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Sample records for narcolepsy current treatment

  1. Narcolepsy: current treatment options and future approaches

    PubMed Central

    Billiard, Michel

    2008-01-01

    The management of narcolepsy is presently at a turning point. Three main avenues are considered in this review: 1) Two tendencies characterize the conventional treatment of narcolepsy. Modafinil has replaced methylphenidate and amphetamine as the first-line treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and sleep attacks, based on randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of modafinil, but on no direct comparison of modafinil versus traditional stimulants. For cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations, new antidepressants tend to replace tricyclic antidepressants and selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in spite of a lack of randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials of these compounds; 2) The conventional treatment of narcolepsy is now challenged by sodium oxybate, the sodium salt of gammahydroxybutyrate, based on a series of randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trials and a long-term open label study. This treatment has a fairly good efficacy and is active on all symptoms of narcolepsy. Careful titration up to an adequate level is essential both to obtain positive results and avoid adverse effects; 3) A series of new treatments are currently being tested, either in animal models or in humans, They include novel stimulant and anticataplectic drugs, endocrine therapy, and, more attractively, totally new approaches based on the present state of knowledge of the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with cataplexy, hypocretine-based therapies, and immunotherapy. PMID:18830438

  2. Treatment Options for Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Barateau, Lucie; Lopez, Régis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2016-05-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2 are central disorders of hypersomnolence. Narcolepsy type 1 is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy and is associated with hypocretin-1 deficiency. On the other hand, in narcolepsy type 2, cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels are normal and cataplexy absent. Despite major advances in our understanding of narcolepsy mechanisms, its current management is only symptomatic. Treatment options may vary from a single drug that targets several symptoms, or multiple medications that each treats a specific symptom. In recent years, narcolepsy treatment has changed with the widespread use of modafinil/armodafinil for daytime sleepiness, antidepressants (selective serotonin and dual serotonin and noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors) for cataplexy, and sodium oxybate for both symptoms. Other psychostimulants can also be used, such as methylphenidate, pitolisant and rarely amphetamines, as third-line therapy. Importantly, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness are required to monitor the treatment efficacy and to provide guidance on whether the treatment goals are met. Associated symptoms and comorbid conditions, such as hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, unpleasant dreams, REM- and non REM-related parasomnias, depressive symptoms, overweight/obesity, and obstructive sleep apnea, should also be taken into account and managed, if required. In the near future, the efficacy of new wake-promoting drugs, anticataplectic agents, hypocretin replacement therapy and immunotherapy at the early stages of the disease should also be evaluated.

  3. Investigational therapies for the treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    de Biase, Stefano; Nilo, Annacarmen; Gigli, Gian Luigi; Valente, Mariarosaria

    2017-08-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by a pentad of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and disturbed nocturnal sleep. While non-pharmacological treatments are sometimes helpful, more than 90% of narcoleptic patients require a pharmacological treatment. Areas covered: The present review is based on an extensive Internet and PubMed search from 1994 to 2017. It is focused on drugs currently in development for the treatment of narcolepsy. Expert opinion: Currently there is no cure for narcolepsy, with treatment focusing on symptoms control. However, these symptomatic treatments are often unsatisfactory. The research is leading to a better understanding of narcolepsy and its symptoms. New classes of compounds with possible applications in the development of novel stimulant/anticataplectic medications are described. H3 receptor antagonists represent a new therapeutic option for EDS in narcolepsy. JZP-110, with its distinct mechanism of action, would be a new therapeutic option for the treatment of EDS in the coming years. In the future, hypocretin-based therapies and immune-based therapies, could modify the clinical course of the disease. However, more information would be necessary to completely understand the autoimmune process and also how this process can be altered for therapeutic benefits.

  4. Update on the treatment of narcolepsy: clinical efficacy of pitolisant

    PubMed Central

    Calik, Michael W

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disease that affects 1 in 2,000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). In 60–70% of individuals with narcolepsy, it is also characterized by cataplexy or a sudden loss of muscle tone that is triggered by positive or negative emotions. Narcolepsy decreases the quality of life of the afflicted individuals. Currently used drugs treat EDS alone (modafinil/armodafinil, methylphenidate, and amphetamine), cataplexy alone (“off-label” use of antidepressants), or both EDS and cataplexy (sodium oxybate). These drugs have abuse, tolerability, and adherence issues. A greater diversity of drug options is needed to treat narcolepsy. The small molecule drug, pitolisant, acts as an inverse agonist/antagonist at the H3 receptor, thus increasing histaminergic tone in the wake promoting system of the brain. Pitolisant has been studied in animal models of narcolepsy and used in clinical trials as a treatment for narcolepsy. A comprehensive search of online databases (eg, Medline, PubMed, EMBASE, the Cochrane Library Database, Ovid MEDLINE, Europe PubMed Central, EBSCOhost CINAHL, ProQuest Research Library, Google Scholar, and ClinicalTrials.gov) was performed. Nonrandomized and randomized studies were included. This review focuses on the outcomes of four clinical trials of pitolisant to treat narcolepsy. These four trials show that pitolisant is an effective drug to treat EDS and cataplexy in narcolepsy. PMID:28490912

  5. Cognitive behavioral treatment for narcolepsy: can it complement pharmacotherapy?

    PubMed Central

    Marín Agudelo, Hernán Andrés; Jiménez Correa, Ulises; Carlos Sierra, Juan; Pandi-Perumal, Seithikurippu R.; Schenck, Carlos H.

    2014-01-01

    Sleep medicine in general and psychology in particular have recently developed cognitive behavioral treatment for narcolepsy (CBT-N). Despite a growing interest in this topic, most studies since 2007 have reviewed CBT applications for other sleep disorders. Currently, 6 reviews have been published on narcolepsy, with an expert consensus being reached that CBT represented an important adjunctive treatment for the disease. The current paper reviews the need for CBT applications for narcolepsy by generalizing the application of multicomponent treatments and performing studies that extrapolate the results obtained from multicenter studies. Nineteen studies were found in which the need-for-treatment guidelines identified the use of CBT for narcolepsy. Three additional studies were identified that evaluated the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral measures and multicomponent treatments for which treatment protocols have been proposed. PMID:26483898

  6. Treatment of Narcolepsy and other Hypersomnias of Central Origin

    PubMed Central

    Wise, Merrill S.; Arand, Donna L.; Auger, R. Robert; Brooks, Stephen N.; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this paper is to summarize current knowledge about treatment of narcolepsy and other hypersomnias of central origin. Methods: The task force performed a systematic and comprehensive review of the relevant literature and graded the evidence using the Oxford grading system. This paper discusses the strengths and limitations of the available evidence regarding treatment of these conditions, and summarizes key information about safety of these medications. Our findings provide the foundation for development of evidence-based practice parameters on this topic by the Standards of Practice Committee of the American Academy of Sleep Medicine. Results: The majority of recent papers in this field provide information about use of modafinil or sodium oxybate for treatment of sleepiness associated with narcolepsy. Several large randomized, placebo-controlled studies indicate that modafinil and sodium oxybate are effective for treatment of hypersomnia due to narcolepsy. We identified no studies that report direct comparison of these newer medications versus traditional stimulants, or that indicate what proportion of patients treated initially with these medications require transition to traditional stimulants or to combination therapy to achieve adequate alertness. As with the traditional stimulants, modafinil and sodium oxybate provide, at best, only moderate improvement in alertness rather than full restoration of alertness in patients with narcolepsy. Several large randomized placebo-controlled studies demonstrate that sodium oxybate is effective for treatment of cataplexy associated with narcolepsy, and earlier studies provide limited data to support the effectiveness of fluoxetine and tricyclic antidepressants for treatment of cataplexy. Our findings indicate that very few reports provide information regarding treatment of special populations such as children, older adults, and pregnant or breastfeeding women. The available literature provides a

  7. The neurobiology, diagnosis, and treatment of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Thomas E

    2003-02-01

    Narcolepsy is a common cause of chronic sleepiness distinguished by intrusions into wakefulness of physiological aspects of rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy and hallucinations. Recent advances provide compelling evidence that narcolepsy may be a neurodegenerative or autoimmune disorder resulting in a loss of hypothalamic neurons containing the neuropeptide orexin (also known as hypocretin). Because orexin promotes wakefulness and inhibits rapid eye movement sleep, its absence may permit inappropriate transitions between wakefulness and sleep. These discoveries have considerably improved our understanding of the neurobiology of sleep and should foster the development of rational treatments for a variety of sleep disorders.

  8. Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mitler, Merrill M.; Hajdukovic, Roza; Erman, Milton; Koziol, James A.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Narcolepsy is a neurological condition with a prevalence of up to 1 per 1,000 that is characterized by irresistible bouts of sleep. Associated features include the pathological manifestations of rapid-eye-movement (REM) sleep: cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and abnormal sleep-onset REM periods and disturbed nocturnal sleep. The condition is strongly associated with the HLA-DR2 and DQw1 phenotype. The phenomenology of narcolepsy is discussed, and diagnostic procedures are reviewed. Treatment modalities involving central nervous system stimulants for somnolence and tricyclic drugs for REM-sleep abnormalities are discussed. Sleep laboratory studies on the treatment efficacy of methylphenidate, pemoline, dextroamphetamine, protriptyline, and viloxazine are presented. Data suggest that: (1) methylphenidate and dextro-amphetamine objectively improve somnolence; (2) pemoline, at doses up to 112.5 mg, is less effective in controlling somnolence but may improve certain aspects of performance; and (3) protriptyline and viloxazine are effective anticataplectic agents that produce little improvement in somnolence. PMID:1968069

  9. The diagnosis and treatment of pediatric narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Nevsimalova, Sona

    2014-08-01

    Narcolepsy in children is a serious disorder marked by a chronic course and lifelong handicap in school performance and choice of employment, by free time activity limitation, and by behavior and personality changes, all of which constitute a major influence on the quality of life. Increased daytime sleepiness may be the only sign at the disease onset, with attacks of sleep becoming longer and lasting up to hours. Also present may be confusional arousals with features of sleep drunkenness. Paradoxically, preschool and young children may show inattentiveness, emotional lability, and hyperactive behavior. Cataplexy may develop after onset of sleepiness and affect mainly muscles of the face. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis are seldom present. Multiple Sleep Latency Test criteria are not available for children younger than 6 years. The haplotype (HLA-DQB1:0602) can be associated with the disorder; however, the best predictor of narcolepsy-cataplexy is hypocretin deficiency. The treatment generally used in adults is regarded as off-label in childhood, which is why the management of pediatric narcolepsy is difficult.

  10. Treatment of Narcolepsy with Methamphetamine

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Merrill M.; Hajdukovic, Roza; Erman, Milton K.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Eight pairs of subjects (each consisting of a narcoleptic and a control matched on the basis of age, sex, educational background and job) were evaluated under the following double-blind, randomized treatment conditions: baseline, placebo, low dose and high dose methamphetamine. Subjects were drug-free for 2 weeks prior to beginning the protocol. Methamphetamine was the only drug taken during the protocol and was given in a single morning dose of 0, 20 or 40–60 mg to narcoleptics and 0, 5 or 10 mg to controls. The protocol was 28 days long, with each of the four treatment conditions lasting 4 days followed by 3 days of washout. Nighttime polysomnography and daytime testing were done during the last 24 hours of each treatment condition. Daytime sleep tendency was assessed with the multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). Daytime performance was assessed with performance tests including a simple, computer-based driving task. Narcoleptics’ mean MSLT sleep latency increased from 4.3 minutes on placebo to 9.3 minutes on high dose, compared with an increase from 10.4 to 17.1 minutes for controls. Narcoleptics’ error rate on the driving task decreased from 2.53% on placebo to 0.33% on high dose, compared with a decrease from 0.22% to 0.16% for controls. The effects of methamphetamine on nocturnal sleep were generally dose-dependent and affected sleep continuity and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Elimination half life was estimated to be between 15.9 and 22.0 hours. Mild side effects emerged in a dose-dependent fashion and most often involved the central nervous system and gastrointestinal tract. We concluded that methamphetamine caused a dose-dependent decrease in daytime sleep tendency and improvement in performance in both narcoleptics and controls. Methamphetamine at doses of 40–60 mg allowed narcoleptics to function at levels comparable to those of unmedicated controls. PMID:8341891

  11. Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Murray, T. J.; Foley, Anita

    1974-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a disorder of sleep control characterized by a tetrad of symptoms: sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations. A diagnosis is made from a careful history. The incidence is estimated as high as 0.3% of the population. Unfortunately patients go for many years before the diagnosis is made and often have experienced disruption of their employment, social and family life, and may have experienced a number of car accidents because of falling asleep at the wheel. An unknown number of narcoleptics kill themselves on the highways before the diagnosis is ever made. Sleep attacks can usually be controlled by methylphenidate, and if the other symptoms persist they can often be effectively managed by imipramine. PMID:4809449

  12. Sodium Oxybate treatment in pediatric type 1 narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Moresco, Monica; Pizza, Fabio; Antelmi, Elena; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2018-03-05

    Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) is a rare chronic neurologic disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hallucinations and disrupted nocturnal sleep, usually with onset during childhood/adolescence. Pediatric NT1 is associated with limitations on children's activities and achievements, especially poor performance at school, difficulty with peers due to disease symptoms and comorbidities including depression, obesity, and precocious puberty. NT1 disease is caused by the selective loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus, most probably related to an autoimmune pathophysiology. Indeed a strong genetic predisposition including the HLA system and other associations in genes involved in immune responses has been found together with the triggering role of environmental agents such as H1N1 influenza infections and vaccinations. Sodium Oxybate (SO) is a sodium salt of γ-hydroxybutyric (GHB) acid that is synthetized by neurons in the brain and functions as neurotransmitter. GHB is a central nervous system depressant and produces dose-dependent sedation. SO is a first line medication for cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness in adults with NT1, but can be helpful also for sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucination and sleep paralysis in these patients. Although in the majority of patients narcolepsy develops before 15 years of age, there are no approved treatments for pediatric NT1. However, SO has been widely used off-label to treat narcolepsy symptoms in children and adolescents with NT1 in non-controlled studies, showing a similar safety profile and therapeutic response to adult patients. Current therapy is based only on empirical data shared among expert sleep disorders clinicians. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  13. Disrupted Nighttime Sleep in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. Methods: A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. Results: The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Conclusions: Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment. Citation: Roth T; Dauvilliers Y; Mignot E; Montplaisir J; Paul J

  14. Complex Diagnostic and Treatment Issues in Psychotic Symptoms Associated with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Ivanenko, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is an uncommon chronic, neurological disorder characterized by abnormal manifestations of rapid eye movement sleep and perturbations in the sleep-wake cycle. Accurate diagnosis of psychotic symptoms in a person with narcolepsy could be difficult due to side effects of stimulant treatment (e.g., hallucinations) as well as primary symptoms of narcolepsy (e.g., sleep paralysis and hypnagogic and/or hypnapompic hallucinations). Pertinent articles from peer-reviewed journals were identified to help understand the complex phenomenology of psychotic symptoms in patients with narcolepsy. In this ensuing review and discussion, we present an overview of narcolepsy and outline diagnostic and management approaches for psychotic symptoms in patients with narcolepsy. PMID:19724760

  15. Disrupted nighttime sleep in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Roth, Thomas; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montplaisir, Jacques; Paul, Josh; Swick, Todd; Zee, Phyllis

    2013-09-15

    Characterize disrupted nighttime sleep (DNS) in narcolepsy, an important symptom of narcolepsy. A panel of international narcolepsy experts was convened in 2011 to build a consensus characterization of DNS in patients with narcolepsy. A literature search of the Medline (1965 to date), Medline In-Process (latest weeks), Embase (1974 to date), Embase Alert (latest 8 weeks), and Biosis (1965 to date) databases was conducted using the following search terms: narcolepsy and disrupted nighttime sleep, disturbed nighttime sleep, fragmented sleep, consolidated sleep, sleep disruption, and narcolepsy questionnaire. The purpose of the literature search was to identify publications characterizing the nighttime sleep of patients with narcolepsy. The panel reviewed the literature. Nocturnal sleep can also be disturbed by REM sleep abnormalities such as vivid dreaming and REM sleep behavior disorder; however, these were not reviewed in the current paper, as we were evaluating for idiopathic sleep disturbances. The literature reviewed provide a consistent characterization of nighttime sleep in patients with narcolepsy as fragmented, with reports of frequent, brief nightly awakenings with difficulties returning to sleep and associated reports of poor sleep quality. Polysomnographic studies consistently report frequent awakenings/arousals after sleep onset, more stage 1 (S1) sleep, and more frequent shifts to S1 sleep or wake from deeper stages of sleep. The consensus of the International Experts' Panel on Narcolepsy was that DNS can be distressing for patients with narcolepsy and that treatment of DNS warrants consideration. Clinicians involved in the management of patients with narcolepsy should investigate patients' quality of nighttime sleep, give weight and consideration to patient reports of nighttime sleep experience, and consider DNS a target for treatment.

  16. Listening to the Patient Voice in Narcolepsy: Diagnostic Delay, Disease Burden, and Treatment Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Maski, Kiran; Steinhart, Erin; Williams, David; Scammell, Thomas; Flygare, Julie; McCleary, Kimberly; Gow, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: Describe common symptoms, comorbidities, functional limitations, and treatment responsiveness among patients with narcolepsy. Investigate the effect of pediatric onset of narcolepsy symptoms on time to diagnosis of narcolepsy and presence of comorbid depression. Methods: Cross-sectional survey of 1,699 people in the United States with self-reported diagnosis of narcolepsy. We utilized mixed-methods data analyses to report study findings. Results: Most participants reported receiving a diagnosis of narcolepsy more than 1 y after symptom onset. We found that the strongest predictor of this delayed diagnosis was pediatric onset of symptoms (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.0005). Depression was the most common comorbidity but we detected no association with pediatric onset of narcolepsy symptoms. Overall, participants reported that fatigue and cognitive difficulties were their most burdensome symptoms in addition to sleepiness and cataplexy. The majority of participants reported residual daytime fatigue and/or sleepiness despite treatment. Most participants reported they could not perform at work or school as well as they would like because of narcolepsy symptoms. Conclusions: This study provides unique insight into the narcolepsy disease experience. The study quantifies the problem of diagnostic delay for narcolepsy patients in the United States and highlights that symptoms are more likely to be missed if they develop before 18 y of age. These results suggest that narcolepsy awareness efforts should be aimed at parents, pediatric health care providers, school professionals, and children/adolescents themselves. Disease burden is high because of problems with fatigue, cognition, and persistence of residual symptoms despite treatment. Citation: Maski K, Steinhart E, Williams D, Scammell T, Flygare J, McCleary K, Gow M. Listening to the patient voice in narcolepsy: diagnostic delay, disease burden and treatment efficacy. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017;13(3):419–425

  17. Effective treatment of narcolepsy-like symptoms with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jian-bo; Han, Mao-mao; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-hua

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with disrupted sleep-architecture. Clinical management of narcolepsy lies dominantly on symptom-driven pharmacotherapy. The treatment role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for narcolepsy remains unexplored. Patient concerns: In this paper, we present a case of a 14-year-old young girl with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations. Diagnoses: After excluding other possible medical conditions, this patient was primarily diagnosed with narcolepsy. Interventions: The patient received 25 sessions of high-frequency rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). Outcomes: The symptoms of EDS and cataplexy significantly improved after rTMS treatment. Meanwhile, her score in the Epworth sleep scale (ESS) also remarkably decreased. Lessons: This case indicates that rTMS may be selected as a safe and effective alternative strategy for treating narcolepsy-like symptoms. Well-designed researches are warranted in future investigations on this topic. PMID:29145290

  18. Listening to the Patient Voice in Narcolepsy: Diagnostic Delay, Disease Burden, and Treatment Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Maski, Kiran; Steinhart, Erin; Williams, David; Scammell, Thomas; Flygare, Julie; McCleary, Kimberly; Gow, Monica

    2017-03-15

    Describe common symptoms, comorbidities, functional limitations, and treatment responsiveness among patients with narcolepsy. Investigate the effect of pediatric onset of narcolepsy symptoms on time to diagnosis of narcolepsy and presence of comorbid depression. Cross-sectional survey of 1,699 people in the United States with self-reported diagnosis of narcolepsy. We utilized mixed-methods data analyses to report study findings. Most participants reported receiving a diagnosis of narcolepsy more than 1 y after symptom onset. We found that the strongest predictor of this delayed diagnosis was pediatric onset of symptoms (odds ratio = 2.4, p < 0.0005). Depression was the most common comorbidity but we detected no association with pediatric onset of narcolepsy symptoms. Overall, participants reported that fatigue and cognitive difficulties were their most burdensome symptoms in addition to sleepiness and cataplexy. The majority of participants reported residual daytime fatigue and/or sleepiness despite treatment. Most participants reported they could not perform at work or school as well as they would like because of narcolepsy symptoms. This study provides unique insight into the narcolepsy disease experience. The study quantifies the problem of diagnostic delay for narcolepsy patients in the United States and highlights that symptoms are more likely to be missed if they develop before 18 y of age. These results suggest that narcolepsy awareness efforts should be aimed at parents, pediatric health care providers, school professionals, and children/adolescents themselves. Disease burden is high because of problems with fatigue, cognition, and persistence of residual symptoms despite treatment. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  19. Sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset REM periods in MSLT predicts treatment response in patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Drakatos, Panagis; Patel, Kishankumar; Thakrar, Chiraag; Williams, Adrian J; Kent, Brian D; Leschziner, Guy D

    2016-04-01

    Current treatment recommendations for narcolepsy suggest that modafinil should be used as a first-line treatment ahead of conventional stimulants or sodium oxybate. In this study, performed in a tertiary sleep disorders centre, treatment responses were examined following these recommendations, and the ability of sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test to predict treatment response. Over a 3.5-year period, 255 patients were retrospectively identified in the authors' database as patients diagnosed with narcolepsy, type 1 (with cataplexy) or type 2 (without) using clinical and polysomnographic criteria. Eligible patients were examined in detail, sleep study data were abstracted and sleep-stage sequencing of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods were analysed. Response to treatment was graded utilizing an internally developed scale. Seventy-five patients were included (39% males). Forty (53%) were diagnosed with type 1 narcolepsy with a mean follow-up of 2.37 ± 1.35 years. Ninety-seven percent of the patients were initially started on modafinil, and overall 59% reported complete response on the last follow-up. Twenty-nine patients (39%) had the sequence of sleep stage 1 or wake to rapid eye movement in all of their sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods, with most of these diagnosed as narcolepsy type 1 (72%). The presence of this specific sleep-stage sequence in all sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods was associated with worse treatment response (P = 0.0023). Sleep-stage sequence analysis of sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in the multiple sleep latency test may aid the prediction of treatment response in narcoleptics and provide a useful prognostic tool in clinical practice, above and beyond their classification as narcolepsy type 1 or 2. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  20. Reducing the Clinical and Socioeconomic Burden of Narcolepsy by Earlier Diagnosis and Effective Treatment.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael; Morse, Anne Marie

    2017-03-01

    The burden of narcolepsy is likely the result of 2 main aspects: the clinical difficulties and disability incurred as a direct effect of the disorder and the socioeconomic burden. The clinical burden includes the symptoms, diagnosis, comorbidities, treatment, and even mortality that can be associated with narcolepsy. Lifelong therapy is necessary for these patients. Effective treatment results in long-term benefits from both patient and societal perspectives by improving clinical outcomes, potentially enabling improved education and increased employment and work productivity, and quality of life. Thus, reducing the time to appropriate management results in improved outcomes in these patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effective treatment of narcolepsy-like symptoms with high-frequency repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation: A case report.

    PubMed

    Lai, Jian-Bo; Han, Mao-Mao; Xu, Yi; Hu, Shao-Hua

    2017-11-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder with disrupted sleep-architecture. Clinical management of narcolepsy lies dominantly on symptom-driven pharmacotherapy. The treatment role of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) for narcolepsy remains unexplored. In this paper, we present a case of a 14-year-old young girl with excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations. After excluding other possible medical conditions, this patient was primarily diagnosed with narcolepsy. The patient received 25 sessions of high-frequency rTMS over the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). The symptoms of EDS and cataplexy significantly improved after rTMS treatment. Meanwhile, her score in the Epworth sleep scale (ESS) also remarkably decreased. This case indicates that rTMS may be selected as a safe and effective alternative strategy for treating narcolepsy-like symptoms. Well-designed researches are warranted in future investigations on this topic.

  2. Patient-Reported Measures of Narcolepsy: The Need for Better Assessment.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Schmidt, Markus; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2017-05-15

    Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the central nervous system, is clinically characterized by a symptom pentad that includes excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnopompic/hypnagogic hallucinations, and disrupted nighttime sleep. Ideally, screening and diagnosis instruments that assist physicians in evaluating a patient for type 1 or type 2 narcolepsy would be brief, easy for patients to understand and physicians to score, and would identify or rule out the need for electrophysiological testing. A search of the literature was conducted to review patient-reported measures used for the assessment of narcolepsy, mainly in clinical trials, with the goal of summarizing existing scales and identifying areas that may require additional screening questions and clinical practice scales. Of the seven scales reviewed, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale continues to be an important outcome measure to screen adults for excessive daytime sleepiness, which may be associated with narcolepsy. Several narcolepsy-specific scales have demonstrated utility, such as the Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale, Swiss Narcolepsy Scale, and Narcolepsy Symptom Assessment Questionnaire, but further validation is required. Although the narcolepsy-specific scales currently in use may identify type 1 narcolepsy, there are no validated questionnaires to identify type 2 narcolepsy. Thus, there remains a need for short, easily understood, and well-validated instruments that can be readily used in clinical practice to distinguish narcolepsy subtypes, as well as other hypersomnias, and for assessing symptoms of these conditions during treatment. © 2017 American Academy of Sleep Medicine

  3. Narcolepsy: a review

    PubMed Central

    Akintomide, Gbolagade Sunmaila; Rickards, Hugh

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by a classic tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks, cataplexy (sudden bilateral loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis. There are two distinct groups of patients, ie, those having narcolepsy with cataplexy and those having narcolepsy without cataplexy. Narcolepsy affects 0.05% of the population. It has a negative effect on the quality of life of its sufferers and can restrict them from certain careers and activities. There have been advances in the understanding of the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. It is thought that narcolepsy with cataplexy is secondary to loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons in those genetically predisposed to the disorder by possession of human leukocyte antigen DQB1*0602. The diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy are based on symptoms, laboratory sleep tests, and serum levels of hypocretin. There is no cure for narcolepsy, and the present mainstay of treatment is pharmacological treatment along with lifestyle changes. Some novel treatments are also being developed and tried. This article critically appraises the evidence for diagnosis and treatment of narcolepsy. PMID:21931493

  4. Efficiency of a Combination of Pharmacological Treatment and Nondrug Interventions in Childhood Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Kacar Bayram, Ayşe; Per, Hüseyin; Ismailoğullari, Sevda; Canpolat, Mehmet; Gumus, Hakan; Aksu, Murat

    2016-12-01

    Objective  Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic and/or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. It is one of the most important causes of excessive daytime sleepiness in the pediatric population. The aim of this study is to present the clinical and laboratory findings, and treatment results of pediatric patients with narcolepsy. Materials and Methods  We studied five unrelated consecutive children with narcolepsy, focusing on clinical and laboratory features, the therapy and outcome over the 33-month follow-up period. Results  The study subjects included two boys and three girls. The mean age at diagnosis was 11.8 ± 3.3 years (range: 8-16 years). Three patients had cataplexy. There were no hypnagogic hallucinations and/or sleep paralysis in any patients. All patients were educated about sleep hygiene, appropriate nutrition, and regular exercise. Three patients were treated with modafinil, while two patients received methylphenidate. Sodium oxybate was added to existing treatment in patients with cataplexy. Cataplexy attacks did not respond well to the treatment in one patient; therefore intravenous immunoglobulin therapy was given. Conclusions  Early diagnosis is important to help narcoleptic patients in improving their quality of life. A combination of pharmacological treatment and nondrug interventions can greatly improve children's clinical symptoms. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  5. Challenges in the development of therapeutics for narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Kilduff, Thomas S.

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder that afflicts 1 in 2000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy—a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by positive emotions. Features of narcolepsy include dysregulation of arousal state boundaries as well as autonomic and metabolic disturbances. Disruption of neurotransmission through the hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) system, usually by degeneration of the HCRT-producing neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, results in narcolepsy. The cause of Hcrt neurodegeneration is unknown but thought to be related to autoimmune processes. Current treatments for narcolepsy are symptomatic, including wake-promoting therapeutics that increase presynaptic dopamine release and anticataplectic agents that activate monoaminergic neurotransmission. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that alleviates both sleep/wake disturbances and cataplexy. Development of therapeutics for narcolepsy has been challenged by historical misunderstanding of the disease, its many disparate symptoms and, until recently, its unknown etiology. Animal models have been essential to elucidating the neuropathology underlying narcolepsy. These models have also aided understanding the neurobiology of the Hcrt system, mechanisms of cataplexy, and the pharmacology of narcolepsy medications. Transgenic rodent models will be critical in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of narcolepsy, particularly efforts directed to overcome challenges in the development of hypocretin replacement therapy. PMID:26721620

  6. Challenges in the development of therapeutics for narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Yamanaka, Akihiro; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2017-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder that afflicts 1 in 2000 individuals and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy-a sudden loss of muscle tone triggered by positive emotions. Features of narcolepsy include dysregulation of arousal state boundaries as well as autonomic and metabolic disturbances. Disruption of neurotransmission through the hypocretin/orexin (Hcrt) system, usually by degeneration of the HCRT-producing neurons in the posterior hypothalamus, results in narcolepsy. The cause of Hcrt neurodegeneration is unknown but thought to be related to autoimmune processes. Current treatments for narcolepsy are symptomatic, including wake-promoting therapeutics that increase presynaptic dopamine release and anticataplectic agents that activate monoaminergic neurotransmission. Sodium oxybate is the only medication approved by the US Food and Drug Administration that alleviates both sleep/wake disturbances and cataplexy. Development of therapeutics for narcolepsy has been challenged by historical misunderstanding of the disease, its many disparate symptoms and, until recently, its unknown etiology. Animal models have been essential to elucidating the neuropathology underlying narcolepsy. These models have also aided understanding the neurobiology of the Hcrt system, mechanisms of cataplexy, and the pharmacology of narcolepsy medications. Transgenic rodent models will be critical in the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of narcolepsy, particularly efforts directed to overcome challenges in the development of hypocretin replacement therapy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Treatment with venlafaxine in six cases of children with narcolepsy and with cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations.

    PubMed

    Møller, Lene Ruge; Østergaard, John R

    2009-04-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a chronic neuropsychiatric disorder associated with inappropriate control of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. The main symptoms are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and disturbed nocturnal sleep. Cataplexy is marked by episodes of muscular weakness and may cause the patient to collapse to the ground. So far, pharmacotherapy of cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations has been predominantly based on tricyclic antidepressants. Recently, new drugs that block the reuptake of norepineprine and serotonin (e.g., venlafaxine) have been suggested as first-line treatment. These drugs have become our choice in treating children with cataplexy and nightmares as a symptom in narcolepsy. We describe clinical case reports of venlafaxine treatment in 6 children aged 7-12 years old when diagnosed with narcolepsy-cataplexy. In 2 cases with up to 50 daily cataplectic attacks, an initial effect of 37.5 mg of venlafaxine was initially observed. However, during the first year, the dose had to be increased to 112.5 mg daily to avoid cataplexy. A third patient with partial cataplexy was treated with 75 mg of venlafaxine daily. In 2 cases, hypnagogic hallucinations, described by the patients as nightmares, were the most troubling symptom and were successfully treated with only 37.5 mg of venlafaxine daily. Side effects included an increase of disturbed nocturnal sleep when venlafaxine was taken after 2:00 p.m. No major aggressive or suicidal thoughts and no raised blood pressure were recorded. Venlafaxine has proven to be an effective treatment of cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations in 6 children with narcolepsy. No severe side effects were observed.

  8. An overview of hypocretin based therapy in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Takenoshita, Shinichi; Sakai, Noriaki; Chiba, Yuhei; Matsumura, Mari; Yamaguchi, Mai; Nishino, Seiji

    2018-04-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is most commonly caused by a loss of hypocretin/orexin peptide-producing neurons in the hypothalamus (i.e., Narcolepsy Type 1). Since hypocretin deficiency is assumed to be the main cause of narcoleptic symptoms, hypocretin replacement will be the most essential treatment for narcolepsy. Unfortunately, this option is still not available clinically. There are many potential approaches to replace hypocretin in the brain for narcolepsy such as intranasal administration of hypocretin peptides, developing small molecule hypocretin receptor agonists, hypocretin neuronal transplantation, transforming hypocretin stem cells into hypothalamic neurons, and hypocretin gene therapy. Together with these options, immunotherapy treatments to prevent hypocretin neuronal death should also be developed. Areas covered: In this review, we overview the pathophysiology of narcolepsy and the current and emerging treatments of narcolepsy especially focusing on hypocretin receptor based treatments. Expert opinion: Among hypocretin replacement strategies, developing non-peptide hypocretin receptor agonists is currently the most encouraging since systemic administration of a newly synthesized, selective hypocretin receptor 2 agonist (YNT-185) has been shown to ameliorate symptoms of narcolepsy in murine models. If this option is effective in humans, hypocretin cell transplants or gene therapy technology may become realistic in the future.

  9. Patient-Reported Measures of Narcolepsy: The Need for Better Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Kallweit, Ulf; Schmidt, Markus; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy, a chronic disorder of the central nervous system, is clinically characterized by a symptom pentad that includes excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnopompic/hypnagogic hallucinations, and disrupted nighttime sleep. Ideally, screening and diagnosis instruments that assist physicians in evaluating a patient for type 1 or type 2 narcolepsy would be brief, easy for patients to understand and physicians to score, and would identify or rule out the need for electrophysiological testing. Methods: A search of the literature was conducted to review patient-reported measures used for the assessment of narcolepsy, mainly in clinical trials, with the goal of summarizing existing scales and identifying areas that may require additional screening questions and clinical practice scales. Results: Of the seven scales reviewed, the Epworth Sleepiness Scale continues to be an important outcome measure to screen adults for excessive daytime sleepiness, which may be associated with narcolepsy. Several narcolepsy-specific scales have demonstrated utility, such as the Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale, Swiss Narcolepsy Scale, and Narcolepsy Symptom Assessment Questionnaire, but further validation is required. Conclusions: Although the narcolepsy-specific scales currently in use may identify type 1 narcolepsy, there are no validated questionnaires to identify type 2 narcolepsy. Thus, there remains a need for short, easily understood, and well-validated instruments that can be readily used in clinical practice to distinguish narcolepsy subtypes, as well as other hypersomnias, and for assessing symptoms of these conditions during treatment. Citation: Kallweit U, Schmidt M, Bassetti CL. Patient-reported measures of narcolepsy: the need for better assessment. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017;13(5):737–744. PMID:28162143

  10. Practice Parameters for the Treatment of Narcolepsy and other Hypersomnias of Central Origin An American Academy of Sleep Medicine Report

    PubMed Central

    Morgenthaler, Timothy I.; Kapur, Vishesh K.; Brown, Terry; Swick, Todd J.; Alessi, Cathy; Aurora, R. Nisha; Boehlecke, Brian; Chesson, Andrew L.; Friedman, Leah; Maganti, Rama; Owens, Judith; Pancer, Jeffrey; Zak, Rochelle

    2007-01-01

    These practice parameters pertain to the treatment of hypersomnias of central origin. They serve as both an update of previous practice parameters for the therapy of narcolepsy and as the first practice parameters to address treatment of other hypersomnias of central origin. They are based on evidence analyzed in the accompanying review paper. The specific disorders addressed by these parameters are narcolepsy (with cataplexy, without cataplexy, due to medical condition and unspecified), idiopathic hypersomnia (with long sleep time and without long sleep time), recurrent hypersomnia and hypersomnia due to medical condition. Successful treatment of hypersomnia of central origin requires an accurate diagnosis, individual tailoring of therapy to produce the fullest possible return of normal function, and regular follow-up to monitor response to treatment. Modafinil, sodium oxybate, amphetamine, methamphetamine, dextroamphetamine, methylphenidate, and selegiline are effective treatments for excessive sleepiness associated with narcolepsy, while tricyclic antidepressants and fluoxetine are effective treatments for cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations; but the quality of published clinical evidence supporting them varies. Scheduled naps can be beneficial to combat sleepiness in narcolepsy patients. Based on available evidence, modafinil is an effective therapy for sleepiness due to idiopathic hypersomnia, Parkinson's disease, myotonic dystrophy, and multiple sclerosis. Based on evidence and/or long history of use in the therapy of narcolepsy committee consensus was that modafinil, amphetamine, methamphetamine, dextroamphetamine, and methylphenidate are reasonable options for the therapy of hypersomnias of central origin. Citation: Morgenthaler TI; Kapur VK; Brown T; Swick TJ; Alessi C; Aurora RN; Boehlecke B; Chesson AL; Friedman L; Maganti R; Owens J; Pancer J; Zak R; Standards of Practice Committee of the AASM. Practice parameters for the treatment

  11. Autoimmunity in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Bonvalet, Melodie; Ollila, Hanna M; Ambati, Aditya; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2017-11-01

    Summarize the recent findings in narcolepsy focusing on the environmental and genetic risk factors in disease development. Both genetic and epidemiological evidence point towards an autoimmune mechanism in the destruction of orexin/hypocretin neurons. Recent studies suggest both humoral and cellular immune responses in the disease development. Narcolepsy is a severe sleep disorder, in which neurons producing orexin/hypocretin in the hypothalamus are destroyed. The core symptoms of narcolepsy are debilitating, extreme sleepiness, cataplexy, and abnormalities in the structure of sleep. Both genetic and epidemiological evidence point towards an autoimmune mechanism in the destruction of orexin/hypocretin neurons. Importantly, the highest environmental risk is seen with influenza-A infection and immunization. However, how the cells are destroyed is currently unknown. In this review we summarize the disease symptoms, and focus on the immunological findings in narcolepsy. We also discuss the environmental and genetic risk factors as well as propose a model for disease development.

  12. The Medical and Economic Burden of Narcolepsy: Implications for Managed Care

    PubMed Central

    Thorpy, Michael J.; Hiller, George

    2017-01-01

    Background The neurologic disorder narcolepsy results from dysregulation of the sleep-wake cycle and is primarily characterized by chronic, severely excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, an emotionally induced muscle weakness. The prevalence of narcolepsy is approximately 0.05%, and onset generally occurs during the first 2 decades of life. Narcolepsy is believed to be an autoimmune disorder with destruction of hypocretin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. Objectives To provide an enhanced understanding of narcolepsy and establish the need for early diagnosis and rapid initiation of effective treatment for patients with narcolepsy. Discussion Narcolepsy reduces daily functioning and is associated with a substantial medical and economic burden, with many patients being on full disability. The annual direct medical costs are approximately 2-fold higher in patients with narcolepsy than in matched controls without this condition ($11,702 vs $5261, respectively; P <.0001). Further contributing to the overall burden is a lack of recognition of the signs and symptoms of narcolepsy and an absence of easily measurable biomarkers, resulting in a diagnostic delay that often exceeds 10 years and may be associated with misdiagnosis and inappropriate resource utilization. Because narcolepsy generally has an onset in childhood or in adolescence, is often misdiagnosed, has no known cure, and requires lifelong treatment, it is an important disease from a managed care perspective. Clinical features, as well as objective testing, should be used to ensure the timely diagnosis and treatment of patients with narcolepsy. Conclusion Policies for the diagnosis and treatment of narcolepsy should be based on the current treatment guidelines, but they should also encourage shared decisions between clinicians and patients to allow for individualized diagnostic and treatment choices, as suggested in best practice recommendations. PMID:28975007

  13. Improved vigilance after sodium oxybate treatment in narcolepsy: a comparison between in-field and in-laboratory measurements.

    PubMed

    van Schie, Mojca K M; Werth, Esther; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Baumann, Christian R; Fronczek, Rolf

    2016-08-01

    This two-centre observational study of vigilance measurements assessed the feasibility of vigilance measurements on multiple days using the Sustained Attention to Response Task and the Psychomotor Vigilance Test with portable task equipment, and subsequently assessed the effect of sodium oxybate treatment on vigilance in patients with narcolepsy. Twenty-six patients with narcolepsy and 15 healthy controls were included. The study comprised two in-laboratory days for the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test and the Oxford Sleep Resistance test, followed by 7-day portable vigilance battery measurements. This procedure was repeated for patients with narcolepsy after at least 3 months of stable treatment with sodium oxybate. Patients with narcolepsy had a higher Sustained Attention to Response Task error count, lower Psychomotor Vigilance Test reciprocal reaction time, higher Oxford Sleep Resistance test omission error count adjusted for test duration (Oxford Sleep Resistance testOMIS / MIN ), and lower Oxford Sleep Resistance test and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test sleep latency compared with controls (all P < 0.01). Treatment with sodium oxybate was associated with a longer Maintenance of Wakefulness Test sleep latency (P < 0.01), lower Oxford Sleep Resistance testOMIS / MIN (P = 0.01) and a lower Sustained Attention to Response Task error count (P = 0.01) in patients with narcolepsy, but not with absolute changes in Oxford Sleep Resistance test sleep latency or Psychomotor Vigilance Test reciprocal reaction time. It was concluded that portable measurements of sustained attention as well as in-laboratory Oxford Sleep Resistance test and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test measurements revealed worse performance for narcoleptic patients compared with controls, and that sodium oxybate was associated with an improvement of sustained attention and a better resistance to sleep. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  14. Comparing Treatment Effect Measurements in Narcolepsy: The Sustained Attention to Response Task, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; van Schie, Mojca K M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Mayer, Geert; Bassetti, Claudio L; Ding, Claire-Li; Lehert, Philippe; van Dijk, J Gert

    2015-07-01

    To validate the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) as a treatment effect measure in narcolepsy, and to compare the SART with the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT) and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Validation of treatment effect measurements within a randomized controlled trial (RCT). Ninety-five patients with narcolepsy with or without cataplexy. The RCT comprised a double-blind, parallel-group, multicenter trial comparing the effects of 8-w treatments with pitolisant (BF2.649), modafinil, or placebo (NCT01067222). MWT, ESS, and SART were administered at baseline and after an 8-w treatment period. The severity of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy was also assessed using the Clinical Global Impression scale (CGI-C). The SART, MWT, and ESS all had good reliability, obtained for the SART and MWT using two to three sessions in 1 day. The ability to distinguish responders from nonresponders, classified using the CGI-C score, was high for all measures, with a high performance for the SART (r = 0.61) and the ESS (r = 0.54). The Sustained Attention to Response Task is a valid and easy-to-administer measure to assess treatment effects in narcolepsy, enhanced by combining it with the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Update on therapy for narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael J

    2015-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a severe, incurable, neurological disorder that is treated by pharmacological management of its symptoms. The main symptoms are excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and cataplexy, although addition symptoms that may require treatment include sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and disturbed nocturnal sleep. Sodium oxybate and modafinil/armodafinil are the first-line treatments for EDS, and sodium oxybate for cataplexy. Sodium oxybate treats all the symptoms of narcolepsy, whereas modafinil is effective for EDS only. Alternative medications for EDS include methylphenidate or amphetamines such as dextroamphetamine, lisdexamfetamine, methamphetamine, or combination amphetamine salts. Non-FDA approved medications for cataplexy include norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors such as venlafaxine or atomoxetine. Combination therapy can be more effective for sleepiness such as sodium oxybate and modafinil/armodafinil. Medication for narcolepsy is generally well tolerated and usually required life-long although does not eliminate all symptoms of narcolepsy.

  16. Narcolepsy: Let the Patient’s Voice Awaken Us!

    PubMed Central

    Flygare, Julie; Parthasarathy, Sairam

    2014-01-01

    This is a “patient-centered” review about narcolepsy that aims to awaken the reader to the narcolepsy condition and to the trials and tribulations of patients with sleep problems in general. Narcolepsy is a neurological disorder with a classic tetrad of symptoms consisting of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep onset hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. The diagnosis of narcolepsy and other sleep disorders are often overlooked and could be attributed to other medical or even psychiatric conditions with years of missed diagnosis. Implementation of “two sleep-related questions” to the review of systems in the primary care physicians’ office visit may help address the issue of missed diagnosis and allow patients to seek prompt medical attention. Definitive diagnosis can be made by overnight sleep study followed by a nap test, “multiple sleep latency test” (MSLT). There is currently no cure for narcolepsy with the treatments addressing symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and nighttime sleep disruption with stimulants (modafinil, methylphenidate, and amphetamines), anti-cataplexy medications (Serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitors and tricyclic antidepressants) and sedative-hypnotics including sodium oxybate. Narcolepsy, like other sleep disorders, can lead to marked reductions of health-related quality of life and affect patients’ social and work lives deleteriously. While traditional healthcare approaches are focused more on hard biomedical outcomes, a patient-centered approach with novel methods for better sleep assessment of patients, that can bypass the “impossibly crammed” physician office visit, would allow healthcare providers to better detect, diagnose and treat narcolepsy and other such sleep problems. PMID:24931392

  17. Tolerance and Efficacy of Sodium Oxybate in Childhood Narcolepsy with Cataplexy: A Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lecendreux, Michel; Poli, Francesca; Oudiette, Delphine; Benazzouz, Fatima; Donjacour, Claire E.H.M; Franceschini, Christian; Finotti, Elena; Pizza, Fabio; Bruni, Oliviero; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, irresistible sleep episodes, and sudden loss of muscle tone (cataplexy) mostly triggered by emotions. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a disabling lifelong disorder frequently arising during childhood. Pediatric narcolepsy often results in severe learning and social impairment. Improving awareness about this condition increases early diagnosis and may allow patients to rapidly access adequate treatments, including pharmacotherapy and/or non-medication-based approaches. Even though children currently undergo pharmacotherapy, data about safety and efficacy in the pediatric population are scarce. Lacking international guidelines as well as drugs registered for childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy, physicians have no other alternative but to prescribe in an off-label manner medications identical to those recommended for adults. We retrospectively evaluated 27 children ranging from 6 to 16 years old, suffering from narcolepsy with cataplexy, who had been treated with off-label sodium oxybate and had been followed in a clinical setting. Throughout a semi-structured interview, we documented the good efficacy and tolerability of sodium oxybate in the majority of the patients. This study constitutes a preliminary step towards a further randomized controlled trial in childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy. Citation: Lecendreux M; Poli F; Oudiette D; Benazzouz F; Donjacour CEHM; Franceschini C; Finotti E; Pizza F; Bruni O; Plazzi G. Tolerance and efficacy of sodium oxybate in childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy: a retrospective study. SLEEP 2012;35(5):709-711. PMID:22547897

  18. Increased Lucid Dreaming Frequency in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Rak, Michael; Beitinger, Pierre; Steiger, Axel; Schredl, Michael; Dresler, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Study Objective: Nightmares are a frequent symptom in narcolepsy. Lucid dreaming, i.e., the phenomenon of becoming aware of the dreaming state during dreaming, has been demonstrated to be of therapeutic value for recurrent nightmares. Data on lucid dreaming in narcolepsy patients, however, is sparse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of recalled dreams (DF), nightmares (NF), and lucid dreams (LDF) in narcolepsy patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, we explored if dream lucidity provides relief during nightmares in narcolepsy patients. Design: We interviewed patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls. Setting: Telephone interview. Patients: 60 patients diagnosed with narcolepsy (23–82 years, 35 females) and 919 control subjects (14–93 years, 497 females) Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Logistic regression revealed significant (P < 0.001) differences in DF, NF, and LDF between narcolepsy patients and controls after controlling for age and gender, with effect sizes lying in the large range (Cohen's d > 0.8). The differences in NF and LDF between patients and controls stayed significant after controlling for DF. Comparison of 35 narcolepsy patients currently under medication with their former drug-free period revealed significant differences in DF and NF (z < 0.05, signed-rank test) but not LDF (z = 0.8). Irrespective of medication, 70% of narcolepsy patients with experience in lucid dreaming indicated that dream lucidity provides relief during nightmares. Conclusion: Narcolepsy patients experience a markedly higher lucid dreaming frequency compared to controls, and many patients report a positive impact of dream lucidity on the distress experienced from nightmares. Citation: Rak M, Beitinger P, Steiger A, Schredl M, Dresler M. Increased lucid dreaming frequency in narcolepsy. SLEEP 2015;38(5):787–792. PMID:25325481

  19. Clinical and Neurobiological Aspects of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Nishino, Seiji

    2007-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy and/or other dissociated manifestations of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep (hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis). Narcolepsy is currently treated with amphetamine-like central nervous system (CNS) stimulants (for EDS) and antidepressants (for cataplexy). Some other classes of compounds such as modafinil (a non-amphetamine wake-promoting compound for EDS) and gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB, a short-acting sedative for EDS/fragmented nighttime sleep and cataplexy) given at night are also employed. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently elucidated based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals. Using forward (i.e., positional cloning in canine narcolepsy) and reverse (i.e., mouse gene knockout) genetics, the genes involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy (hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor) in animals have been identified. Hypocretins/orexins are novel hypothalamic neuropeptides also involved in various hypothalamic functions such as energy homeostasis and neuroendocrine functions. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in many narcolepsy-cataplexy cases. In this review, the clinical, pathophysiological and pharmacological aspects of narcolepsy are discussed. PMID:17470414

  20. Cases of pediatric narcolepsy after misdiagnoses.

    PubMed

    Kauta, Shilpa R; Marcus, Carole L

    2012-11-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by recurrent brief attacks of irresistible sleepiness. Signs can begin during childhood. However, diagnoses are frequently delayed by 10-15 years because of unfamiliarity with pediatric narcolepsy and variable presentations of its associated features (cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis). Therefore, patients may remain untreated during their formative years. Three children with narcolepsy who were initially misdiagnosed are described. Each child's signs were initially related to depression, hypothyroidism, jaw dysfunction, or conversion disorder. However, after a multiple sleep latency test, the diagnosis of narcolepsy was established. All three patients were treated appropriately with stimulant medications, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, or sodium oxybate, and demonstrated positive responses. Although no definitive cure exists for narcolepsy, early recognition and appropriate symptomatic treatment with medications can allow affected children to improve quality of life and achieve normality, both academically and socially. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Increased lucid dreaming frequency in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Rak, Michael; Beitinger, Pierre; Steiger, Axel; Schredl, Michael; Dresler, Martin

    2015-05-01

    Nightmares are a frequent symptom in narcolepsy. Lucid dreaming, i.e., the phenomenon of becoming aware of the dreaming state during dreaming, has been demonstrated to be of therapeutic value for recurrent nightmares. Data on lucid dreaming in narcolepsy patients, however, is sparse. The aim of this study was to evaluate the frequency of recalled dreams (DF), nightmares (NF), and lucid dreams (LDF) in narcolepsy patients compared to healthy controls. In addition, we explored if dream lucidity provides relief during nightmares in narcolepsy patients. We interviewed patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls. Telephone interview. 60 patients diagnosed with narcolepsy (23-82 years, 35 females) and 919 control subjects (14-93 years, 497 females). N/A. Logistic regression revealed significant (P < 0.001) differences in DF, NF, and LDF between narcolepsy patients and controls after controlling for age and gender, with effect sizes lying in the large range (Cohen's d > 0.8). The differences in NF and LDF between patients and controls stayed significant after controlling for DF. Comparison of 35 narcolepsy patients currently under medication with their former drug-free period revealed significant differences in DF and NF (z < 0.05, signed-rank test) but not LDF (z = 0.8). Irrespective of medication, 70% of narcolepsy patients with experience in lucid dreaming indicated that dream lucidity provides relief during nightmares. Narcolepsy patients experience a markedly higher lucid dreaming frequency compared to controls, and many patients report a positive impact of dream lucidity on the distress experienced from nightmares. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  2. Time to Response with Sodium Oxybate for the Treatment of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and Cataplexy in Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bogan, Richard K.; Roth, Thomas; Schwartz, Jonathan; Miloslavsky, Maja

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: This post hoc analysis evaluated the time to response that can be expected with sodium oxybate (SXB) for treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. Methods: Data were from a 4-week, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial (GHB-2; N = 136) of oral SXB 3 g, 6 g, and 9 g nightly, and its 12-month open-label extension (GHB-3). Two response definitions were utilized: ≥ 20% improvement in Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score (EDS responders), and ≥ 50% reduction in weekly cataplexy attacks (cataplexy responders). These thresholds were previously determined to be clinically relevant based on analysis of the relationship of Clinical Global Impression of Change with ESS and number of cataplexy attacks. Kaplan-Meier curves and median times to first response, based on above criteria, and to maximum response were estimated. Results: Among 86 patients randomized to SXB in GHB-2 and continued into GHB-3, 77.6% and 90.7% were EDS and cataplexy responders, respectively. The median (95% CI) times to first response were 37 (31–50) days for EDS and 25 (17–29) days for cataplexy, and median times to maximum response were 106 (85–164) days for EDS and 213 (94–279) days for cataplexy. GHB-3 results among 31 patients initially randomized to placebo were consistent with those treated with SXB throughout, but with longer times to maximum response. Conclusions: Response onset, assessed as clinically meaningful improvements in EDS and cataplexy, was observed in most patients within 2 months; a longer period is needed to achieve maximum response. Clinicians should recognize that time to initial and maximum response may take weeks to months. Citation: Bogan RK, Roth T, Schwartz J, Miloslavsky M. Time to response with sodium oxybate for the treatment of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy in patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(4):427–432. PMID:25580605

  3. Challenges in Diagnosing Narcolepsy without Cataplexy: A Consensus Statement

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Christian R.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Arnulf, Isabelle; Rye, David; Dauvilliers, Yves; Honda, Makoto; Owens, Judith A.; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy is often a challenge as the symptoms are nonspecific, current diagnostic tests are limited, and there are no useful biomarkers. In this report, we review the clinical and physiological aspects of narcolepsy without cataplexy, the limitations of available diagnostic procedures, and the differential diagnoses, and we propose an approach for more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. Methods: A group of clinician-scientists experienced in narcolepsy reviewed the literature and convened to discuss current diagnostic tools, and to map out directions for research that should lead to a better understanding and more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. Recommendations: To aid in the identification of narcolepsy without cataplexy, we review key indicators of narcolepsy and present a diagnostic algorithm. A detailed clinical history is mainly helpful to rule out other possible causes of chronic sleepiness. The multiple sleep latency test remains the most important measure, and prior sleep deprivation, shift work, or circadian disorders should be excluded by actigraphy or sleep logs. A short REM sleep latency (≤ 15 minutes) on polysomnography can aid in the diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy, although sensitivity is low. Finally, measurement of hypocretin levels can helpful, as levels are low to intermediate in 10% to 30% of narcolepsy without cataplexy patients. Citation: Baumann CR, Mignot E, Lammers GJ, Overeem S, Arnulf I, Rye D, Dauvilliers Y, Honda M, Owens JA, Plazzi G, Scammell TE. Challenges in diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy: a consensus statement. SLEEP 2014;37(6):1035-1042. PMID:24882898

  4. Transient Impact of Rituximab in H1N1 Vaccination-associated Narcolepsy With Severe Psychiatric Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Alén, Reija; Partinen, Markku

    2016-09-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is an organic sleep disorder caused by the destruction of hypocretin producing neurons in hypothalamus. In addition to daytime sleepiness, the spectrum and severity of symptoms are very variable. Psychiatric comorbidity and phenomena resembling psychotic symptoms are also common. Current treatment options for narcolepsy are symptomatic but there are few case reports of positive effect of immunotherapy. We report a very severely affected young boy treated with rituximab (RXB). A 12-year-old boy developed narcolepsy after Pandemrix H1N1 vaccination in 2010. He started to express severe psychiatric symptoms shortly after the onset. Cataplexy and sleepiness were devastatingly disabling. Conventional treatments did not have any effect on symptoms so we decided to try RXB, chimeric human monoclonal antibody against CD20 expressed in B lymphocytes. After the first treatment his condition ameliorated dramatically. Unfortunately, the effect lasted only for 2 months. Following attempts did not show any effect. Effect of RXB on narcolepsy has not been reported before. Remarkable but short-lasting effect of RXB in narcolepsy is intriguing as it could imply that there is still ongoing B cell-mediated autoimmune response possible contributing to symptoms in narcolepsy.

  5. Measurement of narcolepsy symptoms: The Narcolepsy Severity Scale.

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Beziat, Severine; Pesenti, Carole; Lopez, Regis; Barateau, Lucie; Carlander, Bertrand; Luca, Gianina; Tafti, Mehdi; Morin, Charles M; Billiard, Michel; Jaussent, Isabelle

    2017-04-04

    To validate the Narcolepsy Severity Scale (NSS), a brief clinical instrument to evaluate the severity and consequences of symptoms in patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1). A 15-item scale to assess the frequency and severity of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disrupted nighttime sleep was developed and validated by sleep experts with patients' feedback. Seventy untreated and 146 treated adult patients with NT1 were evaluated and completed the NSS in a single reference sleep center. The NSS psychometric properties, score changes with treatment, and convergent validity with other clinical parameters were assessed. The NSS showed good psychometric properties with significant item-total score correlations. The factor analysis indicated a 3-factor solution with good reliability, expressed by satisfactory Cronbach α values. The NSS total score temporal stability was good. Significant NSS score differences were observed between untreated and treated patients (dependent sample, 41 patients before and after sleep therapy; independent sample, 29 drug-free and 105 treated patients). Scores were lower in the treated populations (10-point difference between groups), without ceiling effect. Significant correlations were found among NSS total score and daytime sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale, Mean Sleep Latency Test), depressive symptoms, and health-related quality of life. The NSS can be considered a reliable and valid clinical tool for the quantification of narcolepsy symptoms to monitor and optimize narcolepsy management. © 2017 American Academy of Neurology.

  6. [Narcolepsy in childhood and adolescence: symptoms, diagnosis, and therapy. A case report].

    PubMed

    Gehrmann, Jochen; Siegler, Dominik; Ignacy, Evelin; Reimer, Inga

    2017-03-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare, multifactorial disease of the hypothalamus characterized by its leading symptoms of excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Sleep-EEG and a HLA-DR-genotype serve to secure the diagnosis. We report here on a 14-year-old girl suffering from anxieties, depression, school refusal, social withdrawal as well as very frequent attacks of sleep during the day and cataplexy. Currently, there is no approved drug for children and adolescents suffering from narcolepsy. Our patient benefited significantly and quickly from an off-label treatment with methylphenidate in combination with psychoeducation, cognitive behavioral therapy, and family therapy. Narcolepsy is a very rare but probably underestimated differential diagnosis applied to unclear daytime sleepiness, anxieties, or depression in childhood and adolescence. Both the key symptoms and the comorbid symptoms improve significantly under treatment with stimulants, albeit at a higher dosage.

  7. Narcolepsy in children: a diagnostic and management approach.

    PubMed

    Babiker, Mohamed O E; Prasad, Manish

    2015-06-01

    To provide a diagnostic and management approach for narcolepsy in children. Narcolepsy is a chronic disabling disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnogogic and/or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. All four features are present in only half of the cases. Excessive daytime sleepiness is the essential feature of narcolepsy at any age and is usually the first symptom to manifest. A combination of excessive daytime sleepiness and definite cataplexy is considered pathognomonic of narcolepsy syndrome. New treatment options have become available over the past few years. Early diagnosis and management can significantly improve the quality of life of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy. This review summarizes the pathophysiology, clinical features, and management options for children with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Misdiagnosis of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Laura; Patel, Pallavi; Maschauer, Emily L; Morrison, Ian; Riha, Renata L

    2016-12-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic primary sleep disorder, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep dysfunction with or without cataplexy. Narcolepsy is uncommon, with a low prevalence rate which makes it difficult to diagnose definitively without a complex series of tests and a detailed history. The aim of this study was to review patients referred to a tertiary sleep centre who had been labelled with a diagnosis of narcolepsy prior to referral in order to assess if the diagnosis was accurate, and if not, to determine the cause of diagnostic misattribution. All patients seen at a sleep centre from 2007-2013 (n = 551) who underwent detailed objective testing including an MSLT PSG, as well as wearing an actigraphy watch and completing a sleep diary for 2 weeks, were assessed for a pre-referral and final diagnosis of narcolepsy. Of the 41 directly referred patients with a diagnostic label of narcolepsy, 19 (46 %) were subsequently confirmed to have narcolepsy on objective testing and assessment by a sleep physician using ICSD-2 criteria. The diagnosis of narcolepsy was incorrectly attributed to almost 50 % of patients labelled with a diagnosis of narcolepsy who were referred for further opinion by a variety of specialists and generalists. Accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy is critical for many reasons, such as the impact it has on quality of life, driving, employment, insurance and pregnancy in women as well as medication management.

  9. [NARCOLEPSY WITH CATAPLEXY: TYPE 1 NARCOLEPSY].

    PubMed

    Dauvilliers, Yves; Lopez, Régis

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy or narcolepsy type 1 in a rare, disabling sleep disorder, with a prevalence of 20 to 30 per 100,000. Its onset peaks in the second decade. The main features are excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy or sudden less of muscle tone triggered by emotional situations. Other less consistent symptoms include hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, disturbed nighttime sleep, and weight gain. Narcolepsy with cataplexy remains a clinical diagnosis but nighttime and daytime polysomnography (multiple sleep latency tests) are useful to document mean sleep latency below 8 min and at least two sleep-onset REM periods. HLA typing shows an association with HLA DQB1*0602 in more than 92% of cases but was not included in the new diagnostic criteria. In contrast, a low hypocretin-1/orexin-A levels (values below 110 pg/mL) in the cerebrospinal fluid was highly specific for narcolepsy with cataplexy and was included in the recent diagnostic criteria for narcolepsy. The deficiency of the hypocretin system is well-established in human narcoleptics with a reduction of cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels in relation with an early loss of hypocretin neurons. The cause of human narcolepsy remains unknown, however an autoimmune process in most probable acting on a highly genetic background with environmental factors such as streptococcal infections, and H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine named Pandemrix.

  10. Neuroimaging of Narcolepsy and Kleine-Levin Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Bong

    2017-09-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurologic disorder with the abnormal regulation of the sleep-wake cycle, resulting in excessive daytime sleepiness, disturbed nocturnal sleep, and manifestations related to rapid eye movement sleep, such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucination. Over the past decade, numerous neuroimaging studies have been performed to characterize the pathophysiology and various clinical features of narcolepsy. This article reviews structural and functional brain imaging findings in narcolepsy and Kleine-Levin syndrome. Based on the current state of research, brain imaging is a useful tool to investigate and understand the neuroanatomic correlates and brain abnormalities of narcolepsy and other hypersomnia. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. New developments in the management of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Abad, Vivien C; Guilleminault, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a life-long, underrecognized sleep disorder that affects 0.02%-0.18% of the US and Western European populations. Genetic predisposition is suspected because of narcolepsy's strong association with HLA DQB1*06-02, and genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in T-cell receptor loci. Narcolepsy pathophysiology is linked to loss of signaling by hypocretin-producing neurons; an autoimmune etiology possibly triggered by some environmental agent may precipitate hypocretin neuronal loss. Current treatment modalities alleviate the main symptoms of excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) and cataplexy and, to a lesser extent, reduce nocturnal sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Sodium oxybate (SXB), a sodium salt of γ hydroxybutyric acid, is a first-line agent for cataplexy and EDS and may help sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Various antidepressant medications including norepinephrine serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants are second-line agents for treating cataplexy. In addition to SXB, modafinil and armodafinil are first-line agents to treat EDS. Second-line agents for EDS are stimulants such as methylphenidate and extended-release amphetamines. Emerging therapies include non-hypocretin-based therapy, hypocretin-based treatments, and immunotherapy to prevent hypocretin neuronal death. Non-hypocretin-based novel treatments for narcolepsy include pitolisant (BF2.649, tiprolisant); JZP-110 (ADX-N05) for EDS in adults; JZP 13-005 for children; JZP-386, a deuterated sodium oxybate oral suspension; FT 218 an extended-release formulation of SXB; and JNJ-17216498, a new formulation of modafinil. Clinical trials are investigating efficacy and safety of SXB, modafinil, and armodafinil in children. γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) modulation with GABA A receptor agonists clarithromycin and flumazenil may help daytime somnolence

  12. Challenges in diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy: a consensus statement.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Christian R; Mignot, Emmanuel; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Arnulf, Isabelle; Rye, David; Dauvilliers, Yves; Honda, Makoto; Owens, Judith A; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Scammell, Thomas E

    2014-06-01

    Diagnosing narcolepsy without cataplexy is often a challenge as the symptoms are nonspecific, current diagnostic tests are limited, and there are no useful biomarkers. In this report, we review the clinical and physiological aspects of narcolepsy without cataplexy, the limitations of available diagnostic procedures, and the differential diagnoses, and we propose an approach for more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. A group of clinician-scientists experienced in narcolepsy reviewed the literature and convened to discuss current diagnostic tools, and to map out directions for research that should lead to a better understanding and more accurate diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy. To aid in the identification of narcolepsy without cataplexy, we review key indicators of narcolepsy and present a diagnostic algorithm. A detailed clinical history is mainly helpful to rule out other possible causes of chronic sleepiness. The multiple sleep latency test remains the most important measure, and prior sleep deprivation, shift work, or circadian disorders should be excluded by actigraphy or sleep logs. A short REM sleep latency (≤ 15 minutes) on polysomnography can aid in the diagnosis of narcolepsy without cataplexy, although sensitivity is low. Finally, measurement of hypocretin levels can helpful, as levels are low to intermediate in 10% to 30% of narcolepsy without cataplexy patients.

  13. HYPOCRETIN/OREXIN AND NARCOLEPSY NEW BASIC AND CLINICAL INSIGHTS

    PubMed Central

    NISHINO, Seiji; OKURO, Masashi; KOTORII, Nozomu; ANEGAWA, Emiko; ISHIMARU, Yuji; MATSUMURA, Mari; KANBAYASHI, Takashi

    2009-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Both sporadic (95%) and familial (5%) forms of narcolepsy exist in humans. The major pathophysiology of human narcolepsy has been recently discovered based on the discovery of narcolepsy genes in animals; the genes involved in the pathology of the hypocretin/orexin ligand and its receptor. Mutations in hypocretin-related genes are rare in humans, but hypocretin-ligand deficiency is found in a large majority of narcolepsy with cataplexy. Hypocretin ligand deficiency in human narcolepsy is likely due to the postnatal cell death of hypocretin neurons. Although tight association between human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association and human narcolepsy with cataplexy suggests an involvement of autoimmune mechanisms, this has not yet been proven. Hypocretin deficiency is also found in symptomatic cases of narcolepsy and EDS with various neurological conditions, including immune-mediated neurological disorders, such as Guillain-Barre syndrome, MA2-positive paraneoplastic syndrome and neuromyelitis optica (NMO) related disorder. These findings likely have significant clinical relevance and for understanding the mechanisms of hypocretin cell death and choice of treatment option. These series of discoveries in humans lead to the establishment of the new diagnostic test of narcolepsy (i.e. low cerebrospinal fluid [CSF] hypocretin-1 levels for narcolepsy with cataplexy and narcolepsy due to medical condition). Since a large majority of human narcolepsy patients are ligand deficient, hypocretin replacement therapy may be a promising new therapeutic option, and animal experiments using gene therapy and cell transplantations are in progress. PMID:19555382

  14. The European Narcolepsy Network (EU-NN) database.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ramin; Luca, Gianina; Baumann, Christian R; Bassetti, Claudio L; Bruni, Oliviero; Canellas, Francesca; Dauvilliers, Yves; Del Rio-Villegas, Rafael; Feketeova, Eva; Ferri, Raffaele; Geisler, Peter; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Kornum, Birgitte R; Lecendreux, Michel; Martins-da-Silva, Antonio; Mathis, Johannes; Mayer, Geert; Paiva, Teresa; Partinen, Markku; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Plazzi, Guiseppe; Santamaria, Joan; Sonka, Karel; Riha, Renata; Tafti, Mehdi; Wierzbicka, Aleksandra; Young, Peter; Lammers, Gert Jan; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2016-06-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare disease with an estimated prevalence of 0.02% in European populations. Narcolepsy shares many features of rare disorders, in particular the lack of awareness of the disease with serious consequences for healthcare supply. Similar to other rare diseases, only a few European countries have registered narcolepsy cases in databases of the International Classification of Diseases or in registries of the European health authorities. A promising approach to identify disease-specific adverse health effects and needs in healthcare delivery in the field of rare diseases is to establish a distributed expert network. A first and important step is to create a database that allows collection, storage and dissemination of data on narcolepsy in a comprehensive and systematic way. Here, the first prospective web-based European narcolepsy database hosted by the European Narcolepsy Network is introduced. The database structure, standardization of data acquisition and quality control procedures are described, and an overview provided of the first 1079 patients from 18 European specialized centres. Due to its standardization this continuously increasing data pool is most promising to provide a better insight into many unsolved aspects of narcolepsy and related disorders, including clear phenotype characterization of subtypes of narcolepsy, more precise epidemiological data and knowledge on the natural history of narcolepsy, expectations about treatment effects, identification of post-marketing medication side-effects, and will contribute to improve clinical trial designs and provide facilities to further develop phase III trials. © 2016 European Sleep Research Society.

  15. Narcolepsy induced by chronic heavy alcohol consumption: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xinyuan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disorder, characterized by uncontrollable excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplectic episodes, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and night time sleep disruption. The paper reviewed the related literature and reported a case of long-term drinking induced narcolepsy which was significantly improved after treatment with paroxetine and dexzopiclone. PMID:25328357

  16. The Humanistic and Economic Burden of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Natalia M.; Villa, Kathleen F.; Black, Jed; Chervin, Ronald D.; Witt, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the burden of narcolepsy--with respect to psychiatric comorbidities, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), direct costs for healthcare resource utilization, and indirect costs for reported work loss–through comparison of patients to matched controls. Methods: This analysis was conducted on data from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS; 2011 NHWS n = 75,000, 2012 NHWS n = 71,157, and 2013 NHWS n = 75,000). Patients who reported a narcolepsy diagnosis (n = 437) were matched 1:2 with controls (n = 874) on age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, household income, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, exercise, and physical comorbidity. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to assess whether the narcolepsy and control groups differed on psychiatric comorbidities, HRQoL, labor force participation, work productivity, and healthcare resource utilization. Results: Patients with narcolepsy, in comparison to matched controls, reported substantially (two to four times) greater psychiatric comorbidity, HRQoL impairment, prevalence of long-term disability, absenteeism, and presenteeism, and greater resource use in the past 6 mo as indicated by higher mean number of hospitalizations, emergency department visits, traditional healthcare professional visits, neurologist visits, and psychiatrist visits (each p < 0.05). Conclusions: These population-based data suggest that a narcolepsy diagnosis is associated with substantial adverse impact on mental health, HRQoL, and key economic burdens that include work impairment, resource use, and both direct and indirect costs. Although this study is cross-sectional, the results highlight the magnitude of the potential opportunity to improve mental health, lower costs, and augment work-related productivity through effective assessment and treatment of narcolepsy. Citation: Flores NM, Villa KF, Black J, Chervin RD, Witt EA. The

  17. Narcolepsy and disorders of excessive somnolence.

    PubMed

    Dyken, Mark E; Yamada, Thoru

    2005-06-01

    Recent studies provide valid criteria that help differentiate idiopathic narcolepsy from other disorders of excessive daytime somnolence [3]. Research to date suggests that idiopathic narcolepsy might properly be considered a disorder of excessive sleepiness with dysfunctional REM-sleep mechanisms, clinically evidenced as cataplexy and electrophysiologically recognized as SOREMPs. Given these criteria, a diagnosis can generally be made using a combination of history, PSG, and MSLT. Traditionally, the medical treatment of idiopathic narcolepsy has centered on a two-drug regimen (stimulants for sleepiness and TCAs for cataplexy and auxiliary symptoms). Some newer medications are proving efficacious for sleepiness with minimal adverse effects, whereas others may provide a single-drug regimen that simultaneously addresses sleepiness and cataplexy [18]. New research has allowed some experts to hypothesize that idiopathic narcolepsy may be the result of a genetic predisposition to autoimmune disease [176]. It is possible that aberrant genetic coding of elements in the hypocretin/orexin systems allows a sensitivity to inducible and possibly virally mediated changes, which leave cells in the lateral hypothalamus susceptible to autoimmune attack [96]. As such, genetic screening of high-risk individuals might eventually rationalize the prophylactic use of immunosuppressants in some instances. In the future, for atypical cases(poorly responsive to therapy), genetic, CSF, and brain imaging studies, and possibly even neuronal transplantation may prove beneficial in the assessment and treatment of idiopathic narcolepsy.

  18. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases

    PubMed Central

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Methods and Results: Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Conclusions: Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. Citation: Baiardi S, Vandi S, Pizza F, Alvisi L, Toscani L, Zambrelli E, Tinuper P, Mayer G, Plazzi G. Narcolepsy type 1 and

  19. Reward-Seeking Behavior in Human Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrova, Alexandra; Fronczek, Rolf; Van der Ploeg, Janneke; Scammell, Thomas; Gautam, Shiva; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; Lammers, Gert Jan

    2011-01-01

    were higher in all narcoleptic subjects. However, using the current methods, no evidence could be found to support the hypothesis that hypocretin deficiency would affect reward-processing in humans. Citation: Dimitrova A; Fronczek R; Van der Ploeg J; Scammell T; Gautam S; Pascual-Leone A; Lammers GJ. Reward-seeking behavior in human narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2011;7(3):293-300. PMID:21677900

  20. Disorders of Excessive Daytime Sleepiness Including Narcolepsy and Idiopathic Hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Berkowski, Joseph Andrew; Shelgikar, Anita Valanju

    2016-09-01

    Central disorders of hypersomnolence are rare conditions with a poorly understood pathophysiology, making the identification and management challenging for sleep clinicians. Clinical history is essential for ruling out secondary causes of hypersomnolence and distinguishing among diagnoses. Current diagnostic criteria rely heavily on the polysomnogram and multiple sleep latency test. The current focus of treatment of hypersomnolence is on drugs that promote alertness. Additionally, in the case of narcolepsy type 1, medication management addresses control of cataplexy, the hallmark symptom of this disorder. Elucidation of pathophysiology of these disorders in the future will be essential to better categorization and management. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Pharmacological management of narcolepsy with and without cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Kallweit, Ulf; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2017-06-01

    Narcolepsy is an orphan neurological disease and presents with sleep-wake, motoric, neuropsychiatric and metabolic symptoms. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is most commonly caused by an immune-mediated process including genetic and environmental factors, resulting in the selective loss of hypocretin-producing neurons. Narcolepsy has a major impact on workableness and quality of life. Areas covered: This review provides an overview of the temporal available treatment options for narcolepsy (type 1 and 2) in adults, including authorization status by regulatory agencies. First- and second-line options are discussed as well as combination therapies. In addition, treatment options for frequent coexisting co-morbidities and different phenotypes of narcolepsy are presented. Finally, this review considers potential future management strategies. Non-pharmacological approaches are important in the management of narcolepsy but will not be covered in this review. Expert opinion: Concise evaluation of symptoms and type of narcolepsy, coexisting co-morbidities and patients´ distinct needs is mandatory in order to identify a suitable, individual pharmacological treatment. First-line options include Modafinil/Armodafinil (for excessive daytime sleepiness, EDS), Sodium Oxybate (for EDS and/with cataplexy), Pitolisant (for EDS and cataplexy) and Venlafaxine (for cataplexy (off-label) and co-morbid depression). New symptomatic and causal treatment most probably will be completed by hypocretin-replacement and immune-modifying strategies.

  2. New developments in the management of narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Vivien C; Guilleminault, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a life-long, underrecognized sleep disorder that affects 0.02%–0.18% of the US and Western European populations. Genetic predisposition is suspected because of narcolepsy’s strong association with HLA DQB1*06-02, and genome-wide association studies have identified polymorphisms in T-cell receptor loci. Narcolepsy pathophysiology is linked to loss of signaling by hypocretin-producing neurons; an autoimmune etiology possibly triggered by some environmental agent may precipitate hypocretin neuronal loss. Current treatment modalities alleviate the main symptoms of excessive daytime somnolence (EDS) and cataplexy and, to a lesser extent, reduce nocturnal sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Sodium oxybate (SXB), a sodium salt of γ hydroxybutyric acid, is a first-line agent for cataplexy and EDS and may help sleep disruption, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Various antidepressant medications including norepinephrine serotonin reuptake inhibitors, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, and tricyclic antidepressants are second-line agents for treating cataplexy. In addition to SXB, modafinil and armodafinil are first-line agents to treat EDS. Second-line agents for EDS are stimulants such as methylphenidate and extended-release amphetamines. Emerging therapies include non-hypocretin-based therapy, hypocretin-based treatments, and immunotherapy to prevent hypocretin neuronal death. Non-hypocretin-based novel treatments for narcolepsy include pitolisant (BF2.649, tiprolisant); JZP-110 (ADX-N05) for EDS in adults; JZP 13-005 for children; JZP-386, a deuterated sodium oxybate oral suspension; FT 218 an extended-release formulation of SXB; and JNJ-17216498, a new formulation of modafinil. Clinical trials are investigating efficacy and safety of SXB, modafinil, and armodafinil in children. γ-amino butyric acid (GABA) modulation with GABAA receptor agonists clarithromycin and flumazenil may help daytime somnolence

  3. Facial expression recognition and emotional regulation in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Bayard, Sophie; Croisier Langenier, Muriel; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2013-04-01

    Cataplexy is pathognomonic of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and defined by a transient loss of muscle tone triggered by strong emotions. Recent researches suggest abnormal amygdala function in narcolepsy with cataplexy. Emotion treatment and emotional regulation strategies are complex functions involving cortical and limbic structures, like the amygdala. As the amygdala has been shown to play a role in facial emotion recognition, we tested the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy would have impaired recognition of facial emotional expressions compared with patients affected with central hypersomnia without cataplexy and healthy controls. We also aimed to determine whether cataplexy modulates emotional regulation strategies. Emotional intensity, arousal and valence ratings on Ekman faces displaying happiness, surprise, fear, anger, disgust, sadness and neutral expressions of 21 drug-free patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy were compared with 23 drug-free sex-, age- and intellectual level-matched adult patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy and 21 healthy controls. All participants underwent polysomnography recording and multiple sleep latency tests, and completed depression, anxiety and emotional regulation questionnaires. Performance of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from patients with hypersomnia without cataplexy or healthy controls on both intensity rating of each emotion on its prototypical label and mean ratings for valence and arousal. Moreover, patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy did not use different emotional regulation strategies. The level of depressive and anxious symptoms in narcolepsy with cataplexy did not differ from the other groups. Our results demonstrate that narcolepsy with cataplexy accurately perceives and discriminates facial emotions, and regulates emotions normally. The absence of alteration of perceived affective valence remains a major clinical interest in narcolepsy with cataplexy

  4. Narcolepsy in African Americans.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Makoto; O'Hara, Ruth; Einen, Mali; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Although narcolepsy affects 0.02-0.05% of individuals in various ethnic groups, clinical presentation in different ethnicities has never been fully characterized. Our goal was to study phenotypic expression across ethnicities in the United States. Cases of narcolepsy from 1992 to 2013 were identified from searches of the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Research database. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition diagnosis criteria for type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy were used for inclusion, but subjects were separated as with and without cataplexy for the purpose of data presentation. Information extracted included demographics, ethnicity and clinical data, HLA-DQB1*06:02, polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) data, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 level. 182 African-Americans, 839 Caucasians, 35 Asians, and 41 Latinos with narcolepsy. Sex ratio, PSG, and MSLT findings did not differ across ethnicities. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was higher and age of onset of sleepiness earlier in African Americans compared with other ethnicities. HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity was higher in African Americans (91.0%) versus others (76.6% in Caucasians, 80.0% in Asians, and 65.0% in Latinos). CSF hypocretin-1 level, obtained in 222 patients, was more frequently low (≤ 110 pg/ml) in African Americans (93.9%) versus Caucasians (61.5%), Asians (85.7%) and Latinos (75.0%). In subjects with low CSF hypocretin-1, African Americans (28.3%) were 4.5 fold more likely to be without cataplexy when compared with Caucasians (8.1%). Narcolepsy in African Americans is characterized by earlier symptom onset, higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, higher HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity, and low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 level in the absence of cataplexy. In African Americans, more subjects without cataplexy have type 1 narcolepsy. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  5. The Humanistic and Economic Burden of Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Flores, Natalia M; Villa, Kathleen F; Black, Jed; Chervin, Ronald D; Witt, Edward A

    2016-03-01

    To evaluate the burden of narcolepsy--with respect to psychiatric comorbidities, Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL), direct costs for healthcare resource utilization, and indirect costs for reported work loss-through comparison of patients to matched controls. This analysis was conducted on data from the 2011, 2012, and 2013 US National Health and Wellness Survey (NHWS; 2011 NHWS n = 75,000, 2012 NHWS n = 71,157, and 2013 NHWS n = 75,000). Patients who reported a narcolepsy diagnosis (n = 437) were matched 1:2 with controls (n = 874) on age, sex, race/ethnicity, marital status, education, household income, body mass index, smoking status, alcohol use, exercise, and physical comorbidity. Chi-square tests and one-way analyses of variance were used to assess whether the narcolepsy and control groups differed on psychiatric comorbidities, HRQoL, labor force participation, work productivity, and healthcare resource utilization. Patients with narcolepsy, in comparison to matched controls, reported substantially (two to four times) greater psychiatric comorbidity, HRQoL impairment, prevalence of long-term disability, absenteeism, and presenteeism, and greater resource use in the past 6 mo as indicated by higher mean number of hospitalizations, emergency department visits, traditional healthcare professional visits, neurologist visits, and psychiatrist visits (each p < 0.05). These population-based data suggest that a narcolepsy diagnosis is associated with substantial adverse impact on mental health, HRQoL, and key economic burdens that include work impairment, resource use, and both direct and indirect costs. Although this study is cross-sectional, the results highlight the magnitude of the potential opportunity to improve mental health, lower costs, and augment work-related productivity through effective assessment and treatment of narcolepsy. © 2016 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Lucid dreaming in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Dodet, Pauline; Chavez, Mario; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2015-03-01

    To evaluate the frequency, determinants and sleep characteristics of lucid dreaming in narcolepsy. University hospital sleep disorder unit. Case-control study. Consecutive patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls. Participants were interviewed regarding the frequency and determinants of lucid dreaming. Twelve narcolepsy patients and 5 controls who self-identified as frequent lucid dreamers underwent nighttime and daytime sleep monitoring after being given instructions regarding how to give an eye signal when lucid. Compared to 53 healthy controls, the 53 narcolepsy patients reported more frequent dream recall, nightmares and recurrent dreams. Lucid dreaming was achieved by 77.4% of narcoleptic patients and 49.1% of controls (P < 0.05), with an average of 7.6±11 vs. 0.3±0.8 lucid dreams/ month (P < 0.0001). The frequency of cataplexy, hallucinations, sleep paralysis, dyssomnia, HLA positivity, and the severity of sleepiness were similar in narcolepsy with and without lucid dreaming. Seven of 12 narcoleptic (and 0 non-narcoleptic) lucid dreamers achieved lucid REM sleep across a total of 33 naps, including 14 episodes with eye signal. The delta power in the electrode average, in delta, theta, and alpha powers in C4, and coherences between frontal electrodes were lower in lucid than non-lucid REM sleep in spectral EEG analysis. The duration of REM sleep was longer, the REM sleep onset latency tended to be shorter, and the percentage of atonia tended to be higher in lucid vs. non-lucid REM sleep; the arousal index and REM density and amplitude were unchanged. Narcolepsy is a novel, easy model for studying lucid dreaming. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  7. Lucid Dreaming in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Dodet, Pauline; Chavez, Mario; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the frequency, determinants and sleep characteristics of lucid dreaming in narcolepsy Settings: University hospital sleep disorder unit Design: Case-control study Participants: Consecutive patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls Methods: Participants were interviewed regarding the frequency and determinants of lucid dreaming. Twelve narcolepsy patients and 5 controls who self-identified as frequent lucid dreamers underwent nighttime and daytime sleep monitoring after being given instructions regarding how to give an eye signal when lucid. Results: Compared to 53 healthy controls, the 53 narcolepsy patients reported more frequent dream recall, nightmares and recurrent dreams. Lucid dreaming was achieved by 77.4% of narcoleptic patients and 49.1% of controls (P < 0.05), with an average of 7.6 ± 11 vs. 0.3 ± 0.8 lucid dreams/month (P < 0.0001). The frequency of cataplexy, hallucinations, sleep paralysis, dyssomnia, HLA positivity, and the severity of sleepiness were similar in narcolepsy with and without lucid dreaming. Seven of 12 narcoleptic (and 0 non-narcoleptic) lucid dreamers achieved lucid REM sleep across a total of 33 naps, including 14 episodes with eye signal. The delta power in the electrode average, in delta, theta, and alpha powers in C4, and coherences between frontal electrodes were lower in lucid than non-lucid REM sleep in spectral EEG analysis. The duration of REM sleep was longer, the REM sleep onset latency tended to be shorter, and the percentage of atonia tended to be higher in lucid vs. non-lucid REM sleep; the arousal index and REM density and amplitude were unchanged. Conclusion: Narcoleptics have a high propensity for lucid dreaming without differing in REM sleep characteristics from people without narcolepsy. This suggests narcolepsy patients may provide useful information in future studies on the nature of lucid dreaming. Citation: Dodet P, Chavez M, Leu-Semenescu S, Golmard JL, Arnulf I. Lucid dreaming in

  8. Narcolepsy in African Americans

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Makoto; O'Hara, Ruth; Einen, Mali; Lin, Ling; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Although narcolepsy affects 0.02–0.05% of individuals in various ethnic groups, clinical presentation in different ethnicities has never been fully characterized. Our goal was to study phenotypic expression across ethnicities in the United States. Design/Setting: Cases of narcolepsy from 1992 to 2013 were identified from searches of the Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Research database. International Classification of Sleep Disorders, Third Edition diagnosis criteria for type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy were used for inclusion, but subjects were separated as with and without cataplexy for the purpose of data presentation. Information extracted included demographics, ethnicity and clinical data, HLA-DQB1*06:02, polysomnography (PSG), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) data, and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1 level. Patients: 182 African-Americans, 839 Caucasians, 35 Asians, and 41 Latinos with narcolepsy. Results: Sex ratio, PSG, and MSLT findings did not differ across ethnicities. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) score was higher and age of onset of sleepiness earlier in African Americans compared with other ethnicities. HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity was higher in African Americans (91.0%) versus others (76.6% in Caucasians, 80.0% in Asians, and 65.0% in Latinos). CSF hypocretin-1 level, obtained in 222 patients, was more frequently low (≤ 110 pg/ml) in African Americans (93.9%) versus Caucasians (61.5%), Asians (85.7%) and Latinos (75.0%). In subjects with low CSF hypocretin-1, African Americans (28.3%) were 4.5 fold more likely to be without cataplexy when compared with Caucasians (8.1%). Conclusions: Narcolepsy in African Americans is characterized by earlier symptom onset, higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score, higher HLA-DQB1*06:02 positivity, and low cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 level in the absence of cataplexy. In African Americans, more subjects without cataplexy have type 1 narcolepsy. Citation: Kawai M, O'Hara R, Einen M, Lin L

  9. Degenerative pontine lesions in patients with familial narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Stepień, Adam; Staszewski, Jacek; Domzał, Teofan M; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Skrobowska, Ewa; Durka-Kesy, Marta

    2010-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by chronic excessive daytime sleepiness with episodic sleep attacks. There are several associated symptoms of narcolepsy: cataplexy (bilateral muscle weakness without loss of consciousness provoked by an emotional trigger, e.g. laughter), sleep paralysis and hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations. Most cases are sporadic; familial narcolepsy contributes to only 1-5% of all cases. While most cases of narcolepsy are idiopathic and are not associated with clinical or radiographic evidence of brain pathology, symptomatic or secondary narcolepsy may occur occasionally in association with lesions caused by tumours, demyelination or strokes of the diencephalon, midbrain, and pons. There are some examples of non-specific brainstem lesions found in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with idiopathic narcolepsy. The authors present eleven patients from a five-generation family with many members who suffer from episodic excessive daytime sleepiness. Narcolepsy was diagnosed in 9 patients. Sleepiness was frequently associated with cataplexy, hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Improvement in their clinical state was observed during the treatment with modafinil. All probands had MRI of the brain, routine blood tests, EEG, polysomnography, examination of the level of hypocretin in cerebrospinal fluid and evaluation by means of Epworth and Stanford Sleepiness Scales. In 9 patients with narcolepsy, decreased thickness of the substantia nigra was found and in six of them degenerative lesions in the pontine substantia nigra were also noticed. The significance of these changes remains unclear. No data have been published until now concerning the presence of any brain lesions in patients with familial narcolepsy.

  10. Narcolepsy and the hypocretins.

    PubMed

    Wurtman, Richard J

    2006-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurologic disease characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and one or more of three additional symptoms (cataplexy, or sudden loss of muscle tone; vivid hallucinations; and brief periods of total paralysis) related to the occurrence of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep at inappropriate times. The daytime sleepiness typically presents as a sudden overwhelming urge to sleep, followed by periods of sleep that last for seconds or minutes, or even longer. During daytime sleep episodes, patients may exhibit "automatic behavior," performing conventionalized functions (eg, taking notes), but not remembering having done so once they are awake. About 10% of narcoleptics are members of familial clusters; however, genetic factors alone are apparently insufficient to cause the disease, inasmuch as the most common genetic disorder, a mutation in chromosome 6 controlling the HLA antigen immune complex, although seen in 90% to 100% of patients, also occurs in as many as 50% of people without narcolepsy. A dog model of narcolepsy exhibits a mutation on chromosome 12 that disrupts the processing of the peptide neurotransmitter hypocretin. No such mutation characterizes human narcolepsy; however, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin levels are profoundly depressed in narcoleptic patients, and a specific reduction in hypocretin-containing neurons has been described. One hypothesis concerning the pathophysiology of narcolepsy proposes that the HLA subtype resulting from the mutation on chromosome 6 increases the susceptibility of hypocretin-containing brain neurons to immune attack. Because hypocretin may normally participate in the maintenance of wakefulness, the loss of neurons that release this peptide might allow REM sleep to occur at inappropriate times, ie, while the patient is awake, in contrast to its normal cyclic appearance after a period of slow-wave sleep. The cataplexy, hallucinations, and/or paralysis associated with REM episodes normally are

  11. Anesthetic Management of Narcolepsy Patients During Surgery: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Hu, Sally; Singh, Mandeep; Wong, Jean; Auckley, Dennis; Hershner, Shelley; Kakkar, Rahul; Thorpy, Michael J; Chung, Frances

    2018-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep paralysis, and/or hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, and in some cases cataplexy. The response to anesthetic medications and possible interactions in narcolepsy patients is unclear in the perioperative period. In this systematic review, we aim to evaluate the current evidence on the perioperative outcomes and anesthetic considerations in narcolepsy patients. Electronic literature search of Medline, Medline in-process, Embase, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews databases, international conference proceedings, and abstracts was conducted in November 2015 according to the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis Protocols guideline. A total of 3757 articles were screened using a 2-stage strategy (title-abstract followed by full text). We included case studies/series, cohort studies, and randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy patients undergoing surgical procedures under anesthesia or sedation. Preoperative narcolepsy symptoms and sleep study data, anesthetic technique, and perioperative complications were extracted. Screening of articles, data extraction, and compilation were conducted by 2 independent reviewers and any conflict was resolved by the senior author. A total of 19 studies including 16 case reports and 3 case series were included and evaluated. The majority of these patients received general anesthesia, whereas a small percentage of patients received regional anesthesia. Reported complications of narcolepsy patients undergoing surgeries were mainly related to autonomic dysregulation, or worsening of narcolepsy symptoms intra/postoperatively. Narcolepsy symptoms worsened only in those patient populations where the preoperative medications were either discontinued or reduced (mainly in obstetric patients). In narcolepsy patients, use of depth of anesthesia monitoring and total intravenous technique may have some advantage in terms

  12. Narcolepsy Type 1 and Idiopathic Generalized Epilepsy: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Challenges in Dual Cases.

    PubMed

    Baiardi, Simone; Vandi, Stefano; Pizza, Fabio; Alvisi, Lara; Toscani, Lucia; Zambrelli, Elena; Tinuper, Paolo; Mayer, Geert; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-11-15

    The aim of this study is to describe the possible co-occurrence of narcolepsy type 1 and generalized epilepsy, focusing on diagnostic challenge and safety of dual treatments. Four patients with comorbidity for narcolepsy type 1 and idiopathic generalized epilepsy are reported: in three cases the onset of epilepsy preceded narcolepsy type 1 appearance, whereas in one case epileptic spells onset was subsequent. Patients presented with absences, myoclonic and tonic-clonic seizure type: in the patient with tonic-clonic seizures the dual pathology was easily recognized, in the other cases the first diagnosis caused the comorbid disease to be overlooked, independent of the time-course sequence. All four patients underwent neurological examination, video-electroencephalogram during which ictal and interictal epileptic discharges were recorded, and sleep polysomnographic studies. Repeated sleep onset rapid eye movement periods (SOREMPs) were documented with the multiple sleep latency test (MLST) in all the four cases. All patients had unremarkable brain magnetic resonance imaging studies and cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 was assessed in two patients, revealing undetectable levels. The association of antiepileptic drugs and substances currently used to treat narcolepsy type 1, including sodium oxybate, was effective in improving seizures, sleep disturbance, and cataplexy. Narcolepsy type 1 may occur in association with idiopathic generalized epilepsy, leading to remarkable diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Electrophysiological studies as well as a comprehensive somnologic interview can help confirm the diagnosis in patients with ambiguous neurological history. Sodium oxybate in combination with antiepileptic drugs is safe and effective in treating cataplexy and excessive daytime sleepiness. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  13. A Global View on Narcolepsy - A Review Study.

    PubMed

    Klimova, Blanka; Maresova, Petra; Novotny, Michal; Kuca, Kamil

    2018-02-14

    Narcolepsy is an incurable neurological disorder when the brain is not able to regulate a sleep and wakefulness cycle correctly. The affected person suddenly falls asleep during the day or he/she suffers from excessive day sleepiness. In addition, people may also suffer from cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and disturbed nighttime sleep. The purpose of this review study is to provide the latest information on both clinical and socioeconomic issues in the field of narcolepsy treatment and emphasize its benefits and limitations. The methodological approaches include a method of literature review of available sources exploring the issue of narcolepsy, both from a global and specific perspective point of view. On the basis of evaluation of these literature sources, the researched issue is examined. The main benefits (e.g., new drugs are being tested or non-invasive cognitive behavioral therapies are being applied) and limitations (e.g., late diagnosis of the disease or lifelong and costly treatment) of the treatment of narcolepsy are highlighted. The findings call for more research in the field of the development of novel drugs reflecting understanding of the neurological basis of narcolepsy and early diagnosis in order to eliminate the symptoms of narcolepsy and prevent the development of this disease. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  14. Allergies and Disease Severity in Childhood Narcolepsy: Preliminary Findings.

    PubMed

    Aydinoz, Secil; Huang, Yu-Shu; Gozal, David; Inocente, Clara O; Franco, Patricia; Kheirandish-Gozal, Leila

    2015-12-01

    Narcolepsy frequently begins in childhood, and is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, with the presence of cataplexy reflecting a more severe phenotype. Narcolepsy may result from genetic predisposition involving deregulation of immune pathways, particularly involving T helper 2 cells (Th2). Increased activation of Th2 cells is usually manifested as allergic conditions such as rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma. We hypothesized that the presence of allergic conditions indicative of increased Th2 balance may dampen the severity of the phenotype in children with narcolepsy. A retrospective chart review of childhood narcolepsy patients was conducted at three major pediatric sleep centers. Patients were divided into those with narcolepsy without cataplexy (NC-) and narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC+). Demographics, polysomnographic and multiple sleep latency test data, and extraction of information on the presence of allergic diseases such allergic rhinitis, atopic dermatitis, and asthma was performed. There were 468 children identified, with 193 children in NC- group and 275 patients in the NC+ group. Overall, NC+ children were significantly younger, had higher body mass index, and had shorter mean sleep latencies and increased sleep onset rapid eye movement events. The frequency of allergic conditions, particularly asthma and allergic rhinitis, was markedly lower in NC+ (58/275) compared to NC- patients (94/193; P < 0.0001). Involvement of the immune system plays an important role in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy. Current findings further suggest that an increased shift toward T helper 2 cells, as indicated by the presence of allergic conditions, may modulate the severity of the phenotype in childhood narcolepsy, and reduce the prevalence of cataplexy in these patients. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  15. Mastocytosis: current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Worobec, Alexandra S; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2002-02-01

    An explosion of research on mastocytosis in the last decade has witnessed a greater understanding of the molecular basis of this heterogeneous group of disorders and the conclusion that similar disease phenotypes may indeed be the result of different underlying genotypes. Along with our growing knowledge base of mastocytosis, newer approaches of treating these disorders are becoming available, all under investigational use at this time. This short review highlights the state of the art of current treatment strategies for the different categories of mastocytosis. The future will undoubtedly witness an even greater array of therapeutic options, as we continue to learn more about this enigmatic disease. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  16. Clinical and practical considerations in the pharmacologic management of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Thorpy, Michael J; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Despite published treatment recommendations and the availability of approved and off-label pharmacologic therapies for narcolepsy, the clinical management of this incurable, chronic neurologic disorder remains challenging. While treatment is generally symptomatically driven, decisions regarding which drug(s) to use need to take into account a variety of factors that may affect adherence, efficacy, and tolerability. Type 1 narcolepsy (predominantly excessive daytime sleepiness with cataplexy) or type 2 narcolepsy (excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy) may drive treatment decisions, with consideration given either to a single drug that targets multiple symptoms or to multiple drugs that each treat a specific symptom. Other drug-related characteristics that affect drug choice are dosing regimens, tolerability, and potential drug-drug interactions. Additionally, the patient should be an active participant in treatment decisions, and the main symptomatic complaints, treatment goals, psychosocial setting, and use of lifestyle substances (ie, alcohol, nicotine, caffeine, and cannabis) need to be discussed with respect to treatment decisions. Although there is a lack of narcolepsy-specific instruments for monitoring therapeutic effects, clinically relevant subjective and objective measures of daytime sleepiness (eg, Epworth Sleepiness Scale and Maintenance of Wakefulness Test) can be used to provide guidance on whether treatment goals are being met. These considerations are discussed with the objective of providing clinically relevant recommendations for making treatment decisions that can enhance the effective management of patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Psychosis in Patients with Narcolepsy as an Adverse Effect of Sodium Oxybate

    PubMed Central

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Niemelä, Valter; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Partinen, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Aim: Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are characteristic symptoms of narcolepsy, as are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and sleep paralysis. Narcolepsy patients may also experience daytime hallucinations unrelated to sleep–wake transitions. The effect of medication on hallucinations is of interest since treatment of narcolepsy may provoke psychotic symptoms. We aim to analyze the relation between sodium oxybate (SXB) treatment and psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy patients. Furthermore, we analyze the characteristics of hallucinations to determine their nature as mainly psychotic or hypnagogic and raise a discussion about whether SXB causes psychosis or if psychosis occurs as an endogenous complication in narcolepsy. Method: We present altogether four patients with narcolepsy who experienced psychotic symptoms during treatment with SXB. In addition, we searched the literature for descriptions of hallucinations in narcolepsy and similarities and differences with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Results: Three out of four patients had hallucinations typical for psychosis and one had symptoms that resembled aggravated hypnagogic hallucinations. Two patients also had delusional symptoms primarily associated with mental disorders. Tapering down SXB was tried and helped in two out of four cases. Adding antipsychotic treatment (risperidone) alleviated psychotic symptoms in two cases. Conclusion: Psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy may appear during SXB treatment. Hallucinations resemble those seen in schizophrenia; however, the insight that symptoms are delusional is usually preserved. In case of SXB-induced psychotic symptoms or hallucinations, reducing SXB dose or adding antipsychotic medication can be tried. PMID:25191304

  18. Psychosis in patients with narcolepsy as an adverse effect of sodium oxybate.

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi; Niemelä, Valter; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Partinen, Markku

    2014-01-01

    Hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations are characteristic symptoms of narcolepsy, as are excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and sleep paralysis. Narcolepsy patients may also experience daytime hallucinations unrelated to sleep-wake transitions. The effect of medication on hallucinations is of interest since treatment of narcolepsy may provoke psychotic symptoms. We aim to analyze the relation between sodium oxybate (SXB) treatment and psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy patients. Furthermore, we analyze the characteristics of hallucinations to determine their nature as mainly psychotic or hypnagogic and raise a discussion about whether SXB causes psychosis or if psychosis occurs as an endogenous complication in narcolepsy. We present altogether four patients with narcolepsy who experienced psychotic symptoms during treatment with SXB. In addition, we searched the literature for descriptions of hallucinations in narcolepsy and similarities and differences with psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. Three out of four patients had hallucinations typical for psychosis and one had symptoms that resembled aggravated hypnagogic hallucinations. Two patients also had delusional symptoms primarily associated with mental disorders. Tapering down SXB was tried and helped in two out of four cases. Adding antipsychotic treatment (risperidone) alleviated psychotic symptoms in two cases. Psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy may appear during SXB treatment. Hallucinations resemble those seen in schizophrenia; however, the insight that symptoms are delusional is usually preserved. In case of SXB-induced psychotic symptoms or hallucinations, reducing SXB dose or adding antipsychotic medication can be tried.

  19. Current Treatments of Bruxism.

    PubMed

    Guaita, Marc; Högl, Birgit

    2016-02-01

    Despite numerous case reports, the evidence for treatment of bruxism is still low. Different treatment modalities (behavioral techniques, intraoral devices, medications, and contingent electrical stimulation) have been applied. A clinical evaluation is needed to differentiate between awake bruxism and sleep bruxism and rule out any medical disorder or medication that could be behind its appearance (secondary bruxism). A polysomnography is required only in a few cases of sleep bruxism, mostly when sleep comorbidities are present. Counselling with regard to sleep hygiene, sleep habit modification, and relaxation techniques has been suggested as the first step in the therapeutic intervention, and is generally considered not harmful, despite low evidence of any efficacy. Occlusal splints are successful in the prevention of dental damage and grinding sounds associated with sleep bruxism, but their effects on reducing bruxism electromyographic (EMG) events are transient. In patients with psychiatric and sleep comorbidities, the acute use of clonazepam at night has been reported to improve sleep bruxism, but in the absence of double-blind randomized trials, its use in general clinical practice cannot be recommended. Severe secondary bruxism interfering with speaking, chewing, or swallowing has been reported in patients with neurological disorders such as in cranial dystonia; in these patients, injections of botulinum toxin in the masticatory muscles may decrease bruxism for up to 1-5 months and improve pain and mandibular functions. Long-term studies in larger and better specified samples of patients with bruxism, comparing the effects of different therapeutic modalities on bruxism EMG activity, progression of dental wear, and orofacial pain are current gaps of knowledge and preclude the development of severity-based treatment guidelines.

  20. Quality Measures for the Care of Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Krahn, Lois E.; Hershner, Shelley; Loeding, Lauren D.; Maski, Kiran P.; Rifkin, Daniel I.; Selim, Bernardo; Watson, Nathaniel F.

    2015-01-01

    The American Academy of Sleep Medicine (AASM) commissioned a Workgroup to develop quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. Following a comprehensive literature search, 306 publications were found addressing quality care or measures. Strength of association was graded between proposed process measures and desired outcomes. Following the AASM process for quality measure development, we identified three outcomes (including one outcome measure) and seven process measures. The first desired outcome was to reduce excessive daytime sleepiness by employing two process measures: quantifying sleepiness and initiating treatment. The second outcome was to improve the accuracy of diagnosis by employing the two process measures: completing both a comprehensive sleep history and an objective sleep assessment. The third outcome was to reduce adverse events through three steps: ensuring treatment follow-up, documenting medical comorbidities, and documenting safety measures counseling. All narcolepsy measures described in this report were developed by the Narcolepsy Quality Measures Work-group and approved by the AASM Quality Measures Task Force and the AASM Board of Directors. The AASM recommends the use of these measures as part of quality improvement programs that will enhance the ability to improve care for patients with narcolepsy. Citation: Krahn LE, Hershner S, Loeding LD, Maski KP, Rifkin DI, Selim B, Watson NF. Quality measures for the care of patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(3):335–355. PMID:25700880

  1. Misleading hallucinations in unrecognized narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Szucs, A; Janszky, J; Holló, A; Migléczi, G; Halász, P

    2003-10-01

    To describe psychosis-like hallucinatory states in unrecognized narcolepsy. Two patients with hypnagogic/hypnapompic hallucinations are presented. Both patients had realistic and complex - multi-modal and scenic-daytime sexual hallucinations leading, in the first case, to a legal procedure because of false accusation, and in the second, to serious workplace conflicts. Both patients were convinced of the reality of their hallucinatory experiences but later both were able to recognize their hallucinatory character. Clinical data, a multiple sleep latency test, polysomnography, and HLA typing revealed that both patients suffered from narcolepsy. We suggest that in unrecognized narcolepsy with daytime hypnagogic/hypnapompic hallucinations the diagnostic procedure may mistakenly incline towards delusional psychoses. Daytime realistic hypnagogic/hypnapompic hallucinations may also have forensic consequences and mislead legal evaluation. Useful clinical features in differentiating narcolepsy from psychoses are: the presence of other narcoleptic symptoms, features of hallucinations, and response to adequate medication.

  2. Central Disorders of Hypersomnolence: Focus on the Narcolepsies and Idiopathic Hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Zeeshan; Trotti, Lynn Marie

    2015-07-01

    The central disorders of hypersomnolence are characterized by severe daytime sleepiness, which is present despite normal quality and timing of nocturnal sleep. Recent reclassification distinguishes three main subtypes: narcolepsy type 1, narcolepsy type 2, and idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), which are the focus of this review. Narcolepsy type 1 results from loss of hypothalamic hypocretin neurons, while the pathophysiology underlying narcolepsy type 2 and IH remains to be fully elucidated. Treatment of all three disorders focuses on the management of sleepiness, with additional treatment of cataplexy in those patients with narcolepsy type 1. Sleepiness can be treated with modafinil/armodafinil or sympathomimetic CNS stimulants, which have been shown to be beneficial in randomized controlled trials of narcolepsy and, quite recently, IH. In those patients with narcolepsy type 1, sodium oxybate is effective for the treatment of both sleepiness and cataplexy. Despite these treatments, there remains a subset of hypersomnolent patients with persistent sleepiness, in whom alternate therapies are needed. Emerging treatments for sleepiness include histamine H3 antagonists (eg, pitolisant) and possibly negative allosteric modulators of the gamma-aminobutyric acid-A receptor (eg, clarithromycin and flumazenil).

  3. Incidence of Narcolepsy in Germany.

    PubMed

    Oberle, Doris; Drechsel-Bäuerle, Ursula; Schmidtmann, Irene; Mayer, Geert; Keller-Stanislawski, Brigitte

    2015-10-01

    Following the 2009 pandemic, reports of an association between an AS03 adjuvanted H1N1 pandemic influenza vaccine and narcolepsy were published. Besides determining background incidence rates for narcolepsy in Germany this study aimed at investigating whether there was a change in incidence rates of narcolepsy between the pre-pandemic, pandemic, and the post-pandemic period on the population level. Retrospective epidemiological study on the incidence of narcolepsy with additional capture-recapture analysis. German sleep centers. Eligible were patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy (ICD10 Code G47.4) within the period from January 1, 2007 to December 31, 2011. None; observational study. A total of 342 sleep centers were invited to participate in the study. Adequate and suitable data were provided by 233 sleep centers (68.1%). A total of 1,198 patients with an initial diagnosis of narcolepsy within the observed period were included, of whom 106 (8.8%) were children and adolescents under the age of 18 years and 1,092 (91.2%) were adults. In children and adolescents, the age-standardized adjusted incidence rate significantly increased from 0.14/100,000 person-years in the pre-pandemic period to 0.50/100,000 person-years in the post-pandemic period (incidence density ratio, IDR 3.57; 95% CI 1.94-7.00). In adults, no significant change was detectable. This increase started in spring 2009. For the years 2007-2011, valid estimates for the incidence of narcolepsy in Germany were provided. In individuals under 18, the incidence rates continuously increased from spring 2009. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. [Current treatment of bacterial vaginosis].

    PubMed

    Borisov, I

    1999-01-01

    Therapeutic options for the treatment of accurately diagnosed bacterial vaginosis are reviewed on the basis of current concepts for treatment of bacterial vaginosis. The importance for screening for bacterial vaginosis is pointed out especially before intrauterine procedures and in pregnant women at risk for premature deliveries. Treatment regimens for pregnant women are discussed as well. Emphasis is given to treatment modalities for recurrent bacterial vaginosis.

  5. Dual cases of type 1 narcolepsy with schizophrenia and other psychotic disorders.

    PubMed

    Canellas, Francesca; Lin, Ling; Julià, Maria Rosa; Clemente, Antonio; Vives-Bauza, Cristofol; Ollila, Hanna M; Hong, Seung Chul; Arboleya, Susana M; Einen, Mali A; Faraco, Juliette; Fernandez-Vina, Marcelo; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-09-15

    Cases of narcolepsy in association with psychotic features have been reported but never fully characterized. These patients present diagnostic and treatment challenges and may shed new light on immune associations in schizophrenia. Our case series was gathered at two narcolepsy specialty centers over a 9-year period. A questionnaire was created to improve diagnosis of schizophrenia or another psychotic disorder in patients with narcolepsy. Pathophysiological investigations included full HLA Class I and II typing, testing for known systemic and intracellular/synaptic neuronal antibodies, recently described neuronal surface antibodies, and immunocytochemistry on brain sections to detect new antigens. Ten cases were identified, one with schizoaffective disorder, one with delusional disorder, two with schizophreniform disorder, and 6 with schizophrenia. In all cases, narcolepsy manifested first in childhood or adolescence, followed by psychotic symptoms after a variable interval. These patients had auditory hallucinations, which was the most differentiating clinical feature in comparison to narcolepsy patients without psychosis. Narcolepsy therapy may have played a role in triggering psychotic symptoms but these did not reverse with changes in narcolepsy medications. Response to antipsychotic treatment was variable. Pathophysiological studies did not reveal any known autoantibodies or unusual brain immunostaining pattern. No strong HLA association outside of HLA DQB1*06:02 was found, although increased DRB3*03 and DPA1*02:01 was notable. Narcolepsy can occur in association with schizophrenia, with significant diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. Dual cases maybe under diagnosed, as onset is unusually early, often in childhood. Narcolepsy and psychosis may share an autoimmune pathology; thus, further investigations in larger samples are warranted. © 2014 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  6. Positive Effects of Massage Therapy on a Patient with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Robyn; Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the sleep patterns of a woman with narcolepsy. Participant The 23-year-old woman’s primary symptoms included excessive daytime sleepiness and periodic leg movements (PLM), which were associated with her diagnoses of both narcolepsy and cataplexy. Intervention Five 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The patient’s sleep patterns were recorded each week before the treatment. A final measurement was recorded in the sixth week. The sleep patterns were monitored using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, which included ten visual analogue scales. Results The results of this case report included an improvement in getting to sleep by 148%, an improvement in quality of sleep by 1100%, an improvement in awake following sleep by 121%, and an improvement in behaviour following wakening by 28% using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. Conclusion This case report suggests that massage therapy had a positive effect on this patient with narcolepsy. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of massage therapy on narcolepsy and sleep patterns. PMID:23730398

  7. Positive effects of massage therapy on a patient with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Hill, Robyn; Baskwill, Amanda

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this case report was to investigate the effects of massage therapy on the sleep patterns of a woman with narcolepsy. The 23-year-old woman's primary symptoms included excessive daytime sleepiness and periodic leg movements (PLM), which were associated with her diagnoses of both narcolepsy and cataplexy. Five 45-minute massage therapy treatments were administered over a five-week period. The patient's sleep patterns were recorded each week before the treatment. A final measurement was recorded in the sixth week. The sleep patterns were monitored using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire, which included ten visual analogue scales. The results of this case report included an improvement in getting to sleep by 148%, an improvement in quality of sleep by 1100%, an improvement in awake following sleep by 121%, and an improvement in behaviour following wakening by 28% using the Leeds Sleep Evaluation Questionnaire. This case report suggests that massage therapy had a positive effect on this patient with narcolepsy. Further research is needed to investigate the effects of massage therapy on narcolepsy and sleep patterns.

  8. Comorbidity of narcolepsy and depressive disorders: a nationwide population-based study in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Jing; Lee, Sheng-Yu; Yuan, Shin-Sheng; Yang, Chun-Ju; Yang, Kang-Chung; Lee, Tung-Liang; Sun, Chi-Chin; Shyu, Yu-Chiau; Wang, Liang-Jen

    2017-11-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder that is likely to have neuropsychiatric comorbidities. Depression is a serious mood disorder that affects individuals' daily activities and functions. The current study aimed to investigate the relationship between narcolepsy and depressive disorders. The study consisted of patients diagnosed with narcolepsy between January 2002, and December 2011 (n = 258), and age-matched and gender-matched controls (n = 2580) from Taiwan's National Health Insurance database. Both the patients and the controls were monitored through December 31, 2011, to identify the occurrence of a depressive disorder. A multivariate logistic regression model was used to assess the narcolepsy's potential influence on the comorbidity of a depressive disorder. During the study period, 32.7%, 24.8%, and 10.9% of the narcoleptic patients were comorbid with any depressive disorder, dysthymic disorder, and major depressive disorder, respectively. When compared to the control subjects, the patients with narcolepsy were at greater risks of having any depressive disorder (aOR 6.77; 95% CI 4.90-9.37), dysthymic disorder (aOR 6.62; 95% CI 4.61-9.57), and major depressive disorder (aOR 6.83; 95% CI 4.06-11.48). Of the narcoleptic patients that were comorbid with depression, >50% had been diagnosed with depression prior to being diagnosed with narcolepsy. This nationwide data study revealed that narcolepsy and depression commonly co-occurred. Since some symptoms of narcolepsy overlapped with those of depressive disorders, the findings serve as a reminder that clinicians must pay attention to the comorbidity of narcolepsy and depression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Levothyroxine Improves Subjective Sleepiness in a Euthyroid Patient with Narcolepsy without Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Sobol, Danielle L.; Spector, Andrew R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: We discuss the use of levothyroxine for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and prolonged nocturnal sleep time in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy. Methods: After failure of first-line narcolepsy treatments, a 48-year-old female began levothyroxine (25 mcg/day). After 12 weeks of treatment, the patient was evaluated for improvement in total sleep time and subjective daytime sleepiness assessed by Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS). Results: At baseline, ESS score was 16 and total sleep time averaged 16 h/day. After 12 weeks, ESS was 13 and reported total sleep time was 13 h/day. Conclusions: Levothyroxine improved EDS and total sleep time in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy without cataplexy after 12 weeks without side effects. Citation: Sobol DL, Spector AR. Levothyroxine improves subjective sleepiness in a euthyroid patient with narcolepsy without cataplexy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(11):1231-1232. PMID:25325591

  10. [Current treatment of hepatic trauma].

    PubMed

    Silvio-Estaba, Leonardo; Madrazo-González, Zoilo; Ramos-Rubio, Emilio

    2008-05-01

    The therapeutic and diagnostic approach of liver trauma injuries (by extension, of abdominal trauma) has evolved remarkably in the last decades. The current non-surgical treatment in the vast majority of liver injuries is supported by the accumulated experience and optimal results in the current series. It is considered that the non-surgical treatment of liver injuries has a current rate of success of 83-100%, with an associated morbidity of 5-42%. The haemodynamic stability of the patient will determine the applicability of the non-surgical treatment. Arteriography with angioembolisation constitutes a key technical tool in the context of liver trauma. Patients with haemodynamic instability will need an urgent operation and can benefit from abdominal packing techniques, damage control and post-operative arteriography. The present review attempts to contribute to the current, global and practical management in the care of liver trauma.

  11. Going to School with Narcolepsy--Perceptions of Families and Teachers of Children with Narcolepsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karjalainen, Satu; Nyrhilä, Anna-Maria; Määttä, Kaarina; Uusiautti, Satu

    2014-01-01

    In 2009 and 2010, a large group of Finnish children and adolescents got narcolepsy after the vaccination campaign to prevent swine flu pandemic. A sample of children and adolescents who had gotten narcolepsy after 2009 participated in this study. The purpose of this research was to analyse how narcolepsy that developed from the swine flu…

  12. Evidence for Metabolic Hypothalamo-Amygdala Dysfunction in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Poryazova, Rositsa; Schnepf, Betina; Werth, Esther; Khatami, Ramin; Dydak, Ulrike; Meier, Dieter; Boesiger, Peter; Bassetti, Claudio L.

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: Proton resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) allows noninvasive chemical tissue analysis in the living brain. As neuronal loss and gliosis have been described in narcolepsy, metabolites of primary interest are N-acetylaspartate (NAA), a marker of neuronal integrity and myo-Inositol (mI), a glial marker and second messenger involved in the regulation of intracellular calcium. One 1H-MRS study in narcolepsy found no metabolic changes in the pontomedullary junction. Another study showed a reduction in NAA/creatine-phosphocreatine (Cr) in the hypothalamus of narcolepsy patients with cataplexy. We aimed to test for metabolic changes in specific brain areas, “regions of interest,” thought to be involved in emotional processing, sleep regulation and pathophysiology of narcolepsy: hypothalamus, pontomesencephalic junction and both amygdalae. Design: We performed 1H-MRS using a 3T Philips Achieva whole body MR scanner. Single-voxel proton MR spectra were acquired and quantified with LCModel to determine metabolite concentration ratios. Setting: The participants in the study were recruited at the outpatient clinic for sleep medicine, Department of Neurology and magnetic resonance spectroscopy was performed at the MRI facility, University Hospital Zurich. Participants: 1H-MRS was performed in fourteen narcolepsy patients with cataplexy, CSF hypocretin deficiency (10/10) and HLA-DQB1*0602 positivity (14/14) and 14 age, gender and body mass index matched controls. Patients were treatment naïve or off therapy for at least 14 days before scanning. Measurements and Results: No differences were observed in the regions of interest for (total NAA)/Cr ratios. Myo-Inositol (mI)/Cr was significantly lower in the right amygdala of the patients, compared to controls (P < 0.042). Significant negative correlations only in the patients group were found between (total NAA)/Cr in hypothalamus and mI/Cr in the right amygdala (r = −0.89, P < 0.001), between mI/Cr in

  13. Current treatment for vitreous floaters.

    PubMed

    Sendrowski, David P; Bronstein, Mark A

    2010-03-01

    Vitreous floaters are a common complaint in the ophthalmic care setting. Patients seek explanation and advice regarding possible treatment options. Because the condition is considered benign, ophthalmic care practitioners have little to offer regarding treatment options. The majority of cases encountered are managed with patient education and reassurance. Although almost all patients accept the conservative management option, there is a small subset of patients who may desire a more aggressive treatment intervention for resolution of their visual symptoms. Information with regard to treatment options is readily available to patients through Internet searches and non-peer reviewed educational Web sites. The risks and benefits for these treatment options are not fully covered. Management of floaters should include education regarding "off-label" procedures as well as discussion about benefits and risks associated with such treatment options. It is vital that eye care practitioners advise and counsel patients with symptomatic floaters for optimum ocular health care. This article reviews the current conventional and "off-label" treatment options for symptomatic patients with vitreous floaters. Copyright (c) 2010 American Optometric Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Current Challenges in Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Guedes, Cristiano; Ponce, Santiago; Ferrer, Irene; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2016-07-01

    In this review, we highlight the current concepts and discuss some of the current challenges and future prospects in cancer therapy. We frequently use the example of lung cancer. We conducted a nonsystematic PubMed search, selecting the most comprehensive and relevant research articles, clinical trials, translational papers, and review articles on precision oncology and immuno-oncology. Papers were prioritized and selected based on their originality and potential clinical applicability. Two major revolutions have changed cancer treatment paradigms in the past few years: targeting actionable alterations in oncogene-driven cancers and immuno-oncology. Important challenges are still ongoing in both fields of cancer therapy. On the one hand, druggable genomic alterations are diverse and represent only small subsets of patients in certain tumor types, which limits testing their clinical impact in biomarker-driven clinical trials. Next-generation sequencing technologies are increasingly being implemented for molecular prescreening in clinical research, but issues regarding clinical interpretation of large genomic data make their wide clinical use difficult. Further, dealing with tumor heterogeneity and acquired resistance is probably the main limitation for the success of precision oncology. On the other hand, long-term survival benefits with immune checkpoint inhibitors (anti-programmed death cell protein-1/programmed death cell ligand-1[PD-1/L1] and anti-cytotoxic T lymphocyte antigen-4 monoclonal antibodies) are restricted to a minority of patients, and no predictive markers are yet robustly validated that could help us recognize these subsets and optimize treatment delivery and selection. To achieve long-term survival benefits, drug combinations targeting several molecular alterations or cancer hallmarks might be needed. This will probably be one of the most challenging but promising precision cancer treatment strategies in the future. Targeting single molecular

  15. Sleep spindle density in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julie Anja Engelhard; Nikolic, Miki; Hvidtfelt, Mathias; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-06-01

    Patients with narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) show alterations in sleep stage transitions, rapid-eye-movement (REM) and non-REM sleep due to the loss of hypocretinergic signaling. However, the sleep microstructure has not yet been evaluated in these patients. We aimed to evaluate whether the sleep spindle (SS) density is altered in patients with NT1 compared to controls and patients with narcolepsy type 2 (NT2). All-night polysomnographic recordings from 28 NT1 patients, 19 NT2 patients, 20 controls (C) with narcolepsy-like symptoms, but with normal cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin levels and multiple sleep latency tests, and 18 healthy controls (HC) were included. Unspecified, slow, and fast SS were automatically detected, and SS densities were defined as number per minute and were computed across sleep stages and sleep cycles. The between-cycle trends of SS densities in N2 and NREM sleep were evaluated within and between groups. Between-group comparisons in sleep stages revealed no significant differences in any type of SS. Within-group analyses of the SS trends revealed significant decreasing trends for NT1, HC, and C between first and last sleep cycle. Between-group analyses of SS trends between first and last sleep cycle revealed that NT2 differ from NT1 patients in the unspecified SS density in NREM sleep, and from HC in the slow SS density in N2 sleep. SS activity is preserved in NT1, suggesting that the ascending neurons to thalamic activation of SS are not significantly affected by the hypocretinergic system. NT2 patients show an abnormal pattern of SS distribution. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Increase of histaminergic tuberomammillary neurons in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Valko, Philipp O; Gavrilov, Yury V; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Mignot, Emmanuel; Baumann, Christian R; Scammell, Thomas E

    2013-12-01

    Narcolepsy is caused by loss of the hypothalamic neurons producing the orexin/hypocretin neuropeptides. One key target of the orexin system is the histaminergic neurons of the tuberomammillary nucleus (TMN), an essential wake-promoting system. As cerebrospinal fluid histamine levels may be low in patients with narcolepsy, we examined histaminergic neurons in patients with narcolepsy and in 2 mouse models of narcolepsy. We counted the number of hypothalamic neurons producing orexin, melanin-concentrating hormone, and histamine in 7 narcolepsy patients and 12 control subjects using stereological techniques. We identified histaminergic neurons using immunostaining for histidine decarboxylase. We also examined these systems in 6 wild-type mice, 6 orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic mice, and 5 orexin ligand knockout mice. Compared to controls, narcolepsy patients had 94% more histaminergic TMN neurons (233,572 ± 49,476 vs 120,455 ± 10,665, p < 0.001). This increase was higher in 5 narcolepsy patients with >90% orexin neuron loss than in 2 patients with ≤75% orexin neuron loss (252,279 ± 46,264 vs 186,804 ± 1,256, p = 0.03). Similarly, the number of histaminergic TMN neurons was increased 53% in orexin ligand knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, whereas orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic mice showed an intermediate 28% increase. This surprising increase in histaminergic neurons in narcolepsy may be a compensatory response to loss of excitatory drive from the orexin neurons and may contribute to some of the symptoms of narcolepsy such as preserved consciousness during cataplexy and fragmented nighttime sleep. In addition, this finding may have therapeutic implications, as medications that enhance histamine signaling are now under development. © 2013 American Neurological Association.

  17. CD8 T cell-mediated killing of orexinergic neurons induces a narcolepsy-like phenotype in mice.

    PubMed

    Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Yshii, Lidia; Quériault, Clémence; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Arthaud, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Magda; Canivet, Astrid; Morel, Anne-Laure; Matthys, Arthur; Bauer, Jan; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dauvilliers, Yves; Peyron, Christelle; Liblau, Roland S

    2016-09-27

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin(+) neuron loss and narcolepsy development. We generated mice expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) as a "neo-self-antigen" specifically in hypothalamic orexin(+) neurons (called Orex-HA), which were transferred with effector neo-self-antigen-specific T cells to assess whether an autoimmune process could be at play in narcolepsy. Given the tight association of narcolepsy with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, we first tested the pathogenic contribution of CD4 Th1 cells. Although these T cells readily infiltrated the hypothalamus and triggered local inflammation, they did not elicit the loss of orexin(+) neurons or clinical manifestations of narcolepsy. In contrast, the transfer of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) led to both T-cell infiltration and specific destruction of orexin(+) neurons. This phenotype was further aggravated upon repeated injections of CTLs. In situ, CTLs interacted directly with MHC class I-expressing orexin(+) neurons, resulting in cytolytic granule polarization toward neurons. Finally, drastic neuronal loss caused manifestations mimicking human narcolepsy, such as cataplexy and sleep attacks. This work demonstrates the potential role of CTLs as final effectors of the immunopathological process in narcolepsy.

  18. CD8 T cell-mediated killing of orexinergic neurons induces a narcolepsy-like phenotype in mice

    PubMed Central

    Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Yshii, Lidia; Quériault, Clémence; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Arthaud, Sébastien; Rodrigues, Magda; Canivet, Astrid; Morel, Anne-Laure; Matthys, Arthur; Bauer, Jan; Pignolet, Béatrice; Dauvilliers, Yves; Peyron, Christelle; Liblau, Roland S.

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is a rare and severe sleep disorder caused by the destruction of orexinergic neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. The genetic and environmental factors associated with narcolepsy, together with serologic data, collectively point to an autoimmune origin. The current animal models of narcolepsy, based on either disruption of the orexinergic neurotransmission or neurons, do not allow study of the potential autoimmune etiology. Here, we sought to generate a mouse model that allows deciphering of the immune mechanisms leading to orexin+ neuron loss and narcolepsy development. We generated mice expressing the hemagglutinin (HA) as a “neo-self-antigen” specifically in hypothalamic orexin+ neurons (called Orex-HA), which were transferred with effector neo-self-antigen–specific T cells to assess whether an autoimmune process could be at play in narcolepsy. Given the tight association of narcolepsy with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, we first tested the pathogenic contribution of CD4 Th1 cells. Although these T cells readily infiltrated the hypothalamus and triggered local inflammation, they did not elicit the loss of orexin+ neurons or clinical manifestations of narcolepsy. In contrast, the transfer of cytotoxic CD8 T cells (CTLs) led to both T-cell infiltration and specific destruction of orexin+ neurons. This phenotype was further aggravated upon repeated injections of CTLs. In situ, CTLs interacted directly with MHC class I-expressing orexin+ neurons, resulting in cytolytic granule polarization toward neurons. Finally, drastic neuronal loss caused manifestations mimicking human narcolepsy, such as cataplexy and sleep attacks. This work demonstrates the potential role of CTLs as final effectors of the immunopathological process in narcolepsy. PMID:27621438

  19. Current Treatments in Familial Dysautonomia

    PubMed Central

    Palma, Jose-Alberto; Kaufmann, Lucy; Fuente, Cristina; Percival, Leila; Mendoza, Carlos; Kaufmann, Horacio

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Familial dysautonomia (FD) is a rare hereditary sensory and autonomic neuropathy (type III). The disease is caused by a point mutation in the IKBKAP gene that affects the splicing of the elongator-1 protein (also known as IKAP). Patients have dramatic blood pressure instability due to baroreflex failure, chronic kidney disease, and impaired swallowing leading to recurrent aspiration pneumonia, which results in chronic lung disease. Diminished pain and temperature perception results in neuropathic joints and thermal injuries. Impaired proprioception leads to gait ataxia. Optic neuropathy and corneal opacities lead to progressive visual loss. Areas covered This article reviews current therapeutic strategies for the symptomatic treatment of FD, as well as the potential of new gene modifying agents. Expert opinion Therapeutic focus on FD is centered on reducing the catecholamine surges caused by baroreflex failure. Managing neurogenic dysphagia with effective protection of the airway passages and prompt treatment of aspiration pneumonias is necessary to prevent respiratory failure. Sedative medications should be used cautiously due to risk of respiratory depression. Non-invasive ventilation during sleep effectively manages apneas and prevents hypercapnia. Clinical trials of compounds that increase levels of IKAP (ELP-1) are underway and will determine whether they can reverse or slow disease progression. PMID:25323828

  20. An autoantibody in narcolepsy disrupts colonic migrating motor complexes.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Michael W; Reed, Joanne H; Smith, Anthony J F; Gordon, Tom P

    2008-12-03

    Despite strong circumstantial evidence for the autoimmune hypothesis of narcolepsy, conventional immunological methods have failed to detect an autoantibody. This study investigated the real-time effects of narcoleptic immunoglobulins on a spontaneous colonic migrating motor complex (CMMC) preparation. IgG from patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy or healthy controls was added directly to isolated mouse colons undergoing CMMC activity to test for autoantibodies that disrupt colonic motility. The effect of immunoglobulins prepared for clinical intravenous treatment (IVIg) on autoantibody-mediated colonic disruption was also assessed. Narcoleptic IgGs markedly reduced the frequency of CMMCs or irreversibly abolished them. Abrogation of CMMCs was followed by an increase in the resting tension of the colon preparation and appearance of atropine-sensitive phasic smooth muscle contractions. IVIg partially neutralized the inhibitory effect of narcoleptic IgG on the CMMCs. The dramatic effect of narcoleptic IgG on CMMC generation is consistent with an autoantibody-mediated disruption of enteric neural pathways. The ex vivo whole-organ approach allows real-time examination of the physiological effects of the narcoleptic autoantibody and offers a new avenue for exploring the autoimmune basis of narcolepsy. The neutralizing effect of IVIg on the autoantibody provides a rationale for the reported clinical improvement in cataplexy when IVIg are given at disease onset.

  1. Current nutritional treatments of obesity.

    PubMed

    Greenwald, Ashli

    2006-01-01

    Obesity in our country is a growing concern. There are several different options for weight loss; however, individuals must be self-motivated and amendable to change in order to achieve success with their weight loss goals. Several strategies used by professionals in the US today to treat overweight and obesity, include diet therapy, exercise, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgery. The focus of the American Dietetic Association (ADA) Weight Management Position Statement is no longer just on weight loss but now on weight management. Reaching one's ideal body weight is recommended but not often realistic. Frequently, the goal of treatment shifts to maintenance of ones current weight or attempts at moderate weight loss. Lifestyle modification or behavioral modification interventions rely on analyzing behavior to identify events that are associated with appropriate vs. inappropriate eating, exercise, or thinking habits. Certain primary strategies that have been found to be useful for helping people change their behaviors so that they can lose weight and maintain their weight loss, include self-monitoring, stimulus control, cognitive restructuring, stress management, social support, physical activity, and relapse prevention. Weight loss programs should strive to combine a nutritionally balanced dietary regimen with exercise and lifestyle modifications at the lowest possible cost. There are several different methods used for dietary modifications; low calorie diets, very low calorie diets, fasting, formula diets and meal replacement programs, and popular diets. Bariatric surgery is gaining popularity as it has been an effective way to treat obesity. Following gastric bypass surgery, the patients must be prepared to modify their eating behaviors and dietary selections to assist with weight loss and prevent potential complications. Patients should be educated on the dietary guidelines extensively prior to surgery and again post-operatively.

  2. ApoE polymorphisms in narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gencik, Martin; Dahmen, Norbert; Wieczorek, Stefan; Kasten, Meike; Gencikova, Alexandra; Epplen, Jorg T

    2001-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy is a common neuropsychiatric disorder characterized by increased daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and hypnagogic hallucinations. Deficiency of the hypocretin neurotransmitter system was shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of narcolepsy in animals and men. There are several hints that neurodegeneration of hypocretin producing neurons in the hypothalamus is the pathological correlate of narcolepsy. The ApoE4 allele is a major contributing factor to early-onset neuronal degeneration in Alzheimer disease and other neurodegenerative diseases as well. Methods To clarify whether the ApoE4 phenotype predisposes to narcolepsy or associates with an earlier disease onset, we have genotyped the ApoE gene in 103 patients with narcolepsy and 101 healthy controls. Results The frequency of the E4 allele of the ApoE gene was 11% in the patient and 15% in the control groups. Furthermore, the mean age of onset did not differ between the ApoE4+ and ApoE4- patient groups. Conclusion Our results exclude the ApoE4 allele as a major risk factor for narcolepsy. PMID:11560764

  3. [Narcolepsy with cataplexy: an autoimmune disease?].

    PubMed

    Jacob, Louis; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2014-12-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 (also named narcolepsy-cataplexy or hypocretin deficiency syndrome) is a rare sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, plus frequently hypnagogic hallucinations, sleep paralysis and nocturnal sleep disturbances. Narcolepsy type 1 is an immune system-associated disease linked with the destruction of 70.000-90.000 hypocretin neurons notably involved in wakefulness. Among narcoleptic patients, 98% are positive for HLA-DQB1*06:02, a HLA class II allele, against 20-25% in general population. Individuals carrying HLA-DQB1*06:02 have an extraordinary risk to develop narcolepsy (odd ratio: 251). Other genes involved in CD4+ T cells and immune system activation as T-cell receptor α are also associated with narcolepsy. The development of the disease is linked with environmental factors such as influenza and streptococcal infections. Narcolepsy type 1 incidence also increased in Europe following the use of Pandemrix, a 2009 H1N1 AS03-adjuvanted vaccine manufactured by GlaxoSmithKline. Interestingly, such increase was not observed with Arepanrix, another vaccine developed by GSK very similar to Pandemrix. © 2014 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  4. Benefit and risk of modafinil in idiopathic hypersomnia vs. narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Lavault, Sophie; Dauvilliers, Yves; Drouot, Xavier; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Golmard, Jean-Louis; Lecendreux, Michel; Franco, Patricia; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2011-06-01

    The benefit/risk ratio of modafinil was recently re-evaluated by the European Medicines Agency and was shown to be negative for idiopathic hypersomnia (IH) because of insufficient data. To evaluate the benefit/risk ratio of modafinil in idiopathic hypersomnia (with and without long sleep time) vs. narcolepsy/cataplexy. The benefit (Epworth sleepiness score, ESS; visual analog scale, patient and clinician opinions) and risks (habituation, adverse effects) of modafinil were studied in a consecutive clinical cohort of 104 IH patients (59 with long sleep time) and 126 patients with narcolepsy/cataplexy. Modafinil was the first line treatment in 96-99% of patients. It produced a similar ESS change in IH patients and in narcolepsy patients (-2.6±5.1 vs. -3±5.1) and a similar benefit as estimated by the patients (6.9±2.7 vs. 6.5±2.5 on a visual analog scale) and clinicians. The ESS change was lower in IH patients with long sleep time than in those without. Sudden loss of efficacy and habituation were rare in both groups. Patients with IH reported similar but more frequent adverse effects with modafinil than narcolepsy patients: nervousness (14%), palpitations (13%), and headache (11%). Modafinil has an excellent benefit/risk ratio in idiopathic hypersomnia, with or without long sleep time, similar to its effect on narcolepsy/cataplexy. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Medical comorbidity in narcolepsy: findings from the Burden of Narcolepsy Disease (BOND) study.

    PubMed

    Black, J; Reaven, N L; Funk, S E; McGaughey, K; Ohayon, M M; Guilleminault, C; Ruoff, C

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate medical comorbidity patterns in patients with a narcolepsy diagnosis in the United States. This was a retrospective medical claims data analysis. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan® Research Databases were accessed to identify individuals ≥18 years of age with ≥1 diagnosis code for narcolepsy (International Classification of Diseases (ICD)-9, 347.0, 347.00, 347.01, 347.1, 347.10, or 347.11) continuously insured between 2006 and 2010, and controls without narcolepsy matched 5:1 on age, gender, region, and payer. Narcolepsy and control subjects were compared for frequency of comorbid conditions, identified by the appearance of >1 diagnosis code(s) mapped to a Clinical Classification System (CCS) level 1 category any time during the study period, and on specific subcategories, including recognized narcolepsy comorbidities of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and depression. The final study group included 9312 subjects with narcolepsy and 46,559 controls (each group: average age, 46.1 years; 59% female). As compared with controls, patients with narcolepsy showed a statistically significant excess prevalence in all the CCS multilevel categories, the only exceptions being conditions originating in the perinatal period and pregnancy/childbirth complications. The greatest excess prevalence in the narcolepsy cohort was seen for mental illness (31.1% excess prevalence; odds ratio (OR) 3.8, 95% confidence interval (CI) 3.6, 4.0), followed by diseases of the digestive system (21.4% excess prevalence; OR 2.7, 95% CI 2.5, 2.8) and nervous system/sense organs (excluding narcolepsy; 20.7% excess prevalence; OR 3.7, 95% CI 3.4, 3.9). In this claims analysis, a narcolepsy diagnosis was associated with a wide range of comorbid medical illness claims, at significantly higher rates than matched controls. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy in Pediatric Narcolepsy: A Nonrandomized, Open-Label, Controlled, Longitudinal Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Lecendreux, Michel; Berthier, Johanna; Corny, Jennifer; Bourdon, Olivier; Dossier, Claire; Delclaux, Christophe

    2017-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous case reports of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) in pediatric narcolepsy have shown contradictory results. Methods: This was a nonrandomized, open-label, controlled, longitudinal observational study of IVIg use in pediatric narcolepsy with retrospective data collection from medical files obtained from a single pediatric national reference center for the treatment of narcolepsy in France. Of 56 consecutively referred patients with narcolepsy, 24 received IVIg (3 infusions administered at 1-mo intervals) in addition to standard care (psychostimulants and/or anticataplectic agents), and 32 continued on standard care alone (controls). Results: For two patients in each group, medical files were unavailable. Of the 22 IVIg patients, all had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin ≤ 110 pg/mL and were HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive. Of the 30 control patients, 29 were HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive and of those with available CSF measurements, all 12 had hypocretin ≤ 110 pg/mL. Compared with control patients, IVIg patients had shorter disease duration, shorter latency to sleep onset, and more had received H1N1 vaccination. Mean (standard deviation) follow-up length was 2.4 (1.1) y in the IVIg group and 3.9 (1.7) y in controls. In multivariate-adjusted linear mixed-effects analyses of change from baseline in Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale (UNS) scores, high baseline UNS, but not IVIg treatment, was associated with a reduction in narcolepsy symptoms. On time-to-event analysis, among patients with high baseline UNS scores, control patients achieved a UNS score < 14 (indicating remission) less rapidly than IVIg patients (adjusted hazard ratio 0.18; 95% confidence interval: 95% confidence interval: 0.03, 0.95; p = 0.043). Shorter or longer disease duration did not influence treatment response in any analysis. Conclusions: Overall, narcolepsy symptoms were not significantly reduced by IVIg. However, in patients with high baseline symptoms, a subset of IVIg

  7. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms in Pediatric Narcolepsy: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Lecendreux, Michel; Lavault, Sophie; Lopez, Régis; Inocente, Clara Odilia; Konofal, Eric; Cortese, Samuele; Franco, Patricia; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the frequency, severity, and associations of symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with narcolepsy with and without cataplexy. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Four French national reference centers for narcolepsy. Patients: One hundred eight consecutively referred children aged younger than 18 y with narcolepsy, with (NwC, n = 86) or without cataplexy (NwoC, n = 22), and 67 healthy controls. Interventions: The participants, their families, and sleep specialists completed a structured interview and questionnaires about sleep, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and ADHD symptoms (ADHD-rating scale based upon Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision [DSM-IV-TR] symptoms), and use of psychostimulants for the treatment of narcolepsy (administered in 68.2%). Polysomnographic measures were collected. Measurements and Results: Clinically significant levels of ADHD symptoms were found in 4.8% of controls compared with 35.3% in patients with NwoC (P < 0.001) and 19.7% in patients with NwC (P < 0.01). Total ADHD scores were 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5, 9.0) in controls compared with 14.2 (95% CI: 10.6, 18.9; P < 0.001), in patients with NwoC and 12.2 (95% CI: 9.8, 15.3; P < 0.01) in patients with NwC; subscores of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity were also significantly higher in both narcolepsy groups compared with controls. No difference was found between the NwC and NwoC groups for any ADHD measure. ADHD symptom severity was associated with increased levels of sleepiness, fatigue, and insomnia. Compared with the 34 untreated patients, the 73 patients treated with psychostimulants (modafinil in 91%) showed a trend toward lower narcolepsy symptoms but not lower ADHD symptoms. Conclusions: Pediatric patients with narcolepsy have high levels of treatment-resistant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. The optimal treatment for

  8. Narcolepsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... when you fall asleep. This is called a sleep attack. These periods can last from a few seconds to a few minutes. They may happen after eating, while talking to someone, or during other situations. Most often, ...

  9. [Current treatment of rheumatoid arthritis].

    PubMed

    Carli, P; Landais, C; Aletti, M; Cournac, J-M; Poisnel, E; Paris, J-F

    2009-12-01

    Over the past 10 years, the management of rheumatoid arthritis has been revolutionized. Early diagnosis is essential and should allow an early initiation of disease modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARD), if possible within the first 3 three months after disease onset, aiming at disease remission and the best long-term prognosis. Recommendations for the prescription of synthetic and biologic DMARD (mainly anti-TNFalpha agents) are available since September 2007 [6] by HAS in France. The great efficacy of these drugs has been established from many clinical trials including tens of thousands of patients. However, severe adverse side effects may occur (allergy, tuberculosis, opportunistic infections, demyelination) and rheumatologists should remain vigilant. Global care of the patient includes prescription of pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic treatments (education, physical treatment, ergotherapy, psychotherapy, surgery). A good coordination between all specialists is required. Screening and treatment of extra-articular manifestations, prevention of infections, osteoporosis and cardiovascular complications are essential to allow a better long-term prognosis, and reduce disability and mortality of rheumatoid arthritis.

  10. Autoantibody targets in vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Häggmark-Månberg, Anna; Zandian, Arash; Forsström, Björn; Khademi, Mohsen; Lima Bomfim, Izaura; Hellström, Cecilia; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Hallböök, Tove; Darin, Niklas; Lundberg, Ingrid E; Uhlén, Mathias; Partinen, Markku; Schwenk, Jochen M; Olsson, Tomas; Nilsson, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder with a yet unknown cause, but the specific loss of hypocretin-producing neurons together with a strong human leukocyte antigen (HLA) association has led to the hypothesis that autoimmune mechanisms might be involved. Here, we describe an extensive effort to profile autoimmunity repertoires in serum with the aim to find disease-related autoantigens. Initially, 57 serum samples from vaccine-associated and sporadic narcolepsy patients and controls were screened for IgG reactivity towards 10 846 fragments of human proteins using planar microarrays. The discovered differential reactivities were verified on suspension bead arrays in the same sample collection followed by further investigation of 14 antigens in 176 independent samples, including 57 narcolepsy patients. Among these 14 antigens, methyltransferase-like 22 (METTL22) and 5'-nucleotidase cytosolic IA (NT5C1A) were recognized at a higher frequency in narcolepsy patients of both sample sets. Upon sequence analysis of the 14 proteins, polymerase family, member 3 (PARP3), acyl-CoA-binding domain containing 7 (ARID4B), glutaminase 2 (GLS2) and cyclin-dependent kinase-like 1 (CDKL1) were found to contain amino acid sequences with homology to proteins found in the H1N1 vaccine. These findings could become useful elements of further clinical assays that aim towards a better phenotypic understanding of narcolepsy and its triggers.

  11. [Current treatment of postabortion sepsis].

    PubMed

    Grishchenko, V I; Vorontsov, Iu M; Reznikov, V A

    1986-08-01

    The results of combined treatment of 83 women (17-43 years old) with septic complications following abortion in a nonhospital setting are reviewed. The group included 9 primigravida and 74 secundigravida. Almost all women had a history of extragenital diseases and 52 had a history of genital tract inflammations. Pregnancy was terminated in the first trimester in 56 and in second trimester in 27. Septic complications (endometritis and adnexitis) developed on day 2-20 after abortion. Of 83 patients, 10 (12%) died in spite of prolonged and unsuccessful treatment. 22 women with diffuse peritonitis and peritoneal abscess underwent surgery (extirpation of the uterus and tubes in 17, supravaginal amputation of the uterus in 1, and opening of the abscess in 4) and 51 underwent curettage of the uterine cavity. Postoperative treatment included antibiotics, administration of plasma substitutes, heparin, correction of electrolyte imbalance, administration of immunostimulants, and transfusion of the autologous blood irradiated with ultraviolet rays. Antibiotic therapy usually consisted of at least 2 drugs in maximum doses (1 antibiotic was given iv). The most frequent combination was penicillin (6-8 g/day) together with aminoglycosides or cephalosporins. Antibiotics were given for 7-10 days. Indications for extirpation of the uterus and tubes included anaerobic septic process in the uterus, dissemination of the infection outside the uterus, renal-hepatic failure, perforation or necrosis of the uterine wall. Instead of peritoneal dialysis, the patients received irrigation of the peritoneal cavity with a mixture of kanamycin, furagin and novocain. All 72 patients survived surgery or curettage and were cured.

  12. Increased GABA Levels in Medial Prefrontal Cortex of Young Adults with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seog Ju; Lyoo, In Kyoon; Lee, Yujin S.; Sung, Young Hoon; Kim, Hengjun J.; Kim, Jihyun H.; Kim, Kye Hyun; Jeong, Do-Un

    2008-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore absolute concentrations of brain metabolites including gamma amino-butyric acid (GABA) in the medial prefrontal cortex and basal ganglia of young adults with narcolepsy. Design: Proton magnetic resonance (MR) spectroscopy centered on the medial prefrontal cortex and the basal ganglia was acquired. The absolute concentrations of brain metabolites including GABA and glutamate were assessed and compared between narcoleptic patients and healthy comparison subjects. Setting: Sleep and Chronobiology Center at Seoul National University Hospital; A high strength 3.0 Tesla MR scanner in the Department of Radiology at Seoul National University Hospital. Patients or Participants: Seventeen young adults with a sole diagnosis of HLA DQB1 0602 positive narcolepsy with cataplexy (25.1 ± 4.6 years old) and 17 healthy comparison subjects (26.8 ± 4.8 years old). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: Relative to comparison subjects, narcoleptic patients had higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex (t = 4.10, P <0.001). Narcoleptic patients with nocturnal sleep disturbance had higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex than those without nocturnal sleep disturbance (t = 2.45, P= 0.03), but had lower GABA concentration than comparison subjects (t = 2.30, P = 0.03). Conclusions: The current study reports that young adults with narcolepsy had a higher GABA concentration in the medial prefrontal cortex, which was more prominent in patients without nocturnal sleep disturbance. Our findings suggest that the medial prefrontal GABA level may be increased in narcolepsy, and the increased medial prefrontal GABA might be a compensatory mechanism to reduce nocturnal sleep disturbances in narcolepsy. Citation: Kim SJ; Lyoo IK; Lee YS; Sung YH; Kim HJ; Kim JH; Kim KH; Jeong DU. Increased GABA levels in medial prefrontal cortex of young adults with narcolepsy. SLEEP 2008;31(3):342-347. PMID:18363310

  13. Narcolepsy in Adolescence-A Missed Diagnosis: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Anoop K; Sahoo, Swapnajeet; Grover, Sandeep

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is an uncommon sleep cycle disorder with a usual onset in adolescence, but it is often misdiagnosed and underdiagnosed. Rarely is the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis seen in patients. The clinical characteristics of narcolepsy are often confused with many psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Lack of clinical awareness about narcolepsy leads to frequent prescriptions of antiepileptics and psychotropics, which can adversely affect the quality of life of children and adolescents. We report a case of an adolescent male who presented with all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy and had been misdiagnosed with epilepsy, psychosis, and depression. We discuss various issues regarding narcolepsy in children and adolescents.

  14. [Clinical effect of atomoxetine hydrochloride in 66 children with narcolepsy].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shen; Ding, Changhong; Wu, Husheng; Fang, Fang; Wang, Xiaohui; Ren, Xiaotun

    2015-10-01

    To observe the efficacy and safety of atomoxetine hydrochloride in children with narcolepsy. Totally 66 patients with narcolepsy who were conformed international classification of sleep disturbances (ICSD-2) diagnostic criteria treated with atomoxetine hydrochloride seen from November 2010 to December 2014 were enrolled into this study, 42 of them were male and 24 female, mean age of onset was 7.5 years (3.75-13.00 years), mean duration before diagnosis was 1.75 years (0.25-5.00 years). Complete blood count, liver and kidney function, multiple sleep latency test (MSLT), polysomnography (PGS), neuroimaging and electroencephalography (EEG) were performed for each patient. For some of the children HLA-DR2 gene and serum markers of infection were tested. The 66 cases were followed up from 2 to 49 months (average 18 months) to observe the clinical efficacy and adverse reactions. In 62 cases excessive daytime sleepiness was improved, in 11 cases (16.7%) it was controlled (16.7%), in 29 cases (43.9%) the treatment was obviously effective and in 22 (33.3%) it was effective; cataplexy occurred in 54 cases, in 18 (33.3%) it was controlled, in 19 (35.2%) the treatment was obviously effective and in 10 (18.5%) effective; night sleep disorders existed in 55 cases, in 47 cases it was improved, in 14 (25.5%) it was controlled, in 20 (36.4%) the treatment was obviously effective and in 13 (23.6%) effective; hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucination was present in 13 cases, in only 4 these symptoms were controlled. Sleep paralysis existed in 4 cases, it was controlled in only 1 case. In 18 cases attention and learning efficiency improved.Anorexia occurred in 18 cases, mood disorder in 5 cases, depression in 2 cases, nocturia, muscle tremors, involuntary tongue movement each occurred in 1 case. P-R interval prolongation and atrial premature contraction were found in 1 case. Atomoxetine hydrochloride showed good effects in patients with narcolepsy on excessive daytime sleepiness

  15. Retinal vein occlusion: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Lattanzio, Rosangela; Torres Gimeno, Ana; Battaglia Parodi, Maurizio; Bandello, Francesco

    2011-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusion (RVO) is a pathology noted for more than 150 years. Although a lot has been written on the matter, it is still a frequent condition with multifactorial etiopathogenesis with many unclear aspects. The RVO pathogenesis has varied systemic and local implications that make it difficult to elaborate treatment guidelines. The management of the patient with RVO is very complex and a multidisciplinary approach is required in order to identify and correct the associated risk factors. Laser therapy remains the gold standard in RVO, but only modest functional improvement has been shown in branch retinal occlusion forms. Multicenter studies of intravitreal drugs present them as an option to combine with laser. Anti-vascular endothelial growth factor, corticosteroids and sustained-release implants are the future weapons to stop disease progression and get a better visual outcome. Consequently, it is useful to clarify some aspects of the pathology that allow a better patient management. Copyright © 2010 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Chronic constipation: Current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Louis Wing Cheong

    2011-01-01

    Chronic constipation is a common functional gastrointestinal disorder that affects patients of all ages. In 2007, a consensus group of 10 Canadian gastroenterologists developed a set of recommendations pertaining to the management of chronic constipation and constipation-dominant irritable bowel syndrome. Since then, tegaserod has been withdrawn from the Canadian market. A new, highly selective serotonin receptor subtype 4 agonist, prucalopride, has been examined in several large, randomized, placebo-controlled trials demonstrating its efficacy and safety in the management of patients with chronic constipation. Additional studies evaluating the use of stimulant laxatives, polyethylene glycol and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation have also been published. The present review summarizes the previous recommendations and new evidence supporting different treatment modalities – namely, diet and lifestyle, bulking agents, stool softeners, osmotic and stimulant laxatives, prucalopride and probiotics in the management of chronic constipation. A brief summary of lubiprostone and linaclotide is also presented. The quality of evidence is presented by adopting the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development and Evaluation system. Finally, a management pyramid for patients with chronic constipation is proposed based on the quality of evidence, impact of each modality on constipation and on general health, and their availabilities in Canada. PMID:22114754

  17. Narcolepsy and cataplexy: a pediatric case report.

    PubMed

    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, Ilknur; Saygı, Semra; Habeşoğlu, Mehmet Ali

    2016-12-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis during the rapid eye movement period of sleep. Herein, we present a boy aged eight years who was diagnosed as having narcolepsy and cataplexy about thirteen months after his first presentation. He was admitted with symptoms of daytime sleepiness. In the follow-up, cataplexy in the form of head dropping attacks developed seven months after the first admission. The patient was investigated for different prediagnoses and was eventually diagnosed as having narcolepsy and cataplexy through polysomnography and multiple sleep latency tests thirteen months after the first presentation. He is being followed up and is under drug therapy; his symptoms have improved substantially.

  18. [Workplace accomodations for two workers with narcolepsy].

    PubMed

    Vico Garcerán, Belén; Monzó Salas, Monserrat; Cuenca Esteve, Francisco; Luis Domingo, José

    2013-01-01

    We describe the case of two workers evaluated in our occupational health unit. The first worker was a kitchen aide; the second was a primary care physician. Both had been diagnosed with narcolepsy and had obvious disability.We assessed occupational hazards related to their jobs, analysed their tasks, and performed medical examinations. Afterwards, we offered recommendations to the patients, consisting of avoidance of situations involving a risk of work accidents and improving their sleep habits. Narcolepsy is a rare disorder, but it has important social and occupational consequences. A better understanding of the disease and some work accommodations can help improve the quality of life of affected workers.

  19. Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) Symptoms in Pediatric Narcolepsy: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel; Lavault, Sophie; Lopez, Régis; Inocente, Clara Odilia; Konofal, Eric; Cortese, Samuele; Franco, Patricia; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the frequency, severity, and associations of symptoms of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in children with narcolepsy with and without cataplexy. Cross-sectional survey. Four French national reference centers for narcolepsy. One hundred eight consecutively referred children aged younger than 18 y with narcolepsy, with (NwC, n = 86) or without cataplexy (NwoC, n = 22), and 67 healthy controls. The participants, their families, and sleep specialists completed a structured interview and questionnaires about sleep, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, and ADHD symptoms (ADHD-rating scale based upon Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision [DSM-IV-TR] symptoms), and use of psychostimulants for the treatment of narcolepsy (administered in 68.2%). Polysomnographic measures were collected. Clinically significant levels of ADHD symptoms were found in 4.8% of controls compared with 35.3% in patients with NwoC (P < 0.001) and 19.7% in patients with NwC (P < 0.01). Total ADHD scores were 6.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 4.5, 9.0) in controls compared with 14.2 (95% CI: 10.6, 18.9; P < 0.001), in patients with NwoC and 12.2 (95% CI: 9.8, 15.3; P < 0.01) in patients with NwC; subscores of inattention and hyperactivity/impulsivity were also significantly higher in both narcolepsy groups compared with controls. No difference was found between the NwC and NwoC groups for any ADHD measure. ADHD symptom severity was associated with increased levels of sleepiness, fatigue, and insomnia. Compared with the 34 untreated patients, the 73 patients treated with psychostimulants (modafinil in 91%) showed a trend toward lower narcolepsy symptoms but not lower ADHD symptoms. Pediatric patients with narcolepsy have high levels of treatment-resistant attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) symptoms. The optimal treatment for ADHD symptoms in these patients warrants further evaluation in longitudinal intervention studies.

  20. Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy in Pediatric Narcolepsy: A Nonrandomized, Open-Label, Controlled, Longitudinal Observational Study.

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel; Berthier, Johanna; Corny, Jennifer; Bourdon, Olivier; Dossier, Claire; Delclaux, Christophe

    2017-03-15

    Previous case reports of intravenous immunoglobulins (IVIg) in pediatric narcolepsy have shown contradictory results. This was a nonrandomized, open-label, controlled, longitudinal observational study of IVIg use in pediatric narcolepsy with retrospective data collection from medical files obtained from a single pediatric national reference center for the treatment of narcolepsy in France. Of 56 consecutively referred patients with narcolepsy, 24 received IVIg (3 infusions administered at 1-mo intervals) in addition to standard care (psychostimulants and/or anticataplectic agents), and 32 continued on standard care alone (controls). For two patients in each group, medical files were unavailable. Of the 22 IVIg patients, all had cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin ≤ 110 pg/mL and were HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive. Of the 30 control patients, 29 were HLA-DQB1*06:02 positive and of those with available CSF measurements, all 12 had hypocretin ≤ 110 pg/mL. Compared with control patients, IVIg patients had shorter disease duration, shorter latency to sleep onset, and more had received H1N1 vaccination. Mean (standard deviation) follow-up length was 2.4 (1.1) y in the IVIg group and 3.9 (1.7) y in controls. In multivariate-adjusted linear mixed-effects analyses of change from baseline in Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale (UNS) scores, high baseline UNS, but not IVIg treatment, was associated with a reduction in narcolepsy symptoms. On time-to-event analysis, among patients with high baseline UNS scores, control patients achieved a UNS score < 14 (indicating remission) less rapidly than IVIg patients (adjusted hazard ratio 0.18; 95% confidence interval: 95% confidence interval: 0.03, 0.95; p = 0.043). Shorter or longer disease duration did not influence treatment response in any analysis. Overall, narcolepsy symptoms were not significantly reduced by IVIg. However, in patients with high baseline symptoms, a subset of IVIg-treated patients achieved remission more rapidly than

  1. Parkinson's disease and narcolepsy-like symptoms.

    PubMed

    Ylikoski, Ari; Martikainen, Kirsti; Sarkanen, Tomi; Partinen, Markku

    2015-04-01

    Various sleep-related problems, for example, insomnia and symptoms of rapid eye movement behavior disorder (RBD), are common in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). We studied the prevalence of symptoms of narcolepsy (NARC), hallucinations, and RBD and their association with other symptoms. Altogether, 1447 randomly selected patients with PD, aged 43-89 years, participated in a questionnaire study. A structured questionnaire with 207 items was based on the Basic Nordic Sleep Questionnaire. Questions on demographics, PD, RBD, and other issues were included. The response rate was 59.0%; of these patients, 73% had answered to all questions that were used in the analyses (N = 623). The occurrence of suspected narcolepsy (Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale ≥ 14 and Epworth Sleepiness Scale ≥ 11) was observed in 9.3% of the subjects (PD with NARC), RBD (REM Sleep Behavior Disorder Screening Questionnaire ≥ 6) in 39.2% of all patients with PD, and in 62.1% of those with PD and NARC. In patients with PD, hallucinations before going to bed in the evening occurred in 5.8%, hypnagogic hallucinations in 4.0%, hallucinations during night 8.3%, and hypnopompic hallucinations in 3.2%. Cataplexy symptoms occurred in 43.1% of subjects with PD and NARC. In a logistic regression analysis, PD with NARC was associated with RBD, all types of hallucinations, daytime sleepiness, fatigue, insomnia, and intense dreaming also when adjusted for age, sex, disease duration, and levodopa. Narcolepsy-like symptoms may be present in patients with PD. Symptoms of RBD were associated with symptoms of narcolepsy including symptoms of cataplexy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Current orthopaedic treatment of ballistic injuries.

    PubMed

    Volgas, David A; Stannard, James P; Alonso, Jorge E

    2005-03-01

    The purpose of this review is to examine current orthopaedic treatment of gunshot wounds. Surgeons are increasingly confronted by gunshot wounds that occur in both military and civilian settings. Much of the published work has been from military settings. In the United States, low-energy gunshot wounds are very common, and their incidence is increasing elsewhere in the world. Current treatment and its rationale is reviewed and a systematic approach to the assessment and treatment of these injuries is offered, taking into account the entirety of the injury, rather than simply the velocity of the missile.

  3. Altered Brain Microstate Dynamics in Adolescents with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Drissi, Natasha M.; Szakács, Attila; Witt, Suzanne T.; Wretman, Anna; Ulander, Martin; Ståhlbrandt, Henriettae; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Landtblom, Anne-Marie; Engström, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder caused by a loss of hypocretin-1 producing neurons in the hypothalamus. Previous neuroimaging studies have investigated brain function in narcolepsy during rest using positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). In addition to hypothalamic and thalamic dysfunction they showed aberrant prefrontal perfusion and glucose metabolism in narcolepsy. Given these findings in brain structure and metabolism in narcolepsy, we anticipated that changes in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) resting state network (RSN) dynamics might also be apparent in patients with narcolepsy. The objective of this study was to investigate and describe brain microstate activity in adolescents with narcolepsy and correlate these to RSNs using simultaneous fMRI and electroencephalography (EEG). Sixteen adolescents (ages 13–20) with a confirmed diagnosis of narcolepsy were recruited and compared to age-matched healthy controls. Simultaneous EEG and fMRI data were collected during 10 min of wakeful rest. EEG data were analyzed for microstates, which are discrete epochs of stable global brain states obtained from topographical EEG analysis. Functional MRI data were analyzed for RSNs. Data showed that narcolepsy patients were less likely than controls to spend time in a microstate which we found to be related to the default mode network and may suggest a disruption of this network that is disease specific. We concluded that adolescents with narcolepsy have altered resting state brain dynamics. PMID:27536225

  4. Circadian Rest-Activity Rhythm in Pediatric Type 1 Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Filardi, Marco; Pizza, Fabio; Bruni, Oliviero; Natale, Vincenzo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Pediatric type 1 narcolepsy is often challenging to diagnose and remains largely undiagnosed. Excessive daytime sleepiness, disrupted nocturnal sleep, and a peculiar phenotype of cataplexy are the prominent features. The knowledge available about the regulation of circadian rhythms in affected children is scarce. This study compared circadian rest-activity rhythm and actigraphic estimated sleep measures of children with type 1 narcolepsy versus healthy controls. Methods: Twenty-two drug-naïve type 1 narcolepsy children and 21 age- and sex- matched controls were monitored for seven days during the school week by actigraphy. Circadian activity rhythms were analyzed through functional linear modeling; nocturnal and diurnal sleep measures were estimated from activity using a validated algorithm. Results: Children with type 1 narcolepsy presented an altered rest-activity rhythm characterized by enhanced motor activity throughout the night and blunted activity in the first afternoon. No difference was found between children with type 1 narcolepsy and controls in the timing of the circadian phase. Actigraphic sleep measures showed good discriminant capabilities in assessing type 1 narcolepsy nycthemeral disruption. Conclusions: Actigraphy reliably renders the nycthemeral disruption typical of narcolepsy type 1 in drug-naïve children with recent disease onset, indicating the sensibility of actigraphic assessment in the diagnostic work-up of childhood narcolepsy type 1. Citation: Filardi M, Pizza F, Bruni O, Natale V, Plazzi G. Circadian rest-activity rhythm in pediatric type 1 narcolepsy. SLEEP 2016;39(6):1241–1247. PMID:27091539

  5. Status cataplecticus as initial presentation of late onset narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Panda, Samhita

    2014-02-15

    Narcolepsy, one of the important causes of hypersomnia, is an under diagnosed sleep disorder. It has a bimodal age of onset around 15 and 35 years. It is characterized by the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic/ hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Cataplexy is by far the most predictive feature of narcolepsy. Status cataplecticus is the occurrence of cataplexy repeatedly for hours or days, a rare presentation of narcolepsy. This report describes an elderly gentleman with late onset narcolepsy in the sixth decade of life presenting with initial and chief symptom of status cataplecticus.

  6. Psychotic symptoms in narcolepsy: phenomenology and a comparison with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Fortuyn, Hal A Droogleever; Lappenschaar, G A; Nienhuis, Fokko J; Furer, Joop W; Hodiamont, Paul P; Rijnders, Cees A; Lammers, Gert Jan; Renier, Willy O; Buitelaar, Jan K; Overeem, Sebastiaan

    2009-01-01

    Patients with narcolepsy often experience pervasive hypnagogic hallucinations, sometimes even leading to confusion with schizophrenia. We aimed to provide a detailed qualitative description of hypnagogic hallucinations and other "psychotic" symptoms in patients with narcolepsy and contrast these with schizophrenia patients and healthy controls. We also compared the prevalence of formal psychotic disorders between narcolepsy patients and controls. We used SCAN 2.1 interviews to compare psychotic symptoms between 60 patients with narcolepsy, 102 with schizophrenia and 120 matched population controls. In addition, qualitative data was collected to enable a detailed description of hypnagogic hallucinations in narcolepsy. There were clear differences in the pattern of hallucinatory experiences in narcolepsy vs. schizophrenia patients. Narcoleptics reported multisensory "holistic" hallucinations rather than the predominantly verbal-auditory sensory mode of schizophrenia patients. Psychotic symptoms such as delusions were not more frequent in narcolepsy compared to population controls. In addition, the prevalence of formal psychotic disorders was not increased in patients with narcolepsy. Almost half of narcoleptics reported moderate interference with functioning due to hypnagogic hallucinations, mostly due to related anxiety. Hypnagogic hallucinations in narcolepsy can be differentiated on a phenomenological basis from hallucinations in schizophrenia which is useful in differential diagnostic dilemmas.

  7. Extravasation injuries: current medical and surgical treatment.

    PubMed

    Doornaert, M; Monstrey, S; Roche, N

    2013-01-01

    Extravasation is a devastating complication of intravenous therapy that develops when a drug infiltrates the interstitial tissue surrounding the vein. Due to the uncertain and possibly dramatic outcome, early recognition and adequate treatment with the aid of a standardized protocol are needed. A pubmed literature search was conducted and all relevant articles were reviewed for the development of an extravasation treatment protocol. An overview of current treatment guidelines and clinical experience is provided. The extravasation treatment protocol was implied during 1 year in this university hospital with satisfactory outcome. Treatment starts with prevention. In case of an established extravasation injury, early recognition, assessment of severity, and treatment with medical and/or surgical therapies are recommended.

  8. Age-related macular degeneration: current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Hubschman, Jean Pierre; Reddy, Shantan; Schwartz, Steven D

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: Although important progress has been made in understanding age-related macular degeneration (AMD), management of the disease continues to be a challenge. AMD research has led to a widening of available treatment options and improved prognostic perspectives. This essay reviews these treatment options. Design: Interpretative essay. Methods: Literature review and interpretation. Results: Current treatments to preserve vision in patients with non-exudative AMD include antioxidant vitamins and mineral supplementations. Exudative AMD is currently most often treated monthly with anti-VEGF intravitreal injections. However, investigators are beginning to experiment with combination therapy and surgical approaches in an attempt to limit the number of treatment and reduce the financial burden on the health care system. Conclusion: By better understanding the basis and pathogenesis of AMD, newer therapies will continue to be developed that target specific pathways in patients with AMD, with the hoped for outcome of better management of the disease and improved visual acuity. PMID:19668560

  9. Pectus carinatum treatment in Canada: current practices.

    PubMed

    Emil, Sherif; Laberge, Jean-Martin; Sigalet, David; Baird, Robert

    2012-05-01

    Multiple treatment options currently exist for the correction of pectus carinatum (PC). We performed a survey of Canadian pediatric surgeons to define current practices. All active members of Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons were surveyed online during winter 2011 through the Canadian Association of Paediatric Surgeons Web site. The survey assessed multiple facets of PC evaluation and treatment, with particular emphasis on the practice of bracing. Forty-five active members (85%) responded, of whom 32 (71%) currently treat PC. Fifty-three percent of practices are low volume (<5 patients annually). In terms of preferred or most used treatment modality, 69% of surgeons used bracing, 25% performed Ravitch repairs, 3% performed open minimal cartilage resections, and 3% performed reverse Nuss procedures. Of 23 surgeons (72%) who used bracing, 83% used it for most or the patients. Fifty-seven percent judged their bracing results as good or excellent, and 74% felt that most or all patients braced were satisfied; 80% and 88% agreed or strongly agreed that bracing was generally preferable to surgical repair and that bracing should be first line treatment, respectively. Bracing is the preferred treatment for PC by most Canadian pediatric surgeons, despite lack of prospective outcome data. This presents an opportunity for a multicenter prospective study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Multiple sleep latency test in narcolepsy type 1 and narcolepsy type 2: A 5-year follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yu-Shu; Guilleminault, Christian; Lin, Cheng-Hui; Chen, Chia-Hsiang; Chin, Wei-Chih; Chen, Tzu-Shuang

    2018-05-29

    Excessively sleepy teenagers and young adults without sleep-disordered breathing are diagnosed with either narcolepsy type 1 or narcolepsy type 2, or hypersomnia, based on the presence/absence of cataplexy and the results of a multiple sleep latency test. However, there is controversy surrounding this nomenclature. We will try to find the differences between different diagnoses of hypersomnia from the results of the long-term follow-up evaluation of a sleep study. We diagnosed teenagers who had developed excessive daytime sleepiness based on the criteria of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders, 3rd edition. Each individual received the same clinical neurophysiologic testing every year for 5 years after the initial diagnosis of narcolepsy type 1 (n = 111) or type 2 (n = 46). The follow-up evaluation demonstrated that narcolepsy type 1 (narcolepsy-cataplexy) is a well-defined clinical entity, with very reproducible clinical neurophysiologic findings over time, whereas patients with narcolepsy type 2 presented clear clinical and test variability. By the fifth year of the follow-up evaluation, 17.6% of subjects did not meet the diagnostic criteria of narcolepsy type 2, and 23.9% didn't show any two sleep-onset rapid eye movement periods in multiple sleep latency during the 5-year follow-up. Therefore narcolepsy type 1 (narcolepsy-cataplexy) is a well-defined syndrome, with the presentation clearly related to the known consequences of destruction of hypocretin/orexin neurons. Narcolepsy type 2 covers patients with clinical and test variability over time, thus bringing into question the usage of the term "narcolepsy" to label these patients. © 2018 European Sleep Research Society.

  11. A Consensus Definition of Cataplexy in Mouse Models of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Scammell, Thomas E.; Willie, Jon T.; Guilleminault, Christian; Siegel, Jerome M.

    2009-01-01

    People with narcolepsy often have episodes of cataplexy, brief periods of muscle weakness triggered by strong emotions. Many researchers are now studying mouse models of narcolepsy, but definitions of cataplexy-like behavior in mice differ across labs. To establish a common language, the International Working Group on Rodent Models of Narcolepsy reviewed the literature on cataplexy in people with narcolepsy and in dog and mouse models of narcolepsy and then developed a consensus definition of murine cataplexy. The group concluded that murine cataplexy is an abrupt episode of nuchal atonia lasting at least 10 seconds. In addition, theta activity dominates the EEG during the episode, and video recordings document immobility. To distinguish a cataplexy episode from REM sleep after a brief awakening, at least 40 seconds of wakefulness must precede the episode. Bouts of cataplexy fitting this definition are common in mice with disrupted orexin/hypocretin signaling, but these events almost never occur in wild type mice. It remains unclear whether murine cataplexy is triggered by strong emotions or whether mice remain conscious during the episodes as in people with narcolepsy. This working definition provides helpful insights into murine cataplexy and should allow objective and accurate comparisons of cataplexy in future studies using mouse models of narcolepsy. Citation: Scammell TE; Willie JT; Guilleminault C; Siegel JM. A consensus definition of cataplexy in mouse models of narcolepsy. SLEEP 2009;32(1):111-116. PMID:19189786

  12. Circadian Rest-Activity Rhythm in Pediatric Type 1 Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Filardi, Marco; Pizza, Fabio; Bruni, Oliviero; Natale, Vincenzo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-06-01

    Pediatric type 1 narcolepsy is often challenging to diagnose and remains largely undiagnosed. Excessive daytime sleepiness, disrupted nocturnal sleep, and a peculiar phenotype of cataplexy are the prominent features. The knowledge available about the regulation of circadian rhythms in affected children is scarce. This study compared circadian rest-activity rhythm and actigraphic estimated sleep measures of children with type 1 narcolepsy versus healthy controls. Twenty-two drug-naïve type 1 narcolepsy children and 21 age- and sex- matched controls were monitored for seven days during the school week by actigraphy. Circadian activity rhythms were analyzed through functional linear modeling; nocturnal and diurnal sleep measures were estimated from activity using a validated algorithm. Children with type 1 narcolepsy presented an altered rest-activity rhythm characterized by enhanced motor activity throughout the night and blunted activity in the first afternoon. No difference was found between children with type 1 narcolepsy and controls in the timing of the circadian phase. Actigraphic sleep measures showed good discriminant capabilities in assessing type 1 narcolepsy nycthemeral disruption. Actigraphy reliably renders the nycthemeral disruption typical of narcolepsy type 1 in drug-naïve children with recent disease onset, indicating the sensibility of actigraphic assessment in the diagnostic work-up of childhood narcolepsy type 1. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  13. Pituitary Macrotumor Causing Narcolepsy-Cataplexy in a Dachshund.

    PubMed

    Schmid, S; Hodshon, A; Olin, S; Pfeiffer, I; Hecht, S

    2017-03-01

    Familial narcolepsy secondary to breed-specific mutations in the hypocretin receptor 2 gene and sporadic narcolepsy associated with hypocretin ligand deficiencies occur in dogs. In this report, a pituitary mass is described as a unique cause of narcolepsy-cataplexy in a dog. A 6-year-old male neutered Dachshund had presented for acute onset of feeding-induced cataplexy and was found to have a pituitary macrotumor on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Cerebral spinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels were normal, indicating that tumor effect on the ventral lateral nucleus of the hypothalamus was not the cause of the dog's narcolepsy-cataplexy. The dog was also negative for the hypocretin receptor 2 gene mutation associated with narcolepsy in Dachshunds, ruling out familial narcolepsy. The Dachshund underwent stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT), which resulted in reduction in the mass and coincident resolution of the cataplectic attacks. Nine months after SRT, the dog developed clinical hyperadrenocorticism, which was successfully managed with trilostane. These findings suggest that disruptions in downstream signaling of hypocretin secondary to an intracranial mass effect might result in narcolepsy-cataplexy in dogs and that brain MRI should be strongly considered in sporadic cases of narcolepsy-cataplexy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  14. EIF3G is associated with narcolepsy across ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Holm, Anja; Lin, Ling; Faraco, Juliette; Mostafavi, Sara; Battle, Alexis; Zhu, Xiaowei; Levinson, Douglas F; Han, Fang; Gammeltoft, Steen; Jennum, Poul; Mignot, Emmanuel; Kornum, Birgitte R

    2015-11-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy, an autoimmune disease affecting hypocretin (orexin) neurons, is strongly associated with HLA-DQB1*06:02. Among polymorphisms associated with the disease is single-nucleotide polymorphism rs2305795 (c.*638G>A) located within the P2RY11 gene. P2RY11 is in a region of synteny conserved in mammals and zebrafish containing PPAN, EIF3G and DNMT1 (DNA methyltransferase 1). As mutations in DNMT1 cause a rare dominant form of narcolepsy in association with deafness, cerebellar ataxia and dementia, we questioned whether the association with P2RY11 in sporadic narcolepsy could be secondary to linkage disequilibrium with DNMT1. Based on genome-wide association data from two cohorts of European and Chinese ancestry, we found that the narcolepsy association signal drops sharply between P2RY11/EIF3G and DNMT1, suggesting that the association with narcolepsy does not extend into the DNMT1 gene region. Interestingly, using transethnic mapping, we identified a novel single-nucleotide polymorphism rs3826784 (c.596-260A>G) in the EIF3G gene also associated with narcolepsy. The disease-associated allele increases EIF3G mRNA expression. EIF3G is located in the narcolepsy risk locus and EIF3G expression correlates with PPAN and P2RY11 expression. This suggests shared regulatory mechanisms that might be affected by the polymorphism and are of relevance to narcolepsy.

  15. Narcolepsy and Orexins: An Example of Progress in Sleep Research

    PubMed Central

    De la Herrán-Arita, Alberto K.; Guerra-Crespo, Magdalena; Drucker-Colín, René

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurodegenerative disease caused by a deficiency of orexin-producing neurons in the lateral hypothalamus. It is clinically characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and by intrusions into wakefulness of physiological aspects of rapid eye movement sleep such as cataplexy, sleep paralysis, and hypnagogic hallucinations. The major pathophysiology of narcolepsy has been recently described on the bases of the discovery of the neuropeptides named orexins (hypocretins) in 1998; considerable evidence, summarized below, demonstrates that narcolepsy is the result of alterations in the genes involved in the pathology of the orexin ligand or its receptor. Deficient orexin transmission is sufficient to produce narcolepsy, as we describe here, animal models with dysregulated orexin signaling exhibit a narcolepsy-like phenotype. Remarkably, these narcoleptic models have different alterations of the orexinergic circuit, this diversity provide us with the means for making comparison, and have a better understanding of orexin-cell physiology. It is of particular interest that the most remarkable findings regarding this sleep disorder were fortuitous and due to keen observations. Sleep is a highly intricate and regulated state, and narcolepsy is a disorder that still remains as one of the unsolved mysteries in science. Nevertheless, advances and development of technology in neuroscience will provide us with the necessary tools to unravel the narcolepsy puzzle in the near future. Through an evaluation of the scientific literature we traced an updated picture of narcolepsy and orexins in order to provide insight into the means by which neurobiological knowledge is constructed. PMID:21541306

  16. Concomitant loss of dynorphin, NARP, and orexin in narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Crocker, Amanda; España, Rodrigo A.; Papadopoulou, Maria; Saper, Clifford B.; Faraco, Juliette; Sakurai, Takeshi; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Scammell, Thomas E.

    2008-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy with cataplexy is associated with a loss of orexin/hypocretin. It is speculated that an autoimmune process kills the orexin-producing neurons, but these cells may survive yet fail to produce orexin. Objective To examine whether other markers of the orexin neurons are lost in narcolepsy with cataplexy. Methods We used immunohistochemistry and in situ hybridization to examine the expression of orexin, neuronal activity-regulated pentraxin (NARP), and prodynorphin in hypothalami from five control and two narcoleptic individuals. Results In the control hypothalami, at least 80% of the orexin-producing neurons also contained prodynorphin mRNA and NARP. In the patients with narcolepsy, the number of cells producing these markers was reduced to about 5–10% of normal. Conclusions Narcolepsy with cataplexy is likely caused by a loss of the orexin-producing neurons. In addition, loss of dynorphin and NARP may contribute to the symptoms of narcolepsy. PMID:16247044

  17. Narcolepsy in Adolescence—A Missed Diagnosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Anoop K.; Sahoo, Swapnajeet

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT: Narcolepsy is an uncommon sleep cycle disorder with a usual onset in adolescence, but it is often misdiagnosed and underdiagnosed. Rarely is the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis seen in patients. The clinical characteristics of narcolepsy are often confused with many psychiatric and neurologic disorders. Lack of clinical awareness about narcolepsy leads to frequent prescriptions of antiepileptics and psychotropics, which can adversely affect the quality of life of children and adolescents. We report a case of an adolescent male who presented with all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy and had been misdiagnosed with epilepsy, psychosis, and depression. We discuss various issues regarding narcolepsy in children and adolescents. PMID:29616151

  18. Status Cataplecticus as Initial Presentation of Late Onset Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Panda, Samhita

    2014-01-01

    Narcolepsy, one of the important causes of hypersomnia, is an under diagnosed sleep disorder. It has a bimodal age of onset around 15 and 35 years. It is characterized by the tetrad of excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic/ hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. Cataplexy is by far the most predictive feature of narcolepsy. Status cataplecticus is the occurrence of cataplexy repeatedly for hours or days, a rare presentation of narcolepsy. This report describes an elderly gentleman with late onset narcolepsy in the sixth decade of life presenting with initial and chief symptom of status cataplecticus. Citation: Panda S. Status cataplecticus as initial presentation of late onset narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):207-209. PMID:24533005

  19. Pseudotumor cerebri syndrome in a patient with narcolepsy type 1.

    PubMed

    Rossor, Thomas; Lim, Ming; VanDenEshof, Kirandeep; Gringras, Paul

    2018-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) is a chronic primary disorder of hypersomnolence characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disrupted nocturnal sleep. NT1 is linked to hypothalamic hypocretin deficiency, strongly associated with Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) marker DQB1*06:02 and of probable autoimmune origin. NT1 is usually associated with increased rates of overweight and obesity, and sometimes with increases in overnight blood pressure and increased rates of hypoventilation with raised CO 2 levels overnight. Many of these are predisposing factors for pseudotumor cerebri syndrome (PTCS). We present a case of a young girl with both NT1 and PTCS that responded well to treatment with acetazolamide after early identification, with improvement of headache and resolution of hypoventilation. Copyright © 2017 European Paediatric Neurology Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. A patient with coexisting narcolepsy and morbid jealousy showing favourable response to fluoxetine.

    PubMed Central

    Wing, Y. K.; Lee, S.; Chiu, H. F.; Ho, C. K.; Chen, C. N.

    1994-01-01

    A 37 year old Chinese man suffered from coexisting narcolepsy and morbid jealousy which were precipitated by head injury 5 years previously. Fluoxetine 20 mg/day reduced his narcoleptic symptoms and morbid jealousy but not his sleepiness. On defaulting treatment, the patient's symptoms and marital problem recurred. A common central serotonin disturbance might be involved in mediating the sleep disorder and associated psychopathology. PMID:8140016

  1. Selected sleep disorders: restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder, sleep apnea syndrome, and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Erman, Milton K

    2006-12-01

    Sleep disorders, including restless legs syndrome and periodic limb movement disorder, sleep apnea syndrome, and narcolepsy, are prevalent medical conditions, likely to be seen by practicing psychiatrists. Awareness of these conditions and their presentations, pathophysiology, and treatment allows psychiatrists to treat these conditions where appropriate, to minimize complications and health consequences associated with delayed diagnosis, and to reduce the burden of disease that these conditions may place on patients already experiencing primary psychiatric disorders.

  2. Kidney cancer: current and novel treatment options.

    PubMed

    Jonasch, Eric

    2015-05-01

    Antiangiogenic therapies remain the standard of care in the front-line setting for renal cell carcinoma, although vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) blockade is not sufficient, and many patients do not respond to such treatment. With a host of approved agents, questions arise as to how best to use them in both initial and secondary treatments. Optimal sequences are currently being tested in various clinical trials. Because approximately 20% of patients exhibiting primary resistance to these anti-VEGF therapies, new therapies are needed. Novel therapies such as MET and AXL inhibitors as well as checkpoint antibodies hold promise for the future. Copyright © 2015 by the National Comprehensive Cancer Network.

  3. Pharmacological treatment of anxiety disorders: Current treatments and future directions✩

    PubMed Central

    Farach, Frank J.; Pruitt, Larry D.; Jun, Janie J.; Jerud, Alissa B.; Zoellner, Lori A.; Roy-Byrne, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Modern pharmacological treatments for anxiety disorders are safer and more tolerable than they were 30 years ago. Unfortunately, treatment efficacy and duration have not improved in most cases despite a greater understanding of the pathophysiology of anxiety. Moreover, innovative treatments have not reached the market despite billions of research dollars invested in drug development. In reviewing the literature on current treatments, we argue that evidence-based practice would benefit from better research on the causes of incomplete treatment response as well as the comparative efficacy of drug combinations and sequencing. We also survey two broad approaches to the development of innovative anxiety treatments: the continued development of drugs based on specific neuroreceptors and the pharmacological manipulation of fear-related memory. We highlight directions for future research, as neither of these approaches is ready for routine clinical use. PMID:23023162

  4. Esophageal achalasia: current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Schlottmann, Francisco; Patti, Marco G

    2018-05-27

    Esophageal achalasia is a primary esophageal motility disorder of unknown origin, characterized by lack of peristalsis and by incomplete or absent relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter in response to swallowing. The goal of treatment is to eliminate the functional obstruction at the level of the gastroesophageal junction Areas covered: This comprehensive review will evaluate the current literature, illustrating the diagnostic evaluation and providing an evidence-based treatment algorithm for this disease Expert commentary: Today we have three very effective therapeutic modalities to treat patients with achalasia - pneumatic dilatation, per-oral endoscopic myotomy and laparoscopic Heller myotomy with fundoplication. Treatment should be tailored to the individual patient, in centers where a multidisciplinary approach is available. Esophageal resection should be considered as a last resort for patients who have failed prior therapeutic attempts.

  5. Changes in Medical Services and Drug Utilization and Associated Costs After Narcolepsy Diagnosis in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Villa, Kathleen F.; Reaven, Nancy L.; Funk, Susan E.; McGaughey, Karen; Black, Jed

    2018-01-01

    Background Healthcare utilization and the cost implications associated with undiagnosed and/or misdiagnosed narcolepsy have not been evaluated, and there is scant literature characterizing the newly diagnosed population with narcolepsy with respect to treatment patterns and resource utilization. Objective To analyze the changes in medication use, healthcare utilization, and the associated costs after a new diagnosis of narcolepsy. Methods In this retrospective cohort study, we used data from the Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases, between January 2006 and March 2013, to identify patients who had a probable new diagnosis of narcolepsy—defined as a de novo medical claim for a multiple sleep latency test—which was preceded by ≥6 months of continuous insurance and was followed by a de novo diagnosis of narcolepsy. The utilization and cost of medical services and the percentage of patients filling prescriptions for narcolepsy-related medications were evaluated in 3 consecutive 1-year periods from the date of a positive multiple sleep latency test result (ie, index date), and each year's findings were compared with the annualized results from the 6-month preindex period. Results A total of 3757 patients who met the definition of a new diagnosis of narcolepsy were identified. The total medical service utilization decreased each year from a preindex average of 28.2 visits per patient per year (PPPY) to 26.9 visits (P <.05), 23.1 visits (P <.0001), and 22.5 visits (P <.0001) PPPY in years 1, 2, and 3 postdiagnosis, respectively. In each outpatient service category, the medical services utilization decreased from preindex to year 3 postdiagnosis, including hospital outpatient and physician visits (P <.0001), and other outpatient and emergency department visits (P <.05). The percentage of patients receiving narcolepsy-related medications increased from 54.0% preindex to 77.4%, 70.0%, and 66.9% for years 1, 2, and 3 postindex (all P <.0001 vs preindex

  6. Surgical treatment of Bell's palsy: current attitudes.

    PubMed

    Smouha, Eric; Toh, Elizabeth; Schaitkin, Barry M

    2011-09-01

    To learn the current management of Bell's palsy among practicing otologists and neurotologists and to better define the role of surgical decompression of the facial nerve in the treatment of Bell's palsy. Survey questionnaire. We conducted a survey of members of the American Otological Society and the American Neurotology Society to learn their current practices in the treatment of Bell's palsy. Eighty-six neurotologists responded out of 334 surveys (26%). The majority of respondents obtain magnetic resonance imaging and electrical testing for new patients and treat with a combination of steroids and antiviral agents. More than two thirds of respondents would recommend surgery to patients who met the established electrophysiologic criteria (electroneuronography <10% normal, no spontaneous motor unit action potentials on electromyography within 10 days of onset of complete paralysis). However, only half believe that surgical decompression should be the standard of care, and only half would use a standard middle fossa approach. Lack of evidence was the most commonly cited reason for not recommending surgery. Several respondents wrote that they would leave the option of surgery to the patient. Most important, one third of neurotologists have not performed a surgical decompression for Bell's palsy in the last 10 years, and 95% perform less than one procedure per year. Disagreement persists among practicing otologists about the role of surgical decompression for Bell's palsy. More convincing clinical evidence will be needed before there is widespread consensus regarding the surgical treatment of this condition. Copyright © 2011 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  7. The Nightly Use of Sodium Oxybate Is Associated with a Reduction in Nocturnal Sleep Disruption: A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled Study in Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Black, Jed; Pardi, Daniel; Hornfeldt, Carl S.; Inhaber, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To further explore the effects of sodium oxybate (SXB) administration on nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy patients during a double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel group study conducted with 228 adult patients with narcolepsy/cataplexy in the United States, Canada, and Europe. Method: Patients were withdrawn from antidepressants and sedative/hypnotics, and then randomized to receive 4.5, 6, or 9 g SXB or placebo nightly for 8 weeks. Patients receiving 6 and 9 g/night doses were titrated to their final dose in weekly 1.5 g increments, while patients receiving placebo were randomized to undergo a similar mock dose titration. The use of stimulant therapy continued unchanged. Changes in sleep architecture were measured using centrally scored nocturnal polysomnograms. Daily diaries were used to record changes in narcolepsy symptoms and adverse events. Results: Following 8 weeks of SXB treatment, study patients demonstrated significant dose-related increases in the duration of stage 3 and 4 sleep, reaching a median increase of 52.5 minutes in patients receiving 9 g nightly. Compared to placebo-treated patients, delta power was significantly increased in all dose groups. Stage 1 sleep and the frequency of nocturnal awakenings were each significantly decreased at the 6 and 9 g/night doses. The changes in nocturnal sleep coincided with significant decreases in the severity and frequency of narcolepsy symptoms. Conclusions: The nightly administration of SXB to narcolepsy patients significantly impacts measures of slow wave sleep, wake after sleep onset, awakenings, total sleep time, and stage 1 sleep in a dose-related manner. The frequency and severity of narcolepsy symptoms decreased with treatment. Citation: Black J; Pardi D; Hornfeldt CS; Inhaber N. The nightly use of sodium oxybate is associated with a reduction in nocturnal sleep disruption: a double-blind, placebo-controlled study in patients with narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2010;6(6):596-602. PMID:21206549

  8. Mechanism of action of narcolepsy medications.

    PubMed

    Gowda, Chandan R; Lundt, Leslie P

    2014-12-01

    The medications used to treat narcolepsy are targeted toward alleviating symptoms such as excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. The cause of this neurological sleep disorder is still not completely clear, though a destruction of hypocretin/orexin neurons has been implicated. The destruction of these neurons is linked to inactivity of neurotransmitters including histamine, norepinephrine, acetylcholine, and serotonin, causing a disturbance in the sleep/wake cycles of narcoleptic patients. Stimulants and MAOIs have traditionally been used to counteract excessive daytime sleepiness and sleep attacks by inhibiting the breakdown of catecholamines. Newer drugs, called wake-promoting agents, have recently become first-line agents due to their better side-effect profile, efficacy, and lesser potential for abuse. These agents similarly inhibit reuptake of dopamine, but have a novel mechanism of action, as they have been found to increase neuronal activity in the tuberomamillary nucleus and in orexin neurons. Sodium oxybate, a sodium salt of gamma-hydroxybutyrate (GHB), is another class that is used to treat many symptoms of narcolepsy, and is the only U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved medication for cataplexy. It has a different mechanism of action than either stimulants or wake-promoting agents, as it binds to its own unique receptor. Antidepressants, like selective serotonin re-uptake inhibitors (SSRIs) and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs), have also been used, as similar to stimulants, they inhibit reuptake of specific catecholamines. In this article, we seek to review the mechanisms behind these classes of drugs in relation to the proposed pathophysiology of narcolepsy. Appropriate clinical strategies will be discussed, including specific combinations of medications that have been shown to be effective.

  9. Executive Control of Attention in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Bayard, Sophie; Croisier Langenier, Muriel; Cochen De Cock, Valérie; Scholz, Sabine; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2012-01-01

    Background Narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) is a disabling sleep disorder characterized by early loss of hypocretin neurons that project to areas involved in the attention network. We characterized the executive control of attention in drug-free patients with NC to determine whether the executive deficits observed in patients with NC are specific to the disease itself or whether they reflect performance changes due to the severity of excessive daytime sleepiness. Methodology Twenty-two patients with NC compared to 22 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy (NwC) matched for age, gender, intellectual level, objective daytime sleepiness and number of sleep onset REM periods (SOREMPs) were studied. Thirty-two matched healthy controls were included. All participants underwent a standardized interview, completed questionnaires, and neuropsychological tests. All patients underwent a polysomnography followed by multiple sleep latency tests (MSLT), with neuropsychological evaluation performed the same day between MSLT sessions. Principal Findings Irrespective of diagnosis, patients reported higher self-reported attentional complaints associated with the intensity of depressive symptoms. Patients with NC performed slower and more variably on simple reaction time tasks than patients with NwC, who did not differ from controls. Patients with NC and NwC generally performed slower, reacted more variably, and made more errors than controls on executive functioning tests. Individual profile analyses showed a clear heterogeneity of the severity of executive deficit. This severity was related to objective sleepiness, higher number of SOREMPs on the MSLT, and lower intelligence quotient. The nature and severity of the executive deficits were unrelated to NC and NwC diagnosis. Conclusions We demonstrated that drug-free patients with NC and NwC complained of attention deficit, with altered executive control of attention being explained by the severity of objective sleepiness and

  10. A consensus definition of cataplexy in mouse models of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Scammell, Thomas E; Willie, Jon T; Guilleminault, Christian; Siegel, Jerome M

    2009-01-01

    People with narcolepsy often have episodes of cataplexy, brief periods of muscle weakness triggered by strong emotions. Many researchers are now studying mouse models of narcolepsy, but definitions of cataplexy-like behavior in mice differ across labs. To establish a common language, the International Working Group on Rodent Models of Narcolepsy reviewed the literature on cataplexy in people with narcolepsy and in dog and mouse models of narcolepsy and then developed a consensus definition of murine cataplexy. The group concluded that murine cataplexy is an abrupt episode of nuchal atonia lasting at least 10 seconds. In addition, theta activity dominates the EEG during the episode, and video recordings document immobility. To distinguish a cataplexy episode from REM sleep after a brief awakening, at least 40 seconds of wakefulness must precede the episode. Bouts of cataplexy fitting this definition are common in mice with disrupted orexin/hypocretin signaling, but these events almost never occur in wild type mice. It remains unclear whether murine cataplexy is triggered by strong emotions or whether mice remain conscious during the episodes as in people with narcolepsy. This working definition provides helpful insights into murine cataplexy and should allow objective and accurate comparisons of cataplexy in future studies using mouse models of narcolepsy.

  11. Nocturnal Sleep Dynamics Identify Narcolepsy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Franceschini, Christian; Liguori, Rocco; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the reliability of nocturnal sleep dynamics in the differential diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence. Design: Cross-sectional. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Patients: One hundred seventy-five patients with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, n = 79), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, n = 22), idiopathic hypersomnia (IH, n = 22), and “subjective” hypersomnolence (sHS, n = 52). Interventions: None. Methods: Polysomnographic (PSG) work-up included 48 h of continuous PSG recording. From nocturnal PSG conventional sleep macrostructure, occurrence of sleep onset rapid eye movement period (SOREMP), sleep stages distribution, and sleep stage transitions were calculated. Patient groups were compared, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to test the diagnostic utility of nocturnal PSG data to identify NT1. Results: Sleep macrostructure was substantially stable in the 2 nights of each diagnostic group. NT1 and NT2 patients had lower latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NT1 patients showed the highest number of awakenings, sleep stage transitions, and more time spent in N1 sleep, as well as most SOREMPs at daytime PSG and at multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) than all other groups. ROC curve analysis showed that nocturnal SOREMP (area under the curve of 0.724 ± 0.041, P < 0.0001), percent of total sleep time spent in N1 (0.896 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), and the wakefulness-sleep transition index (0.796 ± 0.034, P < 0.0001) had a good sensitivity and specificity profile to identify NT1 sleep, especially when used in combination (0.903 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), similarly to SOREMP number at continuous daytime PSG (0.899 ± 0.026, P < 0.0001) and at MSLT (0.956 ± 0.015, P < 0.0001). Conclusions: Sleep macrostructure (i.e. SOREMP, N1 timing) including stage transitions reliably identifies hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 among central disorders of hypersomnolence. Citation: Pizza F, Vandi S

  12. Diabetic neuropathy: Clinical manifestations and current treatments

    PubMed Central

    Callaghan, Brian C.; Cheng, Hsinlin; Stables, Catherine L.; Smith, Andrea L.; Feldman, Eva L.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetic peripheral neuropathy is a prevalent, disabling condition. The most common manifestation is a distal symmetric polyneuropathy (DSP), but many patterns of nerve injury can occur. Currently, the only effective treatments are glucose control and pain management. While glucose control dramatically decreases the development of neuropathy in those with type 1 diabetes, the effect is likely much smaller in those with type 2 diabetes. High levels of evidence support the use of certain anticonvulsants and antidepressants for pain management in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. However, the lack of disease modifying therapies for diabetic DSP makes the identification of new modifiable risk factors essential. Intriguingly, growing evidence supports an association between metabolic syndrome components, including pre-diabetes, and neuropathy. Future studies are needed to further explore this relationship with implications for new treatments for this common disease. PMID:22608666

  13. [Current treatment concepts of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, F; Engelhardt, M; Rawluk, J; Mertelsmann, R; Passlick, B; Wäsch, R

    2011-09-01

    Lung cancer occurs with a median age of 69 years. The main cause is cigarette smoking. For both genders lung cancer is the third-most frequent tumor in Germany. While in an operable tumor stage 30-80% of the patients can reach long-term survival, the prognosis in the metastasised stage is unfavourable with a 5-year overall survival rate of 6% for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and 18% for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Lung cancer is subject of intense research to improve the outcome. This article gives an overview of current treatment options. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  14. Mastocytosis: current concepts in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Escribano, L; Akin, C; Castells, M; Orfao, A; Metcalfe, D D

    2002-12-01

    Mastocytosis consists of a group of disorders characterized by a pathologic increase in mast cells in tissues including skin, bone marrow, liver, spleen, and lymph nodes. Mastocytosis is a rare disease. Because of this, general practitioners have limited exposure to its clinical manifestations, diagnosis, classification, and management. Diagnosis of mastocytosis is suspected on clinical grounds and is established by histopathologic examination of involved tissues such as skin and bone marrow. The most common clinical sign of mastocytosis is the presence of typical skin lesions of urticaria pigmentosa. Most patients experience symptoms related to mast cell mediator release, and prevention of the effects of these mediators on tissues constitutes the major therapeutic goal in the management of mastocytosis. Despite recent advances in knowledge about the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and classification of mastocytosis, a curative treatment for mastocytosis does not now exist. Management of patients within all categories of mastocytosis includes: (1) a careful counseling of patients (parents in pediatric cases) and care providers, (2) avoidance of factors triggering acute mediator release, (3) treatment of acute mast cell mediator release, (4) treatment of chronic mast cell mediator release, and if indicated (5) an attempt to treat organ infiltration by mast cells. The goal of this manuscript is to provide an overview of the mediators produced and released by mast cells, the diagnostic criteria for the different variants of mastocytosis, and the treatment options currently available.

  15. Current treatment approaches to overweight in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Durant, Nefertiti; Cox, Joanne

    2005-08-01

    The prevalence of overweight among adolescents aged 12 to 19 in the United States has steadily increased since the 1960s. The purpose of this review is to familiarize primary care clinicians with the most recent primary care, pharmacotherapy, and surgical options for the treatment of overweight in adolescence. Initial treatment of the overweight adolescent should involve a comprehensive approach that facilitates changes in diet, exercise, and behavior that engage the entire family as participants and role models. For adolescents in whom a comprehensive program of diet, exercise, and behavior modification is unsuccessful, referral to a multidisciplinary team to explore further options, which may include medication and bariatric surgery, should be considered. Experience with medication for use in weight loss and bariatric surgery in adolescents is limited. Currently, two medications, orlistat and sibutramine, have been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration for long-term use in adolescents. Bariatric surgery is currently recommended only for adolescents who are severely overweight (body mass index>or=40) and have comorbid conditions. This intervention should be considered only after failure of other comprehensive interventions and intense medical and psychologic evaluation by a specialty referral center. More research is needed to clarify the roles and timing of diet, exercise, behavior modification, pharmacotherapy, and surgical intervention. Also, long-term studies are needed to further determine the benefits and risks of pharmacotherapy and bariatric surgery in adolescents.

  16. Continuous intrathecal orexin delivery inhibits cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Mahesh K; Aritake, Kosuke; Imanishi, Aya; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Ichikawa, Tadashi; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Urade, Yoshihiro; Yanagisawa, Masashi

    2018-06-05

    Narcolepsy-cataplexy is a chronic neurological disorder caused by loss of orexin (hypocretin)-producing neurons, associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations, and fragmentation of nighttime sleep. Currently, human narcolepsy is treated by providing symptomatic therapies, which can be associated with an array of side effects. Although peripherally administered orexin does not efficiently penetrate the blood-brain barrier, centrally delivered orexin can effectively alleviate narcoleptic symptoms in animal models. Chronic intrathecal drug infusion through an implantable pump is a clinically available strategy to treat a number of neurological diseases. Here we demonstrate that the narcoleptic symptoms of orexin knockout mice can be reversed by lumbar-level intrathecal orexin delivery. Orexin was delivered via a chronically implanted intrathecal catheter at the upper lumbar level. The computed tomographic scan confirmed that intrathecally administered contrast agent rapidly moved from the spinal cord to the brain. Intrathecally delivered orexin was detected in the brain by radioimmunoassay at levels comparable to endogenous orexin levels. Cataplexy and sleep-onset REM sleep were significantly decreased in orexin knockout mice during and long after slow infusion of orexin (1 nmol/1 µL/h). Sleep/wake states remained unchanged both quantitatively as well as qualitatively. Intrathecal orexin failed to induce any changes in double orexin receptor-1 and -2 knockout mice. This study supports the concept of intrathecal orexin delivery as a potential therapy for narcolepsy-cataplexy to improve the well-being of patients.

  17. Current treatment paradigms in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Fries, J F

    2000-06-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has traditionally been treated using the pyramid approach, in which non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the first-line treatment and disease-modifying anti-rheumatic drugs (DMARDs) are introduced relatively late in the disease. This approach is no longer valid. Previously regarded as a benign disease, RA is now recognized as causing substantial morbidity and mortality, as do the NSAIDs used in treatment. DMARDs are more effective in controlling the pain and disability of RA than NSAIDs, and are often no more toxic. The current treatment paradigm emphasizes early, consistent use of DMARDs. A 'sawtooth' strategy of DMARD use has been proposed, in which a rising but low level of disability triggers a change in therapy. Determining the most clinically useful DMARD combinations and the optimal sequence of DMARD use requires effectiveness studies, Bayesian approaches and analyses of long-term outcomes. Such approaches will allow optimization of multiple drug therapies in RA, and should substantially improve the long-term outcome for many patients.

  18. Parastomal hernia – current knowledge and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Styliński, Roman; Rudzki, Sławomir

    2018-01-01

    Intestinal stoma creation is one of the most common surgical procedures. The most common long-term complication following stoma creation is parastomal hernia, which according to some authors is practically unavoidable. Statistical differences of its occurrence are mainly due to patient observation time and evaluation criteria. Consequently, primary prevention methods such as placement of prosthetic mesh and newly developed minimally invasive methods of stoma creation are used. It seems that in the light of evidence-based medicine, the best way to treat parastomal hernia is the one that the surgeon undertaking therapy is the most experienced in and is suited to the individuality of each patient, his condition and comorbidities. As a general rule, reinforcing the abdominal wall with a prosthetic mesh is the treatment of choice, with a low rate of complications and relapses over a long period of time. The current trend is to use lightweight, large pore meshes. PMID:29643952

  19. Insufficient non-REM sleep intensity in narcolepsy-cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Khatami, Ramin; Landolt, Hans-Peter; Achermann, Peter; Rétey, Julia V; Werth, Esther; Mathis, Johannes; Bassetti, Claudio L

    2007-08-01

    To compare electroencephalogram (EEG) dynamics during nocturnal sleep in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy and healthy controls. Fragmented nocturnal sleep is a prominent feature and contributes to excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy-cataplexy. Only 3 studies have addressed changes in homeostatic sleep regulation as a possible mechanism underlying nocturnal sleep fragmentation in narcolepsy-cataplexy. Baseline sleep of 11 drug-naive patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy (19-37 years) and 11 matched controls (18-41 years) was polysomnographically recorded. The EEG was subjected to spectral analysis. None, baseline condition. All patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy but no control subjects showed a sleep-onset rapid eye movement (REM) episode. Non-REM (NREM)-REM sleep cycles were longer in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy than in controls (P = 0.04). Mean slow-wave activity declined in both groups across the first 3 NREM sleep episodes (P<0.001). The rate of decline, however, appeared to be steeper in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy (time constant: narcolepsy-cataplexy 51.1 +/- 23.8 minutes [mean +/- SEM], 95% confidence interval [CI]: 33.4-108.8 minutes) than in controls (169.4 +/- 81.5 minutes, 95% CI: 110.9-357.6 minutes) as concluded from nonoverlapping 95% confidence interval of the time constants. The steeper decline of SWA in narcolepsy-cataplexy compared to controls was related to an impaired build-up of slow-wave activity in the second cycle. Sleep in the second cycle was interrupted in patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy, when compared with controls, by an increased number (P = 0.01) and longer duration (P = 0.01) of short wake episodes. Insufficient NREM sleep intensity is associated with nonconsolidated nocturnal sleep in narcolepsy-cataplexy. The inability to consolidate sleep manifests itself when NREM sleep intensity has decayed below a certain level and is reflected in an altered time course of slow-wave activity across NREM sleep episodes.

  20. Doxazosin in the current treatment of hypertension.

    PubMed

    Wykretowicz, Andrzej; Guzik, Przemyslaw; Wysocki, Henryk

    2008-03-01

    Evidence from various studies has shown that even a very small reduction in the blood pressure explains the majority of benefits in cardiovascular outcomes. Although doxazosin is a relatively old drug, it is a very effective add-on therapeutic agent. It has been used in a variety of clinical trials, including different groups of hypertensive patients such as diabetics, the elderly, patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia or hypercholesterolaemia, the obese or Afro-Americans and in combination with all major groups of antihypertensive drugs such as: calcium channel antagonists, diuretics, beta-adrenoreceptor antagonists, angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors and angiotensin-2 receptor blockers. The purpose of this article is to review the role of doxazosin in the current treatment of hypertension. English-language reports published in 1986 - 2007 were retrieved. Data extraction was based on articles reporting at least 15 or more patients treated with combination of doxazosin with other antihypertensive drugs. In these studies doxazosin in either standard or extended-release formulation was added as a second- or third-line agent. The two formulations of doxazosin, although chemically identical, appear to differ in some other effects. A large proportion of patients demonstrated a favourable blood pressure response with relatively few treatment-associated side effects showing that this drug appears to be a valuable add-on antihypertensive treatment option. Doxazosin reduces blood pressure and additionally influences other risk factors of coronary heart disease. However, it should be clearly stated that the clinical role of 'beyond blood pressure' effects of doxazosin are largely undetermined.

  1. Delusional Confusion of Dreaming and Reality in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Wamsley, Erin; Donjacour, Claire E.H.M.; Scammell, Thomas E.; Lammers, Gert Jan; Stickgold, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: We investigated a generally unappreciated feature of the sleep disorder narcolepsy, in which patients mistake the memory of a dream for a real experience and form sustained delusions about significant events. Design: We interviewed patients with narcolepsy and healthy controls to establish the prevalence of this complaint and identify its predictors. Setting: Academic medical centers in Boston, Massachusetts and Leiden, The Netherlands. Participants: Patients (n = 46) with a diagnosis of narcolepsy with cataplexy, and age-matched healthy healthy controls (n = 41). Interventions: N/A. Measurements and Results: “Dream delusions” were surprisingly common in narcolepsy and were often striking in their severity. As opposed to fleeting hypnagogic and hypnopompic hallucinations of the sleep/wake transition, dream delusions were false memories induced by the experience of a vivid dream, which led to false beliefs that could persist for days or weeks. Conclusions: The delusional confusion of dreamed events with reality is a prominent feature of narcolepsy, and suggests the possibility of source memory deficits in this disorder that have not yet been fully characterized. Citation: Wamsley E; Donjacour CE; Scammell TE; Lammers GJ; Stickgold R. Delusional confusion of dreaming and reality in narcolepsy. SLEEP 2014;37(2):419-422. PMID:24501437

  2. Clinical utility of the Chinese version of the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale in children with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chien-Ming; Huang, Yu-Shu; Song, Yu-Chen

    2010-04-01

    The present study examined the psychometric properties of the Chinese version of the Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) and the utility of the PDSS as a screening tool for pathological daytime sleepiness in teenagers with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and narcolepsy. The PDSS was first administered to 238 middle and high school students to assess the reliability of the scale, and then administered to 28 teenagers with OSA, 31 teenagers with narcolepsy, and 34 normal controls to evaluate its clinical utility. Test-retest reliability and internal consistency were acceptable. The PDSS scores were significantly higher in narcoleptic subjects than in subjects with OSA, and higher in OSA syndrome (OSAS) subjects than normal controls. Furthermore, the scores decreased in narcoleptic subjects after medical treatment. Both reliability and validity were proven to be good. As a screening tool for narcolepsy, receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve analysis showed that the PDSS, with a cut-off score of 16/17, had good sensitivity (87.1%) and fair specificity (74.3%) for identifying individuals with narcolepsy. When used for screening OSA, however, the differentiating power was not as good. The PDSS is a reliable and valid tool for the measurement of sleepiness in clinical youth populations. When used as a screening tool, it is useful for sleep disorders involving more severe pathological sleepiness, as in narcolepsy.

  3. Nocturnal Sleep Dynamics Identify Narcolepsy Type 1.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Franceschini, Christian; Liguori, Rocco; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2015-08-01

    To evaluate the reliability of nocturnal sleep dynamics in the differential diagnosis of central disorders of hypersomnolence. Cross-sectional. Sleep laboratory. One hundred seventy-five patients with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, n = 79), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, n = 22), idiopathic hypersomnia (IH, n = 22), and "subjective" hypersomnolence (sHS, n = 52). None. Polysomnographic (PSG) work-up included 48 h of continuous PSG recording. From nocturnal PSG conventional sleep macrostructure, occurrence of sleep onset rapid eye movement period (SOREMP), sleep stages distribution, and sleep stage transitions were calculated. Patient groups were compared, and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis was used to test the diagnostic utility of nocturnal PSG data to identify NT1. Sleep macrostructure was substantially stable in the 2 nights of each diagnostic group. NT1 and NT2 patients had lower latency to rapid eye movement (REM) sleep, and NT1 patients showed the highest number of awakenings, sleep stage transitions, and more time spent in N1 sleep, as well as most SOREMPs at daytime PSG and at multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) than all other groups. ROC curve analysis showed that nocturnal SOREMP (area under the curve of 0.724 ± 0.041, P < 0.0001), percent of total sleep time spent in N1 (0.896 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), and the wakefulness-sleep transition index (0.796 ± 0.034, P < 0.0001) had a good sensitivity and specificity profile to identify NT1 sleep, especially when used in combination (0.903 ± 0.023, P < 0.0001), similarly to SOREMP number at continuous daytime PSG (0.899 ± 0.026, P < 0.0001) and at MSLT (0.956 ± 0.015, P < 0.0001). Sleep macrostructure (i.e. SOREMP, N1 timing) including stage transitions reliably identifies hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy type 1 among central disorders of hypersomnolence. © 2015 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  4. IgG abnormality in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Susumu; Honda, Makoto

    2010-03-05

    A close association between narcolepsy and the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DQB1*0602 allele suggests the involvement of the immune system, or possibly an autoimmune process. We investigated serum IgG levels in narcolepsy. We measured the serum total IgG levels in 159 Japanese narcolepsy-cataplexy patients positive for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele, 28 idiopathic hypersomnia patients with long sleep time, and 123 healthy controls (the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele present in 45 subjects). The serum levels of each IgG subclass were subsequently measured. The distribution of serum IgG was significantly different among healthy controls negative for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele (11.66+/-3.55 mg/ml), healthy controls positive for the HLA-DQB1*0602 allele (11.45+/-3.43), narcolepsy patients (9.67+/-3.38), and idiopathic hypersomnia patients (13.81+/-3.80). None of the following clinical variables, age, disease duration, Epworth Sleepiness Scale, smoking habit and BMI at the time of blood sampling, were associated with IgG levels in narcolepsy or idiopathic hypersomnia. Furthermore we found the decrease in IgG1 and IgG2 levels, stable expression of IgG3, and the increase in the proportion of IgG4 in narcolepsy patients with abnormally low IgG levels. The increase in the proportion of IgG4 levels was also found in narcolepsy patients with normal serum total IgG levels. Idiopathic hypersomnia patients showed a different pattern of IgG subclass distribution with high IgG3 and IgG4 level, low IgG2 level, and IgG1/IgG2 imbalance. Our study is the first to determine IgG abnormalities in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia by measuring the serum IgG levels in a large number of hypersomnia patients. The observed IgG abnormalities indicate humoral immune alterations in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. Different IgG profiles suggest immunological differences between narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia.

  5. Sleeping Beauty in the Classroom: What Do Teachers Know about Narcolepsy?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cosgrove, Maryellen S.

    2002-01-01

    Investigated teachers' awareness of narcolepsy and the accuracy of their knowledge. Found educators uninformed about narcolepsy and how to accommodate narcoleptic students. Recommended that teachers be aware of narcolepsy's symptoms, plan variety and movement into students' lessons, and allow students to redo assignments if a sleep attack…

  6. Genetic association, seasonal infections and autoimmune basis of narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Abinav Kumar; Mahlios, Josh; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, a growing number of potential autoimmune disorders affecting neurons in the central nervous system have been identified, including narcolepsy. Narcolepsy is a lifelong sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness with irresistible sleep attacks, cataplexy (sudden bilateral loss of muscle tone), hypnagogic hallucinations, and abnormalities of Rapid Eye Movement sleep. Narcolepsy is generally a sporadic disorder and is caused by the loss of hypocretin (orexin)-producing neurons in the hypothalamus region of the brain. Studies have established that more than 90% of patients have a genetic association with HLA DQB1*06:02. Genome-wide association analysis shows a strong association between narcolepsy and polymorphisms in the TCRα locus and weaker associations within TNFSF4 (also called OX40L), Cathepsin H and the P2RY11-DNMT1 (purinergic receptor subtype P2Y11 to DNMT1, a DNA methytransferase) loci, suggesting an autoimmune basis. Mutations in DNMT1 have also been reported to cause narcolepsy in association with a complex neurological syndrome, suggesting the importance of DNA methylation in the pathology. More recently, narcolepsy was identified in association with seasonal streptococcus, H1N1 infections and following AS03-adjuvanted pH1N1 influenza vaccination in Northern Europe. Potential immunological pathways responsible for the loss of hypocretin producing neurons in these cases may be molecular mimicry or bystander activation. Specific autoantibodies or T cells cross-reactive with hypocretin neurons have not yet been identified, however, thus narcolepsy does not meet Witebsky’s criteria for an autoimmune disease. As the brain is not an easily accessible organ, mechanisms of disease initiation and progression remain a challenge to researchers. PMID:23497937

  7. Modafinil : A Review of its Pharmacology and Clinical Efficacy in the Management of Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    McClellan, K J; Spencer, C M

    1998-04-01

    Modafinil promotes wakefulness through an as yet unknown mechanism of action. It significantly increases daytime sleep latency and reduces excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) compared with placebo in patients with narcolepsy. However, the drug does not suppress cataplexy. Although direct comparative data are lacking, modafinil offers advantages over amphetamines and methylphenidate in patients with narcolepsy because of its lack of rebound phenomena after treatment withdrawal and its low abuse potential. Clinical trials have shown modafinil to be well tolerated in patients with narcolepsy. Except for headache, which was reported with a significantly greater frequency in modafinil recipients, the tolerability profile of modafinil 200 to 400 mg/day was similar to that of placebo in patients treated for 9 weeks. Preliminary data suggest that the tolerability of modafinil is maintained long term (40 weeks). Thus, modafinil is effective in the treatment of EDS in patients with narcolepsy, although it is not effective against cataplexy. Preliminary findings indicate that, unlike other psychostimulants, the drug is unlikely to be abused and is not associated with withdrawal phenomena. Therefore, modafinil is likely to be an effective therapeutic option for the treatment of EDS in patients with narcolepsy. The mechanism of action of modafinil has not been clearly established. However, it may indirectly increase wakefulness, at least in part, through inhibition of cortical γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) release via serotonergic mechanisms. Modafinil induces wakefulness and increases locomotor activity in a variety of animal species without causing stereotyped behaviour. In rhesus monkeys, the effects of oral modafinil were not associated with changes in blood pressure or heart rate. In contrast to dexamphetamine 20mg, single night-time doses of modafinil 100 or 200mg had no significant effects on objective sleep variables or sleep structure in young or elderly healthy

  8. Effects of Oral L-Carnitine Administration in Narcolepsy Patients: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Cross-Over and Placebo-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Miyagawa, Taku; Kawamura, Hiromi; Obuchi, Mariko; Ikesaki, Asuka; Ozaki, Akiko; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Makoto

    2013-01-01

    Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities. A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified a novel narcolepsy-related single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), which is located adjacent to the carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B (CPT1B) gene encoding an enzyme involved in β-oxidation of long-chain fatty acids. The mRNA expression levels of CPT1B were associated with this SNP. In addition, we recently reported that acylcarnitine levels were abnormally low in narcolepsy patients. To assess the efficacy of oral l-carnitine for the treatment of narcolepsy, we performed a clinical trial administering l-carnitine (510 mg/day) to patients with the disease. The study design was a randomized, double-blind, cross-over and placebo-controlled trial. Thirty narcolepsy patients were enrolled in our study. Two patients were withdrawn and 28 patients were included in the statistical analysis (15 males and 13 females, all with HLA-DQB1*06:02). l-carnitine treatment significantly improved the total time for dozing off during the daytime, calculated from the sleep logs, compared with that of placebo-treated periods. l-carnitine efficiently increased serum acylcarnitine levels, and reduced serum triglycerides concentration. Differences in the Japanese version of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36) vitality and mental health subscales did not reach statistical significance between l-carnitine and placebo. This study suggests that oral l-carnitine can be effective in reducing excessive daytime sleepiness in narcolepsy patients. Trial Registration University hospital Medical Information Network (UMIN) UMIN000003760 PMID:23349733

  9. Safety and efficacy of long-term use of sodium oxybate for narcolepsy with cataplexy in routine clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Drakatos, Panagis; Lykouras, Dimosthenis; D'Ancona, Grainne; Higgins, Sean; Gildeh, Nadia; Macavei, Raluca; Rosenzweig, Ivana; Steier, Joerg; Williams, Adrian J; Muza, Rexford; Kent, Brian D; Leschziner, Guy

    2017-07-01

    Sodium oxybate is licensed in Europe for the treatment of narcolepsy with cataplexy in adults. The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy and safety of sodium oxybate in clinical practice in patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy refractory to other treatments. This was a retrospective single centre study including patients with severe narcolepsy with cataplexy refractory to other treatments, who were initiated on sodium oxybate between 2009 and 2015. Patients were allowed to be on other stimulants or/and anti-cataplectic agents. Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) and weekly cataplexy events were recorded. Side effects (SEs) were recorded at every follow-up visit. 90 patients were prescribed sodium oxybate, with a total of 3116 patient-months of drug exposure. ESS and weekly cataplexy events were significantly reduced by sodium oxybate for all patients (ΔESS = 4.3 ± 4.4 and Δcataplexy = 21.8 ± 18.5 events/week; p < 0.0001, respectively). The required maintenance dose could not be predicted based upon gender, body mass index, or clinical factors. 60% of patients were able to reduce or come off other medications. Half of the patients experienced at least one SE, and 26.6% had to stop treatment due to limiting SEs. Nausea, mood swings and enuresis were the most commonly reported SEs. SEs that led to drug discontinuation, particularly psychosis, were associated with increasing age and were observed early after the initiation of the drug. Sodium oxybate provides a good clinical efficacy and acceptable safety profile in routine clinical practice for the treatment of patients suffering from narcolepsy with cataplexy. A quarter of patients experience SEs requiring withdrawal of the drug with older patients being more vulnerable to the more serious SEs. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Orexin neurons suppress narcolepsy via 2 distinct efferent pathways

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Emi; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Mieda, Michihiro

    2014-01-01

    The loss of orexin neurons in humans is associated with the sleep disorder narcolepsy, which is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. Mice lacking orexin peptides, orexin neurons, or orexin receptors recapitulate human narcolepsy phenotypes, further highlighting a critical role for orexin signaling in the maintenance of wakefulness. Despite the known role of orexin neurons in narcolepsy, the precise neural mechanisms downstream of these neurons remain unknown. We found that targeted restoration of orexin receptor expression in the dorsal raphe (DR) and in the locus coeruleus (LC) of mice lacking orexin receptors inhibited cataplexy-like episodes and pathological fragmentation of wakefulness (i.e., sleepiness), respectively. The suppression of cataplexy-like episodes correlated with the number of serotonergic neurons restored with orexin receptor expression in the DR, while the consolidation of fragmented wakefulness correlated with the number of noradrenergic neurons restored in the LC. Furthermore, pharmacogenetic activation of these neurons using designer receptor exclusively activated by designer drug (DREADD) technology ameliorated narcolepsy in mice lacking orexin neurons. These results suggest that DR serotonergic and LC noradrenergic neurons play differential roles in orexin neuron–dependent regulation of sleep/wakefulness and highlight a pharmacogenetic approach for the amelioration of narcolepsy. PMID:24382351

  11. Mechanistic insights into influenza vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-12-01

    We previously reported an increased frequency of antibodies to hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 in sera obtained from narcoleptic patients who received the European AS03-adjuvanted vaccine Pandemrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.) for the global influenza A H1N1 pandemic in 2009 [A(H1N1)pdm09]. These antibodies cross-reacted with a particular fragment of influenza nucleoprotein (NP) - one of the proteins naturally contained in the virus used to make seasonal influenza vaccine and pandemic influenza vaccines. The purpose of this commentary is to provide additional insights and interpretations of the findings and share additional data not presented in the original paper to help the reader appreciate the key messages of that publication. First, a brief background to narcolepsy and vaccine-induced narcolepsy will be provided. Then, additional insights and clarification will be provided on the following topics: 1) the critical difference identified in the adjuvanted A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccines, 2) the contributing factor likely for the discordant association of narcolepsy between the AS03-adjuvanted pandemic vaccines Pandemrix and Arepanrix (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, s.a.), 3) the significance of detecting HCRT receptor 2 (HCRTr2) antibodies in some Finnish control subjects, 4) the approach used for the detection of HCRTr2 antibodies in vaccine-associated narcolepsy, and 5) the plausibility of the proposed mechanism involving HCRTr2 modulation in vaccine-associated narcolepsy.

  12. Juvenile myoclonic epilepsy and narcolepsy: A series of three cases.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Puja Aggarwal; Poduri, Annapurna; Kothare, Sanjeev V

    2015-10-01

    This paper sets out to demonstrate the coexistence of juvenile myoclonic epilepsy (JME) and narcolepsy that raises the possibility of a shared genetic predisposition to both conditions. The electronic medical records (EMRs) were searched for narcolepsy and JME over 10years. We identified three young adult women diagnosed with JME in their teenage years, with myoclonic, generalized tonic-clonic, and absence seizure semiologies, along with psychiatric comorbidity, well managed on lamotrigine and/or levetiracetam. Our patients were also found to have disturbed sleep preceding the diagnosis of JME by many years, including excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS), fragmented nocturnal sleep, hypnagogic vivid hallucinations, and REM behavior disorder along with daytime cataplexy. They were ultimately diagnosed with coexisting narcolepsy, confirmed by sleep studies and multiple sleep latency testing, along with positive genetic testing for HLA-DQB1*0602 in all three patients. Stimulants, selective serotonin receptor inhibitors, and/or sodium oxybate were used to successfully treat their narcolepsy. The coexistence of JME and narcolepsy has not been well recognized and may be clinically relevant. In addition, it raises the possibility of a shared genetic predisposition to both conditions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current Treatment Strategies in Pediatric Alopecia Areata

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Etienne; Lee, Joyce SS; Tang, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Alopecia areata (AA) is a non-scarring autoimmune disease of the hair follicle that can present at any age. Pediatric cases are commonly seen in a dermatology clinic, and management can potentially be challenging, with a small proportion of cases experiencing a chronic relapsing course marked by distressing hair loss that can bring about significant psychosocial morbidity. We review the established treatments for pediatric alopecia areata, alongside second and third line therapies that have shown to be efficacious. We also offer a treatment algorithm as a guide to the treatment of pediatric AA. PMID:23248364

  14. [Current treatment options in acute myeloid leukemia].

    PubMed

    Heuser, M; Schlenk, R F; Ganser, A

    2011-12-01

    Genetic aberrations form the basis for diagnostic classification of patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Moreover, these aberrations predict response to induction chemotherapy, relapse-free survival, and overall survival of patients with AML. Understanding the pathogenetic role of cytogenetic and molecular changes has led to the development of targeted treatment strategies that require rapid diagnostic assessment of the genetic profile of each patient to select the best treatment available.

  15. Female pattern hair loss: Current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Quan Q; Sinclair, Rodney

    2007-01-01

    Fewer than 45% of women go through life with a full head of hair. Female pattern hair loss is the commonest cause of hair loss in women and prevalence increases with advancing age. Affected women may experience psychological distress and impaired social functioning. In most cases the diagnosis can be made clinically and the condition treated medically. While many women using oral antiandrogens and topical minoxidil will regrow some hair, early diagnosis and initiation of treatment is desirable as these treatments are more effective at arresting progression of hair loss than stimulating regrowth. Adjunctive nonpharmacological treatment modalities such as counseling, cosmetic camouflage and hair transplantation are important measures for some patients. The histology of female pattern hair loss is identical to that of male androgenetic alopecia. While the clinical pattern of the hair loss differs between men, the response to oral antiandrogens suggests that female pattern hair loss is an androgen dependant condition, at least in the majority of cases. Female pattern hair loss is a chronic progressive condition. All treatments need to be continued to maintain the effect. An initial therapeutic response often takes 12 or even 24 months. Given this delay, monitoring for treatment effect through clinical photography or standardized clinical severity scales is helpful. PMID:18044135

  16. [Irritable bowel syndrome: current treatment options].

    PubMed

    Ducrotté, Philippe

    2007-11-01

    Relieving abdominal pain is the principal treatment objective for patients with irritable bowel syndrome. No single drug stands out in the treatment strategy for this illness. Antispasmodics, magnesium aluminum silicates, and alverine citrate drugs all remain initial options for treatment, although their prescription is impeded by the fact that an increasing number are no longer approved for reimbursement. Increased dietary fibers often have a harmful effect on symptoms. Some patients are probably intolerant to some foods but there is no satisfactory proof on which to base a restrictive diet. Improved knowledge of the pathophysiology of irritable bowel syndrome has made it possible to diversify treatments that act first on one of the key pathophysiologic elements, visceral hypersensitivity. Antidepressants (especially tricyclics) can be used at low doses. Among the serotonergic drugs, serotonin 5-HT4 receptors agonists (tegaserod) may be available soon, but the development of 5-HT3 antagonists (alosetron, cilansetron) has been stopped for safety reasons (ischemic colitis and severe constipation). Non-drug options such as hypnosis, psychotherapy, relaxation, or yoga, may also be proposed to some patients. Probiotics are a possible treatment in the future.

  17. Current Treatment of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    PubMed

    Jamroziak, Krzysztof; Puła, Bartosz; Walewski, Jan

    2017-01-01

    A number of new treatment options have recently emerged for chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients, including the Bruton's tyrosine kinase (BTK) inhibitor ibrutinib, phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) delta isoform inhibitor idelalisib combined with rituximab, the Bcl-2 antagonist venetoclax, and the new anti-CD20 antibodies obinutuzumab and ofatumumab. Most of these agents are already included into treatment algorithms defined by international practice guidelines, but more clinical investigations are needed to answer still remaining questions. Ibrutinib was proven as a primary choice for patients with the TP53 gene deletion/mutation, who otherwise have no active treatment available. Idelalisib with rituximab is also an active therapy, but due to increased risk of serious infections, its use in first-line treatment is limited to patients for whom ibrutinib is not an option. A new indication for ibrutinib was recently approved for older patients with comorbidities, as an alternative to the already existing indication for chlorambucil with obinutuzumab. The use of kinase inhibitors is already well established in recurrent/refractory disease. Immunochemotherapy with fludarabine, cyclophosphamide, rituximab (FCR) remains a major first-line option for many CLL patients without the TP53 gene deletion/mutation, and who have no significant comorbidities or history of infections, and is particularly effective in patients with favorable features including mutated IGHV status. There are a number of issues regarding novel therapies for CLL that need further investigation such as optimum duration of treatment with kinase inhibitors, appropriate sequencing of novel agents, mechanisms of resistance to inhibitors and response to class switching after treatment failure, along with the potential role of combinations of targeted agents.

  18. Early-onset scoliosis: current treatment.

    PubMed

    Cunin, V

    2015-02-01

    Early-onset scoliosis, which appears before the age of 10, can be due to congenital vertebral anomalies, neuromuscular diseases, scoliosis-associated syndromes, or idiopathic causes. It can have serious consequences for lung development and significantly reduce the life expectancy compared to adolescent scoliosis. Extended posterior fusion must be avoided to prevent the crankshaft phenomenon, uneven growth of the trunk and especially restrictive lung disease. Conservative (non-surgical) treatment is used first. If this fails, fusionless surgery can be performed to delay the final fusion procedure until the patient is older. The gold standard delaying surgical treatment is the implantation of growing rods as described by Moe and colleagues in the mid-1980s. These rods, which are lengthened during short surgical procedures at regular intervals, curb the scoliosis progression until the patient reaches an age where fusion can be performed. Knowledge of this technique and its complications has led to several mechanical improvements being made, namely use of rods that can be distracted magnetically on an outpatient basis, without the need for anesthesia. Devices based on the same principle have been designed that preferentially attach to the ribs to specifically address chest wall and spine dysplasia. The second category of surgical devices consists of rods used to guide spinal growth that do not require repeated surgical procedures. The third type of fusionless surgical treatment involves slowing the growth of the scoliosis convexity to help reduce the Cobb angle. The indications are constantly changing. Improvements in surgical techniques and greater surgeon experience may help to reduce the number of complications and make this lengthy treatment acceptable to patients and their family. Long-term effects of surgery on the Cobb angle have not been compared to those involving conservative "delaying" treatments. Because the latter has fewer complications associated with

  19. Current Directions in ADHD and Its Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norvilitis, Jill M., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    The treatment of Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder is a matter of ongoing research and debate, with considerable data supporting both psychopharmacological and behavioral approaches. Researchers continue to search for new interventions to be used in conjunction with or in place of the more traditional approaches. These interventions run the…

  20. Current Treatment of Lower Gastrointestinal Hemorrhage

    PubMed Central

    Raphaeli, Tal; Menon, Raman

    2012-01-01

    Massive lower gastrointestinal bleeding is a significant and expensive problem that requires methodical evaluation, management, and treatment. After initial resuscitation, care should be taken to localize the site of bleeding. Once localized, lesions can then be treated with endoscopic or angiographic interventions, reserving surgery for ongoing or recurrent bleeding. PMID:24294124

  1. Identifying clinically important difference on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale: results from a narcolepsy clinical trial of JZP-110.

    PubMed

    Scrima, Lawrence; Emsellem, Helene A; Becker, Philip M; Ruoff, Chad; Lankford, Alan; Bream, Gary; Khayrallah, Moise; Lu, Yuan; Black, Jed

    2017-10-01

    While scores ≤10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) are within the normal range, the reduction in elevated ESS score that is clinically meaningful in patients with narcolepsy has not been established. This post hoc analysis of a clinical trial of patients with narcolepsy evaluated correlations between Patient Global Impression of Change (PGI-C) and ESS. Data of adult patients with narcolepsy from a double-blind, 12-week placebo-controlled study of JZP-110, a wake-promoting agent, were used in this analysis. Descriptive statistics and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis compared PGI-C (anchor measure) to percent change from baseline in ESS to establish the responder criterion from patients taking either placebo or JZP-110 (treatments). At week 12, patients (n = 10) who reported being "very much improved" on the PGI-C had a mean 76.7% reduction in ESS score, and patients (n = 33) who reported being "much improved" on the PGI-C had a mean 49.1% reduction in ESS score. ROC analysis showed that patients who improved were almost exclusively from JZP-110 treatment group, with an area-under-the-curve of 0.9, and revealed that a 25% reduction in ESS (sensitivity, 81.4%; specificity, 80.9%) may be an appropriate threshold for defining a meaningful patient response to JZP-110 and placebo. A ≥25% reduction in patients' subjective ESS score may be useful as a threshold to identify patients with narcolepsy who respond to JZP-110 treatment. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Antibodies Against Hypocretin Receptor 2 Are Rare in Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Giannoccaro, Maria Pia; Waters, Patrick; Pizza, Fabio; Liguori, Rocco; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Vincent, Angela

    2017-02-01

    Recently, antibodies to the hypocretin receptor 2 (HCRTR2-Abs) were reported in a high proportion of narcolepsy patients who developed the disease following Pandemrix® vaccination. We tested a group of narcolepsy patients for the HCRTR2-Abs using a newly established cell-based assay. Sera from 50 narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) and 11 narcolepsy type 2 (NT2) patients, 22 patients with other sleep disorders, 15 healthy controls, and 93 disease controls were studied. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSFs) from three narcoleptic patients were subsequently included. Human embryonic kidney cells were transiently transfected with human HCRTR2, incubated with patients' sera for 1 hr at 1:20 dilution and then fixed. Binding of antibodies was detected by fluorescently labeled secondary antibodies to human immunoglobulin G (IgG) and the different IgG subclasses. A nonlinear visual scoring system was used from 0 to 4; samples scoring ≥1 were considered positive. Only 3 (5%) of 61 patients showed a score ≥1, one with IgG1- and two with IgG3-antibodies, but titers were low (1:40-1:100). CSFs from these patients were negative. The three positive patients included one NT1 case with associated psychotic features, one NT2 patient, and an NT1 patient with normal hypocretin CSF levels. Low levels of IgG1 or IgG3 antibodies against HCRTR2 were found in 3 of 61 patients with narcolepsy, although only 1 presented with full-blown NT1. HCRTR2-Abs are not common in narcolepsy unrelated to vaccination. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Current Treatment Strategies for Tricuspid Regurgitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Hijji, Mohammed; Fender, Erin A; El Sabbagh, Abdallah; Holmes, David R

    2017-09-14

    Tricuspid regurgitation is common; however, recognition and diagnosis, clinical outcomes, and management strategies are poorly defined. Here, we will describe the etiology and natural history of tricuspid regurgitation (TR), evaluate existing surgical outcomes data, and review the evolving field of percutaneous interventions to treat TR. Previously, the only definitive corrective therapy for TR was surgical valve repair or replacement which is associated with significant operative mortality. Advances in percutaneous valve repair techniques are now being translated to the tricuspid valve. These novel interventions may offer a lower-risk alternative treatment in patients at increased surgical risk. Significant TR adversely impacts survival. Surgery remains the only proven therapy for treatment of TR and may be underutilized due to mixed outcomes data. Early experience with percutaneous interventions is promising, but large clinical experience is lacking. Further study will be required before these therapies are introduced into broader clinical practice.

  4. Current Diagnosis and Treatment of Anxiety Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Bystritsky, Alexander; Khalsa, Sahib S.; Cameron, Michael E.; Schiffman, Jason

    2013-01-01

    Anxiety disorders are the most prevalent mental health conditions. Although they are less visible than schizophrenia, depression, and bipolar disorder, they can be just as disabling. The diagnoses of anxiety disorders are being continuously revised. Both dimensional and structural diagnoses have been used in clinical treatment and research, and both methods have been proposed for the new classification in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders IV (DSM-5). However, each of these approaches has limitations. More recently, the emphasis in diagnosis has focused on neuroimaging and genetic research. This approach is based partly on the need for a more comprehensive understanding of how biology, stress, and genetics interact to shape the symptoms of anxiety. Anxiety disorders can be effectively treated with psychopharmacological and cognitive–behavioral interventions. These inter ventions have different symptom targets; thus, logical combinations of these strategies need to be further studied in order to improve future outcomes. New developments are forthcoming in the field of alternative strategies for managing anxiety and for treatment-resistant cases. Additional treatment enhancements should include the development of algorithms that can be easily used in primary care and with greater focus on managing functional impairment in patients with anxiety. PMID:23599668

  5. [Current treatment strategy in malignant pleural effusion].

    PubMed

    Türler, A; Walter, M; Schmitz-Rixen, T

    1996-01-01

    Malignant pleural effusions are a grave consequence of advanced cancer disease. The successful suppression of pleural fluid reaccumulation can make a major contribution to the management and palliative care of patients with disseminated cancer. Many treatment concepts have been reported in the literature. The recommended therapy in malignant pleural effusions consists of intrapleural instillation of a sclerotic agent to produce pleurodesis. Different substances have been used, including tetracyclines, cytostatic agents, fibrin, talc, Corynebacterium parvum, cytokines and others. We reviewed the most frequently used techniques of pleurodesis in order to define the most effective treatment concept. In 15 prospective randomized trials the success rates varied from 13% with bleomycin to 100% with talc or Corynebacterium parvum. Talc was superior to other agents in 6 of 6, Corynebacterium parvum in 3 of 4 and bleomycin or tetracycline only in 3 of 8 studies. Adverse effects were frequently observed with cytostatic agents, but were very rare in the case of talc or fibrin instillation. Comparing the recently published data pleurodesis with talc appears to be the most effective treatment strategy, followed by Corynebacterium parvum, bleomycin and tetracycline.

  6. Current and future treatment options for gonorrhoea.

    PubMed

    Ison, Catherine A; Deal, Carolyn; Unemo, Magnus

    2013-12-01

    The delivery of effective antimicrobial therapy is essential for public health control of gonorrhoea, in the absence of a suitable vaccine. The antimicrobial agent chosen should have high efficacy and quality, lack toxicity and give >95% success when given empirically. Guidelines, which are informed by surveillance data, are used to aid clinicians in their choice of appropriate agent. Historically, gonorrhoea treatment has been delivered as a single, directly observed dose but this has resulted in failure of successive antimicrobial agents which have been replaced by a new antimicrobial to which resistance has been rare or non-existing. Following the drift towards decreased susceptibility and treatment failure to the extended spectrum cephalosporins, and the lack of 'new' alternative antimicrobials, the threat of difficult to treat or untreatable gonorrhoea has emerged. The challenge of maintaining gonorrhoea as a treatable infection has resulted in national, regional and global response or action plans. This review discusses different approaches to the future treatment of gonorrhoea including; use of ceftriaxone, the injectable cephalosporin at increased dosage; dual antimicrobial therapy; use of drugs developed for other infections and use of older agents, directed by rapid point of care tests, to susceptible infections. Finally, it is considered whether the time is right to readdress the possibility of developing an effective gonococcal vaccine, given the major advances in our understanding of natural infection, molecular pathogenesis and the revolution in molecular biology techniques.

  7. Current treatment of vocal fold scarring.

    PubMed

    Hirano, Shigeru

    2005-06-01

    Vocal fold scarring still remains a therapeutic challenge, with the most problematic issue being the histologic changes that are primarily responsible for altering the viscoelasticity of the vocal fold mucosa. Optimal treatment for vocal fold scarring has not yet been established. To restore or regenerate damaged vocal folds, it is important to investigate the changes to the layer structure of the lamina propria. Tissue engineering and regenerative medicine may provide new strategies for the prevention and treatment of vocal fold scarring. Recent developments in this field are reviewed in the present article. Histologic studies have revealed that hyaluronic acid, fibronectin, decorin, and various other extracellular matrix components, as well as collagen, may contribute to determining the vibratory properties of the vocal fold mucosa. Changes of these molecules are thought to affect the viscoelasticity of the scarred vocal folds. Based on such histologic findings, innovative approaches have been developed, including administration of hyaluronic acid into injured or scarred vocal folds. Other strategies that have recently shown advances include growth factor therapy and cell therapy using stem cells or mature fibroblasts. The effects of these new treatments have not fully been confirmed clinically, but there seems to be great therapeutic potential in such regenerative medical strategies. Recent research has revealed the detailed histologic and rheologic changes related to vocal fold scarring. Based on these findings, various new therapeutic strategies have been developed in animal models using tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, no clinical trials have been performed, and more studies are necessary to establish the optimum modality.

  8. Gynecomastia – evaluation and current treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Ruth E; Kermott, Cindy A; Murad, M Hassan

    2011-01-01

    Clinical question: What is the best management approach for gynecomastia? Results: In most patients, surgical correction usually leads to immediate cosmetic and symptomatic improvement and is considered the best approach. In men who are being treated with antiandrogen therapies, pharmacological intervention with tamoxifen is the most effective approach, followed by radiotherapy. Implementation: Pitfalls to avoid when treating gynecomastia Failure to detect the very rare male breast cancerOverly aggressive early intervention or evaluationAppropriate medical interventionWhen to refer to specialist treatment PMID:21479145

  9. Current Treatment Options for Auricular Hematomas.

    PubMed

    MacPhail, Catriona

    2016-07-01

    Ear disease, such as otitis externa, resulting in aggressive head shaking or ear scratching, is the most common cause of the development of aural hematomas in dogs and cats. An underlying immunologic cause has also been proposed to explain cartilage and blood vessel fragility. Numerous options exist for management of aural hematomas, from medical management alone with corticosteroids, to simple hematoma centesis, to surgical intervention. Because this condition is usually secondary to another disease process, regardless of mode of treatment, likelihood of recurrence is low if the underlying condition is managed properly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Access to an optimal treatment. Current situation.

    PubMed

    Ugarte-Gil, Manuel F; Silvestre, Adriana M R; Pons-Estel, Bernardo A

    2015-03-01

    Access to an optimal treatment is determined by several factors, like availability, pricing/funding, and acceptability. In Latin America (LA), one of the regions with more disparities particularly on healthcare in the world, access is affected by other factors, including socio-demographic factors like poverty, living in rural regions, and/or health coverage. Regarding rheumatoid arthritis (RA), an inadequate access to specialists leads to diagnosis and treatment delays diminishing the probability of remission or control. Unfortunately, in almost every LA country, there are cities with more than 100,000 inhabitants without rheumatologists; furthermore, a primary care reference system is present in only about half the countries. In the public health system, coverage of biologic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs occurs for less than 10 % of the patients in about half of the countries. Also, as healthcare providers based their funding decisions mainly in direct costs instead of on patient-centered healthcare quality indicators, access to new drugs is more complicated in this region than in high-income countries. More accurate epidemiological data from LA need to be obtained in order to improve the management of patients with rheumatic diseases in general and RA in particular.

  11. Current diagnosis and treatment of Castleman's disease.

    PubMed

    González García, A; Moreno Cobo, M Á; Patier de la Peña, J L

    2016-04-01

    Castleman's disease is not just a single disease but rather an uncommon, heterogeneous group of nonclonal lymphoproliferative disorders, which have a broad spectrum of clinical expression. Three histological types have been reported, along with several clinical forms according to clinical presentation, histological substrate and associated diseases. Interleukin-6, its receptor polymorphisms, the human immunodeficiency virus and the human herpes virus 8 are involved in the etiopathogenesis of Castleman's disease. The study of this disease has shed light on a syndrome whose incidence is unknown. Despite recent significant advances in our understanding of this disease and the increasing therapeutic experience with rituximab, tocilizumab and siltuximab, there are still difficult questions concerning its aetiology, prognosis and optimal treatment. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  12. Current treatment of juvenile rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Ilowite, Norman T

    2002-01-01

    Prognostic factors in juvenile rheumatoid arthritis (JRA) include polyarticular onset, polyarticular disease course, and rheumatoid factor positivity; in the systemic onset subtype, persistence of systemic features at 6 months after onset confers a worse prognosis. Timely diagnosis and appropriate aggressive treatment of patients with poor prognostic features improve quality of life and outcome. After nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, methotrexate is the most commonly used second-line agent. However, approximately one third of patients do not respond to methotrexate adequately. Randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trials in patients with JRA are few, but one such trial with the tumor necrosis factor inhibitor etanercept shows that this drug is effective and well-tolerated. Other recently approved agents for rheumatoid arthritis, including infliximab, leflunomide, celecoxib, and rofecoxib, have not been adequately studied in pediatric patients, and the role of these agents in children with JRA remains to be determined.

  13. The management of dermatomyositis: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Sontheimer, Richard D

    2004-05-01

    Dermatomyositis is traditionally classified as one of the idiopathic inflammatory myopathies. The traditional approach to the management of patients with dermatomyositis focuses predominantly on end points related to the systemic manifestations of this disorder, especially proximal muscle weakness resulting from myositis. However, the primary and secondary skin changes that are characteristic of dermatomyositis can, in themselves, produce significant morbidity and disability. This article presents a dermatological perspective on the management of dermatomyositis. As dermatological management approaches can vary between countries, an effort has been made to present a consensus dermatological view concerning this subject. A US dermatologist is most likely to see patients having dermatomyositis skin lesions in the following four clinical settings: soon after the onset of dermatomyositis skin disease activity before the appearance of clinically-evident muscle disease (i.e., 'pre-myopathic' dermatomyositis); during the course of clinically-amyopathic dermatomyositis; during co-management of classical dermatomyositis with other physicians; and for recrudescent skin disease activity in classical dermatomyositis patients after their symptomatic muscle inflammation has been fully suppressed by systematic immunosuppressive/immunomodulatory treatment (i.e., 'postmyopathic' dermatomyositis). Both topical and systemic therapies for dermatomyositis skin lesions encountered in these various settings will be discussed. In addition to specific approaches to the treatment of dermatomyositis skin lesions, broader management issues that dermatologists must be aware of when caring for dermatomyositis patients are included in this discussion (e.g., patient education, risk of associated systemic disease, such as myositis and interstitial lung disease, risk for occult malignancy, and prognosis counselling).

  14. Current and potential treatment options for hyperphosphatemia.

    PubMed

    Carfagna, Fabio; Del Vecchio, Lucia; Pontoriero, Giuseppe; Locatelli, Francesco

    2018-06-01

    Hyperphosphatemia is common in late stages of chronic kidney disease and is often associated with elevated parathormone levels, abnormal bone mineralization, extra-osseous calcification, and increased risk of cardiovascular events and death. Several classes of oral phosphate binders are available to help control plasma phosphorus levels. Although effective at lowering serum phosphorus, they all have safety, tolerability, and compliance issues that need to be considered when selecting which one to use. Areas covered: This paper reviews the most established treatment options for hyperphosphatemia, in patients with chronic kidney disease, focusing on the new inhibitors of active phosphate absorption. Expert opinion: The prevention and the treatment of hyperphosphatemia is today far to be satisfactory. Nonetheless, an extending range of phosphate binders are now available. Aluminum has potentially serious toxic risks. Calcium-based binders are very effective but can lead to hypercalcemia and/or positive calcium balance and progression of cardiovascular calcification. No long-term data are available for the new calcium acetate/magnesium combination product. Lanthanum is an effective phosphate binder, and long-term effects of tissue deposition seem clinically irrelevant. Sevelamer, appear to have profiles that would lead to pleiotropic effects and reduced progression of vascular calcification, and the main adverse events seen with these agents are gastrointestinal. Iron has a powerful capability of binding phosphate, thus numerous preparations are available, both with and without significant systemic absorption of the iron component. The inhibitors of active intestinal phosphate transport, with their very selective mechanism of action and low pill burden seem the most interesting approach; however, do not seem at present to be effective alone, in reducing serum phosphorus levels.

  15. High Rates of Psychiatric Comorbidity in Narcolepsy: Findings From the Burden of Narcolepsy Disease (BOND) Study of 9,312 Patients in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Chad M; Reaven, Nancy L; Funk, Susan E; McGaughey, Karen J; Ohayon, Maurice M; Guilleminault, Christian; Black, Jed

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate psychiatric comorbidity patterns in patients with a narcolepsy diagnosis in the United States. Truven Health Analytics MarketScan Research Databases were accessed to identify individuals ≥ 18 years of age with ≥ 1 ICD-9 diagnosis code(s) for narcolepsy continuously insured between 2006 and 2010 and non-narcolepsy controls matched 5:1 (age, gender, region, payer). Extensive subanalyses were conducted to confirm the validity of narcolepsy definitions. Narcolepsy subjects and controls were compared for frequency of psychiatric comorbid conditions (based on ICD-9 codes/Clinical Classification Software [CCS] level 2 categories) and psychiatric medication use. The final population included 9,312 narcolepsy subjects and 46,559 controls (each group, mean age = 46.1 years; 59% female). All categories of mental illness were significantly more prevalent in patients with narcolepsy versus controls, with the highest excess prevalence noted for CCS 5.8 Mood disorders (37.9% vs 13.8%; odds ratio [OR] = 4.0; 95% CI, 3.8-4.2), CCS 5.8.2 Depressive disorders (35.8% vs 13.0%; OR = 3.9; 95% CI, 3.7-4.1), and CCS 5.2 Anxiety disorders (25.1% vs 11.9%; OR = 2.5; 95% CI, 2.4-2.7). Excess prevalence of anxiety and mood disorders (narcolepsy vs controls) was higher in younger age groups versus older age groups. Psychiatric medication usage was higher in the narcolepsy group versus controls in the following categories: selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (36% vs 17%), anxiolytic benzodiazepines (34% vs 19%), hypnotics (29% vs 13%), serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitors (21% vs 6%), and tricyclic antidepressants (13% vs 4%) (all P values < .0001). Narcolepsy is associated with significant comorbid psychiatric illness burden and higher psychiatric medication usage compared with the non-narcolepsy population. © Copyright 2016 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  16. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies.

    PubMed

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-06-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal "cure" eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure.

  17. Current and emerging treatments for brain metastases.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jenny; Jandial, Rahul; Nesbit, Amanda; Badie, Behnam; Chen, Mike

    2015-04-01

    Brain metastasis in patients with cancer can be indicative of multisystem spread or lead to neurological demise if not locally controlled, and is associated with poor survival and high morbidity. Compared with metastasis to other areas of the body, brain metastasis possesses a unique biology that confers high resistance to systemic therapies. This phenomenon has been historically attributed to the inability of chemotherapeutic agents to pass through the blood-brain barrier. Recent studies challenge this premise, revealing other potentially targetable mechanism(s). Therapies that exploit recent advances in the understanding of brain metastasis are still in early stages of development. Encouragingly, and discovered by happenstance, some molecularly targeted drugs already appear to have efficacy against certain tumors and accompanying cerebral edema. In the meantime, conventional treatment modalities such as surgery and radiation have iteratively reached new levels of refinement. However, these achievements are somewhat muted by the emergence of magnetic resonance (MR)-guided laser interstitial thermal therapy, a minimally invasive neuroablative technique. On the horizon, MR-guided focused ultrasound surgery is similarly intriguing. Even in the absence of further advances, local control is frequently achieved with state-of-the-art therapies. Dramatic improvements will likely require sophisticated approaches that account for the particular effects of the microenvironment of the central nervous system on metastasis.

  18. Current surgical treatment for chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Aimoto, Takayuki; Uchida, Eiji; Nakamura, Yoshiharu; Yamahatsu, Kazuya; Matsushita, Akira; Katsuno, Akira; Cho, Kazumitsu; Kawamoto, Masao

    2011-01-01

    Chronic pancreatitis (CP) is a painful, yet benign inflammatory process of the pancreas. Surgical management should be individualized because the pain is multifactorial and its mechanisms vary from patient to patient. Two main pathogenetic theories for the mechanisms of pain in CP have been proposed: the neurogenic theory and the theory of increased intraductal/intraparenchymal pressures. The latter theory is strongly supported by the good results of drainage procedures in the surgical management of CP. Other possible contributing factors include pancreatic ischemia; a centrally sensitized pain state; and the development of complications, such as pseudocysts and stenosis of the duodenum or common bile duct. Common indications for surgery include intractable pain, suspicion of neoplasm, and complications that cannot be resolved with radiological or endoscopic treatments. Operative procedures have been historically classified into 4 categories: decompression procedures for diseased and obstructed pancreatic ducts; resection procedures for the proximal, distal, or total pancreas; denervation procedures of the pancreas; and hybrid procedures. Pancreaticoduodenectomy and pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy, once the standard operations for patients with CP, have been replaced by hybrid procedures, such as duodenum-preserving pancreatic head resection, the Frey procedure, and their variants. These procedures are safe and effective in providing long-term pain relief and in treating CP-related complications. Hybrid procedures should be the operations of choice for patients with CP.

  19. [Current diagnosis and treatment of acromegaly].

    PubMed

    Melgar, Virgilio; Espinosa, Etual; Cuenca, Dalia; Valle, Vanessa; Mercado, Moisés

    2015-01-01

    Acromegaly is a rare condition characterized by the excessive secretion of growth hormone (GH), usually by a pituitary adenoma. The clinical manifestations of acromegaly include enlarged hands, feet and face, headaches, arthralgias, fatigue and hyperhydrosis. This condition is also associated with comorbidities such as hypertension and diabetes in a significant proportion of patients and frequently compromises life quality and life expectancy. The biochemical diagnosis of acromegaly rests on the demonstration of an autonomous secretion of GH by means of the measurement of glucose-suppressed GH levels and the serum concentration of insulin like growth factor type 1 (IGF-1). The localizing method of choice is magnetic resonance image of the selar area, which in 70 % of the cases reveals the presence of a macroadenoma. Even though the primary treatment is usually the transsphenoidal resection of the adenoma, the majority of patients require a multimodal intervention that includes radiotherapy, as well as pharmacological therapy with somatostatin analogs and dopamine agonists. The latter approach has resulted in a significant reduction in mortality and in an improvement in the quality of life.

  20. Ulcerative colitis: pathogenesis, diagnosis, and current treatment.

    PubMed

    Griffel, L H; Das, K M

    1996-01-01

    Ulcerative colitis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the colon that affects the rectum and a variable length of contiguous colon. The disease is characterized by rectal bleeding and diarrhea during periods of exacerbation; these symptoms usually abate with treatment. The pathogenic mechanism of ulcerative colitis is believed to be an aberrant immune response in which antibodies are formed against colonic epithelial protein(s). The disease usually presents during the second and third decades of life, with a smaller peak after the age of 60 years. There is a genetic component to ulcerative colitis, with a higher incidence among family members and, particularly, first-degree relatives. Diagnosis depends on several factors, most notably symptoms, demonstration of uniformly inflamed mucosa beginning in the rectum, and exclusion of other causes of colitis, such as infection. There is no medical cure for ulcerative colitis, but medical therapy is effective and can improve or eliminate symptoms in more than 80% of patients. Surgery offers a cure but carries the high price of total colectomy. New surgical methods, such as ileoanal anastomosis, allow for maintenance of bowel continuity and better patient satisfaction.

  1. Clinical characteristics and current treatment of glaucoma.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Laura P; Pasquale, Louis R

    2014-06-02

    Glaucoma is a neurodegenerative disorder in which degenerating retinal ganglion cells (RGC) produce significant visual disability. Clinically, glaucoma refers to an array of conditions associated with variably elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) that contributes to RGC loss via mechanical stress, vascular abnormalities, and other mechanisms, such as immune phenomena. The clinical diagnosis of glaucoma requires assessment of the ocular anterior segment with slit lamp biomicroscopy, which allows the clinician to recognize signs of conditions that can produce elevated IOP. After measurement of IOP, a specialized prismatic lens called a gonioscope is used to determine whether the angle is physically open or closed. The structural manifestation of RGC loss is optic nerve head atrophy and excavation of the neuroretinal rim tissue. Treatment is guided by addressing secondary causes for elevated IOP (such as inflammation, infection, and ischemia) whenever possible. Subsequently, a variety of medical, laser, and surgical options are used to achieve a target IOP. Copyright © 2014 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press; all rights reserved.

  2. Acute migraine: Current treatment and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kalra, Arun A; Elliott, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Migraine is a common disabling primary headache disorder. Despite the need for a perfect treatment of this debilitating condition, the ideal “cure” eludes us. In 1992, the first triptan was released in the US for use in acute migraine. Triptans are more specific for the serotonin receptor 5-hydroxy triptamine (5-HT) 1 than previously prescribed drugs, such as ergotamines, with fewer side effects. This was an important first step in specific acute migraine therapy. Today however, triptans continue to be underutilized. There remains a concern, among practitioners and patients, about possible cardiovascular safety issues, despite the lack of strong evidence of serious adverse events. In fact, triptans now have a safe track record over more than a decade of use. Other perceived downfalls to use, include cost and variable efficacy. The more we learn about the clinical features and pathophysiology of migraine, the closer we are to finding a satisfactory monotherapy. Until then, recognizing that mixed mechanisms underlie migraine symptoms, rational polytherapy can be useful. Research on the roles of serotonin, calcitonin gene related peptide, glutamine and N-methyl-D-aspartate in the trigeminovascular system holds promise for those searching for the perfect migraine headache cure. PMID:18488069

  3. [Diabetic nephropathy: current diagnostics and treatment].

    PubMed

    Werth, S; Lehnert, H; Steinhoff, J

    2015-05-01

    Diabetic kidney disease is a leading cause of renal failure in Germany. Albuminuria is an early diagnostic indicator of renal damage in diabetes and, aside from renal failure, a major risk factor of cardiovascular disease. An early diagnosis of diabetic kidney disease is of great importance to reduce associated cardiovascular mortality; glycemic control should aim for HbA1c levels of < 7 %. Guidelines on blood pressure differ, but it should generally be reduced to < 140/90 mmHg; stricter limits should be applied if albuminuria is present. ACE inhibitors (ACE-I) or angiotensin receptor blockers (ARB) should be preferred for blood pressure control. A combination of ACE-Is and ARBs or a renin-inhibitor therapy does not improve cardiovascular outcome, instead it increases the rate of adverse events, e.g., hyperkalemia or renal failure. Lipid control, usually with statins, should be started at an early phase of renal failure. Vitamin D receptor activation and uric acid reduction might play a future role in the treatment of diabetic kidney disease. Pharmacological modification of inflammatory signaling appears to be promising but is not yet of clinical relevance.

  4. Core Body and Skin Temperature in Type 1 Narcolepsy in Daily Life; Effects of Sodium Oxybate and Prediction of Sleep Attacks

    PubMed Central

    van der Heide, Astrid; Werth, Esther; Donjacour, Claire E.H.M.; Reijntjes, Robert H.A.M.; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van Someren, Eus J.W.; Baumann, Christian R.; Fronczek, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Previous laboratory studies in narcolepsy patients showed altered core body and skin temperatures, which are hypothesised to be related to a disturbed sleep wake regulation. In this ambulatory study we assessed temperature profiles in normal daily life, and whether sleep attacks are heralded by changes in skin temperature. Furthermore, the effects of three months of treatment with sodium oxybate (SXB) were investigated. Methods: Twenty-five narcolepsy patients and 15 healthy controls were included. Core body, proximal and distal skin temperatures, and sleep-wake state were measured simultaneously for 24 hours in ambulatory patients. This procedure was repeated in 16 narcolepsy patients after at least 3 months of stable treatment with SXB. Results: Increases in distal skin temperature and distal-to-proximal temperature gradient (DPG) strongly predicted daytime sleep attacks (P < 0.001). As compared to controls, patients had a higher proximal and distal skin temperature in the morning, and a lower distal skin temperature during the night (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, they had a higher core body temperature during the first part of the night (P < 0.05), which SXB decreased (F = 4.99, df = 1, P = 0.03) to a level similar to controls. SXB did not affect skin temperature. Conclusions: This ambulatory study demonstrates that daytime sleep attacks were preceded by clear changes in distal skin temperature and DPG. Furthermore, changes in core body and skin temperature in narcolepsy, previously only studied in laboratory settings, were partially confirmed. Treatment with SXB resulted in a normalisation of the core body temperature profile. Future studies should explore whether predictive temperature changes can be used to signal or even prevent sleep attacks. Citation: van der Heide A, Werth E, Donjacour CE, Reijntjes RH, Lammers GJ, Van Someren EJ, Baumann CR, Fronczek R. Core body and skin temperature in type 1 narcolepsy in daily life; effects of sodium

  5. Evaluation of polygenic risks for narcolepsy and essential hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Maria; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Liu, Xiaoxi; Kuwabara, Hitoshi; Kano, Yukiko; Shimada, Takafumi; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Nishida, Hisami; Sugaya, Nagisa; Tochigi, Mamoru; Otowa, Takeshi; Okazaki, Yuji; Kaiya, Hisanobu; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Miyashita, Akinori; Kuwano, Ryozo; Kasai, Kiyoto; Tanii, Hisashi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2016-10-01

    In humans, narcolepsy is a sleep disorder that is characterized by sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities. Essential hypersomnia (EHS) is another type of sleep disorder that is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness without cataplexy. A human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class II allele, HLA-DQB1*06:02, is a major genetic factor for narcolepsy. Almost all narcoleptic patients are carriers of this HLA allele, while 30-50% of EHS patients and 12% of all healthy individuals in Japan carry this allele. The pathogenesis of narcolepsy and EHS is thought to be partially shared. To evaluate the contribution of common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to narcolepsy onset and to assess the common genetic background of narcolepsy and EHS, we conducted a polygenic analysis that included 393 narcoleptic patients, 38 EHS patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02, 119 EHS patients without HLA-DQB1*06:02 and 1582 healthy individuals. We also included 376 individuals with panic disorder and 213 individuals with autism to confirm whether the results were biased. Polygenic risks in narcolepsy were estimated to explain 58.1% (P HLA-DQB1*06:02 =2.30 × 10 -48 , P whole genome without HLA-DQB1*06:02 =6.73 × 10 -2 ) including HLA-DQB1*06:02 effects and 1.3% (P whole genome without HLA-DQB1*06:02 =2.43 × 10 -2 ) excluding HLA-DQB1*06:02 effects. The results also indicated that small-effect SNPs contributed to the development of narcolepsy. Reported susceptibility SNPs for narcolepsy in the Japanese population, CPT1B (carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1B), TRA@ (T-cell receptor alpha) and P2RY11 (purinergic receptor P2Y, G-protein coupled, 11), were found to explain 0.8% of narcolepsy onset (P whole genome without HLA-DQB1*06:02 =9.74 × 10 -2 ). EHS patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02 were estimated to have higher shared genetic background to narcoleptic patients than EHS patients without HLA-DQB1*06:02 even when the effects of HLA-DQB1*06:02 were excluded (EHS with HLA

  6. Narcolepsy with Long Sleep Time: A Specific Entity?

    PubMed Central

    Vernet, Cyrille; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2009-01-01

    Background: The classical narcolepsy patient reports intense feelings of sleepiness (with/out cataplexy), normal or disrupted nighttime sleep, and takes short and restorative naps. However, with long-term monitoring, we identified some narcoleptics resembling patients with idiopathic hypersomnia. Objective: To isolate and describe a new subtype of narcolepsy with long sleep time). Setting: University Hospital Design: Controlled, prospective cohort Participants: Out of 160 narcoleptics newly diagnosed within the past 3 years, 29 (18%) had a long sleep time (more than 11 h/24 h). We compared narcoleptics with (n = 23) and without (n = 29) long sleep time to 25 hypersomniacs with long sleep time and 20 healthy subjects. Intervention: Patients and controls underwent face-to face interviews, questionnaires, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) genotype, an overnight polysomnography, multiple sleep latency tests, and 24-h ad libitum sleep monitoring. Results: Narcoleptics with long sleep time had a similar disease course and similar frequencies of cataplexy, sleep paralysis, hallucinations, multiple sleep onset in REM periods, short mean sleep latencies, and HLA DQB1*0602 positivity as narcoleptics with normal sleep time did. However, they had longer sleep time during 24 h, and higher sleep efficiency, lower Epworth Sleepiness Scale scores, and reported their naps were more often unrefreshing. Only 3/23 had core narcolepsy (HLA and cataplexy positive). Conclusions: The subgroup of narcoleptics with a long sleep time comprises 18% of narcoleptics. Their symptoms combine the disabilities of both narcolepsy (severe sleepiness) and idiopathic hypersomnia (long sleep time and unrefreshing naps). Thus, they may constitute a group with multiple arousal system dysfunctions. Citation: Vernet C; Arnulf I. Narcolepsy with long sleep time: a specific entity? SLEEP 2009;32(9):1229-1235. PMID:19750928

  7. Adenotonsillectomy outcomes in children with sleep apnea and narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Biyani, Sneh; Cunningham, Tina D; Baldassari, Cristina M

    2017-09-01

    To identify improvements in daytime sleepiness following adenotonsillectomy in children with non-severe obstructive sleep apnea and narcolepsy. Case series with chart review over 15 years. Tertiary Children's Hospital. Children between 6 and 17 years of age with narcolepsy that underwent adenotonsillectomy for non-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were included. Narcolepsy was diagnosed based on clinical assessment and the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT) results. A standardized instrument, the pediatric Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), was used to assess daytime sleepiness before and after adenotonsillectomy. Nine children with a mean age of 12.1 years were included. The majority of the subjects (78%, n = 7) were African American and six children (66.7%) were obese. Four children (44%) were treated with wake promoting agents during the study. The mean preoperative apnea hypopnea index on polysomnography was 4.89 (SD 1.86), while the mean sleep latency on MSLT was 6.32 min (SD 3.14). The mean preoperative ESS was 16.10 and the postoperative ESS was 10.80 (SD 3.96). There was significant improvement (p = 0.02) in the ESS following adenotonsillectomy with seven children (78%) reporting diminished daytime sleepiness. Children with non-severe OSA and narcolepsy experience significant improvement in daytime sleepiness following adenotonsillectomy. Future studies are needed to determine the incidence and clinical significance of non-severe OSA in children with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. High-dimensional single-cell analysis reveals the immune signature of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, Felix J; Bernard-Valnet, Raphaël; Quériault, Clémence; Mrdjen, Dunja; Weber, Lukas M; Galli, Edoardo; Krieg, Carsten; Robinson, Mark D; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung; Dauvilliers, Yves; Liblau, Roland S; Becher, Burkhard

    2016-11-14

    Narcolepsy type 1 is a devastating neurological sleep disorder resulting from the destruction of orexin-producing neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Despite its striking association with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, the autoimmune etiology of narcolepsy has remained largely hypothetical. Here, we compared peripheral mononucleated cells from narcolepsy patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02-matched healthy controls using high-dimensional mass cytometry in combination with algorithm-guided data analysis. Narcolepsy patients displayed multifaceted immune activation in CD4 + and CD8 + T cells dominated by elevated levels of B cell-supporting cytokines. Additionally, T cells from narcolepsy patients showed increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-2 and TNF. Although it remains to be established whether these changes are primary to an autoimmune process in narcolepsy or secondary to orexin deficiency, these findings are indicative of inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis of this enigmatic disease. © 2016 Hartmann et al.

  9. High-dimensional single-cell analysis reveals the immune signature of narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Quériault, Clémence; Krieg, Carsten; Nguyen, Xuan-Hung

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is a devastating neurological sleep disorder resulting from the destruction of orexin-producing neurons in the central nervous system (CNS). Despite its striking association with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele, the autoimmune etiology of narcolepsy has remained largely hypothetical. Here, we compared peripheral mononucleated cells from narcolepsy patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02-matched healthy controls using high-dimensional mass cytometry in combination with algorithm-guided data analysis. Narcolepsy patients displayed multifaceted immune activation in CD4+ and CD8+ T cells dominated by elevated levels of B cell–supporting cytokines. Additionally, T cells from narcolepsy patients showed increased production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL-2 and TNF. Although it remains to be established whether these changes are primary to an autoimmune process in narcolepsy or secondary to orexin deficiency, these findings are indicative of inflammatory processes in the pathogenesis of this enigmatic disease. PMID:27821550

  10. Narcolepsy with cataplexy and hyperthyroidism sudden appeared after H1N1 vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Leiva, Silvia; Madrazo, Jimena; Podesta, Claudio

    2018-01-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) is a chronic sleep disorder, characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and fragmented nocturnal sleep. It is caused by a hypocretin deficiency due to a significant reduction of the neurons producing it. In the last years, it has been postulated that an autoimmune mechanism would be responsible for the destruction of these neurons in those genetically predisposed patients. The increased incidence of narcolepsy after the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccination campaign in 2009-2010 is known. We present below the case of an adult patient who, 10 days after receiving H1N1 vaccination, suffers a traffic accident after falling asleep. Subsequent studies revealed hyperthyroidism due to Graves disease. In spite of the treatment, the patient persisted with daily and disabling daytime sleepiness, sleep attacks and episodes of generalized muscle atony with preservation of consciousness. A nocturnal polysomnography and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) were performed with a diagnosis of NT1. The particularity of this case is the presentation of 2 autoimmune diseases triggered by an H1N1 vaccine without adjuvant, so far there is only evidence of NT1 associated with vaccines with adjuvant and viral infection. The association of both entities has made us reflect on the autoimmune mechanism, reinforcing the theory of its role in the onset of the disease. PMID:29796199

  11. Health-related stigma as a determinant of functioning in young adults with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Kapella, Mary C; Berger, Barbara E; Vern, Boris A; Vispute, Sachin; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of narcolepsy tend to arise during adolescence or young adulthood, a formative time in human development during which people are usually completing their education and launching a career. Little is known about the impact of narcolepsy on the social aspects of health-related quality of life in young adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between health-related stigma, mood (anxiety and depression) and daytime functioning in young adults with narcolepsy compared to those without narcolepsy. Young adults (age 18-35) with narcolepsy (N = 122) and without narcolepsy (N = 93) were mailed a packet that included questionnaires and a self-addressed postage paid envelope. The questionnaire included demographic information and a composite of instruments including the SF 36, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Fife Stigma Scale (FSS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Variable associations were assessed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U Test, correlations, stepwise multiple regression and path analysis. Young adults with narcolepsy perceived significantly more stigma and lower mood and health-related quality of life than young adults without narcolepsy (p<0.01). Health-related stigma was directly and indirectly associated with lower functioning through depressed mood. Fifty-two percent of the variance in functioning was explained by the final model in the young adults with narcolepsy. Health-related stigma in young adults with narcolepsy is at a level consistent with other chronic medical illnesses. Health-related stigma may be an important determinant of functioning in young adults with narcolepsy. Future work is indicated toward further characterizing stigma and developing interventions that address various domains of stigma in people with narcolepsy.

  12. Health-Related Stigma as a Determinant of Functioning in Young Adults with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kapella, Mary C.; Berger, Barbara E.; Vern, Boris A.; Vispute, Sachin; Prasad, Bharati; Carley, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Symptoms of narcolepsy tend to arise during adolescence or young adulthood, a formative time in human development during which people are usually completing their education and launching a career. Little is known about the impact of narcolepsy on the social aspects of health-related quality of life in young adults. The purpose of this study was to examine relationships between health-related stigma, mood (anxiety and depression) and daytime functioning in young adults with narcolepsy compared to those without narcolepsy. Young adults (age 18–35) with narcolepsy (N = 122) and without narcolepsy (N = 93) were mailed a packet that included questionnaires and a self-addressed postage paid envelope. The questionnaire included demographic information and a composite of instruments including the SF 36, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire (FOSQ), Fife Stigma Scale (FSS), Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS). Variable associations were assessed using descriptive statistics, ANOVA, Mann-Whitney U Test, correlations, stepwise multiple regression and path analysis. Young adults with narcolepsy perceived significantly more stigma and lower mood and health-related quality of life than young adults without narcolepsy (p<0.01). Health-related stigma was directly and indirectly associated with lower functioning through depressed mood. Fifty-two percent of the variance in functioning was explained by the final model in the young adults with narcolepsy. Health-related stigma in young adults with narcolepsy is at a level consistent with other chronic medical illnesses. Health-related stigma may be an important determinant of functioning in young adults with narcolepsy. Future work is indicated toward further characterizing stigma and developing interventions that address various domains of stigma in people with narcolepsy. PMID:25898361

  13. Disrupted Sleep in Narcolepsy: Exploring the Integrity of Galanin Neurons in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Area.

    PubMed

    Gavrilov, Yury V; Ellison, Brian A; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Mignot, Emmanuel; Baumann, Christian R; Scammell, Thomas E; Valko, Philipp O

    2016-05-01

    To examine the integrity of sleep-promoting neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in postmortem brains of narcolepsy type 1 patients. Postmortem examination of five narcolepsy and eight control brains. VLPO galanin neuron count did not differ between narcolepsy patients (11,151 ± 3,656) and controls (13,526 ± 9,544). A normal number of galanin-immunoreactive VLPO neurons in narcolepsy type 1 brains at autopsy suggests that VLPO cell loss is an unlikely explanation for the sleep fragmentation that often accompanies the disease. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  14. Comparison of Polysomnography and Multiple Sleep Latency Test Findings in Subjects with Narcolepsy and İdiopathic Hypersomnia.

    PubMed

    Erdem, Murat; Bolu, Abdullah; Ünlü, A Gazi; Alper, Mustafa; Yetkin, Sinan

    2013-09-01

    Both narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia are the main causes of excessive daytime sleepiness. In this study, we aimed to compare polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) findings in narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia patients. The files of patients with narcolepsy and hypersomnia who were admitted between 1995 and 2009 were reviewed. We evaluated data from 94 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 49 with narcolepsy without cataplexy and 140 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia. Sleep latency and REM latency were longer in idiopathic hypersomnia group than in narcolepsy with and without cataplexy group. Mean sleep latency in MSLT was the shortest in narcolepsy with cataplexy group. There was no difference in sleep efficiency, percentage of sleep stage and number of awakenings in PSG between three groups. The findings of the study indicated that narcolepsy patients differ from idiopathic hypersomnia patients in terms of sleep latency and REM latency in PSG.

  15. Current developments in bovine mastitis treatment and control.

    PubMed

    Wager, L A; Linquist, W E; Hayes, G L; Britten, A M; Whitehead, R G; Webster, D E; Barnes, F D

    1978-01-01

    Mastitis in its complexity has managed to forestall all efforts of eradication in spite of years of research, antibiotics and practical control measures. This minisymposium will touch on seven topics current to treatment and control of this economically important disease.

  16. Single dose treatment of malaria - current status and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Mischlinger, Johannes; Agnandji, Selidji T; Ramharter, Michael

    2016-07-01

    Despite increased international efforts for control and ultimate elimination, malaria remains a major health problem. Currently, artemisinin-based combination therapies are the treatment of choice for uncomplicated malaria exhibiting high efficacy in clinical trial settings in sub-Saharan Africa. However, their administration over a three-day period is associated with important problems of treatment adherence resulting in markedly reduced effectiveness of currently recommended antimalarials under real world settings. Antimalarial drug candidates and antimalarial drug combinations currently under advanced clinical development for the indication as single dose antimalarial therapy. Expert commentary: Several new drug candidates and combinations are currently undergoing pivotal proof-of-concept studies or clinical development programmes. The development of a single dose combination therapy would constitute a breakthrough in the control of malaria. Such an innovative treatment approach would simultaneously close the effectiveness gap of current three-day therapies and revolutionize population based interventions in the context of malaria elimination campaigns.

  17. 6. View north of the treatment house currently named the ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. View north of the treatment house currently named the Whitney Water Center. When the water company went to a pre-chlorination process the equipment was housed in this building adjacent to the inlet from the Lake Whitney Dam. The treatment house is currently the building used as an environmental learning center for school children. - Lake Whitney Water Filtration Plant, Lake Whitney Dam, East side of Whitney Avenue near intersection with Armory Street, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  18. Hypocretin Receptor Expression in Canine and Murine Narcolepsy Models and in Hypocretin-Ligand Deficient Human Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mishima, Kazuo; Fujiki, Nobuhiro; Yoshida, Yasushi; Sakurai, Takeshi; Honda, Makoto; Mignot, Emmanuel; Nishino, Seiji

    2008-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine whether hypocretin receptor gene (hcrtR1 and hcrtR2) expression is affected after long-term hypocretin ligand loss in humans and animal models of narcolepsy. Design: Animal and human study. We measured hcrtR1 and hcrtR2 expression in the frontal cortex and pons using the RT-PCR method in murine models (8-week-old and 27-week-old orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (TG) hypocretin cell ablated mice and wild-type mice from the same litter, 10 mice for each group), in canine models (8 genetically narcoleptic Dobermans with null mutations in the hcrtR2, 9 control Dobermans, 3 sporadic ligand-deficient narcoleptics, and 4 small breed controls), and in humans (5 narcolepsy-cataplexy patients with hypocretin deficiency (average age 77.0 years) and 5 control subjects (72.6 years). Measurement and Results: 27-week-old (but not 8-week-old) TG mice showed significant decreases in hcrtR1 expression, suggesting the influence of the long-term ligand loss on the receptor expression. Both sporadic narcoleptic dogs and human narcolepsy-cataplexy subjects showed a significant decrease in hcrtR1 expression, while declines in hcrtR2 expression were not significant in these cases. HcrtR2-mutated narcoleptic Dobermans (with normal ligand production) showed no alteration in hcrtR1 expression. Conclusions: Moderate declines in hcrtR expressions, possibly due to long-term postnatal loss of ligand production, were observed in hypocretin-ligand deficient narcoleptic subjects. These declines are not likely to be progressive and complete. The relative preservation of hcrtR2 expression also suggests that hypocretin based therapies are likely to be a viable therapeutic options in human narcolepsy-cataplexy. Citation: Mishima K; Fujiki N; Yoshida Y; Sakurai T; Honda M; Mignot E; Nishino S. Hypocretin receptor expression in canine and murine narcolepsy models and in hypocretin-ligand deficient human narcolepsy. SLEEP 2008;31(8):1119-1126. PMID:18714784

  19. The Familial Risk and HLA Susceptibility among Narcolepsy Patients in Hong Kong Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Lei; Fong, S.Y.Y.; Lam, Ching W.; Tang, Nelson L.S.; Ng, Margaret H. L.; Li, Albert M.; Ho, C.K.W.; Cheng, Suk-Hang; Lau, Kin-Mang; Wing, Yun Kwok

    2007-01-01

    Study Objectives: To explore the familial aggregation and HLA susceptibility of narcolepsy in Hong Kong Chinese by objective sleep measurements and HLA typing. Design: Case control design Participants: Twelve narcoleptic probands, 34 first-degree relatives, and 30 healthy controls. Interventions: N/A Measurements and Results: Each subject underwent a standardized nocturnal polysomnogram (PSG), followed by a daytime multiple sleep latency test (MSLT). HLA typing was performed for all subjects. One relative (2.9%) was diagnosed as suffering from narcolepsy with cataplexy. Nearly 30% of the relatives fulfilled the criteria of narcolepsy spectrum disorder (shortened mean sleep latency [MSL] and/or the presence of sleep onset REM periods [SOREMPs]). When using the population data for comparison, the relative risk of narcolepsy in first-degree relatives was 85.3. The odds ratio of narcolepsy spectrum disorder in first-degree relatives was 5.8 (95% CI: 1.2 – 29.3) when compared to healthy controls. There existed 6 multiplex families, in which all 10 relatives with narcolepsy spectrum disorders, including all 3 relatives with multiple SOREMPs, were positive for HLA DQB1*0602. Conclusions: Our study demonstrated a definitive familial aggregation of narcolepsy, narcolepsy spectrum disorders, and possibly cataplexy in Hong Kong Chinese. This familial aggregation supported an inherited basis for narcolepsy spectrum. The tight co-segregation of HLA DQB1*0602 and narcolepsy spectrum disorders might suggest that HLA typing, especially DQB1*0602, at least partly confer the familial risk of narcolepsy. In addition, our study suggested that the subjective questionnaire measurements including Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale and Epworth Sleepiness Scale were unable to detect the presence of narcolepsy spectrum disorders among the relatives. A stringent objective measurement-based design for family studies is suggested for future study. Further studies are indicated for the determination

  20. Anti-Tribbles Homolog 2 Autoantibodies in Japanese Patients with Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Tanaka, Susumu; Miyagawa, Taku; Honda, Yutaka; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Honda, Makoto

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: Narcolepsy is a sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy. The association with human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DQB1*0602 and T-cell receptor alpha locus suggests that autoimmunity plays a role in narcolepsy. A recent study reported an increased prevalence of autoantibodies against Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) in patients with narcolepsy. To replicate this finding, we examined anti-TRIB2 autoantibodies in Japanese patients with narcolepsy. Design: We examined anti-TRIB2 autoantibodies against a full-length [35S]-labeled TRIB2 antigen in Japanese patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy (n = 88), narcolepsy without cataplexy (n = 18), and idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time (n = 11). The results were compared to Japanese healthy controls (n = 87). Thirty-seven healthy control subjects were positive for HLA-DRB1*1501-DQB1*0602. We also examined autoantibodies against another Tribbles homolog, TRIB3, as an experimental control. Measurements and Results: Autoantibodies against TRIB2 were found in 26.1% of patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy, a significantly higher prevalence than the 2.3% in healthy controls. We found that anti-TRIB3 autoantibodies were rare in patients with narcolepsy and showed no association with anti-TRIB2 indices. No significant correlation was found between anti-TRIB2 positivity and clinical information. Conclusions: We confirmed the higher prevalence and specificity of anti-TRIB2 autoantibodies in Japanese patients with narcolepsy-cataplexy. This suggests a subgroup within narcolepsy-cataplexy might be affected by an anti-TRIB2 autoantibody-mediated autoimmune mechanism. Citation: Toyoda H; Tanaka S; Miyagawa T; Honda Y; Tokunaga K; Honda M. Anti-Tribbles homolog 2 autoantibodies in Japanese patients with narcolepsy. SLEEP 2010;33(7):875-878. PMID:20614847

  1. The Safety of Adjuvanted Vaccines Revisited: Vaccine-Induced Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, S Sohail; Montomoli, Emanuele; Pasini, Franco Laghi; Steinman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    Despite the very high benefit-to-risk ratio of vaccines, the fear of negative side effects has discouraged many people from getting vaccinated, resulting in the reemergence of previously controlled diseases such as measles, pertussis and diphtheria. This fear has been amplified more recently by multiple epidemiologic studies that confirmed the link of an AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine (Pandemrix, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Germany) used in Europe during the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic [A(H1N1) pdm09] with the development of narcolepsy, a chronic sleep disorder, in children and adolescents. However, public misperceptions of what adjuvants are and why they are used in vaccines has created in some individuals a closed "black box" attitude towards all vaccines. The focus of this review article is to revisit this "black box" using the example of narcolepsy associated with the European AS03-adjuvanted pandemic influenza vaccine.

  2. Clinical and polysomnographic course of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Franceschini, Christian; Peltola, Hanna; Vandi, Stefano; Finotti, Elena; Ingravallo, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J; Partinen, Markku; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-12-01

    Our aim was to investigate the natural evolution of cataplexy and polysomnographic features in untreated children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. To this end, clinical, polysomnographic, and cataplexy-video assessments were performed at diagnosis (mean age of 10 ± 3 and disease duration of 1 ± 1 years) and after a median follow-up of 3 years from symptom onset (mean age of 12 ± 4 years) in 21 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin 1 deficiency (tested in 19 subjects). Video assessment was also performed in two control groups matched for age and sex at first evaluation and follow-up and was blindly scored for presence of hypotonic (negative) and active movements. Patients' data at diagnosis and at follow-up were contrasted, compared with controls, and related with age and disease duration. At diagnosis children with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed an increase of sleep time during the 24 h; at follow-up sleep time and nocturnal sleep latency shortened, in the absence of other polysomnographic or clinical (including body mass index) changes. Hypotonic phenomena and selected facial movements decreased over time and, tested against disease duration and age, appeared as age-dependent. At onset, childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by an abrupt increase of total sleep over the 24 h, generalized hypotonia and motor overactivity. With time, the picture of cataplexy evolves into classic presentation (i.e., brief muscle weakness episodes triggered by emotions), whereas total sleep time across the 24 h decreases, returning to more age-appropriate levels.

  3. Clinical and polysomnographic course of childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Franceschini, Christian; Peltola, Hanna; Vandi, Stefano; Finotti, Elena; Ingravallo, Francesca; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J.; Partinen, Markku; Dauvilliers, Yves; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2013-01-01

    Our aim was to investigate the natural evolution of cataplexy and polysomnographic features in untreated children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. To this end, clinical, polysomnographic, and cataplexy-video assessments were performed at diagnosis (mean age of 10 ± 3 and disease duration of 1 ± 1 years) and after a median follow-up of 3 years from symptom onset (mean age of 12 ± 4 years) in 21 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin 1 deficiency (tested in 19 subjects). Video assessment was also performed in two control groups matched for age and sex at first evaluation and follow-up and was blindly scored for presence of hypotonic (negative) and active movements. Patients’ data at diagnosis and at follow-up were contrasted, compared with controls, and related with age and disease duration. At diagnosis children with narcolepsy with cataplexy showed an increase of sleep time during the 24 h; at follow-up sleep time and nocturnal sleep latency shortened, in the absence of other polysomnographic or clinical (including body mass index) changes. Hypotonic phenomena and selected facial movements decreased over time and, tested against disease duration and age, appeared as age-dependent. At onset, childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by an abrupt increase of total sleep over the 24 h, generalized hypotonia and motor overactivity. With time, the picture of cataplexy evolves into classic presentation (i.e. brief muscle weakness episodes triggered by emotions), whereas total sleep time across the 24 h decreases, returning to more age-appropriate levels. PMID:24142146

  4. Morbidity of childhood onset narcolepsy: a controlled national study.

    PubMed

    Jennum, Poul; Pickering, Line; Thorstensen, Eva Wiberg; Ibsen, Rikke; Kjellberg, Jakob

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is associated with significant morbidities. We evaluated the morbidities and mortality in a national group of child and adolescent patients after a first diagnosis of narcolepsy. Identified from the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR), 243 patients (128 boys) aged 0-19 years diagnosed with narcolepsy between 1998 and 2012 with follow-up until 2014 were compared with 970 controls who were randomly chosen from the Danish Civil Registration System Statistics and matched by age, gender and geography. Comorbidities were calculated three years before and after diagnoses. In addition to the more frequent health contacts due to neurological diseases, patients showed elevated odds ratios before and after diagnosis of endocrine and metabolic conditions (4.4 (95% CI, 1.9-10.4); 3.8 (1.7-8.4)), nervous disorders (16.6 (8.0-34.4); 198 (49.0-804)), psychiatric illnesses (4.5 (2.3-9.1)/5.8 (2.8-12.1)), pulmonary diseases, and other diseases (3.1 (2.0-4.9); 3.1 (2.0-4.9)). Congenital abnormalities (2.5 (1.1-5.5)), respiratory (2.9 (1.5-5-5)) and eye (5.7 (2.2-15.0)) diseases were more common before diagnosis. Injuries were also more common after diagnosis (1.5 (1.0-2.1)). Narcoleptic children presented significantly more diagnoses of multiple comorbidities than controls before and after diagnosis. Before and after a diagnosis of narcolepsy in children, morbidity is more frequent in several domains, including metabolic, psychiatric, neurological and other diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Challenges of implementing fibromyalgia treatment guidelines in current clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Lesley M; Clauw, Daniel J

    2017-09-01

    The current diagnostic and treatment pathway for patients with fibromyalgia (FM) is lengthy, complex, and characterized by multiple physician visits with an average 2-year wait until diagnosis. It is clear that effective identification and appropriate treatment of FM remain a challenge in current clinical practice. Ideally, FM management involves a multidisciplinary approach with the preferable patient pathway originating in primary care but supported by a range of health care providers, including referral to specialist care when necessary. After the publication of individual clinical studies, high-quality reviews, and meta-analyses, recently published FM treatment guidelines have transitioned from an expert consensus to an evidence-based approach. Evidence-based guidelines provide a framework for ensuring early diagnosis and timely adoption of appropriate treatment. However, for successful outcomes, FM treatments must adopt a more holistic approach, which addresses more than just pain. Impact on the associated symptoms of fatigue and cognitive problems, sleep and mood disturbances, and lowered functional status are also important in judging the success of FM therapy. Recently published guidelines recommend the adoption of a symptom-based approach to guide pharmacologic treatment. Emerging treatment options for FM may be best differentiated on the basis of their effect on comorbid symptoms that are often associated with pain (e.g. sleep disturbance, mood, fatigue). The current review discusses the most recently published Canadian guidelines and the implications of the recent European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) recommendations, with a focus on the challenges of implementing these guidelines in current clinical practice.

  6. Narcolepsy: regional cerebral blood flow during sleep and wakefulness

    SciT

    Sakai, F.; Meyer, J.S.; Karacan, I.

    Serial measurements of regional cerebral blood flow were made by the 135Xe inhalation method during the early stages of sleep and wakefulness in eight normal volunteers and 12 patients with narcolepsy. Electroencephalogram, electro-oculogram, and submental electromyogram were recorded simultaneously. In normals, mean hemispheric gray matter blood flow (Fg) during stages I and II sleep was significantly less than waking values. Maximum regional blood flow decreases during sleep occurred in the brainstem-cerebellar, right inferior temporal, and bilateral frontal regions. In patients with narcolepsy, mean hemispheric Fg while awake was 80.5 +- 13 ml per 100 gm brain per minute. During REMmore » sleep, mean hemispheric Fg increased concurrently with large increases in brainstem-cerebellar region flow. During stages I and II sleep without REM, there were significant increases in mean hemispheric Fg and brainstem-cerebellar Fg, just the opposite of changes in normals. In narcolepsy, there appears to be a reversal of normal cerebral deactivation patterns, particularly involving the brainstem, during stages I and II sleep.« less

  7. The current situation of treatment systems for alcoholism in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Kang, Tae-Cheon; Choi, Ihn-Geun

    2013-02-01

    Alcoholism is becoming one of the most serious issues in Korea. The purpose of this review article was to understand the present status of the treatment system for alcoholism in Korea compared to the United States and to suggest its developmental direction in Korea. Current modalities of alcoholism treatment in Korea including withdrawal treatment, pharmacotherapy, and psychosocial treatment are available according to Korean evidence-based treatment guidelines. Benzodiazepines and supportive care including vitamin and nutritional support are mainly used to treat alcohol withdrawal in Korea. Naltrexone and acamprosate are the drugs of first choice to treat chronic alcoholism. Psychosocial treatment methods such as individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, cue exposure therapy, 12-step facilitation therapy, self-help group therapy, and community-based treatment have been carried out to treat chronic alcoholism in Korea. However, current alcohol treatment system in Korea is not integrative compared to that in the United States. To establish the treatment system, it is important to set up an independent governmental administration on alcohol abuse, to secure experts on alcoholism, and to conduct outpatient alcoholism treatment programs and facilities in an open system including some form of continuing care.

  8. The Current Situation of Treatment Systems for Alcoholism in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee Wook; Lee, Boung Chul; Kang, Tae-Cheon

    2013-01-01

    Alcoholism is becoming one of the most serious issues in Korea. The purpose of this review article was to understand the present status of the treatment system for alcoholism in Korea compared to the United States and to suggest its developmental direction in Korea. Current modalities of alcoholism treatment in Korea including withdrawal treatment, pharmacotherapy, and psychosocial treatment are available according to Korean evidence-based treatment guidelines. Benzodiazepines and supportive care including vitamin and nutritional support are mainly used to treat alcohol withdrawal in Korea. Naltrexone and acamprosate are the drugs of first choice to treat chronic alcoholism. Psychosocial treatment methods such as individual psychotherapy, group psychotherapy, family therapy, cognitive behavior therapy, cue exposure therapy, 12-step facilitation therapy, self-help group therapy, and community-based treatment have been carried out to treat chronic alcoholism in Korea. However, current alcohol treatment system in Korea is not integrative compared to that in the United States. To establish the treatment system, it is important to set up an independent governmental administration on alcohol abuse, to secure experts on alcoholism, and to conduct outpatient alcoholism treatment programs and facilities in an open system including some form of continuing care. PMID:23400047

  9. Current options for the treatment of pathological scarring.

    PubMed

    Poetschke, Julian; Gauglitz, Gerd G

    2016-05-01

    Scarring is the consequence of surgery, trauma or different skin diseases. Apart from fresh, immature scars,that transform into mature scars over the course of would healing and that do not require further treatment,linear hypertrophic scars, widespread hypertrophic scars, keloids and atrophic scars exist. Symptoms like pruritusand pain, stigmatization as well as functional and aesthetic impairments that are very disturbing for the affected patients can bethe basis for the desire for treatment. Today, a multitude of options for the treatment and prevention of scars exists. Topical agents based on silicone or onion extract, intralesional injections of cristalline glucocorticoids (oftentimes in combinationwith cryotherapy) or 5-Fluorouracil as well as ablative and nonablative laser treatment are used. Current guidelines summarize the multitude of available treatment options and the currently available datafor the treating physicians, allowing them to make clear therapy recommendations for every single scar type. Relieving patients of their discomfort and doing their aesthetic demands justice is thus possible. Apart from scar prevention becoming more and more important, the increased use of modernlaser treatment options constitutes a key point in clinical scar treatment. At the same time the attention is turned to evaluating current therapeutic options with the help of contemporary study designs so as to graduallyimprove the level of evidence in scar treatment. © 2016 Deutsche Dermatologische Gesellschaft (DDG). Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman’s active sports life. Sportsman’s hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman’s hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman’s hernia at our hospital between 2011–2014, in light of current literature. PMID:27436937

  11. Sportsman hernia; the review of current diagnosis and treatment modalities.

    PubMed

    Paksoy, Melih; Sekmen, Ümit

    2016-01-01

    Groin pain is an important clinical entity that may affect a sportsman's active sports life. Sportsman's hernia is a chronic low abdominal and groin pain syndrome. Open and laparoscopic surgical treatment may be chosen in case of conservative treatment failure. Studies on sportsman's hernia, which is a challenging situation in both diagnosis and treatment, are ongoing in many centers. We reviewed the treatment results of 37 patients diagnosed and treated as sportsman's hernia at our hospital between 2011-2014, in light of current literature.

  12. Treatment for primary hypothyroidism: current approaches and future possibilities

    PubMed Central

    Chakera, Ali J; Pearce, Simon HS; Vaidya, Bijay

    2012-01-01

    Primary hypothyroidism is the most common endocrine disease. Although the diagnosis and treatment of hypothyroidism is often considered simple, there are large numbers of people with this condition who are suboptimally treated. Even in those people with hypothyroidism who are biochemically euthyroid on levothyroxine replacement there is a significant proportion who report poorer quality of life. This review explores the historical and current treatment options for hypothyroidism, reasons for and potential solutions to suboptimal treatment, and future possibilities in the treatment of hypothyroidism. PMID:22291465

  13. Hypersomnia: Evaluation, Treatment, and Social and Economic Aspects.

    PubMed

    Saini, Prabhjyot; Rye, David B

    2017-03-01

    Most central disorders of hypersomnolence are conditions with poorly understood pathophysiologies, making their identification, treatment, and management challenging for sleep clinicians. The most challenging to diagnose and treat is idiopathic hypersomnia. There are no FDA-approved treatments, and off-label usage of narcolepsy treatments seldom provide benefit. Patients are largely left on their own to alleviate the compound effects of this disorder on their quality of life. This review covers the major points regarding clinical features and diagnosis of idiopathic hypersomnia, reviews current evidence supporting the available treatment options, and discusses the psychosocial impact and effects of idiopathic hypersomnia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Epigenome-wide association study of DNA methylation in narcolepsy: an integrated genetic and epigenetic approach.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Mihoko; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Honda, Makoto

    2018-04-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy, which is a hypersomnia characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and cataplexy, is a multifactorial disease caused by both genetic and environmental factors. Several genetic factors including HLA-DQB1*06:02 have been identified; however, the disease etiology is still unclear. Epigenetic modifications, such as DNA methylation, have been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of complex diseases. Here, we examined DNA methylation profiles of blood samples from narcolepsy and healthy control individuals and performed an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) to investigate methylation loci associated with narcolepsy. Moreover, data from the EWAS and a previously performed narcolepsy genome-wide association study were integrated to search for methylation loci with causal links to the disease. We found that (1) genes annotated to the top-ranked differentially methylated positions (DMPs) in narcolepsy were associated with pathways of hormone secretion and monocarboxylic acid metabolism. (2) Top-ranked narcolepsy-associated DMPs were significantly more abundant in non-CpG island regions and more than 95 per cent of such sites were hypomethylated in narcolepsy patients. (3) The integrative analysis identified the CCR3 region where both a single methylation site and multiple single-nucleotide polymorphisms were found to be associated with the disease as a candidate region responsible for narcolepsy. The findings of this study suggest the importance of future replication studies, using methylation technologies with wider genome coverage and/or larger number of samples, to confirm and expand on these results.

  15. Complex Movement Disorders at Disease Onset in Childhood Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plazzi, Giuseppe; Pizza, Fabio; Palaia, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Christian; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan K.; Cortelli, Pietro; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Dauvilliers, Yves; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of bilateral muscle tone triggered by emotions), sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disturbed nocturnal sleep. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is most often associated with human leucocyte antigen-DQB1*0602 and is caused by the loss of…

  16. Growing Up with Type 1 Narcolepsy: Its Anthropometric and Endocrine Features

    PubMed Central

    Ponziani, Virginia; Gennari, Monia; Pizza, Fabio; Balsamo, Antonio; Bernardi, Filippo; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the effect of type 1 narcolepsy (NT1) on anthropometric and endocrine features in childhood/adolescence, focusing on patterns and correlates of weight, pubertal development, and growth in treated and untreated patients. Methods: We collected anthropometric (height, weight, body mass index (BMI) z-scores), pubertal, metabolic, and endocrine data from 72 NT1 patients at diagnosis and all available premorbid anthropometric parameters of patients from their pediatric files (n = 30). New measurements at 1-y reassessment in patients undergoing different treatments were compared with baseline data. Results: We detected a high prevalence of overweight (29.2%), obesity (25%), metabolic syndrome (18.8%), and precocious puberty (16.1%), but no signs of linear growth alterations at diagnosis. According to anthropometric records, weight gain started soon after NT1 onset. At 1-y follow-up reassessment, sodium oxybate treatment was associated with a significant BMI z-score reduction (−1.29 ± 0.30, p < 0.0005) after adjusting for baseline age, sex, sleepiness, and BMI. Conclusions: NT1 onset in children/adolescents is associated with rapid weight gain up to overweight/obesity and precocious puberty without affecting growth. In our study, sodium oxybate treatment resulted in a significant weight reduction in NT1 overweight/obese patients at 1-y follow-up. Citation: Ponziani V, Gennari M, Pizza F, Balsamo A, Bernardi F, Plazzi G. Growing up with type 1 narcolepsy: its anthropometric and endocrine features. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(12):1649–1657. PMID:27707443

  17. Comparison of driving simulator performance and neuropsychological testing in narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Kotterba, Sylvia; Mueller, Nicole; Leidag, Markus; Widdig, Walter; Rasche, Kurt; Malin, Jean-Pierre; Schultze-Werninghaus, Gerhard; Orth, Maritta

    2004-09-01

    Daytime sleepiness and cataplexy can increase automobile accident rates in narcolepsy. Several countries have produced guidelines for issuing a driving license. The aim of the study was to compare driving simulator performance and neuropsychological test results in narcolepsy in order to evaluate their predictive value regarding driving ability. Thirteen patients with narcolepsy (age: 41.5+/-12.9 years) and 10 healthy control patients (age: 55.1+/-7.8 years) were investigated. By computer-assisted neuropsychological testing, vigilance, alertness and divided attention were assessed. In a driving simulator patients and controls had to drive on a highway for 60 min (mean speed of 100 km/h). Different weather and daytime conditions and obstacles were presented. Epworth Sleepiness Scale-Scores were significantly raised (narcolepsy patients: 16.7+/-5.1, controls: 6.6+/-3.6, P < or = 0.001). The accident rate of the control patients increased (3.2+/-1.8 versus 1.3+/-1.5, P < or = 0.01). Significant differences in concentration lapses (e.g. tracking errors and deviation from speed limit) could not be revealed (9.8+/-3.5 versus 7.1+/-3.2, pns). Follow-up investigation in five patients after an optimising therapy could demonstrate the decrease in accidents due to concentration lapses (P < or = 0.05). Neuropsychological testing (expressed as percentage compared to a standardised control population) revealed deficits in alertness (32.3+/-28.6). Mean percentage scores of divided attention (56.9+/-25.4) and vigilance (58.7+/-26.8) were in a normal range. There was, however, a high inter-individual difference. There was no correlation between driving performance and neuropsychological test results or ESS Score. Neuropsychological test results did not significantly change in the follow-up. The difficulties encountered by the narcolepsy patient in remaining alert may account for sleep-related motor vehicle accidents. Driving simulator investigations are closely related to real

  18. Predictors of Hypocretin (Orexin) Deficiency in Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Andlauer, Olivier; Moore, Hyatt; Hong, Seung-Chul; Dauvilliers, Yves; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Nishino, Seiji; Han, Fang; Silber, Michael H.; Rico, Tom; Einen, Mali; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Jennum, Poul; Knudsen, Stine; Nevsimalova, Sona; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: To compare clinical, electrophysiologic, and biologic data in narcolepsy without cataplexy with low (≤ 110 pg/ml), intermediate (110–200 pg/ml), and normal (> 200 pg/ml) concentrations of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin-1. Setting: University-based sleep clinics and laboratories. Patients: Narcolepsy without cataplexy (n = 171) and control patients (n = 170), all with available CSF hypocretin-1. Design and interventions: Retrospective comparison and receiver operating characteristics curve analysis. Patients were also recontacted to evaluate if they developed cataplexy by survival curve analysis. Measurements and Results: The optimal cutoff of CSF hypocretin-1 for narcolepsy without cataplexy diagnosis was 200 pg/ml rather than 110 pg/ml (sensitivity 33%, specificity 99%). Forty-one patients (24%), all HLA DQB1*06:02 positive, had low concentrations (≤ 110 pg/ml) of CSF hypocretin-1. Patients with low concentrations of hypocretin-1 only differed subjectively from other groups by a higher Epworth Sleepiness Scale score and more frequent sleep paralysis. Compared with patients with normal hypocretin-1 concentration (n = 117, 68%), those with low hypocretin-1 concentration had higher HLA DQB1*06:02 frequencies, were more frequently non-Caucasians (notably African Americans), with lower age of onset, and longer duration of illness. They also had more frequently short rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep latency (≤ 15 min) during polysomnography (64% versus 23%), and shorter sleep latencies (2.7 ± 0.3 versus 4.4 ± 0.2 min) and more sleep-onset REM periods (3.6 ± 0.1 versus 2.9 ± 0.1 min) during the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). Patients with intermediate concentrations of CSF hypocretin-1 (n = 13, 8%) had intermediate HLA DQB1*06:02 and polysomnography results, suggesting heterogeneity. Of the 127 patients we were able to recontact, survival analysis showed that almost half (48%) with low concentration of CSF hypocretin-1 had developed

  19. Disrupted Sleep in Narcolepsy: Exploring the Integrity of Galanin Neurons in the Ventrolateral Preoptic Area

    PubMed Central

    Gavrilov, Yury V.; Ellison, Brian A.; Yamamoto, Mihoko; Reddy, Hasini; Haybaeck, Johannes; Mignot, Emmanuel; Baumann, Christian R.; Scammell, Thomas E.; Valko, Philipp O.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To examine the integrity of sleep-promoting neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in postmortem brains of narcolepsy type 1 patients. Methods: Postmortem examination of five narcolepsy and eight control brains. Results: VLPO galanin neuron count did not differ between narcolepsy patients (11,151 ± 3,656) and controls (13,526 ± 9,544). Conclusions: A normal number of galanin-immunoreactive VLPO neurons in narcolepsy type 1 brains at autopsy suggests that VLPO cell loss is an unlikely explanation for the sleep fragmentation that often accompanies the disease. Citation: Gavrilov YV, Ellison BA, Yamamoto M, Reddy H, Haybaeck J, Mignot E, Baumann CR, Scammell TE, Valko PO. Disrupted sleep in narcolepsy: exploring the integrity of galanin neurons in the ventrolateral preoptic area. SLEEP 2016;39(5):1059–1062. PMID:26951397

  20. Narcolepsy with cataplexy in a child with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease. Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Feixia; Wang, Shuang

    2016-09-01

    We report an 8-year-old boy diagnosed with both CMT1 and narcolepsy, which were not reported simultaneously presenting in one person. The boy presented with a history of increased suddenly falling frequency and excessive daytime sleepiness for 3 months. CMT1 was diagnosed by electrophysiology and genetic testing. Narcolepsy had not been diagnosed until the frequently falling caused by sudden and transient episodes of legs weakness triggered by emotion was found. Multiple sleep latency test showed multiple sleep onset REM periods with reduced sleep latency. When CMT1 and narcolepsy were coexist in an individual, the latter might be overlooked. Cataplexy caused by narcolepsy might be disregard as distal muscle weakness of CMT1. The daytime sleepiness might also be ignored. Therefore, we recommend that patients with sleep disorders should be queried about the symptoms of narcolepsy.

  1. Retroperitoneal Liposarcoma: Current Insights in Diagnosis and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Matthyssens, Lucas E.; Creytens, David; Ceelen, Wim P.

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneal liposarcoma (RLS) is a rare, biologically heterogeneous tumor that present considerable challenges due to its size and deep location. As a consequence, the majority of patients with high-grade RLS will develop locally recurrent disease following surgery, and this constitutes the cause of death in most patients. Here, we review current insights and controversies regarding histology, molecular biology, extent of surgery, (neo)adjuvant treatment, and systemic treatment including novel targeted agents in RLS. PMID:25713799

  2. Altered Sleep Stage Transitions of REM Sleep: A Novel and Stable Biomarker of Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaping; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Venny; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2015-08-15

    To determine the diagnostic values, longitudinal stability, and HLA association of the sleep stage transitions in narcolepsy. To compare the baseline differences in the sleep stage transition to REM sleep among 35 patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 39 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 26 unaffected relatives, and 159 non-narcoleptic sleep patient controls, followed by a reassessment at a mean duration of 37.4 months. The highest prevalence of altered transition from stage non-N2/N3 to stage R in multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) was found in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (92.0% and 57.1%), followed by patients with type 2 narcolepsy (69.4% and 12.8%), unaffected relatives (46.2% and 0%), and controls (39.3% and 1.3%). Individual sleep variables had varied sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing narcolepsy. By incorporating a combination of sleep variables, the decision tree analysis improved the sensitivity to 94.3% and 82.1% and enhanced specificity to 82.4% and 83% for the diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy, respectively. There was a significant association of DBQ1*0602 with the altered sleep stage transition (OR = 16.0, 95% CI: 1.7-149.8, p = 0.015). The persistence of the altered sleep stage transition in both MSLT and NPSG was high for both type 1 (90.5% and 64.7%) and type 2 narcolepsy (92.3% and 100%), respectively. Altered sleep stage transition is a significant and stable marker of narcolepsy, which suggests a vulnerable wake-sleep dysregulation trait in narcolepsy. Altered sleep stage transition has a significant diagnostic value in the differential diagnosis of hypersomnias, especially when combined with other diagnostic sleep variables in decision tree analysis. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  3. Psychosocial Profile and Quality of Life in Children With Type 1 Narcolepsy: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Rocca, Francesca Letizia; Finotti, Elena; Pizza, Fabio; Ingravallo, Francesca; Gatta, Michela; Bruni, Oliviero; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate behavioral aspects and quality of life in children and adolescents with type 1 narcolepsy (NT1). Methods: We performed a case-control study comparing 29 patients with NT1 versus sex- and age-matched patients with idiopathic epilepsy (n = 39) and healthy controls (n = 39). Behavior and quality of life were evaluated by self-administered questionnaires (Child Behavior Checklist, Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory). Patient groups were contrasted and scale results were correlated with clinical and polysomnographic parameters, and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 levels. Results: Young patients with NT1 showed increased internalizing problems associated with aggressive behavior. Emotional profile in patients with NT1 positively correlated with age at onset, diagnostic delay, and subjective sleepiness, whereas treatment and disease duration were associated with fewer behavioral problems (attention problems, aggressive behavior, and attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder). Psychosocial health domains of pediatric NT1 were worse than in healthy controls, whereas the physical health domains were comparable. Conclusions: Young NT1 patients show a discrete pattern of altered behavioral, thought, and mood profile in comparison with healthy controls and with idiopathic epilepsy patients thus suggesting a direct link with sleepiness. Further studies investigating behavior in patients with idiopathic hypersomnia or type 2 narcolepsy are needed to disentangle the role of REM sleep dysfunction and hypocretin deficiency in psychiatric disorders. Symptoms of withdrawal, depression, somatic complaints, thought problems, and aggressiveness were common, NT1 children perceived lower school competencies than healthy children, and their parents also reported worse psychosocial health. Our data suggest that early effective treatment and disease self-awareness should be promoted in NT1 children for their positive effect on behavior and psychosocial health

  4. Treatment of spider bites by high voltage direct current.

    PubMed

    Osborn, C D

    1991-06-01

    Between September 7, 1988, and January 15, 1991, 147 cases of confirmed (19) and suspected spider bites have been treated by high voltage direct current (HVDC) shocks. Venom damage to tissue was arrested at the time of treatment. Pain and systemic symptoms usually improved within 15 minutes. Lesion excision or grafts have not been necessary in any of the 127 cases with completed followup.

  5. Core Body and Skin Temperature in Type 1 Narcolepsy in Daily Life; Effects of Sodium Oxybate and Prediction of Sleep Attacks.

    PubMed

    van der Heide, Astrid; Werth, Esther; Donjacour, Claire E H M; Reijntjes, Robert H A M; Lammers, Gert Jan; Van Someren, Eus J W; Baumann, Christian R; Fronczek, Rolf

    2016-11-01

    Previous laboratory studies in narcolepsy patients showed altered core body and skin temperatures, which are hypothesised to be related to a disturbed sleep wake regulation. In this ambulatory study we assessed temperature profiles in normal daily life, and whether sleep attacks are heralded by changes in skin temperature. Furthermore, the effects of three months of treatment with sodium oxybate (SXB) were investigated. Twenty-five narcolepsy patients and 15 healthy controls were included. Core body, proximal and distal skin temperatures, and sleep-wake state were measured simultaneously for 24 hours in ambulatory patients. This procedure was repeated in 16 narcolepsy patients after at least 3 months of stable treatment with SXB. Increases in distal skin temperature and distal-to-proximal temperature gradient (DPG) strongly predicted daytime sleep attacks (P < 0.001). As compared to controls, patients had a higher proximal and distal skin temperature in the morning, and a lower distal skin temperature during the night (all P < 0.05). Furthermore, they had a higher core body temperature during the first part of the night (P < 0.05), which SXB decreased (F = 4.99, df = 1, P = 0.03) to a level similar to controls. SXB did not affect skin temperature. This ambulatory study demonstrates that daytime sleep attacks were preceded by clear changes in distal skin temperature and DPG. Furthermore, changes in core body and skin temperature in narcolepsy, previously only studied in laboratory settings, were partially confirmed. Treatment with SXB resulted in a normalisation of the core body temperature profile. Future studies should explore whether predictive temperature changes can be used to signal or even prevent sleep attacks. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  6. Impact of cytokine in type 1 narcolepsy: Role of pandemic H1N1 vaccination ?

    PubMed

    Lecendreux, Michel; Libri, Valentina; Jaussent, Isabelle; Mottez, Estelle; Lopez, Régis; Lavault, Sophie; Regnault, Armelle; Arnulf, Isabelle; Dauvilliers, Yves

    2015-06-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures (pandemic influenza 2009 vaccination) provide strong support that narcolepsy type 1 is an immune-mediated disease. Considering the limited knowledge regarding the immune mechanisms involved in narcolepsy whether related to flu vaccination or not and the recent progresses in cytokine measurement technology, we assessed 30 cytokines, chemokines and growth factors using the Luminex technology in either peripheral (serum) or central (CSF) compartments in a large population of 90 children and adult patients with narcolepsy type 1 in comparison to 58 non-hypocretin deficient hypersomniacs and 41 healthy controls. Furthermore, we compared their levels in patients with narcolepsy whether exposed to pandemic flu vaccine or not, and analyzed the effect of age, duration of disease and symptom severity. Comparison for sera biomarkers between narcolepsy (n = 84, 54 males, median age: 15.5 years old) and healthy controls (n = 41, 13 males, median age: 20 years old) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of several pro- and anti-inflammatory serum cytokines and growth factors with interferon-γ, CCL11, epidermal growth factor, and interleukin-2 receptor being independently associated with narcolepsy. Increased levels of interferon-γ, CCL11, and interleukin-12 were found when close to narcolepsy onset. After several adjustments, only one CSF biomarker differed between narcolepsy (n = 44, 26 males, median age: 15 years old) and non-hypocretin deficient hypersomnias (n = 57, 24 males, median age: 36 years old) with higher CCL 3 levels found in narcolepsy. Comparison for sera biomarkers between patients with narcolepsy who developed the disease post-pandemic flu vaccination (n = 36) to those without vaccination (n = 48) revealed an increased stimulation of the immune system with high release of three cytokines, regulated upon activation normal T-cell expressed

  7. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease.

    PubMed

    Moctezuma-Velázquez, C

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is the most prevalent hepatopathy, estimated at 30% in the general population. In the coming years, it will likely be the most common indication for liver transplantation and the most frequent cause of hepatocellular carcinoma. Current treatment for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease is based on dietary and exercise interventions that have been shown to be efficacious, even for reverting fibrosis. Unfortunately, compliance with general measures involving lifestyle modifications is very poor, making pharmacologic strategies a necessary option. At present, there are no treatments for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease approved by regulatory agencies, and the only ones with sufficient evidence and recommended by international societies are treatments with pioglitazone and vitamin E, which are not exempt from adverse effects. We review herein the current management of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, including dietary and physical activity interventions, available treatments, equivocal therapies, emerging treatments, and treatments presently in clinical trials. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  8. Consensus on Current Injectable Treatment Strategies in the Asian Face.

    PubMed

    Wu, Woffles T L; Liew, Steven; Chan, Henry H; Ho, Wilson W S; Supapannachart, Nantapat; Lee, Hong-Ki; Prasetyo, Adri; Yu, Jonathan Nevin; Rogers, John D

    2016-04-01

    The desire for and use of nonsurgical injectable esthetic facial treatments are increasing in Asia. The structural and anatomical features specific to the Asian face, and differences from Western populations in facial aging, necessitate unique esthetic treatment strategies, but published recommendations and clinical evidence for injectable treatments in Asians are scarce. The Asian Facial Aesthetics Expert Consensus Group met to discuss current practices and consensus opinions on the cosmetic use of botulinum toxin and hyaluronic acid (HA) fillers, alone and in combination, for facial applications in Southeastern and Eastern Asians. Consensus opinions and statements on treatment aims and current practice were developed following discussions regarding pre-meeting and meeting survey outcomes, peer-reviewed literature, and the experts' clinical experience. The indications and patterns of use of injectable treatments vary among patients of different ages, and among Asian countries. The combination use of botulinum toxin and fillers increases as patients age. Treatment aims in Asians and current practice regarding the use of botulinum toxin and HA fillers in the upper, middle, and lower face of patients aged 18 to >55 years are presented. In younger Asian patients, addressing proportion and structural features and deficiencies are important to achieve desired esthetic outcomes. In older patients, maintaining facial structure and volume and addressing lines and folds are essential to reduce the appearance of aging. This paper provides guidance on treatment strategies to address the complex esthetic requirements in Asian patients of all ages. This journal requires that the authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors www.springer.com/00266.

  9. [Current treatment concepts for olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria].

    PubMed

    Baumbach, S F; Michel, M; Wyen, H; Buschmann, C T; Kdolsky, R; Kanz, K-G

    2013-04-01

    The limited evidence available on the diagnosis and treatment of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis indicates nationally varying treatment approaches. Therefore the aim of this study was to survey the current treatment concepts of olecranon and prepatellar bursitis in Austria. An online questionnaire comprising of demographic data, questions regarding diagnostics and differentiation between septic bursitis (SB) and non-septic bursitis (NSB) as well as two case reports for therapy appraisal were sent to members of the Austrian Society of Orthopaedics and Orthopaedic Surgery (ÖGO) and the Austrian Society of Traumatology (ÖGU). The overall response rates were 46 % (ÖGU)/12 % (ÖGO). Differentiation between SB and NSB was predominantly based on medical history/clinical presentation (ÖGU: 100 %/ÖGO: 84 %) and blood sampling (ÖGU: 82 %/ÖGO: 77 %). 64/36 % of surveyed members of ÖGO/OGU performed a bursal aspiration. 95/55 % of Austrian ÖGU opinion leaders favoured a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB/NSB. Conversely, ÖGO members rather favoured a conservative treatment approach (28/27 %). Significant differences were found between ÖGO and ÖGU, with the latter favouring a surgical treatment approach in cases of SB and NSB. However, the international literature argues for a conservative treatment approach. Further high quality research is needed to establish an evidence-based treatment approach. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  10. Almorexant promotes sleep and exacerbates cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Black, Sarah Wurts; Morairty, Stephen R; Fisher, Simon P; Chen, Tsui-Ming; Warrier, Deepti R; Kilduff, Thomas S

    2013-03-01

    Humans with narcolepsy and orexin/ataxin-3 transgenic (TG) mice exhibit extensive, but incomplete, degeneration of hypo-cretin (Hcrt) neurons. Partial Hcrt cell loss also occurs in Parkinson disease and other neurologic conditions. Whether Hcrt antagonists such as almorexant (ALM) can exert an effect on the Hcrt that remains after Hcrt neurodegeneration has not yet been determined. The current study was designed to evaluate the hypnotic and cataplexy-inducing efficacy of a Hcrt antagonist in an animal model with low Hcrt tone and compare the ALM efficacy profile in the disease model to that produced in wild-type (WT) control animals. Counterbalanced crossover study. Home cage. Nine TG mice and 10 WT mice. ALM (30, 100, 300 mg/kg), vehicle and positive control injections, dark/active phase onset. During the 12-h dark period after dosing, ALM exacerbated cataplexy in TG mice and increased nonrapid eye movement sleep with heightened sleep/wake fragmentation in both genotypes. ALM showed greater hypnotic potency in WT mice than in TG mice. The 100 mg/kg dose conferred maximal promotion of cataplexy in TG mice and maximal promotion of REM sleep in WT mice. In TG mice, ALM (30 mg/ kg) paradoxically induced a transient increase in active wakefulness. Core body temperature (Tb) decreased after acute Hcrt receptor blockade, but the reduction in Tb that normally accompanies the wake-to-sleep transition was blunted in TG mice. These complex dose- and genotype-dependent interactions underscore the importance of effector mechanisms downstream from Hcrt receptors that regulate arousal state. Cataplexy promotion by ALM warrants cautious use of Hcrt antagonists in patient populations with Hcrt neurodegeneration, but may also facilitate the discovery of anticataplectic medications. Black SW; Morairty SR; Fisher SP; Chen TM; Warrier DR; Kilduff TS. Almorexant promotes sleep and exacerbates cataplexy in a murine model of narcolepsy. SLEEP 2013;36(3):325-336.

  11. Current and Emerging Directions in the Treatment of Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Tiffany A.; Keel, Pamela K.

    2012-01-01

    Eating disorders are a significant source of psychiatric morbidity in young women and demonstrate high comorbidity with mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. Thus, clinicians may encounter eating disorders in the context of treating other conditions. This review summarizes the efficacy of current and emerging treatments for anorexia nervosa (AN), bulimia nervosa (BN), and binge eating disorder (BED). Treatment trials were identified using electronic and manual searches and by reviewing abstracts from conference proceedings. Family based therapy has demonstrated superiority for adolescents with AN but no treatment has established superiority for adults. For BN, both 60 mg fluoxetine and cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) have well-established efficacy. For BED, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors, CBT, and interpersonal psychotherapy have demonstrated efficacy. Emerging directions for AN include investigation of the antipsychotic olanzapine and several novel psychosocial treatments. Future directions for BN and BED include increasing CBT disseminability, targeting affect regulation, and individualized stepped-care approaches. PMID:22879753

  12. CSF Hypocretin-1 Levels and Clinical Profiles in Narcolepsy and Idiopathic CNS Hypersomnia in Norway

    PubMed Central

    Heier, Mona Skard; Evsiukova, Tatiana; Vilming, Steinar; Gjerstad, Michaela D.; Schrader, Harald; Gautvik, Kaare

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the relationship between CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and CNS hypersomnia in Norwegian patients. Method: CSF hypocretin-1 was measured by a sensitive radioimmunoassay in 47 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 7 with narcolepsy without cataplexy, 10 with idiopathic CNS hypersomnia, and a control group. Results: Low hypocretin-1 values were found in 72% of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy. Patients with low CSF hypocretin-1 levels reported more extensive muscular involvement during cataplectic attacks than patients with normal levels. Hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis occurred more frequently in patients with cataplexy than in the other patient groups, but with no correlation to hypocretin-1 levels. Conclusion: About three quarters of the HLA DQB1*0602 positive patients with narcolepsy and cataplexy had low CSF hypocretin-1 values, and appear to form a distinct clinical entity. Narcolepsy without cataplexy could not be distinguished from idiopathic CNS hypersomnia by clinical symptoms or biochemical findings. Citation: Heier MS; Evsiukova T; Vilming S; Gjerstad MD; Schrader H; Gautvik K. CSF hypocretin-1 levels and clinical profiles in narcolepsy and idiopathic CNS hypersomnia in norway. SLEEP 2007;30(8):969-973. PMID:17702265

  13. Current and Under Development Treatment Modalities of Psoriasis: A Review.

    PubMed

    Albaghdadi, Abdullah

    2017-01-01

    Psoriasis is a chronic and complex autoimmune inflammatory skin disease that affects over 125 million people worldwide. It can exhibit at any age, in spite of the fact that children are less normally influenced than adults. It is characterized by distinct erythematous plaques shielded with conspicuous silvery scales that shows up in different areas of the skin. Knowledge of pathophysiology, especially the pathogenesis of psoriasis, has significantly progressed in the recent decade. Advancement in molecular knowledge leads to better understanding of the disease, thus influencing the development of efficient treatment modalities. However, even with the availability of various options of treatment most of the efficient treatment modalities are costly. Expenses of health care bring about major financial weight to the patients as well as to health care systems. Thus, it was important to review the available current treatment options and those which are under development, in terms of efficacy, safety and cost to assist in selecting the most appropriate treatment for psoriasis patients. Literatures were searched by using key words psoriasis, topical treatment, systemic treatment, biologics and phototherapies, on Embase, Medline, Jstor, Cochrane and Merck Index databases. Life-style choices such as smoking, alcohol consumption, obesity and stress are recognised as risk factors and triggers associated with psoriasis. Psoriasis poses psycho-social and economic burden on affected patients that sometimes leads to depression, reduced social interaction and suicidal tendencies in patients. Depending on the type, severity and extent of the disease, comorbidities, patient preference, efficacy and safety profile, numerous treatment modalities and therapeutic agents are available such as topical, systemic, biologic and phototherapeutic treatments. However, it was found that among all the current available treatments for psoriasis, biologic agents and phototherapeutic modalities are

  14. Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy: current treatment options and future perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Pavlovic, Dejan; Patera, Andriani C.; Nyberg, Fredrik; Gerber, Marianne; Liu, Maggie

    2015-01-01

    Progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) is a rare but debilitating and frequently fatal viral disease of the central nervous system, primarily affecting individuals with chronically and severely suppressed immune systems. The disease was relatively obscure until the outbreak of HIV/AIDS, when it presented as one of the more frequent opportunistic infections in this immune deficiency syndrome. It attracted additional attention from the medical and scientific community following the discovery of significant PML risk associated with natalizumab, a monoclonal antibody used for treatment of relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. This was followed by association of PML with other immunosuppressive or immunomodulating drugs. PML is currently untreatable disease with poor outcomes, so it is a significant concern when developing new immunotherapies. Current prophylaxis and treatment of PML are focused on immune reconstitution, restoration of immune responses to JC virus infection, and eventual suppression of immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome. This approach was successful in reducing the incidence of PML and improved survival of PML patients with HIV infection. However, the outcome for the majority of PML patients, regardless of their medical history, is still relatively poor. There is a high unmet need for both prophylaxis and treatment of PML. The aim of this review is to discuss potential drug candidates for prophylaxis and treatment of PML with a critical review of previously conducted and completed PML treatment studies as well as to provide perspectives for future therapies. PMID:26600871

  15. Narcolepsy-cataplexy and loss of sphincter control.

    PubMed Central

    Vgontzas, A. N.; Sollenberger, S. E.; Kales, A.; Bixler, E. O.; Vela-Bueno, A.

    1996-01-01

    We describe the case of a 34-year-old man who presented intermittent faecal incontinence as a manifestation of cataplexy. The patient's sleep history was positive for the full narcoleptic tetrad (sleep attacks, cataplexy, sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations) while extensive neuropsychiatric work up was negative for any neurologic or psychiatric illness. Repeat polysomnograms (including a polysomnogram with a full seizure montage) were positive for pathologic sleepiness, but there was no evidence of a seizure disorder. The course of the patient's symptomatology and the favourable response of his symptoms to stimulants and imipramine support the theory that his intermittent loss of sphincter control is part of his narcolepsy-cataplexy. PMID:8796217

  16. Migraine and risk of narcolepsy in children: A nationwide longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Pai; Hsieh, Meng-Lun; Chiang, Jen-Huai; Chang, Hsing-Yi; Hsieh, Vivian Chia-Rong

    2017-01-01

    The association between migraine and narcolepsy remains controversial. We aim to investigate whether migraine is associated with an increased risk of developing narcolepsy in children. In this longitudinal study, nationwide medical-claims data of pediatric patients (0-17y) with migraine are identified using the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) between 1997 and 2010 in Taiwan. Two cohorts are selected: migraine cases (n = 8,923) and propensity score-matched non-migraine controls (n = 35,692). Children with previous history of narcolepsy or headache before the index date are excluded. Cohorts are followed until the end of 2012, their withdrawal from the NHI program, or incidence of narcolepsy (ICD-9-CM: 347). Cox proportional hazards regression models are used to estimate hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals of developing narcolepsy in children with migraine compared to their non-migraine controls. A total of 13 incident cases with narcolepsy are observed during follow-up, with incidence rates of 0.1915 and 0.0278 per 1,000 person-years in migraine and non-migraine children, respectively. After a mean follow-up period of 4.68 and 5.04 years in the case and control cohort, respectively, the former exhibited a greater risk of developing narcolepsy compared to the latter (adjusted hazard ratio (aHR) = 5.30, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.61, 17.4; p = 0.006). This finding persisted after controlling for potential confounders like baseline comorbidities and concurrent medication uptake, and in our analyses with migraine subtypes. Migraine is an independent risk factor for narcolepsy development in children. Further studies are needed to validate our findings and to explore the exact pathophysiological mechanisms linking migraine and narcolepsy.

  17. Angina pectoris: current therapy and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Parikh, Raj; Kadowitz, Philip J

    2014-02-01

    Angina pectoris is the consequence of an inequality between the demand and supply of blood to the heart. Angina manifests itself as chest pain or discomfort and is a common complaint of patients in the hospital and in the clinic. There are, in fact, roughly half a million new cases of angina per year. Chest pain, while having many etiologies, is generally considered to be most lethal when related to a cardiac cause. In this review, the authors outline the current medical and surgical therapies that are used in the management of angina. Highlights of the various clinical trials that have assisted in the investigation of these therapies are summarized also. Then, the authors provide a focused review of the novel therapy options for angina that are currently being explored. From new medical treatments to revised surgical techniques to the discovery of stem cell therapy, many innovative options are being investigated for the treatment of angina.

  18. Current and future medical treatments for patients with acromegaly.

    PubMed

    Maffezzoni, Filippo; Formenti, Anna Maria; Mazziotti, Gherardo; Frara, Stefano; Giustina, Andrea

    2016-08-01

    Acromegaly is a relatively rare condition of growth hormone (GH) excess associated with significant morbidity and, when left untreated, high mortality. Therapy for acromegaly is targeted at decreasing GH and insulin-like growth hormone 1 levels, ameliorating patients' symptoms and decreasing any local compressive effects of the pituitary adenoma. The therapeutic options for acromegaly include surgery, medical therapies (such as dopamine agonists, somatostatin receptor ligands and the GH receptor antagonist pegvisomant) and radiotherapy. However, despite all these treatments option, approximately 50% of patients are not adequately controlled. In this paper, the authors discuss: 1) efficacy and safety of current medical therapy 2) the efficacy and safety of the new multireceptor-targeted somatostatin ligand pasireotide 3) medical treatments currently under clinical investigation (oral octreotide, ITF2984, ATL1103), and 4) preliminary data on the use of new injectable and transdermal/transmucosal formulations of octreotide. This expert opinion supports the need for new therapeutic agents and modalities for patients with acromegaly.

  19. Antibacterial treatment of bacterial vaginosis: current and emerging therapies

    PubMed Central

    Menard, Jean-Pierre

    2011-01-01

    Bacterial vaginosis is a common cause of malodorous vaginal discharge. It is also associated with sexually transmitted infections and adverse pregnancy outcomes. The magnitude of the gynecological and obstetrical consequences has stimulated therapeutic research and led to the testing of several therapies. The objective of this work is to present the currently available therapeutic strategies for the treatment of bacterial vaginosis and associated recommendations, and discuss the emerging therapies. PMID:21976983

  20. Parental Fitness Questioned on the Grounds of Narcolepsy: Presentation of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Barbero, Laura; Govi, Annamaria; Pizza, Fabio; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Ingravallo, Francesca

    2017-01-01

    We report two cases of fathers whose parental fitness was questioned during divorce and custody litigation because of narcolepsy type 2 and type 1, respectively. These cases highlighted both the existence of a narcolepsy-related stigma and the need to involve sleep experts in custody assessments when concerns about the parental fitness are related to a sleep disorder, expanding the field of interest of the growing “sleep forensics.” Citation: Barbero L, Govi A, Pizza F, Plazzi G, Ingravallo F. Parental fitness questioned on the grounds of narcolepsy: presentation of two cases. J Clin Sleep Med. 2017;13(8):1017–1018. PMID:28728625

  1. Diagnosis of narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia. An update based on the International classification of sleep disorders, 2nd edition.

    PubMed

    Billiard, Michel

    2007-10-01

    Defining the precise nosological limits of narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia is an ongoing process dating back to the first description of the two conditions. The most recent step forward has been done within the preparation of the second edition of the "International classification of sleep disorders" published in June 2005. Appointed by Dr Emmanuel Mignot, the Task Force on "Hypersomnias of central origin, not due to a circadian rhythm sleep disorder, sleep related breathing disorder, or other causes of disturbed nocturnal sleep" thoroughly revisited the nosology of narcolepsy and of idiopathic hypersomnia. Narcolepsy is now distinguished into three different entities, narcolepsy with cataplexy, narcolepsy without cataplexy and narcolepsy due to medical condition, and idiopathic hypersomnia into two entities, idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. Nevertheless there are still a number of pending issues. What are the limits of narcolepsy without cataplexy? Is there a continuum in the pathophysiology of narcolepsy with and without cataplexy? Should sporadic and familial forms of narcolepsy with cataplexy appear as subgroups in the classification? Are idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time, two forms of the same condition or two different conditions? Is there a pathophysiological relationship between narcolepsy without cataplexy and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time?

  2. Narcolepsy patients' blood-based miRNA expression profiling: miRNA expression differences with Pandemrix vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mosakhani, N; Sarhadi, V; Panula, P; Partinen, M; Knuutila, S

    2017-11-01

    Narcolepsy is a neurological sleep disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness and nighttime sleep disturbance. Among children and adolescents vaccinated with Pandemrix vaccine in Finland and Sweden, the number of narcolepsy cases increased. Our aim was to identify miRNAs involved in narcolepsy and their association with Pandemrix vaccination. We performed global miRNA proofing by miRNA microarrays followed by RT-PCR verification on 20 narcolepsy patients (Pandemrix-associated and Pandemrix-non-associated) and 17 controls (vaccinated and non-vaccinated). Between all narcolepsy patients and controls, 11 miRNAs were differentially expressed; 17 miRNAs showed significantly differential expression between Pandemrix-non-associated narcolepsy patients and non-vaccinated healthy controls. MiR-188-5p and miR-4499 were over-expressed in narcolepsy patients vs healthy controls. Two miRNAs, miR-1470 and miR-4455, were under-expressed in Pandemrix-associated narcolepsy patients vs Pandemrix-non-associated narcolepsy patients. We identified miRNA expression patterns in narcolepsy patients that linked them to mRNA targets known to be involved in brain-related pathways or brain disorders. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Current status in the treatment options for esophageal achalasia

    PubMed Central

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Jyong-Hong; Lu, Hung-I; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wu, Keng-Liang

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the treatment of achalasia include the use of high-resolution manometry to predict the outcome of patients and the introduction of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first multicenter randomized, controlled, 2-year follow-up study conducted by the European Achalasia Trial group indicated that laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) was not superior to pneumatic dilations (PD). Publications on the long-term success of laparoscopic surgery continue to emerge. In addition, laparoscopic single-site surgery is applicable to advanced laparoscopic operations such as LHM and anterior fundoplication. The optimal treatment option is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review, we provide an update of the current progress in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Unless new conclusive data prove otherwise, LHM is considered the most durable treatment for achalasia at the expense of increased reflux-associated complications. However, PD is the first choice for non-surgical treatment and is more cost-effective. Repeated PD according to an “on-demand” strategy based on symptom recurrence can achieve long-term remission. Decision making should be based on clinical evidence that identifies a subcategory of patients who would benefit from specific treatment options. POEM has shown promise but its long-term efficacy and safety need to be assessed further. PMID:24023484

  4. Current status in the treatment options for esophageal achalasia.

    PubMed

    Chuah, Seng-Kee; Chiu, Chien-Hua; Tai, Wei-Chen; Lee, Jyong-Hong; Lu, Hung-I; Changchien, Chi-Sin; Tseng, Ping-Huei; Wu, Keng-Liang

    2013-09-07

    Recent advances in the treatment of achalasia include the use of high-resolution manometry to predict the outcome of patients and the introduction of peroral endoscopic myotomy (POEM). The first multicenter randomized, controlled, 2-year follow-up study conducted by the European Achalasia Trial group indicated that laparoscopic Heller myotomy (LHM) was not superior to pneumatic dilations (PD). Publications on the long-term success of laparoscopic surgery continue to emerge. In addition, laparoscopic single-site surgery is applicable to advanced laparoscopic operations such as LHM and anterior fundoplication. The optimal treatment option is an ongoing matter of debate. In this review, we provide an update of the current progress in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Unless new conclusive data prove otherwise, LHM is considered the most durable treatment for achalasia at the expense of increased reflux-associated complications. However, PD is the first choice for non-surgical treatment and is more cost-effective. Repeated PD according to an "on-demand" strategy based on symptom recurrence can achieve long-term remission. Decision making should be based on clinical evidence that identifies a subcategory of patients who would benefit from specific treatment options. POEM has shown promise but its long-term efficacy and safety need to be assessed further.

  5. Current Treatment Strategies for Intracranial Aneurysms: An Overview

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hao; Summers, Richard; Yang, Mingmin; Cousins, Brian G.

    2017-01-01

    Intracranial aneurysm is a leading cause of stroke. Its treatment has evolved over the past 2 decades. This review summarizes the treatment strategies for intracranial aneurysms from 3 different perspectives: open surgery approach, transluminal treatment approach, and new technologies being used or trialed. We introduce most of the available treatment techniques in detail, including contralateral clipping, wrapping and clipping, double catheters assisting coiling and waffle-cone technique, and so on. Data from major trials such as Analysis of Treatment by Endovascular approach of Non-ruptured Aneurysms (ATENA), Internal Subarachnoid Trial (ISAT), Clinical and Anatomical Results in the Treatment of Ruptured Intracranial Aneurysms (CLARITY), and Barrow Ruptured Aneurysm Trial (BRAT) as well as information from other clinical reports and local experience are reviewed to suggest a clinical pathway for treating different types of intracranial aneurysms. It will be a valuable supplement to the current existing guidelines. We hope it could help assisting real-time decision-making in clinical practices and also encourage advancements in managing the disease. PMID:28355880

  6. Treatments for Pulmonary Ricin Intoxication: Current Aspects and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Gal, Yoav; Mazor, Ohad; Falach, Reut; Sapoznikov, Anita; Kronman, Chanoch; Sabo, Tamar

    2017-01-01

    Ricin, a plant-derived toxin originating from the seeds of Ricinus communis (castor beans), is one of the most lethal toxins known, particularly if inhaled. Ricin is considered a potential biological threat agent due to its high availability and ease of production. The clinical manifestation of pulmonary ricin intoxication in animal models is closely related to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which involves pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine upregulation, massive neutrophil infiltration and severe edema. Currently, the only post-exposure measure that is effective against pulmonary ricinosis at clinically relevant time-points following intoxication in pre-clinical studies is passive immunization with anti-ricin neutralizing antibodies. The efficacy of this antitoxin treatment depends on antibody affinity and the time of treatment initiation within a limited therapeutic time window. Small-molecule compounds that interfere directly with the toxin or inhibit its intracellular trafficking may also be beneficial against ricinosis. Another approach relies on the co-administration of antitoxin antibodies with immunomodulatory drugs, thereby neutralizing the toxin while attenuating lung injury. Immunomodulators and other pharmacological-based treatment options should be tailored according to the particular pathogenesis pathways of pulmonary ricinosis. This review focuses on the current treatment options for pulmonary ricin intoxication using anti-ricin antibodies, disease-modifying countermeasures, anti-ricin small molecules and their various combinations. PMID:28972558

  7. Current trends in antithyroid drug treatment of Graves' disease.

    PubMed

    Okosieme, Onyebuchi E; Lazarus, John H

    2016-10-01

    Graves' hyperthyroidism is associated with significant morbidity and mortality risk. The thionamides, methimazole, its pro-drug derivative carbimazole, and propylthiouracil, remain a cornerstone of management. Yet despite decades of use, optimal strategies for maximising treatment response and curtailing adverse effect risk remains uncertain. We reviewed the current literature on the evidence based medical management of Graves' disease. Specifically, we evaluated current approaches to the use of thionamides, adjunctive therapies, and potential novel agents for controlling Graves' hyperthyroidism. Primary medical therapy is successful in less than 50% of cases and so careful selection of patients for medical treatment based on a combination of pathological and pragmatic considerations is essential. Carbimazole or methimazole is the treatment of choice in the non-pregnant population driven by its more favourable pharmacokinetic and adverse effect profile over propylthiouracil. In pregnancy the choice of treatment is less straightforward and an approach that minimises undue fetal exposure to all thionamides should be adopted. Additional data is needed on the value of adjunctive therapies including potassium perchlorate, iodides, glucocorticoids, lithium, and cholestyramine. Novel agents directed against pathogenetic targets including TSH receptor blocking monoclonal antibodies and small molecule antagonists may hold promise for the future.

  8. Treatments for Pulmonary Ricin Intoxication: Current Aspects and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Gal, Yoav; Mazor, Ohad; Falach, Reut; Sapoznikov, Anita; Kronman, Chanoch; Sabo, Tamar

    2017-10-03

    Ricin, a plant-derived toxin originating from the seeds of Ricinus communis (castor beans), is one of the most lethal toxins known, particularly if inhaled. Ricin is considered a potential biological threat agent due to its high availability and ease of production. The clinical manifestation of pulmonary ricin intoxication in animal models is closely related to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), which involves pulmonary proinflammatory cytokine upregulation, massive neutrophil infiltration and severe edema. Currently, the only post-exposure measure that is effective against pulmonary ricinosis at clinically relevant time-points following intoxication in pre-clinical studies is passive immunization with anti-ricin neutralizing antibodies. The efficacy of this antitoxin treatment depends on antibody affinity and the time of treatment initiation within a limited therapeutic time window. Small-molecule compounds that interfere directly with the toxin or inhibit its intracellular trafficking may also be beneficial against ricinosis. Another approach relies on the co-administration of antitoxin antibodies with immunomodulatory drugs, thereby neutralizing the toxin while attenuating lung injury. Immunomodulators and other pharmacological-based treatment options should be tailored according to the particular pathogenesis pathways of pulmonary ricinosis. This review focuses on the current treatment options for pulmonary ricin intoxication using anti-ricin antibodies, disease-modifying countermeasures, anti-ricin small molecules and their various combinations.

  9. Pressure ulcers: Current understanding and newer modalities of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Surajit; Mishra, R. K.

    2015-01-01

    This article reviews the mechanism, symptoms, causes, severity, diagnosis, prevention and present recommendations for surgical as well as non-surgical management of pressure ulcers. Particular focus has been placed on the current understandings and the newer modalities for the treatment of pressure ulcers. The paper also covers the role of nutrition and pressure-release devices such as cushions and mattresses as a part of the treatment algorithm for preventing and quick healing process of these wounds. Pressure ulcers develop primarily from pressure and shear; are progressive in nature and most frequently found in bedridden, chair bound or immobile people. They often develop in people who have been hospitalised for a long time generally for a different problem and increase the overall time as well as cost of hospitalisation that have detrimental effects on patient's quality of life. Loss of sensation compounds the problem manifold, and failure of reactive hyperaemia cycle of the pressure prone area remains the most important aetiopathology. Pressure ulcers are largely preventable in nature, and their management depends on their severity. The available literature about severity of pressure ulcers, their classification and medical care protocols have been described in this paper. The present treatment options include various approaches of cleaning the wound, debridement, optimised dressings, role of antibiotics and reconstructive surgery. The newer treatment options such as negative pressure wound therapy, hyperbaric oxygen therapy, cell therapy have been discussed, and the advantages and disadvantages of current and newer methods have also been described. PMID:25991879

  10. Treatment Perspectives Based on Our Current Understanding of Concussion.

    PubMed

    Gay, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Sports-related concussion also referred to in the literature as mild traumatic brain injury remains a popular area of study for physicians, neurologists, neuropsychologists, neuroimaging, athletic trainers, and researchers across the other areas of brain sciences. Treatment for concussion is an emerging area of focus with investigators seeking to improve outcomes and protect patients from the deleterious short-term and long-term consequences which have been extensively studied and identified. Broadly, current treatment strategies for athletes recovering from concussion have remained largely unchanged since early 2000s. Knowledge of the complex pathophysiology surrounding injury should improve or advance our ability to identify processes which may serve as targets for therapeutic intervention. Clinicians working with athletes recovering from sports-related concussion should have an advanced understanding of the injury cascade and also be aware of the current efforts within the research to treat concussion. In addition, how clinicians use the word "treatment" should be carefully defined and promoted so the patient is aware of the level of intervention and what stage of recovery or healing is being affected by a specific intervention. The purpose of this review is to bring together efforts across disciplines of brain science into 1 platform where clinicians can assimilate this information before making best practices decisions regarding the treatment of patients and athletes under their care.

  11. [Our current approach in the treatment of sigmoid colon volvulus].

    PubMed

    Taviloğlu, Korhan; Aydin, Erol; Ertekin, Cemalettin; Güloğlu, Recep; Kurtoğlu, Mehmet

    2002-04-01

    Our aim was to emphasize the role of endoscopic detorsion in the treatment of sigmoid colon volvulus, which we currently apply in the majority of our cases. The data of 37 patients were analyzed in a retrospective manner, during a 86-month period, between May 1994 and July 2001. The patients were classified into three groups. The first group consisted of 9 patients with resection and anastomosis, the second group consisted of 20 patients with Hartmann's procedure, and the third group consisted of 8 patients with endoscopic detorsion. Complications were encountered in 7 patients (19%), and 3 patients (8%) died following treatment. We favor colonic resection following endoscopic treatment. Resection should be preferred, if endoscopic detorsion is not successful or in the presence of a complication.

  12. Symptomatic narcolepsy, cataplexy and hypersomnia, and their implications in the hypothalamic hypocretin/orexin system.

    PubMed

    Nishino, Seiji; Kanbayashi, Takashi

    2005-08-01

    Human narcolepsy is a chronic sleep disorder affecting 1:2000 individuals. The disease is characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy and other abnormal manifestations of REM sleep, such as sleep paralysis and hypnagogic hallucinations. Recently, it was discovered that the pathophysiology of (idiopathic) narcolepsy-cataplexy is linked to hypocretin ligand deficiency in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), as well as the positivity of the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DR2/DQ6 (DQB1*0602). The symptoms of narcolepsy can also occur during the course of other neurological conditions (i.e. symptomatic narcolepsy). We define symptomatic narcolepsy as those cases that meet the International Sleep Disorders Narcolepsy Criteria, and which are also associated with a significant underlying neurological disorder that accounts for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) and temporal associations. To date, we have counted 116 symptomatic cases of narcolepsy reported in literature. As, several authors previously reported, inherited disorders (n=38), tumors (n=33), and head trauma (n=19) are the three most frequent causes for symptomatic narcolepsy. Of the 116 cases, 10 are associated with multiple sclerosis, one case of acute disseminated encephalomyelitis, and relatively rare cases were reported with vascular disorders (n=6), encephalitis (n=4) and degeneration (n=1), and hererodegenerative disorder (three cases in a family). EDS without cataplexy or any REM sleep abnormalities is also often associated with these neurological conditions, and defined as symptomatic cases of EDS. Although it is difficult to rule out the comorbidity of idiopathic narcolepsy in some cases, review of the literature reveals numerous unquestionable cases of symptomatic narcolepsy. These include cases with HLA negative and/or late onset, and cases in which the occurrences of the narcoleptic symptoms are parallel with the rise and fall of the causative disease. A review of these cases

  13. Classical to current approach for treatment of psoriasis: a review.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mahfoozur; Alam, Kainat; Ahmad, Mohammad Zaki; Gupta, Gaurav; Afzal, Muhammad; Akhter, Sohail; Kazmi, Imran; Jyoti; Ahmad, Farhan Jalees; Anwar, Firoz

    2012-09-01

    Psoriasis is a genetic predisposition with T-cell mediated autoimmune inflammatory skin disorder, characterized by cutaneous inflammation, increased epidermal proliferation, hyperkeratosis, angiogenesis, and abnormal keratinization that affects up to 2 - 3% of the population worldwide. Common therapies that are used for the treatment of psoriasis include topical, systemic, phototherapy, combination, herbal therapy and novel molecules. Topically used agents include Vit D, calcipotriol, corticosteroids, dithranol and retinoids etc. Systemically used agents include methotrexate and cyclosporine etc. Phototherapy includes UV-B, Psoralen plus ultraviolet therapy and excimer laser etc. These therapies have a number of potential problems, such as limited in efficacy, inconvenience, organ toxicity, carcinogenic and broadband immunosuppression. In natural treatment a variety of natural agents such as methanolic extracts of duzhong (Eucommia ulmoides Oliv.), yerba mate (Ilex paraguariensis,) linseed oil, fish oil, and Indigo naturalis etc., that modulates T cell and cytokine action at various steps along with the pathogenic sequence have been developed. But till now there is no more in vivo, dose and its efficacy data has been established. Current therapy includes biologicals, small molecules inhibitor and enzyme inhibitors etc, which serve as novel therapeutic options for psoriasis treatment. All these avoid the side effects of the prebiologically developed systemic agents including hepatotoxicity, nephrotoxicity, and bone marrow suppression. Currently, Denilukin diftitox, Efalizumab, Alefacept, Ustekinumab and Etanercept are approved by the FDA, and others molecules are at clinical stage. Patents issued by the US office are also included in current psoriasis treatment scenario. In the United States, biologicals are widely used for moderate-to-severe psoriasis. But because of the high cost of medication and their availability in injection form, it remains to be seen how

  14. Narcolepsy with Cataplexy Mimicry: The Strange Case of Two Sisters

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Franceschini, Christian; Bellucci, Claudia; Cipolli, Carlo; Ingravallo, Francesca; Natalini, Giuliana; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    We report on two sisters, 17 and 12 years of age, with clinical features suggesting narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC): daytime sleepiness, spontaneous and emotionally triggered sudden falls to the ground, and overweight/obesity. MSLT showed borderline sleep latency, with 1 and 0 sleep onset REM periods. HLA typing disclosed the DQB1*0602 allele. Video-polygraphy of the spells ruled out NC diagnosis by demonstrating their easy elicitation by suggestion, with wake EEG, electromyo-graphic persistence of muscle tone, and stable presence of tendon reflexes (i.e., pseudo-cataplexy), together with normal cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 levels. Our cases emphasize the need of a clear depiction of cataplexy pattern at the different ages, the usefulness of examining ictal neurophysiology, and collecting all available disease markers in ambiguous cases. Citation: Pizza F; Vandi S; Poli F; Moghadam KK; Fran-ceschini C; Bellucci C; Cipolli C; Ingravallo F; Natalini G; Mignot E; Plazzi G. Narcolepsy with cataplexy mimicry: the strange case of two sisters. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(6):611-612. PMID:23772196

  15. Narcolepsy and syndromes of primary excessive daytime somnolence.

    PubMed

    Black, Jed E; Brooks, Stephen N; Nishino, Seiji

    2004-09-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) or somnolence is common in our patients and in society in general. The most common cause of EDS is "voluntary" sleep restriction. Other common causes include sleep-fragmenting disorders such as the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Somewhat less familiar to the clinician are EDS conditions arising from central nervous system dysfunction. Of these so-called primary disorders of somnolence, narcolepsy is the most well known and extensively studied, yet often misunderstood and misdiagnosed. Idiopathic hypersomnia, the recurrent hypersomnias, and EDS associated with nervous system disorders also must be well-understood to provide appropriate evaluation and management of the patient with EDS. This review summarizes the distinguishing features of these clinical syndromes of primary EDS. A brief overview of the pharmacological management of primary EDS is included. Finally, in view of the tremendous advances that have occurred in the past few years in our understanding of the pathophysiology of canine and human narcolepsy, we also highlight these discoveries.

  16. Spinal cord stimulation: Current applications for treatment of chronic pain.

    PubMed

    Vannemreddy, Prasad; Slavin, Konstantin V

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulation (SCS) is thought to relieve chronic intractable pain by stimulating nerve fibers in the spinal cord. The resulting impulses in the fibers may inhibit the conduction of pain signals to the brain, according to the pain gate theory proposed by Melzack and Wall in 1965 and the sensation of pain is thus blocked. Although SCS may reduce pain, it will not eliminate it. After a period of concern about safety and efficacy, SCS is now regaining popularity among pain specialists for the treatment of chronic pain. The sympatholytic effect of SCS is one of its most interesting therapeutic properties. This effect is considered responsible for the effectiveness of SCS in peripheral ischemia, and at least some cases of complex regional pain syndrome. The sympatholytic effect has also been considered part of the management of other chronic pain states such as failed back surgery syndrome, phantom pain, diabetic neuropathy, and postherpetic neuralgia. In general, SCS is part of an overall treatment strategy and is used only after the more conservative treatments have failed. The concept of SCS has evolved rapidly following the technological advances that have produced leads with multiple contact electrodes and battery systems. The current prevalence of patients with chronic pain requiring treatment other than conventional medical management has significantly increased and so has been the need for SCS. With the cost benefit analysis showing significant support for SCS, it may be appropriate to offer this as an effective alternative treatment for these patients.

  17. Current treatment options in (peri)myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Maisch, B; Pankuweit, S

    2012-09-01

    In inflammatory dilated cardiomyopathy and myocarditis there is--apart from heart failure and antiarrhythmic therapies--no alternative to an aetiologically driven specific treatment. Prerequisite are noninvasive and invasive biomarkers including endomyocardial biopsy and PCR on cardiotropic agents. This review deals with the different etiologies of myocarditis and inflammatory cardiomyopathy including the genetic background, the predisposition for heart failure and inflammation. It analyses the epidemiologic shift in pathogenetic agents in the last 20 years, the role of innate and aquired immunity including the T- and B-cell driven immune responses. The phases and clinical faces of myocarditis are summarized. Up-to-date information on current treatment options starting with heart failure and antiarrhythmic therapy are provided. Although inflammation can resolve spontaneously, specific treatment directed to the causative aetiology is often required. For fulminant, acute and chronic autoreactive myocarditis immunosuppressive treatment is beneficial, while for viral cardiomyopathy and myocarditis ivIg can resolve inflammation and is as successful as interferon therapy in enteroviral and adenoviral myocarditis. For Parvo B19 and HHV6 myocarditis eradication of the virus is still a problem by any of these treatment options. Finally, the potential of stem cell therapy has to be tested in future trials. In virus-negative, autoreactive perimyocardial disease a locoregional approach with intrapericardial instillation of high local doses of triamcinolone acetate has been shown to be highly efficient and with few systemic side-effects.

  18. New and current preventive treatment options in actinic keratosis.

    PubMed

    Arenberger, P; Arenbergerova, M

    2017-09-01

    Actinic keratosis (AK) is a characteristic skin lesion on skin areas of subjects with mainly phototype I and phototype II, or with specific genetic factors and who are exposed to prolonged ultraviolet radiation. AK may be considered a precursor of in situ squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), a type of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). However, it is still not possible to predict which AK lesions will develop into SCC. Early treatment of AK is therefore recommended. Despite the increasing number of patients with AK developing into SCC, to date, there is still no clear suggestion of therapeutic strategy for AK. Current treatment consists of a multitude of topical lesion-directed or field-directed therapies or a combination of both. Recently, orally administered nicotinamide has shown to significantly reduce rates of new NMSC and AK in high-risk patients. This study aims to provide an update on the most relevant information about AK and to provide an insight into current and new treatment options. © 2017 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  19. Narcolepsy, REM sleep behavior disorder, and supranuclear gaze palsy associated with Ma1 and Ma2 antibodies and tonsillar carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Adams, Chris; McKeon, Andrew; Silber, Michael H; Kumar, Rajeev

    2011-04-01

    To describe a patient with diencephalic and mesencephalic presentation of a Ma1 and Ma2 antibody-associated paraneoplastic neurological disorder. Case report. The Colorado Neurological Institute Movement Disorders Center in Englewood, Colorado, and the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. A 55-year-old man with a paraneoplastic neurological disorder characterized by rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder, narcolepsy, and a progressive supranuclear palsy-like syndrome in the setting of tonsillar carcinoma. Immunotherapy for paraneoplastic neurological disorder, surgery and radiotherapy for cancer, and symptomatic treatment for parkinsonism and sleep disorders. Polysomnography, multiple sleep latency test, and neurological examination. The cancer was detected at a limited stage and treatable. After oncological therapy and immunotherapy, symptoms stabilized. Treatment with modafinil improved daytime somnolence. Rapid onset and progression of multifocal deficits may be a clue to paraneoplastic etiology. Early treatment of a limited stage cancer (with or without immunotherapy) may possibly slow progression of neurological symptoms. Symptomatic treatment may be beneficial.

  20. Narcolepsy (with and without cataplexy) and commercial motor vehicle driver safety.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this evidence report is to address several questions posed by FMCSA regarding the topic of narcolepsy and commercial motor vehicle (CMV) driver safety. In the early scope development work conducted by the Agency and the Medical Review ...

  1. An Interesting Case of Late Age at Onset of Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Krishnamurthy, Venkatesh B.; Nallamothu, Vijaya; Singareddy, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    The usual age at onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy is in the second or third decade. In cases with late onset narcolepsy with cataplexy, symptoms are usually mild with relatively less severe daytime sleepiness and less frequent cataplexy. Here we present a case of narcolepsy with cataplexy with onset of symptoms around sixty years of age. This case is unique, with severe daytime sleepiness both by subjective report as well as on objective Multiple Sleep Latency Test and having multiple cataplexy episodes in a day. Citation: Krishnamurthy VB; Nallamothu V; Singareddy R. An interesting case of late age at onset of narcolepsy with cataplexy. J Clin Sleep Med 2014;10(2):203-205. PMID:24533004

  2. Is there a relationship between narcolepsy, multiple sclerosis and HLA-DQB1*06:02?

    PubMed

    Lorenzoni, Paulo José; Werneck, Lineu Cesar; Crippa, Ana Christina de Souza; Zanatta, Alessandra; Kay, Cláudia S Kamoi; Silvado, Carlos Eduardo S; Scola, Rosana Herminia

    2017-06-01

    We studied multiple sclerosis (MS) patients with the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele and compared them with MS patients who did not carry the HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele. We analyzed clinical and neurophysiological criteria for narcolepsy in six MS patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02, compared with 12 MS patients who were HLA-DQB1*06:02 non-carriers. Only two patients with HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele scored higher than 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Polysomnography recording parameters and the multiple sleep latency test showed an absence of narcolepsy in the study group. Our study suggested no significant correlation between narcolepsy, MS and HLA-DQB1*06:02. The HLA-DQB1*06:02 allele alone was not sufficient to cause MS patients to develop narcolepsy.

  3. Case report of narcolepsy in a six-year-old child initially misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jinquan; Zhang, Xi; Dong, Zaiwen

    2014-08-01

    This report describes a case of first-onset narcolepsy in a six-year-old female that was misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy and other diagnoses at eight different hospitals over a period of 10 months before the correct diagnosis was made. The diagnosis of narcolepsy is more difficult in children because very few of them experience all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy - paroxysmal sleep, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis - and they often have a more prolonged onset and diverse symptoms. To decrease the time lag between initial presentation and accurate diagnosis, we recommend that in all cases in which children report excessive sleep of unknown etiology - regardless of the associated symptoms - that sleep monitoring and sleep latency tests be conducted to rule out the possibility of narcolepsy. The case highlights the wide variety of presentations of uncommon psychiatric conditions, particularly in children, and the need for clinicians to be aware of the atypical presentations of these conditions when collecting medical histories.

  4. Current treatment of dyslipidaemia: PCSK9 inhibitors and statin intolerance.

    PubMed

    Koskinas, Konstantinos; Wilhelm, Matthias; Windecker, Stephan

    2016-01-01

    Statins are the cornerstone of the management of dyslipidaemias and prevention of cardiovascular disease. Although statins are, overall, safe and well tolerated, adverse events can occur and constitute an important barrier to maintaining long-term adherence to statin treatment. In patients who cannot tolerate statins, alternative treatments include switch to another statin, intermittent-dosage regimens and non-statin lipid-lowering medications. Nonetheless, a high proportion of statin-intolerant patients are unable to achieve recommended low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol goals, thereby resulting in substantial residual cardiovascular risk. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a protease implicated in LDL receptor degradation and plays a central role in cholesterol metabolism. In recent studies, PCSK9 inhibition by means of monoclonal antibodies achieved LDL cholesterol reductions of 50% to 70% across various patient populations and background lipid-lowering therapies, while maintaining a favourable safety profile. The efficacy and safety of the monoclonal antibodies alirocumab and evolocumab were confirmed in statin-intolerant patients, indicating that PCSK9 inhibitors represent an attractive treatment option in this challenging clinical setting. PCSK9 inhibitors recently received regulatory approval for clinical use and may be considered in properly selected patients according to current consensus documents, including patients with statin intolerance. In this review we summarise current evidence regarding diagnostic evaluation of statin-related adverse events, particularly statin-associated muscle symptoms, and we discuss current recommendations on the management of statin-intolerant patients. In view of emerging evidence of the efficacy and safety of PCSK9 inhibitors, we further discuss the role of monoclonal PCSK9 antibodies in the management of statin-intolerant hypercholesterolaemic patients.

  5. Transcranial direct-current stimulation as treatment in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Gschwind, Markus; Seeck, Margitta

    2016-12-01

    Neuromodulation (NM) is a complementary therapy for patients with drug-resistant epilepsy. Vagal nerve stimulation and deep brain stimulation of the anterior thalamus are established techniques and have shown their efficacy in lowering seizure frequency, but they are invasive and rarely render patients seizure-free. Non-invasive NM techniques are therefore increasingly investigated in a clinical context. Areas covered: Current knowledge about transcranial direct-current stimulation (tDCS) and other non-invasive NM in patients with epilepsy, based on the available animal and clinical studies from PubMed search. Expert commentary: tDCS modulates neuronal membrane potentials, and consequently alters cortical excitability. Cathodal stimulation leads to cortical inhibition, which is of particular importance in epilepsy treatment. The antiepileptic efficacy is promising but still lacks systematic studies. The beneficial effect, seen in ~20%, outlasts the duration of stimulation, indicating neuronal plasticity and is therefore of great interest to obtain long-term effects.

  6. Eddy current characterization of magnetic treatment of materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. James

    1992-01-01

    Eddy current impedance measuring methods have been applied to study the effect that magnetically treated materials have on service life extension. Eddy current impedance measurements have been performed on Nickel 200 specimens that have been subjected to many mechanical and magnetic engineering processes: annealing, applied strain, magnetic field, shot peening, and magnetic field after peening. Experimental results have demonstrated a functional relationship between coil impedance, resistance and reactance, and specimens subjected to various engineering processes. It has shown that magnetic treatment does induce changes in a material's electromagnetic properties and does exhibit evidence of stress relief. However, further fundamental studies are necessary for a thorough understanding of the exact mechanism of the magnetic-field processing effect on machine tool service life.

  7. Treatment of giant cell tumor of bone: Current concepts.

    PubMed

    Puri, Ajay; Agarwal, Manish

    2007-04-01

    Giant cell tumor (GCT) of bone though one of the commonest bone tumors encountered by an orthopedic surgeon continues to intrigue treating surgeons. Usually benign, they are locally aggressive and may occasionally undergo malignant transformation. The surgeon needs to strike a balance during treatment between reducing the incidence of local recurrence while preserving maximal function.Differing opinions pertaining to the use of adjuvants for extension of curettage, the relative role of bone graft or cement to pack the defect and the management of recurrent lesions are some of the issues that offer topics for eternal debate.Current literature suggests that intralesional curettage strikes the best balance between controlling disease and preserving optimum function in the majority of the cases though there may be occasions where the extent of the disease mandates resection to ensure adequate disease clearance.An accompanying treatment algorithm helps outline the management strategy in GCT.

  8. Current Treatment and Recent Clinical Research in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Neugroschl, Judith; Sano, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The transition from either epidemiological observation or the bench to rigorously tested clinical trials in patients with Alzheimer's disease is crucial in understanding which treatments are beneficial to patients. The amyloid hypothesis has undergone scrutiny recently, as many trials aimed at reducing amyloid and plaque have been completed or are in the testing phase. Examples include modulation of the secretases involved in beta amyloid formation, anti-aggregation agents, and immunotherapeutic trials. Other therapies targeting hyperphosphorylated tau and novel targets such as enhancement of mitochondrial function, serotonin receptors, receptor for advanced glycation end products, and nerve growth factor, as well as other strategies, are discussed. A brief review of the current Food and Drug Administration–approved treatments is included. PMID:20101716

  9. Eddy current characterization of magnetic treatment of nickel 200

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chern, E. J.

    1993-01-01

    Eddy current methods have been applied to characterize the effect of magnetic treatments on component service-life extension. Coil impedance measurements were acquired and analyzed on nickel 200 specimens that have been subjected to many mechanical and magnetic engineering processes: annealing, applied strain, magnetic field, shot peening, and magnetic field after peening. Experimental results have demonstrated a functional relationship between coil impedance, resistance and reactance, and specimens subjected to various engineering processes. It has shown that magnetic treatment does induce changes in electromagnetic properties of nickel 200 that then exhibit evidence of stress relief. However, further fundamental studies are necessary for a thorough understanding of the exact mechanism of the magnetic field processing effect on machine-tool service life.

  10. Penile rehabilitation following prostate cancer treatment: review of current literature

    PubMed Central

    Clavell-Hernandez, Jonathan; Wang, Run

    2015-01-01

    Radical prostatectomy (RP) and radiotherapy (RT) are highly effective in improving prostate cancer survival. However, both have a detrimental effect on erectile function (EF). Penile rehabilitation consists of understanding the mechanisms that cause erectile dysfunction (ED) and utilizing pharmacologic agents, devices or interventions to promote male sexual function. For the past decade, many researchers have pursued to define effective treatment modalities to improve ED after prostate cancer treatment. Despite the understanding of the mechanisms and well-established rationale for postprostate treatment penile rehabilitation, there is still no consensus regarding effective rehabilitation programs. This article reviews a contemporary series of trials that assess penile rehabilitation and explore treatment modalities that might play a role in the future. Published data and trials related to penile rehabilitation after RP and RT were reviewed and presented. Although recent trials have shown that most therapies are well-tolerated and aid in some degree on EF recovery, we currently do not have tangible evidence to recommend an irrefutable penile rehabilitation algorithm. However, advancements in research and technology will ultimately create and refine management options for penile rehabilitation. PMID:25851656

  11. Effectiveness of multiple sclerosis treatment with current immunomodulatory drugs.

    PubMed

    Milo, Ron

    2015-04-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic inflammatory disease of the CNS of a putative autoimmune origin characterized by neurologic dysfunction disseminated in space and time due to demyelination and axonal loss that results in progressive disability. Recent advances in understanding the immune pathogenesis of the disease resulted in the introduction of numerous effective immunomodulatoty drugs having diverse mechanisms of action, modes of administration and risk-benefit profiles. This results in more complex albeit more promising treatment selection and choices. The epidemiology, clinical features, pathogenesis and diagnosis of the disease are discussed. The mode of action and main characteristics of current immunomodulatory drugs for MS and their place in the therapeutic algorithm of the disease based on evidence from clinical trials are described. Speculation on new paradigms, treatment goals and outcome measures aimed at improving the landscape of MS treatment is presented. Multiple disease, drug and patient-related factors should be taken into consideration when selecting the appropriate drug and treatment strategy to the appropriate patient, thus paving the road for personalized medicine in MS.

  12. Validity of Current Treatment Protocols to Overcome Hypochondriasis

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Meher Narain

    2017-01-01

    Hypochondriasis has been difficult to define and its classification amongst diseases has been blurred since, time immemorial. Though decades have been passed since its discovery and known to the people that the disorder is of the mind itself, the treatment options are still limited for the disorder and therefore, in dire need of exploration and analysis. Hypochondriasis, also sometimes referred to as health anxiety, is much more common in general health ward than previously accounted for. Thus, an efficient way of its management needs to be formulated and this review article helps to shed out light on the current treatment protocol available for hypochondriasis and their efficacy for the same. The treatment modules for hypochondriasis are unfortunately few and limited. None of the review articles have evaluated the efficacy of the tried treatment interventions and through this review article we want to highlight the same. A Medline search of the relevant publications and the references of the studies were incorporated to obtain the data. PMID:28274027

  13. Current Status of Interventional Radiology Treatment of Infrapopliteal Arterial Disease

    SciT

    Rand, T., E-mail: thomas.rand@wienkav.at; Uberoi, R.

    2013-06-15

    Treatment of infrapopliteal arteries has developed to a standard technique during the past two decades. With the introduction of innovative devices, a variety of techniques has been created and is still under investigation. Treatment options range from plain balloon angioplasty (POBA), all sorts of stent applications, such as bare metal, balloon expanding, self-expanding, coated and drug-eluting stents, and bio-absorbable stents, to latest developments, such as drug-eluting balloons. Regarding the scientific background, several prospective, randomized studies with relevant numbers of patients have been (or will be) published that are Level I evidence. In contrast to older studies, which primarily were basedmore » mostly on numeric parameters, such as diameters or residual stenoses, more recent study concepts focus increasingly on clinical features, such as amputation rate improvement or changes of clinical stages and quality of life standards. Although it is still not decided, which of the individual techniques might be the best one, we can definitely conclude that whatever treatment of infrapopliteal arteries will be used it is of substantial benefit for the patient. Therefore, the goal of this review is to give an overview about the current developments and techniques for the treatment of infrapopliteal arteries, to present clinical and technical results, to weigh individual techniques, and to discuss the recent developments.« less

  14. Influence of electric current on bacterial viability in wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Wei, V; Elektorowicz, M; Oleszkiewicz, J A

    2011-10-15

    Minimizing the influence of electric current on bacterial viability in the electro-technologies such as electrophoresis and electrocoagulation is crucial in designing and operating the electric hybrid wastewater treatment system. In this study the biomass from a membrane bioreactor (MBR) was subjected to constant direct current and the bacterial viability was monitored against electrical intensity, duration as well as the spatial vicinity related to the electrodes. It was found that the bacterial viability was not significantly affected (less than 10% of death percentage) when the applied electric current density (CD) was less than 6.2 A/m2 after 4 h. The percentage of live cell dropped by 15% and 29% at CD of 12.3 A/m2 and 24.7 A/m2, respectively. The pH of electrolytic biomass fluid has shifted to alkaline (from nearly neutral to around pH 10) at CD above 12.3 A/m2, which could have been the contributing factor for the bacterial inactivation. The temperature change in the electrolytic media at all current densities during 4 h of experiment was less than 2 °C, thus temperature effects were negligible. Bacteria experienced different micro-environments in the electrochemical reactor. Bacterial cells on the cathode surface exhibited highest death rate, whereas bacteria outside the space between electrodes were the least affected. It was concluded that in an electro-technology integrated wastewater treatment process, sufficient mixing should be used to avoid localized inactivation of bacterial cells. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Altered Sleep Stage Transitions of REM Sleep: A Novel and Stable Biomarker of Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaping; Zhang, Jihui; Lam, Venny; Ho, Crover Kwok Wah; Zhou, Junying; Li, Shirley Xin; Lam, Siu Ping; Yu, Mandy Wai Man; Tang, Xiangdong; Wing, Yun-Kwok

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: To determine the diagnostic values, longitudinal stability, and HLA association of the sleep stage transitions in narcolepsy. Methods: To compare the baseline differences in the sleep stage transition to REM sleep among 35 patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 39 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 26 unaffected relatives, and 159 non-narcoleptic sleep patient controls, followed by a reassessment at a mean duration of 37.4 months. Results: The highest prevalence of altered transition from stage non-N2/N3 to stage R in multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and nocturnal polysomnography (NPSG) was found in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (92.0% and 57.1%), followed by patients with type 2 narcolepsy (69.4% and 12.8%), unaffected relatives (46.2% and 0%), and controls (39.3% and 1.3%). Individual sleep variables had varied sensitivity and specificity in diagnosing narcolepsy. By incorporating a combination of sleep variables, the decision tree analysis improved the sensitivity to 94.3% and 82.1% and enhanced specificity to 82.4% and 83% for the diagnosis of type 1 and type 2 narcolepsy, respectively. There was a significant association of DBQ1*0602 with the altered sleep stage transition (OR = 16.0, 95% CI: 1.7–149.8, p = 0.015). The persistence of the altered sleep stage transition in both MSLT and NPSG was high for both type 1 (90.5% and 64.7%) and type 2 narcolepsy (92.3% and 100%), respectively. Conclusions: Altered sleep stage transition is a significant and stable marker of narcolepsy, which suggests a vulnerable wake-sleep dysregulation trait in narcolepsy. Altered sleep stage transition has a significant diagnostic value in the differential diagnosis of hypersomnias, especially when combined with other diagnostic sleep variables in decision tree analysis. Citation: Liu Y, Zhang J, Lam V, Ho CK, Zhou J, Li SX, Lam SP, Yu MW, Tang X, Wing YK. Altered sleep stage transitions of REM sleep: a novel and stable biomarker of narcolepsy. J Clin Sleep Med 2015

  16. Does Narcolepsy Symptom Severity Vary According to HLA-DQB1*0602 Allele Status?

    PubMed Central

    Watson, Nathaniel F.; Ton, Thanh G.N.; Koepsell, Thomas D.; Gersuk, Vivian H.; Longstreth, W.T.

    2010-01-01

    Study Objectives: To investigate associations between HLA-DQB1*0602 allele status and measures of narcolepsy symptom severity. Design: Cross-sectional study of population-based narcolepsy patients. Setting: King County, Washington. Participants: All prevalent cases (n = 279) of physician-diagnosed narcolepsy ascertained from 2001-2005. Interventions: N/A Measurements: Narcolepsy diagnosis was based on cataplexy status, diagnostic sleep study results, and chart review. The number of HLA-DQB1 alleles was determined from buccal genomic DNA. Symptom severity instruments included the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), the Ullanlinna Narcolepsy Scale (UNS), age of symptom onset, subjective sleep latency and duration, and various clinical sleep parameters. We used linear regression adjusted for African American race and an extended chi-square test of trend to assess relationships across ordered groups defined by allele number (0, 1, or 2). Results: Narcolepsy patients were 63% female and 82% Caucasian, with a mean age of 47.6 years (SD = 17.1). One hundred forty-one (51%) patients had no DQB1*0602 alleles; 117 (42%) had one; and 21 (7%) had two. In the complete narcolepsy sample after adjustment for African American race, we observed a linear relationship between HLA-DQB1*0602 frequency and sleepiness as defined by the ESS (P < 0.01), narcolepsy severity as defined by UNS (P < 0.001), age of symptom onset (P < 0.05), and sleep latency (P < 0.001). In univariate analyses, HLA-DQB1*0602 frequency was also associated with napping (P < 0.05) and increased car and work accidents or near accidents (both P < 0.01). Habitual sleep duration was not associated with HLA status. These race-adjusted associations remained for the ESS (P < 0.05), UNS (P < 0.01), and sleep latency (P < 0.001) when restricting to narcolepsy with cataplexy. Conclusions: Narcolepsy symptom severity varies in a linear manner according to HLA-DQB1*0602 allele status. These findings support the notion that HLA

  17. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers of Neurodegeneration Are Decreased or Normal in Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Jørgen Jennum, Poul; Østergaard Pedersen, Lars; Czarna Bahl, Justyna Maria; Modvig, Signe; Fog, Karina; Holm, Anja; Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2017-01-01

    To investigate whether cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) biomarkers of neurodegeneration are altered in narcolepsy in order to evaluate whether the hypocretin deficiency and abnormal sleep-wake pattern in narcolepsy leads to neurodegeneration. Twenty-one patients with central hypersomnia (10 type 1 narcolepsy, 5 type 2 narcolepsy, and 6 idiopathic hypersomnia cases), aged 33 years on average and with a disease duration of 2-29 years, and 12 healthy controls underwent CSF analyses of the levels of β-amyloid, total tau protein (T-tau), phosphorylated tau protein (P-tau181), α-synuclein, neurofilament light chain (NF-L), and chitinase 3-like protein-1 (CHI3L1). Levels of β-amyloid were lower in patients with type 1 narcolepsy (375.4 ± 143.5 pg/mL) and type 2 narcolepsy (455.9 ± 65.0 pg/mL) compared to controls (697.9 ± 167.3 pg/mL, p < .05). Furthermore, in patients with type 1 narcolepsy, levels of T-tau (79.0 ± 27.5 pg/mL) and P-tau181 (19.1 ± 4.3 pg/mL) were lower than in controls (162.2 ± 49.9 pg/mL and 33.8 ± 9.2 pg/mL, p < .05). Levels of α-synuclein, NF-L, and CHI3L1 in CSF from narcolepsy patients were similar to those of healthy individuals. Six CSF biomarkers of neurodegeneration were decreased or normal in narcolepsy indicating that taupathy, synucleinopathy, and immunopathy are not prevalent in narcolepsy patients with a disease duration of 2-29 years. Lower CSF levels of β-amyloid, T-tau protein, and P-tau181 in narcolepsy may indicate that hypocretin deficiency and an abnormal sleep-wake pattern alter the turnover of these proteins in the central nervous system. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Sleep Research Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. CSF histamine contents in narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Kodama, Tohru; Kondo, Hideaki; Satoh, Shinsuke; Inoue, Yuichi; Chiba, Shigeru; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Nishino, Seiji

    2009-02-01

    To (1) replicate our prior result of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) histamine levels in human narcolepsy in a different sample population and to (2) evaluate if histamine contents are altered in other types of hypersomnia with and without hypocretin deficiency. Cross sectional studies. Sixty-seven narcolepsy subjects, 26 idiopathic hypersomnia (IHS) subjects, 16 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) subjects, and 73 neurological controls were included. All patients were Japanese. Diagnoses were made according to ICSD-2. We found significant reductions in CSF histamine levels in hypocretin deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (mean +/- SEM; 176.0 +/- 25.8 pg/mL), hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (97.8 +/- 38.4 pg/mL), hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy without cataplexy (113.6 +/- 16.4 pg/mL), and idiopathic hypersomnia (161.0 +/- 29.3 pg/ mL); the levels in OSAS (259.3 +/- 46.6 pg/mL) did not statistically differ from those in the controls (333.8 +/- 22.0 pg/mL). Low CSF histamine levels were mostly observed in non-medicated patients; significant reductions in histamine levels were evident in non-medicated patients with hypocretin deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (112.1 +/- 16.3 pg/ mL) and idiopathic hypersomnia (143.3 +/- 28.8 pg/mL), while the levels in the medicated patients were in the normal range. The study confirmed reduced CSF histamine levels in hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy. Similar degrees of reduction were also observed in hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy and in idiopathic hypersomnia, while those in OSAS (non central nervous system hypersomnia) were not altered. The decrease in histamine in these subjects were more specifically observed in non-medicated subjects, suggesting CSF histamine is a biomarker reflecting the degree of hypersomnia of central origin.

  19. Narcolepsy in Southern Chinese patients: clinical characteristics, HLA typing and seasonality of birth.

    PubMed

    Wing, Y K; Chen, L; Fong, S Y Y; Ng, M H L; Ho, C K W; Cheng, S H; Tang, N L S; Li, A M

    2008-11-01

    To report clinical characteristics, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) typing and seasonality of birth of a series of 54 Southern Chinese patients suffering from narcolepsy. All subjects underwent detailed medical and psychiatric interviews and a standardised nocturnal polysomnogram followed by a daytime Multiple Sleep Latency Test. Each subject also completed a set of sleep questionnaires. HLA typing was performed in 91% of subjects. A total of 78% and 22% of patients were diagnosed with suffering from cataplectic and non-cataplectic narcolepsy, respectively. The majority (n = 47, 87%) of patients were referred to our sleep clinic for excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS). The cataplectic narcolepsy differed from non-cataplectic narcolepsy by having more rapid eye movement (REM)-related clinical symptoms (more sleep paralysis and sleep-related hallucination) and sleep disturbances (shorter REM latency), as well as tighter association with HLA DQB1*0602. A bi-modal peak pattern was observed at 11 and 39 years old. A similar bi-modal pattern also occurred for EDS and cataplexy. Excess winter births were observed for this series of patients. 81% of patients with cataplectic narcolepsy were DQB1*0602-positive. There were no differences between early- and late-onset cases in the association with positive DQB1*0602 (71.4% vs 60%). Narcolepsy had prominent pernicious effects on various social, academic, family and mental aspects in our patients. In our Southern Chinese narcolepsy series, bi-modal peak pattern of age of onset, excess winter birth and tight association of HLA DQB1*0602 with cataplectic narcolepsy were found.

  20. Frequencies and Associations of Narcolepsy-Related Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Hirotsu, Camila; Araujo, Paula; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Narcolepsy is a disabling disease with a delayed diagnosis. At least 3 years before the disorder identification, several comorbidities can be observed in patients with narcolepsy. The early recognition of narcolepsy symptoms may improve long-term prognosis of the patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of the symptoms associated with narcolepsy and its social and psychological association in a sample of Sao Paulo city inhabitants. Methods: We performed a cross-sectional evaluation with 1,008 individuals from the Sao Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study (EPISONO). Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Volunteers were also asked about the occurrence of cataplectic-like, hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis symptoms. The participants underwent a full-night polysomnography and completed questionnaires about psychological, demographic, and quality of life parameters. Results: We observed a prevalence of 39.2% of EDS, 15.0% of cataplectic-like symptom, 9.2% of hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and 14.9% of sleep paralysis in Sao Paulo city inhabitants. A frequency of 6.9% was observed when EDS and cataplectic-like symptoms were grouped. The other associations were EDS + hallucinations (4.7%) and EDS + sleep paralysis (7.5%). Symptomatic participants were predominantly women and younger compared with patients without any narcolepsy symptom (n = 451). Narcolepsy symptomatology was also associated with a poor quality of life and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and fatigue. Conclusions: Narcolepsy-related symptoms are associated with poor quality of life and worse psychological parameters. Citation: Kim LJ, Coelho FM, Hirotsu C, Araujo P, Bittencourt L, Tufik S, Andersen ML. Frequencies and associations of narcolepsy-related symptoms: a cross-sectional study. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(12):1377–1384. PMID:26235160

  1. Clostridium difficile infection: current, forgotten and emerging treatment options.

    PubMed

    Drekonja, Dimitri M

    2014-09-01

    Clostridium difficile infection (CDI) has increased in incidence and severity, and is now among the most common nosocomial infections. Several agents are available for the initial treatment of CDI, some of which are rarely used, and none of which is clearly superior for initial clinical cure. Fidaxomicin appears to offer a benefit in terms of preventing recurrent disease, although the cost-benefit ratio is debated. Recurrent CDI is a major challenge, occurring after 15-30% of initial episodes. The treatment of recurrent CDI is difficult, with sparse evidence available to support any particular agent. Fecal microbiota therapy, also known as 'stool transplantation', appears to be highly effective, although availability is currently limited, and the regulatory environment is in flux. Synthetic stool products and an orally available fecal microbiota therapy product are both under investigation, which may address the problem of availability. As with most infectious diseases, an effective vaccine would be a welcome addition to our armamentarium, but none is currently available.

  2. Current and future treatment options for polycythemia vera.

    PubMed

    Griesshammer, Martin; Gisslinger, Heinz; Mesa, Ruben

    2015-06-01

    Patients with polycythemia vera (PV), a myeloproliferative neoplasm characterized by an elevated red blood cell mass, are at high risk of vascular and thrombotic complications and have reduced quality of life due to a substantial symptom burden that includes pruritus, fatigue, constitutional symptoms, microvascular disturbances, and bleeding. Conventional therapeutic options aim at reducing vascular and thrombotic risk, with low-dose aspirin and phlebotomy as first-line recommendations for patients at low risk of thrombotic events and cytoreductive therapy (usually hydroxyurea or interferon alpha) recommended for high-risk patients. However, long-term effective and well-tolerated treatments are still lacking. The discovery of mutations in Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) as the underlying molecular basis of PV has led to the development of several targeted therapies, including JAK inhibitors, and results from the first phase 3 clinical trial with a JAK inhibitor in PV are now available. Here, we review the current treatment landscape in PV, as well as therapies currently in development.

  3. Current Pharmaceutical Treatments and Alternative Therapies of Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Jie; Cui, Yanhua; Li, Song; Le, Weidong

    2016-01-01

    Over the decades, pharmaceutical treatments, particularly dopaminergic (DAergic) drugs have been considered as the main therapy against motor symptoms of Parkinson's disease (PD). It is proposed that DAergic drugs in combination with other medications, such as monoamine oxidase type B inhibitors, catechol-O-methyl transferase inhibitors, anticholinergics and other newly developed non-DAergic drugs can make a better control of motor symptoms or alleviate levodopa-induced motor complications. Moreover, non-motor symptoms of PD, such as cognitive, neuropsychiatric, sleep, autonomic and sensory disturbances caused by intrinsic PD pathology or drug-induced side effects, are gaining increasing attention and urgently need to be taken care of due to their impact on quality of life. Currently, neuroprotective therapies have been investigated extensively in pre-clinical studies, and some of them have been subjected to clinical trials. Furthermore, non-pharmaceutical treatments, including deep brain stimulation (DBS), gene therapy, cell replacement therapy and some complementary managements, such as Tai chi, Yoga, traditional herbs and molecular targeted therapies have also been considered as effective alternative therapies to classical pharmaceutics. This review will provide us updated information regarding the current drugs and non-drugs therapies for PD. PMID:26585523

  4. Current status of urban wastewater treatment plants in China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Q H; Yang, W N; Ngo, H H; Guo, W S; Jin, P K; Dzakpasu, Mawuli; Yang, S J; Wang, Q; Wang, X C; Ao, D

    2016-01-01

    The study reported and analyzed the current state of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in urban China from the perspective of treatment technologies, pollutant removals, operating load and effluent discharge standards. By the end of 2013, 3508 WWTPs have been built in 31 provinces and cities in China with a total treatment capacity of 1.48×10(8)m(3)/d. The uneven population distribution between China's east and west regions has resulted in notably different economic development outcomes. The technologies mostly used in WWTPs are AAO and oxidation ditch, which account for over 50% of the existing WWTPs. According to statistics, the efficiencies of COD and NH3-N removal are good in 656 WWTPs in 70 cities. The overall average COD removal is over 88% with few regional differences. The average removal efficiency of NH3-N is up to 80%. Large differences exist between the operating loads applied in different WWTPs. The average operating loading rate is approximately 83%, and 52% of WWTPs operate at loadings of <80%, treating up to 40% of the wastewater generated. The implementation of discharge standards has been low. Approximately 28% of WWTPs that achieved the Grade I-A Discharge Standard of Pollutants for Municipal Wastewater Treatment Plant (GB 18918-2002) were constructed after 2010. The sludge treatment and recycling rates are only 25%, and approximately 15% of wastewater is inefficiently treated. Approximately 60% of WWTPs have capacities of 1×10(4)m(3)/d-5×10(4)m(3)/d. Relatively high energy consumption is required for small-scale processing, and the utilization rate of recycled wastewater is low. The challenges of WWTPs are discussed with the aim of developing rational criteria and appropriate technologies for water recycling. Suggestions regarding potential technical and administrative measures are provided. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Complex movement disorders at disease onset in childhood narcolepsy with cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Pizza, Fabio; Palaia, Vincenzo; Franceschini, Christian; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan K.; Cortelli, Pietro; Nobili, Lino; Bruni, Oliviero; Dauvilliers, Yves; Lin, Ling; Edwards, Mark J.; Mignot, Emmanuel; Bhatia, Kailash P.

    2011-01-01

    Narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by daytime sleepiness, cataplexy (sudden loss of bilateral muscle tone triggered by emotions), sleep paralysis, hypnagogic hallucinations and disturbed nocturnal sleep. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is most often associated with human leucocyte antigen-DQB1*0602 and is caused by the loss of hypocretin-producing neurons in the hypothalamus of likely autoimmune aetiology. Noting that children with narcolepsy often display complex abnormal motor behaviours close to disease onset that do not meet the classical definition of cataplexy, we systematically analysed motor features in 39 children with narcolepsy with cataplexy in comparison with 25 age- and sex-matched healthy controls. We found that patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy displayed a complex array of ‘negative’ (hypotonia) and ‘active’ (ranging from perioral movements to dyskinetic–dystonic movements or stereotypies) motor disturbances. ‘Active’ and ‘negative’ motor scores correlated positively with the presence of hypotonic features at neurological examination and negatively with disease duration, whereas ‘negative’ motor scores also correlated negatively with age at disease onset. These observations suggest that paediatric narcolepsy with cataplexy often co-occurs with a complex movement disorder at disease onset, a phenomenon that may vanish later in the course of the disease. Further studies are warranted to assess clinical course and whether the associated movement disorder is also caused by hypocretin deficiency or by additional neurochemical abnormalities. PMID:21930661

  6. Rare missense mutations in P2RY11 in narcolepsy with cataplexy.

    PubMed

    Degn, Matilda; Dauvilliers, Yves; Dreisig, Karin; Lopez, Régis; Pfister, Corinne; Pradervand, Sylvain; Rahbek Kornum, Birgitte; Tafti, Mehdi

    2017-06-01

    The sleep disorder narcolepsy with cataplexy is characterized by a highly specific loss of hypocretin (orexin) neurons, leading to the hypothesis that the condition is caused by an immune or autoimmune mechanism. All genetic variants associated with narcolepsy are immune-related. Among these are single nucleotide polymorphisms in the P2RY11-EIF3G locus. It is unknown how these genetic variants affect narcolepsy pathogenesis and whether the effect is directly related to P2Y11 signalling or EIF3G function. Exome sequencing in 18 families with at least two affected narcolepsy with cataplexy subjects revealed non-synonymous mutations in the second exon of P2RY11 in two families, and P2RY11 re-sequencing in 250 non-familial cases and 135 healthy control subjects revealed further six different non-synonymous mutations in the second exon of P2RY11 in seven patients. No mutations were found in healthy controls. Six of the eight narcolepsy-associated P2Y11 mutations resulted in significant functional deficits in P2Y11 signalling through both Ca2+ and cAMP signalling pathways. In conclusion, our data show that decreased P2Y11 signalling plays an important role in the development of narcolepsy with cataplexy. © The Author (2017). Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Guarantors of Brain. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Narcolepsy in a three-year-old girl: A case report.

    PubMed

    Park, Eu Gene; Lee, Jiwon; Joo, Eun Yeon; Lee, Munhyang; Lee, Jeehun

    2016-01-01

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive daytime somnolence associated with sleep paralysis, hallucinations when falling asleep or awakening, and cataplexy. Early recognition of pediatric narcolepsy is essential for growth and development. We experienced a case of narcolepsy in a three-year-old girl. The patient underwent brain MRI and 24h video-electroencephalogram (EEG) monitoring. Polysomnography (PSG) with multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) and human leukocyte antigen (HLA) DQ typing was performed. The brain MRI was normal. 24h video-EEG monitoring revealed no abnormal slow or epileptiform discharge on interictal EEG, and no EEG change during tongue thrusting, dropping head with laughter, or flopping down, which was consistent with cataplexy associated with narcolepsy. A mean sleep latency of 2.5 min and four episodes of sleep-onset REM periods in five naps were observed in PSG with MSLT. She was positive in HLA-DQB1*0602. Based on these findings, she was diagnosed as narcoleptic with cataplexy. The history, combined with PSG and MSLT, was helpful in the diagnosis of narcolepsy. We report a case of early-onset narcolepsy presenting with excessive sleepiness and cataplexy. Copyright © 2015 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Current status of atypical antipsychotics for the treatment of fibromyalgia.

    PubMed

    Rico-Villademoros, F; Calandre, E P; Slim, M

    2014-06-01

    The treatment of fibromyalgia requires pharmacological and nonpharmacological therapies. The pharmacological treatment of fibromyalgia is limited to a few drugs that have been demonstrated to be moderately effective in some but not all dimensions of the disease. Therefore, the search for new drugs to treat this condition is warranted. Atypical antipsychotics offered an attractive alternative because they had been shown to be active against several key symptoms of fibromyalgia. The results of open-label studies, however, appear to indicate that atypical antipsychotics are poorly tolerated in patients with fibromyalgia, and only quetiapine XR has been studied in randomized controlled trials. Quetiapine XR has demonstrated effectiveness in treating comorbid major depression, anxiety and sleep disturbance. However, in two randomized controlled trials, quetiapine XR was not differentiated from placebo and failed to demonstrate noninferiority to amitriptyline in terms of improving overall symptomatology. The effect of quetiapine XR on pain and its usefulness as part of a combination pharmacological regimen should be further evaluated. Overall, the use of quetiapine (initiated at a low dose and slowly titrated) in fibromyalgia should be limited to patients with comorbid major depression or patients who are currently receiving other treatments and have unresolved and disabling depressive and/or anxiety symptoms. Copyright 2014 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  9. Current and emerging treatment options in the management of lupus

    PubMed Central

    Jordan, Natasha; D’Cruz, David

    2016-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a complex autoimmune disease with variable clinical manifestations. While the clearest guidelines for the treatment of SLE exist in the context of lupus nephritis, patients with other lupus manifestations such as neuropsychiatric, hematologic, musculoskeletal, and severe cutaneous lupus frequently require immunosuppression and/or biologic therapy. Conventional immunosuppressive agents such as mycophenolate mofetil, azathioprine, and cyclophosphamide are widely used in the management of SLE with current more rationalized treatment regimens optimizing the use of these agents while minimizing potential toxicity. The advent of biologic therapies has advanced the treatment of SLE particularly in patients with refractory disease. The CD20 monoclonal antibody rituximab and the anti-BLyS agent belimumab are now widely in use in clinical practice. Several other biologic agents are in ongoing clinical trials. While immunosuppressive and biologic agents are the foundation of inflammatory disease control in SLE, the importance of managing comorbidities such as cardiovascular risk factors, bone health, and minimizing susceptibility to infection should not be neglected. PMID:27529058

  10. Narcolepsy and its treatment with stimulants. ASDA standards of practice.

    PubMed

    Mitler, M M; Aldrich, M S; Koob, G F; Zarcone, V P

    1994-06-01

    This review is part of the standards of practice recommendations. It has been commended and reviewed by the Board of the ASDA. It reflects recommendations of the Board for the practice of sleep medicine in North America. The subcommittee is responsible for the presented write-up.

  11. Current Advances in Detection and Treatment of Babesiosis

    PubMed Central

    Mosqueda, J; Olvera-Ramírez, A; Aguilar-Tipacamú, G; Cantó, GJ

    2012-01-01

    Babesiosis is a disease with a world-wide distribution affecting many species of mammals principally cattle and man. The major impact occurs in the cattle industry where bovine babesiosis has had a huge economic effect due to loss of meat and beef production of infected animals and death. Nowadays to those costs there must be added the high cost of tick control, disease detection, prevention and treatment. In almost a century and a quarter since the first report of the disease, the truth is: there is no a safe and efficient vaccine available, there are limited chemotherapeutic choices and few low-cost, reliable and fast detection methods. Detection and treatment of babesiosis are important tools to control babesiosis. Microscopy detection methods are still the cheapest and fastest methods used to identify Babesia parasites although their sensitivity and specificity are limited. Newer immunological methods are being developed and they offer faster, more sensitive and more specific options to conventional methods, although the direct immunological diagnoses of parasite antigens in host tissues are still missing. Detection methods based on nucleic acid identification and their amplification are the most sensitive and reliable techniques available today; importantly, most of those methodologies were developed before the genomics and bioinformatics era, which leaves ample room for optimization. For years, babesiosis treatment has been based on the use of very few drugs like imidocarb or diminazene aceturate. Recently, several pharmacological compounds were developed and evaluated, offering new options to control the disease. With the complete sequence of the Babesia bovis genome and the B. bigemina genome project in progress, the post-genomic era brings a new light on the development of diagnosis methods and new chemotherapy targets. In this review, we will present the current advances in detection and treatment of babesiosis in cattle and other animals, with additional

  12. Narcolepsy with cataplexy mimicry: the strange case of two sisters.

    PubMed

    Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Poli, Francesca; Moghadam, Keivan Kaveh; Franceschini, Christian; Bellucci, Claudia; Cipolli, Carlo; Ingravallo, Francesca; Natalini, Giuliana; Mignot, Emmanuel; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2013-06-15

    We report on two sisters, 17 and 12 years of age, with clinical features suggesting narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC): daytime sleepiness, spontaneous and emotionally triggered sudden falls to the ground, and overweight/obesity. MSLT showed borderline sleep latency, with 1 and 0 sleep onset REM periods. HLA typing disclosed the DQB1*0602 allele. Video-polygraphy of the spells ruled out NC diagnosis by demonstrating their easy elicitation by suggestion, with wake EEG, electromyographic persistence of muscle tone, and stable presence of tendon reflexes (i.e., pseudo-cataplexy), together with normal cerebrospinal hypocretin-1 levels. Our cases emphasize the need of a clear depiction of cataplexy pattern at the different ages, the usefulness of examining ictal neurophysiology, and collecting all available disease markers in ambiguous cases.

  13. Current and future medical treatment in primary dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Delnooz, Cathérine C.S.

    2012-01-01

    Dystonia is a hyperkinetic movement disorder, characterized by involuntary and sustained contractions of opposing muscles causing twisting movements and abnormal postures. It is often a disabling disorder that has a significant impact on physical and psychosocial wellbeing. The medical therapeutic armamentarium used in practice is quite extensive, but for many of these interventions formal proof of efficacy is lacking. Exceptions are the use of botulinum toxin in patients with cervical dystonia, some forms of cranial dystonia (in particular, blepharospasm) and writer’s cramp; deep brain stimulation of the pallidum in generalized and segmental dystonia; and high-dose trihexyphenidyl in young patients with segmental and generalized dystonia. In order to move this field forward, we not only need better trials that examine the effect of current treatment interventions, but also a further understanding of the pathophysiology of dystonia as a first step to design and test new therapies that are targeted at the underlying biologic and neurophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:22783371

  14. Current pharmacotherapy for the treatment of crescentic glomerulonephritis.

    PubMed

    Tam, Frederick W K

    2006-11-01

    Glomerulonephritis is an important cause of end-stage renal disease. Crescentic glomerulonephritis is the most severe form of glomerulonephritis and, if untreated, patients will develop renal failure within days or weeks of diagnosis. Current immunotherapy consists of corticosteroids, cytotoxic drugs and plasma exchange. Challenges include minimising toxicity of therapy, preventing relapse in antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies-associated vasculitis and finding an effective treatment for crescentic IgA nephropathy. There are opportunities for more specific therapies using monoclonal antibodies to T cells (and their co-stimulatory receptors), B cells and cytokines, or pharmacological inhibitors of signal transduction. Their efficacy and safety remain to be established with controlled clinical trials. Recent development of urinary cytokine measurement provides a noninvasive biomarker of renal disease activity, which is useful in monitoring response to therapy and assessing prognosis.

  15. Decreased sleep stage transition pattern complexity in narcolepsy type 1.

    PubMed

    Ferri, Raffaele; Pizza, Fabio; Vandi, Stefano; Iloti, Martina; Plazzi, Giuseppe

    2016-08-01

    To analyze the complexity of the nocturnal sleep stage sequence in central disorders of hypersomnolence (CDH), with the hypothesis that narcolepsy type 1 (NT1) might exhibit distinctive sleep stage sequence organization and complexity. Seventy-nine NT1 patients, 22 narcolepsy type 2 (NT2), 22 idiopathic hypersomnia (IH), and 52 patients with subjective hypersomnolence (sHS) were recruited and their nocturnal sleep was polysomnographically recorded and scored. Group between-stage transition probability matrices were obtained and compared. Patients with NT1 differed significantly from all the other patient groups, the latter, in turn, were not different between each other. The individual probability of the R-to-N2 transition was found to be the parameter showing the difference of highest significance between the groups (lowest in NT1) and classified patients with or without NT1 with an accuracy of 78.9% (sensitivity 78.5% and specificity 79.2%), by applying a cut-off value of 0.15. The main result of this study is that the structure of the sleep stage transition pattern of hypocretin-deficient NT1 patients is significantly different from that of other forms of CDH and sHS, with normal hypocretin levels. The lower probability of R-to-N2 transition occurrence in NT1 appears to be a reliable polysomnographic feature with potential application at the individual level, for supportive diagnostic purposes. Copyright © 2016 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ivabradine: Current and Future Treatment of Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Thorup, Lene; Simonsen, Ulf; Grimm, Daniela; Hedegaard, Elise R

    2017-08-01

    In heart failure (HF), the heart cannot pump blood efficiently and is therefore unable to meet the body's demands of oxygen, and/or there is increased end-diastolic pressure. Current treatments for HF with reduced ejection fraction (HFrEF) include angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, angiotension receptor type 1 (AT 1 ) antagonists, β-adrenoceptor antagonists, aldosterone receptor antagonists, diuretics, digoxin and a combination drug with AT 1 receptor antagonist and neprilysin inhibitor. In HF, the risk of readmission for hospital and mortality is markedly higher with a heart rate (HR) above 70 bpm. Here, we review the evidence regarding the use of ivabradine for lowering HR in HF. Ivabradine is a blocker of an I funny current (I(f)) channel and causes rate-dependent inhibition of the pacemaker activity in the sinoatrial node. In clinical trials of HFrEF, treatment with ivabradine seems to improve clinical outcome, for example improved ejection fraction (EF) and less readmission for hospital, but the effect appears most pronounced in patients with HRs above 70 bpm, while the effect on cardiovascular death appears less consistent. The adverse effects of ivabradine include bradycardia, atrial fibrillation and visual disturbances, but ivabradine avoids the negative inotrope effects observed with β-adrenoceptor antagonists. In conclusion, in patients with stable HFrEF with EF<35% and HR above 70 bpm, ivabradine improves the outcome and might be a first choice of therapy, if beta-adrenoceptor antagonists are not tolerated. Further studies must show whether that can be extended to HF patients with preserved EF. © 2017 Nordic Association for the Publication of BCPT (former Nordic Pharmacological Society).

  17. Osteoporosis – a current view of pharmacological prevention and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhajit; Crockett, Julie C

    2013-01-01

    Postmenopausal osteoporosis is the most common bone disease, associated with low bone mineral density (BMD) and pathological fractures which lead to significant morbidity. It is defined clinically by a BMD of 2.5 standard deviations or more below the young female adult mean (T-score =−2.5). Osteoporosis was a huge global problem both socially and economically – in the UK alone, in 2011 £6 million per day was spent on treatment and social care of the 230,000 osteoporotic fracture patients – and therefore viable preventative and therapeutic approaches are key to managing this problem within the aging population of today. One of the main issues surrounding the potential of osteoporosis management is diagnosing patients at risk before they develop a fracture. We discuss the current and future possibilities for identifying susceptible patients, from fracture risk assessment to shape modeling and in relation to the high heritability of osteoporosis now that a plethora of genes have been associated with low BMD and osteoporotic fracture. This review highlights the current therapeutics in clinical use (including bisphosphonates, anti-RANKL [receptor activator of NF-κB ligand], intermittent low dose parathyroid hormone, and strontium ranelate) and some of those in development (anti-sclerostin antibodies and cathepsin K inhibitors). By highlighting the intimate relationship between the activities of bone forming (osteoblasts) and bone-resorbing (osteoclasts) cells, we include an overview and comparison of the molecular mechanisms exploited in each therapy. PMID:23807838

  18. Osteoarthritis: detection, pathophysiology, and current/future treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Sovani, Sujata; Grogan, Shawn P

    2013-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is a disease of the joint, and age is the major risk factor for its development. Clinical manifestation of OA includes joint pain, stiffness, and loss of mobility. Currently, no pharmacological treatments are available to treat this specific joint disease; only symptom-modifying drugs are available. Improvement in imaging technology, identification of biomarkers, and increased understanding of the molecular basis of OA will aid in detecting the early stages of disease. Yet the development of interventional strategies remains elusive and will be critical for effective prevention of OA-associated joint destruction. The potential of cell-based therapies may be applicable in improving joint function in mild to more advanced cases of OA. Ongoing studies to understand the basis of this disease will eventually lead to prevention and treatment strategies and will also be a key in reducing the social and economic burden of this disease. Nurses are advised to provide an integrative approach of disease assessment and management in OA patients' care with a focus on education and implementation. Knowledge and understanding of OA and how this affects the individual patient form the basis for such an integrative approach to all-round patient care and disease management.

  19. Treatment of Helicobacter pylori infection: Current status and future concepts

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jyh-Chin; Lu, Chien-Wei; Lin, Chun-Jung

    2014-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infection is highly associated with the occurrence of gastrointestinal diseases, including gastric inflammation, peptic ulcer, gastric cancer, and gastric mucosa-associated lymphoid-tissue lymphoma. Although alternative therapies, including phytomedicines and probiotics, have been used to improve eradication, current treatment still relies on a combination of antimicrobial agents, such as amoxicillin, clarithromycin, metronidazole, and levofloxacin, and antisecretory agents, such as proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). A standard triple therapy consisting of a PPI and two antibiotics (clarithromycin and amoxicillin/metronidazole) is widely used as the first-line regimen for treatment of infection, but the increased resistance of H. pylori to clarithromycin and metronidazole has significantly reduced the eradication rate using this therapy and bismuth-containing therapy or 10-d sequential therapy has therefore been proposed to replace standard triple therapy. Alternatively, levofloxacin-based triple therapy can be used as rescue therapy for H. pylori infection after failure of first-line therapy. The increase in resistance to antibiotics, including levofloxacin, may limit the applicability of such regimens. However, since resistance of H. pylori to amoxicillin is generally low, an optimized high dose dual therapy consisting of a PPI and amoxicillin can be an effective first-line or rescue therapy. In addition, the concomitant use of alternative medicine has the potential to provide additive or synergistic effects against H. pylori infection, though its efficacy needs to be verified in clinical studies. PMID:24833858

  20. Cancer Treatment Using Peptides: Current Therapies and Future Prospects

    PubMed Central

    Thundimadathil, Jyothi

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses the role of peptides in cancer therapy with special emphasis on peptide drugs which are already approved and those in clinical trials. The potential of peptides in cancer treatment is evident from a variety of different strategies that are available to address the progression of tumor growth and propagation of the disease. Use of peptides that can directly target cancer cells without affecting normal cells (targeted therapy) is evolving as an alternate strategy to conventional chemotherapy. Peptide can be utilized directly as a cytotoxic agent through various mechanisms or can act as a carrier of cytotoxic agents and radioisotopes by specifically targeting cancer cells. Peptide-based hormonal therapy has been extensively studied and utilized for the treatment of breast and prostate cancers. Tremendous amount of clinical data is currently available attesting to the efficiency of peptide-based cancer vaccines. Combination therapy is emerging as an important strategy to achieve synergistic effects in fighting cancer as a single method alone may not be efficient enough to yield positive results. Combining immunotherapy with conventional therapies such as radiation and chemotherapy or combining an anticancer peptide with a nonpeptidic cytotoxic drug is an example of this emerging field. PMID:23316341

  1. Current Research Therapeutic Strategies for Alzheimer's Disease Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Folch, Jaume; Petrov, Dmitry; Ettcheto, Miren; Abad, Sonia; Sánchez-López, Elena; García, M. Luisa; Olloquequi, Jordi; Beas-Zarate, Carlos; Auladell, Carme; Camins, Antoni

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) currently presents one of the biggest healthcare issues in the developed countries. There is no effective treatment capable of slowing down disease progression. In recent years the main focus of research on novel pharmacotherapies was based on the amyloidogenic hypothesis of AD, which posits that the beta amyloid (Aβ) peptide is chiefly responsible for cognitive impairment and neuronal death. The goal of such treatments is (a) to reduce Aβ production through the inhibition of β and γ secretase enzymes and (b) to promote dissolution of existing cerebral Aβ plaques. However, this approach has proven to be only modestly effective. Recent studies suggest an alternative strategy centred on the inhibition of the downstream Aβ signalling, particularly at the synapse. Aβ oligomers may cause aberrant N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) activation postsynaptically by forming complexes with the cell-surface prion protein (PrPC). PrPC is enriched at the neuronal postsynaptic density, where it interacts with Fyn tyrosine kinase. Fyn activation occurs when Aβ is bound to PrPC-Fyn complex. Fyn causes tyrosine phosphorylation of the NR2B subunit of metabotropic glutamate receptor 5 (mGluR5). Fyn kinase blockers masitinib and saracatinib have proven to be efficacious in treating AD symptoms in experimental mouse models of the disease. PMID:26881137

  2. [Comments on current guidelines of type 2 diabetes mellitus treatment].

    PubMed

    Martinka, Emil

    In an effort to facilitate the widest possible application of recent findings in diabetology and the related medical fields, with regard to characteristics of medicines and current possibilities of using modern procedures, but also to their limitations due to the financial capacities of health insurance companies, SDS innovates its therapeutic recommendations for the treatment of diabetes mellitus on a regular basis. The most recent recommendations were issued by SDS in August 2016. The review discusses and describes several factors which the authors considered during their preparation: (1) Compliance with the findings of evidence-based medicine, compliance with reference recommendations (therapeutic recommendations ADA/EASD), compliance with summary characteristics of active substances in the treatment of diabetes mellitus and approved possibilities of their use, and compliance with indica-tive restrictions (IO) which define medical and economic conditions for health insurance covered treatment. (2) Certain departure from the "glucocentric" approach to therapy, in favour of the approach preferring the selection of drugs based on clinical characteristics of the patient and proven benefits/risks of individual drugs (3) Preference of groups as well as individual active substances within groups based on evidence medicine regarding the individual active substances for specific patient groups. (4) Emphasis on individualization of goals for glycemic control (5) Emphasis on the right classification of diabetes mellitus as the basic condition for the selection of an optimum thera-peutic procedure, and (6) Emphasis on education and overcoming of clinical inertia, and patient medication adherence and medication "literacy" as the basic condition for successful therapy. The discussion also considers the outcomes of the most recent studies including of the studies focusing on empagliflozin and liraglutide, as well as recent modifications of the therapeutic recommendations of

  3. Current and emerging treatment strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Mah, Jean K

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy in childhood. It is caused by mutations of the DMD gene, leading to progressive muscle weakness, loss of independent ambulation by early teens, and premature death due to cardiorespiratory complications. The diagnosis can usually be made after careful review of the history and examination of affected boys presenting with developmental delay, proximal weakness, and elevated serum creatine kinase, plus confirmation by muscle biopsy or genetic testing. Precise characterization of the DMD mutation is important for genetic counseling and individualized treatment. Current standard of care includes the use of corticosteroids to prolong ambulation and to delay the onset of secondary complications. Early use of cardioprotective agents, noninvasive positive pressure ventilation, and other supportive strategies has improved the life expectancy and health-related quality of life for many young adults with DMD. New emerging treatment includes viral-mediated microdystrophin gene replacement, exon skipping to restore the reading frame, and nonsense suppression therapy to allow translation and production of a modified dystrophin protein. Other potential therapeutic targets involve upregulation of compensatory proteins, reduction of the inflammatory cascade, and enhancement of muscle regeneration. So far, data from DMD clinical trials have shown limited success in delaying disease progression; unforeseen obstacles included immune response against the generated mini-dystrophin, inconsistent evidence of dystrophin production in muscle biopsies, and failure to demonstrate a significant improvement in the primary outcome measure, as defined by the 6-minute walk test in some studies. The long-term safety and efficacy of emerging treatments will depend on the selection of appropriate clinical end points and sensitive biomarkers to detect meaningful changes in disease progression. Correction of the underlying

  4. Current and emerging treatment options for mantle cell lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Fakhri, Bita; Kahl, Brad

    2017-01-01

    Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma with typically aggressive behavior. The genetic signature is the chromosomal translocation t(11;14)(q13;q32) resulting in overexpression of cyclin D1. Asymptomatic newly diagnosed MCL patients with low tumor burden can be closely observed, deferring therapy to the time of disease progression. Although MCL classically responds to upfront chemotherapy, it remains incurable with standard approaches. For patients in need of frontline therapy, the initial decision is whether to proceed with an intensive treatment strategy or a non-intensive treatment strategy. In general, given the unfavorable risk–benefit profile, older MCL patients should be spared intensive strategies, while younger and fit patients can be considered for intensive strategies. The bendamustine and rituximab (BR) regimen is becoming an increasingly popular treatment option among the elderly population, with improved progression-free survival (PFS) and acceptable side-effect profile. Although rituximab maintenance after R-CHOP improves survival outcomes in elderly patients, no clinical trial to date has shown statistical significance to support the use of rituximab maintenance after BR induction in older patients. In young and fit patients with MCL, an intensive strategy to maximize the length of first remission has emerged as a worldwide standard of care. With current high-dose cytarabine-containing immunochemotherapy regimens followed by autologous stem cell transplantation, the median PFS has exceeded 7 years. In the relapsed or refractory (R/R) setting, reduced intensity conditioning allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may offer the highest likelihood of long-term survival in young R/R MCL patients, at the cost of increased risk of non-relapse mortality and chronic graft versus host disease. Novel agents targeting activated pathways in MCL cells, such as bortezomib, lenalidamide, ibrutinib and temsirolimus are now available

  5. A population-based epidemiologic study of adult-onset narcolepsy incidence and associated risk factors, 2004-2013.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel U; Radin, Jennifer M

    2016-11-15

    An increase in narcolepsy incidence was noted after the novel pandemic influenza of 2009, leading to further interest in risk factors associated with this disease. However, there is limited data on the epidemiology of narcolepsy, particularly in the adult population. Therefore, we sought to examine narcolepsy incidence rates in the United States and describe associated characteristics. We performed a population based epidemiologic study of active duty military personnel. All outpatient clinics in the continental United States providing care for active duty military between 2004 through 2013 were included utilizing existing databases. Narcolepsy was defined in 3 ways: (1) 2 diagnoses of narcolepsy within 6months of each other, one made by a sleep expert; (2) 2 diagnoses by any provider followed by a narcolepsy prescription within 14days of last visit; and (3) procedure code for a sleep study followed by a narcolepsy diagnosis by a sleep expert within 6months. There were 1675 narcolepsy cases. Overall incidence of narcolepsy trended from 14.6 to 27.3 cases per 100,000 person-years, with an increase starting after 2005-2006 and peaking during the 2011-2012 influenza season. Higher frequencies were seen among females, non-Hispanic blacks, and members living in the south. Narcolepsy incidence rates among active duty military members are higher than previously described. The reason for the steady rise of incidence from 2005 to 2006 through 2011-2012 is unknown; however, these findings require further exploration. We detected risk factors associated with the development of narcolepsy which may aid in future study efforts. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Narcolepsy with and without cataplexy, idiopathic hypersomnia with and without long sleep time: a cluster analysis.

    PubMed

    Šonka, Karel; Šusta, Marek; Billiard, Michel

    2015-02-01

    The successive editions of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (ICSD) reflect the evolution of the concepts of various sleep disorders. This is particularly the case for central disorders of hypersomnolence, with continuous changes in terminology and divisions of narcolepsy, idiopathic hypersomnia, and recurrent hypersomnia. According to the ICSD 2nd Edition (ICSD-2), narcolepsy with cataplexy (NwithC), narcolepsy without cataplexy (Nw/oC), idiopathic hypersomnia with long sleep time (IHwithLST), and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (IHw/oLST) are four, well-defined hypersomnias of central origin. However, in the absence of biological markers, doubts have been raised as to the relevance of a division of idiopathic hypersomnia into two forms, and it is not yet clear whether Nw/oC and IHw/oLST are two distinct entities. With this in mind, it was decided to empirically review the ICSD-2 classification by using a hierarchical cluster analysis to see whether this division has some relevance, even though the terms "with long sleep time" and "without long sleep time" are inappropriate. The cluster analysis differentiated three main clusters: Cluster 1, "combined monosymptomatic hypersomnia/narcolepsy type 2" (people initially diagnosed with IHw/oLST and Nw/oC); Cluster 2 "polysymptomatic hypersomnia" (people initially diagnosed with IHwithLST); and Cluster 3, narcolepsy type 1 (people initially diagnosed with NwithC). Cluster analysis confirmed that narcolepsy type 1 and polysymptomatic hypersomnia are independent sleep disorders. People who were initially diagnosed with Nw/oC and IHw/oLST formed a single cluster, referred to as "combined monosymptomatic hypersomnia/narcolepsy type 2." Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Identification of Differentially Expressed Genes in Blood Cells of Narcolepsy Patients

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Susumu; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto

    2007-01-01

    Study Objective: A close association between the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*1501/DQB1*0602 and abnormalities in some inflammatory cytokines have been demonstrated in narcolepsy. Specific alterations in the immune system have been suggested to occur in this disorder. We attempted to identify alterations in gene expression underlying the abnormalities in the blood cells of narcoleptic patients. Designs: Total RNA from 12 narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and from 12 age- and sex-matched healthy controls were pooled. The pooled samples were initially screened for candidate genes for narcolepsy by differential display analysis using annealing control primers (ACP). The second screening of the samples was carried out by semiquantitative PCR using gene-specific primers. Finally, the expression levels of the candidate genes were further confirmed by quantitative real-time PCR using a new set of samples (20 narcolepsy-cataplexy patients and 20 healthy controls). Results: The second screening revealed differential expression of 4 candidate genes. Among them, MX2 was confirmed as a significantly down-regulated gene in the white blood cells of narcoleptic patients by quantitative real-time PCR. Conclusion: We found the MX2 gene to be significantly less expressed in comparison with normal subjects in the white blood cells of narcoleptic patients. This gene is relevant to the immune system. Although differential display analysis using ACP technology has a limitation in that it does not help in determining the functional mechanism underlying sleep/wakefulness dysregulation, it is useful for identifying novel genetic factors related to narcolepsy, such as HLA molecules. Further studies are required to explore the functional relationship between the MX2 gene and narcolepsy pathophysiology. Citation: Tanaka S; Honda Y; Honda M. Identification of differentially expressed genes in blood cells of narcolepsy patients. SLEEP 2007;30(8):974-979. PMID:17702266

  8. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D.; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J.; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients’ CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research. PMID:26090827

  9. Neuronal Antibodies in Children with or without Narcolepsy following H1N1-AS03 Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Thebault, Simon; Waters, Patrick; Snape, Matthew D; Cottrell, Dominic; Darin, Niklas; Hallböök, Tove; Huutoniemi, Anne; Partinen, Markku; Pollard, Andrew J; Vincent, Angela

    2015-01-01

    Type 1 narcolepsy is caused by deficiency of hypothalamic orexin/hypocretin. An autoimmune basis is suspected, but no specific antibodies, either causative or as biomarkers, have been identified. However, the AS03 adjuvanted split virion H1N1 (H1N1-AS03) vaccine, created to protect against the 2009 Pandemic, has been implicated as a trigger of narcolepsy particularly in children. Sera and CSFs from 13 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated patients (12 children, 1 young adult) with type 1 narcolepsy were tested for autoantibodies to known neuronal antigens including the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) and contactin-associated protein 2 (CASPR2), both associated with encephalopathies that include disordered sleep, to rodent brain tissue including the lateral hypothalamus, and to live hippocampal neurons in culture. When sufficient sample was available, CSF levels of melanin-concentrating hormone (MCH) were measured. Sera from 44 H1N1-ASO3-vaccinated children without narcolepsy were also examined. None of these patients' CSFs or sera was positive for NMDAR or CASPR2 antibodies or binding to neurons; 4/13 sera bound to orexin-neurons in rat brain tissue, but also to other neurons. MCH levels were a marginally raised (n = 8; p = 0.054) in orexin-deficient narcolepsy patients compared with orexin-normal children (n = 6). In the 44 H1N1-AS03-vaccinated healthy children, there was no rise in total IgG levels or in CASPR2 or NMDAR antibodies three weeks following vaccination. In conclusion, there were no narcolepsy-specific autoantibodies identified in type 1 narcolepsy sera or CSFs, and no evidence for a general increase in immune reactivity following H1N1-AS03 vaccination in the healthy children. Antibodies to other neuronal specific membrane targets, with their potential for directing use of immunotherapies, are still an important goal for future research.

  10. Cardiovascular fitness in narcolepsy is inversely related to sleepiness and the number of cataplexy episodes.

    PubMed

    Matoulek, Martin; Tuka, Vladimír; Fialová, Magdalena; Nevšímalová, Soňa; Šonka, Karel

    2017-06-01

    Cardiopulmonary fitness depends on daily energy expenditure or the amount of daily exercise. Patients with narcolepsy spent more time being sleepy or asleep than controls; thus we may speculate that they have a lower quantity and quality of physical activity. The aim of the present study was thus to test the hypothesis that exercise tolerance in narcolepsy negatively depends on sleepiness. The cross-sectional study included 32 patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, 10 patients with narcolepsy without cataplexy, and 36 age- and gender-matched control subjects, in whom a symptom-limited exercise stress test with expired gas analysis was performed. A linear regression analysis with multivariate models was used with stepwise variable selection. In narcolepsy patients, maximal oxygen uptake (VO 2peak ) was 30.1 ± 7.5 mL/kg/min, which was lower than 36.0 ± 7.8 mL/kg/min, p = 0.001, in controls and corresponded to 86.4% ± 20.0% of the population norm (VO 2peak %) and to a standard deviation (VO 2peak SD) of -1.08 ± 1.63 mL/kg/min of the population norm. VO 2peak depended primarily on gender (p = 0.007) and on sleepiness (p = 0.046). VO 2peak % depended on sleepiness (p = 0.028) and on age (p = 0.039). VO 2peak SD depended on the number of cataplexy episodes per month (p = 0.015) and on age (p = 0.030). Cardiopulmonary fitness in narcolepsy and in narcolepsy without cataplexy is inversely related to the degree of sleepiness and cataplexy episode frequency. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Association Study of HLA-DQB1*0602 Allele in Iranian Patients with Narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Geremew, Demeke; Rahimi-Golkhandan, Ania; Sadeghniiat-Haghighi, Khosro; Shakiba, Yadollah; Khajeh-Mehrizi, Ahmad; Ansaripour, Bita; Izad, Maryam

    2017-10-01

    Narcolepsy is a rare, disabling disorder characterized by excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations and sleep paralysis. Several studies demonstrated its association with HLA-DQB1*0602 in various ethnic groups. Our study aimed to determine the prevalence of HLA-DQB1*0602 allele in Iranian patients with narcolepsy and assess its predictive parameters for diagnosing narcolepsy. In addition, car accidents and job problems were assessed among narcoleptic patients. We studied 44 narcoleptic patients, 30 patients with other types of excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS)  and 50 healthy age and sex matched individuals in this case-control study. Patients and controls filled out a questionnaire including items about car accidents due to sleepiness and job problems. International classification of sleep disorders-2 criteria was used as the gold standard for diagnosis of narcolepsy. The DNAs isolated from whole blood samples were collected from the patients and controls to assess the presence of HLA-DQB1*0602. The results showed that HLA DQB1*0602 was present in 4 (8%) individual of controls and 20 (45.5%) patients with higher prevalence in patients with cataplexy (78.9%) than patients without cataplexy (p<0.001). The sensitivities of the DQB1*0602 for diagnosing narcolepsy with cataplexy and narcolepsy without cataplexy were 78.9 and 20; specificities were 88 and 72.4, respectively. 18.2% of patients had car accidents due to sleepiness and 68.2% suffered from job problems. Our study shows that evaluation of DQB1*0602 in patients suspected to narcolepsy could be helpful especially in complex cases with atypical cataplexy and indistinguishable multiple sleep latency test MSLT results. Moreover, high rates of car accidents and job problems are found among narcoleptic patients.

  12. Frequencies and Associations of Narcolepsy-Related Symptoms: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Kim, Lenise Jihe; Coelho, Fernando Morgadinho; Hirotsu, Camila; Araujo, Paula; Bittencourt, Lia; Tufik, Sergio; Andersen, Monica Levy

    2015-12-15

    Narcolepsy is a disabling disease with a delayed diagnosis. At least 3 years before the disorder identification, several comorbidities can be observed in patients with narcolepsy. The early recognition of narcolepsy symptoms may improve long-term prognosis of the patients. Thus, we aimed to investigate the prevalence of the symptoms associated with narcolepsy and its social and psychological association in a sample of Sao Paulo city inhabitants. We performed a cross-sectional evaluation with 1,008 individuals from the Sao Paulo Epidemiologic Sleep Study (EPISONO). Excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) was assessed by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale. Volunteers were also asked about the occurrence of cataplectic-like, hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis symptoms. The participants underwent a full-night polysomnography and completed questionnaires about psychological, demographic, and quality of life parameters. We observed a prevalence of 39.2% of EDS, 15.0% of cataplectic-like symptom, 9.2% of hypnagogic or hypnopompic hallucinations, and 14.9% of sleep paralysis in Sao Paulo city inhabitants. A frequency of 6.9% was observed when EDS and cataplectic-like symptoms were grouped. The other associations were EDS + hallucinations (4.7%) and EDS + sleep paralysis (7.5%). Symptomatic participants were predominantly women and younger compared with patients without any narcolepsy symptom (n = 451). Narcolepsy symptomatology was also associated with a poor quality of life and symptoms of depression, anxiety, and fatigue. Narcolepsy-related symptoms are associated with poor quality of life and worse psychological parameters. © 2015 American Academy of Sleep Medicine.

  13. Electrochemical treatment of mouse and rat fibrosarcomas with direct current

    SciT

    Chou, C.K.; McDougall, J.A.; Ahn, C.

    1997-03-01

    Electrochemical treatment (ECT) of cancer utilizes direct current to produce chemical changes in tumors. ECT has been suggested as an effective alternative local cancer therapy. However, a methodology is not established, and mechanisms are not well studied. In vivo studies were conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of ECT on animal tumor models. Radiation-induced fibrosarcomas were implanted subcutaneously in 157 female C3H/HeJ mice. Larger rat fibrosarcomas were implanted on 34 female Fisher 344 rats. When the spheroidal tumors reached 10 mm in the mice, two to five platinum electrodes were inserted into the tumors at various spacings and orientations. Ten ratsmore » in a pilot group were treated when their ellipsoidal tumors were about 25 mm long; electrode insertion was similar to the later part of the mouse study; i.e., two at the base and two at the center. A second group of 24 rats was treated with six or seven electrodes when their tumors were about 20 mm long; all electrodes were inserted at the tumor base. Of the 24 rats, 12 of these were treated once, 10 were treated twice, and 2 were treated thrice. All treated tumors showed necrosis and regression for both mice and rats; however, later tumor recurrence reduced long-term survival. When multiple treatments were implemented, the best 3 month mouse tumor cure rate was 59.3%, and the best 6 month rat tumor cure rate was 75.0%. These preliminary results indicate that ECT is effective on the radiation-induced fibrosarcoma (RIF-1) mouse tumor and rat fibrosarcoma. The effectiveness is dependent on electrode placement and dosage.« less

  14. Healthcare Costs Among Patients with Excessive Sleepiness Associated with Obstructive Sleep Apnea, Shift Work Disorder, or Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Carlton, Rashad; Lunacsek, Orsolya; Regan, Timothy; Carroll, Cathryn A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Excessive daytime sleepiness affects nearly 20% of the general population and is associated with many medical conditions, including shift work disorder (SWD), obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), and narcolepsy. Excessive sleepiness imposes a significant clinical, quality-of-life, safety, and economic burden on society. Objective To compare healthcare costs for patients receiving initial therapy with armodafinil or with modafinil for the treatment of excessive sleepiness associated with OSA, SWD, or narcolepsy. Methods A retrospective cohort analysis of medical and pharmacy claims was conducted using the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims Database. Patients aged ≥18 years who had a pharmacy claim for armodafinil or for modafinil between June 1, 2009, and February 28, 2012, and had 6 months of continuous eligibility before the index prescription date, as well as International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision diagnosis for either OSA (327.23), SWD (327.36), or narcolepsy (347.0x) were included in the study. Patients were placed into 1 of 2 treatment cohorts based on their index prescription and followed for 1 month minimum and 34 months maximum. The annualized all-cause costs were calculated by multiplying the average per-month medical and pharmacy costs for each patient by 12 months. The daily average consumption (DACON) for armodafinil or for modafinil was calculated by dividing the total units dispensed of either drug by the prescription days supply. Results A total of 5693 patients receiving armodafinil and 9212 patients receiving modafinil were included in this study. A lower DACON was observed for armodafinil (1.04) compared with modafinil (1.47). The postindex mean medical costs were significantly lower for the armodafinil cohort compared with the modafinil cohort after adjusting for baseline differences ($11,363 vs $13,775, respectively; P = .005). The mean monthly drug-specific pharmacy costs were lower for the armodafinil cohort compared with

  15. Neonatal posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus from prematurity: pathophysiology and current treatment concepts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Shenandoah

    2013-01-01

    Object Preterm infants are at risk for perinatal complications, including germinal matrix–intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) and subsequent posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH). This review summarizes the current understanding of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, management, and outcomes of IVH and PHH in preterm infants. Methods The MEDLINE database was systematically searched using terms related to IVH, PHH, and relevant neurosurgical procedures to identify publications in the English medical literature. To complement information from the systematic search, pertinent articles were selected from the references of articles identifed in the initial search. Results This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding the epidemiology and pathophysiology of IVH and PHH, primarily using evidence-based studies. Advances in obstetrics and neonatology over the past few decades have contributed to a marked improvement in the survival of preterm infants, and neurological morbidity is also starting to decrease. The incidence of IVH is declining, and the incidence of PHH will likely follow. Currently, approximately 15% of preterm infants who suffer severe IVH will require permanent CSF diversion. The clinical presentation and surgical management of symptomatic PHH with temporary ventricular reservoirs (ventricular access devices) and ventriculosubgaleal shunts and permanent ventriculoperitoneal shunts are discussed. Preterm infants who develop PHH that requires surgical treatment remain at high risk for other related neurological problems, including cerebral palsy, epilepsy, and cognitive and behavioral delay. This review highlights numerous opportunities for further study to improve the care of these children. Conclusions A better grasp of the pathophysiology of IVH is beginning to impact the incidence of IVH and PHH. Neonatologists conduct rigorous Class I and II studies to advance the outcomes of preterm infants. The need for well-designed multicenter trials is

  16. Current options and new developments in the treatment of haemophilia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Trisha; Recht, Michael

    2011-02-12

    Haemophilia A and B are X-linked bleeding disorders due to the inherited deficiency of factor VIII or factor IX, respectively. Of the approximately 1 per 5000-10000 male births affected by haemophilia, 80% are deficient in factor VIII and 20% are deficient in factor IX. Haemophilia is characterized by spontaneous and provoked joint, muscle, gastrointestinal and CNS bleeding leading to major morbidity and even mortality if left untreated or under-treated. The evolution of haemophilia management has been marked by tragedy and triumph over recent decades. Clotting factors and replacement strategies continue to evolve for patients without inhibitors. For patients with an inhibitor, factor replacement for acute bleeding episodes and immune tolerance, immune modulation and extracorporeal methods for inhibitor reduction are the cornerstone of care. In addition, adjuvant therapies such as desmopressin, antifibrinolytics and topical agents also contribute to improved outcomes for patients with and without inhibitors. The future direction of haemophilia care is promising with new longer-acting clotting factors and genetic therapies, including gene transfer and premature termination codon suppressors. With these current and future treatment modalities, the morbidity and mortality rates in patients with haemophilia certainly will continue to improve.

  17. [Current Status of Targeted Treatment in Breast Cancer].

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Katharina; Schmalfeldt, Barbara; Müller, Volkmar

    2017-11-01

    Within the last years, significant improvements have been achieved in breast cancer treatment, particularly with the development of targeted therapies. Major progress has been made in identifying the drivers malignant growth in oestrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer and the mechanisms of resistance to endocrine therapy. This progress has translated into several targeted therapies that enhance the efficacy of endocrine therapy; inhibitors of the cyclin-dependent kinases CDK4 and CDK6 like palbociclib and inhibitors of mTOR substantially improve progression-free survival. For patients with HER2-positive disease the addition of Pertuzumab to Trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy has been a significant improvement in anti-HER2 therapy in early as well as metastatic breast cancer. Evidence-based further line therapy options in the metastatic setting include T-DM1 and in later lines Lapatinib. For triple negative disease the angiogenesis inhibitor Bevacizumab is approved, which increases progression free survival. Immune checkpoint inhibitors, PARP-inhibitors or anti-androgens represent promising strategies, all of which are currently being evaluated in clinical trials. The development of predictive biomarkers to guide targeted therapies is still the subject of research. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  18. Atherosclerotic renovascular disease – epidemiology, treatment and current challenges

    PubMed Central

    Vassallo, Diana

    2017-01-01

    The neutral results of recent large randomized controlled trials comparing renal revascularization with optimal medical therapy in patients with atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) have cast doubt on the role of revascularization in the management of unselected patients with this condition. However, these studies have strengthened the evidence base for the role of contemporary intensive medical vascular protection therapy and aggressive risk factor control in improving clinical outcomes in ARVD. Patients presenting with ‘high-risk’ clinical features such as uncontrolled hypertension, rapidly declining renal function or flash pulmonary oedema are underrepresented in these studies; hence these results may not be applicable to all patients with ARVD. In this ‘high-risk’ subgroup, conservative management may not be sufficient in preventing adverse events, and indeed, observational evidence suggests that this specific patient subgroup may gain benefit from timely renal revascularization. Current challenges include the development of novel diagnostic techniques to establish haemodynamic significance of a stenosis, patient risk stratification and prediction of post-revascularization outcomes to ultimately facilitate patient selection for revascularization. In this paper we describe the epidemiology of this condition and discuss treatment recommendations for this condition in light of the results of recent randomized controlled trials while highlighting important clinical unmet needs and challenges faced by clinicians managing this condition. PMID:29056991

  19. Polymeric nanoparticles for targeted treatment in oncology: current insights

    PubMed Central

    Prabhu, Rashmi H; Patravale, Vandana B; Joshi, Medha D

    2015-01-01

    Chemotherapy, a major strategy for cancer treatment, lacks the specificity to localize the cancer therapeutics in the tumor site, thereby affecting normal healthy tissues and advocating toxic adverse effects. Nanotechnological intervention has greatly revolutionized the therapy of cancer by surmounting the current limitations in conventional chemotherapy, which include undesirable biodistribution, cancer cell drug resistance, and severe systemic side effects. Nanoparticles (NPs) achieve preferential accumulation in the tumor site by virtue of their passive and ligand-based targeting mechanisms. Polymer-based nanomedicine, an arena that entails the use of polymeric NPs, polymer micelles, dendrimers, polymersomes, polyplexes, polymer–lipid hybrid systems, and polymer–drug/protein conjugates for improvement in efficacy of cancer therapeutics, has been widely explored. The broad scope for chemically modifying the polymer into desired construct makes it a versatile delivery system. Several polymer-based therapeutic NPs have been approved for clinical use. This review provides an insight into the advances in polymer-based targeted nanocarriers with focus on therapeutic aspects in the field of oncology. PMID:25678788

  20. MRSA new treatments on the horizon: current status.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, M H

    2011-12-01

    There is a choice of anti-MRSA antibiotic available with proven efficacy in the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infection (cSSSI). Additional anti-MRSA antibiotics are in development, which have the potential to influence how such infections are managed. The emergence of resistance to current anti-MRSA agents, toxicity, and general lack of oral agents with proven efficacy for deep seated infection justify the development of new agents. However, there is a relative dearth of information specific to patients with orthopaedic-related infection. Combination therapy is often used in these patients, although there is a paucity of controlled trial data to support particular antibiotic combinations. As the choice of anti-MRSA agents increases, so does the need to identify which are best for the large variety of infections included in the group of cSSSIs. This is particular true for infections occurring in orthopaedic patients where poorly vascularised tissue, trauma or implanted prosthetic material, pose specific challenges. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Current status of the surgical treatment of atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Geha, Alexander S; Abdelhady, Khaled

    2008-03-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects several million patients worldwide and is associated with a number of heart conditions, particularly coronary artery disease, rheumatic heart disease, hypertension, and congestive heart failure. The treatment of AF and its complications is quite costly. Atrial fibrillation usually results from multiple macro-re-entrant circuits in the left atrium. Very frequently, particularly in association with mitral valve disease, these circuits arise from the area of the junction of the pulmonary venous endothelium and the left atrial endocardium. Pharmacological therapy is at best 50% effective. Therapeutic options for AF include antiarrhythmic drugs, cardioversion, atrioventricular (A-V) node block, pacemaker insertion, and ablative surgery. In 1987, Cox developed an effective surgical procedure to achieve ablation. Current ablative procedures include the classic cut-and-sew Maze operation or a modification of it, namely through catheter ablation, namely, cryoablation, radiofrequency ablation (dry or irrigated), and other forms of ablation (e.g., laser, microwave). These procedures will be described, along with the indications, advantages and disadvantages of each. Special emphasis on the alternative means to cutting and sewing to achieve appropriate effective atrial scars will be stressed, and our experience with these approaches in 50 patients with AF and associated cardiac lesions and their outcomes is presented.

  2. Cutaneous Scarring: Basic Science, Current Treatments, and Future Directions.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Clement D; Hu, Michael S; Leavitt, Tripp; Barnes, Leandra A; Lorenz, H Peter; Longaker, Michael T

    2018-02-01

    Significance: Scarring of the skin from burns, surgery, and injury constitutes a major burden on the healthcare system. Patients affected by major scars, particularly children, suffer from long-term functional and psychological problems. Recent Advances: Scarring in humans is the end result of the wound healing process, which has evolved to rapidly repair injuries. Wound healing and scar formation are well described on the cellular and molecular levels, but truly effective molecular or cell-based antiscarring treatments still do not exist. Recent discoveries have clarified the role of skin stem cells and fibroblasts in the regeneration of injuries and formation of scar. Critical Issues: It will be important to show that new advances in the stem cell and fibroblast biology of scarring can be translated into therapies that prevent and reduce scarring in humans without major side effects. Future Directions: Novel therapies involving the use of purified human cells as well as agents that target specific cells and modulate the immune response to injury are currently undergoing testing. In the basic science realm, researchers continue to refine our understanding of the role that particular cell types play in the development of scar.

  3. Current and emerging pharmacological treatments for sarcoidosis: a review

    PubMed Central

    Beegle, Scott H; Barba, Kerry; Gobunsuy, Romel; Judson, Marc A

    2013-01-01

    The treatment of sarcoidosis is not standardized. Because sarcoidosis may never cause significant symptoms or organ dysfunction, treatment is not mandatory. When treatment is indicated, oral corticosteroids are usually recommended because they are highly likely to be effective in a relative short period of time. However, because sarcoidosis is often a chronic condition, long-term treatment with corticosteroids may cause significant toxicity. Therefore, corticosteroid sparing agents are often indicated in patients requiring chronic therapy. This review outlines the indications for treatment, corticosteroid treatment, and corticosteroid sparing treatments for sarcoidosis. PMID:23596348

  4. CSF Histamine Contents in Narcolepsy, Idiopathic Hypersomnia and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kanbayashi, Takashi; Kodama, Tohru; Kondo, Hideaki; Satoh, Shinsuke; Inoue, Yuichi; Chiba, Shigeru; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Nishino, Seiji

    2009-01-01

    Study Objective: To (1) replicate our prior result of low cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) histamine levels in human narcolepsy in a different sample population and to (2) evaluate if histamine contents are altered in other types of hypersomnia with and without hypocretin deficiency. Design: Cross sectional studies. Setting and Patients: Sixty-seven narcolepsy subjects, 26 idiopathic hypersomnia (IHS) subjects, 16 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) subjects, and 73 neurological controls were included. All patients were Japanese. Diagnoses were made according to ICSD-2. Results: We found significant reductions in CSF histamine levels in hypocretin deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (mean ± SEM; 176.0 ± 25.8 pg/mL), hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (97.8 ± 38.4 pg/mL), hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy without cataplexy (113.6 ± 16.4 pg/mL), and idiopathic hypersomnia (161.0 ± 29.3 pg/mL); the levels in OSAS (259.3 ± 46.6 pg/mL) did not statistically differ from those in the controls (333.8 ± 22.0 pg/mL). Low CSF histamine levels were mostly observed in non-medicated patients; significant reductions in histamine levels were evident in non-medicated patients with hypocretin deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy (112.1 ± 16.3 pg/mL) and idiopathic hypersomnia (143.3 ± 28.8 pg/mL), while the levels in the medicated patients were in the normal range. Conclusion: The study confirmed reduced CSF histamine levels in hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy with cataplexy. Similar degrees of reduction were also observed in hypocretin non-deficient narcolepsy and in idiopathic hypersomnia, while those in OSAS (non central nervous system hypersomnia) were not altered. The decrease in histamine in these subjects were more specifically observed in non-medicated subjects, suggesting CSF histamine is a biomarker reflecting the degree of hypersomnia of central origin. Citation: Kanbayashi T; Kodama T; Kondo H; Satoh S; Inoue Y; Chiba S; Shimizu T; Nishino S. CSF

  5. Gray matter atrophy in narcolepsy: An activation likelihood estimation meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hsu-Huei; Chen, Chih-Feng; Tsai, Yuan-Hsiung; Wu, Chih-Ying; Lee, Meng; Lin, Yu-Ching; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Tsai, Ying-Huang; Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2015-12-01

    The authors reviewed the literature on the use of voxel-based morphometry (VBM) in narcolepsy magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) studies via the use of a meta-analysis of neuroimaging to identify concordant and specific structural deficits in patients with narcolepsy as compared with healthy subjects. We used PubMed to retrieve articles published between January 2000 and March 2014. The authors included all VBM research on narcolepsy and compared the findings of the studies by using gray matter volume (GMV) or gray matter concentration (GMC) to index differences in gray matter. Stereotactic data were extracted from 8 VBM studies of 149 narcoleptic patients and 162 control subjects. We applied activation likelihood estimation (ALE) technique and found significant regional gray matter reduction in the bilateral hypothalamus, thalamus, globus pallidus, extending to nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), left mid orbital and rectal gyri (BAs 10 and 11), right inferior frontal gyrus (BA 47), and the right superior temporal gyrus (BA 41) in patients with narcolepsy. The significant gray matter deficits in narcoleptic patients occurred in the bilateral hypothalamus and frontotemporal regions, which may be related to the emotional processing abnormalities and orexin/hypocretin pathway common among populations of patients with narcolepsy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Cataplexy in anxious patients: is subclinical narcolepsy underrecognized in anxiety disorders?

    PubMed

    Flosnik, Dawn L; Cortese, Bernadette M; Uhde, Thomas W

    2009-06-01

    Excessive daytime sleepiness, hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis, and cataplexy are symptoms associated with narcolepsy. Recent findings indicate that anxiety disorders also are associated with excessive daytime sleepiness, hypnagogic-hypnopompic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. These observations suggest a possible relationship between anxiety disorders and narcolepsy. Cataplexy is considered the most specific symptom of narcolepsy, but its association with anxiety disorders is unknown. This preliminary investigation examined the prevalence and types of cataplexy in patients with primary anxiety disorders. Sex- and age-matched patients with anxiety disorders (N = 33) and healthy volunteers (N = 33) were assessed on standardized and validated measures of subjective sleep quality (Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index) and subclinical narcoleptic events in the form of cataplexy (Stanford Center for Narcolepsy Revised Sleep Inventory). Patients were recruited from October 2006 to January 2007 from 2 programs of the Penn State Behavioral Health Clinic. Anxiety disorder patients as a group reported poorer sleep quality and endorsed a larger number of different types of situations (e.g., surprise, embarrassment) associated with cataplectic events. Among anxious patients, 33.3% (11 of 33) endorsed events specific for classic cataplexy, as opposed to 9.1% (3 of 33) of healthy volunteers (chi(2) = 5.80, p = .016). Our preliminary findings suggest that anxiety disorders are associated with increased rates of cataplexy. Future research is indicated to elucidate the relationship between anxiety and narcolepsy, with a particular focus on panic and generalized anxiety disorders. Copyright 2009 Physicians Postgraduate Press, Inc.

  7. Current Issues in the Evaluation and Treatment of Sexual Disturbance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beutler, Larry E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses causes of sexual disturbance, assessment of sexual dysfunction, treatment of sexual dysfunction, psychological issues associated with chronic physical illness and sexual behavior, theory and treatment in child molestation, and the psychosocial outcomes of sex reassignment surgery. (BL)

  8. Current drug treatments targeting dopamine D3 receptor.

    PubMed

    Leggio, Gian Marco; Bucolo, Claudio; Platania, Chiara Bianca Maria; Salomone, Salvatore; Drago, Filippo

    2016-09-01

    Dopamine receptors (DR) have been extensively studied, but only in recent years they became object of investigation to elucidate the specific role of different subtypes (D1R, D2R, D3R, D4R, D5R) in neural transmission and circuitry. D1-like receptors (D1R and D5R) and D2-like receptors (D2R, D2R and D4R) differ in signal transduction, binding profile, localization in the central nervous system and physiological effects. D3R is involved in a number of pathological conditions, including schizophrenia, Parkinson's disease, addiction, anxiety, depression and glaucoma. Development of selective D3R ligands has been so far challenging, due to the high sequence identity and homology shared by D2R and D3R. As a consequence, despite a rational design of selective DR ligands has been carried out, none of currently available medicines selectively target a given D2-like receptor subtype. The availability of the D3R ligand [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO for positron emission tomography studies in animal models as well as in humans, allows researchers to estimate the expression of D3R in vivo; displacement of [(11)C]-(+)-PHNO binding by concurrent drug treatments is used to estimate the in vivo occupancy of D3R. Here we provide an overview of studies indicating D3R as a target for pharmacological therapy, and a review of market approved drugs endowed with significant affinity at D3R that are used to treat disorders where D3R plays a relevant role. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Various treatment options for benign prostatic hyperplasia: A current update

    PubMed Central

    Shrivastava, Alankar; Gupta, Vipin B.

    2012-01-01

    In benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) there will be a sudden impact on overall quality of life of patient. This disease occurs normally at the age of 40 or above and also is associated with sexual dysfunction. Thus, there is a need of update on current medications of this disease. The presented review provides information on medications available for BPH. Phytotherapies with some improvements in BPH are also included. Relevant articles were identified through a search of the English-language literature indexed on MEDLINE, PUBMED, Sciencedirect and the proceedings of scientific meetings. The search terms were BPH, medications for BPH, drugs for BPH, combination therapies for BPH, Phytotherapies for BPH, Ayurveda and BPH, BPH treatments in Ayurveda. Medications including watchful waitings, Alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers, 5-alpha reductase inhibitors, combination therapies including tamsulosin-dutasteride, doxazosin-finasteride, terazosin-finasteride, tolterodine-tamsulosin and rofecoxib-finasteride were found. Herbal remedies such as Cernilton, Saxifraga stolonifera, Zi-Shen Pill (ZSP), Orbignya speciosa, Phellodendron amurense, Ganoderma lucidum, Serenoa Repens, pumpkin extract and Lepidium meyenii (Red Maca) have some improvements on BPH are included. Other than these discussions on Ayurvedic medications, TURP and minimally invasive therapies (MITs) are also included. Recent advancements in terms of newly synthesized molecules are also discussed. Specific alpha one adrenoreceptor blockers such as tamsulosin and alfuzosin will remain preferred choice of urologists for symptom relief. Medications with combination therapies are still needs more investigation to establish as preference in initial stage for fast symptom relief reduced prostate growth and obviously reduce need for BPH-related surgery. Due to lack of proper evidence Phytotherapies are not gaining much advantage. MITs and TURP are expensive and are rarely supported by healthcare systems. PMID:22923974

  10. Current and emerging treatments for the management of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Sathasivam, Sivakumar

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis is an autoimmune neuromuscular disorder. There are several treatment options, including symptomatic treatment (acetylcholinesterase inhibitors), short-term immunosuppression (corticosteroids), long-term immunosuppression (azathioprine, cyclosporine, cyclophosphamide, methotrexate, mycophenolate mofetil, rituximab, tacrolimus), rapid acting short-term immunomodulation (intravenous immunoglobulin, plasma exchange), and long-term immunomodulation (thymectomy). This review explores in detail these different treatment options. Potential future treatments are also discussed. PMID:21845054

  11. ImmunoChip Study Implicates Antigen Presentation to T Cells in Narcolepsy

    PubMed Central

    Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Kenny, Eimear E.; Trynka, Gosia; Einen, Mali; Rico, Tom J.; Lichtner, Peter; Dauvilliers, Yves; Arnulf, Isabelle; Lecendreux, Michel; Javidi, Sirous; Geisler, Peter; Mayer, Geert; Pizza, Fabio; Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Lammers, Gert Jan; Kemlink, David; Sonka, Karel; Nevsimalova, Sona; Rouleau, Guy; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Frauscher, Birgit; Ehrmann, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Jennum, Poul; Bourgin, Patrice; Peraita-Adrados, Rosa; Iranzo, Alex; Bassetti, Claudio; Chen, Wei-Min; Concannon, Patrick; Thompson, Susan D.; Damotte, Vincent; Fontaine, Bertrand; Breban, Maxime; Gieger, Christian; Klopp, Norman; Deloukas, Panos; Wijmenga, Cisca; Hallmayer, Joachim; Onengut-Gumuscu, Suna; Rich, Stephen S.; Winkelmann, Juliane; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2013-01-01

    Recent advances in the identification of susceptibility genes and environmental exposures provide broad support for a post-infectious autoimmune basis for narcolepsy/hypocretin (orexin) deficiency. We genotyped loci associated with other autoimmune and inflammatory diseases in 1,886 individuals with hypocretin-deficient narcolepsy and 10,421 controls, all of European ancestry, using a custom genotyping array (ImmunoChip). Three loci located outside the Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA) region on chromosome 6 were significantly associated with disease risk. In addition to a strong signal in the T cell receptor alpha (TRA@), variants in two additional narcolepsy loci, Cathepsin H (CTSH) and Tumor necrosis factor (ligand) superfamily member 4 (TNFSF4, also called OX40L), attained genome-wide significance. These findings underline the importance of antigen presentation by HLA Class II to T cells in the pathophysiology of this autoimmune disease. PMID:23459209

  12. Municipal wastewater treatment in Mexico: current status and opportunities for employing ecological treatment systems.

    PubMed

    Zurita, Florentina; Roy, Eric D; White, John R

    2012-06-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the current status of municipal wastewater (MWW) treatment in Mexico, as well as to assess opportunities for using ecological treatment systems, such as constructed wetlands. In 2008, Mexico had 2101 MWW treatment plants that treated only 84 m3/s of wastewater (208 m3/s ofMWW were collected in sewer systems). Unfortunately, most treatment plants operate below capacity owing to a lack of maintenance and paucity of properly trained personnel. The main types of treatment systems applied in Mexico are activated sludge and waste stabilization ponds, which treat 44.3% and 18% of the MWW collected, respectively. As in many other developing nations around the world, there is a great need in Mexico for low-cost, low-maintenance wastewater treatment systems that are both economically and environmentally sustainable. In 2005, 24.3 million Mexicans lived in villages of less than 2500 inhabitants and 14.1 million lived in towns with 2500-15,000 inhabitants. An opportunity exists to extend the use of ecological treatment systems to these low population density areas and considerably increase the percentage of MWW that is treated in Mexico. Small-scale and medium-size constructed wetlands have been built successfully in some states, primarily during the past five years. Several barriers need to be overcome to increase the adoption and utilization of ecological wastewater technology in Mexico, including: a lack of knowledge about this technology, scarce technical information in Spanish, and the government's concentration on constructing MWW treatment plants solely in urban areas.

  13. Beta-amyloid and phosphorylated tau metabolism changes in narcolepsy over time.

    PubMed

    Liguori, Claudio; Placidi, Fabio; Izzi, Francesca; Nuccetelli, Marzia; Bernardini, Sergio; Sarpa, Maria Giovanna; Cum, Fabrizio; Marciani, Maria Grazia; Mercuri, Nicola Biagio; Romigi, Andrea

    2016-03-01

    The aim od this study is to test whether metabolism of beta-amyloid and tau proteins changes in narcolepsy along with the disease course. We analyzed a population of narcoleptic drug-naïve patients compared to a sample of healthy controls. Patients and controls underwent lumbar puncture for assessment of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) beta-amyloid1-42 (Aβ42), total tau (t-tau), and phosphorylated tau (p-tau) levels. Moreover, based on the median disease duration of the whole narcolepsy group, the patients were divided into two subgroups: patients with a short disease duration (SdN, <5 years) and patients with a long disease duration (LdN, >5 years). We found significantly lower CSF Aβ42 levels in the whole narcolepsy group with respect to controls. Taking into account the patient subgroups, we documented reduced CSF Aβ42 levels in SdN compared to both LdN and controls. Even LdN patients showed lower CSF Aβ42 levels with respect to controls. Moreover, we documented higher CSF p-tau levels in LdN patients compared to both SdN and controls. Finally, a significant positive correlation between CSF Aβ42 levels and disease duration was evident. We hypothesize that beta-amyloid metabolism and cascade may be impaired in narcolepsy not only at the onset but also along with the disease course, although they show a compensatory profile over time. Concurrently, also CSF biomarkers indicative of neural structure (p-tau) appear to be altered in narcolepsy patients with a long disease duration. However, the mechanism underlying beta-amyloid and tau metabolism impairment in narcolepsy remains still unclear and deserves to be better elucidated.

  14. Aberrant Food Choices after Satiation in Human Orexin-Deficient Narcolepsy Type 1

    PubMed Central

    van Holst, Ruth Janke; van der Cruijsen, Lisa; van Mierlo, Petra; Lammers, Gert Jan; Cools, Roshan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Aarts, Esther

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Besides influencing vigilance, orexin neurotransmission serves a variety of functions, including reward, motivation, and appetite regulation. As obesity is an important symptom in orexin-deficient narcolepsy, we explored the effects of satiety on food-related choices and spontaneous snack intake in patients with narcolepsy type 1 (n = 24) compared with healthy matched controls (n = 19). In additional analyses, we also included patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 14) to assess sleepiness-related influences. Methods: Participants were first trained on a choice task to earn salty and sweet snacks. Next, one of the snack outcomes was devalued by having participants consume it until satiation (i.e., sensory-specific satiety). We then measured the selective reduction in choices for the devalued snack outcome. Finally, we assessed the number of calories that participants consumed spontaneously from ad libitum available snacks afterwards. Results: After satiety, all participants reported reduced hunger and less wanting for the devalued snack. However, while controls and idiopathic hypersomnia patients chose the devalued snack less often in the choice task, patients with narcolepsy still chose the devalued snack as often as before satiety. Subsequently, narcolepsy patients spontaneously consumed almost 4 times more calories during ad libitum snack intake. Conclusions: We show that the manipulation of food-specific satiety has reduced effects on food choices and caloric intake in narcolepsy type 1 patients. These mechanisms may contribute to their obesity, and suggest an important functional role for orexin in human eating behavior. Clinical Trials Registration: Study registered at Netherlands Trial Register. URL: www.trialregister.nl. Trial ID: NTR4508. Citation: van Holst RJ, van der Cruijsen L, van Mierlo P, Lammers GJ, Cools R, Overeem S, Aarts E. Aberrant food choices after satiation in human orexindeficient narcolepsy type 1. SLEEP 2016

  15. A polymorphism in CCR1/CCR3 is associated with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Miyagawa, Taku; Koike, Asako; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Imanishi, Aya; Sagawa, Yohei; Kotorii, Nozomu; Kotorii, Tatayu; Hashizume, Yuji; Ogi, Kimihiro; Hiejima, Hiroshi; Kamei, Yuichi; Hida, Akiko; Miyamoto, Masayuki; Imai, Makoto; Fujimura, Yota; Tamura, Yoshiyuki; Ikegami, Azusa; Wada, Yamato; Moriya, Shunpei; Furuya, Hirokazu; Takeuchi, Masaki; Kirino, Yohei; Meguro, Akira; Remmers, Elaine F; Kawamura, Yoshiya; Otowa, Takeshi; Miyashita, Akinori; Kashiwase, Koichi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Yamasaki, Maria; Kuwano, Ryozo; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Ishigooka, Jun; Kuroda, Kenji; Kume, Kazuhiko; Chiba, Shigeru; Yamada, Naoto; Okawa, Masako; Hirata, Koichi; Mizuki, Nobuhisa; Uchimura, Naohisa; Shimizu, Tetsuo; Inoue, Yuichi; Honda, Yutaka; Mishima, Kazuo; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2015-10-01

    Etiology of narcolepsy-cataplexy involves multiple genetic and environmental factors. While the human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DRB1*15:01-DQB1*06:02 haplotype is strongly associated with narcolepsy, it is not sufficient for disease development. To identify additional, non-HLA susceptibility genes, we conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using Japanese samples. An initial sample set comprising 409 cases and 1562 controls was used for the GWAS of 525,196 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) located outside the HLA region. An independent sample set comprising 240 cases and 869 controls was then genotyped at 37 SNPs identified in the GWAS. We found that narcolepsy was associated with a SNP in the promoter region of chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 1 (CCR1) (rs3181077, P=1.6×10(-5), odds ratio [OR]=1.86). This rs3181077 association was replicated with the independent sample set (P=0.032, OR=1.36). We measured mRNA levels of candidate genes in peripheral blood samples of 38 cases and 37 controls. CCR1 and CCR3 mRNA levels were significantly lower in patients than in healthy controls, and CCR1 mRNA levels were associated with rs3181077 genotypes. In vitro chemotaxis assays were also performed to measure monocyte migration. We observed that monocytes from carriers of the rs3181077 risk allele had lower migration indices with a CCR1 ligand. CCR1 and CCR3 are newly discovered susceptibility genes for narcolepsy. These results highlight the potential role of CCR genes in narcolepsy and support the hypothesis that patients with narcolepsy have impaired immune function. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Differences in Brain Morphological Findings between Narcolepsy with and without Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Masaki; Nishida, Shingo; Hayashida, Kenichi; Ueki, Yoichiro; Dauvilliers, Yves; Inoue, Yuichi

    2013-01-01

    Objective Maps of fractional anisotropy (FA) and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) obtained by diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can detect microscopic axonal changes by estimating the diffusivity of water molecules using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We applied an MRI voxel-based statistical approach to FA and ADC maps to evaluate microstructural abnormalities in the brain in narcolepsy and to investigate differences between patients having narcolepsy with and without cataplexy. Methods Twelve patients with drug-naive narcolepsy with cataplexy (NA/CA), 12 with drug-naive narcolepsy without cataplexy (NA w/o CA) and 12 age-matched healthy normal controls (NC) were enrolled. FA and ADC maps for these 3 groups were statistically compared by using voxel-based one-way ANOVA. In addition, we investigated the correlation between FA and ADC values and clinical variables in the patient groups. Results Compared to the NC group, the NA/CA group showed higher ADC values in the left inferior frontal gyrus and left amygdala, and a lower ADC value in the left postcentral gyrus. The ADC value in the right inferior frontal gyrus and FA value in the right precuneus were higher for NA/CA group than for the NA w/o CA group. However, no significant differences were observed in FA and ADC values between the NA w/o CA and NC groups in any of the areas investigated. In addition, no correlation was found between the clinical variables and ADC and FA values of any brain areas in these patient groups. Conclusions Several microstructural changes were noted in the inferior frontal gyrus and amygdala in the NA/CA but not in the NA w/o CA group. These findings suggest that these 2 narcolepsy conditions have different pathological mechanisms: narcolepsy without cataplexy form appears to be a potentially broader condition without any significant brain imaging differences from normal controls. PMID:24312261

  17. Incidence of narcolepsy before and after MF59-adjuvanted influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccination in South Korean soldiers.

    PubMed

    Kim, Woo Jung; Lee, Sang Don; Lee, Eun; Namkoong, Kee; Choe, Kang-Won; Song, Joon Young; Cheong, Hee Jin; Jeong, Hye Won; Heo, Jung Yeon

    2015-09-11

    Previous reports mostly from Europe suggested an association between an occurrence of narcolepsy and an influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 vaccine adjuvanted with AS03 (Pandemrix(®)). During the 2009 H1N1 pandemic vaccination campaign, the Korean military performed a vaccination campaign with one type of influenza vaccine containing MF59-adjuvants. This study was conducted to investigate the background incidence rate of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers and the association of the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine with the occurrence of narcolepsy in a young adult group. To assess the incidence of narcolepsy, we retrospectively reviewed medical records of suspicious cases of narcolepsy in 2007-2013 in the whole 20 military hospitals of the Korean military. The screened cases were classified according to the Brighton Collaboration case definition of narcolepsy. After obtaining the number of confirmed cases of narcolepsy per 3 months in 2007-2013, we compared the crude incidence rate of narcolepsy before and after the vaccination campaign. We included 218 narcolepsy suspicious cases in the initial review, which were screened by the diagnostic code on the computerized disease registry in 2007-2013. Forty-one cases were finally diagnosed with narcolepsy in 2007-2013 (male sex, 95%; median age, 21 years). The average background incidence rate of narcolepsy in Korean soldiers was 0.91 cases per 100,000 persons per year. During the 9 months before vaccination implementation (April to December 2009), 6 narcolepsy cases occurred, whereas during the next 9 months (January to September 2010) including the 3-month vaccination campaign, 5 cases occurred. The incidence of narcolepsy in South Korean soldiers was not increased after the pandemic vaccination campaign using the MF59-adjuvanted vaccine. Our results suggest that the MF59-adjuvanted H1N1 vaccine did not contribute to the occurrence of narcolepsy in this young adult group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Potential treatments for genetic hearing loss in humans: current conundrums.

    PubMed

    Minoda, R; Miwa, T; Ise, M; Takeda, H

    2015-08-01

    Genetic defects are a major cause of hearing loss in newborns. Consequently, hearing loss has a profound negative impact on human daily living. Numerous causative genes for genetic hearing loss have been identified. However, presently, there are no truly curative treatments for this condition. There have been several recent reports on successful treatments in mice using embryonic gene therapy, neonatal gene therapy and neonatal antisense oligonucleotide therapy. Herein, we describe state-of-the-art research on genetic hearing loss treatment through gene therapy and discuss the obstacles to overcome in curative treatments of genetic hearing loss in humans.

  19. Irritable bowel syndrome: a concise review of current treatment concepts.

    PubMed

    Wall, Geoffrey C; Bryant, Ginelle A; Bottenberg, Michelle M; Maki, Erik D; Miesner, Andrew R

    2014-07-21

    Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) is one of the most common gastrointestinal disorders causing patients to seek medical treatment. It is relatively resource intensive and the source of significant morbidity. Recent insights into the pathophysiology and treatment of IBS has given clinicians more options than ever to contend with this disorder. The purpose of our paper is to review older, "classic" treatments for IBS as well as newer agents and "alternative" therapies. We discuss the evidence base of these drugs and provide context to help develop appropriate treatment plans for IBS patients.

  20. Narcolepsy Treated with Racemic Amphetamine during Pregnancy and Breastfeeding.

    PubMed

    Öhman, Inger; Wikner, Birgitta Norstedt; Beck, Olof; Sarman, Ihsan

    2015-08-01

    This case report describes a woman with narcolepsy treated with racemic amphetamine (rac-amphetamine) during pregnancy and breastfeeding with follow-up on the infant's development up to 10 months of age. The pregnancy outcome and the pharmacokinetics of rac-amphetamine were studied during breastfeeding. The pregnancy and the delivery were uneventful. Concentrations of rac-amphetamine were determined in the plasma of the mother and infant, and in the breast milk with a liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry method. Samples were obtained at 2, 5, and 9 weeks postpartum. The transfer of rac-amphetamine to the breast milk was extensive (mean milk/maternal plasma concentration ratio approximately 3). The breastfed infant had a low plasma concentration of rac-amphetamine (about 9% of the maternal plasma level) and the calculated relative infant dose was low (2%). No adverse effects were observed in the breastfed infant. The infant's somatic and psychomotor development up to 10 months of age was normal. Further studies of amphetamine prescribed for medical reasons during pregnancy and lactation are needed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Projecting treatment opportunities for current Minnesota forest conditions.

    W. Brad Smith; Pamela J. Jakes

    1981-01-01

    Reviews opportunities for treatment of timber stands in Minnesota for the decade of 1977-1986. Under the assumptions and management guides specified, 27% of Minnesota's commercial forest land would require timber harvest or some other form of treatment during the decade.

  2. Paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis and possible narcolepsy in a patient with testicular cancer: case study.

    PubMed Central

    Landolfi, Joseph C.; Nadkarni, Mangala

    2003-01-01

    We describe a patient who presented with a clinical syndrome of limbic encephalitis, narcolepsy, and cataplexy. The anti-Ma2 antibody was positive. Although there was no mass on imaging, orchiectomy was performed in this patient, and testicular carcinoma was found. This is the first known case of limbic encephalitis and anti-Ma2 antibody to be associated with cataplexy and possible narcolepsy. Neurological symptoms precede the diagnosis of cancer in 50% of patients with paraneoplastic syndromes, and clinicians are therefore strongly advised to evaluate patients with neurological symptoms for this condition. PMID:12816728

  3. Absence of anti-hypocretin receptor 2 autoantibodies in post pandemrix narcolepsy cases.

    PubMed

    Luo, Guo; Lin, Ling; Jacob, Louis; Bonvalet, Mélodie; Ambati, Aditya; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Pizza, Fabio; Leib, Ryan; Adams, Christopher M; Partinen, Markku; Mignot, Emmanuel Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    A recent publication suggested molecular mimicry of a nucleoprotein (NP) sequence from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) strain, the backbone used in the construction of the reassortant strain X-179A that was used in Pandemrix® vaccine, and reported on anti-hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 (anti-HCRTR2) autoantibodies in narcolepsy, mostly in post Pandemrix® narcolepsy cases (17 of 20 sera). In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis through mass spectrometry (MS) characterization of Pandemrix®, and two other pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1)-2009 vaccines, Arepanrix® and Focetria®, and analyzed anti-HCRTR2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients and controls using three independent strategies. MS characterization of Pandemrix® (2 batches), Arepanrix® (4 batches) and Focetria® (1 batch) was conducted with mapping of NP 116I or 116M spectrogram. Two sets of narcolepsy cases and controls were used: 40 post Pandemrix® narcolepsy (PP-N) cases and 18 age-matched post Pandemrix® controls (PP-C), and 48 recent (≤6 months) early onset narcolepsy (EO-N) cases and 70 age-matched other controls (O-C). Anti-HCRTR2 autoantibodies were detected using three strategies: (1) Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells with transient expression of HCRTR2 were stained with human sera and then analyzed by flow cytometer; (2) In vitro translation of [35S]-radiolabelled HCRTR2 was incubated with human sera and immune complexes of autoantibody and [35S]-radiolabelled HCRTR2 were quantified using a radioligand-binding assay; (3) Optical density (OD) at 450 nm (OD450) of human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to HCRTR2 stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cell line was measured using an in-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). NP 116M mutations were predominantly present in all batches of Pandemrix®, Arepanrix® and Focetria®. The wild-type NP109-123 (ILYDKEEIRRIWRQA), a mimic to HCRTR234-45 (YDDEEFLRYLWR), was not found to bind to DQ0602. Three or four subjects were found

  4. Absence of anti-hypocretin receptor 2 autoantibodies in post pandemrix narcolepsy cases

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ling; Jacob, Louis; Bonvalet, Mélodie; Ambati, Aditya; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Pizza, Fabio; Leib, Ryan; Adams, Christopher M.; Partinen, Markku; Mignot, Emmanuel Jean-Marie

    2017-01-01

    Background A recent publication suggested molecular mimicry of a nucleoprotein (NP) sequence from A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 (PR8) strain, the backbone used in the construction of the reassortant strain X-179A that was used in Pandemrix® vaccine, and reported on anti-hypocretin (HCRT) receptor 2 (anti-HCRTR2) autoantibodies in narcolepsy, mostly in post Pandemrix® narcolepsy cases (17 of 20 sera). In this study, we re-examined this hypothesis through mass spectrometry (MS) characterization of Pandemrix®, and two other pandemic H1N1 (pH1N1)-2009 vaccines, Arepanrix® and Focetria®, and analyzed anti-HCRTR2 autoantibodies in narcolepsy patients and controls using three independent strategies. Methods MS characterization of Pandemrix® (2 batches), Arepanrix® (4 batches) and Focetria® (1 batch) was conducted with mapping of NP 116I or 116M spectrogram. Two sets of narcolepsy cases and controls were used: 40 post Pandemrix® narcolepsy (PP-N) cases and 18 age-matched post Pandemrix® controls (PP-C), and 48 recent (≤6 months) early onset narcolepsy (EO-N) cases and 70 age-matched other controls (O-C). Anti-HCRTR2 autoantibodies were detected using three strategies: (1) Human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells with transient expression of HCRTR2 were stained with human sera and then analyzed by flow cytometer; (2) In vitro translation of [35S]-radiolabelled HCRTR2 was incubated with human sera and immune complexes of autoantibody and [35S]-radiolabelled HCRTR2 were quantified using a radioligand-binding assay; (3) Optical density (OD) at 450 nm (OD450) of human serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) binding to HCRTR2 stably expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-K1 cell line was measured using an in-cell enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results NP 116M mutations were predominantly present in all batches of Pandemrix®, Arepanrix® and Focetria®. The wild-type NP109-123 (ILYDKEEIRRIWRQA), a mimic to HCRTR234-45 (YDDEEFLRYLWR), was not found to bind to DQ0602. Three

  5. Mazindol in narcolepsy and idiopathic and symptomatic hypersomnia refractory to stimulants: a long-term chart review.

    PubMed

    Nittur, Nandini; Konofal, Eric; Dauvilliers, Yves; Franco, Patricia; Leu-Semenescu, Smaranda; Cock, Valérie Cochen De; Inocente, Clara O; Bayard, Sophie; Scholtz, Sabine; Lecendreux, Michel; Arnulf, Isabelle

    2013-01-01

    Mazindol is a tricyclic, anorectic, non-amphetamine stimulant used in narcolepsy and obesity since 1970. This study aimed to evaluate the long-term benefit/risk ratio in drug-resistant hypersomniacs and cataplexy sufferers. By retrospective analysis of the patients' files in the hospitals of Paris-Salpêtrière (n=91), Montpellier (n=40) and Lyon (n=8), the benefit (Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS), cataplexy frequency, authorization renewal) and tolerance (side-effects, vital signs, electrocardiogram and cardiac echography) of mazindol were assessed. The 139 patients (45% men) aged 36±15years (range: 9-74) suffered narcolepsy (n=94, 66% with cataplexy), idiopathic (n=37) and symptomatic hypersomnia (n=8) refractory to modafinil, methylphenidate and sodium oxybate. Under mazindol (3.4±1.3mg/day, 1-6mg) for an average of 30months, the ESS decreased from 17.7±3.5 to 12.8±5.1, with an average fall of -4.6±4.7 (p<0.0001) and the frequency of cataplexy fell from 4.6±3.1 to 2±2.8 episodes per week. The cataplexy was eliminated in 14.5% of patients, improved in 27.5%, and unchanged in 29% (missing data in 29%). The treatment was maintained long term in 83 (60%) patients, and stopped because of a lack of efficacy (22%) and/or secondary effects (9%). There was no pulmonary hypertension in the 45 patients who underwent a cardiac echography. The most common adverse effects were dry mouth (13%), palpitations (10%, including one with ventricular hyperexcitability), anorexia (6%), nervousness (6%) and headaches (6%). Mazindol has a long-term, favorable benefit/risk ratio in 60% of drug-resistant hypersomniacs, including a clear benefit on cataplexy. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Current Status and Future Prospects for Esophageal Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Kuwano, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The local control effect of esophagectomy with three-field lymph node dissection (3FLD) is reaching its limit pending technical advancement. Minimally invasive esophagectomy (MIE) by thoracotomy is slowly gaining acceptance due to advantages in short-term outcomes. Although the evidence is slowly increasing, MIE is still controversial. Also, the results of treatment by surgery alone are limiting, and multimodality therapy, which includes surgical and non-surgical treatment options including chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endoscopic treatment, has become the mainstream therapy. Esophagectomy after neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NAC) is the standard treatment for clinical stages II/III (except for T4) esophageal cancer, whereas chemoradiotherapy (CRT) is regarded as the standard treatment for patients who wish to preserve their esophagus, those who refuse surgery, and those with inoperable disease. CRT is also usually selected for clinical stage IV esophageal cancer. On the other hand, with the spread of CRT, salvage esophagectomy has traditionally been recognized as a feasible option; however, many clinicians oppose the use of surgery due to the associated unfavorable morbidity and mortality profile. In the future, the improvement of each treatment result and the establishment of individual strategies are important although esophageal cancer has many treatment options. PMID:28003586

  7. Comparison of clinical characteristics among narcolepsy with and without cataplexy and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time, focusing on HLA-DRB1( *)1501/DQB1( *)0602 finding.

    PubMed

    Sasai, Taeko; Inoue, Yuichi; Komada, Yoko; Sugiura, Tatsuki; Matsushima, Eisuke

    2009-10-01

    Clinical characteristics of narcolepsy without cataplexy (NA w/o CA) and its relation to positivity of HLA-DRB1( *)1501/DQB1( *)0602 remain unclarified. We investigated clinical features of NA w/o CA, particularly addressing HLA-DRB1( *)1501/DQB1( *)0602. Comparisons of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) variables, rapid eye movement (REM)-related symptoms, and treatment response to psychostimulant medication were made for four patient groups (narcolepsy with cataplexy; NA-CA, NA w/o CA HLA-positive, NA w/o CA HLA-negative, and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time; IHS w/o LST). Mean sleep latency was significantly shorter and the rate of reduction of ESS after medication was lower in both NA-CA and NA w/o CA HLA-positive groups than those in the IHS w/o LST group. Among the three narcoleptic groups, the NA w/o CA HLA-negative group showed the lowest REM latency and the highest reduction rate of ESS after treatment. Neither these subjective and objective sleepiness measures nor the treatment response measure was significantly different between this group and the IHS w/o LST group. In NA w/o CA, HLA-positivity might affect hypersomnia severity and REM propensity. The NA w/o CA HLA-negative group and the IHS w/o LST group exhibit equivalent hypersomnia severity.

  8. [Treatment of posterior noninfectious uveitis : Current situation and future developments].

    PubMed

    Pleyer, U; Pohlmann, D; Stübiger, N

    2016-05-01

    Treatment of autoimmune diseases has undergone significant changes and developments in recent years. New classes of active substances, in particular biologics and small molecules have resulted in previously unknown success in the treatment of many diseases. In particular patients suffering from autoimmune rheumatic or dermatological diseases have benefited. For autoimmune uveitis there are numerous reports indicating excellent therapeutic and preventive effects; however, statutory approval for therapy in adults is still pending. This article outlines recent advances and future therapeutic options for the treatment of posterior segment noninfectious uveitis.

  9. Correlation of Changes in Patient-Reported Quality of Life With Physician-Rated Global Impression of Change in Patients With Narcolepsy Participating in a Clinical Trial of Sodium Oxybate: A Post Hoc Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bogan, Richard K; Black, Jed; Swick, Todd; Mamelak, Mortimer; Kovacevic-Ristanovic, Ruzica; Villa, Kathleen F; Mori, Fannie; Montplaisir, Jacques

    2017-12-01

    Narcolepsy patients report lower health-related quality of life (HRQoL) than the general population, as measured by the Short Form-36 Health Survey (SF-36). This analysis evaluated whether changes in SF-36 correlated with physician-rated Clinical Global Impression of Change (CGI-C). Data were from 209 of 228 narcolepsy patients participating in an 8-week clinical trial of sodium oxybate. Changes from baseline for SF-36 subscales (Physical Functioning, Role Physical, Bodily Pain, General Health, Vitality, Social Functioning, Role Emotional, and Mental Health) and the summary scores were evaluated for correlation with CGI-C overall and by treatment group. Correlations were calculated using the Pearson product-moment correlation coefficient (r). Correlations described an inverse relationship in scores, but a direct relationship in improvement; lower CGI-C scores (i.e., better) were associated with higher SF-36 subscale scores (i.e., improved HRQoL). Moderate and significant correlations were observed for Vitality (r = -0.464; P < 0.0001) and Role Physical (r = -0.310; P < 0.0001) subscales, but weak correlations were observed with other subscales including summary scores. Correlations were stronger at higher sodium oxybate doses for most SF-36 subscales. Some aspects of HRQoL, measured by the SF-36, may be associated with narcolepsy. In particular, Vitality (indicative of energy and tiredness) and Role Physical (impact of physical function on daily roles) moderately correlated with overall change in status observed by clinicians. However, lack of strong correlations between SF-36 and CGI-C indicates differences in patient and clinician perspectives of disease, and suggest a need for broader assessment of the impact of narcolepsy and its treatment on patients. Jazz Pharmaceuticals.

  10. Current options for the treatment of facial angiofibromas.

    PubMed

    Salido-Vallejo, R; Garnacho-Saucedo, G; Moreno-Giménez, J C

    2014-01-01

    Facial angiofibromas are hamartomatous growths that are closely associated with tuberous sclerosis complex and, in fact, they constitute one of the main diagnostic criteria for that disease. These lesions composed of blood vessels and fibrous tissue appear on the face at an early age. Since they have important physical and psychological repercussions for patients, several treatment options have been used to remove them or improve their appearance. However, the lack of treatment guidelines prevents us from developing a common protocol for patients with this condition. The present article aims to review the treatments for facial angiofibromas used to date and to propose a new evidence-based treatment protocol. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  11. Chronic Pancreatitis: Current Status and Challenges for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lew, Daniel; Afghani, Elham

    2017-01-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of the continuum of pancreatic diseases from acute and recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis and the diseases that are often linked with pancreatitis including diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. In addition to reviewing the current state of the field, we identify gaps in knowledge that are necessary to address to improve patient outcomes in these conditions. PMID:28501969

  12. Chronic Pancreatitis: Current Status and Challenges for Prevention and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Lew, Daniel; Afghani, Elham; Pandol, Stephen

    2017-07-01

    This paper reviews the current status of our understanding of the epidemiology, diagnosis, and management of the continuum of pancreatic diseases from acute and recurrent acute pancreatitis to chronic pancreatitis and the diseases that are often linked with pancreatitis including diabetes mellitus and pancreatic cancer. In addition to reviewing the current state of the field, we identify gaps in knowledge that are necessary to address to improve patient outcomes in these conditions.

  13. Treatment of Cannabis Use Disorder: Current Science and Future Outlook

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Brian J.; McRae-Clark, Aimee L.

    2016-01-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly used illicit substance in the United States. Rates of cannabis use and cannabis use disorder have increased in the past decade, paralleling changes in the legal and political climate favoring legalization. Almost 20 million people aged 12 years or older report past-month cannabis use, and 8 million report daily or near-daily use. Concurrently, the perception that cannabis use poses a significant risk of negative consequences has decreased. Contrary to this perception, heavy cannabis use is associated with cognitive impairment, increased risk for psychotic disorders and other mental health problems, lower education attainment, and unemployment. Clinical trials of various treatments for cannabis use disorder have likewise increased, focusing primarily on psychotherapy treatments, specifically, motivational enhancement therapy, cognitive behavioral therapy, and contingency management. Their findings suggest that a combination of these three modalities produces the best abstinence outcomes, although abstinence rates remain modest and decline after treatment. More recently, pharmacotherapy trials have been conducted as adjunctive interventions to psychosocial treatment. N-acetylcysteine and gabapentin are two of the most promising medications, although no pharmacologic treatment has emerged as clearly efficacious. In this review, we provide a detailed summary of clinical trials that evaluated psychotherapy and pharmacotherapy for treating cannabis use disorder and discuss emerging areas of clinical research and cannabis-specific barriers to treatment. PMID:27027272

  14. Current diagnosis and treatment of chronic subdural haematomas

    PubMed Central

    Iliescu, IA

    2015-01-01

    A developed society is usually also characterized by an elderly population, which has a continuous percentage growth. This population frequently presents a cumulus of medical pathologies. With the development of the medication and surgical treatment of different affections, the life span has increased and the pathology of an old patient has diversified as far as the cumulus of various pathological diseases in the same person is concerned. Chronic subdural pathologies represent an affection frequently met in neurosurgery practice. Any neurosurgeon, neurologist and not only, has to be aware of the possibility of the existence of a chronic subdural haematoma, especially when the patient is old and is subjected to an anticoagulant or antiaggregant treatment, these 2 causes being by far the etiological factors most frequently met in chronic subdural haematomas. With an adequate diagnosis and treatment, usually surgical, the prognosis is favorable. Although the surgical treatment presents a categorical indication in most of the cases, the fact that there are many surgical techniques, a great relapse rate, as well as the numerous studies, which try to highlight the efficiency of a technique as compared to another, demonstrate that the treatment of these haematomas is far from reaching a consensus among the neurosurgeons. The latest conservatory treatment directions are still being studied and need many years to be confirmed. Abbreviations: CT = computerized tomography, MRI = magnetic resonance imaging PMID:26351527

  15. Current Treatment Options for Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease Dementia.

    PubMed

    Szeto, Jennifer Y Y; Lewis, Simon J G

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD) are the two most common neurodegenerative disorders encountered in clinical practice. Whilst dementia has long been synonymous with AD, it is becoming more widely accepted as part of the clinical spectrum in PD (PDD). Neuropsychiatric complications, including psychosis, mood and anxiety disorders, and sleep disorders also frequently co-exist with cognitive dysfunctions in AD and PDD patients. The incidence of such symptoms is often a significant source of disability, and may aggravate pre-existing cognitive deficits. Management of AD and PDD involves both pharmacological and non-pharmacological measures. Although research on pharmacological therapies for AD and PDD has so far had some success in terms of developing symptomatic treatments, the benefits are often marginal and non-sustained. These shortcomings have led to the investigation of non-pharmacological and novel treatments for both AD and PD. Furthermore, in light of the diverse constellation of other neuropsychiatric, physical, and behavioural symptoms that often occur in AD and PD, consideration needs to be given to the potential side effects of pharmacological treatments where improving one symptom may lead to the worsening of another, rendering the clinical management of these patients challenging. Therefore, the present article will critically review the evidence for both pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatments for cognitive impairment in AD and PD patients. Treatment options for other concomitant neuropsychiatric and behavioural symptoms, as well as novel treatment strategies will also be discussed.

  16. [Current standards in the treatment of gastric cancer].

    PubMed

    Hacker, Ulrich; Lordick, Florian

    2015-08-01

    Endoscopic resection is established in the treatment of early gastric cancer. More advanced gastric cancer requires gastrectomy and D2 lymphadenectomy. Perioperative chemotherapy improves overall survival in locally advanced gastric cancer representing a standard of care. Locally advanced adenocarcinomas of the esophago-gastric junction can alternatively be treated with concurrent radiochemotherapy. In metastatic disease, systemic chemotherapy improves survival, quality of life and symptom control. Trastuzumab plus chemotherapy should be used together with first-line chemotherapy in HER2 positive gastric cancer patients. Second- and third-line therapy is now well established. The anti-VEGFR2 antibody Ramucirumab improves survival in second line treatment both as a monotherapy and in combination with paclitaxel and represents a novel treatment option. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  17. Treatment of glioblastoma in elderly patients: an overview of current treatments and future perspective.

    PubMed

    Lanzetta, Gaetano; Minniti, Giuseppe

    2010-01-01

    Current treatment of glioblastoma in the elderly includes surgery, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, but the prognosis remains extremely poor, and its optimal management is still debated. Longer survival after extensive resection compared with biopsy only has been reported, although the survival advantage remains modest. Radiation in the form of standard (60 Gy in 30 fractions over 6 weeks) and abbreviated courses of radiotherapy (30-50 Gy in 6-20 fractions over 2-4 weeks) has been employed in elderly patients with glioblastoma, showing survival benefits compared with supportive care alone. Temozolomide is an alkylating agent recently employed in older patients with newly diagnosed glioblastoma. The addition of concomitant and/or adjuvant chemotherapy with temozolomide to radiotherapy, which is currently the standard treatment in adults with glioblastoma, is emerging as an effective therapeutic option for older patients with favorable prognostic factors. The potential benefits on survival, improvement in quality of life and toxicity of different schedules of radiotherapy plus temozolomide need to be addressed in future randomized studies.

  18. Current state of prostate cancer treatment in Jamaica.

    PubMed

    Morrison, Belinda F; Aiken, William D; Mayhew, Richard

    2014-01-01

    Prostate cancer is the commonest cancer in Jamaica as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths. One report suggested that Jamaica has the highest incidence rate of prostate cancer in the world, with an age-standardised rate of 304/100,000 per year. The Caribbean region is reported to have the highest mortality rate of prostate cancer worldwide. Prostate cancer accounts for a large portion of the clinical practice for health-care practitioners in Jamaica. The Jamaica Urological Society is a professional body comprising 19 urologists in Jamaica who provide most of the care for men with prostate cancer in collaboration with medical oncologists, radiation oncologists, and a palliative care physician. The health-care system is structured in two tiers in Jamaica: public and private. The urologist-to-patient ratio is high, and this limits adequate urological care. Screening for prostate cancer is not a national policy in Jamaica. However, the Jamaica Urological Society and the Jamaica Cancer Society work synergistically to promote screening as well as to provide patient education for prostate cancer. Adequate treatment for localised prostate cancer is available in Jamaica in the forms of active surveillance, nerve-sparing radical retropubic prostatectomy, external beam radiation, and brachytherapy. However, there is a geographic maldistribution of centres that provide prostate cancer treatment, which leads to treatment delays. Also, there is difficulty in affording some treatment options in the private health-care sectors. Androgen deprivation therapy is available for treatment of locally advanced and metastatic prostate cancer and is subsidised through a programme called the National Health Fund. Second-line hormonal agents and chemotherapeutic agents are available but are costly to most of the population. The infrastructure for treatment of prostate cancer in Jamaica is good, but it requires additional technological advances as well as additional specialist

  19. Effect of Oral JZP-110 (ADX-N05) on Wakefulness and Sleepiness in Adults with Narcolepsy: A Phase 2b Study

    PubMed Central

    Ruoff, Chad; Swick, Todd J.; Doekel, Robert; Emsellem, Helene A.; Feldman, Neil T.; Rosenberg, Russell; Bream, Gary; Khayrallah, Moise A.; Lu, Yuan; Black, Jed

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral JZP-110, a second-generation wake-promoting agent with dopaminergic and noradrenergic activity, for treatment of impaired wakefulness and excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Methods: This was a phase 2b, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, parallel-group trial conducted at 28 centers in the United States. Patients were adults with narcolepsy who had baseline scores ≥ 10 on the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and baseline sleep latency ≤ 10 min on the Maintenance of Wakefulness Test (MWT). Patients received a daily placebo (n = 49) or JZP-110 (n = 44) 150 mg/day weeks 1–4 and 300 mg/day weeks 5–12. Primary efficacy endpoints were change from baseline in average MWT sleep latency, and the Clinical Global Impression-Change (CGI-C); secondary endpoints were change from baseline in ESS score and Patient Global Impression-Change. Results: Improvements were significantly greater with JZP-110 versus placebo on mean MWT sleep latency (4 w, 9.5 versus 1.4 min, P < 0.0001; 12 w, 12.8 versus 2.1 min, P < 0.0001), percentage of patients with CGI-C improvement (4 w, 80% versus 51%, P = 0.0066; 12 w, 86% versus 38%, P < 0.0001), and mean change in ESS (4 w, −5.6 versus −2.4, P = 0.0038; 12 w, −8.5 versus −2.5, P < 0.0001). Three JZP-110-treated patients (6.8%) discontinued due to adverse events (AEs). The most common AEs with JZP-110 versus placebo were insomnia (23% versus 8%), headache (16% versus 10%), nausea (14% versus 6%), diarrhea (11% versus 6%), decreased appetite (14% versus 0%), and anxiety (11% versus 0%). Conclusions: At doses of 150–300 mg/day, JZP-110 was well tolerated and significantly improved the ability to stay awake and subjective symptoms of excessive sleepiness in adults with narcolepsy. Clinical Trials Registration: Clinicaltrials.gov identifier NCT01681121. Citation: Ruoff C, Swick TJ, Doekel R, Emsellem HA, Feldman NT, Rosenberg R, Bream G, Khayrallah MA

  20. Treatment of opioid dependence with buprenorphine: current update

    PubMed Central

    Soyka, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Opioid maintenance treatment is the first-line approach in opioid dependence. Both the full opioid agonist methadone (MET) and the partial agonist buprenorphine (BUP) are licensed for the treatment of opioid dependence. BUP differs significantly from MET in its pharmacology, side effects, and safety issues. For example, the risk of respiratory depression is lower than with MET. The risk of diversion and injection of BUP have been reduced by also making it available as a tablet containing the opioid antagonist naloxone. This review summarizes the clinical effects of BUP and examines possible factors that can support decisions regarding the use of BUP or MET in opioid-dependent people. PMID:29302227

  1. Cognitive and neuropsychiatric impairments in Alzheimer's disease: current treatment strategies.

    PubMed

    Borisovskaya, Anna; Pascualy, Marcella; Borson, Soo

    2014-09-01

    This update on Alzheimer's disease (AD) discusses treatment strategies for cognitive and neuropsychiatric symptoms (such as agitation, psychosis, anxiety, and depression) common in this illness, emphasizing in particular nonpharmacologic strategies such as cognitive interventions, physical exercise, and psychotherapy. We provide an overview of cognitive enhancers and their combination strategies and medications commonly used for treatment of neuropsychiatric symptoms in AD. Finally, we give recommendations for providing support to caregivers and suggest how to identify caregiver/patient pairs most in need of intensive dementia care services.

  2. Pectus Excavatum: A Review of Diagnosis and Current Treatment Options.

    PubMed

    Abid, Irfaan; Ewais, MennatAllah M; Marranca, Joseph; Jaroszewski, Dawn E

    2017-02-01

    Osteopathic medicine places a special emphasis on the musculoskeletal system, and understanding how chest wall structure may influence function is critical. Pectus excavatum is a common congenital chest wall defect in which the sternum is depressed posteriorly. Patients may present with complaints of chest wall discomfort, exercise intolerance, and tachycardia. The medical implications, diagnosis, and treatment options for patients with pectus excavatum are reviewed.

  3. Idiopathic condylar resorption: The current understanding in diagnosis and treatment

    PubMed Central

    Young, Andrew

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic condylar resorption (ICR) is a condition with no known cause, which manifests as progressive malocclusion, esthetic changes, and often pain. Cone-beam computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging are the most valuable imaging methods for diagnosis and tracking, compared to the less complete and more distorted images provided by panoramic radiographs, and the higher radiation of 99mtechnetium-methylene diphosphonate. ICR has findings that overlap with osteoarthritis, inflammatory arthritis, physiologic resorption/remodeling, congenital disorders affecting the mandible, requiring thorough image analysis, physical examination, and history-taking. Correct diagnosis and determination of whether the ICR is active or inactive are essential when orthodontic or prosthodontic treatment is anticipated as active ICR can undo those treatments. Several treatments for ICR have been reported with the goals of either halting the progression of ICR or correcting the deformities that it caused. These treatments have varying degrees of success and adverse effects, but the rarity of the condition prevents any evidence-based recommendations. PMID:28584413

  4. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment - Review and Current Concepts.

    PubMed

    Güntensperger, Dominik; Thüring, Christian; Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB), a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily control their brain activity and thus triggers them to unlearn typical neural activity patterns related to tinnitus. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss previous findings of neurofeedback treatment studies in the field of chronic tinnitus. In doing so, also an overview about the underlying theories of tinnitus emergence is presented and results of resting-state EEG and MEG studies summarized and critically discussed. To date, neurofeedback as well as electrophysiological tinnitus studies lack general guidelines that are crucial to produce more comparable and consistent results. Even though neurofeedback has already shown promising results for chronic tinnitus treatment, further research is needed in order to develop more sophisticated protocols that are able to tackle the individual needs of tinnitus patients more specifically.

  5. Treatment for spasmodic dysphonia: limitations of current approaches

    PubMed Central

    Ludlow, Christy L.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose of review Although botulinum toxin injection is the gold standard for treatment of spasmodic dysphonia, surgical approaches aimed at providing long-term symptom control have been advancing over recent years. Recent findings When surgical approaches provide greater long-term benefits to symptom control, they also increase the initial period of side effects of breathiness and swallowing difficulties. However, recent analyses of quality-of-life questionnaires in patients undergoing regular injections of botulinum toxin demonstrate that a large proportion of patients have limited relief for relatively short periods due to early breathiness and loss-of-benefit before reinjection. Summary Most medical and surgical approaches to the treatment of spasmodic dysphonia have been aimed at denervation of the laryngeal muscles to block symptom expression in the voice, and have both adverse effects as well as treatment benefits. Research is needed to identify the central neuropathophysiology responsible for the laryngeal muscle spasms in order target treatment towards the central neurological abnormality responsible for producing symptoms. PMID:19337127

  6. Current Concepts in Examination and Treatment of Elbow Tendon Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ellenbecker, Todd S.; Nirschl, Robert; Renstrom, Per

    2013-01-01

    Context: Injuries to the tendons of the elbow occur frequently in the overhead athlete, creating a significant loss of function and dilemma to sports medicine professionals. A detailed review of the anatomy, etiology, and pathophysiology of tendon injury coupled with comprehensive evaluation and treatment information is needed for clinicians to optimally design treatment programs for rehabilitation and prevention. Evidence Acquisitions: The PubMed database was searched in January 2012 for English-language articles pertaining to elbow tendon injury. Results: Detailed information on tendon pathophysiology was found along with incidence of elbow injury in overhead athletes. Several evidence-based reviews were identified, providing a thorough review of the recommended rehabilitation for elbow tendon injury. Conclusions: Humeral epicondylitis is an extra-articular tendon injury that is common in athletes subjected to repetitive upper extremity loading. Research is limited on the identification of treatment modalities that can reduce pain and restore function to the elbow. Eccentric exercise has been studied in several investigations and, when coupled with a complete upper extremity strengthening program, can produce positive results in patients with elbow tendon injury. Further research is needed in high-level study to delineate optimal treatment methods. PMID:24427389

  7. [The costs of new drugs compared to current standard treatment].

    PubMed

    Ujeyl, Mariam; Schlegel, Claudia; Gundert-Remy, Ursula

    2013-01-01

    Until AMNOG came into effect Germany had free pricing of new drugs. Our exemplary work investigates the costs of new drugs that were licensed in the two years prior to AMNOG, and compares them to the costs of standard treatment that has been used in pivotal trials. Also, the important components of pharmaceutical prices will be illustrated. We retrospectively analysed the European Public Assessment Reports of proprietary medicinal products that the European Medicinal Agency initially approved in 2009 and 2010 and that were tested against an active control in at least one pivotal trial. If the standard treatment was a generic, the average pharmacy retail price of new drugs was 7.4 times (median 7.1) higher than that of standard treatment. If the standard treatment was an originator drug the average price was 1.4 times (median 1.2) higher than that of the new drug. There was no clear correlation of an increase in costs for new drugs and their "grade of innovation" as rated according to the criteria of Fricke. Our study shows that prices of new drugs must be linked to the evidence of comparative benefit; since German drug pricing is complex, cost saving effects obtained thereby will depend on a range of other rules and decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  8. Neurofeedback for Tinnitus Treatment – Review and Current Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Güntensperger, Dominik; Thüring, Christian; Meyer, Martin; Neff, Patrick; Kleinjung, Tobias

    2017-01-01

    An effective treatment to completely alleviate chronic tinnitus symptoms has not yet been discovered. However, recent developments suggest that neurofeedback (NFB), a method already popular in the treatment of other psychological and neurological disorders, may provide a suitable alternative. NFB is a non-invasive method generally based on electrophysiological recordings and visualizing of certain aspects of brain activity as positive or negative feedback that enables patients to voluntarily control their brain activity and thus triggers them to unlearn typical neural activity patterns related to tinnitus. The purpose of this review is to summarize and discuss previous findings of neurofeedback treatment studies in the field of chronic tinnitus. In doing so, also an overview about the underlying theories of tinnitus emergence is presented and results of resting-state EEG and MEG studies summarized and critically discussed. To date, neurofeedback as well as electrophysiological tinnitus studies lack general guidelines that are crucial to produce more comparable and consistent results. Even though neurofeedback has already shown promising results for chronic tinnitus treatment, further research is needed in order to develop more sophisticated protocols that are able to tackle the individual needs of tinnitus patients more specifically. PMID:29249959

  9. [Current treatment and epidemiology of Clostridium difficile infections].

    PubMed

    Dinh, A; Bouchand, F; Le Monnier, A

    2015-09-01

    During the past 10years, Clostridium difficile infections (CDI) have become a major public health challenge. Their epidemiology has changed with a rise in the number of cases and an increase in severe episodes. Recurrence and failure of conventional treatments have become more common. Furthermore, a spread of CDI has been observed in the general population-involving subjects without the usual risk factors (unexposed to antibiotic treatment, young people, pregnant women, etc.). All these change are partially due to the emergence of the hypervirulent and hyperepidemic clone NAP1/B1/027. New therapeutic strategies (antimicrobial treatment, immunoglobulins, toxin chelation, fecal microbiota transplantation) are now available and conventional treatments (metronidazole and vancomycin) have been reevaluated with new recommendations. Recent studies show a better efficacy of vancomycin compared to metronidazole for severe episodes. Fidaxomicin is a novel antibiotic drug with interesting features, including an efficacy not inferior to vancomycin and a lower risk of recurrence. Finally, for multi-recurrent forms, fecal microbiota transplantation seems to be the best option. We present the available data in this review. Copyright © 2015 Société nationale française de médecine interne (SNFMI). Published by Elsevier SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Viral meningitis: current issues in diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    McGill, Fiona; Griffiths, Michael J; Solomon, Tom

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this review is to give an overview of viral meningitis and then focus in on some of the areas of uncertainty in diagnostics, treatment and outcome. Bacterial meningitis has been declining in incidence over recent years. Over a similar time period molecular diagnostics have increasingly been used. Because of both of these developments viral meningitis is becoming relatively more important. However, there are still many unanswered questions. Despite improvements in diagnostics many laboratories do not use molecular methods and even when they are used many cases still remain without a proven viral aetiology identified. There are also no established treatments for viral meningitis and the one potential treatment, aciclovir, which is effective in vitro for herpes simplex virus, has never been subjected to a clinical trial. Viruses are in increasingly important cause of meningitis in the era of declining bacterial disease. The exact viral aetiology varies according to age and country. Molecular diagnostics can not only improve the rate of pathogen detection but also reduce unnecessary antibiotics use and length of hospitalization. Further research is required into treatments for viral meningitis and the impact in terms of longer term sequelae.

  11. Health-Related Quality of Life Among Drug-Naïve Patients with Narcolepsy with Cataplexy, Narcolepsy Without Cataplexy, and Idiopathic Hypersomnia Without Long Sleep Time

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, Akiko; Inoue, Yuichi; Nakajima, Toru; Hayashida, Kenichi; Honda, Makoto; Komada, Yoko; Takahashi, Kiyohisa

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the health-related quality life (HRQOL) of drugnaïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NA with CA), narcolepsy without cataplexy (NA without CA) and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (IHS without LST), and to explore the factors influencing the HRQOL. Factors associated with the occurrence of automobile accidents are also discussed. Methods: A total of 137 consecutive drug naïve patients who met the criteria of the 2nd edition of the International Classification of Sleep Disorders (NA with CA, n = 28; NA without CA, n = 27; IHS without LST, n = 82) were enrolled. The patients were asked to fill out questionnaires, including the SF-36, Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS), sociodemographic variables, and items regarding driving habits and the experiences related to automobile accidents. Results: All 3 diagnostic groups had significantly lower scores in most SF-36 domains compared with Japanese normative data. Significant differences among the 3 diagnostic groups were not observed. Specific factors in SF-36 domains were not found with multiple linear regression analyses, while disease duration was positively correlated with mental health among all subjects. Among the patients reporting driving habits, ESS score (≥16) was positively associated with the experience of automobile accidents. Conclusions: Our results indicated that HRQOL decreases in drugnaïve patients with hypersomnia, but neither disease category nor severity of the disorder appears as an associated factor. Increased severity of hypersomnia, however, was thought to play an important role in the occurrence of automobile accidents. Citation: Ozaki A; Inoue Y; Nakajima T; Hayashida K; Honda M; Komada Y; Takahashi K. Health-related quality of life among drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, narcolepsy without cataplexy, and idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. J Clin Sleep Med 2008;4(6):572-578. PMID:19110887

  12. Current diagnosis and treatments for critical congenital heart defects

    PubMed Central

    ZENG, ZHANDONG; ZHANG, HONGWEI; LIU, FENGLI; ZHANG, NING

    2016-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHD) affect approximately 7% of infants, and account for 3% of all infant deaths. CHD is most often caused by the defects associated with ductus arteriosus, which is a vessel that usually closes shortly after birth. The types of CHD include tetralogy of fallot, hypoplastic left heart syndrome, pulmonary atresia, total anomalous pulmonary venous return, transposition of great arteries, tricuspid atresia and truncus arteriosus. There are some risk factors that can increase the chance of a fetus developing CHD such as prematurity, an existing CHD in a first-degree relative, genetic syndromes, infections in utero, maternal drug consumptions and disorders. CHD is diagnosed is through different techniques including pulse oximetry, echocardiograms and physical exams. In this review, we examined the current incidence of CHD, the risk factors associated with CHD, the current methods of diagnosis and surgical options used to repair the defects. PMID:27168772

  13. Subjective deficits of attention, cognition and depression in patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Zamarian, Laura; Högl, Birgit; Delazer, Margarete; Hingerl, Katharina; Gabelia, David; Mitterling, Thomas; Brandauer, Elisabeth; Frauscher, Birgit

    2015-01-01

    Patients with narcolepsy often complain about attention deficits in everyday situations. In comparison with these subjective complaints, deficits in objective testing are subtler. The present study assessed the relationships between subjective complaints, objectively measured cognitive performance, disease-related variables, and mood. A total of 51 patients with narcolepsy and 35 healthy controls responded to questionnaires regarding subjectively perceived attention deficits, sleepiness, anxiety and depression. Moreover, they performed an extensive neuropsychological assessment tapping into attention, executive functions, and memory. Patients rated their level of attention in everyday situations to be relatively poor. In an objective assessment of cognitive functioning, they showed only slight attention and executive function deficits. The subjective ratings of attention deficits significantly correlated with ratings of momentary sleepiness, anxiety, and depression, but not with objectively measured cognitive performance. Momentary sleepiness and depression predicted almost 39% of the variance in the ratings of subjectively perceived attention deficits. The present study showed that sleepiness and depression, more than objective cognitive deficits, might play a role in the subjectively perceived attention deficits of patients with narcolepsy. The results suggested that when counselling and treating patients with narcolepsy, clinicians should pay attention to potential depression because subjective cognitive complaints may not relate to objective cognitive impairments. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. CD4+ T-Cell Reactivity to Orexin/Hypocretin in Patients With Narcolepsy Type 1.

    PubMed

    Ramberger, Melanie; Högl, Birgit; Stefani, Ambra; Mitterling, Thomas; Reindl, Markus; Lutterotti, Andreas

    2017-03-01

    Narcolepsy type 1 is accompanied by a selective loss of orexin/hypocretin (hcrt) neurons in the lateral hypothalamus caused by yet unknown mechanisms. Epidemiologic and genetic associations strongly suggest an immune-mediated pathogenesis of the disease. We compared specific T-cell reactivity to orexin/hcrt peptides in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of narcolepsy type 1 patients to healthy controls by a carboxyfluorescein succinimidyl ester proliferation assay. Orexin/hcrt-specific T-cell reactivity was also determined by cytokine (interferon gamma and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor) analysis. Individuals were considered as responders if the cell division index of CD3+CD4+ T cells and both stimulation indices of cytokine secretion exceeded the cutoff 3. Additionally, T-cell reactivity to orexin/hcrt had to be confirmed by showing reactivity to single peptides present in different peptide pools. Using these criteria, 3/15 patients (20%) and 0/13 controls (0%) showed orexin/hcrt-specific CD4+ T-cell proliferation (p = .2262). The heterogeneous reactivity pattern did not allow the identification of a preferential target epitope. A significant role of orexin/hcrt-specific T cells in narcolepsy type 1 patients could not be confirmed in this study. Further studies are needed to assess the exact role of CD4+ T cells and possible target antigens in narcolepsy type 1 patients. © Sleep Research Society 2016. Published by Oxford University Press [on behalf of the Sleep Research Society].

  15. 78 FR 43209 - Narcolepsy Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-19

    ... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration [Docket No. FDA-2013-N-0815] Narcolepsy Public Meeting on Patient-Focused Drug Development AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Notice of public meeting; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA...

  16. Case report of narcolepsy in a six-year-old child initially misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, Jinquan; ZHANG, Xi; DONG, Zaiwen

    2014-01-01

    Summary This report describes a case of first-onset narcolepsy in a six-year-old female that was misdiagnosed as atypical epilepsy and other diagnoses at eight different hospitals over a period of 10 months before the correct diagnosis was made. The diagnosis of narcolepsy is more difficult in children because very few of them experience all four cardinal symptoms of narcolepsy – paroxysmal sleep, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucination, and sleep paralysis – and they often have a more prolonged onset and diverse symptoms. To decrease the time lag between initial presentation and accurate diagnosis, we recommend that in all cases in which children report excessive sleep of unknown etiology – regardless of the associated symptoms – that sleep monitoring and sleep latency tests be conducted to rule out the possibility of narcolepsy. The case highlights the wide variety of presentations of uncommon psychiatric conditions, particularly in children, and the need for clinicians to be aware of the atypical presentations of these conditions when collecting medical histories. PMID:25317010

  17. Cataplectic facies: clinical marker in the diagnosis of childhood narcolepsy-report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Manish; Setty, Gururaj; Ponnusamy, Athi; Hussain, Nahin; Desurkar, Archana

    2014-05-01

    Narcolepsy is a chronic disease and is commonly diagnosed in adulthood. However, more than half of the patients have onset of symptoms in childhood and/or adolescence. The full spectrum of clinical manifestations, namely excessive daytime sleepiness, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis, is usually not present at disease onset, delaying diagnosis during childhood. Mean delay in diagnosis since symptom onset is known to be several years. Initial manifestations can sometimes be as subtle as only partial drooping of eyelids leading to confusion with a myasthenic condition. We present two children who presented with "cataplectic facies," an unusual facial feature only recently described in children with narcolepsy with cataplexy. The diagnosis of narcolepsy was confirmed by multiple sleep latency test along with human leukocyte antigen typing and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin assay. The diagnosis of narcolepsy with cataplexy at onset can be challenging in young children. With more awareness of subtle signs such as cataplectic facies, earlier diagnosis is possible. To date, only 11 children between 6 and 18 years of age presenting with typical cataplectic facies have been reported in the literature. We present two patients, one of whom is the youngest individual (4 years old) yet described with the typical cataplectic facies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Psychosocial Problems of Children with Narcolepsy and Those with Excessive Daytime Sleepiness of Uncertain Origin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stores, Gregory; Montgomery, Paul; Wiggs, Luci

    2007-01-01

    Background: Narcolepsy is a predominantly rapid eye movement sleep disorder with onset usually in the second decade but often in earlier childhood. Classically it is characterized by combinations of excessive sleepiness especially sleep attacks, cataplexy, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. The psychosocial effects of this lifelong…

  19. Treatment of renal cell carcinoma: Current status and future directions.

    PubMed

    Barata, Pedro C; Rini, Brian I

    2017-11-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE Over the past 12 years, medical treatment for renal cell carcinoma (RCC) has transitioned from a nonspecific immune approach (in the cytokine era), to targeted therapy against vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and now to novel immunotherapy agents. Multiple agents-including molecules against vascular endothelial growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and related receptors; inhibitors of other targets, such as the mammalian target of rapamycin and the MET and AXL tyrosine-protein kinase receptors; and an immune-checkpoint inhibitor-have been approved based on significant activity in patients with advanced RCC. Despite these advances, important questions remain regarding biomarkers of efficacy, patient selection, and the optimal combination and sequencing of agents. The purpose of this review is to summarize present management and future directions in the treatment of metastatic RCC. CA Cancer J Clin 2017;67:507-524. © 2017 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  20. Gastroparesis: a review of current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Enweluzo, Chijioke; Aziz, Fahad

    2013-01-01

    Gastroparesis is a motility disorder of the stomach causing delay in food emptying from the stomach without any evidence of mechanical obstruction. The majority of cases are idiopathic. Patients need to be diagnosed properly by formal testing, and the evaluation of the severity of the gastroparesis may assist in guiding therapy. Initially, dietary modifications are encouraged, which include frequent and small semisolid-based meals. Promotility medications, like erythromycin, and antiemetics, like prochlorperazine, are offered for symptom relief. In patients who are refractory to pharmacologic treatment, more invasive options, such as intrapyloric botulinum toxin injections, placement of a jejunostomy tube, or implantation of a gastric stimulator, can be considered. Hemin therapy and gastric electric stimulation are emerging treatment options that are still at different stages of research. Regenerative medicine and stem cell-based therapies also hold promise for gastroparesis in the near future. PMID:24039443

  1. Current approach to the treatment of chronic myeloid leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Pasic, Ivan; Lipton, Jeffrey H

    2017-04-01

    Of all the cancers, chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) has witnessed the most rapid evolution of the therapeutic milieu in recent decades. The introduction of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) as a therapeutic option has profoundly changed patient experience and outcome. The availability of multiple new highly effective therapies has increasingly underscored the importance of a good understanding of the underlying pathophysiological basis in CML, as well as patient-specific factors in choosing the right treatment for every individual. The treatment of CML has migrated in many jurisdictions from the office of a highly specialized malignant hematologist to the general hematologist or even a general practitioner. The goal of this review is to offer an overview of the modern approach to the treatment of CML, with an emphasis on chronic phase (CP) CML, including both TKI-based therapies such as imatinib, dasatinib, nilotinib, bosutinib and ponatinib, and non-TKI medications, such as omacetaxine. We discuss evidence behind each drug, most common and material adverse reactions and outline how this information can be used in selecting the right drug for the right patient. We also discuss evidence as it relates to other therapies, including stem cell transplant (SCT), and patients in accelerated (AP) and blastic phase (BP). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Current and emerging treatments for the management of osteogenesis imperfecta

    PubMed Central

    Monti, Elena; Mottes, Monica; Fraschini, Paolo; Brunelli, PierCarlo; Forlino, Antonella; Venturi, Giacomo; Doro, Francesco; Perlini, Silvia; Cavarzere, Paolo; Antoniazzi, Franco

    2010-01-01

    Osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) is the most common bone genetic disorder and it is characterized by bone brittleness and various degrees of growth disorder. Clinical severity varies widely; nowadays eight types are distinguished and two new forms have been recently described although not yet classified. The approach to such a variable and heterogeneous disease should be global and therefore multidisciplinary. For simplicity, the objectives of treatment can be reduced to three typical situations: the lethal perinatal form (type II), in which the problem is survival at birth; the severe and moderate forms (types III–IX), in which the objective is ‘autonomy’; and the mild form (type I), in which the aim is to reach ‘normal life’. Three types of treatment are available: non-surgical management (physical therapy, rehabilitation, bracing and splinting), surgical management (intramedullary rod positioning, spinal and basilar impression surgery) and medical-pharmacological management (drugs to increase the strength of bone and decrease the number of fractures as bisphosphonates or growth hormone, depending on the type of OI). Suggestions and guidelines for a therapeutic approach are indicated and updated with the most recent findings in OI diagnosis and treatment. PMID:20856683

  3. Current concepts of etiology and treatment of chondromalacia patellae.

    PubMed

    Bentley, G; Dowd, G

    1984-10-01

    Chondromalacia patellae is a distinct clinical entity characterized by retropatellar pain that is associated with recognizable changes in the articular cartilage of the posterior surface of the patella. Several factors may be involved in the etiology, such as severe patella alta, trauma, and, in rare cases, abnormal patellar tracking. Clinical symptoms and signs are reliable in only 50% of cases, but measurable quadriceps wasting, palpable patellofemoral crepitus, and effusion are strongly suggestive. Diagnosis must be confirmed by arthroscopy or direct examination of the posterior surface of the patella. Radiologic measurements of patellofemoral relations are of limited value in diagnosis. The initial pathologic finding is usually surface cartilage breakdown. Radioisotope studies show cartilage cell replication which suggests a healing capacity in early cases following treatment that alters the load through the affected cartilage. There is no evidence of progression to patellofemoral osteoarthritis, which is probably a different entity. The treatment should be conservative where possible with isometric quadriceps exercises and simple anti-inflammatory drugs such as aspirin. Operative treatment is indicated for patients with persistent pain and macroscopic involvement of more than half a centimeter of the articular cartilage surface. The simplest effective procedure that avoids quadriceps dysfunction and fibrosis is a distal patellar tendon medial realignment with lateral release and medial reefing of the quadriceps expansion. Patellectomy is indicated in more extensive involvement of the patella of 2 or more centimeters in diameter, but this must be performed only when the patient has excellent quadriceps function before surgery and is motivated to exercise after surgery.

  4. Current treatment options for depression after mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Bay, Esther

    2009-09-01

    Mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI) is the most common neurologic condition in the United States; about 503 of every 100,000 persons visiting the emergency department have this diagnosis. A complex cluster of neurologic signs and symptoms are associated with an acceleration-deceleration mechanism of injury. Unfortunately, many persons do not seek treatment for MTBI. Depression following MTBI adds to the complexity and complicates the diagnosis and treatment because of overlap of symptoms, including delays in information processing, sleep difficulties, irritability, and fatigue, as well as pain in association with headache or other musculoskeletal injuries. Depression after MTBI has been associated with abnormal CT scan results, older age, and increased depressive symptoms within a week after injury. Given the progress made in understanding the natural history of MTBI and post-TBI depression in general, there has been less progress in treatment trials for post-MTBI depression. In this review, we report on one phase 4, nonrandomized single-group trial in persons with mild-to-moderate TBI and note a "response to treatment" effect without the ability to discern the potential impact of other prescribed pharmacotherapies on the outcome. In a randomized controlled trial focusing on a telephone counseling intervention for post-MTBI symptoms, the intervention appeared to be effective in reducing 6-month post-MTBI symptoms, but it was not effective for the general health outcome, which included measures of depressive symptoms and anxiety. Thus, evidence-based treatment of post-MTBI depression is quite limited. Because depressive symptoms can develop as early as 1 week after injury and can be exacerbated by stress, pain, and comorbidities, it seems prudent to begin early interventions focused on managing pain and stress, along with providing psychoeducational and problem-solving therapies. Efficacy studies are needed to determine whether telemedicine approaches, group

  5. Chronic urticaria: aetiology, management and current and future treatment options.

    PubMed

    Kozel, Martina M A; Sabroe, Ruth A

    2004-01-01

    Chronic urticaria is a common condition that can be very disabling when severe. A cause for chronic idiopathic urticaria (CIU) is only infrequently identified. Potential causes include reactions to food and drugs, infections (rarely) and, apart from an increased incidence of thyroid disease, uncomplicated urticaria is not usually associated with underlying systemic disease or malignancy. About one-third of patients with CIU have circulating functional autoantibodies against the high affinity IgE receptor or against IgE, although it is not known why such antibodies are produced, or how the presence of such antibodies alters the course of the disease or response to treatment. There are only a few publications relating to childhood urticaria, but it is probably similar to the adult form, except that adult urticaria is more common. The diagnosis is based on patient history and it is vital to spend time documenting this in detail. Extensive laboratory tests are not required in the vast majority of patients. Chronic urticaria resolves spontaneously in 30-55% of patients within 5 years, but it can persist for many years. Treatment is aimed firstly at avoiding underlying causative or exacerbating factors. Histamine H1 receptor antagonists remain the mainstay of oral treatment for all forms of urticaria. The newer low-sedating antihistamines desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine and mizolastine should be tried first. Sedating antihistamines have more adverse effects but are useful if symptoms are causing sleep disturbance. Low-dose dopexin is effective and especially suitable for patients with associated depression. There is controversy as to whether the addition of an histamine H2 receptor antagonist or a leukotriene antagonist is helpful. For CIU, second-line agents include ciclosporin (cyclosporine) [which is effective in approximately 75% of patients], short courses of oral corticosteroids, intravenous immunoglobulins and plasmapheresis, although the last two were

  6. Body Mass Index-Independent Metabolic Alterations in Narcolepsy with Cataplexy

    PubMed Central

    Poli, Francesca; Plazzi, Giuseppe; Di Dalmazi, Guido; Ribichini, Danilo; Vicennati, Valentina; Pizza, Fabio; Mignot, Emmanuel; Montagna, Pasquale; Pasquali, Renato; Pagotto, Uberto

    2009-01-01

    Study Objectives: To contribute to the anthropometric and metabolic phenotyping of orexin-A–deficient narcoleptic patients, and to explore a possible risk of their developing a metabolic syndrome. Design: We performed a cross-sectional study comparing metabolic alterations in patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (NC) and patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. Setting: University hospital. Patients: Fourteen patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy and 14 sex and age-matched patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time. Interventions: N/A. Measurements and results: Metabolic parameters were evaluated by measuring body mass index (BMI), waist circumference (also with abdominal computed tomography), blood pressure, and daily calorie intake (3-day diary). Chronotypes were assessed through the morningness-eveningness questionnaire. Lumbar puncture for cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A determination and HLA typing were performed. Patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy (all HLA DQB1*0602 positive and with cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A levels < 110 pg/mL) had a higher BMI and BMI-independent metabolic alterations, namely waist circumference, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and glucose/insulin ratio (an insulin resistance index), with respect to patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time (cerebrospinal fluid orexin-A levels > 300 pg/mL). Despite lower daily food intake, patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy displayed significant alterations in metabolic parameters resulting in a diagnosis of metabolic syndrome in more than half the cases. Conclusions: BMI-independent metabolic alterations and the relative hypophagia of patients with narcolepsy with cataplexy, as compared with patients with idiopathic hypersomnia without long sleep time, suggest that orexin-A influences the etiology of this phenotype. Moreover, considering that these dysmetabolic alterations are present from a young age, a careful metabolic

  7. Current Options for the Treatment of Food Allergy

    PubMed Central

    Lanser, Bruce J.; Wright, Benjamin L.; Orgel, Kelly A.; Vickery, Brian P.; Fleischer, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Food allergy is increasing in prevalence; as a result, there is intense focus on developing safe and effective therapies. Current methods of specific immunotherapy include oral, sublingual, and epicutaneous, while nonspecific methods that have been investigated include: Chinese herbal medicine, probiotics, and anti-IgE antibodies. Although some studies have demonstrated efficacy in inducing desensitization, questions regarding safety and the potential for achieving immune tolerance remain. Although some of these therapies demonstrate promise, further investigation is required before their incorporation into routine clinical practice. PMID:26456449

  8. Current trends and pitfalls in endoscopic treatment of urolithiasis.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Takaaki; Okada, Shinsuke; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Yoshida, Takashi; Matsuda, Tadashi

    2018-02-01

    Current development of endoscopic technology, lithotripters, and stone-retrieval devices has expanded the indications for retrograde and antegrade endoscopic therapy in the management of urolithiasis. This technology has also resulted in minimally invasive therapy. As surgeons' experience of endourological procedures with the newer instruments has become integrated, the surgical technique and indications for urolithiasis have also changed in the past few years. The present review provides an overview of endourological procedures for upper urinary tract stones and the key points related to surgical techniques. © 2017 The Japanese Urological Association.

  9. When is facial paralysis Bell palsy? Current diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Anwar

    2005-05-01

    Bell palsy is largely a diagnosis of exclusion, but certain features in the history and physical examination help distinguish it from facial paralysis due to other conditions: eg, abrupt onset with complete, unilateral facial weakness at 24 to 72 hours, and, on the affected side, numbness or pain around the ear, a reduction in taste, and hypersensitivity to sounds. Corticosteroids and antivirals given within 10 days of onset have been shown to help. But Bell palsy resolves spontaneously without treatment in most patients within 6 months.

  10. Current and potential future drug treatments for osteoporosis.

    PubMed Central

    Patel, S

    1996-01-01

    There has been a major interest in the drug treatment of osteoporosis and an increase in the number of drugs available in most countries. The ideal drug (one which increases or restores bone density and trabecular connectivity) is still not available. However, in patients with relatively preserved trabecular connectivity and moderately reduced bone density, several agents have shown substantial clinical benefit. Oestrogens are still the mainstay of drug treatment, but the risks of breast cancer versus the cardiovascular and skeletal benefits with long term use have to be assessed in the individual. Newer tissue specific oestrogens show some promise in this respect. The bisphosphonates and possibly fluoride are likely to be the major alternatives to oestrogens in the medium term. The newer bisphosphonates, alendronate and in the future risedronate, are likely to supersede etidronate. Calcitriol probably has a limited role, confined to those patients in whom HRT or bisphosphonates are not appropriate. Calcium supplementation, or an increase in dietary intake if deficient, irrespective of which agent is used, is also of benefit. In older patients there is considerable support for using a combination of calcium and vitamin D. Whether combination treatment, for example oestrogens, bisphosphonates, and calcium together, will result in greater efficacy remains to be conclusively shown, but may be an attractive option in younger patients with higher bone turnover. Apart from fluoride, bone formation stimulators are unlikely to have a major role until the next century, although it may be possible to use growth factors as part of an ADFR regimen (A = activate remodelling, D = depress resorption, F = free formation, and R = repeat). This is still an important theoretical approach and needs further work with newer agents to see if increased efficacy can be found. In addition sequential treatment may be necessary in view of the limited time periods over which particular agents

  11. miRNA Profiles in Plasma from Patients with Sleep Disorders Reveal Dysregulation of miRNAs in Narcolepsy and Other Central Hypersomnias

    PubMed Central

    Holm, Anja; Bang-Berthelsen, Claus Heiner; Knudsen, Stine; Kornum, Birgitte R.; Modvig, Signe; Jennum, Poul; Gammeltoft, Steen

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been implicated in the pathogenesis of human diseases including neurological disorders. The aim is to address the involvement of miRNAs in the pathophysiology of central hypersomnias including autoimmune narcolepsy with cataplexy and hypocretin deficiency (type 1 narcolepsy), narcolepsy without cataplexy (type 2 narcolepsy), and idiopathic hypersomnia. Design: We conducted high-throughput analysis of miRNA in plasma from three groups of patients—with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively—in comparison with healthy controls using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) panels. Setting: University hospital based sleep clinic and research laboratories. Patients: Twelve patients with type 1 narcolepsy, 12 patients with type 2 narcolepsy, 12 patients with idiopathic hypersomnia, and 12 healthy controls. Measurements and Results: By analyzing miRNA in plasma with qPCR we identified 50, 24, and 6 miRNAs that were different in patients with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy, and idiopathic hypersomnia, respectively, compared with healthy controls. Twenty miRNA candidates who fulfilled the criteria of at least two-fold difference and p-value < 0.05 were selected to validate the miRNA changes in an independent cohort of patients. Four miRNAs differed significantly between type 1 narcolepsy patients and healthy controls. Levels of miR-30c, let-7f, and miR-26a were higher, whereas the level of miR-130a was lower in type 1 narcolepsy than healthy controls. The miRNA differences were not specific for type 1 narcolepsy, since the levels of the four miRNAs were also altered in patients with type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia compared with healthy controls. Conclusion: The levels of four miRNAs differed in plasma from patients with type 1 narcolepsy, type 2 narcolepsy and idiopathic hypersomnia suggesting that alterations of miRNAs may be involved in the

  12. Drug treatment of obesity: current status and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Kakkar, Ashish Kumar; Dahiya, Neha

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is a growing epidemic and a major contributor to the global burden of disease. Obesity strains the healthcare systems and has profound economic and psychosocial consequences. Historically, pharmacotherapy for obesity has witnessed the rise and fall of several promising drug candidates that had to be eventually withdrawn due to unacceptable safety concerns. Currently four drugs are approved for chronic weight management in obese adults: orlistat, lorcaserin, phentermine/topiramate extended release and naltrexone/bupropion extended release. While lorcaserin and phentermine/topiramate were approved by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2012, after a gap of 13 years following the licensing of orlistat, naltrexone/bupropion has been recently approved in 2014. This review provides a brief overview of these current therapeutic interventions available for management of obesity along with the evidence of their safety and efficacy. Additionally, several novel monotherapies as well as combination products are undergoing evaluation in various stages of clinical development. These therapies if proven successful will strengthen the existing armamentarium of antiobesity drugs and will be critical to combat the global public health crisis of obesity and its associated co-morbidities. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Drugs currently under investigation for the treatment of invasive candidiasis.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Matthew W; Walsh, Thomas J

    2017-07-01

    The widespread implementation of immunosuppressants, immunomodulators, hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and solid organ transplantation in clinical practice has led to an expanding population of patients who are at risk for invasive candidiasis, which is the most common form of fungal disease among hospitalized patients in the developed world. The emergence of drug-resistant Candida spp. has added to the morbidity associated with invasive candidiasis and novel therapeutic strategies are urgently needed. Areas covered: In this paper, we explore investigational agents for the treatment of invasive candidiasis, with particular attention paid to compounds that have recently entered phase I or phase II clinical trials. Expert opinion: The antifungal drug development pipeline has been severely limited due to regulatory hurdles and a systemic lack of investment in novel compounds. However, several promising drug development strategies have recently emerged, including chemical screens involving Pathogen Box compounds, combination antifungal therapy, and repurposing of existing agents that were initially developed to treat other conditions, all of which have the potential to redefine the treatment of invasive candidiasis.

  14. Current status of gastroesophageal reflux disease : diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Tang-Wei; Chen, Shou-Chien; Chen, Kow-Tong

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the recent advances in diagnosis and treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Previous studies were searched using the terms "gastroesophageal reflux disease" and "diagnosis" or "treatment" in Medline and Pubmed. Articles that were not published in the English language, manuscripts without an abstract, reviews, meta-analysis, and opinion articles were excluded from the review. After a preliminary screening, all of the articles were reviewed and synthesized to provide an overview of the contemporary approaches to GERD. GERD has a variety of symptomatic manifestations, which can be grouped into typical, atypical and extra-esophageal symptoms. Those with the highest specificity for GERD are acid regurgitation and heartburn. In the absence of other alarming symptoms, these symptoms allow one to make a presumptive diagnosis of GERD and initiate empiric therapy. GERD-associated complications include erosive esophagitis, peptic stricture, Barrett's esophagus, esophageal adenocarcinoma and pulmonary disease. Management of GERD may involve lifestyle modifications, medical and surgical therapy. Medical therapy involves acid suppression, which can be achieved with antacids, histamine-receptor antagonists or proton-pump inhibitors. Whereas most patients can be effectively managed with medical therapy, others may go on to require anti-reflux surgery after undergoing a proper pre-operative evaluation. The management of this disease requires a complex approach. Maintenance therapy of GERD after using anti-secretory drugs should be continuously monitored. © Acta Gastro-Enterologica Belgica.

  15. Current and emerging therapies for the treatment of myasthenia gravis

    PubMed Central

    Mantegazza, Renato; Bonanno, Silvia; Camera, Giorgia; Antozzi, Carlo

    2011-01-01

    Myasthenia gravis (MG) is an autoimmmune disease in which autoantibodies to different antigens of the neuromuscular junction cause the typical weakness and fatigability. Treatment includes anticholinesterase drugs, immunosuppression, immunomodulation, and thymectomy. The autoimmune response is maintained under control by corticosteroids frequently associated with immunosuppressive drugs, with improvement in the majority of patients. In case of acute exacerbations with bulbar symptoms or repeated relapses, modulation of autoantibody activity by plasmapheresis or intravenous immunoglobulins provides rapid improvement. Recently, techniques removing only circulating immunoglobulins have been developed for the chronic management of treatment-resistant patients. The rationale for thymectomy relies on the central role of the thymus. Despite the lack of controlled studies, thymectomy is recommended as an option to improve the clinical outcome or promote complete remission. New videothoracoscopic techniques have been developed to offer the maximal surgical approach with the minimal invasiveness and hence patient tolerability. The use of biological drugs such as anti-CD20 antibodies is still limited but promising. Studies performed in the animal model of MG demonstrated that several more selective or antigen-specific approaches, ranging from mucosal tolerization to inhibition of complement activity or cellular therapy, might be feasible. Investigation of the transfer of these therapeutic approaches to the human disease will be the challenge for the future. PMID:21552317

  16. Current Concepts in Diagnosis and Treatment of Functional Neurological Disorders.

    PubMed

    Espay, Alberto J; Aybek, Selma; Carson, Alan; Edwards, Mark J; Goldstein, Laura H; Hallett, Mark; LaFaver, Kathrin; LaFrance, W Curt; Lang, Anthony E; Nicholson, Tim; Nielsen, Glenn; Reuber, Markus; Voon, Valerie; Stone, Jon; Morgante, Francesca

    2018-06-04

    Functional neurological disorders (FND) are common sources of disability in medicine. Patients have often been misdiagnosed, correctly diagnosed after lengthy delays, and/or subjected to poorly delivered diagnoses that prevent diagnostic understanding and lead to inappropriate treatments, iatrogenic harm, unnecessary and costly evaluations, and poor outcomes. Functional Neurological Symptom Disorder/Conversion Disorder was adopted by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition, replacing the term psychogenic with functional and removing the criterion of psychological stress as a prerequisite for FND. A diagnosis can now be made in an inclusionary manner by identifying neurological signs that are specific to FNDs without reliance on presence or absence of psychological stressors or suggestive historical clues. The new model highlights a wider range of past sensitizing events, such as physical trauma, medical illness, or physiological/psychophysiological events. In this model, strong ideas and expectations about these events correlate with abnormal predictions of sensory data and body-focused attention. Neurobiological abnormalities include hypoactivation of the supplementary motor area and relative disconnection with areas that select or inhibit movements and are associated with a sense of agency. Promising evidence has accumulated for the benefit of specific physical rehabilitation and psychological interventions alone or in combination, but clinical trial evidence remains limited. Functional neurological disorders are a neglected but potentially reversible source of disability. Further research is needed to determine the dose and duration of various interventions, the value of combination treatments and multidisciplinary therapy, and the therapeutic modality best suited for each patient.

  17. White matter alterations in narcolepsy patients with cataplexy: tract-based spatial statistics.

    PubMed

    Park, Yun K; Kwon, Oh-Hun; Joo, Eun Yeon; Kim, Jae-Hun; Lee, Jong M; Kim, Sung T; Hong, Seung B

    2016-04-01

    Functional imaging studies and voxel-based morphometry analysis of brain magnetic resonance imaging showed abnormalities in the hypothalamus-thalamus-orbitofrontal pathway, demonstrating altered hypocretin pathway in narcolepsy. Those distinct morphometric changes account for problems in wake-sleep control, attention and memory. It also raised the necessity to evaluate white matter changes. To investigate brain white matter alterations in drug-naïve narcolepsy patients with cataplexy and to explore relationships between white matter changes and patient clinical characteristics, drug-naïve narcolepsy patients with cataplexy (n = 22) and healthy age- and gender-matched controls (n = 26) were studied. Fractional anisotropy and mean diffusivity images were obtained from whole-brain diffusion tensor imaging, and tract-based spatial statistics were used to localize white matter abnormalities. Compared with controls, patients showed significant decreases in fractional anisotropy of white matter of the bilateral anterior cingulate, fronto-orbital area, frontal lobe, anterior limb of the internal capsule and corpus callosum, as well as the left anterior and medial thalamus. Patients and controls showed no differences in mean diffusivity. Among patients, mean diffusivity values of white matter in the bilateral superior frontal gyri, bilateral fronto-orbital gyri and right superior parietal gyrus were positively correlated with depressive mood. This tract-based spatial statistics study demonstrated that drug-naïve patients with narcolepsy had reduced fractional anisotropy of white matter in multiple brain areas and significant relationship between increased mean diffusivity of white matter in frontal/cingulate and depression. It suggests the widespread disruption of white matter integrity and prevalent brain degeneration of frontal lobes according to a depressive symptom in narcolepsy. © 2015 European Sleep Research Society.

  18. Aberrant Food Choices after Satiation in Human Orexin-Deficient Narcolepsy Type 1.

    PubMed

    van Holst, Ruth Janke; van der Cruijsen, Lisa; van Mierlo, Petra; Lammers, Gert Jan; Cools, Roshan; Overeem, Sebastiaan; Aarts, Esther

    2016-11-01

    Besides influencing vigilance, orexin neurotransmission serves a variety of functions, including reward, motivation, and appetite regulation. As obesity is an important symptom in orexin-deficient narcolepsy, we explored the effects of satiety on food-related choices and spontaneous snack intake in patients with narcolepsy type 1 (n = 24) compared with healthy matched controls (n = 19). In additional analyses, we also included patients with idiopathic hypersomnia (n = 14) to assess sleepiness-related influences. Participants were first trained on a choice task to earn salty and sweet snacks. Next, one of the snack outcomes was devalued by having participants consume it until satiation (i.e., sensory-specific satiety). We then measured the selective reduction in choices for the devalued snack outcome. Finally, we assessed the number of calories that participants consumed spontaneously from ad libitum available snacks afterwards. After satiety, all participants reported reduced hunger and less wanting for the devalued snack. However, while controls and idiopathic hypersomnia patients chose the devalued snack less often in the choice task, patients with narcolepsy still chose the devalued snack as often as before satiety. Subsequently, narcolepsy patients spontaneously consumed almost 4 times more calories during ad libitum snack intake. We show that the manipulation of food-specific satiety has reduced effects on food choices and caloric intake in narcolepsy type 1 patients. These mechanisms may contribute to their obesity, and suggest an important functional role for orexin in human eating behavior. Study registered at Netherlands Trial Register. URL: www.trialregister.nl. Trial ID: NTR4508. © 2016 Associated Professional Sleep Societies, LLC.

  19. Narcolepsy susceptibility gene CCR3 modulates sleep-wake patterns in mice.

    PubMed

    Toyoda, Hiromi; Honda, Yoshiko; Tanaka, Susumu; Miyagawa, Taku; Honda, Makoto; Honda, Kazuki; Tokunaga, Katsushi; Kodama, Tohru

    2017-01-01

    Narcolepsy is caused by the loss of hypocretin (Hcrt) neurons and is associated with multiple genetic and environmental factors. Although abnormalities in immunity are suggested to be involved in the etiology of narcolepsy, no decisive mechanism has been established. We previously reported chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 3 (CCR3) as a novel susceptibility gene for narcolepsy. To understand the role of CCR3 in the development of narcolepsy, we investigated sleep-wake patterns of Ccr3 knockout (KO) mice. Ccr3 KO mice exhibited fragmented sleep patterns in the light phase, whereas the overall sleep structure in the dark phase did not differ between Ccr3 KO mice and wild-type (WT) littermates. Intraperitoneal injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) promoted wakefulness and suppressed both REM and NREM sleep in the light phase in both Ccr3 KO and WT mice. Conversely, LPS suppressed wakefulness and promoted NREM sleep in the dark phase in both genotypes. After LPS administration, the proportion of time spent in wakefulness was higher, and the proportion of time spent in NREM sleep was lower in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice only in the light phase. LPS-induced changes in sleep patterns were larger in Ccr3 KO compared to WT mice. Furthermore, we quantified the number of Hcrt neurons and found that Ccr3 KO mice had fewer Hcrt neurons in the lateral hypothalamus compared to WT mice. We found abnormalities in sleep patterns in the resting phase and in the number of Hcrt neurons in Ccr3 KO mice. These observations suggest a role for CCR3 in sleep-wake regulation in narcolepsy patients.

  20. Narcolepsy type 1 and hypersomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder show different slow wave activity dynamics.

    PubMed

    Walacik-Ufnal, Ewa; Piotrowska, Anna Justyna; Wołyńczyk-Gmaj, Dorota; Januszko, Piotr; Gmaj, Bartłomiej; Ufnal, Marcin; Kabat, Marek; Wojnar, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare electrophysiological parameters of night sleep in narcolepsy type 1 and hypersomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder. Fortyfour patients: 15 with narcolepsy type 1, 14 with hypersomnia associated with a psychiatric disorder and 15 age- and sex-matched controls participated in the study. The study subjects filled in the Athens Insomnia Scale (AIS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). The severity of daytime sleepiness was quantified subjectively using the Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) and the Stanford Sleepiness Scale (SSS), and objectively using the Multiple Sleep Latency Test (MSLT). All subjects underwent polysomnography (PSG) on the two consecutive nights. The data from the second night was analysed. The slow wave activity (SWA, 1-4 Hz) was calculated for the three consecutive sleep cycles, and topographic delta power maps were plotted. In contrast to narcoleptics, psychiatric hypersomniacs had undisturbed nocturnal sleep, high sleep efficiency, normal non-rapid eye movement (NREM) and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep proportions, normal REM latency and sleep latencies on MSLT and PSG. The subjective and objective sleepiness was significantly higher in narcolepsy group than in psychiatric hypersomnia group. In all the study groups SWA was the most prominent in frontal areas, while the greatest between-group differences were found in the central areas. There were significant differences between the groups in SWA in the second NREM episode. The highest SWA was observed in the hypersomnia group, while the lowest in the narcolepsy group. Psychiatric hypersomniacs and controls did not differ in the SWA exponential decline over consecutive NREM episodes, whereas narcoleptics exhibited a steeper dissipation of sleep pressure from the first to the second NREM episode. In conclusion, narcolepsy type1 and hypersomnia associated with psychiatric disorder differ in the SWA dynamics. Narcoleptics presented with the altered

  1. Novel method for evaluation of eye movements in patients with narcolepsy.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Julie A E; Kempfner, Lykke; Leonthin, Helle L; Hvidtfelt, Mathias; Nikolic, Miki; Kornum, Birgitte Rahbek; Jennum, Poul

    2017-05-01

    Narcolepsy causes abnormalities in the control of wake-sleep, non-rapid-eye-movement (non-REM) sleep and REM sleep, which includes specific eye movements (EMs). In this study, we aim to evaluate EM characteristics in narcolepsy as compared to controls using an automated detector. We developed a data-driven method to detect EMs during sleep based on two EOG signals recorded as part of a polysomnography (PSG). The method was optimized using the manually scored hypnograms from 36 control subjects. The detector was applied on a clinical sample with subjects suspected for central hypersomnias. Based on PSG, multiple sleep latency test and cerebrospinal fluid hypocretin-1 measures, they were divided into clinical controls (N = 20), narcolepsy type 2 (NT2, N = 19), and narcolepsy type 1 (NT1, N = 28). We investigated the distribution of EMs across sleep stages and cycles. NT1 patients had significantly less EMs during wake, N1, and N2 sleep and more EMs during REM sleep compared to clinical controls, and significantly less EMs during wake and N1 sleep compared to NT2 patients. Furthermore, NT1 patients showed less EMs during NREM sleep in the first sleep cycle and more EMs during NREM sleep in the second sleep cycle compared to clinical controls and NT2 patients. NT1 patients show an altered distribution of EMs across sleep stages and cycles compared to NT2 patients and clinical controls, suggesting that EMs are directly or indirectly controlled by the hypocretinergic system. A data-driven EM detector may contribute to the evaluation of narcolepsy and other disorders involving the control of EMs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Body weight and basal metabolic rate in childhood narcolepsy: a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zongwen; Wu, Huijuan; Stone, William S; Zhuang, Jianhua; Qiu, Linli; Xu, Xing; Wang, Yan; Zhao, Zhengqing; Han, Fang; Zhao, Zhongxin

    2016-09-01

    The aims of this study were to document the trajectory of weight gain and body mass index (BMI) in children with type 1 narcolepsy, and to analyze basal metabolic rate (BMR). A total of 65 Chinese children with type 1 narcolepsy with a disease duration ≤12 months were included. In addition, 79 healthy age-matched students were enrolled as controls. Height and body weight were measured every six months for up to 36 months to calculate BMI growth. BMR was measured using COSMED K4b2 indirect calorimetry in 34 patients and 30 healthy controls at six months. At the end of 36 months, the BMR was compared among 18 patients and 16 healthy controls. The children with type 1 narcolepsy showed higher BMIs at follow-up assessments. At the end of the study, 38.46% of the patients were obese and an additional 26.15% were overweight. The patients' BMI growth at six, 12, 18, 24 and 30 months of follow-up was significantly higher, but not at month 36. The patients' basal energy expenditure was significantly lower than that of the controls at six months but not at 36 months. BMI increased rapidly in children with type 1 narcolepsy after disease onset, but BMI growth decreased gradually with prolonged disease. Decreased BMR is an important cause underlying rapid weight gain. The gradual restoration of BMI growth and BMR in narcolepsy emphasizes the importance of compensatory metabolic mechanisms in this disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Two cases of childhood narcolepsy mimicking epileptic seizures in video-EEG/EMG.

    PubMed

    Yanagishita, Tomoe; Ito, Susumu; Ohtani, Yui; Eto, Kaoru; Kanbayashi, Takashi; Oguni, Hirokazu; Nagata, Satoru

    2018-06-06

    Narcolepsy is characterized by excessive sleepiness, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis, and can occur with or without cataplexy. Here, we report two children with narcolepsy presenting with cataplexy mimicking epileptic seizures as determined by long-term video-electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) monitoring. Case 1 was a 15-year-old girl presenting with recurrent episodes of "convulsions" and loss of consciousness, who was referred to our hospital with a diagnosis of epilepsy showing "convulsions" and "complex partial seizures". The long-term video-polygraph showed a clonic attack lasting for 15 s, which corresponded to 1-2 Hz with interruption of mentalis EMG discharges lasting for 70-300 ms without any EEG changes. Narcolepsy was suspected due to the attack induced by hearty laughs and the presence of sleep attacks, and confirmed by low orexin levels in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Case 2 was an 11-year-old girl presenting with recurrent episodes of myoclonic attacks simultaneously with dropping objects immediately after hearty laughs, in addition to sleep attacks, hypnagogic hallucinations, and sleep paralysis. The long-term video-polygraph showed a subtle attack, characterized by dropping chopsticks from her hand, which corresponded to an interruption of ongoing deltoid EMG discharges lasting 140 ms without any EEG changes. A diagnosis of narcolepsy was confirmed by the low orexin levels in CSF. These cases demonstrate that children with narcolepsy may have attacks of cataplexy that resemble clonic or myoclonic seizures. Copyright © 2018 The Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. The ICSD-3 and DSM-5 guidelines for diagnosing narcolepsy: clinical relevance and practicality.

    PubMed

    Ruoff, Chad; Rye, David

    2016-07-20

    Narcolepsy is a chronic neurological disease manifesting as difficulty with maintaining continuous wake and sleep. Clinical presentation varies but requires excessive daytime sleepiness (EDS) occurring alone or together with features of rapid-eye movement (REM) sleep dissociation (e.g., cataplexy, hypnagogic/hypnopompic hallucinations, sleep paralysis), and disrupted nighttime sleep. Narcolepsy with cataplexy is associated with reductions of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) hypocretin due to destruction of hypocretin peptide-producing neurons in the hypothalamus in individuals with a specific genetic predisposition. Updated diagnostic criteria include the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders Fifth Edition (DSM-5) and International Classification of Sleep Disorders Third Edition (ICSD-3). DSM-5 criteria require EDS in association with any one of the following: (1) cataplexy; (2) CSF hypocretin deficiency; (3) REM sleep latency ≤15 minutes on nocturnal polysomnography (PSG); or (4) mean sleep latency ≤8 minutes on multiple sleep latency testing (MSLT) with ≥2 sleep-onset REM-sleep periods (SOREMPs). ICSD-3 relies more upon objective data in addition to EDS, somewhat complicating the diagnostic criteria: 1) cataplexy and either positive MSLT/PSG findings or CSF hypocretin deficiency; (2) MSLT criteria similar to DSM-5 except that a SOREMP on PSG may count as one of the SOREMPs required on MSLT; and (3) distinct division of narcolepsy into type 1, which requires the presence of cataplexy or documented CSF hypocretin deficiency, and type 2, where cataplexy is absent, and CSF hypocretin levels are either normal or undocumented. We discuss limitations of these criteria such as variability in clinical presentation of cataplexy, particularly when cataplexy may be ambiguous, as well as by age; multiple and/or invasive CSF diagnostic test requirements; and lack of normative diagnostic test data (e.g., MSLT) in certain populations. While ICSD-3 criteria

  5. Current Concepts in Treatment of Patellofemoral Osteochondritis Dissecans

    PubMed Central

    Paine, Russ; Chicas, Eric; Gardner, Emily; Bailey, Lane; McDermott, James

    2016-01-01

    Identification, protection, and management of patellofemoral articular cartilage lesions continue to remain on the forefront of sports medicine rehabilitation. Due to high-level compression forces that are applied through the patellofemoral (PF) joint, managing articular cartilage lesions is challenging for sports medicine specialists. Articular cartilage damage may exist in a wide spectrum of injuries ranging from small, single areas of focal damage to wide spread osteoarthritis involving large chondral regions. Management of these conditions has evolved over the last two centuries, most recently using biogenetic materials and cartilage replacement modalities. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss PF articular cartilage injuries, etiological variables, and investigate the evolution in management of articular cartilage lesions. Rehabilitation of these lesions will also be discussed with a focus on current trends and return to function criteria. Level of Evidence 5 PMID:27904793

  6. Nondopaminergic treatments for Parkinson's disease: current and future prospects

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, Maria Eliza; Fox, Susan H

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease is primarily caused by dysfunction of dopaminergic neurons, however, nondopaminergic (ND) systems are also involved. ND targets are potentially useful to reduce doses of levodopa or to treat nonlevodopa-responsive symptoms. Recent studies have investigated the role of ND drugs for motor and nonmotor symptoms. Adenosine A2A receptor antagonists, mixed inhibitors of sodium/calcium channels and monoamine oxidase-B have recently been found to improve motor fluctuations. N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor antagonists and serotonin 5HT1B receptor agonists demonstrated benefit in levodopa-induced dyskinesia. Conversely, studies using antiepileptic drugs and adrenoreceptor antagonist had conflicting results. Moreover, metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists also failed to improve symptoms. The current review summarizes the most recent findings on ND drugs over the last 2 years. PMID:27230697

  7. Ganglion blocks as a treatment of pain: current perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Gunduz, Osman Hakan; Kenis-Coskun, Ozge

    2017-01-01

    The inputs from sympathetic ganglia have been known to be involved in the pathophysiology of various painful conditions such as complex regional pain syndrome, cancer pain of different origin, and coccygodynia. Sympathetic ganglia blocks are used to relieve patients who suffer from these conditions for over a century. Many numbers of local anesthetics such as bupivacaine or neurolytic agents such as alcohol can be chosen for a successful block. The agent is selected according to its duration of effect and the purpose of the injection. Most commonly used sympathetic blocks are stellate ganglion block, lumbar sympathetic block, celiac plexus block, superior hypogastric block, and ganglion Impar block. In this review, indications, methods, effectiveness, and complications of these blocks are discussed based on the data from the current literature. PMID:29276402

  8. Common Ice Hockey Injuries and Treatment: A Current Concepts Review.

    PubMed

    Mosenthal, William; Kim, Michael; Holzshu, Robert; Hanypsiak, Bryan; Athiviraham, Aravind

    Injuries are common in ice hockey, a contact sport where players skate at high speeds on a sheet of ice and shoot a vulcanized rubber puck in excess of one hundred miles per hour. This article reviews the diagnoses and treatment of concussions, injuries to the cervical spine, and lower and upper extremities as they pertain to hockey players. Soft tissue injury of the shoulder, acromioclavicular joint separation, glenohumeral joint dislocation, clavicle fractures, metacarpal fractures, and olecranon bursitis are discussed in the upper-extremity section of the article. Lower-extremity injuries reviewed in this article include adductor strain, athletic pubalgia, femoroacetabular impingement, sports hernia, medial collateral and anterior cruciate ligament tears, skate bite, and ankle sprains. This review is intended to aid the sports medicine physician in providing optimal sports-specific care to allow their athlete to return to their preinjury level of performance.

  9. Human toxocariasis: current advances in diagnostics, treatment, and interventions.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Gustavo Marçal Schmidt Garcia; Telmo, Paula de Lima; Mendonça, Marcelo; Moreira, Angela Nunes; McBride, Alan John Alexander; Scaini, Carlos James; Conceição, Fabricio Rochedo

    2014-09-01

    Toxocariasis is a neglected zoonosis caused by the nematodes Toxocara canis and Toxocara cati. This disease is widespread in many countries, reaching high prevalence independently of the economic conditions. However, the true number of cases of toxocariasis is likely to be underestimated owing to the lack of adequate surveillance programs. Although some diagnostic tests are available, their sensitivity and specificity need to be improved. In addition, treatment options for toxocariasis are limited and are non-specific. Toxocariasis is listed as one of the five most important neglected diseases by the CDC. This review presents recent advances related to the control of toxocariasis, including new immunodiagnostics, therapies, and drug formulations, as well as novel interventions using DNA vaccines, immunomodulators, and probiotics. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Antimicrobial treatment in complicated intraabdominal infections--current situation].

    PubMed

    Vyhnánek, F

    2009-04-01

    Compared to other infections, intraabdominal infections include wide spectrum of infections of various severity, have different ethiology, which is frequently polymicrobial, show different microbiological results, which are difficult to interpret. The role of surgical intervention is essential. Intraabdominal infections are common causes of morbidity and mortality. Their prognosis is significantly improved with early and exact diagnosis, appropriate surgical or radiological intervention and timely effective antimicrobial therapy. Practitioners may choose between older or more modern antibiotics, between monotherapy or combination therapy, however, they should also consider clinical condition of the patient, the antibiotic's spectrum of activity, the treatment timing and its duration, the dose and dosing scheme of the particular antimicrobials. Furthermore, antimicrobial therapy should be used with caution, with the aim to prevent development of antimicrobial resistence. Inappropriate choice of antimicrobials in initial empiric therapy results in relapsing infections, surgical intervention and prolongation of hospitalization, and even death rates reflect adequate and timely empiric therapy.

  11. Current and emerging strategies for treatment of childhood dystonia

    PubMed Central

    Bertucco, Matteo; Sanger, Terence D.

    2014-01-01

    Childhood dystonia is a movement disorder characterized by involuntary sustained or intermittent muscle contractions causing twisting and repetitive movements, abnormal postures, or both (Sanger et al. 2003). Dystonia is a devastating neurological condition that prevents the acquisition of normal motor skills during critical periods of development in children. Moreover, it is particularly debilitating in children when dystonia affects the upper extremities such that learning and consolidation of common daily motor actions are impeded. Thus, the treatment and rehabilitation of dystonia is a challenge that continuously requires exploration of novel interventions. This review will initially describe the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms of the motor impairments found in childhood dystonia followed by the clinical measurement tools that are available to document the presence and severity of symptoms. Finally, we will discuss the state-of-the-art of therapeutic options for childhood dystonia, with particular emphasis on emergent and innovative strategies. PMID:25835254

  12. Current concepts regarding pharmacologic treatment of rheumatoid and osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Wildy, K S; Wasko, M C

    2001-05-01

    Treating patients with osteoarthritis (OA) and rheumatoid arthritis (RA) remains challenging; however, new agents offer the chance for an improved quality of life. As an alternative to traditional nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories, cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitors provide pain relief for OA and RA patients with possible fewer side effects. Otherwise, OA patients may opt for topical agents, injections, or supplements. Rheumatoid arthritis research has led to an improved understanding of the inflammatory cascade and an appreciation of the early tissue destruction. A new treatment philosophy has thus emerged along with the development of new biologic agents; the latter, along with combination therapy and a new disease modifying antirheumatic drug, leflunomide, have greatly expanded the chances for disease control in RA patients.

  13. Eosinophilic oesophagitis: Current evidence-based diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lucendo, Alfredo J; Molina-Infante, Javier

    2018-04-01

    Eosinophilic oesophagitis (EoE) is a disease caused by an immune response to food antigens in contact with the oesophageal mucosa. Its diagnosis is defined by the combination of oesophageal dysfunction symptoms and inflammation of the oesophageal mucosa predominantly by eosinophils. Its chronic course and frequent progression to subepithelial fibrosis and oesophageal strictures indicate the need for treatment. The information provided by recent clinical trials and systematic reviews has led to the development of new clinical guidelines, endorsed by several European scientific societies. This review includes the most relevant aspects of the new guidelines, updates the EoE concept and reports its epidemiology and risk factors, associated conditions and its natural history in children and adults. Diagnostic criteria are provided, and tests for EoE diagnosis and monitoring and therapeutic options are analysed based on the best scientific evidence and consensus opinion of experts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  14. Current challenges and pitfalls in the pharmacological treatment of depression

    PubMed Central

    Popa-Velea, O; Gheorghe, IR; Truţescu, CI; Purcărea, VL

    2015-01-01

    The multifactorial etiology of depression obliges needs an individual assessment, the psychopharmacological approach involving a biopsychosocial analysis for each individual case. The rebalancing of the depressive patient, seen as a return to a normal level of psychosocial functioning and reduced risk of relapse is achieved with a prompt and constant support of specialized teams. Treatment should include psychopharmacological and psychosocial approaches, the results being interrelated and contributing to the prognosis of the disorder. Progress in clinical and pharmacological research, vivid dynamics of socio-economic environment, the complexity of diagnostic evaluation and the need for an interdisciplinary approach may cause difficulties in addressing the depressive patient and the ethical controversies. The aim of this paper is to present a brief analysis of challenges encountered in the present psychiatric practice, starting from the heterogeneity of depressive manifestations and finishing with the prioritization of interventional forms. PMID:25866576

  15. CURRENT CONCEPTS AND TREATMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL COMPRESSIVE ISSUES.

    PubMed

    Mullaney, Michael J; Fukunaga, Takumi

    2016-12-01

    Patellofemoral disorders, commonly encountered in sports and orthopedic rehabilitation settings, may result from dysfunction in patellofemoral joint compression. Osseous and soft tissue factors, as well as the mechanical interaction of the two, contribute to increased patellofemoral compression and pain. Treatment of patellofemoral compressive issues is based on identification of contributory impairments. Use of reliable tests and measures is essential in detecting impairments in hip flexor, quadriceps, iliotibial band, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius flexibility, as well as in joint mobility, myofascial restrictions, and proximal muscle weakness. Once relevant impairments are identified, a combination of manual techniques, instrument-assisted methods, and therapeutic exercises are used to address the impairments and promote functional improvements. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to describe the clinical presentation, contributory considerations, and interventions to address patellofemoral joint compressive issues.

  16. CURRENT CONCEPTS AND TREATMENT OF PATELLOFEMORAL COMPRESSIVE ISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Fukunaga, Takumi

    2016-01-01

    Patellofemoral disorders, commonly encountered in sports and orthopedic rehabilitation settings, may result from dysfunction in patellofemoral joint compression. Osseous and soft tissue factors, as well as the mechanical interaction of the two, contribute to increased patellofemoral compression and pain. Treatment of patellofemoral compressive issues is based on identification of contributory impairments. Use of reliable tests and measures is essential in detecting impairments in hip flexor, quadriceps, iliotibial band, hamstrings, and gastrocnemius flexibility, as well as in joint mobility, myofascial restrictions, and proximal muscle weakness. Once relevant impairments are identified, a combination of manual techniques, instrument-assisted methods, and therapeutic exercises are used to address the impairments and promote functional improvements. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to describe the clinical presentation, contributory considerations, and interventions to address patellofemoral joint compressive issues. PMID:27904792

  17. Chronic perineal pain: current pathophysiological aspects, diagnostic approaches and treatment.

    PubMed

    Andromanakos, Nikolaos P; Kouraklis, Grigorios; Alkiviadis, Kostakis

    2011-01-01

    Chronic perineal pain is the anorectal and perineal pain without underlying organic disease, anorectal or endopelvic, which has been excluded by careful physical examination, radiological and endoscopic investigations. A variety of neuromuscular disorders of the pelvic floor lead to the different pathological conditions such as anorectal incontinence, urinary incontinence and constipation of obstructed defecation, sexual dysfunction and pain syndromes. The most common functional disorders of the pelvic floor muscles, accompanied by perineal pain are levator ani syndrome, proctalgia fugax, myofascial syndrome and coccygodynia. In the diagnosis of these syndromes, contributing to a thorough history, physical examination, selected specialized investigations and the exclusion of organic disease with proctalgia is carried out. Accurate diagnosis of the syndromes helps in choosing an appropriate treatment and in avoiding unnecessary and ineffective surgical procedures, which often are performed in an attempt to alleviate the patient's symptoms.

  18. Current treatment options for the management of esophageal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mawhinney, Mark R; Glasgow, Robert E

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, esophageal cancer characteristics and management options have evolved significantly. There has been a sharp increase in the frequency of esophageal adenocarcinoma and a decline in the frequency of squamous cell carcinoma. A more comprehensive understanding of prognostic factors influencing outcome has also been developed. This has led to more management options for esophageal cancer at all stages than ever before. A multidisciplinary, team approach to management in a high volume center is the preferred approach. Each patient should be individually assessed based on type of cancer, local or regional involvement, and his or her own functional status to determine an appropriate treatment regimen. This review will discuss management of esophageal cancer relative to disease progression and patient functional status. PMID:23152702

  19. The androgen-deficient aging male: current treatment options.

    PubMed

    Tenover, J Lisa

    2003-01-01

    All delivery forms of testosterone should be equally efficacious in treating the androgen-deficient aging male if adequate serum testosterone levels are obtained. The testosterone preparations available in North America include the oral undecanoate, injectable testosterone esters, the scrotal patch, the nonscrotal transdermal patch, and the transdermal gels. Selection of a specific testosterone preparation for replacement therapy depends on many factors, including the magnitude and pattern of serum testosterone levels produced, side effects of the particular formulation, reversibility if an adverse event should occur, convenience of use, cosmetic issues related to the preparation, and cost. In addition, potential adverse effects of testosterone therapy applicable to all forms of testosterone delivery, such as fluid retention, gynecomastia, polycythemia, worsening of sleep apnea, change in cardiovascular-disease risk, or alterations in prostate health, need to be considered both prior to therapy and during treatment monitoring.

  20. Post-traumatic epilepsy: current and emerging treatment options

    PubMed Central

    Szaflarski, Jerzy P; Nazzal, Yara; Dreer, Laura E

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to many undesired problems and complications, including immediate and long-term seizures/epilepsy, changes in mood, behavioral, and personality problems, cognitive and motor deficits, movement disorders, and sleep problems. Clinicians involved in the treatment of patients with acute TBI need to be aware of a number of issues, including the incidence and prevalence of early seizures and post-traumatic epilepsy (PTE), comorbidities associated with seizures and anticonvulsant therapies, and factors that can contribute to their emergence. While strong scientific evidence for early seizure prevention in TBI is available for phenytoin (PHT), other antiepileptic medications, eg, levetiracetam (LEV), are also being utilized in clinical settings. The use of PHT has its drawbacks, including cognitive side effects and effects on function recovery. Rates of recovery after TBI are expected to plateau after a certain period of time. Nevertheless, some patients continue to improve while others deteriorate without any clear contributing factors. Thus, one must ask, ‘Are there any actions that can be taken to decrease the chance of post-traumatic seizures and epilepsy while minimizing potential short- and long-term effects of anticonvulsants?’ While the answer is ‘probably,’ more evidence is needed to replace PHT with LEV on a permanent basis. Some have proposed studies to address this issue, while others look toward different options, including other anticonvulsants (eg, perampanel or other AMPA antagonists), or less established treatments (eg, ketamine). In this review, we focus on a comparison of the use of PHT versus LEV in the acute TBI setting and summarize the clinical aspects of seizure prevention in humans with appropriate, but general, references to the animal literature. PMID:25143737

  1. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment: current realities and future.

    PubMed

    Berthon-Jones, M; Lawrence, S; Sullivan, C E; Grunstein, R

    1996-11-01

    Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a highly effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. The apnea/hypopnea index (AHI) is reduced 10-fold, but the patient dropout rate is up to 30%, and usage is typically < 5 hours per night. Titration, designed to make the best trade-off between effectiveness and side effects, is expensive. Autotitrating devices make this trade-off on a minute-by-minute basis, potentially reducing mean pressure delivery, reducing side effects, and increasing compliance. The aim of this study was to test the effectiveness of the AutoSet self-adjusting nasal CPAP system (ResMed, Sydney, Australia) in eliminating obstructive events and normalizing the arousal index. Forty-five subjects (41 males and 4 females with AHI) values of > 20/hour were recruited, with written informed consent. Subjects slept for a diagnostic night, followed by a treatment night, in the laboratory, using the AutoSet system with full polysomnographic monitoring of respiratory and sleep variables. Arousals were scored using ASDA criteria. Hypopneas were scored when there was a 50% reduction in ventilation for > 10 seconds, associated with a 4% drop in oxygen saturation. For comparison, the ASDA arousal index in 16 normal subjects (without nasal CPAP) is provided. Results are given as mean +/- standard error of the mean. AHI was reduced from 55 +/- 3 to 1.5 +/- 0.35 events/hour (p < 0.0001). The arousal index was reduced from 65 +/- 3 to 18 +/- 2 events/hour (p < 0.0001), identical to the value in the 16 healthy normal subjects. There was a 158% +/- 21% increase in slow-wave sleep (p = 0.01) and a 186% +/- 27% increase in rapid eye movement sleep (p = 0.013). The AutoSet self-adjusting nasal CPAP system adequately treats obstructive sleep apnea syndrome on the first night under laboratory conditions.

  2. Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities

    Cancer.gov

    Cancer Treatment-Related Cardiotoxicity: Understanding the Current State of Knowledge and Developing Future Research Priorities, a 2013 workshop sponsored by the Epidemiology and Genomics Research Program.

  3. Catatonia: Our current understanding of its diagnosis, treatment and pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Sean A; Mazurek, Michael F; Rosebush, Patricia I

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome that has been reported to occur in more than 10% of patients with acute psychiatric illnesses. Two subtypes of the syndrome have been identified. Catatonia of the retarded type is characterized by immobility, mutism, staring, rigidity, and a host of other clinical signs. Excited catatonia is a less common presentation in which patients develop prolonged periods of psychomotor agitation. Once thought to be a subtype of schizophrenia, catatonia is now recognized to occur with a broad spectrum of medical and psychiatric illnesses, particularly affective disorders. In many cases, the catatonia must be treated before any underlying conditions can be accurately diagnosed. Most patients with the syndrome respond rapidly to low-dose benzodiazepines, but electroconvulsive therapy is occasionally required. Patients with longstanding catatonia or a diagnosis of schizophrenia may be less likely to respond. The pathobiology of catatonia is poorly understood, although abnormalities in gamma-aminobutyric acid and glutamate signaling have been suggested as causative factors. Because catatonia is common, highly treatable, and associated with significant morbidity and mortality if left untreated, physicians should maintain a high level of suspicion for this complex clinical syndrome. Since 1989, we have systematically assessed patients presenting to our psychiatry service with signs of retarded catatonia. In this paper, we present a review of the current literature on catatonia along with findings from the 220 cases we have assessed and treated. PMID:28078203

  4. Current trends in the diagnosis and treatment of tuboovarian abscess

    SciT

    Landers, D.V.; Sweet, R.L.

    Tuboovarian abscess is a well-recognized complication of acute salpingitis and has been reported in as many as one third of hospital admissions for acute salpingitis. The incidence of tuboovarian abscess is expected to increase as a result of the current epidemic of sexually transmitted diseases and their sequelae. Patients with tuboovarian abscess most commonly present with lower abdominal pain and an adnexal mass(es). Fever and leukocytosis may be absent. Ultrasound, computed tomographic scans, laparoscopy, or laparotomy may be necessary to confirm the diagnosis. Tuboovarian abscess may be unilateral or bilateral regardless of intrauterine contraceptive device usage. Tuboovarian abscess is polymicrobialmore » with a preponderance of anaerobic organisms. An initial conservative antimicrobial approach to the management of the unruptured tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if the antimicrobial agents used can penetrate abscesses, remain active within the abscess environment, and are active against the major pathogens in tuboovarian abscess, including the resistant gram-negative anaerobes such as Bacteroides fragilis and Bacteroides bivius. However, if the patient does not begin to show a response within a reasonable amount of time, about 48 to 72 hours, surgical intervention should be undertaken. Suspicion of rupture should remain an indication for immediate operation. Once operation is undertaken, a conservative approach with unilateral adnexectomy for one-side tuboovarian abscess is appropriate if future fertility or hormone production is desired.« less

  5. Current approaches to the treatment of metastatic brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    Owonikoko, Taofeek K.; Arbiser, Jack; Zelnak, Amelia; Shu, Hui-Kuo G.; Shim, Hyunsuk; Robin, Adam M.; Kalkanis, Steven N.; Whitsett, Timothy G.; Salhia, Bodour; Tran, Nhan L.; Ryken, Timothy; Moore, Michael K.; Egan, Kathleen M.; Olson, Jeffrey J.

    2014-01-01

    Metastatic tumours involving the brain overshadow primary brain neoplasms in frequency and are an important complication in the overall management of many cancers. Importantly, advances are being made in understanding the molecular biology underlying the initial development and eventual proliferation of brain metastases. Surgery and radiation remain the cornerstones of the therapy for symptomatic lesions; however, image-based guidance is improving surgical technique to maximize the preservation of normal tissue, while more sophisticated approaches to radiation therapy are being used to minimize the long-standing concerns over the toxicity of whole-brain radiation protocols used in the past. Furthermore, the burgeoning knowledge of tumour biology has facilitated the entry of systemically administered therapies into the clinic. Responses to these targeted interventions have ranged from substantial toxicity with no control of disease to periods of useful tumour control with no decrement in performance status of the treated individual. This experience enables recognition of the limits of targeted therapy, but has also informed methods to optimize this approach. This Review focuses on the clinically relevant molecular biology of brain metastases, and summarizes the current applications of these data to imaging, surgery, radiation therapy, cytotoxic chemotherapy and targeted therapy. PMID:24569448

  6. Current and Emerging Drug Treatments for Binge Eating Disorder

    PubMed Central

    Reas, Deborah L.; Grilo, Carlos M.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction This study evaluated controlled treatment studies of pharmacotherapy for binge eating disorder (BED). Areas Covered The primary focus of the review was on phase II and III controlled trials testing medications for BED. A total of 46 studies were considered and 26 were reviewed in detail. BED outcomes included binge-eating remission, binge-eating frequency, associated eating-disorder psychopathology, associated depression, and weight loss. Expert Opinion Data from controlled trials suggests that certain medications are superior to placebo for stopping binge-eating and for producing faster reductions in binge eating, and - to varying degrees - for reducing associated eating-disorder psychopathology, depression, and weight loss over the short-term. Almost no data exist regarding longer-term effects of medication for BED. Except for topiramate, which reduces both binge eating and weight, weight loss is minimal with medications tested for BED. Psychological interventions and the combination of medication with psychological interventions produce binge-eating outcomes that are superior to medication-only approaches. Combining medications with psychological interventions does not significantly enhance binge-eating outcomes, although the addition of certain medications enhances weight losses achieved with cognitive-behavioral therapy and behavioral weight loss, albeit modestly. PMID:24460483

  7. Genome-wide analysis of CNV (copy number variation) and their associations with narcolepsy in a Japanese population.

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Maria; Miyagawa, Taku; Toyoda, Hiromi; Khor, Seik-Soon; Koike, Asako; Nitta, Aino; Akiyama, Kumi; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Honda, Yutaka; Honda, Makoto; Tokunaga, Katsushi

    2014-05-01

    In humans, narcolepsy with cataplexy (narcolepsy) is a sleep disorder that is characterized by sleepiness, cataplexy and rapid eye movement (REM) sleep abnormalities. Narcolepsy is caused by a reduction in the number of neurons that produce hypocretin (orexin) neuropeptide. Both genetic and environmental factors contribute to the development of narcolepsy.Rare and large copy number variations (CNVs) reportedly play a role in the etiology of a number of neuropsychiatric disorders. Narcolepsy is considered a neurological disorder; therefore, we sought to investigate any possible association between rare and large CNVs and human narcolepsy. We used DNA microarray data and a CNV detection software application, PennCNV-Affy, to detect CNVs in 426 Japanese narcoleptic patients and 562 healthy individuals. Overall, we found a significant enrichment of rare and large CNVs (frequency ≤1%, size ≥100 kb) in the patients (case-control ratio of CNV count=1.54, P=5.00 × 10(-4)). Next, we extended a region-based association analysis by including CNVs with its size ≥30 kb. Rare and large CNVs in PARK2 region showed a significant association with narcolepsy. Four patients were assessed to carry duplications of the gene region, whereas no controls carried the duplication, which was further confirmed by quantitative PCR assay. This duplication was also found in 2 essential hypersomnia (EHS) patients out of 171 patients. Furthermore, a pathway analysis revealed enrichments of gene disruptions by rare and large CNVs in immune response, acetyltransferase activity, cell cycle regulation and regulation of cell development. This study constitutes the first report on the risk association between multiple rare and large CNVs and the pathogenesis of narcolepsy. In the future, replication studies are needed to confirm the associations.

  8. [The current view of surgical treatment of diverticular disease].

    PubMed

    Zonca, P; Jacobi, C A; Meyer, G P

    2009-10-01

    complications, trombosis/embolia, postoperative qualitative conscious disorder, renal insufficiency, and others) occurred by elective group in 19.6% and by acute operated group in 50%. Overall extraabdominal postoperative complications occurred in all involved patients in 26.90%. The mortality was 0%. The conversion rate in elective group was 3.8% (3 pts.). An anastomosis leak occurred once (1%) by elective operated patient. An acute reoperation with resection according to Hartmann was performed. A small bowel loop perforation by coincidental adhesiolysis occurred once. A small bowel defect was identified and sutured by early laparoscopic reoperation. The conversion rate in acute group was 23.1% (6 pts.). The colonoscopy was necessary on 3rd day by 1 patient after left hemicolectomy for splenic flexure bleeding. This examination revealed bleeding from diverticulum in hepatic flexure. An endoscopic treatment was performed. An abscess in small pelvis occurred by this patient (12th postoperative day) and open drainage was performed. There was no anastomosis leak in group with acutely operated patients. The usage of standard classification is suitable for operation's indication for diverticular disease and its complications. It helps to determine the type and operation's strategy. The acute complicated diveticulitis has high morbidity and mortality. The early indication of selected patients with diverticular disease for elective colon sigmoideum resection protects against possible complication in the case of next attack of diverticulitis. It concerns the patients with recidivated uncomplicated and complicated forms of disease as well. The primary conservative treatment with percutaneous CT navigated drainage allows a postponed elective surgery. The primary resection with suture is better than the two stage surgery. The primary laparoscopic resection is safe procedure in almost all the cases. The primary suture can be safely performed in all elective cases for uncomplicated

  9. Incidence of narcolepsy after H1N1 influenza and vaccinations: Systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Sarkanen, Tomi O; Alakuijala, Anniina P E; Dauvilliers, Yves A; Partinen, Markku M

    2018-04-01

    An increased incidence of narcolepsy was seen in many countries after the pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccination campaign in 2009-2010. The H1N1 vaccine - narcolepsy connection is based on observational studies that are prone to various biases, e.g., confounding by H1N1 infection, and ascertainment, recall and selection biases. A direct pathogenic link has, however, remained elusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to analyze the magnitude of H1N1 vaccination related risk and to examine if there was any association with H1N1 infection itself. We searched all articles from PubMed, Web of Science and Scopus, and other relevant sources reporting the incidence and risk of post-vaccine narcolepsy. In our paper, we show that the risk appears to be limited to only one vaccine (Pandemrix ® ). During the first year after vaccination, the relative risk of narcolepsy was increased 5 to 14-fold in children and adolescents and 2 to 7-fold in adults. The vaccine attributable risk in children and adolescents was around 1 per 18,400 vaccine doses. Studies from Finland and Sweden also appear to demonstrate an extended risk of narcolepsy into the second year following vaccination, but such conclusions should be interpreted with a word of caution due to possible biases. Benefits of immunization outweigh the risk of vaccination-associated narcolepsy, which remains a rare disease. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Patent ductus arteriosus: are current neonatal treatment options better or worse than no treatment at all?

    PubMed Central

    Clyman, Ronald I.; Couto, Jim; Murphy, Gail M.

    2012-01-01

    Although a moderate-size PDA needs to be closed by the time a child is 1–2 years old, there is great uncertainty about whether it needs to be closed during the neonatal period. While 95% of neonatologists believe that a moderate-size PDA should be closed if it persists in infants (born before 28 weeks) who still require mechanical ventilation, the number that treat a PDA when it occurs in infants that do not require mechanical ventilation varies widely. Both the high likelihood of spontaneous ductus closure and the absence of RCTs, specifically addressing the risks and benefits of neonatal ductus closure, adds to the current uncertainty. New information suggests that early pharmacologic treatment has several important short-term benefits for the preterm newborn. On the other hand, ductus ligation, while eliminating the detrimental effects of a PDA on lung development, may create its own set of morbidities that counteract many of the benefits derived from ductus closure. PMID:22414883

  11. Narcolepsy and Predictors of Positive MSLTs in the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort

    PubMed Central

    Goldbart, Aviv; Peppard, Paul; Finn, Laurel; Ruoff, Chad M.; Barnet, Jodi; Young, Terry; Mignot, Emmanuel

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: To study whether positive multiple sleep latency tests (MSLTs, mean sleep latency [MSL] ≤ 8 minu