sup -1}. In the second approach, two laser beams are coupled in order to increase the interaction time duration from 27 ns to 60 ns. It becomes possible to probe different depths in the carpet. The obtained value (180 W Multiplication-Sign m{sup -1} Multiplication-Sign K{sup -1}) confirms the pulsed photothermal method consistency for porous samples. Finally, assuming that the carbon nanotubes are parallel and without any defects, the equivalent intrinsic thermal conductivity of a single carbon nanotube is estimated to be around 3600 W Multiplication-Sign m{sup -1} Multiplication-Sign K{sup -1}.

  9. Control of Effluent Gases from Solid Waste Processing Using Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Cinke, Martin; Wignarajab, Kanapathipillai

    2005-01-01

    One of the major problems associated with solid waste processing technologies is the release of effluent gases and contaminants that are in gaseous formed from the processes. A number of other gases, in particular NO(x), SO2, NH3, Hydrocarbons (e.g. CH4) do present hazards to the crew in space habitats. Reduction of mass, power, volume and resupply can be achieved by using catalyst impregnated carbon nanotubes as compared to other catalytic systems. The development and characterization of an innovative approach for the control and elimination of gaseous toxins using single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) promise superior performance over conventional approaches. This is due to the ability to direct the selective uptake of gaseous species based on their controllable pore size, high adsorptive capacity and the effectiveness of carbon nanotubes as catalyst supports for gaseous conversion. For example, SWNTs have high adsorptive capacity for NO and the adsorbed NO can be decomposed to N2 and O2 . Experimental results showing the decomposition of NO on metal impregnated carbon nanotubes is presented. Equivalent System Mass (ESM) comparisons are made of the existing TCCS systems with the carbon nanotube technology for removing NO(x). The potential for methane decomposition using carbon nanotubes catalysts is also discussed.

  10. Cu nanocrystal growth on peptide nanotubes by biomineralization: Size control of Cu nanocrystals by tuning peptide conformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Ipsita A.; Yu, Lingtao; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2003-12-01

    With recent interest in seeking new biologically inspired device-fabrication methods in nanotechnology, a new biological approach was examined to fabricate Cu nanotubes by using sequenced histidine-rich peptide nanotubes as templates. The sequenced histidine-rich peptide molecules were assembled as nanotubes, and the biological recognition of the specific sequence toward Cu lead to efficient Cu coating on the nanotubes. Cu nanocrystals were uniformly coated on the histidine-incorporated nanotubes with high packing density. In addition, the diameter of Cu nanocrystal was controlled between 10 and 30 nm on the nanotube by controlling the conformation of histidine-rich peptide by means of pH changes. Those nanotubes showed significant change in electronic structure by varying the nanocrystal diameter; therefore, this system may be developed to a conductivity-tunable building block for microelectronics and biological sensors. This simple biomineralization method can be applied to fabricate various metallic and semiconductor nanotubes with peptides whose sequences are known to mineralize specific ions.

  11. Gears Based on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaffe, Richard; Han, Jie; Globus, Al; Deardorff, Glenn

    2005-01-01

    Gears based on carbon nanotubes (see figure) have been proposed as components of an emerging generation of molecular- scale machines and sensors. In comparison with previously proposed nanogears based on diamondoid and fullerene molecules, the nanotube-based gears would have simpler structures and are more likely to be realizable by practical fabrication processes. The impetus for the practical development of carbon-nanotube- based gears arises, in part, from rapid recent progress in the fabrication of carbon nanotubes with prescribed diameters, lengths, chiralities, and numbers of concentric shells. The shafts of the proposed gears would be made from multiwalled carbon nanotubes. The gear teeth would be rigid molecules (typically, benzyne molecules), bonded to the nanotube shafts at atomically precise positions. For fabrication, it may be possible to position the molecular teeth by use of scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) or other related techniques. The capability to position individual organic molecules at room temperature by use of an STM tip has already been demonstrated. Routes to the chemical synthesis of carbon-nanotube-based gears are also under investigation. Chemical and physical aspects of the synthesis of molecular scale gears based on carbon nanotubes and related molecules, and dynamical properties of nanotube- based gears, have been investigated by computational simulations using established methods of quantum chemistry and molecular dynamics. Several particularly interesting and useful conclusions have been drawn from the dynamical simulations performed thus far: The forces acting on the gears would be more sensitive to local molecular motions than to gross mechanical motions of the overall gears. Although no breakage of teeth or of chemical bonds is expected at temperatures up to at least 3,000 K, the gears would not work well at temperatures above a critical range from about 600 to about 1,000 K. Gear temperature could probably be controlled by

  12. Carbon nanotubes/TiO2 nanotubes hybrid supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qiang; Wen, Zhenhai; Li, Jinghong

    2007-09-01

    The rational selection and assembly of materials are central issues in the development of energy conversion and storage applications. Incorporating the utilization of carbon nanotubes cathode and TiO2 nanotubes anode in energy storage, a nonaqueous hybrid supercapacitor was developed in order to significantly increase the energy density of the supercapacitor. The electrochemical performance of the hybrid supercapacitor is characterized by charge/discharge test and cyclic voltam-mograms. According to the voltage value, the energy density of the asymmetric supercapacitor, by applying a potential varying from 0 to 2.8 V, is found to be 14.4 Wh/kg at upwards of 10 C, which is twice more than for the conventional symmetric supercapacitor utilizing carbon nanotubes, while maintaining desirable cycling stability and rate capability.

  13. Analysis of Carbon Nanotube Field-Effect-Transistors (FETs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamada, Toshishige

    1999-01-01

    This five page presentation is grouped into 11 numbered viewgraphs, most of which contain one or more diagrams. Some of the diagrams are accompanied by captions, including: 2) Nanotube FET by Delft, IBM; 3) Nanotube FET/Standard MOSFET; 5) Saturation with carrier-carrier; 7) Electronic properties of carbon nanotube; 8) Theoretical nanotube FET characteristics; 11) Summary: Delft and IBM nanotube FET analysis.

  14. Nanocapillarity and chemistry in carbon nanotubes

    SciTech Connect

    Ugarte, D.; Chatelain, A.; Heer, W.A. de

    1996-12-13

    Open carbon nanotubes were filled with molten silver nitrate by capillary forces. Only those tubes with inner diameters of 4 nanometers or more were filled, suggesting a capillarity size dependence as a result of the lowering of the nanotube-salt interface energy with increasing curvature of the nanotube walls. Nanotube cavities should also be less chemically reactive than graphite and may serve as nanosize test tubes. This property has been illustrated by monitoring the decomposition of silver nitrate within nanotubes in situ in an electron microscope, which produced chains of silver nanobeads separated by high-pressure gas pockets. 32 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  16. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Chungui; Ji, Lijun; Liu, Huiju; Hu, Guangjun; Zhang, Shimin; Yang, Mingshu; Yang, Zhenzhong

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA).

  17. Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao Chungui; Ji Lijun; Liu Huiju; Hu Guangjun; Zhang Shimin; Yang Mingshu . E-mail: yms@iccas.ac.cn; Yang Zhenzhong . E-mail: yangzz@iccas.ac.cn

    2004-12-01

    Functionalized carbon nanotubes containing isocyanate groups can extend the nanotube chemistry, and may promote their many potential applications such as in polymer composites and coatings. This paper describes a facile method to prepare functionalized carbon nanotubes containing highly reactive isocyanate groups on its surface via the reaction between toluene 2,4-diisocyanate and carboxylated carbon nanotubes. Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) confirmed that reactive isocyanate groups were covalently attached to carbon nanotubes. The content of isocyanate groups were determined by chemical titration and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA)

  18. Supported Lipid Bilayer/Carbon Nanotube Hybrids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Xinjian; Moran-Mirabal, Jose; Craighead, Harold; McEuen, Paul

    2007-03-01

    We form supported lipid bilayers on single-walled carbon nanotubes and use this hybrid structure to probe the properties of lipid membranes and their functional constituents. We first demonstrate membrane continuity and lipid diffusion over the nanotube. A membrane-bound tetanus toxin protein, on the other hand, sees the nanotube as a diffusion barrier whose strength depends on the diameter of the nanotube. Finally, we present results on the electrical detection of specific binding of streptavidin to biotinylated lipids with nanotube field effect transistors. Possible techniques to extract dynamic information about the protein binding events will also be discussed.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  1. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  2. Metal Nanoparticle Catalysts for Carbon Nanotube Growth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pierce, Benjamin F.

    2003-01-01

    Work this summer involved and new and unique process for producing the metal nanoparticle catalysts needed for carbon nanotube (CNT) growth. There are many applications attributed to CNT's, and their properties have deemed them to be a hot spot in research today. Many groups have demonstrated the versatility in CNT's by exploring a wide spectrum of roles that these nanotubes are able to fill. A short list of such promising applications are: nanoscaled electronic circuitry, storage media, chemical sensors, microscope enhancement, and coating reinforcement. Different methods have been used to grow these CNT's. Some examples are laser ablation, flame synthesis, or furnace synthesis. Every single approach requires the presence of a metal catalyst (Fe, Co, and Ni are among the best) that is small enough to produce a CNT. Herein lies the uniqueness of this work. Microemulsions (containing inverse micelles) were used to generate these metal particles for subsequent CNT growth. The goal of this summer work was basically to accomplish as much preliminary work as possible. I strived to pinpoint which variable (experimental process, metal product, substrate, method of application, CVD conditions, etc.) was the determining factor in the results. The resulting SEM images were sufficient for the appropriate comparisons to be made. The future work of this project consists of the optimization of the more promising experimental procedures and further exploration onto what exactly dictated the results.

  3. Design and Characterization of Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siochi, Emilie J.; Lillehei, Peter T.; Wise, Kristopher E.; Park, Cheol; Rouse, Jason H.

    2003-01-01

    Revolutionary design concepts in future aerospace vehicles will depend on extraordinary material properties to permit significant reduction of mass and size of components, while imparting intelligence. Due to their combination of remarkable electrical and mechanical properties, carbon nanotubes (CNT) are expected to enable this paradigm shift in design concepts. However, significant challenges still exist in translating these CNT properties into the macrostructures required for future generations of aerospace vehicles. While an accepted route for making the leap from nanostructures to useful macrostructures has not been fully charted, this paper will give an overview of the approach taken by some researchers at NASA Langley Research Center to sort out issues involved in the development of CNT nanocomposites for multifunctional structures. Specifically, the dispersion of carbon nanotubes in polymer matrices, characterization of nanocomposites, the role of quantum computation in providing guidance for processing and the use of computational analysis in data interpretation will be covered. Significant improvements in mechanical and electrical properties of CNT nanocomposites with very low loadings of CNTs are described and lend credence to the potential for using CNTs in achieving technological leaps in composite development.

  4. A carbon nanotube based ammonia sensor on cotton textile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jin-Woo; Kim, Beomseok; Li, Jing; Meyyappan, M.

    2013-05-01

    A single-wall carbon nanotube (CNT) based ammonia (NH3) sensor was implemented on a cotton yarn. Two types of sensors were fabricated: Au/sensing CNT/Au and conducting/sensing/conducting all CNT structures. Two perpendicular Au wires were designed to contact CNT-cotton yarn for metal-CNT sensor, whereas nanotubes were used for the electrode as well as sensing material for the all CNT sensor. The resistance shift of the CNT network upon NH3 was monitored in a chemiresistor approach. The CNT-cotton yarn sensors exhibited uniformity and repeatability. Furthermore, the sensors displayed good mechanical robustness against bending. The present approach can be utilized for low-cost smart textile applications.

  5. Torsional properties of hexagonal boron nitride nanotubes, carbon nanotubes and their hybrid structures: A molecular dynamics study

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Qi-lin; Tian, Xiao Geng

    2015-10-15

    The torsional mechanical properties of hexagonal single-walled boron nitride nanotubes (SWBNNTs), single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs), and their hybrid structures (SWBN-CNTs) are investigated using molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. Two approaches - force approach and energy approach, are adopted to calculate the shear moduli of SWBNNTs and SWCNTs, the discrepancy between two approaches is analyzed. The results show that the shear moduli of single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), including SWBNNTs and SWCNTs are dependent on the diameter, especially for armchair SWNTs. The armchair SWNTs show the better ability of resistance the twisting comparable to the zigzag SWNTs. The effects of diameter and length on the critical values of torque of SWNTs are obtained by comparing the torsional behaviors of SWNTs with different diameters and different lengths. It is observed that the MD results of the effect of diameter and length on the critical values of torque agrees well with the prediction of continuum shell model. The shear modulus of SWBN-CNT has a significant dependence on the percentages of SWCNT and the hybrid style has also an influence on shear modulus. The critical values of torque of SWBN-CNTs increase with the increase of the percentages of SWCNT. This phenomenon can be interpreted by the function relationship between the torque of different bonds (B-N-X, C-C-X, C-B-X, C-N-X) and the angles of bonds.

  6. Boron Nitride Nanotubes for Spintronics

    PubMed Central

    Dhungana, Kamal B.; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-01-01

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics. PMID:25248070

  7. Boron nitride nanotubes for spintronics.

    PubMed

    Dhungana, Kamal B; Pati, Ranjit

    2014-09-22

    With the end of Moore's law in sight, researchers are in search of an alternative approach to manipulate information. Spintronics or spin-based electronics, which uses the spin state of electrons to store, process and communicate information, offers exciting opportunities to sustain the current growth in the information industry. For example, the discovery of the giant magneto resistance (GMR) effect, which provides the foundation behind modern high density data storage devices, is an important success story of spintronics; GMR-based sensors have wide applications, ranging from automotive industry to biology. In recent years, with the tremendous progress in nanotechnology, spintronics has crossed the boundary of conventional, all metallic, solid state multi-layered structures to reach a new frontier, where nanostructures provide a pathway for the spin-carriers. Different materials such as organic and inorganic nanostructures are explored for possible applications in spintronics. In this short review, we focus on the boron nitride nanotube (BNNT), which has recently been explored for possible applications in spintronics. Unlike many organic materials, BNNTs offer higher thermal stability and higher resistance to oxidation. It has been reported that the metal-free fluorinated BNNT exhibits long range ferromagnetic spin ordering, which is stable at a temperature much higher than room temperature. Due to their large band gap, BNNTs are also explored as a tunnel magneto resistance device. In addition, the F-BNNT has recently been predicted as an ideal spin-filter. The purpose of this review is to highlight these recent progresses so that a concerted effort by both experimentalists and theorists can be carried out in the future to realize the true potential of BNNT-based spintronics.

  8. Effect of Carbon Nanotubes on Mammalian Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Michelle; Ahmed, Asma; Black, Melanie; Kawamoto, Nicole; Lucas, Jessica; Pagala, Armie; Pham, Tram; Stankiewicz, Sara; Chen, Howard

    2010-03-01

    Carbon Nanotubes possess extraordinary electrical, mechanical, and thermal properties. Research on applying the carbon nanotubes for ultrasensitive detection, disease diagnosis, and drug delivery is rapidly developing. While the fundamental and technological findings on carbon nanotubes show great promise, it is extremely important to investigate the effect of the carbon nanotubes on human health. In our experiments, we introduce purified carbon nanotubes in suspension to ovary cells cultured from Hamsters. These cells are chosen since they show robust morphological changes associated with cytotoxicity that can easily be observed under a light microscope. We will discuss the toxicity of carbon nanotubes by characterizing the cell morphology and viability as a function of time and the concentration of carbon nanotube suspension.

  9. Interfacial heat flow in carbon nanotube suspensions.

    PubMed

    Huxtable, Scott T; Cahill, David G; Shenogin, Sergei; Xue, Liping; Ozisik, Rahmi; Barone, Paul; Usrey, Monica; Strano, Michael S; Siddons, Giles; Shim, Moonsub; Keblinski, Pawel

    2003-11-01

    The enormous amount of basic research into carbon nanotubes has sparked interest in the potential applications of these novel materials. One promising use of carbon nanotubes is as fillers in a composite material to improve mechanical behaviour, electrical transport and thermal transport. For composite materials with high thermal conductivity, the thermal conductance across the nanotube-matrix interface is of particular interest. Here we use picosecond transient absorption to measure the interface thermal conductance (G) of carbon nanotubes suspended in surfactant micelles in water. Classical molecular dynamics simulations of heat transfer from a carbon nanotube to a model hydrocarbon liquid are in agreement with experiment. Our findings indicate that heat transport in a nanotube composite material will be limited by the exceptionally small interface thermal conductance (G approximately 12 MW m(-2) K(-1)) and that the thermal conductivity of the composite will be much lower than the value estimated from the intrinsic thermal conductivity of the nanotubes and their volume fraction.

  10. Smart Polymer/Carbon Nanotube Nanocomposites and Their Electrorheological Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Choi, Hyoung Jin

    2014-01-01

    This review article summarizes the preparation of polymer/carbon nanotube (CNT) nanocomposites and their applications as electrorheological (ER) fluids. These ER fluids exhibited a controllable electro-response under an applied electric field due to the presence of well-dispersed CNTs. The background, morphology, preparations, and characteristics of these materials are discussed, specifically focusing on the various approaches in the preparation of polymer/CNT nanocomposites, morphology, and their effects on the ER characteristics. PMID:28788624

  11. Majorana fermion wavefunctions in carbon nanotubes and carbynes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadykov, N. R.; Aporoski, A. V.

    2017-02-01

    Electron properties of semiconducting zigzag carbon nanotubes (CNTs) can be described by two uncoupled Dirac equations of dimension (1+1) for the particle with nonzero mass. The solutions of these equations are two charge-neutral Majorana fields. An analogous equation is obtained for the carbon chains. We use the approach, wherein wavefunction of charged particle is represented as the production of a rapidly oscillating exponent and the slowly varying function amplitude depending on the longitudinal coordinate.

  12. Optical properties of chiral nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cecilia, Noguez; Román-Velázquez Carlos, E.; Ariadna, Sánchez; Montes Lilia, Meza

    2004-03-01

    A recent theoretical model [1] is applied to study the optical properties chiral nanostructures like carbon nanotubes. We calculate the Circular Dichroism (CD) spectra for carbon nanotubes with different chirality. The calculated CD spectra show features that allow us to distinguish between nanotubes with different indexes of chirality. Other nanostructures, like chiral fullerenes are also investigated.These results provide theoretical support for the quantification of chirality and its measurement, using the CD lineshapes of chiral. This work has been partly financed by CONACyT grant No. 36651-E and by DGAPA-UNAM grants No. IN104201. [1] C. E. Roman-Velazquez, et al., J. of Phys. Chem. B (Letter) 107, 12035 (2003)

  13. Carbon Nanotube Material Quality Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yowell, Leonard; Arepalli, Sivaram; Sosa, Edward; Niolaev, Pavel; Gorelik, Olga

    2006-01-01

    The nanomaterial activities at NASA Johnson Space Center focus on carbon nanotube production, characterization and their applications for aerospace systems. Single wall carbon nanotubes are produced by arc and laser methods. Characterization of the nanotube material is performed using the NASA JSC protocol developed by combining analytical techniques of SEM, TEM, UV-VIS-NIR absorption, Raman, and TGA. A possible addition of other techniques such as XPS, and ICP to the existing protocol will be discussed. Changes in the quality of the material collected in different regions of the arc and laser production chambers is assessed using the original JSC protocol. The observed variations indicate different growth conditions in different regions of the production chambers.

  14. Plasma CVD of Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delzeit, Lance; Cruden, B.; Hash, D.; Meyyappan, M.; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes(CNT) exhibit remarkable mechanical and unique electronic properties and thus have created excitement in the research community about their potential in electronics, computing, sensor and structural applications. Realization of these applications critically depends on the ability to control the properties(such as diameter, chirality) as well purity. We have investigated CNT growth using an inductively coupled plasma(ICP) process using hydrocarbon feedstock. The catalyst required for nanotube growth consists of thin sputtered layers of aluminum and iron(10 nm each) and aligned carbon nanotubes have been obtained. Optical emission diagnostics as well as a plasma modeling effort have been undertaken to understand growth mechanisms. This presentation will discuss growth characteristics under various pressure, power and feedgas compositions and our understanding from modeling and diagnostics.

  15. Hydrodynamic properties of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Walther, J H; Werder, T; Jaffe, R L; Koumoutsakos, P

    2004-06-01

    We study water flowing past an array of single walled carbon nanotubes using nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. For carbon nanotubes mounted with a tube spacing of 16.4 x 16.4 nm and diameters of 1.25 and 2.50 nm, respectively, we find drag coefficients in reasonable agreement with the macroscopic, Stokes-Oseen solution. The slip length is -0.11 nm for the 1.25 nm carbon nanotube, and 0.49 for the 2.50 nm tube for a flow speed of 50 m/s, respectively, and 0.28 nm for the 2.50 nm tube at 200 m/s. A slanted flow configuration with a stream- and spanwise velocity component of 100 ms(-1) recovers the two-dimensional results, but exhibits a significant 88 nm slip along the axis of the tube. These results indicate that slip depends on the particular flow configuration.

  16. Rhenium(IV) sulfide nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Brorson, Michael; Hansen, Thomas W; Jacobsen, Claus J H

    2002-10-02

    Rhenium(IV) sulfide, ReS(2), has been prepared with nanotubular morphology by carbon nanotube templating. A multiwall carbon nanotube material was impregnated with solutions of NH(4)ReO(4) or ReCl(5), followed by drying and sulfidation with H(2)S at 1000 degrees C. The composite material synthesized was characterized by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray powder diffraction. Like previously described MS(2) nanotube compounds, ReS(2) has a layered structure consisting of S-M-S layers. Re atoms in ordinary ReS(2) are octahedrally coordinated with S, and tetranuclear metal clusters are present as a consequence of metal-metal bonds.

  17. Quantum transport in carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laird, Edward A.; Kuemmeth, Ferdinand; Steele, Gary A.; Grove-Rasmussen, Kasper; Nygârd, Jesper; Flensberg, Karsten; Kouwenhoven, Leo P.

    2015-07-01

    Carbon nanotubes are a versatile material in which many aspects of condensed matter physics come together. Recent discoveries have uncovered new phenomena that completely change our understanding of transport in these devices, especially the role of the spin and valley degrees of freedom. This review describes the modern understanding of transport through nanotube devices. Unlike in conventional semiconductors, electrons in nanotubes have two angular momentum quantum numbers, arising from spin and valley freedom. The interplay between the two is the focus of this review. The energy levels associated with each degree of freedom, and the spin-orbit coupling between them, are explained, together with their consequences for transport measurements through nanotube quantum dots. In double quantum dots, the combination of quantum numbers modifies the selection rules of Pauli blockade. This can be exploited to read out spin and valley qubits and to measure the decay of these states through coupling to nuclear spins and phonons. A second unique property of carbon nanotubes is that the combination of valley freedom and electron-electron interactions in one dimension strongly modifies their transport behavior. Interaction between electrons inside and outside a quantum dot is manifested in SU(4) Kondo behavior and level renormalization. Interaction within a dot leads to Wigner molecules and more complex correlated states. This review takes an experimental perspective informed by recent advances in theory. As well as the well-understood overall picture, open questions for the field are also clearly stated. These advances position nanotubes as a leading system for the study of spin and valley physics in one dimension where electronic disorder and hyperfine interaction can both be reduced to a low level.

  18. Novel Nanotube Manufacturing Streamlines Production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Nanotubes have novel qualities that make them uniquely qualified for a plethora of uses, including applications in electronics, optics, and other scientific and industrial fields. The NASA process for creating these nanostructures involves using helium arc welding to vaporize an amorphous carbon rod and then form nanotubes by depositing the vapor onto a water-cooled carbon cathode, which then yields bundles, or ropes, of single-walled nanotubes at a rate of 2 grams per hour using a single setup. This eliminates costs associated with the use of metal catalysts, including the cost of product purification, resulting in a relatively inexpensive, high-quality, very pure end product. While managing to be less expensive, safer, and simpler, the process also increases the quality of the nanotubes. Goddard's Innovative Partnerships Program (IPP) Office promoted the technology, and in 2005, Boise-based Idaho Space Materials Inc. (ISM) was formed and applied for a nonexclusive license for the single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT) manufacturing technology. ISM commercialized its products, and the inexpensive, robust nanotubes are now in the hands of the scientists who will create the next generation of composite polymers, metals, and ceramics that will impact the way we live. In fact, researchers are examining ways for these newfound materials to be used in the manufacture of transistors and fuel cells, large screen televisions, ultra-sensitive sensors, high-resolution atomic force microscopy probes, supercapacitors, transparent conducting films, drug carriers, catalysts, and advanced composite materials, to name just a few of the myriad technologies to benefit.

  19. CMOS Integrated Carbon Nanotube Sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, M. S.; Lerner, B.; Boselli, A.; Lamagna, A.; Obregon, P. D. Pareja; Julian, P. M.; Mandolesi, P. S.; Buffa, F. A.

    2009-05-23

    Recently carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gaining their importance as sensors for gases, temperature and chemicals. Advances in fabrication processes simplify the formation of CNT sensor on silicon substrate. We have integrated single wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) with complementary metal oxide semiconductor process (CMOS) to produce a chip sensor system. The sensor prototype was designed and fabricated using a 0.30 um CMOS process. The main advantage is that the device has a voltage amplifier so the electrical measure can be taken and amplified inside the sensor. When the conductance of the SWCNTs varies in response to media changes, this is observed as a variation in the output tension accordingly.

  20. Magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Li; Kang, N.; Kong, W. J.; Hu, J. S.; Pan, Z. W.; Xie, S. S.

    2002-03-01

    We have investigated the magnetoresistance of multiwall carbon nanotubes bundles. At temperatures above 15 K, the magnetoresistance was found to follow exactly a scaling law as predicted by the theory of two-dimensional (2D) weak localization. Below 15 K, the 2D weak localization behavior is modified due to the formation of a Coulomb gap. This modification does not fit to those theories which treat electron-electron interaction as a perturbation. Altshular-Aronov-Spivak (AAS) resistance oscillation was observed in milli-Kelvin temperature range. The results will be discussed in terms of the interplay between electron-electron interaction and disorder scattering in multiwall carbon nanotube.