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Sample records for narcology hospital patients

  1. Mitigating risky sexual behaviors among Russian narcology hospital patients: the PREVENT (Partnership to Reduce the Epidemic Via Engagement in Narcology Treatment) randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Krupitsky, Evgeny M.; Cheng, Debbie M.; Raj, Anita; Egorova, Valentina Y.; Levenson, Suzette; Meli, Seville; Bridden, Carly; Verbitskaya, Elena V.; Kamb, Mary L.; Zvartau, Edwin E.

    2008-01-01

    Aim To assess the effectiveness of a sexual risk reduction intervention in the Russian narcology hospital setting. Design, setting and participants This was a randomized controlled trial from October 2004 to December 2005 among patients with alcohol and/or heroin dependence from two narcology hospitals in St Petersburg, Russia. Intervention Intervention subjects received two personalized sexual behavior counseling sessions plus three telephone booster sessions. Control subjects received usual addiction treatment, which did not include sexual behavior counseling. All received a research assessment and condoms at baseline. Measurements Primary outcomes were percentage of safe sex episodes (number of times condoms were used ÷ by number of sexual episodes) and no unprotected sex (100% condom use or abstinence) during the previous 3 months, assessed at 6 months. Findings Intervention subjects reported higher median percentage of safe sex episodes (unadjusted median difference 12.7%; P = 0.01; adjusted median difference 23%, P = 0.07); a significant difference was not detected for the outcome no unprotected sex in the past 3 months [unadjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.8-3.1; adjusted OR 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.3]. Conclusions Among Russian substance-dependent individuals, sexual behavior counseling during addiction treatment should be considered as one potential component of efforts to decrease risky sexual behaviors in this HIV at-risk population. PMID:18636998

  2. Fatal and Non-Fatal Overdose After Narcology Hospital Discharge Among Russians Living with HIV/Aids who Inject Drugs‡

    PubMed Central

    Walley, Alexander Y; Cheng, Debbie M; Quinn, Emily K.; Blokhina, Elena; Gnatienko, Natalia; Chaisson, Christine E.; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Coffin, Philip O; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Among Russians living with HIV/AIDS who inject drugs, we examined the incidence of fatal and non-fatal overdoses following discharge from a narcology hospital and the associations with more advanced HIV infection. Design Prospective cohort study of data collected at baseline, 3 and 6 months from HIV-infected patients with a history of injection drug use who were not treated with anti-retroviral therapy. Participants were recruited between 2012-14 from a narcology (addiction) hospital in St. Petersburg, Russia. Methods Fatal overdose was determined based on contact reports to study staff in the year after discharge. Non-fatal overdose was self-reported at the 3- and 6-month assessments. The main independent variable for HIV severity was CD4 cell count at the baseline interview (<200 cells/mm3 ≥ 200 cells/mm3). Secondary analyses assessed time since HIV diagnosis and treated with anti-retroviral treatment (ART) prior to enrollment as independent variables. We fit Cox proportional hazards models to assess whether HIV severity is associated with either fatal or non-fatal overdose. Results Among 349 narcology patients, 18 participants died from overdose within one year after discharge (8.7%, 95%CI 3.4-14.2 by Kaplan-Meier); an estimated 51% [95% CI 34-68%] reported at least one non-fatal overdose within 6 months of discharge. HIV severity, time since HIV diagnosis and ever ART were not significantly associated with either fatal or non-fatal overdose events. Conclusion Fatal and non-fatal overdose are common among Russians living with HIV/AIDS who inject drugs after narcology hospital discharge. Overdose prevention interventions are urgently warranted among Russian narcology patients with HIV infection. PMID:27907848

  3. Linking Infectious and Narcology Care (LINC) in Russia: design, intervention and implementation protocol.

    PubMed

    Gnatienko, Natalia; Han, Steve C; Krupitsky, Evgeny; Blokhina, Elena; Bridden, Carly; Chaisson, Christine E; Cheng, Debbie M; Walley, Alexander Y; Raj, Anita; Samet, Jeffrey H

    2016-05-04

    Russia and Eastern Europe have one of the fastest growing HIV epidemics in the world. While countries in this region have implemented HIV testing within addiction treatment systems, linkage to HIV care from these settings is not yet standard practice. The Linking Infectious and Narcology Care (LINC) intervention utilized peer-led strengths-based case management to motivate HIV-infected patients in addiction treatment to obtain HIV care. This paper describes the protocol of a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of the LINC intervention in St. Petersburg, Russia. Participants (n = 349) were recruited from the inpatient wards at the City Addiction Hospital in St. Petersburg, Russia. After completing a baseline assessment, participants were randomly assigned to receive either the LINC intervention or standard of care. Participants returned for research assessments 6 and 12 months post-baseline. Primary outcomes were assessed via chart review at HIV treatment locations. LINC holds the potential to offer an effective approach to coordinating HIV care for people who inject drugs in Russia. The LINC intervention utilizes existing systems of care in Russia, minimizing adoption of substantial infrastructure for implementation. Trial Registration NCT01612455.

  4. On drug treatment and social control: Russian narcology's great leap backwards.

    PubMed

    Elovich, Richard; Drucker, Ernest

    2008-06-24

    The medical discipline of narcology in Russia is a subspecialty of psychiatry from the Soviet era and it is given warrant to define the scope of health activities with regard to alcohol and other drug use, drug users, and related problems. Narcological practice is in turn constrained by the State. The emergence of widespread injection opiate use and associated HIV morbidities and mortalities during the first decade following the collapse of the Soviet Union has brought the contradictions in Russian narcological discourse into high relief. Narcology officials in the Russian Federation have consistently opposed substitution treatment for opiate dependence--the replacement of a short-acting illegal substance with a longer acting prescribed drug with similar pharmacological action but lower degree of risk. Thus, despite the addition of methadone and buprenorphine to WHO's list of essential medicines in 2005 and multiple position papers by international experts calling for substitution treatment as a critical element in the response to HIV (IOM, 2006; UNODC, UNAIDS, and WHO, 2005), methadone or buprenorphine remain prohibited by law in Russia. The authors detail Russian opposition to the prescription of methadone and buprenorphine, describing four phenomena: (1) the dominance of law enforcement and drug control policy over public health and medical ethics; (2) the conflation of Soviet era alcoholism treatment with treatment for opiate dependence; (3) the near universal representation of detoxification from drugs as treatment for dependence; and (4) a framework for judging treatment efficacy that is restricted to "cure" versus "failure to cure," and does not admit its poor outcomes or recognize alternative frameworks for gauging treatment of opiate dependence. In keeping with this position, Russian narcology officials have taken an implacable ideological stance toward illicit drug use, the people who use drugs, and their treatment. By adopting policies and practices

  5. Hospitalized Patients and Fungal Infections

    MedlinePlus

    ... but can also be caused by fungi. Hospital construction. Hospital staff do everything they can to prevent ... patients staying at hospitals where there is ongoing construction or renovation. 5 This is thought to be ...

  6. Hospital Patients Are Adult Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caffarella, Rosemary S.

    Patient education is recognized by health care providers and patients themselves as an important component of adequate health care for hospital patients. Through this informational process, patients receive information about specific health problems, learn the necessary competencies to deal with them, and develop accepting attitudes toward the…

  7. Hospital charges for stroke patients.

    PubMed

    Alberts, M J; Bennett, C A; Rutledge, V R

    1996-10-01

    Stroke is a common disease with a yearly cost in the United States of approximately $30 billion. The increasing prevalence of managed care and cost-containment measures may affect the delivery of stroke care now and in the future. This study was performed to determine (1) hospital charges and test utilization for stroke patients and (2) the effectiveness of educational efforts in modifying test utilization and related hospital charges. Patients with a diagnosis of stroke who were discharged from either the neurology service or another service of the Department of Medicine (DOM) were identified. Data on test utilization and hospital charges were collected and analyzed. Following this analysis, educational sessions were held in an effort to reduce the use of specific diagnostic tests. The effectiveness of these methods was studied in a second group of stroke patients. In the baseline period there were 303 stroke patients, of which 262 (86%) were discharged from the neurology service and 41 (14%) were discharged from other services of the DOM. Patients on the neurology service had a lower mean length of stay than patients on the other services of the DOM (9.2 days versus 10.5 days) and lower mean total charges per case ($13,149 versus $15,727), although the respective differences were not statistically significant. Patient on the neurology service were more likely to have both brain CT and MRI performed (82 of 262 patients, 31.3%) than patients on the other services of the DOM (4 of 41, 9.8%, P = .005). In addition, patients on the neurology service were more likely to undergo a transthoracic echocardiogram than patients on the other services of the DOM (71.8% versus 53.7%, P = .025). After educational sessions, the percentage of stroke patients on the neurology service having both CT and MRI fell from 31.3% to 17.7% (P = .005), and the number of stroke patients having a transthoracic echocardiogram fell from 71.8% to 60.3% (P = .025). However, the overall charges for

  8. Hospital Readmission Risk: Isolating Hospital from Patient Effects

    PubMed Central

    Krumholz, Harlan M.; Wang, Kun; Lin, Zhenqiu; Dharmarajan, Kumar; Horwitz, Leora I.; Ross, Joseph S.; Drye, Elizabeth E.; Bernheim, Susannah M.; Normand, Sharon-Lise T.

    2017-01-01

    Background To isolate hospital effects on hospitals’ risk-standardized readmission rates, we examined readmission outcomes among patients with multiple admissions for a similar diagnosis at >1 hospital within a given year. Methods We divided the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services hospital-wide readmission measure cohort from July 2014–June 2015 into 2 random samples. We used the first sample to calculate each hospital’s risk-standardized readmission rate and classified hospitals into performance quartiles. In the second sample, we identified patients with 2 admissions for similar diagnoses at different hospitals that occurred more than a month and less than a year apart, and compared observed readmission rates for those admitted to hospitals in different performance quartiles. Results In the sample used to characterize hospital performance, the median risk-standardized readmission rate was 15.5% (IQR 15.3%–15.8%). The other sample included 37,508 patients with 2 admissions for similar diagnoses at 4,272 different hospitals. The observed readmission rate was consistently higher when patients were admitted to hospitals in the worse performing quartile, but the only statistically significant difference was observed when the same patients were admitted to hospitals in the best and worst performing quartiles, in which the absolute readmission rate difference was 1.95 percentage points (95% CI, 0.39%–3.50%). Conclusions When the same patients were admitted with similar diagnoses to hospitals in the best performing quartile compared with the worst performing quartile for hospital readmission performance, there is a significant difference in rates of readmission within 30 days. The findings suggest that hospital quality contributes in part to readmission rates independent of patient factors. PMID:28902587

  9. [Hospital hygiene - clothing in hospitals: protection for staff and patients].

    PubMed

    Kerwat, Klaus; Wulf, Hinnerk

    2008-03-01

    Hospital clothing worn by medical personnel in German hospitals can be divided into two groups, work clothing and protective clothing. Work clothing is not changed between patient visits and hence is no measure of infection control. Its function is to protect private clothing and to identify medical personnel. Protective clothing on the other hand should protect staff and patients from nosocomial infections. It has to be changed between patient visits and is especially recommended with invasive procedures and immunocompromised patients.

  10. Hyperkalaemia in patients in hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Paice, B; Gray, J M; McBride, D; Donnelly, T; Lawson, D H

    1983-01-01

    Significant hyperkalaemia occurred in 406 out of 29 063 patients admitted to a major Scottish teaching hospital in one year (1.4%). Mortality was higher in these patients than in control patients and was strongly correlated with the severity of the hyperkalaemia. Overall seven deaths were directly due to hyperkalaemia (out of 58 deaths among patients with hyperkalaemia). Factors contributing to a poor prognosis were severity and speed of onset of hyperkalaemia and the presence of appreciable renal impairment. Patients with hyperkalaemia were older and more likely to be male; this trend was present in all diagnostic subcategories. Genitourinary disease, gastrointestinal disease, and cancer were significantly more common among the patients with hyperkalaemia than the controls. Hyperkalaemia due to drug treatment was invariably mild and non-fatal, whereas genitourinary disease was often associated with moderate to severe hyperkalaemia, which in two cases proved fatal. Use of electrocardiographic monitoring was rare, and although the treatment of hyperkalaemia was effective, it was often used when not required. Hyperkalaemia is a potential hazard in diabetic ketoacidosis, and use of potassium supplements should be carefully monitored during correction of the acidosis. PMID:6404388

  11. A Computerized Hospital Patient Information Management System

    PubMed Central

    Wig, Eldon D.

    1982-01-01

    The information processing needs of a hospital are many, with varying degrees of complexity. The prime concern in providing an integrated hospital information management system lies in the ability to process the data relating to the single entity for which every hospital functions - the patient. This paper examines the PRIMIS computer system developed to accommodate hospital needs with respect to a central patient registry, inpatients (i.e., Admission/Transfer/Discharge), and out-patients. Finally, the potential for expansion to permit the incorporation of more hospital functions within PRIMIS is examined.

  12. [Hospitalization period and nutritional status in hospitalized patients].

    PubMed

    Merhi, V A Leandro; de Oliveira, Ma R Marques; Caran, A L; Tristão, T Menuzzo Graupner; Ambo, R Miante; Tanner, M A; Vergna, C Marton

    2007-01-01

    With the objective of studying the nutritional status and its relationship with hospitalization period, a cross-sectional study was done with patients from a private hospital representing a population with a better socioeconomic condition. The anthropometric data of 267 patients, 46% males and 54% females ranging from 20 to 80 years of age, were assessed on the second day of hospitalization. Hospitalization period associated with nutritional status. The data were analyzed by the software Excel and Sigma Stat, using Fisher's exact test and the chi-square test. The studied population presented a body mass index of 25.9 +/- 5.3 and most patients lost weight during hospitalization. The longest hospitalization periods were found among patients with lung diseases (13 days), some being pre-obese (40%) with a small prevalence of undernutrition (4%). The percentage distribution of nutritional status among the groups according to diagnosis was different (P < 0.01) when assessed by the Fisher's exact test and the percentage distribution in weight variation between men and women was different (P < 0.02) when assessed by the chi-square test. When the population was segmented according to age, the percentage distribution of the nutritional status between > 60 and < or = 60 did not present a difference when assessed by the chi-square test. The results of this study show that the nutritional status in some diseases deserves special attention given the greater risk found in these situations, contributing to a longer hospitalization period.

  13. Implementing Patient Safety Initiatives in Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klingner, Jill; Moscovice, Ira; Tupper, Judith; Coburn, Andrew; Wakefield, Mary

    2009-01-01

    Implementation of patient safety initiatives can be costly in time and energy. Because of small volumes and limited resources, rural hospitals often are not included in nationally driven patient safety initiatives. This article describes the Tennessee Rural Hospital Patient Safety Demonstration project, whose goal was to strengthen capacity for…

  14. Patient Care Utility Module for DEPMEDS Hospitals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-06-05

    identified in the patient care utility capability in Deployable Medical S-:tems (DEPMEDS) hospitals, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A...identified in the patient care utility capability in Deployable Medical Systems (DEPMEDS) hospitals, especially in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). A...REQUEST FROM DEFENSE MEDICAL STANDARDIZATION BOARD TO STUDY SPACE AROUND PATIENT BEDSIDE IN DEPHEDS HOSPITALS 28 DEFENSE MEDICAL STANDARDIZATION BOARD FONT

  15. Hospital at home versus in-patient hospital care.

    PubMed

    Shepperd, S; Iliffe, S

    2005-07-20

    Hospital at home is defined as a service that provides active treatment by health care professionals, in the patient's home, of a condition that otherwise would require acute hospital in-patient care, always for a limited period. To assess the effects of hospital at home compared with in-patient hospital care. We searched the Cochrane Effective Practice and Organisation of Care Group (EPOC) specialised register (November 2004), MEDLINE (1966 to 1996), EMBASE (1980 to 1995), Social Science Citation Index (1992 to 1995), Cinahl (1982 to 1996), EconLit (1969 to 1996), PsycLit (1987 to 1996), Sigle (1980 to 1995) and the Medical Care supplement on economic literature (1970 to 1990). Randomised trials of hospital at home care compared with acute hospital in-patient care. The participants were patients aged 18 years and over. Two reviewers independently extracted data and assessed study quality. Twenty two trials are included in this update of the review. Among trials evaluating early discharge hospital at home schemes we found an odds ratio (OR) for mortality of 1.79 95% CI 0.85 to 3.76 for elderly medical patients (age 65 years and over) (n = 3 trials); OR 0.58; 95% CI 0.29 to 1.17 for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 5 trials); and OR 0.78; 95%CI 0.52 to 1.19 for patients recovering from a stroke (n = 4 trials). Two trials evaluating the early discharge of patients recovering from surgery reported an OR 0.43 (95% CI 0.02 to 10.89) for patients recovering from a hip replacement and an OR 1.01 (95% CI 0.37 to 2.81) for patients with a mix of conditions at three months follow-up. For readmission to hospital we found an OR 1.76; 95% CI 0.78 to 3.99 at 3 months follow-up for elderly medical patients (n = 2 trials); OR 0.81; 95% CI 0.55 to 1.19 for patients with COPD (n = 5 trials); and OR 0.96; 95% CI 0.63 to 1.45 for patients recovering from a stroke (n = 3 trials). No significant heterogeneity was observed. One trial recruiting patients

  16. Hospital level analysis to improve patient flow.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sankalp; Boyle, Justin; Good, Norm; Bugden, Simon; Scott, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The complexity of hospital operations ensures that one-size-fits-all solutions seldom work. As hospitals turn to evidence based strategies to redesign flow, it is critical that they tailor the strategies to suit their individual service. This paper analyses the effect of hospital occupancy on inpatient and emergency department patient flow parameters at the Caboolture hospital in Queensland, Australia, and identifies critical levels, or choke points, that result in performance decline. The effect of weekdays and weekends on patient flow is also investigated. We compare these findings to a previous study that has analysed patient flow across Queensland hospitals grouped by size, and discover several differences in the interaction between rising occupancy and patient flow parameters including rates of patient flow, length of stay, and access block. We also identify significantly higher choke points for Caboolture hospital as compared to other similarly sized Queensland hospitals, which suggest that patient flow here can be redesigned to operate at higher levels of occupancy without degrading flow performance. The findings support arguments for hospitals to analyse patient flow at a service level to deliver optimum service improvement.

  17. Candiduria in hospitalized patients in teaching hospitals of Ahvaz.

    PubMed

    Zarei-Mahmoudabadi, A; Zarrin, M; Ghanatir, F; Vazirianzadeh, B

    2012-12-01

    Nosocomial infections are usually acquired during hospitalization. Fungal infection of the urinary tract is increasing due to predisposing factors such as; antibacterial agents, indwelling urinary catheters, diabetes mellitus, long hospitalization, immunosuppressive agents, use of IV catheters, radiation therapy, malignancy. The aim of our study was to determine the prevalence of candiduria and urinary tract infection in patients admitted in Golestan and Emam Khomeini hospitals of Ahvaz, Iran. During 14 months, a total of 744 urine samples were collected and transferred to medical mycology laboratory immediately. Ten µl of uncentrifuged sample was cultured on CHROM agar Candida plates and incubated at 37°C for 24-48h aerobically. Candida species were identified based on colony morphology on CHROM agar Candida, germ tube production and micro-morphology on corn meal agar including 1% Tween 80. In the present study, 744 hospitalized patients were sampled (49.5%, female; 50.5%, male). The prevalence of candiduria in subjects was 16.5% that included 65.1% female and 34.9% male. The most common isolates were C. albicans (53.3%), followed by C. glabrata (24.4%), C. tropicalis (3.7%), C. krusei (2.2%), and Geotrichum spp. (0.7%) Urine cultures yielded more than 10,000 yeast colonies in 34.1% of cases, and the major predisposing factor associated with candiduria was antibiotic therapy (69.1%). Candiduria is relatively common in hospitalized patients in educational hospitals of Ahvaz. In addition, there is a strong correlation between the incidence of candiduria in hospitalized patients and broad-spectrum antibiotics therapy.

  18. Latex allergies - for hospital patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... bands used to stop or slow blood flow) Stethoscopes (used to listen to your heart beat and ... the hospital include asking for: Equipment, such as stethoscopes and blood pressure cuffs, to be covered, so ...

  19. Steering Patients to Safer Hospitals? The Effect of a Tiered Hospital Network on Hospital Admissions

    PubMed Central

    Scanlon, Dennis P; Lindrooth, Richard C; Christianson, Jon B

    2008-01-01

    Objective To determine if a tiered hospital benefit and safety incentive shifted the distribution of admissions toward safer hospitals. Data Sources/Study Setting A large manufacturing company instituted the hospital safety incentive (HSI) for union employees. The HSI gave union patients a financial incentive to choose hospitals that met the Leapfrog Group's three patient safety “leaps.” The analysis merges data from four sources: claims and enrollment data from the company, the American Hospital Association, the AHRQ HCUP-SID, and a state Office of the Insurance Commissioner. Study Design Changes in hospital admissions’ patterns for union and nonunion employees using a difference-in-difference design. We estimate the probability of choosing a specific hospital from a set of available alternatives using conditional logistic regression. Principal Findings Patients affiliated with the engineers’ union and admitted for a medical diagnosis were 2.92 times more likely to select a hospital designated as safer in the postperiod than in the preperiod, while salaried nonunion (SNU) patients (not subject to the financial incentive) were 0.64 times as likely to choose a compliant hospital in the post- versus preperiod. The difference-in-difference estimate, which is based on the predictions of the conditional logit model, is 0.20. However, the machinists’ union was also exposed to the incentive and they were no more likely to choose a safer hospital than the SNU patients. The incentive did not have an effect on patients admitted for a surgical diagnosis, regardless of union status. All patients were averse to travel time, but those union patients selecting an incentive hospital were less averse to travel time. Conclusions Patient price incentives and quality/safety information may influence hospital selection decisions, particularly for medical admissions, though the optimal incentive level for financial return to the plan sponsor is not clear. PMID:18761676

  20. Factors influencing warfarin response in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Abdel-Aziz, Mahmoud I.; Ali, Mostafa A. Sayed; Hassan, Ayman K.M.; Elfaham, Tahani H.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the influence of simultaneous factors that potentially keep patients far from achieving target INR range at discharge in hospitalized patients. Prospective cross-sectional observational study conducted at the Cardiology Department and Intensive Care Unit (ICU) of the Assiut University Hospitals. One-hundred and twenty patients were enrolled in the study from July 2013 to January 2014. Outcome measures were discharge INRs, bleeding and thromboembolic episodes. Bivariate analysis and multinomial logistic regression were conducted to determine independent risk factors that can keep patients outside target INR range. Patients who were newly initiated warfarin on hospital admission were given low initiation dose (2.8 mg ± 0.9). They were more likely to have INR values below 1.5 during hospital stay, 13 (27.7%) patients compared with 9 (12.3%) previously treated patients, respectively (p = .034). We found that the best predictors of achieving below target INR range relative to within target INR range were; shorter hospital stay periods (OR, 0.82 for every day increase [95% CI, 0.72–0.94]), being a male patient (OR, 2.86 [95% CI, 1.05–7.69]), concurrent infection (OR, 0.21 [95% CI, 0.07–0.59]) and new initiation of warfarin therapy on hospital admission (OR, 3.73 [95% CI, 1.28–10.9]). Gender, new initiation of warfarin therapy on hospital admission, shorter hospital stay periods and concurrent infection can have a significant effect on discharge INRs. Initiation of warfarin without giving loading doses increases the risk of having INRs below 1.5 during hospital stay and increases the likelihood of a patient to be discharged with INR below target range. Following warfarin dosing nomograms and careful monitoring of the effect of various factors on warfarin response should be greatly considered. PMID:26702259

  1. Patient (customer) expectations in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Bostan, Sedat; Acuner, Taner; Yilmaz, Gökhan

    2007-06-01

    The expectations of patient are one of the determining factors of healthcare service. The purpose of this study is to measure the Patients' Expectations, based on Patient's Rights. This study was done with Likert-Survey in Trabzon population. The analyses showed that the level of the expectations of the patient was high on the factor of receiving information and at an acceptable level on the other factors. Statistical meaningfulness was determined between age, sex, education, health insurance, and the income of the family and the expectations of the patients (p<0.05). According to this study, the current legal regulations have higher standards than the expectations of the patients. The reason that the satisfaction of the patients high level is interpreted due to the fact that the level of the expectation is low. It is suggested that the educational and public awareness studies on the patients' rights must be done in order to increase the expectations of the patients.

  2. Hospitalized Patients' Responses to Offers of Prayer.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Kathy; Taylor, Elizabeth Johnston

    2018-02-01

    Most Americans pray; many pray about their health. When they are hospitalized, however, do patients want an offer of prayer from a healthcare provider? This project allowed for the measurement of hospitalized patient's responses to massage therapists' offers of a colloquial prayer after a massage. After the intervention, 78 patients completed questionnaires that elicited quantitative data that were analyzed using uni- and bivariate statistical analyses. In this sample, 88% accepted the offer of prayer, 85% found it helpful, and 51% wanted prayer daily. Patients may welcome prayer, as long as the clinician shows "genuine kindness and respect."

  3. Acute porphyrias: clinical spectrum of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Sheerani, Mughis; Urfy, Mian Zainulsajadeen; Hassan, Ali; Islam, Zunaira; Baig, Shahid

    2007-11-01

    To determine characteristics, clinical features and triggers of acute porphyria in hospitalized patients presenting to a tertiary care center in Pakistan. Case series. The Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from 1988 to 2003. Case records of 26 patients hospitalized with diagnosis were identified through computerized hospital patients' data. The diagnosis of acute porphyria was based on pertinent clinical features and laboratory investigations after exclusion of other alternative diagnosis and patients previously diagnosed as porphyric. The data was analyzed through SPSS software version 11.0. Twelve patients (46.2%) were males. Mean age was 21 years. Most common manifestation were gastrointestinal (n=22; 88.5%) followed by neurological symptoms (n=14; 54%). Neurological manifestations included seizures (n=9; 34.6%) and neuropathy (n=6; 23%). One patient presented with depression and insomnia. Family history was positive in (n=8; 30.8%). Eighteen (69%) had history of previous attacks at their presentation to the hospital. Most common precipitating factor was 'eating outside' (n=18; 69%). Porphyrias are uncommon and cryptic group of diseases. This study shows a slightly different gender distribution, earlier onset of symptoms, higher number of neuropsychiatric symptoms (especially seizures), more distal neuropathies and different precipitant in the studied subset of patients than described previously in the western studies.

  4. Patient choice modelling: how do patients choose their hospitals?

    PubMed

    Smith, Honora; Currie, Christine; Chaiwuttisak, Pornpimol; Kyprianou, Andreas

    2018-06-01

    As an aid to predicting future hospital admissions, we compare use of the Multinomial Logit and the Utility Maximising Nested Logit models to describe how patients choose their hospitals. The models are fitted to real data from Derbyshire, United Kingdom, which lists the postcodes of more than 200,000 admissions to six different local hospitals. Both elective and emergency admissions are analysed for this mixed urban/rural area. For characteristics that may affect a patient's choice of hospital, we consider the distance of the patient from the hospital, the number of beds at the hospital and the number of car parking spaces available at the hospital, as well as several statistics publicly available on National Health Service (NHS) websites: an average waiting time, the patient survey score for ward cleanliness, the patient safety score and the inpatient survey score for overall care. The Multinomial Logit model is successfully fitted to the data. Results obtained with the Utility Maximising Nested Logit model show that nesting according to city or town may be invalid for these data; in other words, the choice of hospital does not appear to be preceded by choice of city. In all of the analysis carried out, distance appears to be one of the main influences on a patient's choice of hospital rather than statistics available on the Internet.

  5. Reducing Hospital Toxicity: Impact on Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Milani, Richard V; Bober, Robert M; Lavie, Carl J; Wilt, Jonathan K; Milani, Alexander R; White, Christopher J

    2018-05-02

    Circadian rhythms are endogenous 24-hour oscillations in biologic processes that drive nearly all physiologic and behavioral functions. Disruption in circadian rhythms can adversely impact short and long-term health outcomes. Routine hospital care often causes significant disruption in sleep-wake patterns that is further compounded by loss of personal control of health information and health decisions. We wished to evaluate measures directed at improving circadian rhythm and access to daily health information on hospital outcomes. We evaluated 3,425 consecutive patients admitted to a medical-surgical unit comprised of an intervention wing (n=1,185) or standard control wing (n=2,240) over a 2.5-year period. Intervention patients received measures to improve sleep that included reduction of nighttime noise, delay of routine morning phlebotomy, passive vital sign monitoring, and use of red-enriched lighting after sunset, as well as access to daily health information utilizing an inpatient portal. Intervention patients accessed the inpatient portal frequently during hospitalization seeking personal health and care team information. Measures impacting the quality and quantity of sleep were significantly improved. LOS was 8.6 hours less (p=0.04), 30 and 90-day readmission rates were 16% and 12% lower, respectively (both p≤ 0.02), and self-rated emotional/mental health was higher (69.2% vs. 52.4%; p=0.03) in the intervention group compared to controls. Modest changes in routine hospital care can improve the hospital environment impacting sleep and access to health knowledge, leading to improvements in hospital outcomes. Sleep-wake patterns of hospitalized patients represent a potential avenue for further enhancing hospital quality and safety. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients.

    PubMed

    Zapatero, Antonio; Barba, Raquel; Canora, Jesús; Losa, Juan E; Plaza, Susana; San Roman, Jesús; Marco, Javier

    2013-01-08

    The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization.Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p < 0.001, and the mean length of stay was significantly longer for patients with a hip fracture (20.7 days vs 9.8 days; p < 0.001). Cost were higher in hip-fracture patients (6927€ per hospitalization vs 3730€ in non fracture patients). Risk factors related to fracture were: increasing age by 10 years increments (OR 2.32 95% CI 2.11-2.56), female gender (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.08-1.37), admission from nursing home (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.27-2.12), dementia (1.55 OR 95% CI1.30-1.84), malnutrition (OR 2.50 95% CI 1.88-3.32), delirium (OR 1.57 95% CI 1.16-2.14), and anemia (OR 1.30 95%CI 1.12-1.49). In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients.

  7. Hip fracture in hospitalized medical patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The aim of the present study is to analyze the incidence of hip fracture as a complication of admissions to internal medicine units in Spain. Methods We analyzed the clinical data of 2,134,363 adults who had been admitted to internal medicine wards. The main outcome was a diagnosis of hip fracture during hospitalization. Outcome measures included rates of in-hospital fractures, length of stay and cost. Results A total of 1127 (0.057%) admittances were coded with an in-hospital hip fracture. In hospital mortality rate was 27.9% vs 9.4%; p < 0.001, and the mean length of stay was significantly longer for patients with a hip fracture (20.7 days vs 9.8 days; p < 0.001). Cost were higher in hip-fracture patients (6927€ per hospitalization vs 3730€ in non fracture patients). Risk factors related to fracture were: increasing age by 10 years increments (OR 2.32 95% CI 2.11-2.56), female gender (OR 1.22 95% CI 1.08-1.37), admission from nursing home (OR 1.65 95% CI 1.27-2.12), dementia (1.55 OR 95% CI1.30-1.84), malnutrition (OR 2.50 95% CI 1.88-3.32), delirium (OR 1.57 95% CI 1.16-2.14), and anemia (OR 1.30 95%CI 1.12-1.49). Conclusions In-hospital hip fracture notably increased mortality during hospitalization, doubling the mean length of stay and mean cost of admission. These are reasons enough to stress the importance of designing and applying multidisciplinary plans focused on reducing the incidence of hip fractures in hospitalized patients. PMID:23298165

  8. Hospital experience and mortality in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus: which patients benefit most from treatment at highly experienced hospitals?

    PubMed

    Ward, Michael M

    2002-06-01

    To determine if hospitalization at a hospital experienced in the treatment of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), compared to hospitalization at a less experienced hospital, is associated with decreased in-hospital mortality in all subsets of patients with SLE, or if the decrease in mortality is greater for patients with particular demographic characteristics, manifestations of SLE, or reasons for hospitalization. Data on in-hospital mortality were available for 9989 patients with SLE hospitalized in acute care hospitals in California from 1991 to 1994. Differences in in-hospital mortality between patients hospitalized at highly experienced hospitals (those hospitals with more than 50 urgent or emergent hospitalizations of patients with SLE per year) and those hospitalized at less experienced hospitals were compared in patient subgroups defined by age, sex, ethnicity, type of medical insurance, the presence of common SLE manifestations, and each of the 10 most common principal reasons for hospitalization. In univariate analyses, in-hospital mortality was lower among those hospitalized at a highly experienced hospital for women, blacks, and Hispanics, and those with public medical insurance or no insurance. The risk of in-hospital mortality was similar between highly experienced and less experienced hospitals for men, whites, and those with private insurance. Patients with nephritis also had lower risks of in-hospital mortality if they were hospitalized at highly experienced hospitals, but this risk did not differ in subgroups with other SLE manifestations or subgroups with different principal reasons for hospitalization. In multivariate analyses, only the interaction between medical insurance and hospitalization at a highly experienced hospital was significant. Results were similar in the subgroup of patients with an emergency hospitalization (n = 2,372), but more consistent benefits of hospitalization at a highly experienced hospital were found across subgroups of

  9. Improving sleep for patients in acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Norton, Christine; Flood, David; Brittin, Andy; Miles, Jane

    2015-03-11

    Sleep is important to health and recovery from illness, but is known to be difficult in hospital. This article describes a quality improvement project conducted on 18 wards in acute hospitals. Patients reported sleeping an average of five hours per night, and 47% (352/749) rated their sleep quality as good or excellent in hospital. Individualised ward action plans were implemented. At follow up, disturbance by noise and light had fallen significantly and 69% (540/783) of patients rated their sleep as good or excellent, 22% more than before the intervention (P<0.001). Local interventions such as improving staff awareness of noise, installing window blinds and turning down equipment alarms improved the patient experience of sleep.

  10. Qualities of Inpatient Hospital Rooms: Patients' Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Ann Sloan; Andrade, Cláudia Campos; Carvalho, Diana

    2016-04-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate what design features of hospital rooms are valued by inpatients. Little research has explored how patients evaluate the physical environment of their hospital rooms. Most responses are captured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, which includes only two questions about the physical environment. Two hundred thirty-six orthopedic patients (78 in the United States and 158 in Portugal) listed three features of their hospital room that influenced their level of satisfaction with their hospital stay, indicating whether the feature was positive or negative. The comments were more positive (71.4%) than negative (28.6%). Using the framework of supportive design from Ulrich, over half the comments (64.31%) could be categorized in one of the three dimensions: 33.2% (positive distraction), 22.4% (perceived control), and 6.0% (social support). This total includes Internet (2.7%), which could be categorized as either social support or positive distraction. Comments called "other aspects" focused on overall environmental appraisals, cleanliness, and functionality and maintenance. The majority of comments could be accommodated by Ulrich's theory, but it is noteworthy that other aspects emerge from patients' comments and affect their experience. Cross-cultural differences pointed to the greater role of light and sun for Portuguese patients and health status whiteboard for U.S. Qualitative research can add significantly to our understanding of the healthcare experience and may inform design decisions. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. [Nutritional status recording in hospitalized patient notes].

    PubMed

    Matos, L; Teixeira, M A; Henriques, A; Tavares, M M; Alvares, L; Antunes, A; Amaral, Teresa F

    2007-01-01

    The prevalence of disease-related malnutrition (DRM) is described to be of 30-60% on admission to hospital, and of 10% in the community. It has been associated with worse clinical outcomes, namely higher morbidity and mortality as well as higher frequency of health care and its associated costs. The lack of screening and monitoring of nutritional status have been said to be risk factors for the increased prevalence of DRM during hospital stay. The aims of this study were to evaluate the importance given by health care professionals to certain aspects related with nutritional status (weight, food intake) of hospital patients and to see if there were any differences between the under and non undernourished ones. A systematic sample of patients from six hospitals was collected. Pregnancy, paediatric age and critical illness were exclusion criteria as well as incapacity to fulfil nutritional risk screening protocol and length-of-stay less than 24h. Socio-demographic, anthropometric data and clinical notes (e.g. weight, food/nutrient intake) from medical records were collected and Nutritional Risk Screening 2002 protocol was applied. A total of 1152 patients were included in this study. The prevalence of nutritional risk varied between 28.5% and 47.3% while undernutrition classified by anthropometrical parameters was considerably lower (6.3% to 14.9%). Two thirds of the patients had their food intake monitored and registered in medical records but only one third were weighted. Undernourished patients had their food intake more frequently monitored but their weight was less frequently measured, than the well-nourished ones. DRM prevalence amongst hospital patients on admission is significantly high. Clinical notes regarding nutritional status is rather infrequent on medical records. This study showed that urges the need to empower health care providers of the importance of the screening and monitoring of weight and food intake, on admission and during hospital stay.

  12. Assessment of jaundice in the hospitalized patient.

    PubMed

    Kathpalia, Priya; Ahn, Joseph

    2015-02-01

    Jaundice in the hospitalized patient is not an uncommon consultation for the general gastroenterologist. It is essential to explore the underlying cause of jaundice because management is largely aimed at addressing these causes rather than the jaundice itself. Although the diagnostic evaluation for jaundice can be broad, clinical judgment must be used to prioritize between various laboratory tests and imaging studies. Most importantly, clinicians must understand which conditions are emergent and/or require evaluation for liver transplantation. Further studies need to be performed to better understand the outcomes of hospitalized patients who develop jaundice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Persistent delirium in older hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Cole, Martin G

    2010-05-01

    There are two contradictory views on the prognosis of delirium in older hospital patients. On one hand, the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 4th Text Revision (DSM-IV-TR), describes delirium as a transient cognitive disorder, the majority of affected individuals having a full recovery. On the other hand, longitudinal studies of delirium in this population report that the outcomes are poor. This review proposes to reconcile these two contradictory views. In older hospital patients, delirium appears to persist in 44.7% of patients at discharge and in 32.8, 25.6 and 21% of patients at 1, 3 and 6 months, respectively. The outcomes (cognition, function, nursing home placement, mortality) of patients with persistent delirium are consistently worse than the outcomes of patients who recover from delirium. The majority of older hospital patients with delirium may recover but the persistence of delirium in a substantial minority of patients may account, in large part, for the poor outcomes of delirium in this population. This proposal has potentially important implications for clinical practice and research.

  14. Constipation in the acutely hospitalized older patients.

    PubMed

    Cardin, Fabrizio; Minicuci, Nadia; Droghi, Annapaola Teggia; Inelmen, Emine Meral; Sergi, Giuseppe; Terranova, Oreste

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to establish the factors that determine the onset of constipation in acutely hospitalized older patients with a view to contributing towards an evidence-based identification of which patients warrant early, specific preventive measures. To evade the problem posed by the definition of constipation, we have considered parameters that are part of the daily routine in the hospital ward, such as the prescription of laxatives, also paying attention to how the co-operative older person subjectively interpret this condition. One thirds of the 192 hospitalized older patients needed a laxative at least once every 3 days. Multivariate analysis identified the use of laxatives at home as the only risk factor for objective constipation while in hospital (odds ratio (OR)=3.0). A significant risk of being dissatisfied with their bowel emptying emerged among patients who were bedridden for more than 2 weeks (OR=6.0), and in those who experienced cerebrovascular events (OR=3.1). The use of laxatives at home and awareness that satisfaction with bowel movements drops in patients obliged to stay in bed for lengthy periods of time and in those who have suffered cerebrovascular damage, should provide the grounds for a screening program to establish rational guidelines on bowel movement therapy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients' expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved.

  16. Hospital dental practice in special patients

    PubMed Central

    Silvestre-Rangil, Javier; Espín-Gálvez, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Dental patients with special needs are people with different systemic diseases, multiple disorders or severe physical and/or mental disabilities. A Medline search was made, yielding a total of 29 articles that served as the basis for this study, which offers a brief description of the dental intervention protocols in medically compromised patients. Dental treatment in patients with special needs, whether presenting medical problems or disabilities, is sometimes complex. For this reason the hospital should be regarded as the ideal setting for the care of these individuals. Before starting any dental intervention, a correct patient evaluation is needed, based on a correct anamnesis, medical records and interconsultation reports, and with due assessment of the medical risks involved. The hospital setting offers the advantage of access to electronic medical records and to data referred to any complementary tests that may have been made, and we moreover have the possibility of performing treatments under general anesthesia. In this context, ambulatory major surgery is the best approach when considering general anesthesia in patients of this kind. Key words:Hospital dentistry, special patients, medically compromised patients. PMID:24121921

  17. Model construction of nursing service satisfaction in hospitalized tumor patients

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yongyi; Liu, Jingshi; Xiao, Shuiyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Tang, Xinhui; Zhou, Yujuan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to construct a satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients. Using questionnaires, data about hospitalized tumor patients’ expectation, quality perception and satisfaction of hospital nursing service were obtained. A satisfaction model of nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients was established through empirical study and by structural equation method. This model was suitable for tumor specialized hospital, with reliability and validity. Patient satisfaction was significantly affected by quality perception and patient expectation. Patient satisfaction and patient loyalty was also affected by disease pressure. Hospital brand was positively correlated with patient satisfaction and patient loyalty, negatively correlated with patient complaint. Patient satisfaction was positively correlated with patient loyalty, patient complaints, and quality perception, and negatively correlated with disease pressure and patient expectation. The satisfaction model on nursing service in hospitalized tumor patients fits well. By this model, the quality of hospital nursing care may be improved. PMID:25419410

  18. GERIATRIC PATIENTS IN A MENTAL HOSPITAL

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Franklin H.; Oliver, W. A.; Simon, Alexander; Malamud, Nathan

    1956-01-01

    An intensive study was made of men 55 years of age and over admitted to Napa State Hospital with either senile or arteriosclerotic brain disease. A ward treatment program, combining both the medical and psychiatric approaches, was applied to one-half of such patients admitted to a state hospital, with the aim of determining what, if any, effect this program would have on the course of the illnesses. Special laboratory studies showed: (a) Serial electroencephalograms and hospital adjustment ratings appeared to be positively correlated with the patients' clinical course; (b) In 35 per cent of cases the electrocardiographic tracings at the time of admittance were within normal limits; (c) A “pathological level” of blood bromides was found in only one of 340 consecutive admissions in this age group. Sociopsychiatric study of 100 consecutively admitted patients revealed that: (a) 35 per cent of the patients were from the middle, and 65 per cent from the lower classes of society; (b) Only 59 per cent were admitted because of activities specifically psychotic. (c) 63 per cent needed admittance to this state hospital for observation and diagnosis, but only 44 per cent needed to stay for care and treatment; (d) In 88 per cent, specific emotional stresses were present just preceding and coincident with the clinical appearance of the organic brain syndrome. PMID:13304672

  19. Midwife Learns Lessons as a Hospital Patient

    PubMed Central

    Rosensweig, Nancey

    2008-01-01

    After her first-time experience as a patient in a hospital, a midwife and childbirth educator reflects on the vulnerability and dependence of women who undergo operative birth. Continuous support for these women during the early postpartum period is imperative. Childbirth educators are encouraged to advocate for these women's needs and to teach them how to advocate for themselves. PMID:19436416

  20. Hospital patient loyalty: causes and correlates.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1994-01-01

    This study was designed to test whether factors associated with customer and employee loyalty are linked to hospital loyalty, and to measure the relative strength of the associations between traditional patient satisfaction factors and loyalty as compared to non-traditional factors.

  1. [Respect of patient's dignity in the hospital].

    PubMed

    Duguet, A-M

    2010-12-01

    Every code of ethics of health professionals in France considers the respect of dignity as a fundamental duty. The French 2002 Law on patient rights says that the person has the right to respect of dignity and of private life. After a presentation of the articles of ethics codes regarding dignity, this paper presents recommendations to deliver medical care in situations where dignity might be endangered such as for patients hospitalized in psychiatric services without consent, or for medical examination of prisoners or medical care to vulnerable patients unable to express their will, especially in palliative care or at the end of life. Respect of dignity after death is illustrated by the reflection conducted by the Espace Ethique de l'AP-HP (Paris area hospitals) and in the Chart of the mortuary yard. A survey of the patients' letters of complaint received by the emergency service of the Toulouse University Hospital showed that, in five years, there were 188 letters and 18 pointed out infringements to the dignity of the person. The health professional team is now aware of this obligation, and in the accreditation of the hospitals, the respect of dignity is one of the indicators of the quality of medical care.

  2. Are housestaff identifying malnourished hospitalized medicine patients?

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Michael A; Duerksen, Donald R; Rahman, Adam

    2014-10-01

    Clinical nutrition and nutritional assessment are often a neglected component of medical school curriculums despite the high prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized patients. This study found that medical housestaff performed nutritional assessments in only 4% of admitted patients despite a high rate of malnutrition (57%). Survey results show housestaff lack knowledge in the area of malnutrition. Medical schools and training programs must place greater emphasis of providing qualified physician nutrition specialists to implement effective nutrition instruction.

  3. The Use of Cimetidine in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kopala, Lili

    1984-01-01

    Cimetidine is the most commonly prescribed drug in North America. A clinical review was conducted to identify physicians' prescribing habits. From September 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982, the charts were reviewed of 50 patients receiving cimetidine in an isolated coastal community hospital in British Columbia. It was discovered that physicians prescribed the drug for reasons approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only 14% of the time. The FDA guidelines approve cimetidine for duodenal ulcer, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and other hypersecretory states. A literature review was conducted, and guidelines on prescribing cimetidine were given to all members of the hospital's medical staff. PMID:21283494

  4. The use of cimetidine in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Kopala, L

    1984-01-01

    Cimetidine is the most commonly prescribed drug in North America. A clinical review was conducted to identify physicians' prescribing habits. From September 1, 1981 to March 31, 1982, the charts were reviewed of 50 patients receiving cimetidine in an isolated coastal community hospital in British Columbia. It was discovered that physicians prescribed the drug for reasons approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) only 14% of the time. The FDA guidelines approve cimetidine for duodenal ulcer, Zollinger-Ellison syndrome, and other hypersecretory states. A literature review was conducted, and guidelines on prescribing cimetidine were given to all members of the hospital's medical staff.

  5. Suicide in high security hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Jones, Roland M; Hales, Heidi; Butwell, Martin; Ferriter, Mike; Taylor, Pamela J

    2011-08-01

    People with mental disorder and people who are violent are separately recognised as being at high risk of suicide. People detained in high security hospitals are recognised for their violence to others, but perhaps less so for their suicide potential. We aimed to investigate suicide rates among such patients during and after their high security hospital residency, and to establish risk factors for suicide. We extracted data from the Special Hospitals' Case Register on each person resident at any time between 1 January 1972 and 31 December 2000. Suicide rates were calculated for the whole period. We compared rates to the general population using standardised mortality ratios (SMRs). We used poisson regression to estimate the effects of gender, legal category of detention, offending history and length of admission on the suicide rate. Of the 5,955 individuals, 218 completed suicide. The suicide rate was nearly 7 times higher among resident men (SMR 662, 95% CI 478-845) and over 40 times higher in resident women (SMR 4,012, 95% CI 2,526-5,498) than in the general population; it was 23 times higher (SMR 2,325, 95% CI 1,901-2,751) and 45 times higher (SMR 4,486, 95% CI 2,727-6,245) among post-discharge men and women, respectively. The suicide rate was significantly higher among women than men inside high security but not after discharge. The suicide rate among high security hospital patients was significantly higher than in the general population. Women were especially at risk while resident, whereas for men, the risk was higher after discharge.

  6. Hospitals Known for Nursing Excellence Associated with Better Hospital Experience for Patients.

    PubMed

    Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M; McHugh, Matthew D; Aiken, Linda H

    2016-06-01

    To examine the relationship between Magnet recognition, an indicator of nursing excellence, and patients' experience with their hospitalization reported in the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey. This secondary analysis includes cross-sectional data from the 2010 HCAHPS survey, the American Hospital Association, and the American Nurses Credentialing Center. We conducted a retrospective observational study. Using common hospital identifiers, we created a matched set of 212 Magnet hospitals and 212 non-Magnet hospitals. Patients in Magnet hospitals gave their hospitals higher overall ratings, were more likely to recommend their hospital, and reported more positive care experiences with nurse communication. Magnet recognition is associated with better patient care experiences, which may positively enhance reimbursement for hospitals. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. Patient Safety Outcomes in Small Urban and Small Rural Hospitals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vartak, Smruti; Ward, Marcia M.; Vaughn, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To assess patient safety outcomes in small urban and small rural hospitals and to examine the relationship of hospital and patient factors to patient safety outcomes. Methods: The Nationwide Inpatient Sample and American Hospital Association annual survey data were used for analyses. To increase comparability, the study sample was…

  8. Bedding, not boarding. Psychiatric patients boarded in hospital EDs create crisis for patient care and hospital finances.

    PubMed

    Kutscher, Beth

    2013-11-18

    As the supply of psychiatric beds dwindles, hospitals are devising innovative ways handle psych patients who come through the emergency department. Some collaborate with other hospitals, use separate pysch EDs or refer patients to residential treatment centers.

  9. Symptomatic subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Chiaie, Roberto Delle; Iannucci, Gino; Paroli, Marino; Salviati, Massimo; Caredda, Maria; Pasquini, Massimo; Biondi, Massimo

    2011-12-01

    Clinicians generally agree on the association between depression and hypertension. Less clear is if the nature of the link is direct or indirect and if this should be considered confined only to syndromal forms or if it concerns also subsyndromal affective presentations. This study investigated the nature of the association between hypertension and subsyndromal depression in hospitalized hypertensive patients. 196 hypertensive and 96 non hypertensive inpatients underwent a SCID interview, to exclude patients positive for any Axis I or Axis II diagnosis. Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression (SSD) was identified according to criteria proposed by Judd. Psychopathological assessment was performed with Anxiety Sensitivity Index (ASI) and Hopkins Symptom Checklist-90 (SCL-90). Clinical assessments included blood pressure measurement, evaluation of general health conditions and screening cardiovascular risk factors (smoke, alcohol, body weight, sedentary life style). Hypertensives met more frequently criteria for SSD. They also scored higher on ASI and SCL-90. However, those with more severe physical conditions, if compared with more healthy patients, did not show increased psychopathological severity. Similarly, psychopathological symptom severity did not differ among hypertensives positive for other cardiovascular risk factors, commonly more frequent among depressed subjects. Further analyses are needed to explore the potential advantage obtained on blood pressure control by treating SSD. Hospitalized hypertensives, more frequently satisfied criteria for Symptomatic Subsyndromal Depression. These milder affective forms are probably directly linked to the presence of hypertension, rather than being indirectly associated to physical impairment or to higher prevalence of other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Evaluation of Patient Safety Indicators in Semnan City Hospitals by Using the Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiative (PSFHI).

    PubMed

    Babamohamadi, Hassan; Nemati, Roghayeh Khabiri; Nobahar, Monir; Keighobady, Seifullah; Ghazavi, Soheila; Izadi-Sabet, Farideh; Najafpour, Zhila

    2016-08-01

    Nowadays, patient safety issue is among one of the main concerns of the hospital policy worldwide. This study aimed to evaluate the patient safety status in hospitals affiliated to Semnan city, using the WHO model for Patient Safety Friendly Hospital Initiatives (PSFHI) in summer 2014. That was a cross sectional descriptive study that addressed patient safety , which explained the current status of safety in the Semnan hospitals using by instrument of Patient safety friendly initiative standards (PSFHI). Data was collected from 5 hospitals in Semnan city during four weeks in May 2014. The finding of 5 areas examined showed that some components in critical standards had disadvantages. Critical standards of hospitals including areas of leadership and administration, patient and public involvement and safe evidence-based clinical practice, safe environment with and lifetime education in a safe and secure environment were analyzed. The domain of patient and public involvement obtained the lowest mean score and the domain of safe environment obtained the highest mean score in the surveyed hospitals. All the surveyed hospitals had a poor condition regarding standards based on patient safety. Further, the identified weak points are almost the same in the hospitals. Therefore, In order to achieve a good level of all aspects of the protocol, the goals should be considered in the level of strategic planning at hospitals. An effective execution of patient safety creatively may depend on the legal infrastructure and enforcement of standards by hospital management, organizational liability to expectation of patients, safety culture in hospitals.

  11. Hospital Choice of Rural Medicare Beneficiaries: Patient, Hospital Attributes, and the Patient–Physician Relationship

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Wan-Tzu Connie; Porell, Frank W; Adams, E Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    Objective To examine how patient and hospital attributes and the patient–physician relationship influence hospital choice of rural Medicare beneficiaries. Data Sources Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS), Health Care Financing Administration (HCFA) Provider of Services (POS) file, American Hospital Association (AHA) Annual Survey, and Medicare Hospital Service Area (HSA) files for 1994 and 1995. Study Design The study sample consisted of 1,702 hospitalizations of rural Medicare beneficiaries. McFadden's conditional logit model was used to analyze hospital choices of rural Medicare beneficiaries. The model included independent variables to control for patients' and hospitals' attributes and the distance to hospital alternatives. Principal Findings The empirical results show strong preferences of aged patients for closer hospitals and those of greater scale and service capacity. Patients with complex acute medical conditions and those with more resources were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospitals. Beneficiaries were more likely to bypass their closest rural hospital if they had no regular physician, had a shorter patient–physician tie, were dissatisfied with the availability of health care, and had a longer travel time to their physician's office. Conclusions The significant influences of patients' socioeconomic, health, and functional status, their satisfaction with and access to primary care, and their strong preferences for certain hospital attributes should inform federal program initiatives about the likely impacts of policy changes on hospital bypassing behavior. PMID:15533193

  12. Hospitalization costs and complications in hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus in Beijing, China.

    PubMed

    Bao, Xiaoyuan; Yang, Chao; Fang, Kai; Shi, Moye; Yu, Guopei; Hu, Yonghua

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate hospitalization costs, diabetes complications, and their relationships using a large dataset in Beijing, China. Data for 2006-10 from the 38 top-ranked (Grade 3 A) hospitals in Beijing, obtained from electronic Hospitalization Summary Reports (HSRs), were analyzed for hospitalization costs and diabetic complications. Patient demographics, types of costs, and length of hospital stay (LOS) were also evaluated. During the period evaluated, 62 523 patients with diabetes were hospitalized, of which 41 875 (67.0 %) had diabetes-associated complications. The median cost of hospitalization for diabetic patients was 7996.11 RMB. Prescribed drugs and laboratory tests were two major contributors to hospitalization costs, accounting for 36.2 % and 22.4 %, respectively. Hospitalization costs were significantly associated with LOS, number of complications, age, year of admission, admission status, sex, and medical insurance (P < 0.001). Both hospitalization costs and LOS increased substantially with an increase in the number of complications (P < 0.001). The highest hospitalization costs were seen in those diabetic patients with foot complications. Diabetic complications have a significant effect on increases in hospitalization costs and LOS in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. © 2016 Ruijin Hospital, Shanghai Jiaotong University School of Medicine and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Rural Hospital Patient Safety Systems Implementation in Two States

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Longo, Daniel R.; Hewett, John E.; Ge, Bin; Schubert, Shari

    2007-01-01

    Context and Purpose: With heightened attention to medical errors and patient safety, we surveyed Utah and Missouri hospitals to assess the "state of the art" in patient safety systems and identify changes over time. This study examines differences between urban and rural hospitals. Methods: Survey of all acute care hospitals in Utah and…

  14. Integrated Patient Education on U.S. Hospital Web Sites.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar; Wu, Kerong; Edwards, Kelsey

    2016-01-01

    Based on a census of the 2015 Most Wired Hospitals, this content analysis aimed to find out how patient education has been integrated on these best IT hospitals' Web sites to serve the purposes of marketing and meeting online visitors' needs. This study will help hospitals to understand where the weaknesses are in their interactive patient education implementation and come up with a smart integration strategy. The study found that 70% of these hospitals had adopted interactive patient education contents, 76.6% of such contents were from a third-party developer, and only 20% of the hospitals linked their patient education contents to one or more of the hospital's resources while 26% cross-references such contents. The authors concluded that more hospitals should take advantage of modern information communication technology to cross-reference their patient education contents and to integrate such contents into their overall online marketing strategy to benefit patients and themselves.

  15. A Strategic Framework for Improving the Patient Experience in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Birkelien, Natalie L

    Hospitals are taking new approaches to satisfy consumers and deliver on customer expectations by enhancing their patients' comprehensive experience. The HCAHPS (Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems) survey and value-based purchasing initiatives have tied reimbursement to patient satisfaction scores, bringing patient perspectives on care to the forefront of hospitals' strategic priorities. This essay reviews the patient experience literature and argues that hospitals should adopt an expanded approach beyond HCAHPS measures to enhance the patient experience. Such an approach allows providers to deliver quality outcomes that satisfy patients' wants and needs.

  16. Prognosis of delirium in elderly hospital patients.

    PubMed Central

    Cole, M G; Primeau, F J

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the prognosis of delirium in elderly patients. DATA SOURCES: MEDLINE was searched for relevant articles published from January 1980 to March 1992. The bibliographies of identified articles were searched for additional references. STUDY SELECTION: Eight reports (involving 573 patients with delirium) met the following inclusion criteria: original research, published in English or French, prospective study design, diagnosis based on acute deterioration in mental state, sample of at least 20 patients, patients aged 60 years or over and follow-up of at least 1 week. The validity of the studies was independently assessed according to the criteria for prognostic studies established by McMaster University, Hamilton, Ont. No study met all the criteria. DATA EXTRACTION: Information about the patient sample, length of follow-up and results was systematically abstracted from each report and tabulated. DATA SYNTHESIS: A meta-analysis of the outcomes indicated that elderly patients with delirium had a mean length of stay of 20.7 days. One month after admission 46.5% were in institutions, and 14.2% had died; only 54.9% had improved mentally. Six months after admission 43.2% were in institutions. Compared with unmatched control subjects they had longer hospital stays, higher mortality rates at 1 month and higher rates of institutional care at 1 and 6 months. The presence of severe physical illness or dementia may have been related to some outcomes. CONCLUSIONS: Delirium in the elderly appears to have a poor prognosis. However, this finding may have been confounded by the presence of concomitant dementia or severe physical illness. Future studies must pay attention to methods and design, particularly the composition of study populations and the control of extraneous prognostic factors. PMID:8319153

  17. Are Comparisons of Patient Experiences Across Hospitals Fair? A Study in Veterans Health Administration Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Cleary, Paul D.; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M.; Zaslavsky, Alan M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. Objectives To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. Research Design We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Results Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. Conclusions This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics. PMID:24926709

  18. Are comparisons of patient experiences across hospitals fair? A study in Veterans Health Administration hospitals.

    PubMed

    Cleary, Paul D; Meterko, Mark; Wright, Steven M; Zaslavsky, Alan M

    2014-07-01

    Surveys are increasingly used to assess patient experiences with health care. Comparisons of hospital scores based on patient experience surveys should be adjusted for patient characteristics that might affect survey results. Such characteristics are commonly drawn from patient surveys that collect little, if any, clinical information. Consequently some hospitals, especially those treating particularly complex patients, have been concerned that standard adjustment methods do not adequately reflect the challenges of treating their patients. To compare scores for different types of hospitals after making adjustments using only survey-reported patient characteristics and using more complete clinical and hospital information. We used clinical and survey data from a national sample of 1858 veterans hospitalized for an initial acute myocardial infarction (AMI) in a Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) medical center during fiscal years 2003 and 2004. We used VA administrative data to characterize hospitals. The survey asked patients about their experiences with hospital care. The clinical data included 14 measures abstracted from medical records that are predictive of survival after an AMI. Comparisons of scores across hospitals adjusted only for patient-reported health status and sociodemographic characteristics were similar to those that also adjusted for patient clinical characteristics; the Spearman rank-order correlations between the 2 sets of adjusted scores were >0.97 across 9 dimensions of inpatient experience. This study did not support concerns that measures of patient care experiences are unfair because commonly used models do not adjust adequately for potentially confounding patient clinical characteristics.

  19. The evolving ecology of risk for hospitalized dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Sandroni, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    Despite an increased focus on patient safety, changes in resident work rules and contemporary hospital culture often combine to create an environment of potential hazard for the hospitalized dialysis patient. Clinical scenarios are presented to illustrate some of these risks, and suggestions are offered for the protection of patients.

  20. A Comparative Study of Terminally Ill Hospice and Hospital Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Labus, Janet G.; Dambrot, Faye H.

    1986-01-01

    Investigated differences between 28 hospice and 28 hospital patients who died. Comparison found that hospice patients were younger, had more people living in the home, and had shorter disease history. Age, number of people living in the home, and primary cancer site significantly discriminated between hospice and hospital patients and predicted…

  1. Measuring hospital care from the patients' perspective: an overview of the CAHPS Hospital Survey development process.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Elizabeth; Farquhar, Marybeth; Crofton, Christine; Darby, Charles; Garfinkel, Steven

    2005-12-01

    To describe the developmental process for the CAHPS Hospital Survey. A pilot was conducted in three states with 19,720 hospital discharges. A rigorous, multi-step process was used to develop the CAHPS Hospital Survey. It included a public call for measures, multiple Federal Register notices soliciting public input, a review of the relevant literature, meetings with hospitals, consumers and survey vendors, cognitive interviews with consumer, a large-scale pilot test in three states and consumer testing and numerous small-scale field tests. The current version of the CAHPS Hospital Survey has survey items in seven domains, two overall ratings of the hospital and five items used for adjusting for the mix of patients across hospitals and for analytical purposes. The CAHPS Hospital Survey is a core set of questions that can be administered as a stand-alone questionnaire or combined with a broader set of hospital specific items.

  2. Voting pattern of mental patients in a community state hospital.

    PubMed

    Klein, M M; Grossman, S A

    1967-06-01

    The voting pattern of mental patients in a community-based state hospital was studied. Patients were polled on the New York City mayoralty race. A comparison to the vote of the general population revealed that the hospital sample vote resembled most closely the election results of the hospital district. The results highlight the advantage of community-centered mental health facilities, which undertake the treatment and rehabilitation of mental patients under conditions that maintain ties with family and community.

  3. Risk factors for cardiovascular hospitalization in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vaičiūnienė, Rūta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Ziginskienė, Edita; Petrulienė, Kristina

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk factors for cardiovascular hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. A cross-sectional cohort analysis of risk factors during one census month (November) and one-year follow-up for cardiovascular hospitalization rates during 5 consecutive years (2002-2006) in all end-stage renal disease patients hemodialyzed in Kaunas region was carried out. During the census month, we collected data on patient's age and sex, disability status, comorbidities, anemia control, malnutrition and inflammation, calcium-phosphorus metabolism, and patient's compliance with prescribed medications. We analyzed 559 patients during 1163 patient-years of observation. Patients were considered as new patients every year (1520 cases). Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis were used to evaluate time to first hospitalization. The mean number of cardiovascular hospitalizations was 0.31 per patient-year at risk, the total days of cardiovascular hospitalizations per patient-year at risk were 3.93, and the mean length of one hospitalization was 13.2±12.9 days. Cardiovascular diseases were the most frequent cause of hospitalization (25% of all hospitalizations). The relative risk of cardiovascular hospitalization increased by 1.03 for every year of age, by 1.7 for worse disability status, by 1.4 for nonadherence to medications, by 1.1 for every additional medication prescribed to the patient. Cardiovascular hospitalization risk was decreased by 0.99 with a 1-g/L rise in hemoglobin level. Older age, worse disability status, patient's noncompliance with medications, and higher number of medications used were associated with a higher risk for cardiovascular hospitalization. Higher hemoglobin level was associated with a lower risk for cardiovascular hospitalization.

  4. Hospital Rating Systems and Implications For Patient Travel to Better-rated Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Arun; Adler, Joel T; Shah, Nilay D; Hyder, Joseph A

    2017-03-01

    Publicly reported hospital ratings aim to encourage transparency, spur quality improvement, and empower patient choice. Travel burdens may limit patient choice, particularly for older adults (aged 65 years and more) who receive most medical care. For 3 major hospital ratings systems, we estimated travel burden as the additional 1-way travel distance to receive care at a better-rated hospital.Distances were estimated from publicly available data from the US Census, US News Top Hospitals, Society of Thoracic Surgeons composite rating for coronary artery bypass grafting (STS-CABG), and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Services (HCAHPS).Hospitals were rated for HCAHPS (n = 4656), STS-CABG (n = 470), and US News Top Hospitals (n = 15). Older adults were commonly located within 25 miles of their closest HCAHPS hospital (89.6%), but less commonly for STS-CABG (62.9%). To receive care at a better-rated hospital, travel distances commonly exceeded 25 miles: HCAHPS (39.2%), STS-CABG (62.7%), and US News Top Hospital (85.2%). Additional 1-way travel distances exceeded 25 miles commonly: HCAHPS (23.7%), STS-CABG (36.7%), US News Top Hospitals (81.8%).Significant travel burden is common for older adults seeking "better" care and is an important limitation of current hospital ratings for empowering patient choice.

  5. Communication Problems for Patients Hospitalized with Chest Pain

    PubMed Central

    Simon, Steven R.; Lee, Thomas H.; Goldman, Lee; McDonough, Allison L.; Pearson, Steven D.

    1998-01-01

    In many settings, primary care physicians have begun to delegate inpatient care to hospitalists, but the impact of this change on patients' hospital experience is unknown. To determine the effect on physician-patient communication of having the regular outpatient physician (continuity physician) continue involvement in hospital care, we surveyed 1,059 consecutive patients hospitalized with chest pain. Patients whose continuity physicians remained involved in their hospital care were less likely to report communication problems regarding tests (20% vs 31%, p = .03), activity after discharge (42% vs 51%, p = .02), and health habits (31% vs 38%, p = .07). In a setting without a designated hospitalist system, communication problems were less frequent among patients whose continuity physicians were involved in their hospital care. New models of inpatient care delivery can maintain patient satisfaction but to do so must focus attention on improving physician-patient communication. PMID:9844081

  6. Staff countertransference reactions in the hospital treatment of borderline patients.

    PubMed

    Brown, L J

    1980-11-01

    The aim of this paper is to elucidate a systematic framework for understanding the nature of the borderline patient's reactions to the hospital milieu and for comprehending the responses of hospital staff to such patients. The theory and principles of the therapeutic milieu or milieu therapy are not the focus of this paper; rather, the unique ways in which borderline patients create their own reality and interact with that reality are examined. The borderline patients considered here constitute a group who present severe character pathology, including pronounced distortions in reality testing, marked paranoid trends, minimal distinction between self and others, and multiple hospitalizations that have proven ineffectual. Overall, these patients are functioning at a level more regressed than most borderline patients and their histories often reveal many psychotic episodes. Because of their severe psychopathology, long-term intensive treatment in a hospital setting, termed "reconstructive hospital treatment" by Zee (1975), is indicated. The goal of such treatment is to augment the patient's failing ego functioning, to help the patient develop constructive alternatives for dealing with conflict, and to aid the patient develop constructive alternatives for dealing with conflict, and to aid the patient in embarking upon a psychoanalytically oriented exploration of his highly conflicted object relations. Without the use of the hospital as a treatment modality these patients tend to continue in a downward spiral of destructive relationships. These remarks, therefore, are addressed to the effect severely ill borderline patients have upon the hospital milieu and to the impact of the milieu upon them.

  7. Patients' perceptions of interactions with hospital staff are associated with hospital readmissions: a national survey of 4535 hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lianping; Liu, Chaojie; Huang, Cunrui; Mukamel, Dana B

    2018-01-29

    Reducing 30-day hospital readmissions has become a focus of the current national payment policies. Medicare requires that hospitals collect and report patients' experience with their care as a condition of payment. However, the extent to which patients' experience with hospital care is related to hospital readmission is unknown. We established multivariate regression models in which 30-day risk-adjusted readmission rates were the dependent variables and patients' perceptions of the responsiveness of the hospital staff and communication (as measured by the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores) were the independent variables of interest. We selected six different clinical conditions for analyses, including acute myocardial infarction (AMI), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), heart failure, hip/knee surgery, pneumonia, and stroke. Data included all acute care hospitals reporting in Hospital Compare in 2014. The number of hospitals with reported readmissions ranged from 2234 hospitals for AMI to 3758 hospitals for pneumonia. The average 30-day readmission rates ranged from 5.19% for knee/hip surgery to 22.7% for COPD. Patient experience of hospital-staff responsiveness as "top-box" ranged from 64% to 67% across the six clinical conditions, communication with nurses ranged from 77% to 79% and communication with doctors ranged from 80% to 81% (higher numbers are better). Our finding suggests that hospitals with better staff responsiveness were significantly more likely to have lower 30-day readmissions for all conditions. The effect size depended on the baseline readmission rates, with the largest effect on hospitals in the upper 75th quartile. A ten-percentage-point increase in staff responsiveness led to a 0.03-0.18 percentage point decrease in readmission rates. We found that neither communication with physicians nor communication with nurses was significantly associated with hospital readmissions. Our findings

  8. The feeding of patients in hospital: a review.

    PubMed

    McGlone, P C; Dickerson, J W; Davies, G J

    1995-10-01

    The feeding of patients in hospitals is a topical issue. This review considers the development of feeding practices in British hospitals and highlights disturbing aspects which may have a bearing on recovery. The issues highlighted may also exacerbate the problem of hospital-induced malnutrition. There is little evidence that the provision of food per se is a cause for concern. It is rather the many other factors which may contribute to the patients consuming an in adequate diet.

  9. Loyalty of hospital patients: a vital marketing objective.

    PubMed

    MacStravic, R S

    1987-01-01

    Hospitals must strive for patient loyalty as a top priority objective in their marketing strategies. Loyal patients are sources of repeat business, potential users of new services, and positive spokespersons in word-of-mouth advertising.

  10. Health care marketing: doctors to patients and hospitals to doctors.

    PubMed

    Paul, D P; Honeycutt, E D

    1996-01-01

    The adoption and usage of formal marketing practices by hospitals and physicians have increased exponentially over the past twenty-five years. This article examines marketing developments within the doctor-patient and hospital-patient associations, as well as the impact of managed care on these two relationships. Conclusions are drawn and suggestions for future research are provided.

  11. Assuring Rural Hospital Patient Safety: What Should Be the Priorities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coburn, Andrew F.; Wakefield, Mary; Casey, Michelle; Moscovice, Ira; Payne, Susan; Loux, Stephenie

    2004-01-01

    Context: Since reports on patient safety were issued by the Institute of Medicine, a number of interventions have been recommended and standards designed to improve hospital patient safety, including the Leapfrog, evidence-based safety standards. These standards are based on research conducted largely in urban hospitals, and it may not be possible…

  12. High waste contributes to low food intake in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    van Bokhorst-de van der Schueren, Marian A E; Roosemalen, Martin M; Weijs, Peter J M; Langius, Jacqueline A E

    2012-04-01

    The prevalence of disease-related malnutrition in hospital inpatients is high; many patients do not meet individual nutrition requirements while hospitalized. To better understand the reasons for inadequate nutrition intake, this study describes patient satisfaction, food provision, food intake, and waste of hospital meals. Over 6 days, 150 hospital meals were weighed and nutrient composition was calculated. On return from the wards, waste was weighed. In addition, nutrition intake was compared to nutrition requirements in 42 patients. In a separate study, the authors studied patient satisfaction with the hospital food service using interviews (n = 112). The 3 main meals accounted for a mean of 1809 ± 143 kcal and 76 ± 13 g of protein per day. In total, 38% of the food provided by the kitchen was wasted. As a consequence, the main meals supplied an average of 1105 ± 594 kcal and 47 ± 27 g of protein to patients. Sixty-one percent of patients had an energy intake <90% and 75% had a protein intake <90% of requirements. Most patients were satisfied or fairly satisfied with the choices, taste, and presentation of the main meals. Satisfaction with snack meals and information was inadequate. The standard meals provided by the hospital kitchen provide adequate amounts of energy and protein. However, most patients do not consume complete meals. It may be concluded that food waste is largely attributed to the inadequate intake of many hospitalized patients. Patients who experienced the worst health status ate the least.

  13. Using Public Reports of Patient Satisfaction for Hospital Quality Improvement

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K; Giannotti, Tierney E; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Duquette, Cathy E; Waters, William J; Petrillo, Marcia K

    2006-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of statewide public reporting of hospital patient satisfaction on hospital quality improvement (QI), using Rhode Island (RI) as a case example. Data Source Primary data collected through semi-structured interviews between September 2002 and January 2003. Study Design The design is a retrospective study of hospital executives at all 11 general and two specialty hospitals in RI. Respondents were asked about hospital QI activities at several points throughout the public reporting process, as well as about hospital structure and processes to accomplish QI. Qualitative analysis of the interview data proceeded through an iterative process to identify themes and categories in the data. Principal Findings Data from the standardized statewide patient satisfaction survey process were used by hospitals to identify and target new QI initiatives, evaluate performance, and monitor progress. While all hospitals fully participated in the public reporting process, they varied in the stage of development of their QI activities and adoption of the statewide standardized survey for ongoing monitoring of their QI programs. Most hospitals placed responsibility for QI within each department, with results reported to top management, who were perceived as giving strong support for QI. The external environment facilitated QI efforts. Conclusion Public reporting of comparative data on patient views can enhance and reinforce QI efforts in hospitals. The participation of key stakeholders facilitated successful implementation of statewide public reporting. This experience in RI offers lessons for other states or regions as they move to public reporting of hospital quality data. PMID:16704506

  14. Hospital variation in sphincter preservation for elderly rectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Dodgion, Christopher M; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2014-09-01

    The primary goal of an operation for rectal cancer is to cure cancer and, where possible, preserve continence. A wide range of sphincter preservation rates have been reported. This study evaluated hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE), and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of elderly rectal cancer patients. Using Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results-Medicare linked data, we identified 4959 patients older than 65 y with stage I-III rectal cancer diagnosed from 2000-2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly patients with rectal cancer. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which combined explained 31% of procedure variation. Receipt of LE is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. HOSPITAL VARIATION IN SPHINCTER PRESERVATION FOR ELDERLY RECTAL CANCER PATIENTS

    PubMed Central

    Dodgion, Christopher M.; Neville, Bridget A; Lipsitz, Stuart R.; Schrag, Deborah; Breen, Elizabeth; Zinner, Michael J.; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate hospital variation in the use of low anterior resection (LAR), local excision (LE) and abdominoperineal resection (APR) in the treatment of rectal cancer in elderly patients. Methods Using SEER-Medicare linked data, we identified 4,959 stage I–III rectal cancer patients over age 65 diagnosed from 2000–2005 who underwent operative intervention at one of 370 hospitals. We evaluated the distribution of hospital-specific procedure rates and used generalized mixed models with random hospital effects to examine the influence of patient characteristics and hospital on operation type, using APR as a reference. Results The median hospital performed APR on 33% of elderly rectal cancer patients. Hospital was a stronger predictor of LAR receipt than any patient characteristic, explaining 32% of procedure choice, but not a strong predictor of LE, explaining only 3.8%. Receipt of LE was primarily related to tumor size and tumor stage, which, combined, explained 31% of procedure variation. Conclusions Receipt of local excision is primarily determined by patient characteristics. In contrast, the hospital where surgery is performed significantly influences whether a patient undergoes an LAR or APR. Understanding the factors that cause this institutional variation is crucial to ensuring equitable availability of sphincter preservation. PMID:24750983

  16. Utilization of hospital services by cardiovascular patients, Alberta, Canada.

    PubMed Central

    Bay, K S; Maher, M; Lee, S J

    1989-01-01

    Using hospital discharge records, and United States DRG (diagnosis related groups) data, we studied hospital utilization by cardiovascular patients, associated hospital expenditures, and the per capita cost of treating cardiovascular diseases in Alberta, Canada between 1971 and 1986. Expressed in constant 1984 Canadian dollars, the estimated total hospital cost increased from $84 million in 1971 to $131 million in 1986; during this period the Province of Alberta spent about $51 Canadian per resident each year for cardiovascular hospital services. It was noted that rural residents consumed a higher volume of resources per capita than their urban counterparts. A patient origin-destination analysis indicated an increasing dependence of rural patients on urban hospitals for secondary or tertiary care, underscoring the effects of medical technology on referral patterns. PMID:2499201

  17. Responsiveness to the hospital patient needs in Poland.

    PubMed

    Gromulska, Lucyna; Supranowicz, Piotr; Wysocki, Mirosław Jan

    2014-01-01

    The health system responsiveness, defined as non-medical aspect of treatment relating to the protection of the patients' legitimate rights, is the intrinsic goal of the WHO strategy for 21st century. To describe the patients' opinions on treatment they received in hospital, namely: admission to hospital, the role of patient in hospital treatment, course of treatment, medical workforce attitude, hospital environment, contact with family and friends, and the efficacy of hospital treatment in respect to responsiveness to patient's needs and expectations (dignity, autonomy, confidentiality, communication, prompt attention, social support, basic amenities and choice of provider). The data were collected in 2012 from 998 former patients of the randomly selected 73 hospital in Poland. Dignity: Over 80% of patients experienced kindness, empathy, care and gentleness, and over 90% of them had the sense of security in hospital, met with friendliness during the admission to hospital and never encountered inappropriate comments from medical staff. Autonomy: About 80% of patients accepted the active role of patients in hospital, they perceived they had influence on procedures related to hospitalization and course of treatment, and they felt medical staff responded to their requests and concerns. Over 90% of them had opportunity to communicate their concerns to medical staff and to discuss the course of treatment. On the other hand, the explanation of the reason for the refusal to meet their requests was given to only 23% of the patients interested. Confidentiality: 70-80% of patients declared the respect for privacy and confidentiality during collecting the health information and during medical examinations, and were not examined in presence of other people. Nevertheless, only 23% of patients examined so were asked of their consent. Communication: About 90% of patients declared they trusted their physician, received from him explanation regarding the course of treatment and

  18. [Customer and patient satisfaction. An appropriate management tool in hospitals?].

    PubMed

    Pawils, S; Trojan, A; Nickel, S; Bleich, C

    2012-09-01

    Recently, the concept of patient satisfaction has been established as an essential part of the quality management of hospitals. Despite the concept's lack of theoretical and methodological foundations, patient surveys on subjective hospital experiences contribute immensely to the improvement of hospitals. What needs to be considered critically in this context is the concept of customer satisfaction for patients, the theoretical integration of empirical results, the reduction of false satisfaction indications and the application of risk-adjusted versus naïve benchmarking of data. This paper aims to contribute to the theoretical discussion of the topic and to build a basis for planning methodologically sound patient surveys.

  19. Improving Hospital Discharge Planning for Elderly Patients

    PubMed Central

    Potthoff, Sandra; Kane, Robert L.; Franco, Sheila J.

    1997-01-01

    Hospital discharge planning has become increasingly important in an era of prospective payment and managed care. Given the changes in tasks, decisions, and environments involved, it is important to identify how to move such planning from an art to an empirically based decisionmaking process. The authors use a decision-sciences framework to review the state-of-the-art of hospital discharge planning and to suggest methods for improvement. PMID:10345406

  20. Migration of patients between five urban teaching hospitals in Chicago.

    PubMed

    Galanter, William L; Applebaum, Andrew; Boddipalli, Viveka; Kho, Abel; Lin, Michael; Meltzer, David; Roberts, Anna; Trick, Bill; Walton, Surrey M; Lambert, Bruce L

    2013-04-01

    To quantify the extent of patient sharing and inpatient care fragmentation among patients discharged from a cohort of Chicago hospitals. Admission and discharge dates and patient ZIP codes from 5 hospitals over 2 years were matched with an encryption algorithm. Admission to more than one hospital was considered fragmented care. The association between fragmentation and socio-economic variables using ZIP-code data from the 2000 US Census was measured. Using validation from one hospital, patient matching using encrypted identifiers had a sensitivity of 99.3 % and specificity of 100 %. The cohort contained 228,151 unique patients and 334,828 admissions. Roughly 2 % of the patients received fragmented care, accounting for 5.8 % of admissions and 6.4 % of hospital days. In 3 of 5 hospitals, and overall, the length of stay of patients with fragmented care was longer than those without. Fragmentation varied by hospital and was associated with the proportion of non-Caucasian persons, the proportion of residents whose income fell in the lowest quartile, and the proportion of residents with more children being raised by mothers alone in the zip code of the patient. Patients receiving fragmented care accounted for 6.4 % of hospital days. This percentage is a low estimate for our region, since not all regional hospitals participated, but high enough to suggest value in creating Health Information Exchange. Fragmentation varied by hospital, per capita income, race and proportion of single mother homes. This secure methodology and fragmentation analysis may prove useful for future analyses.

  1. Diabetes hinders community-acquired pneumonia outcomes in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Martins, M; Boavida, J M; Raposo, J F; Froes, F; Nunes, B; Ribeiro, R T; Macedo, M P; Penha-Gonçalves, C

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of diabetes mellitus (DM) in hospitalized patients with community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and its impact on hospital length of stay and in-hospital mortality. We carried out a retrospective, nationwide register analysis of CAP in adult patients admitted to Portuguese hospitals between 2009 and 2012. Anonymous data from 157 291 adult patients with CAP were extracted from the National Hospital Discharge Database and we performed a DM-conditioned analysis stratified by age, sex and year of hospitalization. The 74 175 CAP episodes that matched the inclusion criteria showed a high burden of DM that tended to increase over time, from 23.7% in 2009 to 28.1% in 2012. Interestingly, patients with CAP had high DM prevalence in the context of the national DM prevalence. Episodes of CAP in patients with DM had on average 0.8 days longer hospital stay as compared to patients without DM (p<0.0001), totaling a surplus of 15 370 days of stay attributable to DM in 19 212 admissions. In-hospital mortality was also significantly higher in patients with CAP who have DM (15.2%) versus those who have DM (13.5%) (p=0.002). Our analysis revealed that DM prevalence was significantly increased within CAP hospital admissions, reinforcing other studies' findings that suggest that DM is a risk factor for CAP. Since patients with CAP who have DM have longer hospitalization time and higher mortality rates, these results hold informative value for patient guidance and healthcare strategies.

  2. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A.; Klazinga, Niek S.; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D.; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A.; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. Materials and Methods We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Results Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute

  3. Patient Experience Shows Little Relationship with Hospital Quality Management Strategies.

    PubMed

    Groene, Oliver; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Klazinga, Niek S; Wagner, Cordula; Bartels, Paul D; Kristensen, Solvejg; Saillour, Florence; Thompson, Andrew; Thompson, Caroline A; Pfaff, Holger; DerSarkissian, Maral; Sunol, Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Patient-reported experience measures are increasingly being used to routinely monitor the quality of care. With the increasing attention on such measures, hospital managers seek ways to systematically improve patient experience across hospital departments, in particular where outcomes are used for public reporting or reimbursement. However, it is currently unclear whether hospitals with more mature quality management systems or stronger focus on patient involvement and patient-centered care strategies perform better on patient-reported experience. We assessed the effect of such strategies on a range of patient-reported experience measures. We employed a cross-sectional, multi-level study design randomly recruiting hospitals from the Czech Republic, France, Germany, Poland, Portugal, Spain, and Turkey between May 2011 and January 2012. Each hospital contributed patient level data for four conditions/pathways: acute myocardial infarction, stroke, hip fracture and deliveries. The outcome variables in this study were a set of patient-reported experience measures including a generic 6-item measure of patient experience (NORPEQ), a 3-item measure of patient-perceived discharge preparation (Health Care Transition Measure) and two single item measures of perceived involvement in care and hospital recommendation. Predictor variables included three hospital management strategies: maturity of the hospital quality management system, patient involvement in quality management functions and patient-centered care strategies. We used directed acyclic graphs to detail and guide the modeling of the complex relationships between predictor variables and outcome variables, and fitted multivariable linear mixed models with random intercept by hospital, and adjusted for fixed effects at the country level, hospital level and patient level. Overall, 74 hospitals and 276 hospital departments contributed data on 6,536 patients to this study (acute myocardial infarction n = 1,379, hip fracture

  4. Hospital-Level Variation in Practice Patterns and Patient Outcomes for Pediatric Patients Hospitalized With Functional Constipation.

    PubMed

    Librizzi, Jamie; Flores, Samuel; Morse, Keith; Kelleher, Kelly; Carter, Jodi; Bode, Ryan

    2017-06-01

    Constipation is a common pediatric condition with a prevalence of 3% to 5% in children aged 4 to 17 years. Currently, there are no evidence-based guidelines for the management of pediatric patients hospitalized with constipation. The primary objective was to evaluate practice patterns and patient outcomes for the hospital management of functional constipation in US children's hospitals. We conducted a multicenter, retrospective cohort study of children aged 0 to 18 years hospitalized for functional constipation from 2012 to 2014 by using the Pediatric Health Information System. Patients were included by using constipation and other related diagnoses as classified by International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision . Patients with complex chronic conditions were excluded. Outcome measures included percentage of hospitalizations due to functional constipation, therapies used, length of stay, and 90-day readmission rates. Statistical analysis included means with 95% confidence intervals for individual hospital outcomes. A total of 14 243 hospitalizations were included, representing 12 804 unique patients. The overall percentage of hospitalizations due to functional constipation was 0.65% (range: 0.19%-1.41%, P < .0001). The percentage of patients receiving the following treatment during their hospitalization included: electrolyte laxatives: 40% to 96%; sodium phosphate enema: 0% to 64%; mineral oil enema: 0% to 61%; glycerin suppository: 0% to 37%; bisacodyl 0% to 47%; senna: 0% to 23%; and docusate 0% to 11%. Mean length of stay was 1.97 days (range: 1.31-2.73 days, P < .0001). Mean 90-day readmission rate was 3.78% (range: 0.95%-7.53%, P < .0001). There is significant variation in practice patterns and clinical outcomes for pediatric patients hospitalized with functional constipation across US children's hospitals. Collaborative initiatives to adopt evidence-based best practices guidelines could help standardize the hospital management of pediatric

  5. Guidelines for the Treatment of Smoking in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Jiménez Ruiz, Carlos A; de Granda Orive, Jose Ignacio; Solano Reina, Segismundo; Riesco Miranda, Juan Antonio; de Higes Martinez, Eva; Pascual Lledó, Jose Francisco; Garcia Rueda, Marcos; Lorza Blasco, Jose Javier; Signes Costa-Miñana, Jaime; Valencia Azcona, Borja; Villar Laguna, Cristina; Cristóbal Fernández, Maribel

    2017-07-01

    Between 15 and 27% of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals are smokers. Hospitalization is an ideal time for a smoker to decide to quit. We performed a MEDLINE search of controlled, randomized or observational studies associated with helping hospitalized patients quit smoking, published between January 1, 2002 and September 30, 2015. On the basis of the results of those studies, we have issued some recommendations for the treatment of smoking in hospitalized patients. The recommendations were drawn up according to the GRADE system. Offering the smoker psychological counselling and prolonging follow-up for at least 4 weeks after discharge is the most effective recommendation for helping hospitalized patients to quit. Copyright © 2016 SEPAR. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. [Communication between the primary care physician, hospital staff and the patient during hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Menahem, Sasson; Roitgarz, Ina; Shvartzman, Pesach

    2011-04-01

    HospitaL admission is a crisis for the patient and his family and can interfere with the continuity of care. It may lead to mistakes due to communication problems between the primary care physician and the hospital medical staff. To explore the communication between the primary care physician, the hospital medical staff, the patient and his family during hospitalization. A total of 269 questionnaires were sent to all Clalit Health Services-South District, primary care physicians; 119 of these questionnaires (44.2%) were completed. Half of the primary care physicians thought that they should, always or almost always, have contact with the admitting ward in cases of internal medicine, oncology, surgery or pediatric admissions. However, the actual contact rate, according to their report, was only in a third of the cases. A telephone contact was more common than an actual visit of the patient in the ward. Computer communication between the hospital physicians and the primary care physicians is still insufficiently developed, although 96.6% of the primary care physicians check, with the aid of computer software, for information on their hospitalized patients. The main reasons to visit the hospitalized patient were severe medical conditions or uncertainty about the diagnosis; 79% of the physicians thought that visiting their patients strengthened the level of trust between them and their patients. There are sometimes communication difficulties and barriers between the primary care physicians and the ward's physicians due to partial information delivery and rejection from the hospital physicians. The main barriers for visiting admitted patients were workload and lack of pre-allocated time on the work schedule. No statistically significant differences were found between communication variables and primary care physician's personal and demographic characteristics. The communication between the primary care physician and the hospital physicians should be improved through

  7. Patients' Hand Washing and Reducing Hospital-Acquired Infection.

    PubMed

    Haverstick, Stacy; Goodrich, Cara; Freeman, Regi; James, Shandra; Kullar, Rajkiran; Ahrens, Melissa

    2017-06-01

    Hand hygiene is important to prevent hospital-acquired infections. Patients' hand hygiene is just as important as hospital workers' hand hygiene. Hospital-acquired infection rates remain a concern across health centers. To improve patients' hand hygiene through the promotion and use of hand washing with soap and water, hand sanitizer, or both and improve patients' education to reduce hospital-acquired infections. In August 2013, patients in a cardiothoracic postsurgical step-down unit were provided with individual bottles of hand sanitizer. Nurses and nursing technicians provided hand hygiene education to each patient. Patients completed a 6-question survey before the intervention, at hospital discharge and 1, 2, and 3 months after the intervention. Hospital-acquired infection data were tracked monthly by infection prevention staff. Significant correlations were found between hand hygiene and rates of infection with vancomycin-resistant enterococci ( P = .003) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus ( P = .01) after the intervention. After the implementation of hand hygiene interventions, rates of both infections declined significantly and patients reported more staff offering opportunities for and encouraging hand hygiene. This quality improvement project demonstrates that increased hand hygiene compliance by patients can influence infection rates in an adult cardiothoracic step-down unit. The decreased infection rates and increased compliance with hand hygiene among the patients may be attributed to the implementation of patient education and the increased accessibility and use of hand sanitizer. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  8. Variability of patient safety culture in Belgian acute hospitals.

    PubMed

    Vlayen, Annemie; Schrooten, Ward; Wami, Welcome; Aerts, Marc; Barrado, Leandro Garcia; Claes, Neree; Hellings, Johan

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to measure differences in safety culture perceptions within Belgian acute hospitals and to examine variability based on language, work area, staff position, and work experience. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed to hospitals participating in the national quality and safety program (2007-2009). Hospitals were invited to participate in a comparative study. Data of 47,136 respondents from 89 acute hospitals were used for quantitative analysis. Percentages of positive response were calculated on 12 dimensions. Generalized estimating equations models were fitted to explore differences in safety culture. Handoffs and transitions, staffing, and management support for patient safety were considered as major problem areas. Dutch-speaking hospitals had higher odds of positive perceptions for most dimensions in comparison with French-speaking hospitals. Safety culture scores were more positive for respondents working in pediatrics, psychiatry, and rehabilitation compared with the emergency department, operating theater, and multiple hospital units. We found an important gap in safety culture perceptions between leaders and assistants within disciplines. Administration and middle management had lower perceptions toward patient safety. Respondents working less than 1 year in the current hospital had more positive safety culture perceptions in comparison with all other respondents. Large comparative databases provide the opportunity to identify distinct high and low scoring groups. In our study, language, work area, and profession were identified as important safety culture predictors. Years of experience in the hospital had only a small effect on safety culture perceptions.

  9. Patient experience and hospital profitability: Is there a link?

    PubMed

    Richter, Jason P; Muhlestein, David B

    Patient experience has had a direct financial impact on hospitals since value-based purchasing was instituted by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services in 2013 as a method to reward or punish hospitals based on performance on various measures, including patient experience. Although other industries have shown an indirect impact of customer experience on overall profitability, that link has not been well established in the health care industry. Return-to-provider rate and perceptions of health quality have been associated with profitability in the health care industry. Our aims were to assess whether, independent of a direct financial impact, a more positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and whether a more negative patient experience is associated with decreased profitability. We used a sample of 19,792 observations from 3767 hospitals over the 6-year period 2007-2012. The data were sourced from Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services and Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. Using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures, we fit four separate models for three dependent variables: net patient revenue, net income, and operating margin. Each model included one of the following independent variables of interest: percentage of patients who definitely recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who definitely would not recommend the hospital, percentage of patients who rated the hospital 9 or 10, and percentage of patients who rated the hospital 6 or lower. We identified that a positive patient experience is associated with increased profitability and a negative patient experience is even more strongly associated with decreased profitability. Management should have greater justification for incurring costs associated with bolstering patient experience programs. Improvements in training, technology, and staffing can be justified as a way to improve not only quality but now

  10. Comparing Patient Safety in Rural Hospitals by Bed Count

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    provided direct patient safety measures among rural hospitals. In an early study, Brennan and colleagues1 reviewed medical records to examine rates...affiliated with, or owned by, medical schools. And when controls for patient age and severity of illness were introduced, they discovered that rural...Incidence of adverse events and negligence in hospitalized patients . Results of the Harvard Medical Practice Study I. NEJM 1991 324(6):370–6. 2. Romano

  11. Vitamin D Status in Hospitalized Chronically Ill Patients.

    PubMed

    Botros, Raef Malak; AbdElsalam Besibes, Mona Mohamed; Bahaaeldin, Ahmed Mohamed; Abo Elyazed, Sherihan

    2018-04-13

    Vitamin D deficiency is rarely considered or treated in critically ill patients. Deficiency of 25-hydroxy vitamin D [25(OH)D] prior to hospital admission might be a significant predictor of short- and long-term all cause patient mortality in a critically ill patient. The aim of this work is to investigate the prevalence of vitamin D deficiency in hospitalized patients and its relation to the length of stay and outcome of hospitalization. Prospective cohort study performed on 80 patients admitted with acute deterioration of their chronic illness. Four groups of diseases were included, namely, chronic liver diseases (CLD), chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), cerebrovascular stroke (CVS), and heart failure (HF). The patients were followed up until their discharge, or transfer, or death. Patients were sampled for their vitamin D level on admission and were divided according to their vitamin D status into sufficient, insufficient, and deficient. Statistical methods and analysis of the present study were conducted using the SPSS V17 program. Vitamin D level had a significant inverse correlation with length of hospital stay (r = -0.648) (p < 0.001). In vitamin D-deficient and -insufficient groups, there was a significant difference between survivors and nonsurvivors as regards vitamin D levels and an inverse correlation between vitamin D level and outcome of hospital admission. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are significantly associated with a longer hospital stay and a poor outcome of hospital admission in comparison to control.

  12. Newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis in hospitalized patients: clinical characteristics.

    PubMed

    Rotman-Pikielny, P; Borodin, O; Zissin, R; Ness-Abramof, R; Levy, Y

    2008-11-01

    Thyrotoxicosis is often diagnosed in an outpatient setting. The most common symptoms include irritability, heat intolerance, palpitations and weakness. Sometimes, however, thyrotoxicosis is first diagnosed in the hospital setting. The prevalent symptoms in hospitalized patients with newly diagnosed thyrotoxicosis have not been fully characterized. To determine the clinical characteristics of patients with thyrotoxicosis newly diagnosed during hospitalization. A retrospective computer-based search was undertaken to detect patients that were hospitalized in our medical centre during 1999-2006, and discharged with thyrotoxicosis or thyroiditis as the primary diagnosis. Fifty-eight patients (36F/22M; mean age 52.1 +/- 17.5 years) were identified. Weakness, weight loss and palpitations were the most common manifestations (50, 40 and 35%, respectively) and were predominantly present in patients with hyperthyroidism. Sore throat was present in 41% of patients with thyroiditis. Sinus tachycardia and atrial fibrillation occurred in 65.5 and 15.5% of the patients, more common in those with hyperthyroidism. The diagnoses on discharge were Graves' disease, subacute thyroiditis and multinodular goiter in 39.7, 34.5 and 8.9%, respectively. Weakness, weight loss and palpitations were the main symptoms in patients diagnosed with thyrotoxicosis during hospitalization. Thyrotoxicosis should be included in the differential diagnosis when patients are admitted to the hospital with those symptoms.

  13. Patient satisfaction in Turkey: differences between public and private hospitals.

    PubMed

    Tengilimoglu, D; Kisa, A; Dziegielewski, S F

    1999-02-01

    This article reports the results of a patient-satisfaction survey administered by interview to 2045 adults discharged from several major public and private hospitals in Turkey. The direct measurement of patient-satisfaction is a new phenomenon for this country. An instrument was designed similar to those available in the United States and administered during exit interviews. Two primary areas of analyses were determined in comparing services provided by these public and private hospitals: demographic factors with regard to accessibility and consumer perceptions of the quality of service provided. Relationships and percentages within and among the five public and two private hospitals are reported. Several statistically significant differences were found between the hospitals, with the private hospitals achieving the greatest satisfaction on most of the quality of services issues examined. Future recommendations outline the need to take into account the public's perception of these hospitals and enhancing customer satisfaction as a means of increasing service utilization.

  14. Building patient-centeredness: hospital design as an interpretive act.

    PubMed

    Bromley, Elizabeth

    2012-09-01

    Hospital designs reflect the sociocultural, economic, professional, and aesthetic priorities prevalent at a given time. As such, hospital buildings concretize assumptions about illness, care and healing, patienthood, and medical providers' roles. Trends in hospital design have been attributed to the increasing influence of consumerism on healthcare, the influx of business-oriented managers, and technological changes. This paper describes the impact of the concept of patient-centeredness on the design of a new hospital in the USA. Data come from 35 interviews with planners, administrators, and designers of the new hospital, as well as from public documents about the hospital design. Thematic content analysis was used to identify salient design principles and intents. For these designers, administrators, and planners, an interpretation of patient-centeredness served as a heuristic, guiding the most basic decisions about space, people, and processes in the hospital. I detail the particular interpretation of patient-centeredness used to build and manage the new hospital space and the roles and responsibilities of providers working within it. Three strategies were central to the implementation of patient-centeredness: an onstage/offstage layout; a concierge approach to patients; and the scripting of communication. I discuss that this interpretation of patient-centeredness may challenge medical professionals' roles, may construct medical care as a product that should sate the patient's desire, and may distance patients from the realities of medical care. By describing the ways in which hospital designs reflect and reinforce contemporary concepts of patienthood and caring, this paper raises questions about the implementation of patient-centeredness that deserve further empirical study by medical social scientists. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Pediatric Patients' Malnutrition and Its Relation to Hospitalization Times and Causes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guimarey, Luis M.; And Others

    1984-01-01

    Relates the nutritional status of 1,378 hospitalized pediatric patients to length of hospitalization and definitive hospitalization diagnosis. Findings indicated the length of hospitalization time increased markedly with malnutrition, especially for patients with diarrhea. (BJD)

  16. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H; Peng, Timothy R; Zhu, Carolyn W; Feldman, Penny H

    2016-02-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure-related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. © The Author(s) 2015.

  17. Patient Characteristics Predicting Readmission Among Individuals Hospitalized for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, Melissa; Murtaugh, Christopher M.; Shah, Shivani; Barrón-Vaya, Yolanda; Bowles, Kathryn H.; Peng, Timothy R.; Zhu, Carolyn W.; Feldman, Penny H.

    2015-01-01

    Heart failure is difficult to manage and increasingly common with many individuals experiencing frequent hospitalizations. Little is known about patient factors consistently associated with hospital readmission. A literature review was conducted to identify heart failure patient characteristics, measured before discharge, that contribute to variation in hospital readmission rates. Database searches yielded 950 potential articles, of which 34 studies met inclusion criteria. Patient characteristics generally have a very modest effect on all-cause or heart failure–related readmission within 7 to 180 days of index hospital discharge. A range of cardiac diseases and other comorbidities only minimally increase readmission rates. No single patient characteristic stands out as a key contributor across multiple studies underscoring the challenge of developing successful interventions to reduce readmissions. Interventions may need to be general in design with the specific intervention depending on each patient's unique clinical profile. PMID:26180045

  18. Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder: Illness and Hospital Course in Patients Hospitalized for Nutritional Insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Strandjord, Sarah E; Sieke, Erin H; Richmond, Miranda; Rome, Ellen S

    2015-12-01

    Avoidant/restrictive food intake disorder (ARFID), a recently defined Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders-5 eating disorder diagnosis, has not been extensively studied in the inpatient population. This study compares hospitalized ARFID and anorexia nervosa (AN) patients, including differences in presentation, treatment response, and 1-year outcomes. We conducted a retrospective chart review of ARFID and AN patients hospitalized between 2008 and 2014 for acute medical stabilization at an academic medical center. Data, including characteristics on admission, during hospitalization, and 1 year after discharge, were recorded for each patient and compared between ARFID and AN patients. On presentation, ARFID patients (n = 41) were younger with fewer traditional eating disorder behaviors and less weight loss, comorbidity, and bradycardia than AN patients (n = 203). During hospitalization, although ARFID and AN patients had similar caloric intake, ARFID patients relied on more enteral nutrition and required longer hospitalizations than AN patients (8 vs. 5 days; p = .0006). One year after discharge, around half of ARFID and AN patients met criteria for remission (62% vs. 46%; p = .18), and less than one-quarter required readmission (21% vs. 24%; p = .65). The findings from this study reveal several differences in hospitalized eating disorder patients and emphasize the need for further research on ARFID patients, including research on markers of illness severity and optimal approaches to refeeding. Similar remission and readmission rates among ARFID and AN patients highlight both the success and the continued need for improvement in eating disorder treatment regardless of diagnosis. Copyright © 2015 Society for Adolescent Health and Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Malnutrition in hospitalized patients: results from La Rioja.

    PubMed

    Martín Palmero, Ángela; Serrano Pérez, Andra; Chinchetru Ranedo, Mª José; Cámara Balda, Alejandro; Martínez de Salinas Santamarí, Mª Ángeles; Villar García, Gonzalo; Marín Lizárraga, Mª Del Mar

    2017-03-30

    There is a high malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients. To determine the malnutrition prevalence in hospitalized patients of La Rioja Community (Spain) when evaluated with different screening/ evaluation tools and its relationship with hospital stay and mortality. Cross sectional observational study of hospitalized adult patients (age > 18 years old) from medical and surgical departments that underwent within 72 h of their admission a nutritional screening with Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST), Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS) 2002, Controlling Nutritional Status (CONUT) y Subjective Global Assessment (SGA). 384 patients (273 medical and 111 surgical) were evaluated. Almost fifty percent of them were considered malnourished independently of the screening/assessment tool used. High concordance was found between SGA and NRS-2002 (k = 0.758). Malnourished patients had a longer hospital stay than those well-nourished (9.29 vs. 7.10 days; p = 0.002), used a greater number of medicines (9.2 vs. 7.4; p = 0.001) and underwent a higher number of diagnostic tests (16.4 vs. 12.5; p = 0,002). Half of the hospitalized patients in the medical and surgical department of La Rioja are malnourished. This is associated with a longer hospital stay, higher use of medicines, diagnostics tests and greater mortality. Malnutrition could be detected with easy screening tools to treat it appropriately.

  20. Using standardized patients to evaluate hospital-based intervention outcomes.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Lin, Chunqing; Guan, Jihui

    2014-06-01

    The standardized patient approach has proved to be an effective training tool for medical educators. This article explains the process of employing standardized patients in an HIV stigma reduction intervention in healthcare settings in China. The study was conducted in 40 hospitals in two provinces of China. One year after the stigma reduction intervention, standardized patients made unannounced visits to participating hospitals, randomly approached service providers on duty and presented symptoms related to HIV and disclosed HIV-positive test results. After each visit, the standardized patients evaluated their providers' attitudes and behaviours using a structured checklist. Standardized patients also took open-ended observation notes about their experience and the evaluation process. Seven standardized patients conducted a total of 217 assessments (108 from 20 hospitals in the intervention condition; 109 from 20 hospitals in the control condition). Based on a comparative analysis, the intervention hospitals received a better rating than the control hospitals in terms of general impression and universal precaution compliance as well as a lower score on stigmatizing attitudes and behaviours toward the standardized patients. Standardized patients are a useful supplement to traditional self-report assessments, particularly for measuring intervention outcomes that are sensitive or prone to social desirability. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Epidemiological Association © The Author 2013; all rights reserved.

  1. Survey on patient safety climate in public hospitals in China.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Ping; Bundorf, M Kate; Gu, Jianjun; He, Xiaoyan; Xue, Di

    2015-02-07

    Patient safety climate has been recognized as a core determinant for improving safety in hospitals. Describing workforce perceptions of patient safety climate is an important part of safety climate management. This study aimed to describe staff's perceptions of patient safety climate in public hospitals in Shanghai, China and to determine how perceptions of patient safety climate differ between different types of workers in the U.S. and China. Survey of employees of 6 secondary, general public hospitals in Shanghai conducted during 2013 using a modified version of the U.S. Patient Safety Climate in Health Care Organizations (PSCHO) tool. The percentage of "problematic responses" (PPRs) was used to measure safety climate, and the PPRs were compared among employees with different job types, using χ (2) tests and multivariate regression models. Perceptions of patient safety climate were relatively positive among hospital employees and similar to those of employees in U.S. hospitals along most dimensions. For workers in Chinese hospitals, the scales of "fear of blame" and "fear of shame" had the highest PPRs, whereas in the United States the scale of "fear of shame" had among the lowest PPRs. As in the United States, hospital managers in China perceived a more positive patient safety climate overall than other types of personnel. "Fear of shame" and "fear of blame" may be important barriers to improvement of patient safety in Chinese hospitals. Research on the effect of patient safety climate on outcomes is necessary to implement effective polices to improve patient safety and quality outcomes in China.

  2. Hospital costs by cost center of inpatient hospitalization for medicare patients undergoing major abdominal surgery.

    PubMed

    Stey, Anne M; Brook, Robert H; Needleman, Jack; Hall, Bruce L; Zingmond, David S; Lawson, Elise H; Ko, Clifford Y

    2015-02-01

    This study aims to describe the magnitude of hospital costs among patients undergoing elective colectomy, cholecystectomy, and pancreatectomy, determine whether these costs relate as expected to duration of care, patient case-mix severity and comorbidities, and whether risk-adjusted costs vary significantly by hospital. Correctly estimating the cost of production of surgical care may help decision makers design mechanisms to improve the efficiency of surgical care. Patient data from 202 hospitals in the ACS-NSQIP were linked to Medicare inpatient claims. Patient charges were mapped to cost center cost-to-charge ratios in the Medicare cost reports to estimate costs. The association of patient case-mix severity and comorbidities with cost was analyzed using mixed effects multivariate regression. Cost variation among hospitals was quantified by estimating risk-adjusted hospital cost ratios and 95% confidence intervals from the mixed effects multivariate regression. There were 21,923 patients from 202 hospitals who underwent an elective colectomy (n = 13,945), cholecystectomy (n = 5,569), or pancreatectomy (n = 2,409). Median cost was lowest for cholecystectomy ($15,651) and highest for pancreatectomy ($37,745). Room and board costs accounted for the largest proportion (49%) of costs and were correlated with length of stay, R = 0.89, p < 0.001. The patient case-mix severity and comorbidity variables most associated with cost were American Society of Anesthesiologists (ASA) class IV (estimate 1.72, 95% CI 1.57 to 1.87) and fully dependent functional status (estimate 1.63, 95% CI 1.53 to 1.74). After risk-adjustment, 66 hospitals had significantly lower costs than the average hospital and 57 hospitals had significantly higher costs. The hospital costs estimates appear to be consistent with clinical expectations of hospital resource use and differ significantly among 202 hospitals after risk-adjustment for preoperative patient characteristics and procedure type

  3. Medicaid Markets and Pediatric Patient Safety in Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Richard B; Cheung, Robyn; Owens, Pamela; Wilson, R Mark; Simpson, Lisa

    2007-01-01

    Objective To examine the association of Medicaid market characteristics to potentially preventable adverse medical events for hospitalized children, controlling for patient- and hospital-level factors. Data Sources/Study Setting Two carefully selected Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ) pediatric patient safety indicators (decubitus ulcers and laceration) are analyzed using the new pediatric-specific, risk-adjusting, patient safety algorithm from the AHRQ. All pediatric hospital discharges for patients age 0–17 in Florida, New York, and Wisconsin, and at risk of any of these two patient safety events, are examined for the years 1999–2001 (N=859,922). Study Design Logistic regression on the relevant pool of discharges estimates the probability an individual patient experiences one of the two PSI events. Data Extraction Methods Pediatric discharges from the 1999 to 2001 State Inpatient Databases (SIDs) from the AHRQ Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, merged with hospital-level data from the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey, Medicaid data obtained from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services and state Medicaid offices, and private and Medicaid managed care enrollment data obtained from InterStudy, are used in the estimations. Principal Findings At the market level, patients in markets in which Medicaid payers face relatively little competition are more likely to experience a patient safety event (odds ratio [OR]=1.602), while patients in markets in which hospitals face relatively little competition are less likely to experience an adverse event (OR=0.686). At the patient-discharge and hospital levels, Medicaid characteristics are not significantly associated with the incidence of a pediatric patient safety event. Conclusions Our analysis offers additional insights to previous work and suggests a new factor—the Medicaid-payer market—as relevant to the issue of pediatric patient safety. PMID:17850529

  4. Assessment of patient safety culture in Palestinian public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Motasem; Saleem, Abed Alra'oof

    2013-04-01

    To assess the prevalent patient safety culture in Palestinian public hospitals. A cross-sectional design, Arabic translated version of the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was used. All the 11 general public hospitals in the West Bank. A total of 1460 clinical and non-clinical hospital staff. No. Twelve patient safety culture composites and 2 outcome variables (patient safety grade and events reported in the past year) were measured. Most of the participants were nurses and physicians (69.2%) with direct contact with patients (92%), mainly employed in medical/surgical units (55.1%). The patient safety composites with the highest positive scores were teamwork within units (71%), organizational learning and continuous improvement (62%) and supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting patient safety (56%). The composites with the lowest scores were non-punitive response to error (17%), frequency of events reported (35%), communication openness (36%), hospital management support for patient safety (37%) and staffing (38%). Although 53.2% of the respondents did not report any event in the past year, 63.5% rated patient safety level as 'excellent/very good'. Significant differences in patient safety scores and outcome variables were found between hospitals of different size and in relation to staff positions and work hours. This study highlights the existence of a punitive and blame culture, under-reporting of events, lack of communication openness and inadequate management support that are key challenges for patient safe hospital care. The baseline survey results are valuable for designing and implementing the patient safety program and for measuring future progress.

  5. Burnout in Hospital Social Workers Who Work with AIDS Patients.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oktay, Julianne S.

    1992-01-01

    Surveyed 128 hospital social workers who worked with Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) patients. Found that hospital AIDS social workers had slightly higher rates of emotional exhaustion and depersonalization on Maslach Burnout Inventory but also felt substantially higher level of personal accomplishment. Age, autonomy, and belonging to…

  6. New Instrument to Measure Hospital Patient Experiences in Flanders

    PubMed Central

    Tambuyzer, Else; De Wachter, Dirk; Sermeus, Walter; De Ridder, Dirk; Ramaekers, Dirk; Weeghmans, Ilse; Vanhaecht, Kris

    2017-01-01

    Implementing a standardized patient experience survey may initiate a process to apply pressure on hospitals to attend to improving patient experiences. In Flanders, Belgium, the Flemish Patient Survey was developed between 2011 and 2015. A preliminary version was developed from a scoping review and patient and expert focus groups, and included 27 items for eight hypothesized dimensions: ‘preparing for hospital stay’, ‘information and communication’, ‘coordination’, ‘respect’, ‘privacy’, ‘safe care’, pain management’, and ‘participation’. Exploratory factor analysis for 1076 patients in 17 hospitals found that the data did not fit the dimensions. Adaptations in item wording and response categories were based on the US Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems. The revised version showed excellent model fit in 22,143 patients in 37 hospitals. Multiple group analysis pointed to evidence of measurement invariance over time across mode of administration, type of nursing unit, and various patient characteristics. Fostering a collaborative approach thus proved successful in implementing a standardized patient experience survey. The most recent findings (2016) illustrate substandard performance and a need for patient-mix adjustment. The Flemish government developed a dedicated website to make findings publicly available and the federal government currently considers patient experiences in devising a pay-for-quality scheme. PMID:29084160

  7. The association of antibiotic treatment regimen and hospital mortality in patients hospitalized with Legionella pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Gershengorn, Hayley B; Keene, Adam; Dzierba, Amy L; Wunsch, Hannah

    2015-06-01

    Guidelines recommend azithromycin or a quinolone antibiotic for treatment of Legionella pneumonia. No clinical study has compared these strategies. We performed a retrospective cohort analysis of adults hospitalized in the United States with a diagnosis of Legionella pneumonia in the Premier Perspectives database (1 July 2008-30 June 2013). Our primary outcome was hospital mortality; we additionally evaluated hospital length of stay, development of Clostridium difficile colitis, and total hospital cost. We used propensity-based matching to compare patients treated with azithromycin vs a quinolone. All analyses were repeated on a subgroup of more severely ill patients, defined as requiring intensive care unit admission or mechanical ventilation or having a predicted probability of hospital mortality in the top quartile for all patients. Legionella pneumonia was diagnosed in 3152 adults across 437 hospitals. Quinolones alone were used in 28.8%, azithromycin alone was used in 34.0%, and 1.8% received both. Crude hospital mortality was similar: 6.6% (95% confidence interval [CI], 5.0%-8.2%) for quinolones vs 6.4% (95% CI, 5.0%-7.9%) for azithromycin (P = .87); after propensity matching (n = 813 in each group), mortality remained similar (6.3% [95% CI, 4.6%-7.9%] vs 6.5% [95% CI, 4.8%-8.2%], P = .84 for the whole cohort, and 14.9% [95% CI, 10.0%-19.8%] vs 18.3% [95% CI, 13.0%-23.6%], P = .36 for the more severely ill). There was no difference in hospital length of stay, development of C. difficile, or total hospital cost. Use of azithromycin alone or a quinolone alone for treatment of Legionella pneumonia was associated with similar hospital mortality. Few patients receive combination therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Commercial filming of patient care activities in hospitals.

    PubMed

    Geiderman, Joel M; Larkin, Gregory L

    2002-07-17

    Commercial filming of patient care activities is common in hospital settings. This article reviews common circumstances in which patients are commercially filmed, explores the potential positive and negative aspects of filming, and considers the ethical and legal issues associated with commercial filming of patients in hospital settings. We examine the competing goals of commercial filming and the duties of journalists vs the rights of patients to privacy. Current standards and recommendations for commercial filming of patient care activities are reviewed and additional recommendations are offered.

  9. Hospitalization rates among dialysis patients during Hurricane Katrina.

    PubMed

    Howard, David; Zhang, Rebecca; Huang, Yijian; Kutner, Nancy

    2012-08-01

    Dialysis centers struggled to maintain continuity of care for dialysis patients during and immediately following Hurricane Katrina's landfall on the US Gulf Coast in August 2005. However, the impact on patient health and service use is unclear. The impact of Hurricane Katrina on hospitalization rates among dialysis patients was estimated. Data from the United States Renal Data System were used to identify patients receiving dialysis from January 1, 2001 through August 29, 2005 at clinics that experienced service disruptions during Hurricane Katrina. A repeated events duration model was used with a time-varying Hurricane Katrina indicator to estimate trends in hospitalization rates. Trends were estimated separately by cause: surgical hospitalizations, medical, non-renal-related hospitalizations, and renal-related hospitalizations. The rate ratio for all-cause hospitalization associated with the time-varying Hurricane Katrina indicator was 1.16 (95% CI, 1.05-1.29; P = .004). The ratios for cause-specific hospitalization were: surgery, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.68-1.04; P = .11); renal-related admissions, 2.53 (95% CI, 2.09-3.06); P < .001), and medical non-renal related, 1.04 (95% CI, 0.89-1.20; P = .63). The estimated number of excess renal-related hospital admissions attributable to Katrina was 140, representing approximately three percent of dialysis patients at the affected clinics. Hospitalization rates among dialysis patients increased in the month following the Hurricane Katrina landfall, suggesting that providers and patients were not adequately prepared for large-scale disasters.

  10. Funds for Treatment of Hospitalized Patients: Evidence from Bangladesh

    PubMed Central

    Begum, Farhana; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. ‘Distress’ selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals. PMID:25395909

  11. Funds for treatment of hospitalized patients: evidence from Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Begum, Farhana; Alam, Shahinul; Hossain, Akmal

    2014-09-01

    This study was designed to explore sources of funds for health expenditure of patients if they are hospitalized. We have included 379 patients of 3 private and 7 public hospitals to estimate total expenditure. Of them, 229 (60.4%) were from public and 150 (39.6%) from private hospitals. Mean expenditure was Tk 60,613.3 and 8,262.7, and duration of hospital stay was 10.7 and 11.8 days in private and public hospitals respectively. More than half (55%) of the patients from middle class were treated in private hospitals. Of them, 278 (74.0%) were funded by themselves, 48 (12.8%) by loan with interest rate of 100% to 180%, 23 (6.1%) by loan without interest, 17 (4.5%) by losing their fixed asset, and 4 (1.1%) by begging in the street. Most of the patients did bear expenditure by themselves, followed by loan with high interest rate. 'Distress' selling of property was also a source. Middle-class patients could be comfortable with expenditure if they were in public hospitals.

  12. Hospital Admissions for Malnutrition and Dehydration in Patients With Dementia.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Katherine A; Burson, Rosanne; Gall, Kristyn; Saunders, Mitzi M

    2016-01-01

    Dehydration and malnutrition are commonly experienced by patients with dementia and can result in hospitalizations and decreased quality of life. The purpose of this study was to explore and describe retrospectively, the incidence and correlations of variables that may precede hospitalizations for dehydration/malnutrition in the community-dwelling patient with dementia. Data from the Outcome and Assessment Information Set (OASIS) Start of Care (SOC) on 44 patients served by a Michigan home care agency were retrieved for analysis. This study did not reveal any single or collection of variables that would predict risk for hospitalization for dehydration/malnutrition. With the lack of specific predictors of hospitalization related to dehydration and malnutrition, clinicians need to place high priority on risk-lowering strategies and preventive education for patients, family, and caregivers.

  13. [Screening for malnutrition among hospitalized patients in a Colombian University Hospital].

    PubMed

    Cruz, Viviana; Bernal, Laura; Buitrago, Giancarlo; Ruiz, Álvaro J

    2017-04-01

    On admission, 30 to 50% of hospitalized patients have some degree of malnutrition, which is associated with longer length of stay, higher rates of complications, mortality and greater costs. To determine the frequency of screening for risk of malnutrition in medical records and assess the usefulness of the Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST). In a cross-sectional study, we searched for malnutrition screening in medical records, and we applied the MST tool to hospitalized patients at the Internal Medicine Wards of San Ignacio University Hospital. Of 295 patients included, none had been screened for malnutrition since hospital admission. Sixty one percent were at nutritional risk, with a higher prevalence among patients with HIV (85.7%), cancer (77.5%) and pneumonia. A positive MST result was associated with a 3.2 days increase in length of hospital stay (p = 0.024). The prevalence of malnutrition risk in hospitalized patients is high, but its screening is inadequate and it is underdiagnosed. The MST tool is simple, fast, low-cost, and has a good diagnostic performance.

  14. Educational levels of hospital nurses and surgical patient mortality.

    PubMed

    Aiken, Linda H; Clarke, Sean P; Cheung, Robyn B; Sloane, Douglas M; Silber, Jeffrey H

    2003-09-24

    Growing evidence suggests that nurse staffing affects the quality of care in hospitals, but little is known about whether the educational composition of registered nurses (RNs) in hospitals is related to patient outcomes. To examine whether the proportion of hospital RNs educated at the baccalaureate level or higher is associated with risk-adjusted mortality and failure to rescue (deaths in surgical patients with serious complications). Cross-sectional analyses of outcomes data for 232 342 general, orthopedic, and vascular surgery patients discharged from 168 nonfederal adult general Pennsylvania hospitals between April 1, 1998, and November 30, 1999, linked to administrative and survey data providing information on educational composition, staffing, and other characteristics. Risk-adjusted patient mortality and failure to rescue within 30 days of admission associated with nurse educational level. The proportion of hospital RNs holding a bachelor's degree or higher ranged from 0% to 77% across the hospitals. After adjusting for patient characteristics and hospital structural characteristics (size, teaching status, level of technology), as well as for nurse staffing, nurse experience, and whether the patient's surgeon was board certified, a 10% increase in the proportion of nurses holding a bachelor's degree was associated with a 5% decrease in both the likelihood of patients dying within 30 days of admission and the odds of failure to rescue (odds ratio, 0.95; 95% confidence interval, 0.91-0.99 in both cases). In hospitals with higher proportions of nurses educated at the baccalaureate level or higher, surgical patients experienced lower mortality and failure-to-rescue rates.

  15. Profiles of the Patient Who Had Compulsory Hospitalization in a District Psychiatric Hospital.

    PubMed

    Beşer, Nalan Gördeles; Arabaci, Leyla Baysan; Bozkurt, Satı; Uzunoğlu, Gülçin; Taş, Gülsenay

    2017-08-01

    It aims to examine the profiles of patients who were treated with compulsory hospitalization between 2011 and 2015 in a district psychiatric hospital. In this retrospective and cohort study, hospital records gathered from 202 adult patients who were treated with compulsory hospitalization in units with a bed between 2011 and 2015 in a district psychiatric hospital were examined. In this study, profiles and socio-demographic features of the patients with compulsory hospitalization were evaluated by 23 closed-end and open-ended questions prepared by researchers. In data analysis, Monte Carlo Chi-square test and number-percentage distribution were used. 57.4% of examined cases was female and mean average was 38.88±13.06. Of examined cases, 18.8% was people graduated from high school or university and it was detected that 81.7% didn't have any regular job during the compulsory hospitalization. Of which 55.9% has not gotten married and 12.4% was divorced, 48.0% of the population has been living with their parents, sibling or/and their relatives and 17.8% has been living alone or in the nursing home. Of which 59.9% of the cases which were diagnosed with psychosis, 38.1% with psychotic relapse, 22.8% with medication regulation, 22.8% with excitation (expansiveness) and 15.8% having the risk of self-mutilation and damage his/her environment were admitted to compulsory hospitalization. Of these cases, the relative or custodian of 74.2%, employee of nursing home of 9.4%, law-enforcement officers of 5.4% and medical staff of 4.0% gave hospitalization approval. While not having any history for alcohol-substance abuse, it was established that 10.9% of the population had a problematic juridical records. Of the cases, hospitalization of 75.7% came to end with recovery/discharge and 20.3% was over with the demand of his/her relative/custodian, 1.5% of the cases escaped from the hospital. Patients whose majority was female, person who has never gotten married or was divorced and

  16. Survival factors of hospitalized out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients in Taiwan: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lai, Chung-Yu; Lin, Fu-Huang; Chu, Hsin; Ku, Chih-Hung; Tsai, Shih-Hung; Chung, Chi-Hsiang; Chien, Wu-Chien; Wu, Chun-Hsien; Chu, Chi-Ming; Chang, Chi-Wen

    2018-01-01

    The chain of survival has been shown to improve the chances of survival for victims of cardiac arrest. Post-cardiac arrest care has been demonstrated to significantly impact the survival of out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). How post-cardiac arrest care influences the survival of OHCA patients has been a main concern in recent years. The objective of this study was to assess the survival outcome of hospitalized OHCA patients and determine the factors associated with improved survival in terms of survival to discharge. We conducted a retrospective observational study by analyzing records from the National Health Insurance Research Database of Taiwan from 2007 to 2013. We collected cases with an International Classification of Disease Clinical Modification, 9th revision primary diagnosis codes of 427.41 (ventricular fibrillation, VF) or 427.5 (cardiac arrest) and excluded patients less than 18 years old, as well as cases with an unknown outcome or a combination of traumatic comorbidities. We then calculated the proportion of survival to discharge among hospitalized OHCA patients. Factors associated with the dependent variable were examined by logistic regression. Statistical analysis was conducted using SPSS 22 (IBM, Armonk, NY). Of the 11,000 cases, 2,499 patients (22.7%) survived to hospital discharge. The mean age of subjects who survived to hospital discharge and those who did not was 66.7±16.7 and 71.7±15.2 years, respectively. After adjusting for covariates, neurological failure, cardiac comorbidities, hospital level, intensive care unit beds, transfer to another hospital, and length of hospital stay were independent predictors of improved survival. Cardiac rhythm on admission was a strong factor associated with survival to discharge (VF vs. non-VF: adjusted odds ratio: 3.51; 95% confidence interval: 3.06-4.01). In conclusion, cardiac comorbidities, hospital volume, cardiac rhythm on admission, transfer to another hospital and length of hospital stay had

  17. Patient dumping, COBRA, and the public psychiatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Elliott, R L

    1993-02-01

    Serious clinical and risk management problems arise when indigent patients with acute medical conditions are transferred from general medical hospitals or emergency departments to public psychiatric hospitals that are ill equipped to provide medical care. To combat such practices, referred to as dumping, Congress included measures in the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1985 (COBRA) prohibiting such transfers. Because physicians and administrators in public psychiatric hospitals are generally not aware of the potential usefulness of COBRA in reducing dumping, this paper describes its important provisions. The key to preventing dumping is to educate referral sources to limitations on the medical care available at the receiving hospital and to discourage negligent patient transfers by enforcing COBRA. Public hospital staff and legal counsel who become familiar with COBRA's provisions can develop an antidumping strategy.

  18. Quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of black patients.

    PubMed

    Brooks-Carthon, J Margo; Kutney-Lee, Ann; Sloane, Douglas M; Cimiotti, Jeannie P; Aiken, Linda H

    2011-09-01

    To examine the influence of nursing-specifically nurse staffing and the nurse work environment-on quality of care and patient satisfaction in hospitals with varying concentrations of Black patients. Cross-sectional secondary analysis of 2006-2007 nurse survey data collected across four states (Florida, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and California), the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey, and administrative data. Global analysis of variance and linear regression models were used to examine the association between the concentration of Black patients on quality measures (readiness for discharge, patient or family complaints, health care-associated infections) and patient satisfaction, before and after accounting for nursing and hospital characteristics. Nurses working in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks reported poorer confidence in patients' readiness for discharge and more frequent complaints and infections. Patients treated in hospitals with higher concentrations of Blacks were less satisfied with their care. In the fully adjusted regression models for quality and patient satisfaction outcomes, the effects associated with the concentration of Blacks were explained in part by nursing and structural hospital characteristics. This study demonstrates a relationship between nursing, structural hospital characteristics, quality of care, and patient satisfaction in hospitals with high concentrations of Black patients. Consideration of nursing factors, in addition to other important hospital characteristics, is critical to understanding and improving quality of care and patient satisfaction in minority-serving hospitals. © 2011 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. Are medical students accepted by patients in teaching hospitals?

    PubMed Central

    Marwan, Yousef; Al-Saddique, Muhammad; Hassan, Adnan; Karim, Jumanah; Al-Saleh, Mervat

    2012-01-01

    Background Worldwide, patients are the cornerstone of bedside teaching of medical students. In this study, the authors aimed to assess patients’ acceptability toward medical students in teaching hospitals of the Faculty of Medicine of Kuwait University. Methods Ninehundred and ninety five patients were approached in 14 teaching hospitals; 932 patients agreed to participate (refusal rate is 6.3%). A self-administered questionnaire was used to collect data. Results In general, higher acceptance of students by patients was found when there is no direct contact between the patient and the student (e.g., reading patients’ files, presenting in outpatient clinic, observing doctors performing examination or procedures) compared to other situations (e.g., performing physical examination or procedures). Pediatrics patients showed higher acceptance of students compared to patients in other specialties, while Obstetrics/Gynecology patients showed the highest refusal of students. Gender of patients (especially females) and students appeared to affect the degree of acceptance of medical students by patients. Majority of the patients (436; 46.8%) believed that the presence of medical students in hospitals improves the quality of health care. Conclusion Patients are an important factor of bedside teaching. Clinical tutors must take advantage of patients who accept medical students. Clinical tutors and medical students should master essential communication skills to convince patients in accepting students, thus improving bedside teaching. Also, using simulation and standardization should be considered to address scenarios that most patients are unwilling to allow students to participate. PMID:22509091

  20. Improving discharge planning communication between hospitals and patients.

    PubMed

    New, P W; McDougall, K E; Scroggie, C P R

    2016-01-01

    A potential barrier to patient discharge from hospital is communication problems between the treating team and the patient or family regarding discharge planning. To determine if a bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' increases patient and family's knowledge of discharge date and destination and the name of the key clinician primarily responsible for team-patient communication. This article is a 'before-after' study of patients, their families and the interdisciplinary ward-based clinical team. Outcomes assessed pre-implementation and post-implementation of a bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' containing discharge information for patients and families. Patients and families were asked if they knew the key clinician for team-patient communication and the proposed discharge date and discharge destination. Responses were compared with those set by the team. Staff were surveyed regarding their perceptions of patient awareness of discharge plans and the benefit of the 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet'. Significant improvement occurred regarding patients' knowledge of their key clinician for team-patient communication (31% vs 75%; P = 0.0001), correctly identifying who they were (47% vs 79%; P = 0.02), and correctly reporting their anticipated discharge date (54% vs 86%; P = 0.004). There was significant improvement in the family's knowledge of the anticipated discharge date (78% vs 96%; P = 0.04). Staff reported the 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' assisted with communication regarding anticipated discharge date and destination (very helpful n = 11, 39%; a little bit helpful n = 11, 39%). A bedside 'Leaving Hospital Information Sheet' can potentially improve communication between patients, families and their treating team. © 2016 Royal Australasian College of Physicians.

  1. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient's trust is the service quality. This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient's trust. In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient's trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient's trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff.

  2. Patient Awareness and Expectations of Pharmacist Services During Hospital Stay.

    PubMed

    King, Philip K; Martin, Steven J; Betka, Eric M

    2017-10-01

    There are insufficient data in the United States regarding patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist availability and services. The objective of this research is to assess patient awareness and expectations of hospital pharmacist services and to determine whether a marketing campaign for pharmacist services increases patient awareness and expectations. Eligible inpatients were surveyed before and after implementation of a hospital-wide pharmacist services marketing campaign (12 items; Likert scale of 1 [strongly disagree] to 4 [strongly agree]; maximum total score of 48) regarding awareness of pharmacist services. The primary outcome was the change in median total survey scores from baseline. Other outcomes included the frequency of patient requests for pharmacists. Similar numbers of patients completed the survey before and after the campaign (intervention, n = 140, vs control, n = 147). Awareness of pharmacist availability and services was increased (41 [interquartile ranges, IQRs: 36-46] vs 37 [IQR 31-43]; P < .001). Patients were 7 times more likely to request a pharmacist following the marketing campaign implementation. Awareness among inpatients of pharmacist services is low. Marketing pharmacist availability and services to patients in the hospital improves awareness and expectations for pharmacist-provided care and increases the frequency of patient-initiated interaction between pharmacists and patients. This could improve patient outcomes as pharmacists become more integrally involved in direct patient care.

  3. Risk factors for hospital readmission of elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Carlotta; Nobili, Alessandro; Mari, Daniela; Tettamanti, Mauro; Djade, Codjo D; Pasina, Luca; Salerno, Francesco; Corrao, Salvatore; Marengoni, Alessandra; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify which factors were associated with a risk of hospital readmission within 3 months after discharge of a sample of elderly patients admitted to internal medicine and geriatric wards. Of the 1178 patients aged 65 years or more and discharged from one of the 66 wards of the 'Registry Politerapie SIMI (REPOSI)' during 2010, 766 were followed up by phone interview 3 months after discharge and were included in this analysis. Univariate and multivariate logistic regression models were used to evaluate the association of several variables with rehospitalization within 3 months from discharge. Nineteen percent of patients were readmitted at least once within 3 months after discharge. By univariate analysis in-hospital clinical adverse events (AEs), a previous hospital admission, number of diagnoses and drugs, comorbidity and severity index (according to Cumulative Illness Rating Scale-CIRS), vascular and liver diseases with a level of impairment at discharge of 3 or more at CIRS were significantly associated with risk of readmission. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that only AEs during hospitalization, previous hospital admission, and vascular and liver diseases were significantly associated with the likelihood of readmission. The results demonstrate the need for increased medical attention towards elderly patients discharged from hospital with characteristics such as AEs during the hospitalization, previous admission, vascular and liver diseases. Copyright © 2012 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Voluntary Hospital Coalitions to Promote Patient Safety

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    Health and Accountability (PHA) as a comprehensive, voluntary patient safety program. With a focus on systemic prevention strategies, PHA fulfills...Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Advances in Patient Safety: Vol. 3 494 The Partnership for Health and Accountability Background PHA, officially...Assembly recognized PHA’s Accountability and Health Safety (A&HS) Committee as a testing ground for a unique voluntary patient safety initiative

  5. Mobility decline in patients hospitalized in an intensive care unit

    PubMed Central

    de Jesus, Fábio Santos; Paim, Daniel de Macedo; Brito, Juliana de Oliveira; Barros, Idiel de Araujo; Nogueira, Thiago Barbosa; Martinez, Bruno Prata; Pires, Thiago Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the variation in mobility during hospitalization in an intensive care unit and its association with hospital mortality. Methods This prospective study was conducted in an intensive care unit. The inclusion criteria included patients admitted with an independence score of ≥ 4 for both bed-chair transfer and locomotion, with the score based on the Functional Independence Measure. Patients with cardiac arrest and/or those who died during hospitalization were excluded. To measure the loss of mobility, the value obtained at discharge was calculated and subtracted from the value obtained on admission, which was then divided by the admission score and recorded as a percentage. Results The comparison of these two variables indicated that the loss of mobility during hospitalization was 14.3% (p < 0.001). Loss of mobility was greater in patients hospitalized for more than 48 hours in the intensive care unit (p < 0.02) and in patients who used vasopressor drugs (p = 0.041). However, the comparison between subjects aged 60 years or older and those younger than 60 years indicated no significant differences in the loss of mobility (p = 0.332), reason for hospitalization (p = 0.265), SAPS 3 score (p = 0.224), use of mechanical ventilation (p = 0.117), or hospital mortality (p = 0.063). Conclusion There was loss of mobility during hospitalization in the intensive care unit. This loss was greater in patients who were hospitalized for more than 48 hours and in those who used vasopressors; however, the causal and prognostic factors associated with this decline need to be elucidated. PMID:27410406

  6. Patient-perceived hospital service quality: an empirical assessment.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T; Pai, Rashmi Yogesh

    2018-02-12

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to appraise Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework for measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality (HSQ). Design/methodology/approach A structured questionnaire was used to obtain data from teaching, public and corporate hospital patients. Several tests were conducted to assess the instrument's reliability and validity. Pai and Chary's (2016) nine dimensions for measuring HSQ were examined in this paper. Findings The tests confirm that Pai and Chary's (2016) conceptual framework is reliable and valid. The study also establishes that the nine dimensions measure HSQ. Practical implications The framework empowers managers to assess service quality in any hospital settings, corporate, public and teaching, using an approach that is superior to the existing HSQ scales. Originality/value This paper helps researchers and practitioners to assess HSQ from patient perspectives in any hospital setting.

  7. [Anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home].

    PubMed

    Vellone, Ercole; Sinapi, Nadia; Piria, Paola; Bernardi, Francesca M; Dario, Lucia; Brunetti, Annarita

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the anxiety and depression of cancer patients hospitalized and at home. Using a descriptive, correlational and comparative design and the Roy Adaptation Model, a sample of 80 oncologic patients was studied. Several instruments were used to measure anxiety and depression (HADS), quality of life and symptoms (RSCL), sociodemographic factors, variables connected to the hospitalization, quality of the relationship with health practitioners, family members and friends and the degree of satisfaction for the received information and support. The examined variables were measured on the same patients at hospital and at home. About the 30% of the patients were anxious and depressed. Statistical analysis showed that while anxiety did not change from the hospital to home, depression increased soon after the discharge and decreased over time and after the increasing of the number of hospital access. Anxiety and depression were positively correlated to boredom during the hospitalization, physical symptoms, number of the patients children, and previous anxious and depressive problems. Anxiety and depression were negatively correlated to the ward comfort, the support of health practitioners, family members and friends and the satisfaction for the received information. Differences between this study and the international literature are discussed. Recommendations for the future research and nursing practice are given.

  8. Multidisciplinary in-hospital teams improve patient outcomes: A review.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Nancy E

    2014-01-01

    The use of multidisciplinary in-hospital teams limits adverse events (AE), improves outcomes, and adds to patient and employee satisfaction. Acting like "well-oiled machines," multidisciplinary in-hospital teams include "staff" from different levels of the treatment pyramid (e.g. staff including nurses' aids, surgical technicians, nurses, anesthesiologists, attending physicians, and others). Their enhanced teamwork counters the "silo effect" by enhancing communication between the different levels of healthcare workers and thus reduces AE (e.g. morbidity/mortality) while improving patient and healthcare worker satisfaction. Multiple articles across diverse disciplines incorporate a variety of concepts of "teamwork" for staff covering emergency rooms (ERs), hospital wards, intensive care units (ICUs), and most critically, operating rooms (ORs). Cohesive teamwork improved communication between different levels of healthcare workers, and limited adverse events, improved outcomes, decreased the length of stay (LOS), and yielded greater patient "staff" satisfaction. Within hospitals, delivering the best medical/surgical care is a "team sport." The goals include: Maximizing patient safety (e.g. limiting AE) and satisfaction, decreasing the LOS, and increasing the quality of outcomes. Added benefits include optimizing healthcare workers' performance, reducing hospital costs/complications, and increasing job satisfaction. This review should remind hospital administrators of the critical need to keep multidisciplinary teams together, so that they can continue to operate their "well-oiled machines" enhancing the quality/safety of patient care, while enabling "staff" to optimize their performance and enhance their job satisfaction.

  9. An exploration of Australian hospital pharmacists' attitudes to patient safety.

    PubMed

    Lalor, Daniel J; Chen, Timothy F; Walpola, Ramesh; George, Rachel A; Ashcroft, Darren M; Fois, Romano A

    2015-02-01

    To explore the attitudes of Australian hospital pharmacists towards patient safety in their work settings. A safety climate questionnaire was administered to all 2347 active members of the Society of Hospital Pharmacists of Australia in 2010. Part of the survey elicited free-text comments about patient safety, error and incident reporting. The comments were subjected to thematic analysis to determine the attitudes held by respondents in relation to patient safety and its quality management in their work settings. Two hundred and ten (210) of 643 survey respondents provided comments on safety and quality issues related to their work settings. The responses contained a number of dominant themes including issues of workforce and working conditions, incident reporting systems, the response when errors occur, the presence or absence of a blame culture, hospital management support for safety initiatives, openness about errors and the value of teamwork. A number of pharmacists described the development of a mature patient-safety culture - one that is open about reporting errors and active in reducing their occurrence. Others described work settings in which a culture of blame persists, stifling error reporting and ultimately compromising patient safety. Australian hospital pharmacists hold a variety of attitudes that reflect diverse workplace cultures towards patient safety, error and incident reporting. This study has provided an insight into these attitudes and the actions that are needed to improve the patient-safety culture within Australian hospital pharmacy work settings. © 2014 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  10. Review of thromboembolic prophylaxis in patients attending Cork University Hospital.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Stephen; Weaver, Daniel Timothy

    2013-06-01

    Although preventable, venous thromboembolism remains a common cause of hospital acquired morbidity and mortality. Guidelines, such as the one produced by the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), are aimed at reducing hospital associated venous thromboemboli. Unfortunately the majority of studies have revealed inadequate adherence to these guidelines. The objective of this study was to evaluate the use of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis at Cork University Hospital. Cork University Hospital, Wilton, Cork, Ireland. Data from the patient's chart, drug kardex and laboratory results were recorded during April 2010. A Caprini score, a venous thromboembolism risk factor assessment tool, was subsequently calculated for each patient based on data collected. Appropriate prophylaxis was determined after examining data collected, Caprini score and prophylactic regime according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines. Primary outcome was to analyse adherence to VTE prophylaxis guidelines. A total of 394 patients met the inclusion criteria and were reviewed, of which, 60% (n = 236) were medical and 37% (n = 146) were surgical patients. In total 63% of patients received some form of venous thromboembolism prophylaxis. Furthermore, 54% of medical and 76% of surgical patients received prophylaxis. However only 37% of the patients studied received appropriate thromboprophylaxis according to the ACCP 8th edition guidelines (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). Additionally 51% of surgical and 27% of medical patients received appropriate prophylaxis. Data collected from Cork University Hospital revealed poor adherence to international venous thromboembolism prophylaxis guidelines. As stated in the ACCP 8th edition guidelines, every hospital should develop a formal strategy for venous thromboembolism prevention (Geerts et al. in chest 133(6 Suppl):381S-453S, 2008). In order to improve adherence to guidelines, Cork University Hospital should develop, implement and

  11. Prolonged length of stay in hospitalized internal medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Barba, Raquel; Marco, Javier; Canora, Jesús; Plaza, Susana; Juncos, Sara Nistal; Hinojosa, Juan; Bailon, Manuel Mendez; Zapatero, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Targeting patients with prolonged hospitalizations may represent an effective strategy for reducing average hospital length of stay (LOS). We sought to characterize predictors of prolonged hospitalization among internal medicine patients in an effort to guide future improvement efforts. We conducted a retrospective cohort study using administrative data of internal medicine patients from all hospitals of the Spanish Public Health Service between January 1st, 2005 and December 31st, 2013. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to assess the association between sociodemographic and clinical variables and prolonged LOS, defined as >30days. Of 5,275,139 discharges, 166,470 (3.2%) had a prolonged LOS. Prolonged hospitalizations accounted for 17.4% of total inpatient days and contributed 0.5days to an average LOS of 9.8days during the study period. Prolonged hospitalizations were associated with younger age (odds ratio [OR]: 0.97 per 10-year increase in age, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.96-0.98) and male gender (OR 0.88 IC95% 0.87-0.89). Compared to patients without prolonged LOS, prolonged LOS patients were more likely to require a palliative care consult (OR: 2.48, 95% CI: 2.39-2.58), surgery (OR: 6.9 95% CI: 6.8-7.0); and be discharged to a post-acute-care facility (OR: 2.91, 95% CI: 2.86-2.95). Prolonged hospitalizations in a small proportion of patients were an important contributor to overall LOS and particularly affected complex hospital stays who were not discharged home. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. The Effects of Safety Net Hospital Closures and Conversions on Patient Travel Distance to Hospital Services

    PubMed Central

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Lee, Woolton; Hsieh, Hui-Min; Mobley, Lee Rivers

    2012-01-01

    Objective To examine the effects of safety net hospital (SNH) closure and for-profit conversion on uninsured, Medicaid, and racial/ethnic minorities. Data Sources/Extraction Methods Hospital discharge data for selected states merged with other sources. Study Design We examined travel distance for patients treated in urban hospitals for five diagnosis categories: ambulatory care sensitive conditions, referral sensitive conditions, marker conditions, births, and mental health and substance abuse. We assess how travel was affected for patients after SNH events. Our multivariate models controlled for patient, hospital, health system, and neighborhood characteristics. Principal Findings Our results suggested that certain groups of uninsured and Medicaid patients experienced greater disruption in patterns of care, especially Hispanic uninsured and Medicaid women hospitalized for births. In addition, relative to privately insured individuals in SNH event communities, greater travel for mental health and substance abuse care was present for the uninsured. Conclusions Closure or for-profit conversions of SNHs appear to have detrimental access effects on particular subgroups of disadvantaged populations, although our results are somewhat inconclusive due to potential power issues. Policy makers may need to pay special attention to these patient subgroups and also to easing transportation barriers when dealing with disruptions resulting from reductions in SNH resources. PMID:22091871

  13. Inpatient Portals for Hospitalized Patients and Caregivers: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Michelle M; Coller, Ryan J; Hoonakker, Peter Lt

    2018-06-01

    Patient portals, web-based personal health records linked to electronic health records (EHRs), provide patients access to their healthcare information and facilitate communication with providers. Growing evidence supports portal use in ambulatory settings; however, only recently have portals been used with hospitalized patients. Our objective was to review the literature evaluating the design, use, and impact of inpatient portals, which are patient portals designed to give hospitalized patients and caregivers inpatient EHR clinical information for the purpose of engaging them in hospital care. Literature was reviewed from 2006 to 2017 in PubMed, Web of Science, CINALPlus, Cochrane, and Scopus to identify English language studies evaluating patient portals, engagement, and inpatient care. Data were analyzed considering the following 3 themes: inpatient portal design, use and usability, and impact. Of 731 studies, 17 were included, 9 of which were published after 2015. Most studies were qualitative with small samples focusing on inpatient portal design; 1 nonrandomized trial was identified. Studies described hospitalized patients' and caregivers' information needs and design recommendations. Most patient and caregiver participants in included studies were interested in using an inpatient portal, used it when offered, and found it easy to use and/or useful. Evidence supporting the role of inpatient portals in improving patient and caregiver engagement, knowledge, communication, and care quality and safety is limited. Included studies indicated providers had concerns about using inpatient portals; however, the extent to which these concerns have been realized remains unclear. Inpatient portal research is emerging. Further investigation is needed to optimally design inpatient portals to maximize potential benefits for hospitalized patients and caregivers while minimizing unintended consequences for healthcare teams. © 2017 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  14. Depressive Affect and Hospitalization Risk in Incident Hemodialysis Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bruce, Lisa; Li, Nien-Chen; Mooney, Ann; Maddux, Franklin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background and objectives Recent studies demonstrated an association between depressive affect and higher mortality risk in incident hemodialysis patients. This study sought to determine whether an association also exists with hospitalization risk. Design, setting, participants, & measurements All 8776 adult incident hemodialysis patients with Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 survey results treated in Fresenius Medical Care North America facilities in 2006 were followed for 1 year from the date of survey, and all hospitalization events lasting >24 hours were tracked. A depressive affect score was derived from responses to two Medical Outcomes Study Short Form 36 questions (“down in the dumps” and “downhearted and blue”). A high depressive affect score corresponded with an average response of “some of the time” or more frequent occurrence. Cox and Poisson models were constructed to determine associations of depressive affect scores with risk for time to first hospitalization and risk for hospitalization events, as well as total days spent in the hospital, respectively. Results Incident patients with high depressive affect score made up 41% of the cohort and had a median (interquartile range) hospitalization event rate of one (0, 3) and 4 (0, 15) total hospital days; the values for patients with low depressive affect scores were one (0, 2) event and 2 (0, 11) days, respectively. For high-scoring patients, the adjusted hazard ratio for first hospitalization was 1.12 (1.04, 1.20). When multiple hospital events were considered, the adjusted risk ratio was 1.13 (1.02, 1.25) and the corresponding risk ratio for total hospital days was 1.20 (1.07, 1.35). High depressive affect score was generally associated with lower physical and mental component scores, but these covariates were adjusted for in the models. Conclusions Depressive affect in incident hemodialysis patients was associated with higher risk of hospitalization and more hospital days. Future

  15. What constitutes patient safety culture in Chinese hospitals?

    PubMed

    Zhu, Junya; Li, Liping; Li, Yuxia; Shi, Meiyu; Lu, Haiying; Garnick, Deborah W; Weingart, Saul N

    2012-06-01

    To develop a patient safety culture instrument for use in Chinese hospitals, we assessed the appropriateness of existing safety culture questionnaires used in the USA and Japan for Chinese respondents and identified new items and domains suitable to Chinese hospitals. Focus group study. Twenty-four physicians, nurses and other health-care workers from 11 hospitals in three Chinese cities. Three focus groups were conducted in 2010 to elicit information from hospital workers about their perceptions of the appropriateness and importance of each of 97 questionnaire items, derived from a literature review and an expert panel, characterizing hospital safety culture. understood the concepts of patient safety and safety culture and identified features associated with safe care. They judged that numerous questions from existing surveys were inappropriate, including 39 items that were dropped because they were judged unimportant, semantically redundant, confusing, ambiguous or inapplicable in Chinese settings. Participants endorsed eight new items and three additional dimensions addressing staff training, mentoring of new hires, compliance with rules and procedures, equipment availability and leadership walk-rounds they judged appropriate to assessing safety culture in Chinese hospitals. This process resulted in a 66-item instrument for testing in cognitive interviews, the next stage of survey development. Focus group participants provided important insights into the refinement of existing items and the construction of new items for measuring patient safety culture in Chinese hospitals. This is a necessary first step in producing a culturally appropriate instrument applicable to specific local contexts.

  16. Zolpidem prescribing and adverse drug reactions in hospitalized general medicine patients at a Veterans Affairs hospital.

    PubMed

    Mahoney, Jane E; Webb, Melissa J; Gray, Shelly L

    2004-03-01

    Zolpidem is prescribed for sleep disruption in hospitalized patients, but data on the incidence of adverse drug reactions (ADRs) are based largely on outpatient studies. Thus, the incidence of ADRs in hospitalized patients may be much higher. The goal of this study was to describe prescribing patterns of zolpidem for hospitalized medical patients aged 50 years, the incidence of ADRs possibly and probably associated with its use, and the factors associated with central nervous system (CNS) ADRs. This case series was conducted in 4 general medicine wards at a Veterans Affairs hospital and was a consecutive sample of patients aged 50 years who were hospitalized between 1993 and 1997 and received zolpidem as a hypnotic during hospitalization, but had not received it in the previous 3 months. Chart review was conducted by 2 evaluators. Data extracted from the medical records included admission demographic characteristics, medications, comorbidities, and levels of function in performing basic and instrumental activities of daily living. The main outcome measure was ADRs possibly or probably related to zolpidem use. The association between zolpidem and the occurrence of CNS ADRs (eg, confusion, dizziness, daytime somnolence) was analyzed separately. The review included 119 medical patients aged > or =50 years who had newly received zolpidem for sleep disruption during hospitalization. The median age of the population was 70 years; 86 (72.3%) patients were aged 65 years. The initial zolpidem dose was 5 mg in 42 patients (35.3%) and 10 mg in 77 patients (64.7%). Twenty-three patients had a respective 16 and 10 ADRs possibly and probably related to zolpidem use (19.3% incidence). Of a total of 26 ADRs, 21 (80.8%) were CNS ADRs, occurring with both zolpidem 5 mg (10.8% of users) and 10 mg (18.3% of users). On univariate analyses, the only factor significantly associated with a CNS ADR was functional impairment at baseline (P = 0.003). Zolpidem was discontinued in 38.8% of

  17. The impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection on outcomes of hospitalized patients with sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lagu, Tara; Stefan, Mihaela S; Haessler, Sarah; Higgins, Thomas L; Rothberg, Michael B; Nathanson, Brian H; Hannon, Nicholas S; Steingrub, Jay S; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2014-07-01

    To examine the impact of hospital-onset Clostridium difficile infection (HOCDI) on the outcomes of patients with sepsis. Most prior studies that have addressed this issue lacked adequate matching to controls, suffered from small sample size, or failed to consider time to infection. Retrospective cohort study. We identified adults with a principal or secondary diagnosis of sepsis who received care at 1 of the institutions that participated in a large multihospital database between July 1, 2004 and December 31, 2010. Among eligible patients with sepsis, we identified patients who developed HOCDI during their hospital stay. We used propensity matching and date of diagnosis to match cases to patients without Clostridium difficile infections and compared outcomes between the 2 groups. Of 218,915 sepsis patients, 2368 (1.08%) developed HOCDI. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in HOCDI patients than controls (25% vs 10%, P < 0.001). After multivariate adjustment, in-hospital mortality rate was 24% in cases vs. 15% in controls. In an analysis limited to survivors, adjusted length of stay (LOS) among cases with Clostridium difficile infections was 5.1 days longer than controls (95% confidence interval: 4.4-5.8) and the median-adjusted cost increase was $4916 (P < 0.001). After rigorous adjustment for time to diagnosis and presenting severity, hospital-acquired Clostridium difficile infection was associated with increased mortality, LOS, and cost. Our results can be used to assess the cost-effectiveness of prevention programs and suggest that efforts directed toward high-risk patient populations are needed. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  18. Hypogonadism in aged hospitalized male patients: prevalence and clinical outcome.

    PubMed

    Iglesias, P; Prado, F; Macías, M C; Guerrero, M T; Muñoz, A; Ridruejo, E; Tajada, P; García-Arévalo, C; Díez, J J

    2014-02-01

    Male hypogonadism is common in the elderly and has been associated with increased risk of mortality. Our objective has been to assess the prevalence of primary and central hypogonadism in elderly male patients admitted to the hospital because of acute illness. We also evaluated the relationships between gonadal dysfunction and in-hospital mortality. 150 patients, aged ≥65 years, admitted during 2010 and 2011 in our geriatric unit, were studied. Serum concentrations total, bioavailable and free testosterone, as well as of follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone were quantified in every patient. Hypogonadism was defined by the presence of serum testosterone levels lower than 200 ng/dl. Hypogonadism was found in 80 patients (53.3 %). Serum gonadotropin concentrations were elevated in 43.7 % of these patients, whereas 41.3 % of hypogonadic patients showed normal and 15 % low gonadotropin concentrations. Respiratory tract infection and congestive heart failure were the main causes of hospitalization in hypogonadal men, whereas acute cerebrovascular disease was the main reason for admission in eugonadal patients. Of the 13 patients who died during hospitalization, 12 were hypogonadic. Patients who died showed significantly lower serum levels of total, free and bioavailable testosterone than those found in patients who survived. Our results show that about half of patients admitted for acute illness have hypogonadism, mainly of non-hypergonadotropic type. Gonadal hypofunction is significantly related with in-hospital mortality. A low value of serum testosterone may be a predictor for mortality in elderly male patients.

  19. Predictors of Hospitalization in Patients with Syncope Assisted in Specialized Cardiology Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Fischer, Leonardo Marques; Dutra, João Pedro Passos; Mantovani, Augusto; de Lima, Gustavo Glotz; Leiria, Tiago Luiz Luz

    2013-01-01

    Background Risk stratification of a syncopal episode is necessary to better differentiate patients needing hospitalization of those who can be safely sent home from the emergency department. Currently there are no strict guidelines from our Brazilian medical societies to guide the cardiologist that evaluate patients in an emergency setting. Objectives To analyze the criteria adopted for defining the need for hospitalization and compare them with the predictors of high risk for adverse outcome defined by the OESIL score that is already validated in the medical literature for assessing syncope. Methods A cross-sectional study of patients diagnosed with syncope during emergency department evaluation at our institution in the year 2011. Results Of the 46,476 emergency visits made in that year, 216 were due to syncope. Of the 216 patients analyzed, 39% were hospitalized. The variables associated with the need of hospital admission were - having health care insurance, previous known cardiovascular disease, no history of prior stroke, previous syncope and abnormal electrocardiograms during the presentation. Patients classified in OESIL scores of 0-1 had a greater chance of emergency discharge; 2-3 scores showed greater association with the need of hospitalization. A score ≥ 2 OESIL provided an odds ratio 7.8 times higher for hospitalization compared to score 0 (p <0.001, 95% CI:4,03-15,11). In approximately 39% no etiological cause for syncope was found and in 18% cardiac cause was identified. Conclusions Factors such as cardiovascular disease, prior history of syncope, health insurance, no previous stroke and abnormal electrocardiograms, were the criteria used by doctors to indicate hospital admission. There was a good correlation between the clinical judgment and the OESIL criteria for high risk described in literature. PMID:24145390

  20. Patient evaluation of the hotel function of hospitals.

    PubMed

    Oz, M C; Zikria, J; Mutrie, C; Slater, J P; Scott, C; Lehman, S; Connolly, M W; Asher, D T; Ting, W; Namerow, P B

    2001-01-01

    A means of measuring patient satisfaction is essential in the effort to improve the quality of health care delivered in our nation's hospitals. Accurate feedback allows employers to better meet patients' needs and allows hospital administrators to improve service delivery. Patients are empowered by having a voice in the manner in which their health care is delivered. Moreover, improving the efficiency of the health care delivery system decreases health care costs. Hospital comparisons can be made readily available to a large audience through the Internet, resulting in empowerment of the patient and a universal improvement in hospital care. This is the first multi-institutional analysis of patient satisfaction among New York City and northern New Jersey area tertiary care hospitals. In this study, we evaluated the patient-assessed hotel function of hospitals in a single geographic region to determine whether clinically and statistically significant differences would be revealed that could provide beneficial information to stakeholders in the healthcare system. Patients (n = 261) who had spent a night during the past year in one of eleven hospitals within 60 miles of New York City were chosen at random from doctors' waiting rooms. On average, 24 patients from each hospital were surveyed. They were asked to complete a questionnaire that rated the various departments in the hospital on qualities such as courtesy, promptness, and cleanliness. The questionnaire also rated important characteristics of the patient experience, such as the ease of parking and the taste of the food. Each item on the survey was coded on a scale of 1 to 10 with 10 being the most positive response. The 26 specific questions were divided into 14 domains. Averages in each domain were compared by gender, age, and hospital identity, attractiveness, and setting. All statistical calculations were performed using SPSS/PC, and means were compared using t-tests. Analysis designed to evaluate outcomes

  1. [Effect of hospital policies on patient mobility: Siennese experience].

    PubMed

    Messina, G G; Addari, P; Macchi, C; Nante, N

    2005-01-01

    The Italian National Health Service (S.S.N.), adopted in 1978 (Law n 833) and based on Beveridge's model, emphasises the citizens freedom to choose and the equal opportunity in accessing health care structures. Local Health Authorities--L.H.A. (U.S.L.--Unità Sanitarie Locali) become owners of almost all the structures in their territories and directly responsible for the satisfaction of all residents health needs. The former hospitals' network, based on independent first, second and third level public hospitals, in potential competition, was dismantled. Hospitals' financing, the main economic role of the S.S.N., was based on the documented running expenses: therefore the hospital interest to attract patients diminished and expenses increased in a uncontrolled way. In 1992, the Italian Government, (re)introduced (Law n 502) the quasi-market administered competition between Italian hospitals, making the major ones independent (Aziende Ospedaliere--A.O.) from the L.H.A. Hospital income from then is based on DRGs; the L.H.A. (and hospitals) leadership is now entrusted to managers and not politicians. We describe now how these changes were experienced by our hospital (A.O. Senese), placed in Southern Tuscany, Italy. We elaborated hospitalisation data regarding residents in the province of Siena (252,000 inhabitants) and activity data regarding its main hospital (A.O. Senese, 1200 beds, 47,000 admissions/year). Using the Gandy's Nomogram, we show the variation of patients mobility from 1988 to 1999. Our survey demonstrates that the Italian hospital system answers well enough to the legislative regulations: following the Law 833/1978 our hospital diminished its ability to attract patients from other areas; at the same time migrations of hospitals patients from Siena increased. Following the Law 502/1992, the power of attraction of our hospital is increased. Nevertheless the flow of escape continued to increase. It appears that to discourage the attraction power means to

  2. Adherence to treatment and hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Vaiciuniene, Ruta; Kuzminskis, Vytautas; Ziginskiene, Edita; Skarupskiene, Inga; Bumblyte, Inga A

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate whether adherence to treatment is associated with hospitalization risk in hemodialysis patients. We completed a cohort analysis of risk factors during 1 census month (November) and 1 year of follow-up during 5 consecutive years (2002-2006) in all end-stage renal disease patients hemodialyzed in the Kaunas region. During the census month, we collected data on noncompliance defined as (i) skipping of a hemodialysis (HD) session, (ii) shortening of 1 or more HD sessions, (iii) presence of hyperkalemia, (iv) presence of hyperphosphatemia, or (v) interdialytic weight gain (IDWG). In addition, data on age, sex, disability status, comorbidities, anemia control, malnutrition and inflammation, calcium-phosphorus metabolism and hospitalization rate were collected. Relative risk of hospitalization was estimated using Cox regression evaluating time to first hospitalization. We analyzed 559 patients for a total of 1,163 patient-years during the 5 years of the study. On multivariate analysis, adjusting for ischemic heart disease, diabetes mellitus, higher number of comorbid conditions, higher systolic blood pressure before dialysis, worse disability status, lower hemoglobin, albumin and urea before dialysis, the relative risk for hospitalization increased by 1.1 for every additional percentage point of IDWG and by 1.19 with each 1 mmol/L rise of serum phosphorus level. Skipping or shortening of hemodialysis sessions and serum potassium level were not associated with hospitalization. Higher IDWG and higher serum levels of phosphorus independently increased the relative risk of hospitalizations in hemodialysis patients. With skipped and shortened dialysis sessions, higher serum potassium level was not associated with hospitalization risk.

  3. Food Insecurity in Patients with High Hospital Utilization.

    PubMed

    Phipps, Etienne J; Singletary, S Brook; Cooblall, Clarissa A; Hares, Horacio D; Braitman, Leonard E

    2016-12-01

    Having access to adequate and appropriate food is a major population health issue. This study investigated food insecurity in patients with high rates of inpatient hospitalization ("super-utilizers"). Forty adults with ≥3 hospital inpatient admissions within a 12-month period were interviewed in an urban hospital in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, between March 2015 and May 2015. Inpatient admission history was obtained from hospital billing data. The majority had ≥5 hospitalizations in the past 12 months and ≥6 chronic conditions. Using the USDA definition of food insecurity, 30% (95% CI, 17% to 47%) were food insecure and 25% (95% CI, 13% to 41%) were marginally food secure. Forty percent responded that, in the past 30 days, they worried that their food would run out; 35% that their food would not last; 17.5% that they did not eat for a full day; and 10% that they were hungry but did not eat some or all of the time. Additionally, 75% were unable to shop for food on their own and 58% were unable to prepare their own food. More than half reported using food pantries or other community food resources. The impact of unmet food needs on hospital super-utilization warrants further investigation. Interventions that educate and connect patients with unmet food needs to community resources can help engage patients in their own health and well-being. Communication with patients about whether they have enough nutritionally appropriate food for their health conditions is an important starting point.

  4. Perioperative patient safety indicators and hospital surgical volumes.

    PubMed

    Kitazawa, Takefumi; Matsumoto, Kunichika; Fujita, Shigeru; Yoshida, Ai; Iida, Shuhei; Nishizawa, Hirotoshi; Hasegawa, Tomonori

    2014-02-28

    Since the late 1990s, patient safety has been an important policy issue in developed countries. To evaluate the effectiveness of the activities of patient safety, it is necessary to quantitatively assess the incidence of adverse events by types of failure mode using tangible data. The purpose of this study is to calculate patient safety indicators (PSIs) using the Japanese Diagnosis Procedure Combination/per-diem payment system (DPC/PDPS) reimbursement data and to elucidate the relationship between perioperative PSIs and hospital surgical volume. DPC/PDPS data of the Medi-Target project managed by the All Japan Hospital Association were used. An observational study was conducted where PSIs were calculated using an algorithm proposed by the US Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality. We analyzed data of 1,383,872 patients from 188 hospitals who were discharged from January 2008 to December 2010. Among 20 provider level PSIs, four PSIs (three perioperative PSIs and decubitus ulcer) and mortality rates of postoperative patients were related to surgical volume. Low-volume hospitals (less than 33rd percentiles surgical volume per month) had higher mortality rates (5.7%, 95% confidence interval (CI), 3.9% to 7.4%) than mid- (2.9%, 95% CI, 2.6% to 3.3%) or high-volume hospitals (2.7%, 95% CI, 2.5% to 2.9%). Low-volume hospitals had more deaths among surgical inpatients with serious treatable complications (38.5%, 95% CI, 33.7% to 43.2%) than high-volume hospitals (21.4%, 95% CI, 19.0% to 23.9%). Also Low-volume hospitals had lower proportion of difficult surgeries (54.9%, 95% CI, 50.1% to 59.8%) compared with high-volume hospitals (63.4%, 95% CI, 62.3% to 64.6%). In low-volume hospitals, limited experience may have led to insufficient care for postoperative complications. We demonstrated that PSIs can be calculated using DPC/PDPS data and perioperative PSIs were related to hospital surgical volume. Further investigations focusing on identifying risk factors for poor

  5. Hospital days, hospitalization costs, and inpatient mortality among patients with mucormycosis: a retrospective analysis of US hospital discharge data

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mucormycosis is a rare and potentially fatal fungal infection occurring primarily in severely immunosuppressed patients. Because it is so rare, reports in the literature are mainly limited to case reports or small case series. The aim of this study was to evaluate inpatient mortality, length of stay (LOS), and costs among a matched sample of high-risk patients with and without mucormycosis in a large nationally representative database. Methods We conducted a retrospective analysis using the 2003–2010 Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project – Nationwide Inpatient Sample (HCUP-NIS). The NIS is a nationally representative 20% sample of hospitalizations from acute care United States (US) hospitals, with survey weights available to compute national estimates. We classified hospitalizations into four mutually exclusive risk categories for mucormycosis: A- severely immunocompromised, B- critically ill, C- mildly/moderately immunocompromised, D- major surgery or pneumonia. Mucormycosis hospitalizations (“cases”) were identified by ICD-9-CM code 117.7. Non-mucormycosis hospitalizations (“non-cases”) were propensity-score matched to cases 3:1. We examined demographics, clinical characteristics, and hospital outcomes (mortality, LOS, costs). Weighted results were reported. Results From 319,366,817 total hospitalizations, 5,346 cases were matched to 15,999 non-cases. Cases and non-cases did not differ significantly in age (49.6 vs. 49.7 years), female sex (40.5% vs. 41.0%), White race (53.3% vs. 55.9%) or high-risk group (A-49.1% vs. 49.0%, B-20.0% vs. 21.8%, C-25.5% vs. 23.8%, D-5.5% vs. 5.4%). Cases experienced significantly higher mortality (22.1% vs. 4.4%, P < 0.001), with mean LOS and total costs more than 3-fold higher (24.5 vs. 8.0 days and $90,272 vs. $25,746; both P < 0.001). Conclusions In a national hospital database, hospitalizations with mucormycosis had significantly higher inpatient mortality, LOS, and hospital costs than matched

  6. What do patients value in the hospital meal experience?

    PubMed

    Hartwell, Heather J; Shepherd, Paula A; Edwards, John S A; Johns, Nick

    2016-01-01

    A number of previous studies have reported on the aspects of hospital food service that patients value, but usually as a secondary finding, and not generally based upon patient-centred approaches. This study employed a questionnaire produced ab initio from interviews with patients and hospital staff, the data from which were subjected to factor and cluster analysis, in order to identify and prioritise the factors that contribute to the meal experience empirically. The most important factors, food and service were as identified by other authors. In decreasing order of importance were social, personal and situational factors. The results confirm that improving the quality of the food and the efficiency with which it reaches the patients remain the most important objectives of hospital food service. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. The Leisure Activities of Mental Patients Prior to Hospitalization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Babow, Irving; Simkin, Sol

    To study the leisure activities, social participation, and organizational participation of mental patients before hospital admission, a three-part research instrument was developed consisting of a structured interview schedule requesting information on the patient's leisure activities, a self-administered questionnaire entitled Survey of Opinions…

  8. Access thrombosis, hospitalization, and hematocrit level in hemodialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Heard, K A; Russell, T A

    2000-12-01

    Are occurrences of vascular access thrombosis and hospitalization higher in hemodialysis patients with hematocrits (Hcts) > 36% compared to those < 36%? This 12-month retrospective study included 30 male hemodialysis patients who received erythropoietin (rHuEPO) for at least 6 months. Sixty percent (n = 18) had arteriovenous fistulas and 40% (n = 12) had polytetrafluoroethylene grafts. The mean age was 59.6 years. Twenty patients during 216 patient months had a mean Hct < 36% with five thromboses (2.3%). Ten patients during 118 patient months had a mean Hct > 36% with four thromboses (3.4%). There was no statistically significant difference between the thrombosis rates in the two groups. There were four hospitalizations in 118 patient months in the > 36% group (3.4%). There were 33 hospitalizations in 216 patient months in the < 36% group (15.3%). This is 4.5 times higher than the > 36% group. Our data suggest that Hcts > 36% are not associated with increased thrombosis and are associated with lower hospitalization rates.

  9. Early Cardiac Arrest in Patients Hospitalized With Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Yuen, Trevor C.; McConville, John F.; Kress, John P.; VandenHoek, Terry L.; Hall, Jesse B.; Edelson, Dana P.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Pneumonia is the leading infectious cause of death. Early deterioration and death commonly result from progressive sepsis, shock, respiratory failure, and cardiac complications. Recent data suggest that cardiac arrest may also be common, yet few previous studies have addressed this. Accordingly, we sought to characterize early cardiac arrest in patients who are hospitalized with coexisting pneumonia. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis of a multicenter cardiac arrest database, with data from > 500 North American hospitals. We included in-hospital cardiac arrest events that occurred in community-dwelling adults with pneumonia within the first 72 h after hospital admission. We compared patient and event characteristics for patients with and without pneumonia. For patients with pneumonia, we also compared events according to event location. Results: We identified 4,453 episodes of early cardiac arrest in patients who were hospitalized with pneumonia. Among patients with preexisting pneumonia, only 36.5% were receiving mechanical ventilation and only 33.3% were receiving infusions of vasoactive drugs prior to cardiac arrest. Only 52.3% of patients on the ward were receiving ECG monitoring prior to cardiac arrest. Shockable rhythms were uncommon in all patients with pneumonia (ventricular tachycardia or fibrillation, 14.8%). Patients on the ward were significantly older than patients in the ICU. Conclusions: In patients with preexisting pneumonia, cardiac arrest may occur in the absence of preceding shock or respiratory failure. Physicians should be alert to the possibility of abrupt cardiopulmonary collapse, and future studies should address this possibility. The mechanism may involve myocardial ischemia, a maladaptive response to hypoxia, sepsis-related cardiomyopathy, or other phenomena. PMID:22194592

  10. Patient Mortality During Unannounced Accreditation Surveys at US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Michael L; Olenski, Andrew R; Jena, Anupam B

    2017-05-01

    In the United States, hospitals receive accreditation through unannounced on-site inspections (ie, surveys) by The Joint Commission (TJC), which are high-pressure periods to demonstrate compliance with best practices. No research has addressed whether the potential changes in behavior and heightened vigilance during a TJC survey are associated with changes in patient outcomes. To assess whether heightened vigilance during survey weeks is associated with improved patient outcomes compared with nonsurvey weeks, particularly in major teaching hospitals. Quasi-randomized analysis of Medicare admissions at 1984 surveyed hospitals from calendar year 2008 through 2012 in the period from 3 weeks before to 3 weeks after surveys. Outcomes between surveys and surrounding weeks were compared, adjusting for beneficiaries' sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, with subanalyses for major teaching hospitals. Data analysis was conducted from January 1 to September 1, 2016. Hospitalization during a TJC survey week vs nonsurvey weeks. The primary outcome was 30-day mortality. Secondary outcomes were rates of Clostridium difficile infections, in-hospital cardiac arrest mortality, and Patient Safety Indicators (PSI) 90 and PSI 4 measure events. The study sample included 244 787 and 1 462 339 admissions during survey and nonsurvey weeks with similar patient characteristics, reason for admission, and in-hospital procedures across both groups. There were 811 598 (55.5%) women in the nonsurvey weeks (mean [SD] age, 72.84 [14.5] years) and 135 857 (55.5%) in the survey weeks (age, 72.76 [14.5] years). Overall, there was a significant reversible decrease in 30-day mortality for admissions during survey (7.03%) vs nonsurvey weeks (7.21%) (adjusted difference, -0.12%; 95% CI, -0.22% to -0.01%). This observed decrease was larger than 99.5% of mortality changes among 1000 random permutations of hospital survey date combinations, suggesting that observed mortality changes were

  11. Mental hospital depopulation in Canada: patient perspectives.

    PubMed

    Herman, N J; Smith, C M

    1989-06-01

    This paper reviews briefly the history of mental health depopulation in Canada over the past 30 years. The term "deinstitutionalization" is often used but is unsatisfactory. Using an exploratory, qualitative, methodological approach, data were collected on the problems encountered by a disproportionate, stratified random sample of 139 formerly institutionalized patients living in various geographical locales in Eastern Canada. Adopting a symbolic interactionist theoretical approach, this study, in an effort to fill a neglect in the literature, attempted to discover what the everyday world(s) of Canadian ex-mental patients was really like. Problems encountered related to stigma, poor housing, lack of back living skills, poverty, unemployment and aftercare. Quotations from patients are provided to illustrate such themes. The findings are discussed.

  12. Patients' expectations of information provided at cancer hospitals in Japan.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, N; Tajima, K; Morishita, M; Hyodo, C; Sakakibara, N; Kawai, C; Moritaka, S

    1996-10-01

    In order to survey patients' views on disease and treatment information that should be provided at hospitals, an anonymous self-administered questionnaire was distributed to patients at Aichi Cancer Center Hospital in 1995. All eligible first-visit outpatients (97 persons), randomly selected revisit outpatients (99 persons; about one in ten refused), and all except six eligible inpatients in good condition at discharge (97 persons) responded. Out of 293 patients (115 males, 174 females and 4 unspecified), 74% answered that they wanted to be informed of their diagnosis irrespective of circumstances, 20% answered that they would want to be informed only in certain circumstances, and 2% did not want to be informed at all. There were no significant differences in response among the three sources of patients. Inpatients wanted more (81%) to be explained about recommended therapy than either first-visit outpatients (67%) or revisit outpatients (67%). The majority considered that about a 30-minute explanation was needed using pamphlet-like written materials or video. When asked what information was needed when choosing a cancer hospital, 71% specified information on the specialty of the hospital, 57% the content of the care provided, 23% the name and specialty of the doctors, 20% the waiting period before scheduled admission, 13% the average admission period, 11% the number of patients with the same disease, 10% the waiting time at the outpatient clinic, 6% the meal menu, and 4% the number of private wards. Forty-three percent wanted an information service covering all hospitals in the region through an information center. The results revealed that patients at this cancer hospital required information on their disease, treatment, and hospital specialty.

  13. Hospital financial condition and the quality of patient care.

    PubMed

    Bazzoli, Gloria J; Chen, Hsueh-Fen; Zhao, Mei; Lindrooth, Richard C

    2008-08-01

    Concerns about deficiencies in the quality of care delivered in US hospitals grew during a time period when an increasing number of hospitals were experiencing financial problems. Our study examines a six-year longitudinal database of general acute care hospitals in 11 states to assess the relationship between hospital financial condition and quality of care. We evaluate two measures of financial performance: operating margin and a broader profitability measure that encompasses both operating and non-operating sources of income. Our model specification allows for gradual adjustments in quality-enhancing activities and recognizes that current realizations of patient quality may affect future financial performance. Empirical results suggest that there is a relationship between financial performance and quality of care, but not as strong as suggested in earlier research. Overall, our results suggest that deep financial problems that go beyond the patient care side of business may be important to prompting quality problems. Copyright (c) 2007 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Impact of Hospital Information Systems on Emergency Patient Processing

    PubMed Central

    Rusnak, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The Emergency Department offers the Hospital Information System's designer some unique problems to solve in the operational areas of patient registration, order entry, charge recording, and treatment processing. In a number of instances, Hospital Information Systems implementers have encountered serious difficulties in trying to design system components to support the requirements of the Emergency Services Department's operations. Washington Hospital has developed a very effective system for Emergency Services. The system's features are designed to meet the special requirements of the department and to maximize the use of the data captured by the Hospital Information System. The system supports accurate and timely charging for services. The treatment of the patient has been dramatically improved through the use of a computerized order processing and control. The installed systems resulted in a higher quality of care and cost effective operations.

  15. Medical economic impact of tracheotomy patients on a hospital system.

    PubMed

    Altman, Kenneth W; Banoff, Karen Merl; Tong, Charles C L

    2015-04-01

    Tracheotomy patients are a small portion of hospitalizations, but account for disproportionately high risk and costs. There are many complex decisions that go into the care of these patients, and practice variation is expected to be compounded in a health system. This study sought to characterize the medical economic impact of tracheotomy patients on the hospital system. A retrospective review of the health system's hospital billing software was performed for 2013, and pertinent outcomes measures were tabulated. There were 829 tracheotomies performed in the health system of seven hospitals, with total costs of $128,883,865. Average length of stay was 36.74 days for principal procedures, and 43.36 days for tracheotomy as secondary procedures. Mortality was ∼ 18% overall, and re-admissions were 10.93% for primary, and 14.36% for secondary procedures. A fairly wide variation in each category among the different hospitals was observed. There are potentially many factors that impact variations of care and outcomes in patients with tracheotomy. Due to their large economic impact and risks for morbidity and mortality, a formalized care pathway is warranted. Goals of the pathway should include understanding medical decisions surrounding these complex patients, monitoring pertinent outcomes, reducing practice variation, and improving the efficiency of compassionate care.

  16. [Epidemiological investigation on 2 133 hospitalized patients with electrical burns].

    PubMed

    Jiang, M J; Li, Z; Xie, W G

    2017-12-20

    Objective: To analyze the epidemiological characteristics of the hospitalized patients with electrical burns in Institute of Burns of Tongren Hospital of Wuhan University & Wuhan Third Hospital (hereinafter referred to as Institute of Burns of Wuhan Third Hospital), so as to provide reference for the prevention and treatment of electrical burns. Methods: Medical records of all hospitalized burn patients in Institute of Burns of Wuhan Third Hospital from January 2004 to December 2016 were collected. Genders, ages, social categories, seasons of injury, total burn areas, depths of wounds, electrical voltages of injury, sites of wound, treatment methods, amputation rates, lengths of hospital stay, operation costs, hospitalization costs, and treatment outcomes of the electrical burn patients were collected. Treatment methods, lengths of hospital stay, operation costs, and hospitalization costs of the thermal burn patients were collected and compared with those of the electrical burn patients. Electrical voltages of injury, amputation rates, operation costs, hospitalization costs, and treatment outcomes were compared and analyzed between the electrical contact burn patients and the electrical arc burn patients. Data were processed with Chi-square test and Wilcoxon rank-sum test. Results: During the 13 years, 23 534 burn patients were admitted to Institute of Burns of Wuhan Third Hospital, among whom 2 133 (9.1%) were with electrical burns, without obvious variation in admission number of electrical burn patients every year. There were 1 418 patients (66.5%) with electrical contact burns and 715 patients (33.5%) with electrical arc burns. The ratio of male to female was 11.2∶1.0 among the electrical burn patients with known genders. The proportions of three age groups of more than 20 years old and less than or equal to 30 years old, more than 30 years old and less than or equal to 40 years old, and more than 40 years old and less than or equal to 50 years old were

  17. Features and outcomes of hospitalized Thai patients with pyogenic arthritis: analysis from the nationwide hospital database.

    PubMed

    Mahakkanukrauh, Ajanee; Thavornpitak, Yupa; Foocharoen, Chingching; Suwannaroj, Siraphop; Nanagara, Ratanavadee

    2013-08-01

    Pyogenic arthritis (PA) is still a problematic arthritic disease that requires hospitalization. To study the epidemiological characteristics and predictors of treatment outcomes for Thai patients hospitalized with PA. The nationwide hospital database from the 2010 fiscal year was analyzed. Patients 18 years of age onward, who had primary diagnosis of pyogenic arthritis, were included in this study. There were a total of 6242 PA admissions during 2010. It was ranked third among hospitalized musculoskeletal patients after osteoarthritis (OA) and gouty arthritis. The estimated prevalence of PA was 13.5 per 100 000 adult population. Geographic distributions of PA was related to the population density of each region; however it seemed more frequent in the northern and northeastern regions of Thailand. The prevalence increased with age, 3.6 and 43.6 per 100 000 in young adults and the elderly, respectively. Among the 2877 co-morbidities coded, diabetes was the most common, followed by crystal-induced arthritis, existing other foci of infections (urinary tract infection, skin and soft tissue infections and pneumonia) and pre-existing chronic joint diseases (OA,rheumatoid arthritis), respectively. Overall hospital mortality rate was 2.6%. Poorer outcomes were found among patients with chronic liver disease and other existing foci of infections. The prevalence of hospitalized PA is still modest in Thailand, showing the highest prevalence in the advanced age group. Diabetes was the most commonly co-morbidity found; however, poorer outcomes were noted among patients with chronic liver disease and existing multiple sites of infections. © 2013 Asia Pacific League of Associations for Rheumatology and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  18. Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety Collaborative Impact on Hospital-Acquired Harm.

    PubMed

    Lyren, Anne; Brilli, Richard J; Zieker, Karen; Marino, Miguel; Muething, Stephen; Sharek, Paul J

    2017-09-01

    To determine if an improvement collaborative of 33 children's hospitals focused on reliable best practice implementation and culture of safety improvements can reduce hospital-acquired conditions (HACs) and serious safety events (SSEs). A 3-year prospective cohort study design with a 12-month historical control population was completed by the Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety collaborative. Identification and dissemination of best practices related to 9 HACs and SSE reduction focused on key process and culture of safety improvements. Individual hospital improvement teams leveraged the resources of a large, structured children's hospital collaborative using electronic, virtual, and in-person interactions. Thirty-three children's hospitals from across the United States volunteered to be part of the Children's Hospitals' Solutions for Patient Safety collaborative. Thirty-two met all the data submission eligibility requirements for the HAC improvement objective of this study, and 21 participated in the high-reliability culture work aimed at reducing SSEs. Significant harm reduction occurred in 8 of 9 common HACs (range 9%-71%; P < .005 for all). The mean monthly SSE rate decreased 32% (from 0.77 to 0.52; P < .001). The 12-month rolling average SSE rate decreased 50% (from 0.82 to 0.41; P < .001). Participation in a structured collaborative dedicated to implementing HAC-related best-practice prevention bundles and culture of safety interventions designed to increase the use of high-reliability organization practices resulted in significant HAC and SSE reductions. Structured collaboration and rapid sharing of evidence-based practices and tools are effective approaches to decreasing hospital-acquired harm. Copyright © 2017 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  19. Hospital security: strengthening the weakest link--forensic patients.

    PubMed

    Lashley, Joel

    2008-01-01

    In this article, reprinted with permission from CorrectionsOne.com, the online resource for the Corrections community, the author focuses on the responsibility of the hospital, its security department, and its healthcare staff when a forensic prisoner is brought in for treatment. Hospitals are responsible for all of their patients, he says, and as such, have every right to ask how much of a danger a given patient presents to their facility, and whether they should insist on a higher level of security. To avoid the tragic occurrences which have all to often taken place when forensic prisoners try to escape, hospitals should require their own security department to liaison with all agencies that maintain custody of patients inside their facility in order to assess any related security risks--and offer appropriate support. Even unarmed healthcare security personnel need to receive training in weapons retention and control, and all healthcare staff should be versed in tactical awareness.

  20. Anger, hostility, and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Keith, Felicia; Krantz, David S; Chen, Rusan; Harris, Kristie M; Ware, Catherine M; Lee, Amy K; Bellini, Paula G; Gottlieb, Stephen S

    2017-09-01

    Heart failure patients have a high hospitalization rate, and anger and hostility are associated with coronary heart disease morbidity and mortality. Using structural equation modeling, this prospective study assessed the predictive validity of anger and hostility traits for cardiovascular and all-cause rehospitalizations in patients with heart failure. 146 heart failure patients were administered the STAXI and Cook-Medley Hostility Inventory to measure anger, hostility, and their component traits. Hospitalizations were recorded for up to 3 years following baseline. Causes of hospitalizations were categorized as heart failure, total cardiac, noncardiac, and all-cause (sum of cardiac and noncardiac). Measurement models were separately fit for Anger and Hostility, followed by a Confirmatory Factor Analysis to estimate the relationship between the Anger and Hostility constructs. An Anger model consisted of State Anger, Trait Anger, Anger Expression Out, and Anger Expression In, and a Hostility model included Cynicism, Hostile Affect, Aggressive Responding, and Hostile Attribution. The latent construct of Anger did not predict any of the hospitalization outcomes, but Hostility significantly predicted all-cause hospitalizations. Analyses of individual trait components of each of the 2 models indicated that Anger Expression Out predicted all-cause and noncardiac hospitalizations, and Trait Anger predicted noncardiac hospitalizations. None of the individual components of Hostility were related to rehospitalizations or death. The construct of Hostility and several components of Anger are predictive of hospitalizations that were not specific to cardiac causes. Mechanisms common to a variety of health problems, such as self-care and risky health behaviors, may be involved in these associations. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  1. Changing Patient Classification System for Hospital Reimbursement in Romania

    PubMed Central

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Methods Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). Results The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians’ knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Conclusion Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care. PMID:20564769

  2. Changing patient classification system for hospital reimbursement in Romania.

    PubMed

    Radu, Ciprian-Paul; Chiriac, Delia Nona; Vladescu, Cristian

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the effects of the change in the diagnosis-related group (DRG) system on patient morbidity and hospital financial performance in the Romanian public health care system. Three variables were assessed before and after the classification switch in July 2007: clinical outcomes, the case mix index, and hospital budgets, using the database of the National School of Public Health and Health Services Management, which contains data regularly received from hospitals reimbursed through the Romanian DRG scheme (291 in 2009). The lack of a Romanian system for the calculation of cost-weights imposed the necessity to use an imported system, which was criticized by some clinicians for not accurately reflecting resource consumption in Romanian hospitals. The new DRG classification system allowed a more accurate clinical classification. However, it also exposed a lack of physicians' knowledge on diagnosing and coding procedures, which led to incorrect coding. Consequently, the reported hospital morbidity changed after the DRG switch, reflecting an increase in the national case-mix index of 25% in 2009 (compared with 2007). Since hospitals received the same reimbursement over the first two years after the classification switch, the new DRG system led them sometimes to change patients' diagnoses in order to receive more funding. Lack of oversight of hospital coding and reporting to the national reimbursement scheme allowed the increase in the case-mix index. The complexity of the new classification system requires more resources (human and financial), better monitoring and evaluation, and improved legislation in order to achieve better hospital resource allocation and more efficient patient care.

  3. [Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland].

    PubMed

    Schuwey-Hayoz, Aline; Needham, Ian

    2006-09-01

    Characteristics of patient aggression in a psychiatric hospital in Switzerland Patient aggression in psychiatry is a prominent problem for all concerned. In this prospective survey we registered and analysed all violent incidents of patients in a cantonal psychiatric hospital in Switzerland in order to determine the characteristics of aggression. The Staff Observation Aggression Scale Revised (SOAS-R) was utilised. During the study period 815 patients were admitted to the hospital. 71 (63.4%) of the 110 violent incidents were perpetrated by male patients. The majority of aggressive incidents were perpetrated in the vicinity of the rooms of the patients and were triggered mainly by the refusal to adhere to the demands of the patient or by patients' use of toxic substances. The most frequent type of aggression was of a verbally aggressive nature and the principal target was nursing personnel who felt threatened in most of the cases. In order to terminate the aggression the most predominant measure was communication with the patient and coercive measures. This study demonstrates clearly that aggression concerns psychiatric nursing personnel and points to the recommendation to reinforce measures of security and to predictive measures to ameliorate the management of aggression.

  4. Primary Care Patients' Preference for Hospitals over Clinics in Korea.

    PubMed

    Kim, Agnus M; Cho, Seongcheol; Kim, Hyun Joo; Jung, Hyemin; Jo, Min-Woo; Lee, Jin Yong; Eun, Sang Jun

    2018-05-30

    Korea is in a unique condition to observe whether patients, when equal access to the levels of health care facilities is guaranteed by the support of the national health insurance, choose the appropriate levels of health care facilities. This study was performed to investigate the primary care patients' preference for hospitals over clinics under no restriction for their choice. We used the 2011 National Inpatient Sample database of the Health Insurance Review and Assessment Service in Korea. A primary care patient was defined as a patient who visited as an outpatient in health care facilities with one of the 52 minor conditions defined by the Korean government. We found that approximately 15% of outpatient visits of the patients who were eligible for primary care in Korea happened in hospitals. In terms of cost, the outpatient visits in hospitals accounted for about 29% of total cost of outpatient visits. This arbitrary access to hospitals can lead to an inefficient use of health care resources. In order to ensure that health care facilities are stratified in terms of access as well as size and function, interventions to distribute patients to the appropriate level of care are required.

  5. Handgrip strength and nutrition status in hospitalized pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Silva, Catarina; Amaral, Teresa F; Silva, Diana; Oliveira, Bruno M P M; Guerra, António

    2014-06-01

    Handgrip strength (HGS) is a useful indicator of nutrition status in adults, but evidence is lacking in pediatric patients. The aim of this study was to describe the association between undernutrition and HGS in pediatric patients at hospital admission, quantifying the modifying effect of disease severity, anthropometrics, and other patient characteristics on HGS. Eighty-nine inpatients aged ≥6 years consecutively admitted were recruited in a longitudinal study. Nutrition status was evaluated using body mass index (BMI) z scores, and HGS was evaluated at admission and discharge. In the total sample, 30.3% of patients were undernourished at admission, and 64% lost HGS during the hospital stay. This study showed that HGS at admission was independently associated with undernutrition defined by BMI z scores (β = 0.256, P = .037). In this multivariate analysis, sex, age, height, and BMI z scores explained 67.1% of HGS at hospital admission. Lower HGS may be a potential marker of undernutrition in hospitalized pediatric patients, although HGS data should be interpreted according to sex, age, and height of the patient.

  6. Opioid abuse and hospitalization rates in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Kivimies, Kristiina; Repo-Tiihonen, Eila; Kautiainen, Hannu; Maaranen, Päivi; Muhonen, Leea H; Heikkinen, Martti; Tiihonen, Jari

    2016-01-01

    Substance abuse worsens the course of schizophrenia, but it is not known whether or not there are differences between specific substances concerning their association with the hospitalizations of patients with schizophrenia. The primary aims of this study were to examine the possible associations between amphetamine, cannabis, and opioid abuse, and the risk of hospitalizations among patients with schizophrenia. The study population consisted of 146 patients with ICD-defined schizophrenia from two different geographical sites in Finland, and it included both inpatients and outpatients. Data were collected retrospectively from the patients' medical files. Substance abuse was defined as either harmful use or dependence according to ICD-10. The cumulative prevalence of substance abuse was 10.9% (16/146) for cannabis, 8.9% (13/146) for amphetamine, and 4.1% (6/146) for opioids. Among patients with schizophrenia and abuse of any substance, the number of hospitalizations was about 1.5-fold when compared to those without substance abuse. The incidence rate ratio for hospitalizations was 2.9 (95% CI 2.47-3.63) for opioids, 2.0 (1.71-2.41) for amphetamine, and 1.6 (1.33-1.84) for cannabis, when compared with no abuse of each substance. The risk of hospitalizations was significantly higher for opioids when compared with amphetamine (p < 0.001) or cannabis (p < 0.001). Harmful use or dependence of opioids among patients with schizophrenia is associated with significantly higher risk of hospitalizations than either harmful use or dependence of amphetamine or cannabis.

  7. Appropriateness of hospitalization for CAP-affected pediatric patients: report from a Southern Italy General Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Antonelli, Fabio; De Brasi, Daniele; Siani, Paolo

    2009-01-01

    Background Community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) is a common disease, responsible for significant healthcare expenditures, mostly because of hospitalization. Many practice guidelines on CAP have been developed, including admission criteria, but a few on appropriate hospitalization in children. The aim of this study was to evaluate appropriate hospital admission for CAP in a pediatric population. Methods We evaluated appropriate admission to a Pediatric Unit performing a retrospective analysis on CAP admitted pediatric patients from a Southern Italy area. Diagnosis was made based on clinical and radiological signs. Appropriate hospital admission was evaluated following clinical and non-clinical international criteria. Family ability to care children was assessed by evaluating social deprivation status. Results In 2 winter seasons 120 pediatric patients aged 1-129 months were admitted because of CAP. Median age was 28.7 months. Raised body temperature was scored in 68.3% of patients, cough was present in 100% of cases, and abdominal pain was rarely evidenced. Inflammatory indices (ESR and CRP) were found elevated in 33.3% of cases. Anti-Mycoplasma pneumoniae antibodies were found positive in 20.4%. Trans-cutaneous (TC) SaO2 was found lower than 92% in 14.6%. Dyspnoea was present in 43.3%. Dehydration requiring i.v. fluid supplementation was scored in 13.3%. Evaluation of familial ability to care their children revealed that 76% of families (derived from socially depressed areas) were "at social risk", thus not able to appropriately care their children. Furthermore, analysis of CAP patients revealed that "at social risk" people accessed E.D. and were hospitalized more frequently than "not at risk" patients (odds ratio = 3.59, 95% CI: 1,15 to 11,12; p = 0.01), and that admitted "at social risk" people presented without clinical signs of severity (namely dyspnoea, and/or SaO2 ≤ 92%, and/or dehydration) more frequently than "not at risk" population (p = 0.005). Conclusion

  8. Polypharmacy and Unplanned Hospitalizations in Patients with Rheumatoid Arthritis.

    PubMed

    Filkova, Maria; Carvalho, João; Norton, Sam; Scott, David; Mant, Tim; Molokhia, Mariam; Cope, Andrew; Galloway, James

    2017-12-01

    Polypharmacy (PP), the prescribing of multiple drugs for an individual, is rising in prevalence. PP associates with an increased risk of adverse drug reactions (ADR) and hospital admissions. We investigated the relationship between PP, characteristics of rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and the risk of unplanned hospital admissions. Patients from a hospital RA cohort were retrospectively analyzed. Information was collected from electronic medical records. Cox proportional hazards were used to compare hospitalization risk according to levels of PP. Admissions were adjudicated to determine whether an ADR was implicated. The study included 1101 patients; the mean number of all medications was 5. PP correlated with increasing age, disease duration, disease activity, and disability. At least 1 unplanned admission occurred for 16% of patients. Patients taking ≥ 10 medications had an adjusted HR for hospitalization of 3.1 (95% CI 2.1-4.5), compared to those taking 0-5 medications. Corticosteroid use associated with a doubling in adjusted risk of admission of 1.7 (95% CI 1.2-2.4). The most common reason for hospitalization was infection (28%). While in half of all admissions an ADR was a possible contributing factor, only 2% of admissions were found to directly result from an ADR. PP is common in RA and is a prognostic marker associated with increased risk of acute hospitalizations. Our data suggest that PP may be an indicator of comorbidity burden rather than a contributing cause of a drug-related toxicity. PP should be monitored to minimize inappropriate combination of prescribed medications. PP may be a useful predictor of clinical outcomes in epidemiologic studies.

  9. A multifacet typology of patient satisfaction with a hospital stay.

    PubMed

    Singh, J

    1990-12-01

    The author views patient satisfaction after a hospital visit as a combination of several different and distinct evaluations. Patients are posited to form satisfaction judgments concurrently for each of the individual "objects" (e.g., physician, insurance provider) comprising the health care system. With patient data from four geographic areas, the author examines this multifacet view empirically and uses it to derive a typology of patient satisfaction. The study results suggest two broad groups of patients, the "satisfieds" and the "dissatisfieds." Finally, the author delineates the behavioral and demographic characteristics that discriminate between the two groups. Implications for health care researchers, practitioners, and public policy officials are presented.

  10. AHRQ's hospital survey on patient safety culture: psychometric analyses.

    PubMed

    Blegen, Mary A; Gearhart, Susan; O'Brien, Roxanne; Sehgal, Niraj L; Alldredge, Brian K

    2009-09-01

    This project analyzed the psychometric properties of the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPSC) including factor structure, interitem reliability and intraclass correlations, usefulness for assessment, predictive validity, and sensitivity. The survey was administered to 454 health care staff in 3 hospitals before and after a series of multidisciplinary interventions designed to improve safety culture. Respondents (before, 434; after, 368) included nurses, physicians, pharmacists, and other hospital staff members. Factor analysis partially confirmed the validity of the HSOPSC subscales. Interitem consistency reliability was above 0.7 for 5 subscales; the staffing subscale had the lowest reliability coefficients. The intraclass correlation coefficients, agreement among the members of each unit, were within recommended ranges. The pattern of high and low scores across the subscales of the HSOPSC in the study hospitals were similar to the sample of Pacific region hospitals reported by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality and corresponded to the proportion of items in each subscale that are worded negatively (reverse scored). Most of the unit and hospital dimensions were correlated with the Safety Grade outcome measure in the tool. Overall, the tool was shown to have moderate-to-strong validity and reliability, with the exception of the staffing subscale. The usefulness in assessing areas of strength and weakness for hospitals or units among the culture subscales is questionable. The culture subscales were shown to correlate with the perceived outcomes, but further study is needed to determine true predictive validity.

  11. Across US Hospitals, Black Patients Report Comparable Or Better Experiences Than White Patients.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, José F; Zheng, Jie; Orav, E John; Jha, Ashish K

    2016-08-01

    Patient-reported experience is a critical part of measuring health care quality. There are limited data on racial differences in patient experience. Using patient-level data for 2009-10 from the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS), we compared blacks' and whites' responses on measures of overall hospital rating, communication, clinical processes, and hospital environment. In unadjusted results, there were no substantive differences between blacks' and whites' ratings of hospitals. Blacks were less likely to recommend hospitals but reported more positive experiences, compared to whites. Higher educational attainment and self-reported worse health status were associated with more negative evaluations in both races. Additionally, blacks rated minority-serving hospitals worse than other hospitals on all HCAHPS measures. Taken together, there were surprisingly few meaningful differences in patient experience between blacks and whites across US hospitals. Although blacks tend to receive care at worse-performing hospitals, compared to whites, within any given hospital black patients tend to report better experience than whites do. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  12. Patient's medicines brought to hospital: an overlooked resource?

    PubMed

    Ware, G J

    1993-10-27

    To quantify potential cost advantages and identify practical safeguards required for utilising patients own medicines while in hospital, and returning them on discharge. All medicines brought in by patients in two wards of a geriatric assessment and rehabilitation unit at Auckland Hospital were examined by the pharmacist, and their suitability for re-issue assessed. Medicines were regarded as suitable for use where they could be positively identified, had been dispensed within 3 months of admission, or if packed in foil, provided the expiry date and manufacturer identification were on the foil. Medicines (260 items) totalling $2,976, assessed over a 6 month period, were regarded as suitable for use by the patient, with a mean value of $11.36 per patient. Patients own medicines used within the hospital with a unit-of-issue distribution system, and taken home by them on discharge, would provide appreciable savings for the hospital medicine budget and reduction in waste of the overall health dollar.

  13. Undeclared exposure to St. John's Wort in hospitalized patients

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Facklam, Meret; Rieger, Karin; Riedel, Klaus-Dieter; Burhenne, Jürgen; Walter-Sack, Ingeborg; Haefeli, Walter E

    2004-01-01

    Aim The herbal medicine St. John's Wort (SJW) causes substantial decreases in the plasma concentrations of a range of co-administered drugs. Therefore, we evaluated the extent of systemic exposure to hyperforin and hypericin, two of the main constituents of SJW, in patients on admission and during hospital stay, and compared the results with known use of SJW as documented in the drug chart and detected in additional interviews. Methods One hundred and fifty patients aged ≥ 18 years and admitted, between August 2000 and February 2002, to an internal medicine ward of a large German university hospital were included. Hyperforin and hypericin was determined in plasma by a sensitive liquid chromotography/mass spectometry (LC/MS/MS) method. To assess undeclared use of SJW the data were compared to information obtained from drug charts and from up to three interviews that had a particular focus on intake of herbal medicines and self-medication during hospitalization. Results Hyperforin was detected in 12 patients (plasma concentration on the first day of hospitalization = 12–100 ng ml−1 in five patients and <3 ng ml−1 in seven), and hypericin in five patients (0.5–4.3 ng ml−1). Nine patients (6%) were taking/had taken SJW without the knowledge of the medical team and the pharmacist, who conducted the additional interviews, and 11 (7.3%) were taking/had taken SJW without the knowledge of the medical team alone. Seven of these patients were treated concurrently with drugs that can interact with SJW. Conclusions Unrecognized use of SJW is frequent and may have an important influence on the effectiveness and safety of drug therapy during hospital stay. PMID:15373938

  14. Promising Practices for Achieving Patient-centered Hospital Care: A National Study of High-performing US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Aboumatar, Hanan J; Chang, Bickey H; Al Danaf, Jad; Shaear, Mohammad; Namuyinga, Ruth; Elumalai, Sathyanarayanan; Marsteller, Jill A; Pronovost, Peter J

    2015-09-01

    Patient-centered care is integral to health care quality, yet little is known regarding how to achieve patient-centeredness in the hospital setting. The Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey measures patients' reports on clinician behaviors deemed by patients as key to a high-quality hospitalization experience. We conducted a national study of hospitals that achieved the highest performance on HCAHPS to identify promising practices for improving patient-centeredness, common challenges met, and how those were addressed. We identified hospitals that achieved the top ranks or remarkable recent improvements on HCAHPS and surveyed key informants at these hospitals. Using quantitative and qualitative methods, we described the interventions used at these hospitals and developed an explanatory model for achieving patient-centeredness in hospital care. Fifty-two hospitals participated in this study. Hospitals used similar interventions that focused on improving responsiveness to patient needs, the discharge experience, and patient-clinician interactions. To improve responsiveness, hospitals used proactive nursing rounds (reported at 83% of hospitals) and executive/leader rounds (62%); for the discharge experience, multidisciplinary rounds (56%), postdischarge calls (54%), and discharge folders (52%) were utilized; for clinician-patient interactions, hospitals promoted specific desired behaviors (65%) and set behavioral standards (60%) for which employees were held accountable. Similar strategies were also used to achieve successful intervention implementation including HCAHPS data feedback, and employee and leader engagement and accountability. High-performing hospitals used a set of patient-centered care processes that involved both leaders and clinicians in ensuring that patient needs and preferences are addressed.

  15. Incidence of Hospitalized Stroke in the Czech Republic: The National Registry of Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Sedova, Petra; Brown, Robert D; Zvolsky, Miroslav; Kadlecova, Pavla; Bryndziar, Tomas; Kubelka, Tomáš; Weiss, Viktor; Volný, Ondřej; Bednarik, Josef; Mikulik, Robert

    2017-05-01

    Contemporary stroke incidence data are not available in some countries and regions, including in Eastern Europe. Based on previous validation of the accuracy of the National Registry of Hospitalized Patients (NRHOSP), we report the incidence of hospitalized stroke in the Czech Republic (CR) using the NRHOSP. The results of the prior validation study assessing the accuracy of coding of stroke diagnoses in the NRHOSP were applied, and we calculated (1) the overall incidence of hospitalized stroke and (2) the incidence rates of hospitalized stroke for the three main stroke types: cerebral infarction (International Classification of Diseases Tenth Revision, CI I63), subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH I60), and intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH I61). We calculated the average annual age- and sex-standardized incidence. The overall incidence of hospitalized stroke was 241 out of 100,000 individuals. The incidence of hospitalized stroke for the main stroke types was 8.2 cases in SAH, 29.5 in ICH, and 211 in CI per 100,000 individuals. The standardized annual stroke incidence adjusted to the 2000 World Health Organization population for overall stroke incidence of hospitalized stroke was 131 per 100,000 individuals. Standardized stroke incidence for stroke subtypes was 5.7 cases in SAH, 16.7 in ICH, and 113 in CI per 100,000 individuals. These studies provide an initial assessment of the burden of stroke in this part of the world. The estimates of hospitalized stroke in the CR and Eastern Europe suggest that ICH is about three times more common than SAH, and hemorrhagic stroke makes up about 18% of strokes. Copyright © 2017 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Causes and predictors of mortality in hospitalized lupus patient in Sarawak General Hospital, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Teh, C L; Ling, G R

    2013-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a serious autoimmune disease that can be life threatening and fatal if left untreated. Causes and prognostic indicators of death in SLE have been well studied in developed countries but lacking in developing countries. We aimed to investigate the causes of mortality in hospitalized patients with SLE and determine the prognostic indicators of mortality during hospitalization in our center. All SLE patients who were admitted to Sarawak General Hospital from January 1, 2006 to December 31, 2010, were followed up in a prospective study using a standard protocol. Demographic data, clinical features, disease activities and damage indices were collected. Logistic regression and Cox regression analysis were used to determine the prognostic indicators of mortality in our patients. There were a total of 251 patients in our study, with the female to male ratio 10 to 1. Our study patients were of multiethnic origins. They had a mean age of 30.5 ± 12.2 years and a mean duration of illness of 36.5 ± 51.6 months. The main involvements were hematologic (73.3%), renal (70.9%) and mucocutaneous (67.3%). There were 26 deaths (10.4%), with the main causes being: infection and flare (50%), infection alone (19%), flare alone (19%) and others (12%). Independent predictors of mortality in our cohort of SLE patients were the presence of both infection and flare of disease (hazard ratio (HR) 5.56) and high damage indices at the time of admission (HR 1.91). Infection and flare were the main causes of death in hospitalized Asian patients with SLE. The presence of infection with flare and high damage indices at the time of admission were independent prognostic indicators of mortality.

  17. Performance of activities of daily living among hospitalized cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Lindahl-Jacobsen, Line; Hansen, Dorte Gilså; Wæhrens, Eva Ejlersen; la Cour, Karen; Søndergaard, Jens

    2015-03-01

    Many cancer patients report unmet rehabilitation needs. Rehabilitation may include activities of daily living (ADL) tasks, but little is known about how cancer patients perform these tasks and how they prioritize their daily activities. Hence, this study aims to identify and characterize ADL task performance problems among a group of adult disabled hospitalized cancer patients using interview and questionnaire data. Cross-sectional study on prevalence of ADL task performance problems experienced by disabled hospitalized cancer patients using the Activities of Daily Living Questionnaire (ADL-Q) (n = 118) and the Canadian Occupational Performance Measure (COPM) (n = 55). All 118 patients reported problems with ADL task performance. Based on the ADL-Q patients reported more problems within instrumental (I-)ADL than personal (P-)ADL. In both I-ADL and P-ADL the results differed between women and men. There was significant overlap between problems identified using the COPM and the ADL-Q instruments. RESULTS from the COPM showed that 65% of problems were related to self-care, 25% to leisure, and 19% to productivity. Using both instruments identified more ADL problems than when using only one of the instruments. Adult hospitalized disabled cancer patients experience a high degree and variation in difficulties performing ADL, illustrating the need for a comprehensively planned assessment of problems and needs.

  18. Self-administration of medication in hospital: patients' perspectives.

    PubMed

    Manias, Elizabeth; Beanland, Christine; Riley, Robin; Baker, Linda

    2004-04-01

    Little information is available about patients' perspectives on self- or nurse-related administration of medication. The aim of the study was to determine patients' perspectives about self-medication in the acute care setting. A qualitative approach, using in-depth semi-structured interviews, was taken. Ten patients with a chronic medical illness who had experienced multiple hospital admissions for treatment were interviewed about their experiences of medication administration in the acute care setting. Participants were recruited from two cardiovascular wards in a private, not-for-profit hospital in Melbourne, Australia. Data collection occurred between August and September 2002. Four major themes were identified from the interviews: benefits of self-administration, barriers to self-administration, assessing appropriateness of self-administration and timing of medication administration. Seven participants had previously experienced self-administration of medications and six were in favour of this practice in the clinical setting. Nine managed their own medications at home, and one self-administered with some assistance from his family. Participants were very concerned about how nurses' heavily regulated routines affected delivery of medications in hospital and disrupted individualized plans of care maintained in the home setting. In planning and implementing self-administration programmes, it is important to consider patients' views. Medication regimes should be simple and flexible enough to adapt to patients' lifestyles and usual routines. Nurses should also take advantage of opportunities to support and facilitate patient autonomy, to enable more effective management of health care needs when patients return home.

  19. Post-Hospital Home Health Care for Medicare Patients

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Robert L.; Finch, Michael; Chen, Qing; Blewett, Lynn; Burns, Risa; Moskowitz, Mark

    1994-01-01

    Medicare patients in five diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) associated with heavy use of post-hospital care discharged from 52 hospitals in 3 cities were followed up at 6 weeks, 6 months, and 1 year to determine the factors associated with their being discharged home with or without home health care and the correlates of improvement in their functional status. Models correctly predicted those discharged home from those going to institutions in a range from 54 to 82 percent of cases. The amount of the variance in the change in function for those who went home (with or without home health care) explained by the models tested ranged from 19 percent to 73 percent. Total Medicare costs for the patients who went home were considerably less in the year subsequent to the hospitalization compared with those discharged to institutional care. PMID:10140151

  20. Management of Hyperglycemia and Enteral Nutrition in the Hospitalized Patient.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Patricia; Kwiatkowski, Cynthia Ann; Wien, Michelle

    2015-10-01

    There has been increased attention on the importance of identifying and distinguishing the differences between stress-induced hyperglycemia (SH), newly diagnosed hyperglycemia (NDH), and hyperglycemia in persons with established diabetes mellitus (DM). Inpatient blood glucose control is now being recognized as not only a cost issue for hospitals but also a concern for patient safety and care. The reasons for the increased incidence of hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients include preexisting DM, undiagnosed DM or prediabetes, SH, and medication-induced hyperglycemia with resulting transient blood glucose variability. It is clear that identifying and documenting hyperglycemia in hospitalized patients with and without a previous diagnosis of DM and initiating prompt insulin treatment are important. Agreement on the optimum treatment goals for hyperglycemia remains quite controversial, and the benefits of intensive glucose management may be lost at the cost of hypoglycemia in intensive care unit patients. Nutrition support in the form of enteral nutrition (EN) increases the risk of hyperglycemia in both critical and non-critically ill hospitalized patients. Reasons for beginning a tube feeding are the same whether a person has NDH or DM. What differs is how to incorporate EN into the established insulin management protocols. The risk for hyperglycemia with the addition of EN is even higher in those without a previous diagnosis of DM. This review discusses the incidence of hyperglycemia, the pathogenesis of hyperglycemia, factors contributing to hyperglycemia in the hospitalized patient, glycemic management goals, current glycemic management recommendations, and considerations for EN formula selection, administration, and treatment. © 2015 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  1. [Clinical features of hospitalized patients with deep venous thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Sun, M L; Feng, Y P; Huang, J; Wang, Y

    2017-12-01

    Objective: To increase the consciousness of incident deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in hospitalized patients. Methods: This is a retrospective study of hospitalized patients with DVT in Beijing Shijitan Hospital from 2007 to 2016. Clinical features of DVT patients who were admitted with no DVT were summarized. The demographic and epidemiological characteristics, involved site of veins, department of patients and risk factors were discussed. Results: A total of 5 063 patients were complicated with DVT from 305 922 inpatients who were without DVT at the admission during past 10 years. Among them, 54.36% (2 752/5 063) were men. The age of the patients was (74.1±15.9) years old (range 1-103 years) with 37.78% of them in 80 to 89 age group. The incidence of DVT in the hospital was 1.65%. It increased yearly during the past decade (from 0.50% to 2.74%), and increased with age in patients from 1 to 99 years old (7.32% in 90-99 age group). Totally, 5 204 veins were involved in the patients. Most thrombosis involved inferior vena cava system (96.54%,5 024/5 204), especially deep veins of lower extremity (83.78%,4 360/5 204), some involved portal veins (8.61%,448/5 204) and a little was found in superior venae cava (3.46%, 180/5 204). More DVT patients were in department of internal medicine than those in department of surgery (2.95% vs 0.97%, P< 0.01). ICU had the highest rate of DVT among the hospital departments (9.75%). No DVT occurred in department of newborn. Risk factors of DVT were inflammatory diseases (71.54%), age over 75 years old (67.25%), and heart diseases (58.98%). Conclusion: Sensitivity of detection on DVT should be emphasized in hospitalized patients with DVT risk, especially at the department with high incident of DVT.

  2. Protein-energy undernutrition in hospital in-patients.

    PubMed

    Corish, C A; Kennedy, N P

    2000-06-01

    Impaired nutritional status has been frequently reported in surveys estimating its prevalence amongst patients in hospital. While there is no doubt that protein-energy undernutrition has serious implications for health, recovery from illness or surgery and hospital costs, lack of nationally or internationally accepted cut-off points and guidelines for most nutrition-related variables make nutritional assessment difficult and proper comparisons between studies impossible. In reviewing published work in which the prevalence of undernutrition has been assessed, it can be seen that each study defined undernutrition, or nutritional risk, using different methodology. This present review aims to highlight the problems which arise when deciphering these studies, and the resulting difficulty in determining the true prevalence of undernutrition and nutritional risk, amongst both general and specific groups of hospital in-patients. It is widely agreed that routine hospital practices can further adversely affect the nutritional status of sick patients in hospital. How this occurs, and the potential effects of impaired nutritional status on clinical outcome are examined. The methods currently available to assess nutritional status are evaluated in the knowledge that such assessments are difficult in clinical practice. The review concludes by proposing that if we want the medical and nursing professions to consider the nutritional status of hospital patients seriously, definitions of undernutrition and nutritional risk, and cut-off values for the nutritional variables measured must be agreed to allow evidence-based practice. Outcome measures which allow clear comparisons between groups and treatments must be used in studies assessing the effects of nutritional interventions.

  3. Paget disease of bone among hospitalized patients in Poland.

    PubMed

    Kanecki, Krzysztof; Nitsch-Osuch, Aneta; Goryński, Paweł; Bogdan, Magdalena; Tarka, Patryk; Tyszko, Piotr Zbigniew

    2018-03-14

    Paget's disease (PDB) is a focal disorder of bone remodeling that occurs commonly in older people with decreasing prevalence reported in European countries. This disease is most often asymptomatic, but it can cause a variety of medical complications resulting in considerable morbidity and reduced quality of life. There is little information regarding the epidemiology of PDB in Poland. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first large epidemiological analysis of this disease in Poland. The aim of this study was to analyze factors that may be related to the PDB epidemiology among hospitalized patients in Poland. The analysis was conducted on the basis of population-based administrative data, taken from a Polish hospital morbidity study carried out by the National Institute of Public Health between January 2008 - December 2014. Analyzed data covered 662 hospitalization records. The final study sample comprised 94 (41.8%) male and 131 (58.2%) female patients with first-time hospitalizations for PDB, with a significant predominance of females (P<0.02), and the predominance of patients living in urban (73%) than in rural areas (27%), P<0.001. The average age of the sample was 56.8 years (CI: 54.3-59.3; SD 18.8; range 1-93 years). The number of PDB cases hospitalized in Poland significantly decreased during the analyzed period of time. PDB is a rare disease with decreasing trends observed among hospitalized patients in Poland. The study results may suggest the existence of environmental risk factors for the development of PDB.

  4. [Rehabilitation of asthmatic patients in the chest hospital (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Meister, W

    1976-01-01

    Modern chest hospitals offer favourable conditions for the rehabilitation of asthmatic patients. In the Central Hospital for Heart- and Lung Diseases at Bad Berka 421 patients with asthma were rehabilitated under clinical conditions in 1972 and 1973. Their rehabilitation was based on individualized long-term plans for treatment taking in consideration environmental factors which might have triggered the attacks. We report on experiences with diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and the results of vocational rehabilitation. 284 patients (67.4%) could return to their work, 4.5% were disabled, 16.5% remained invalids and 11.6% were old-age pensioners or children. The results depended on age, on the type of asthma, on the severity of cardio-pulmonary impairment, on certain concomitant diseases and on the patients cooperation. Possibilities for elimination of factors starting an attack sometimes proved decisive. For the maintenance of rehabilitatory success subsequent ambulatory long-term care by a specialist is provided.

  5. [Hospitality for elderly patients in the emergency department].

    PubMed

    Boulet, Marie-Claude; Dami, Fabrice; Hugli, Olivier; Renard, Delphine; Foucault, Eliane; Carron, Pierre-Nicolas

    2015-12-09

    Demographic evolution results in a growing use of emergency department by elderly patients. They require special care to avoid any further degradation of cognitive and functional abilities already compromised by the disease or injury that led them to hospital in the first place. Through a clinical case, we list the risks related to the care of these particular patients in the emergency department. Early recognition of those risks and careful management of these patients' specific needs can significantly contribute to reduce lengths of stay, an important outcome from both the individual patient's and society's perspective.

  6. Patient attitudes towards medical students at Damascus University teaching hospitals.

    PubMed

    Sayed-Hassan, Rima M; Bashour, Hyam N; Koudsi, Abir Y

    2012-03-22

    The cooperation of patients and their consent to involve medical students in their care is vital to clinical education, but large numbers of students and lack of experience as well as loss of privacy may evoke negative attitudes of patients, which may sometimes adversely affect the clinical teaching environment. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of patients towards medical students at Damascus University hospitals, and to explore the determinants of those attitudes thus discussing possible implications applicable to clinical teaching. This cross-sectional study was conducted at three teaching hospitals affiliated to the Faculty of Medicine at Damascus University. Four hundred patients were interviewed between March and April 2011 by a trained sociologist using a structured questionnaire. Of the patients interviewed, 67.8% approved the presence of medical students during the medical consultation and 58.2% of them felt comfortable with the presence of students, especially among patients with better socio-economic characteristics. 81.5% of the patients agreed to be examined by students in the presence of the supervisor, while 40.2% gave agreement even in the absence of the supervisor. Privacy was the most important factor in the patients' reticence towards examination by the students, whilst the relative safety and comfort if a supervisor was available determined patients' agreement. The study concluded overall positive attitudes to the medical students' involvement in medical education. However, it is essential that students and clinical supervisors understand and adhere to professional and ethical conduct when involving patients in medical education.

  7. Evaluation of patient wristbands and patient identification process in a training hospital in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Cengiz, Canan; Celik, Yusuf; Hikmet, Neset

    2016-10-10

    Purpose The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the utilisation of patient wristbands (PWs) and patient identification (PI) process in a training hospital in Ankara, Turkey. Design/methodology/approach This descriptive and cross-sectional study was conducted in a training hospital with 640 beds, accreditied by Joint Commission International. The views of 348 patients and 419 hospital personnel on the implementation of patient wristbands and identification process were evaluated. Findings The results indicated that lack of information among patients about the importance of PWs and the misknowledge among staff participants on when, where, and by whom PWs should be put on and verified were the weakest points in this hospital. Research limitations/implications PI process must be strictly implemented according to the standard procedures of patient safety. Both patients and hospital personnel should be trained continuously, and training sessions must be held to increase their awareness about the importance of PWs and identification process. Practical implications Finding new ways and using new methods for increasing knowledge about PI and PWs are necessary. Hospital management should prepare a written PI and PW policy and procedure documents by taking the views of patients and hospital personnel and share these with them. Originality/value This study incorporates the views and attitudes of patients and health care personnel in improving health care quality by increasing awareness about PI and wristbands.

  8. Patient safety and patient assessment in pre-hospital care: a study protocol.

    PubMed

    Hagiwara, Magnus Andersson; Nilsson, Lena; Strömsöe, Anneli; Axelsson, Christer; Kängström, Anna; Herlitz, Johan

    2016-02-12

    Patient safety issues in pre-hospital care are poorly investigated. The aim of the planned study is to survey patient safety problems in pre-hospital care in Sweden. The study is a retro-perspective structured medical record review based on the use of 11 screening criteria. Two instruments for structured medical record review are used: a trigger tool instrument designed for pre-hospital care and a newly development instrument designed to compare the pre-hospital assessment with the final hospital assessment. Three different ambulance organisations are participating in the study. Every month, one rater in each organisation randomly collects 30 medical records for review. With guidance from the review instrument, he/she independently reviews the record. Every month, the review team meet for a discussion of problematic reviews. The results will be analysed with descriptive statistics and logistic regression. The findings will make an important contribution to knowledge about patient safety issues in pre-hospital care.

  9. Service quality of hospital outpatient departments: patients' perspective.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan

    2015-01-01

    Assessment of patient perceptions of health service quality as an important element in quality assessments has attracted much attention in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to assess the service quality of hospital outpatient departments affiliated to Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences from the patients' perspective. This cross-sectional study was conducted in 2014 in Tehran, Iran. The study samples included 500 patients who were selected by multi-stage random sampling from four hospitals. The data collection instrument was a questionnaire consisting of 50 items, and the validity and reliability of the questionnaire were confirmed. For data analysis, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis, Friedman test, and descriptive statistics were used through LISREL 8.54 and SPSS 18 applications. Eight significant factors were extracted for outpatient service quality, which explained about 67 per cent of the total variance. Physician consultation, information provided to the patient, and the physical environment of the clinic were the three determining factors of the quality of outpatient services. The highest and lowest perceptions were related to physician consultation and perceived waiting time dimension, respectively. The mean score of patients' perception of outpatient service quality was 3.89 (±0.60). About 59.5 per cent of patients assessed the quality of outpatient services as good, 38.2 per cent as moderate, and 2.3 per cent as poor. Practical implications - The instrument developed for this study is valid and reliable, and it can help hospital managers to identify the areas needing improvement and correction. According to the findings of this study, the majority of patients had a positive experience with outpatient departments of teaching hospitals, and the services provided in these centres were of adequate quality, based on patient assessments.

  10. The Effect of Hospital Service Quality on Patient's Trust

    PubMed Central

    Zarei, Ehsan; Daneshkohan, Abbas; Khabiri, Roghayeh; Arab, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Background: The trust is meant the belief of the patient to the practitioner or the hospital based on the concept that the care provider seeks the best for the patient and will provide the suitable care and treatment for him/her. One of the main determinants of patient’s trust is the service quality. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effect of quality of services provided in private hospitals on the patient’s trust. Patients and Methods: In this descriptive cross-sectional study, 969 patients were selected using the consecutive method from eight private general hospitals of Tehran, Iran, in 2010. Data were collected through a questionnaire containing 20 items (14 items for quality, 6 items for trust) and its validity and reliability were confirmed. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and multivariate regression. Results: The mean score of patients' perception of trust was 3.80 and 4.01 for service quality. Approximately 38% of the variance in patient trust was explained by service quality dimensions. Quality of interaction and process (P < 0.001) were the strongest factors in predicting patient’s trust, but the quality of the environment had no significant effect on the patients' degree of trust. Conclusions: The interaction quality and process quality were the key determinants of patient’s trust in the private hospitals of Tehran. To enhance the patients' trust, quality improvement efforts should focus on service delivery aspects such as scheduling, timely and accurate doing of the service, and strengthening the interpersonal aspects of care and communication skills of doctors, nurses and staff. PMID:25763258

  11. A Patient-specific Approach to Hospital Cost Accounting

    PubMed Central

    Macdonald, Larry K.; Reuter, Louis F.

    1973-01-01

    The hospital facilities and manpower used for the various procedures of a delivery suite are identified and measured as the basis for determining individual patient costs. The method of measuring staff and facility requirements, including the “cost of readiness” and the cost of inherent inefficiencies, generates detailed information that can be used in determining utilization ranges for budgeting decisions, for planning space needs, for personnel scheduling, and for patient billing. PMID:4269322

  12. The impact of payer-specific hospital case mix on hospital costs and revenues for third-party patients.

    PubMed

    Lee, Keon-Hyung; Roh, M P H Chul-Young

    2007-02-01

    Competition among hospitals and managed care have forced hospital industry to be more efficient. With higher degrees of hospital competition and managed care penetration, hospitals have argued that the rate of increase in hospital cost is greater than the rate of increase in hospital revenue. By developing a payer-specific case mix index (CMI) for third-party patients, this paper examined the effect of hospital case mix on hospital cost and revenue for third-party patients in California using the hospital financial and utilization data covering 1986-1998. This study found that the coefficients for CMIs in the third-party hospital revenue model were greater than those in the hospital cost model until 1995. Since 1995, however, the coefficients for CMIs in the third-party hospital revenue model have been less than those in hospital cost models. Over time, the differences in coefficients for CMIs in hospital revenue and cost models for third-party patients have become smaller and smaller although those differences are statistically insignificant.

  13. European hospital managers' perceptions of patient-centred care.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Angelina; Groene, Oliver

    2015-01-01

    The spotlight has recently been placed on managers' responsibility for patient-centred care as a result of Mid Staffordshire NHS Foundation Trust failings. In previous research, clinicians reported that managers do not have an adequate structured plan for implementing patient-centred care. The purpose of this paper is to assess the perceptions of European hospital management with respect to factors affecting the implementation of a patient-centred approach. In total, 15 semi-structured interviews were conducted with hospital managers (n=10), expert country informants (n=2), patient organisations (n=2) and a user representative (n=1) from around Europe. Participants were purposively and snowball sampled. Interviews were analysed using framework analysis. Most participants felt that current levels of patient-centred care are inadequate, but accounted that there were a number of macro, meso and micro challenges they faced in implementing this approach. These included budget constraints, political and historical factors, the resistance of clinicians and other frontline staff. Organisational culture emerged as a central theme, shaped by these multi-level factors and influencing the way in which patient-centred care was borne out in the hospital. Participants proposed that the needs of patients might be better met through increasing advocacy by patient organisations and greater staff contact with patients. This study is the first of its kind to obtain management views from around Europe. It offers an insight into different models of how patient-centred care is realised by management. It indicates that managers see the value of a patient-centred approach but that they feel restricted by a number of factors at multiple levels.

  14. An Intelligent Robotic Hospital Bed for Safe Transportation of Critical Neurosurgery Patients Along Crowded Hospital Corridors.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Savkin, Andrey V; Clout, Ray; Nguyen, Hung T

    2015-09-01

    We present a novel design of an intelligent robotic hospital bed, named Flexbed, with autonomous navigation ability. The robotic bed is developed for fast and safe transportation of critical neurosurgery patients without changing beds. Flexbed is more efficient and safe during the transportation process comparing to the conventional hospital beds. Flexbed is able to avoid en-route obstacles with an efficient easy-to-implement collision avoidance strategy when an obstacle is nearby and to move towards its destination at maximum speed when there is no threat of collision. We present extensive simulation results of navigation of Flexbed in the crowded hospital corridor environments with moving obstacles. Moreover, results of experiments with Flexbed in the real world scenarios are also presented and discussed.

  15. Worsening psychosis induced by varenicline in a hospitalized psychiatric patient.

    PubMed

    DiPaula, Bethany A; Thomas, Michele D

    2009-07-01

    Varenicline is a novel treatment for smoking cessation; however, the agent has not been well studied in a population with severe mental illness. Varenicline can reportedly cause neuropsychiatric adverse effects, some resulting in hospitalizations and/or suicides. We describe a case of clinician-observed, worsening psychotic symptoms in a patient with chronic mental illness who was receiving varenicline. A 45-year-old woman with bipolar disorder, mixed type with psychotic features, was admitted to a psychiatric hospital due to acute decompensation after she discontinued her drug therapy. Because of the facility's smoke-free policy, the patient was not permitted to smoke cigarettes during her hospitalization. Over the next several weeks, her condition was stabilized with psychotropic drugs. Her symptoms improved, and plans were made for her discharge. Varenicline was prescribed to manage her nicotine cravings. After 2 days of treatment, staff members noted worsening of the patient's psychotic symptoms and agitation. Varenicline was discontinued, the patient's mental status returned to baseline, and she was subsequently discharged. Use of the Naranjo adverse drug reaction probability scale indicated a probable relationship (score of 7) between the patient's worsening psychosis and her varenicline therapy. This case report provides valuable support of previously published cases that demonstrate the risk of exacerbation of psychotic symptoms with varenicline use in patients with severe mental illness. With proper assessment and management of varenicline-induced neuropsychiatric effects, health care professionals can provide an important role in helping to prevent and manage worsening psychiatric symptoms.

  16. Falls risk assessment in older patients in hospital.

    PubMed

    Matarese, Maria; Ivziku, Dhurata

    2016-07-27

    Falls are the most frequent adverse event reported in hospitals, usually affecting older patients. All hospitals in NHS organisations develop risk prevention policies that include falls risk assessment. Falls risk assessment involves the use of risk screening tools, aimed at identifying patients at increased risk of falls, and risk assessment tools, which identify a patient's risk factors for falls. Various risk screening tools have been used in clinical practice, but no single tool is able to identify all patients at risk of falls or to accurately exclude all those who are not at risk of falls. Guidelines recommend that patients aged 65 years and over who are admitted to hospital should be considered at high risk of falls and that a multifactorial falls risk assessment should be performed. Therefore, falls risk assessment tools should be used to identify the risk factors for each inpatient aged 65 years or over, in order to determine the most appropriate care plan for falls prevention and to maximise patient mobility and independence.

  17. Understanding patients' behavioral intentions: evidence from Iran's private hospitals industry.

    PubMed

    Zarei, Ehsan; Arab, Mohammad; Tabatabaei, Seyed Mahmoud Ghazi; Rashidian, Arash; Forushani, Abbas Rahimi; Khabiri, Roghayeh

    2014-01-01

    In the ever-increasing competitive market of private hospital industry, creating a strong relationship with the customers that shapes patients' loyalty has been considered a key factor in obtaining market share. The purpose of this paper is to test a model of customer loyalty among patients of private hospitals in Iran. This cross-sectional study was carried out in Tehran, the capital of the Islamic Republic of Iran in 2010. The study samples composed of 969 patients who were consecutively selected from eight private hospitals. The survey instrument was designed based on a review of the related literature and included 36 items. Data analysis was performed using structural equation modeling. For the service quality construct, three dimensions extracted: Process, interaction, and environment. Both process and interaction quality had significant effects on perceived value. Perceived value along with the process and interaction quality were the most important antecedents of patient overall satisfaction. The direct effect of the process and interaction quality on behavioral intentions was insignificant. Perceived value and patient overall satisfaction were the direct antecedents of patient behavioral intentions and the mediators between service quality and behavioral intentions. Environment quality of service delivery had no significant effect on perceived value, overall satisfaction, and behavioral intentions. Contrary to previous similar studies, the role of service quality was investigated not in a general sense, but in the form of three types of qualities including quality of environment, quality of process, and quality of interaction.

  18. John M. Eisenberg Patient Safety Awards. System innovation: Concord Hospital.

    PubMed

    Uhlig, Paul N; Brown, Jeffrey; Nason, Anne K; Camelio, Addie; Kendall, Elise

    2002-12-01

    The Cardiac Surgery Program at Concord Hospital (Concord, NH) restructured clinical teamwork for improved safety and effectiveness on the basis of theory and practice from human factors science, aviation safety, and high-reliability organization theory. A team-based, collaborative rounds process--the Concord Collaborative Care Model--that involved use of a structured communications protocol was conducted daily at each patient's bedside. The entire care team agreed to meet at the same time each day (8:45 AM to 9:30 AM) to share information and develop a plan of care for each patient, with patient and family members as active participants. The cardiac surgery team developed a structured communications protocol adapted from human factors science. To provide a forum for discussion of team goals and progress and to address system-level concerns, a biweekly system rounds process was established. Following implementation of collaborative rounds, mortality of Concord Hospital's cardiac surgery patients declined significantly from expected rates. Satisfaction rates of open heart patients scores were consistently in the 97th-99th percentile nationally. A quality of work life survey indicated that in every category, providers expressed greater satisfaction with the collaborative care process than with the traditional rounds process. Practice patterns in the Cardiac Surgery Program at Concord Hospital have changed to a much more collaborative and participatory process, with improved outcomes, happier patients, and more satisfied practitioners. A culture of continuous program improvement has been implemented that continues to evolve and produce benefits.

  19. [Probabilistic models of mortality for patients hospitalized in conventional units].

    PubMed

    Rué, M; Roqué, M; Solà, J; Macià, M

    2001-09-29

    We have developed a tool to measure disease severity of patients hospitalized in conventional units in order to evaluate and compare the effectiveness and quality of health care in our setting. A total of 2,274 adult patients admitted consecutively to inpatient units from the Medicine, Surgery and Orthopaedic Surgery, and Trauma Departments of the Corporació Sanitària Parc Taulí of Sabadell, Spain, between November 1, 1997 and September 30, 1998 were included. The following variables were collected: demographic data, previous health state, substance abuse, comorbidity prior to admission, characteristics of the admission, clinical parameters within the first 24 hours of admission, laboratory results and data from the Basic Minimum Data Set of hospital discharges. Multiple logistic regression analysis was used to develop mortality probability models during the hospital stay. The mortality probability model at admission (MPMHOS-0) contained 7 variables associated with mortality during hospital stay: age, urgent admission, chronic cardiac insufficiency, chronic respiratory insufficiency, chronic liver disease, neoplasm, and dementia syndrome. The mortality probability model at 24-48 hours from admission (MPMHOS-24) contained 9 variables: those included in the MPMHOS-0 plus two statistically significant laboratory variables: hemoglobin and creatinine. Severity measures, in particular those presented in this study, can be helpful for the interpretation of hospital mortality rates and can guide mortality or quality committees at the time of investigating health care-related problems.

  20. Preferences for photographic art among hospitalized patients with cancer.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Hazel; Schroeter, Kathryn; Hanson, Andrew; Asmus, Kathryn; Grossman, Azure

    2013-07-01

    To determine the preferences of patients with cancer for viewing photographic art in an inpatient hospital setting and to evaluate the impact of viewing photographic art. Quantitative, exploratory, single-group, post-test descriptive design incorporating qualitative survey questions. An academic medical center in the midwestern United States. 80 men (n = 44) and women (n = 36) aged 19-85 years (X = 49) and hospitalized for cancer treatment. Participants viewed photographs via computers and then completed a five-instrument electronic survey. Fatigue, quality of life, performance status, perceptions of distraction and restoration, and content categories of photographs. Ninety-six percent of participants enjoyed looking at the study photographs. The photographs they preferred most often were lake sunset (76%), rocky river (66%), and autumn waterfall (66%). The most rejected photographs were amusement park (54%), farmer's market vegetable table (51%), and kayakers (49%). The qualitative categories selected were landscape (28%), animals (15%), people (14%), entertainment (10%), imagery (10%), water (7%), spiritual (7%), flowers (6%), and landmark (3%). Some discrepancy between the quantitative and qualitative sections may be related to participants considering water to be a landscape. The hypothesis that patients' preferences for a category of photographic art are affected by the psychophysical and psychological qualities of the photographs, as well as the patients' moods and characteristics, was supported. Nurses can play an active role in helping patients deal with the challenges of long hospital stays and life-threatening diagnoses through distraction and restoration interventions such as viewing photographic images of nature. Nurses can use photographic imagery to provide a restorative intervention during the hospital experience. Photographic art can be used as a distraction from the hospital stay and the uncertainty of a cancer diagnosis. Having patients view

  1. The psychometric properties of the 'Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture' in Dutch hospitals.

    PubMed

    Smits, Marleen; Christiaans-Dingelhoff, Ingrid; Wagner, Cordula; Wal, Gerrit van der; Groenewegen, Peter P

    2008-11-07

    In many different countries the Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (HSOPS) is used to assess the safety culture in hospitals. Accordingly, the questionnaire has been translated into Dutch for application in the Netherlands. The aim of this study was to examine the underlying dimensions and psychometric properties of the questionnaire in Dutch hospital settings, and to compare these results with the original questionnaire used in USA hospital settings. The HSOPS was completed by 583 staff members of four general hospitals, three teaching hospitals, and one university hospital in the Netherlands. Confirmatory factor analyses were performed to examine the applicability of the factor structure of the American questionnaire to the Dutch data. Explorative factor analyses were performed to examine whether another composition of items and factors would fit the data better. Supplementary psychometric analyses were performed, including internal consistency and construct validity. The confirmatory factor analyses were based on the 12-factor model of the original questionnaire and resulted in a few low reliability scores. 11 Factors were drawn with explorative factor analyses, with acceptable reliability scores and a good construct validity. Two items were removed from the questionnaire. The composition of the factors was very similar to that of the original questionnaire. A few items moved to another factor and two factors turned out to combine into a six-item dimension. All other dimensions consisted of two to five items. The Dutch translation of the HSOPS consists of 11 factors with acceptable reliability and good construct validity. and is similar to the original HSOPS factor structure.

  2. Sarcopenia among hospitalized patients - A cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana S; Guerra, Rita S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Amaral, Teresa F

    2015-12-01

    Data on the prevalence of sarcopenia among hospitalized older patients are scarce and there is no available information on the burden of sarcopenia among younger patients. The present study aims to increase the knowledge about the frequency of sarcopenia among hospitalized patients and to evaluate the influence of different diagnostic criteria in these estimates. A cross-sectional study was conducted in hospitalized adult patients. Sarcopenia was defined, according to the European Working Group on Sarcopenia in Older People (EWGSOP), as the presence of both low muscle mass, assessed by Bioelectrical Impedance Analysis (BIA), adjusted for height, and low muscle function (hand grip strength). Two other criteria were applied, also using hand grip strength for evaluating muscle function, one that also assessed muscle mass by BIA, but adjusted for weight, and another which estimated muscle mass based on mid-arm muscle circumference. Nutritional status was evaluated by Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment. The degree of agreement between the different diagnostic criteria was assessed using kappa. Multivariable logistic regression models were used in order to identify factors associated with sarcopenia. 608 hospitalized adult patients aged ≥18 years composed the study sample. According to EWGSOP's criteria, 25.3% patients were sarcopenic. However, depending on age and on the applied criteria, frequency of sarcopenia varied from 5% to 41.1% for men and from 4.9% to 38.3% for women. There was 95.7% (k = 0.89) agreement between criteria that estimated muscle mass by BIA. According to EWGSOP criteria approximately 20% of the non-undernourished patients were sarcopenic. Furthermore, 29.5% of overweight and 18.7% of obese patients were sarcopenic. Factors associated with sarcopenia were male gender, age ≥65 years, moderate or severe dependence, being undernourished and admitted to a medical ward. Sarcopenia is frequent among hospitalized patients and varies widely

  3. [Patient complaints in a hospital emergency department in Belgium].

    PubMed

    Ngongo, B Tchuyap; Carlier, A; Mols, P

    2011-04-01

    Patients express their dissatisfaction through complaints. This study analyzed the frequency and chief complaints of patients presenting to the emergency department (ED). The end point was find ways to improve patient satisfaction after their ED visit. In this retrospective, seven years study, we reviewed 155 chief complaints of patients presenting to the ED of a university hospital. The chief complaints were either from the patients or a family member. One hundred and fifty five chief complaints collected from 496.816 patients presenting to the ED were reviewed over a period of seven years. Complaints case rate was 3.1 per 10.000 visits. Complaints came from patients between the age of 20 to 60 years old (75.0 percent). Complains involved a physician (79.0 percent). The complaints were related a lack of communication (39.0 percent), long waiting time (14.0 percent), wrong diagnosis (22.0 percent), wrong treatment (13.0 percent) and ED disposition of the patient (12.0 percent). Two types of pathology represented more than 15 percent of the complaints: the traumatology (22.0 percent) and the psychiatry (17.0 percent). The traumatology and psychiatry represented respectively 30.0 percent and 10.0 percent of ED visits. Most complaints were addressed and resolved through a hospital mediator, Chief of service or Chief of staff. The rate of complains is low. Most complaints can be prevented if the physician improves communication with patients.

  4. [Evaluations by hospital-ward physicians of patient care management quality for patients hospitalized after an emergency department admission].

    PubMed

    Bartiaux, M; Mols, P

    2017-01-01

    patient management in the acute and sub-acute setting of an Emergency Department is challenging. An assessment of the quality of provided care enables an evaluation of failings. It contributes to the identification of areas for improvement. to obtain an analysis, by hospital-ward physicians, of adult patient care management quality, as well as of the correctness of diagnosis made during emergency admissions. To evaluate the consequences of inadequate patient care management on morbidity, mortality and cost and duration of hospitalization. prospective data analysis obtained between the 1/12/2009 and the 21/12/2009 from physicians using a questionnaire on adult-patient emergency admissions and subsequent hospitalization. questionnaires were completed for 332 patients. Inadequate management of patient care were reported for 73/332 (22 %) cases. Incorrect diagnoses were reported for 20/332 (6 %) cases. 35 cases of inadequate care management (10.5 % overall) were associated with morbidity (34 cases) or mortality (1 case), including 4 cases (1.2 % ) that required emergency intensive-care or surgical interventions. this quality study analyzed the percentage of patient management cases and incorrect diagnoses in the emergency department. The data for serious outcome and wrong diagnosis are comparable with current literature. To improve performance, we consider the process for establishing a diagnosis and therapeutic care.

  5. Meeting the nutritional requirements of hospitalized patients: an interdisciplinary approach to hospital catering.

    PubMed

    Iff, S; Leuenberger, M; Rösch, S; Knecht, G; Tanner, B; Stanga, Z

    2008-12-01

    The study served to assure the quality of our catering, to locate problems, and to define further optimization measures at the Bern University Hospital. The main objective was to investigate whether the macronutrient and energy content of the hospital food complies with the nutritional value calculated from recipes as well as with the recommendations issued by the German Nutrition Society (DGE). Prospective, randomized, single-center quality study. Complete standard meals were analyzed over seven consecutive days for each seasonal menu plan in one year. The quantitative and qualitative chemical content of a randomly chosen menu was determined by an external laboratory. Sixty meals were analyzed. The amount of food served and the ratio of macronutrients contained in the food satisfactorily reflected all recipes. Not surprisingly, the energy and carbohydrate content of our meals was lower than in the German recommendations, because the report of the DGE is based on the sum of meals, snacks and beverages consumed over the whole day and not only on the main meals, as we analyzed. Periodic quality control is essential in order to meet recommendations and patients' expectations in hospital catering. Members of the catering service should undergo regularly repeated skills training, and continuous efforts should be made to ensure portion size for all delivered meals. Food provision in the hospital setting needs to be tailored to meet the demands of the different patient groups, to optimize nutritional support, and to minimize food waste.

  6. Patients' Care Needs: Documentation Analysis in General Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Paans, Wolter; Müller-Staub, Maria

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the study is (a) to describe care needs derived from records of patients in Dutch hospitals, and (b) to evaluate whether nurses employed the NANDA-I classification to formulate patients' care needs. A stratified cross-sectional random-sampling nursing documentation audit was conducted employing the D-Catch instrument in 10 hospitals comprising 37 wards. The most prevalent nursing diagnoses were acute pain, nausea, fatigue, and risk for impaired skin integrity. Most care needs were determined in physiological health patterns and few in psychosocial patterns. To perform effective interventions leading to high-quality nursing-sensitive outcomes, nurses should also diagnose patients' care needs in the health management, value-belief, and coping stress patterns. © 2014 NANDA International, Inc.

  7. Hospital cannot be held liable for breach of patient's privacy.

    PubMed

    1997-04-04

    The Minnesota Court of Appeals ruled that a law guaranteeing the confidentiality of a patient's medical records did not create a private cause of actions for damages when the patient's HIV was revealed. The plaintiff, known as [name removed], requested that his stepbrother not be told his HIV status. A relative gained access to his medical file while working at a medical center and disclosed [name removed]'s HIV status to his stepbrother. [name removed] sued the relative and the hospital. The district court ruled that he did not have a cause of action against the hospital and the Court of Appeals agreed. The State does not recognize claims for an invasion of privacy under the Minnesota Patients Bill of Rights.

  8. [Validation of a nutritional screening tool for hospitalized pediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Lama More, R A; Moráis López, A; Herrero Álvarez, M; Caraballo Chicano, S; Galera Martínez, R; López Ruzafa, E; Rodríguez Martínez, G; de la Mano Hernández, A; Rivero de la Rosa, M C

    2012-01-01

    Malnutrition among hospitalized patients has clinical implications, and interest has arisen to find screening tools able to identify subjects under risk. At present, there is no consensus about the most suitable nutrition screening tool for pediatric patients. To validate STAMP (Screening Tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition in Pediatrics) pediatric screening tool in Spain. Descriptive cross-sectional study of patients admitted to a 3rd level children's hospital with both medical and surgical specialities. During the first 24 hours of admission, STAMP screening tool was applied. For its validation, results were compared with those obtained from a nutritional assessment performed by specialist staff, which included clinical, anthropometric and body composition data. A sample of 250 children was studied. Nutritional assessment identified 64 patients (25.6%) under risk, 40 of whom were malnourished (16%). STAMP classified 48.4% of the patients as being under nutritional risk. This tool showed 75% sensitivity and 60.8% specificity when identifying patients under risk according to nutritional assessment. It showed 90% sensitivity and 59.5% specificity when identifying malnourished patients. Malnutrition was less frequent than that reported in other European countries, although diagnosis technique was different. STAMP is a simple and useful tool for nutritional screening, avoiding the need to assess all patients on admission in order to identify those under nutritional risk.

  9. Sensory environment on health-related outcomes of hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Drahota, Amy; Ward, Derek; Mackenzie, Heather; Stores, Rebecca; Higgins, Bernie; Gal, Diane; Dean, Taraneh P

    2012-03-14

    Hospital environments have recently received renewed interest, with considerable investments into building and renovating healthcare estates. Understanding the effectiveness of environmental interventions is important for resource utilisation and providing quality care. To assess the effect of hospital environments on adult patient health-related outcomes. We searched: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (last searched January 2006); MEDLINE (1902 to December 2006); EMBASE (January 1980 to February 2006); 14 other databases covering health, psychology, and the built environment; reference lists; and organisation websites. This review is currently being updated (MEDLINE last search October 2010), see Studies awaiting classification. Randomised and non-randomised controlled trials, controlled before-and-after studies, and interrupted times series of environmental interventions in adult hospital patients reporting health-related outcomes. Two review authors independently undertook data extraction and 'Risk of bias' assessment. We contacted authors to obtain missing information. For continuous variables, we calculated a mean difference (MD) or standardized mean difference (SMD), and 95% confidence intervals (CI) for each study. For dichotomous variables, we calculated a risk ratio (RR) with 95% confidence intervals (95% CI). When appropriate, we used a random-effects model of meta-analysis. Heterogeneity was explored qualitatively and quantitatively based on risk of bias, case mix, hospital visit characteristics, and country of study. Overall, 102 studies have been included in this review. Interventions explored were: 'positive distracters', to include aromas (two studies), audiovisual distractions (five studies), decoration (one study), and music (85 studies); interventions to reduce environmental stressors through physical changes, to include air quality (three studies), bedroom type (one study), flooring (two studies), furniture and furnishings (one

  10. Impact of insurance and hospital ownership on hospital length of stay among patients with ambulatory care-sensitive conditions.

    PubMed

    Mainous, Arch G; Diaz, Vanessa A; Everett, Charles J; Knoll, Michele E

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE Some studies suggest proprietary (for-profit) hospitals are maximizing financial margins from patient care by limiting therapies or decreasing length of stay for uninsured patients. This study examines the role of insurance related to length of stay once the patient is in the hospital and risk for mortality, particularly in a for-profit environment. METHODS We undertook an analysis of hospitalizations in the National Hospital Discharge Survey (NHDS) of the 5-year period of 2003 to 2007 for patients aged 18 to 64 years (unweighted n = 849,866; weighted n = 90 million). The analysis included those who were hospitalized with both ambulatory care-sensitive conditions (ACSCs), hospitalizations considered to be preventable, and non-ACSCs. We analyzed the transformed mean length of stay between individuals who had Medicaid or all other insurance types while hospitalized and those who were hospitalized without insurance. This analysis was stratified by hospital ownership. We also examined the relationship between in-hospital mortality and insurance status. RESULTS After controlling for comorbidities; age, sex, and race/ethnicity; and hospitalizations with either an ACSC or non-ACSC diagnosis, patients without insurance tended to have a significantly shorter length of stay. Across all hospital types, the mean length of stay for ACSCs was significantly shorter for individuals without insurance (2.77 days) than for those with either private insurance (2.89 days, P = .04) or Medicaid (3.19, P <.01). Among hospitalizations for ACSCs, in-hospital mortality rate for individuals with either private insurance or Medicaid was not significantly different from the mortality rate for those without insurance. CONCLUSIONS Patients without insurance have shorter lengths of stay for both ACSCs and non-ACSCs. Future research should examine whether patients without insurance are being discharged prematurely.

  11. Hospital Utilization and Characteristics of Patients Experiencing Recurrent Readmissions Within Children’s Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jay G.; Hall, David E.; Kuo, Dennis Z.; Cohen, Eyal; Agrawal, Rishi; Feudtner, Chris; Hall, Matt; Kueser, Jacqueline; Kaplan, William; Neff, John

    2011-01-01

    Context Early hospital readmission is emerging as an indicator of care quality. Some children with chronic illnesses may be readmitted on a recurrent basis, but there are limited data describing their rehospitalization patterns and impact. Objectives To describe the inpatient resource utilization, clinical characteristics, and admission reasons of patients recurrently readmitted to children’s hospitals. Design, Setting, and Patients Retrospective cohort analysis of 317 643 patients (n=579 504 admissions) admitted to 37 US children’s hospitals in 2003 with follow-up through 2008. Main Outcome Measure Maximum number of readmissions experienced by each child within any 365-day interval during the 5-year follow-up period. Results In the sample, 69 294 patients (21.8%) experienced at least 1 readmission within 365 days of a prior admission. Within a 365-day interval, 9237 patients (2.9%) experienced 4 or more readmissions; time between admissions was a median 37 days (interquartile range [IQR], 21–63). These patients accounted for 18.8% (109 155 admissions) of all admissions and 23.2% ($3.4 billion) of total inpatient charges for the study cohort during the entire follow-up period. Tests for trend indicated that as the number of readmissions increased from 0 to 4 or more, the prevalences increased for a complex chronic condition (from 22.3% [n=55 382/248 349] to 89.0% [n=8225/9237]; P <.001), technology assistance (from 5.3% [n = 13 163] to 52.6% [n=4859]; P <.001), public insurance use (from 40.9% [n = 101 575] to 56.3% [n=5202]; P <.001), and non-Hispanic black race (from 21.8% [n=54 140] to 34.4% [n=3181]; P <.001); and the prevalence decreased for readmissions associated with an ambulatory care–sensitive condition (from 23.1% [62 847/272 065] to 14.0% [15 282/109 155], P<.001). Of patients readmitted 4 or more times in a 365-day interval, 2633 (28.5%) were rehospitalized for a problem in the same organ system across all admissions during the interval

  12. Patient safety culture in hospitals within the nursing perspective.

    PubMed

    Toso, Greice Letícia; Golle, Lidiane; Magnago, Tânia Solange Bosi de Souza; Herr, Gerli Elenise Gehrke; Loro, Marli Maria; Aozane, Fabiele; Kolankiewicz, Adriane Cristina Bernat

    2016-12-15

    Evaluate the atmosphere regarding patient safety from the perspective of active nurses in hospitals in a country town of Rio Grande do Sul State. Cross-sectional study with 637 nursing professionals from two hospitals. Data collection through Safety Attitudes Questionnaire, in the second half of 2014. Cutoff for positive assessment was ≥75 points. The scores for domains in the overall assessment were: 76 (team work atmosphere), 73 (safety atmosphere), 88 (job satisfaction), 59 (perceived stress), 66 (perception of unit management), 65 (perception of hospital management) and 80 (work conditions). When comparing averages between institutions, the private institution showed better working conditions. Results can be used to plan and organize actions, given the low scores in relation to the safety atmosphere, management and stress perception.

  13. Medication fall risk in old hospitalized patients: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Costa-Dias, Maria José; Oliveira, Alexandre Santos; Martins, Teresa; Araújo, Fátima; Santos, Ana Sofia; Moreira, Cristina Nogueira; José, Helena

    2014-02-01

    While the causes of falls in old hospitalized patients are multifactorial, medication has been considered as one of the most significant factors. Given the large impact that this phenomenon has on the lives of the elderly and organizations, it is important to explore such phenomenon in greater depth. The objective of this study was to explore the association between medication and falls and the recurrent falls (n≥2), and identify medication related risk for fall in hospitalized patients, in a large acute hospital. Retrospective and quantitative study from June 2008 to December 2010. The study was conducted in a private hospital for acute patients in Lisbon, Portugal. The study included a sample of 214 episodes of fall event notifications which occurred in 193 patients. The current study was conducted through the "face to face consensus" technique which emerged the treatment groups to investigate. Regarding the data analysis we used Student's t test, ANOVA and Odds Ratio. In the violation of the premises for the use of parametric statistics we used the Kruskal-Wallis test. To assess the fall risk, and the medication-related fall risk, we used the Morse Fall Risk Scale, and the Medication Fall Risk Score. Patients who received drugs from the therapy group of "Central Nervous System", are 10 times more likely to have fall risk (OR 9. 90, 95% CI 1.6-60.63). Association was found between falls (OR 6.09, 95% CI 1.30-28.54) and its recurrence (OR 3.32, 95% CI 1.61-6.85), among patients receiving haloperidol and receiving tramadol for recurrent falls (OR 3.10, 95% CI 1.59-6.07). In 34% of the patients the medication fall risk score was 6 or higher. This current study allowed identifying medication-related risk factors for falls, that nurses should consider when prescribing interventions to prevent falls and its recurrence, when patients are admitted to acute care hospitals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Strategies for cutting hospital beds: the impact on patient service.

    PubMed Central

    Green, L V; Nguyen, V

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop insights on the impact of size, average length of stay, variability, and organization of clinical services on the relationship between occupancy rates and delays for beds. DATA SOURCES: The primary data source was Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston. Secondary data were obtained from the United Hospital Fund of New York reflecting data from about 150 hospitals. STUDY DESIGN: Data from Beth Israel Deaconess on discharges and length of stay were analyzed and fit into appropriate queueing models to generate tables and graphs illustrating the relationship between the variables mentioned above and the relationship between occupancy levels and delays. In addition, specific issues of current concern to hospital administrators were analyzed, including the impact of consolidation of clinical services and utilizing hospital beds uniformly across seven days a week rather than five. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using target occupancy levels as the primary determinant of bed capacity is inadequate and may lead to excessive delays for beds. Also, attempts to reduce hospital beds by consolidation of different clinical services into single nursing units may be counterproductive. CONCLUSIONS: More sophisticated methodologies are needed to support decisions that involve bed capacity and organization in order to understand the impact on patient service. Images Figure 2 PMID:11409821

  15. Measuring patient-perceived hospital service quality: a conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Pai, Yogesh P; Chary, Satyanarayana T

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Although measuring healthcare service quality is not a new phenomenon, the instruments used to measure are timeworn. With the shift in focus to patient centric processes in hospitals and recognizing healthcare to be different compared to other services, service quality measurement needs to be tuned specifically to healthcare. The purpose of this paper is to design a conceptual framework for measuring patient perceived hospital service quality (HSQ), based on existing service quality literature. Design/methodology/approach - Using HSQ theories, expanding existing healthcare service models and literature, a conceptual framework is proposed to measure HSQ. The paper outlines patient perceived service quality dimensions. Findings - An instrument for measuring HSQ dimensions is developed and compared with other service quality measuring instruments. The latest dimensions are in line with previous studies, but a relationship dimension is added. Practical implications - The framework empowers managers to assess healthcare quality in corporate, public and teaching hospitals. Originality/value - The paper helps academics and practitioners to assess HSQ from a patient perspective.

  16. Unplanned readmission after hospital discharge in burn patients in Iran.

    PubMed

    Jafaryparvar, Zakiyeh; Adib, Masoomeh; Ghanbari, Atefeh; Leyli, Ehsan Kazemnezhad

    2018-02-21

    Burns are considered as one of the most serious health problems throughout the world. They may lead to adverse consequences and outcomes. One of these outcomes is unplanned readmission. Unplanned readmission has been commonly used as a quality indicator by hospitals and governments. This study aimed to determine the predictors of unplanned readmission in patients with burns hospitalized in a burn center in the North of Iran (Guilan province, Rasht). This retrospective analytic study has been done on the medical records of hospitalized patients with burns in Velayat Sub-Specialty Burn and Plastic Surgery Center, Rasht, Iran during 2008-2013. In general, 703 medical records have been reviewed but statistical analysis was performed on 626 medical records. All data were entered in SPSS (version 16) and analyzed by descriptive and inferential statistics. Among 626 patients with burns, the overall readmission rate was 5.1%. Predictors of readmission included total body surface area (OR 1.030, CI 1.011-1.049), hypertension (OR 2.923, CI 1.089-7.845) and skin graft (OR 7.045, CI 2.718-18.258). Considering the outcome, predictors following burn have a crucial role in the allocation of treatment cost for patients with burns and they can be used as one of the quality indicators for health care providers and governments.

  17. YaAn earthquake increases blood pressure among hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanwei; Luo, Xiaoli; Zhang, Wen; Zhou, Liang; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu

    YaAn, a city in Sichuan province, China, was struck by a major earthquake measuring 7.0 on the Richter scale on April 20, 2013. This study sought to investigate the impact of YaAn earthquake on the blood pressure (BP) among hospitalized patients in the department of cardiology. We enrolled 52 hospitalized patients who were admitted to our hospital at least three days before the day of earthquake in 2013 (disaster group) as compared with 52 patients during April 20, 2014 (nondisaster group). BP was measured three times per day and the prescription of antihypertensive medicine was recorded. The earthquake induced a 3.3 mm Hg significant increase in the mean postdisaster systolic blood pressure (SBP) in the disaster group as compared with the nondisaster group. SBP at admission was positively associated with the elevated SBP in the logistic regression model (odds ratio (OR) = 1.09, 95% confidence interval (CI):1.016-1.168, p = 0.015), but not other potential influencing factors, including antihypertensive medicine, sex, age, and body weight, excluding β-blockers. Patients with β-blockers prescription at the time of earthquake showed a blunt response to earthquake-induced SBP elevation than those who were taking other antihypertensive drugs (OR = 0.128, 95% CI: 0.019-0.876, p = 0.036). The YaAn earthquake induced significant increase in SBP even at a distance from the epicenter among hospitalized patients. The findings demonstrate that pure psychological components seem to be a cause of the pressor response and β-blockers might be better in controlling disaster-induced hypertension.

  18. Randomized clinical trial of nutritional counseling for malnourished hospital patients.

    PubMed

    Casals, C; García-Agua-Soler, N; Vázquez-Sánchez, M Á; Requena-Toro, M V; Padilla-Romero, L; Casals-Sánchez, J L

    2015-01-01

    Malnutrition is associated with an increased risk of mortality and morbidity, longer hospital stays and general loss of quality of life. The aim of this study is to assess the impact of dietary counseling for malnourished hospital patients. Prospective, randomized, open-label study of 106 hospital patients with malnutrition (54 in the control group and 52 in the intervention group). The intervention group received dietary counseling, and the control group underwent standard treatment. We determined the patients' nutritional state (body mass index, laboratory parameters, malnutrition universal screening tool), degree of dependence (Barthel index), quality of life (SF-12), degree of satisfaction (CSQ-8), the number and length of readmissions and mortality. The patients who underwent the "intervention" increased their weight at 6 months, while the controls lost weight (difference in body mass index, 2.14kg/m(2); p<.001). The intervention group had better results when compared with the control group in the Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool scores (difference, -1.29; p<.001), Barthel index (difference, 7.49; p=.025), SF-12 (difference, 13.72; p<.001) and CSQ-8 (difference, 4.34, p<.001) and required fewer readmissions (difference, -0.37; p=.04) and shorter stays for readmissions (difference, -6.75; p=.035). Mortality and laboratory parameters were similar for the 2 groups. Nutritional counseling improved the patients' nutritional state, quality of life and degree of dependence and decreased the number of hospital readmissions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  19. [Adverse events in patients from a pediatric hospital.

    PubMed

    Ornelas-Aguirre, José Manuel; Arriaga-Dávila, José de Jesús; Domínguez-Serrano, María Isabel; Guzmán-Bihouet, Beatriz Filomena; Navarrete-Navarro, Susana

    2013-01-01

    Background: detection of adverse events is part of the safety management in hospitalized patients. The objective of this study was to describe the incidence of adverse events that occurred in a pediatric hospital. Methods: cross-sectional study of the adverse events occurred in a pediatric hospital from 2007 to 2009. Factors associated with their developmental causes were identified. The statistical analysis was descriptive and bivariate, with contingency tables to estimate the relationship between those factors. A p value = 0.05 was considered significant. Results: a total of 177 adverse events were registered. When they began, human factor occurred in 23 cases (13 %, OR = 1.41, p = 0.001), organizational factor was present in 71 cases (40 %, OR = 1.91, p = 0.236) and technical factor in 46 cases (26 %, OR = 0.87, p = 0.01). Blows or bruises from falls as a result of adverse events occurred in 71 cases (40 %, 95 % CI = 64-78). Conclusions: we found 1.84 events per 100 hospital discharges during the study period. The fall of patients ranked first of the adverse events identified.

  20. Real money: complications and hospital costs in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Hemmila, Mark R; Jakubus, Jill L; Maggio, Paul M; Wahl, Wendy L; Dimick, Justin B; Campbell, Darrell A; Taheri, Paul A

    2008-08-01

    Major postoperative complications are associated with a substantial increase in hospital costs. Trauma patients are known to have a higher rate of complications than the general surgery population. We used the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP) methodology to evaluate hospital costs, duration of stay, and payment associated with complications in trauma patients. Using NSQIP principles, patient data were collected for 512 adult patients admitted to the trauma service for > 24 hours at a Level 1 trauma center (2004-2005). Patients were placed in 1 of 3 groups: no complications (none), >or=1 minor complication (minor, eg, urinary tract infection), or >or=1 major complication (major, eg, pneumonia). Total hospital charges, costs, payment, and duration of stay associated with each complication group were determined from a cost-accounting database. Multiple regression was used to determine the costs of each type of complication after adjusting for differences in age, sex, new injury severity score, Glasgow coma scale score, maximum head abbreviated injury scale, and first emergency department systolic blood pressure. A total of 330 (64%) patients had no complications, 53 (10%) had >or= 1 minor complication, and 129 (25%) had >or= 1 major complication. Median hospital charges increased from $33,833 (none) to $81,936 (minor) and $150,885 (major). The mean contribution to margin per day was similar for the no complication and minor complication groups ($994 vs $1,115, P = .7). Despite higher costs, the patients in the major complication group generated a higher mean contribution to margin per day compared to the no complication group ($2,168, P < .001). The attributable increase in median total hospital costs when adjusted for confounding variables was $19,915 for the minor complication group (P < .001), and $40,555 for the major complication group (P < .001). Understanding the costs associated with traumatic injury provides a window for assessing the

  1. Comparison of Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems patient satisfaction scores for specialty hospitals and general medical hospitals: confounding effect of survey response rate.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Zishan K; Wu, Albert W; Kurbanova, Nargiza; Qayyum, Rehan

    2014-09-01

    Specialty hospitals are a subset of acute-care hospitals that provide a narrower set of services than general medical hospitals (GMHs), predominantly in areas such as cardiac disease and surgery. Although specialty hospitals also advertise high patient satisfaction, this has not been examined using national data. We examined the differences in Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) satisfaction scores in a national sample. HCAHPS results were obtained for July 2007 to June 2010. Specialty hospitals were identified using the American Hospital Association's Annual Survey, the Physician Hospital Association's directory, a name search of hospitals on the HCAHPS database, contact with experts, and online searches. Multiple linear regression was performed to examine the relationship between overall satisfaction and hospital specialty status, survey response rate, and subdomains of patient satisfaction. We identified 188 specialty hospitals and 4368 GMHs. Specialty hospitals were disproportionately located in states that do not require Certification Of Need (47.9%), and had a higher overall patient satisfaction score (86.6 vs 67.8%, P < 0.0001) and survey response rates (49.6% vs 32.2%, P < 0.0001). After adjusting for response rate, the difference in overall patient satisfaction decreased by >50% (from 18.5 to 8.7) but remained significantly higher (P < 0.0001). Similar results were obtained for patient satisfaction subdomains. Specialty hospitals have a significantly higher overall HCAHPS patient satisfaction score than GMHs, although more than half of this difference disappears when adjusted for survey response rate. Comparisons among healthcare organizations should take into account survey response rates. © 2014 Society of Hospital Medicine.

  2. Acoustical criteria for hospital patient rooms: Resolving competing requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brooks, Bennett M.

    2003-10-01

    The acoustical criteria for patient rooms in hospitals, nursing homes, and rehabilitation facilities may be based on several needs. One important requirement is that noise levels in the room be conducive to restful sleep. Also, caregivers must have easy auditory and visual access to the patients, and be able to hear vital sign monitor alarms. This often means that patient rooms are located near central nurse stations and that patient room doors are left open. Further, the recently published federal privacy standards developed by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HSS) under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA) require that ``appropriate physical safeguards'' be put in place to protect the confidentiality of patient health information. The simultaneous and competing requirements for speech privacy, caregiver access, and good sleeping conditions present a serious acoustical challenge to health care facility designers. Specific facility design issues and potential solution strategies are presented.

  3. Disclosing discourses: biomedical and hospitality discourses in patient education materials.

    PubMed

    Öresland, Stina; Friberg, Febe; Määttä, Sylvia; Öhlen, Joakim

    2015-09-01

    Patient education materials have the potential to strengthen the health literacy of patients. Previous studies indicate that readability and suitability may be improved. The aim of this study was to explore and analyze discourses inherent in patient education materials since analysis of discourses could illuminate values and norms inherent in them. Clinics in Sweden that provided colorectal cancer surgery allowed access to written information and 'welcome letters' sent to patients. The material was analysed by means of discourse analysis, embedded in Derrida's approach of deconstruction. The analysis revealed a biomedical discourse and a hospitality discourse. In the biomedical discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as the messenger of medical information while that of the patients as the carrier of diagnoses and recipients of biomedical information. In the hospitality discourse, the subject position of the personnel was interpreted as hosts who invite and welcome the patients as guests. The study highlights the need to eliminate paternalism and fosters a critical reflective stance among professionals regarding power and paternalism inherent in health care communication. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Assessing motivation to smoking cessation in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda-Sánchez, Juana María; Canca-Sánchez, José Carlos; Rivas-Ruiz, Francisco; Martín-García, Mónica; Lorente Márquez, Celia; Timonet-Andreu, Eva María

    To assess motivation to quit smoking in patients admitted to an acute care hospital, determine predictors of readiness to change, and identify a risk group that requires targeted motivational interviewing. A cross-sectional descriptive study. A retrospective study was performed on the medical records of 248 patients aged >18 years with smoking habits admitted to the medical and surgery units of a district hospital between May 2014 and April 2015. The data collected included sociodemographic data, data on respiratory function, number of cigarettes smoked per day, motivation to quit smoking, patient-reported readiness to quit, history of respiratory diseases and previous admissions. The Richmond test revealed that 54% of patients (n=134) were poorly motivated to quit smoking vs. 11.74% (n=29) who reported to be highly motivated. The group of patients who reported to be willing to receive support (n=77) was prevailingly composed of men (p=.009) admitted to a medical care unit (p=.026) -mainly the Unit of Cardiology (51%)- who smoked 11/29 cigarettes/day (p=.015). Dyspnoea at admission, a history of respiratory disease and previous admissions for respiratory problems were not predictors of readiness to quit. This study identifies a risk group of patients with respiratory disease, low motivation to quit smoking and poor readiness to receive smoke cessation support, that should be the target of motivational approaches to behavior change. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Prevention of patient falls in hospitals in the Czech Republic.

    PubMed

    Brabcová, Iva; Bártlová, Sylva; Hajduchová, Hana; Tóthová, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    The prevention of patient falls is one of the safety goals set forth by the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic. A sociological survey was carried out to (1) determine to what extent nurses identify the risk of patient falls at admission, (2) if the risk is reassessed and at what intervals, (3) what preventive measures were taken, and (4) in what way are patient falls reported. A representative sample consisting of general nurses working shifts on inpatient wards at hospitals in the Czech Republic was surveyed. Altogether 772 nurses took part in the study. The survey showed that at admission, most nurses assessed the risk of falls (91.6%). Nonetheless, it should stand as a stark warning that nearly one fifth of the respondents (16.2%) did not reassess the risk of falls after admission! On the other hand, it can be perceived as a positive that most nurses (70.1%) use a multifaceted program of preventive measures for at risk patients and immediately reported fall events to the doctor in charge (71.4%). During statistical testing, the predication that a working atmosphere supporting a culture of patient safety would significantly decrease the probability of patient falls and increases the willingness of nurses to use preventive programs in daily practice. Results from the survey showed that a system to minimalize fall risks has been successfully introduced into the hospitals of the Czech Republic. The system is based on the recommendations of the Ministry of Health of the Czech Republic.

  6. Association Between Energy Prices and US Hospital Patient Outcomes.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lawrence H; Chaiechi, Taha; Buettner, Petra G; Canyon, Deon V

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate associations between changing energy prices and US hospital patient outcomes. Generalized estimating equations were used to analyze relationships between changes in energy prices and subsequent changes in hospital patient outcomes measures for the years 2008 through 2014. Patient outcomes measures included 30-day acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia mortality rates, and 30-day acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia readmission rates. Energy price data included state average distillate fuel, electricity and natural gas prices, and the US average coal price. All of the price data were converted to 2014 dollars using Consumer Price Index multipliers. There was a significant positive association between changes in coal price and both short-term ( P = 0.029) and long-term ( P = 0.017) changes in the 30-day heart failure mortality rate. There was a similar significant positive association between changes in coal price and both short-term ( P <0.001) and long-term ( P = 0.002) changes in the 30-day pneumonia mortality rate. Changes in coal prices also were positively associated with long-term changes in the 30-day myocardial infarction readmission rate ( P < 0.001). Changes in coal prices ( P = 0.20), natural gas prices ( P = 0.040), and electricity prices ( P = 0.040) were positively associated with long-term changes in the 30-day heart failure readmission rate. Changing energy prices are associated with subsequent changes in hospital mortality and readmission measures. In light of these data, we encourage hospital, health system, and health policy leaders to pursue patient-support initiatives, energy conservation programs, and reimbursement policy strategies aimed at mitigating those effects.

  7. Effect of molindone on weight change in hospitalized schizophrenic patients.

    PubMed

    Parent, M M; Roy, S; Sramek, J; Lawson, W; Herrera, J

    1986-11-01

    A retrospective review was conducted to assess the effect of molindone on weight. Monthly weights and neuroleptic dosages during the first three months of psychiatric hospitalization were compared between matched groups of patients receiving molindone, a combination of molindone and other neuroleptics, or other neuroleptic drugs. We found no significant differences in weight gain among the three groups. Our results challenge the common opinion that molindone can be associated with a lack of weight gain compared to other antipsychotics.

  8. Auditing the nutrition content of patient charts: one hospital's perspective.

    PubMed

    Skopelianos, S

    1993-01-01

    Chart audits are traditionally based on patient charts categorized by disease. An alternate approach, using categorization by four types of nutrition care intervention, has been developed by University Hospital. This paper describes the process followed, criteria developed and the results of two complete chart audits. It was shown that nutrition profile forms improved documentation. Overall norms increased significantly from 81.5% to 90% (p < .05). Discussion centres on the evolutionary process from quality assurance to continuous quality improvement.

  9. Patient attitudes towards medical students at Damascus University teaching hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The cooperation of patients and their consent to involve medical students in their care is vital to clinical education, but large numbers of students and lack of experience as well as loss of privacy may evoke negative attitudes of patients, which may sometimes adversely affect the clinical teaching environment. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of patients towards medical students at Damascus University hospitals, and to explore the determinants of those attitudes thus discussing possible implications applicable to clinical teaching. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted at three teaching hospitals affiliated to the Faculty of Medicine at Damascus University. Four hundred patients were interviewed between March and April 2011 by a trained sociologist using a structured questionnaire. Results Of the patients interviewed, 67.8% approved the presence of medical students during the medical consultation and 58.2% of them felt comfortable with the presence of students, especially among patients with better socio-economic characteristics. 81.5% of the patients agreed to be examined by students in the presence of the supervisor, while 40.2% gave agreement even in the absence of the supervisor. Privacy was the most important factor in the patients' reticence towards examination by the students, whilst the relative safety and comfort if a supervisor was available determined patients' agreement. Conclusions The study concluded overall positive attitudes to the medical students' involvement in medical education. However, it is essential that students and clinical supervisors understand and adhere to professional and ethical conduct when involving patients in medical education. PMID:22439893

  10. [Patient satisfaction in hospital: critical incident technique or standardised questionnaire?].

    PubMed

    Eckhardt-Abdulla, R; Bock, M; Bauer, M

    2008-03-01

    Questionnaires are usually used for the measurement of patient satisfaction, however, it is increasingly being recognized that the critical incident technique (CIT) also provides valuable insight. Questionnaires of the "Hamburger questionnaire on hospital stay" were distributed to 650 consecutive patients before discharge. Additionally 103 interviews were conducted in which the patients were asked to describe positive and negative incidents during their hospital stay. The results of both methods were then compared. A total of 369 patients returned the questionnaire and 103 patients participated in the interviews. The duration of a single interview was between 5 and 45 min with a mean of 12.7 min+/-10.1 min standard deviation (SD). Cronbach's alpha of the questionnaire was 0.9. A total of 424 incidents were reported, 301 of them were negative compared to 123 positive events. The questionnaires and interviews yielded partly similar and partly different results at category and subcategory levels concerning the areas of weaknesses and strengths in quality performance. The CIT was more concrete but did not give results for all aspects of quality. The CIT, but not the questionnaire, was able to detect 40/56 (71%) of the positive and 33/75 (44%) of the negative reports regarding medical performance and 25/42 (60%) of the positive and 15/51 (29.4%) of the negative reports of the performance of the nurses were revealed by the CIT and not by the questionnaires. The CIT gives valuable insights into the patient's perspective of strengths and weaknesses in hospital care, which might be overlooked by the questionnaire alone. However, the CIT is probably not suited for routine use because it is very time-consuming.

  11. Drivers of Hospital Costs in the Self-Pay Facelift (Rhytidectomy) Patient: Analysis of Hospital Resource Utilization in 1890 Patients.

    PubMed

    Chattha, Anmol; Bucknor, Alexandra; Chi, David; Ultee, Klaas; Chen, Austin D; Lin, Samuel J

    2018-04-01

    Rhytidectomy is one of the most commonly performed cosmetic procedures by plastic surgeons. Increasing attention to the development of a high-value, low-cost healthcare system is a priority in the USA. This study aims to analyze specific patient and hospital factors affecting the cost of this procedure. We conducted a retrospective cohort study of self-pay patients over the age of 18 who underwent rhytidectomy using the Healthcare Utilization Cost Project National Inpatient Sample database between 2013 and 2014. Mean marginal cost increases patient characteristics, and outcomes were studied. Generalized linear modeling with gamma regression and a log-link function were performed along with estimated marginal means to provide cost estimates. A total of 1890 self-pay patients underwent rhytidectomy. Median cost was $11,767 with an interquartile range of $8907 [$6976-$15,883]. The largest marginal cost increases were associated with postoperative hematoma ($12,651; CI $8181-$17,120), West coast region ($7539; 95% CI $6412-$8666), and combined rhinoplasty ($7824; 95% CI $3808-$11,840). The two risk factors associated with the generation of highest marginal inpatient costs were smoking ($4147; 95% CI $2804-$5490) and diabetes mellitus ($5622; 95% CI $3233-8011). High-volume hospitals had a decreased cost of - $1331 (95% CI - $2032 to - $631). Cost variation for inpatient rhytidectomy procedures is dependent on preoperative risk factors (diabetes and smoking), postoperative complications (hematoma), and regional trends (West region). Rhytidectomy surgery is highly centralized and increasing hospital volume significantly decreases costs. Clinicians and hospitals can use this information to discuss the drivers of cost in patients undergoing rhytidectomy. This journal requires that authors assign a level of evidence to each article. For a full description of these Evidence-Based Medicine ratings, please refer to the Table of Contents or the online Instructions to Authors

  12. Relationship between' patient's rights charter' and patients' satisfaction in gynecological hospitals.

    PubMed

    Farzianpour, Fereshteh; Rahimi Foroushani, Abbas; Shahidi Sadeghi, Niusha; Ansari Nosrati, Saeede

    2016-09-07

    Patient's satisfaction with hospital services is one of the most important indicators of efficiency and quality of services of different hospital wards. This cross-sectional descriptive analytical study was conducted in 2015. The study population included patients in gynecological hospitals of TUMS, and by using questionnaires; data were collected from 304 patients. Statistical analysis was performed using the SPSS 22. The rights of patients were mainly observed through "quality of care" (Mean ± SD: 9.65 ± 2.62), "knowing the charges and the right to complain"; (Mean ± SD: 6.00 ± 2.5) "presence of an active system to handle complaints of patients in the hospital and explanation of the error that occurred during service provision to patients by the wrongdoer" is the lowest (7.5 ± 2.62). It was found that patients' satisfaction is below the mean and its different aspects are higher than the mean level. However, the services of physicians and feeding recorded the highest and lowest satisfaction, respectively (19.4 ± 4.25, 20.77 ± 4.39). The mean score of satisfaction of patients admitted with nursing physical care was 24.5 ± 6.2. Overall, patients' satisfaction with hospital services was close to the mean. Deficiencies and grievances should be resolved with a correct measure.

  13. Cumulative lactate and hospital mortality in ICU patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Both hyperlactatemia and persistence of hyperlactatemia have been associated with bad outcome. We compared lactate and lactate-derived variables in outcome prediction. Methods Retrospective observational study. Case records from 2,251 consecutive intensive care unit (ICU) patients admitted between 2001 and 2007 were analyzed. Baseline characteristics, all lactate measurements, and in-hospital mortality were recorded. The time integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold of 2.2 mmol/L (lactate-time-integral), maximum lactate (max-lactate), and time-to-first-normalization were calculated. Survivors and nonsurvivors were compared and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were applied. Results A total of 20,755 lactate measurements were analyzed. Data are srpehown as median [interquartile range]. In nonsurvivors (n = 405) lactate-time-integral (192 [0–1881] min·mmol/L) and time-to-first normalization (44.0 [0–427] min) were higher than in hospital survivors (n = 1846; 0 [0–134] min·mmol/L and 0 [0–75] min, respectively; all p < 0.001). Normalization of lactate <6 hours after ICU admission revealed better survival compared with normalization of lactate >6 hours (mortality 16.6% vs. 24.4%; p < 0.001). AUC of ROC curves to predict in-hospital mortality was the largest for max-lactate, whereas it was not different among all other lactate derived variables (all p > 0.05). The area under the ROC curves for admission lactate and lactate-time-integral was not different (p = 0.36). Conclusions Hyperlactatemia is associated with in-hospital mortality in a heterogeneous ICU population. In our patients, lactate peak values predicted in-hospital mortality equally well as lactate-time-integral of arterial blood lactate levels above the upper normal threshold. PMID:23446002

  14. Quitline Tobacco Interventions in Hospitalized Patients: A Randomized Trial.

    PubMed

    Warner, David O; Nolan, Margaret B; Kadimpati, Sandeep; Burke, Michael V; Hanson, Andrew C; Schroeder, Darrell R

    2016-10-01

    Hospitalization provides an opportunity for smokers to quit, but tobacco interventions can require specialized services that are not available to many hospitals. This study tests the hypothesis that a brief intervention to facilitate the use of telephone quitline services for both initial and follow-up counseling is effective in helping patients achieve sustained abstinence. This was a population-based RCT. Participants were Olmsted County, MN residents who reported current smoking and were admitted to Mayo Clinic hospitals in Rochester, MN between May 2012 and August 2014. A control group received brief (~5-minute) cessation advice; an intervention group received a brief (~5-minute) quitline facilitation intervention, with either warm handoff or faxed referral to a national quitline provider. All were offered a 2-week supply of nicotine patches at discharge. Outcomes included self-reported 7-day point prevalence abstinence at 6 months after hospitalization and quitline utilization. Data analysis was performed from September 2014 to March 2015. Of the 1,409 eligible patients who were approached, 600 (47%) were randomized. The quitline intake call was completed by 195 subjects (65% of the intervention group). Of these, 128 (66%) completed the first coaching call. Self-reported abstinence rates at 6 months after discharge were identical in both groups (24%). The quitline facilitation intervention did not improve self-reported abstinence rates compared with a standard brief stop-smoking intervention. These results do not support the effectiveness of quitlines in providing tobacco use interventions to a general population of hospitalized smokers. Copyright © 2016 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Involving patients in understanding hospital infection control using visual methods.

    PubMed

    Wyer, Mary; Jackson, Debra; Iedema, Rick; Hor, Su-Yin; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L; Jorm, Christine; Hooker, Claire; O'Sullivan, Matthew Vincent Neil; Carroll, Katherine

    2015-06-01

    This paper explores patients' perspectives on infection prevention and control. Healthcare-associated infections are the most frequent adverse event experienced by patients. Reduction strategies have predominantly addressed front-line clinicians' practices; patients' roles have been less explored. Video-reflexive ethnography. Fieldwork undertaken at a large metropolitan hospital in Australia involved 300 hours of ethnographic observations, including 11 hours of video footage. This paper focuses on eight occasions, where video footage was shown back to patients in one-on-one reflexive sessions. Viewing and discussing video footage of clinical care enabled patients to become articulate about infection risks, and to identify their own roles in reducing transmission. Barriers to detailed understandings of preventative practices and their roles included lack of conversation between patients and clinicians about infection prevention and control, and being ignored or contradicted when challenging perceived suboptimal practice. It became evident that to compensate for clinicians' lack of engagement around infection control, participants had developed a range of strategies, of variable effectiveness, to protect themselves and others. Finally, the reflexive process engendered closer scrutiny and a more critical attitude to infection control that increased patients' sense of agency. This study found that patients actively contribute to their own safety. Their success, however, depends on the quality of patient-provider relationships and conversations. Rather than treating patients as passive recipients of infection control practices, clinicians can support and engage with patients' contributions towards achieving safer care. This study suggests that if clinicians seek to reduce infection rates, they must start to consider patients as active contributors to infection control. Clinicians can engage patients in conversations about practices and pay attention to patient feedback

  16. Hospital mergers and acquisitions: does market consolidation harm patients?

    PubMed

    Ho, V; Hamilton, B H

    2000-09-01

    Debate continues on whether consolidation in health care markets enhances efficiency or instead facilitates market power, possibly damaging quality. We compare the quality of hospital care before and after mergers and acquisitions in California between 1992 and 1995. We analyze inpatient mortality for heart attack and stroke patients, 90-day readmission for heart attack patients, and discharge within 48 h for normal newborn babies. Recent mergers and acquisitions have not had a measurable impact on inpatient mortality, although the associated standard errors are large. Readmission rates and early discharge increased in some cases. The adverse consequences of increased market power on the quality of care require further substantiation.

  17. A Prognostic Indicator for Patients Hospitalized with Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Snow, Richard; Vogel, Karen; Vanderhoff, Bruce; Kelch, Benjamin P; Ferris, Frank D

    2016-12-01

    Current methods for identifying patients at risk of dying within six months suffer from clinician biases resulting in underestimation of this risk. As a result, patients who are potentially eligible for hospice and palliative care services frequently do not benefit from these services until they are very close to the end of their lives. To develop a prospective prognostic indicator based on actual survival within Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) claims data that identifies patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) who are at risk of six-month mortality. CMS claims data from January 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009 were reviewed to find the first hospitalization for CHF patients with episode of care diagnosis-related groups (DRGs) 291, 292, and 293. Univariate and multivariable analyses were used to determine the associations between demographic and clinical factors and six-month mortality. The resulting model was evaluated for discrimination and calibration. The resulting prospective prognostic model demonstrated fair discrimination with an ROC of 0.71 and good calibration with a Hosmer-Lemshow statistic of 0.98. Across all DRGs, 5% of discharged patients had a six-month mortality risk of greater than 50%. This prospective approach appears to provide a method to identify patients with CHF who would potentially benefit from a clinical evaluation for referral to hospice care or for a palliative care consult due to high predicted risk of dying within 180 days after discharge from a hospital. This approach can provide a model to match at-risk patients with evidenced-based care in a more consistent manner. This method of identifying patients at risk needs further prospective evaluation to see if it has value for clinicians, increases referrals to hospice and palliative care services, and benefits patients and families.

  18. Exploring relationships between hospital patient safety culture and Consumer Reports safety scores.

    PubMed

    Smith, Scott Alan; Yount, Naomi; Sorra, Joann

    2017-02-16

    A number of private and public companies calculate and publish proprietary hospital patient safety scores based on publicly available quality measures initially reported by the U.S. federal government. This study examines whether patient safety culture perceptions of U.S. hospital staff in a large national survey are related to publicly reported patient safety ratings of hospitals. The Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture (Hospital SOPS) assesses provider and staff perceptions of hospital patient safety culture. Consumer Reports (CR), a U.S. based non-profit organization, calculates and shares with its subscribers a Hospital Safety Score calculated annually from patient experience survey data and outcomes data gathered from federal databases. Linking data collected during similar time periods, we analyzed relationships between staff perceptions of patient safety culture composites and the CR Hospital Safety Score and its five components using multiple multivariate linear regressions. We analyzed data from 164 hospitals, with patient safety culture survey responses from 140,316 providers and staff, with an average of 856 completed surveys per hospital and an average response rate per hospital of 56%. Higher overall Hospital SOPS composite average scores were significantly associated with higher overall CR Hospital Safety Scores (β = 0.24, p < 0.05). For 10 of the 12 Hospital SOPS composites, higher patient safety culture scores were associated with higher CR patient experience scores on communication about medications and discharge. This study found a relationship between hospital staff perceptions of patient safety culture and the Consumer Reports Hospital Safety Score, which is a composite of patient experience and outcomes data from federal databases. As hospital managers allocate resources to improve patient safety culture within their organizations, their efforts may also indirectly improve consumer

  19. Quality Pain Management in Adult Hospitalized Patients: A Concept Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Zoëga, Sigridur; Gunnarsdottir, Sigridur; Wilson, Margaret E; Gordon, Debra B

    2016-01-01

    To explore the concept of quality pain management (QPM) in adult hospitalized patients. Pain is common in hospitalized patients, and pain management remains suboptimal in some settings. A concept evaluation based on Morse et al.'s method. Of more than 5,000 articles found, data were restricted to 37 selected key articles published in peer-reviewed journals. Data were extracted from the selected articles and then synthesized according to the following: definition, characteristics, boundaries, preconditions, and outcomes. QPM relates to the Structure: organizationally supported evidence-based policies, competent staff, interprofessional and specialized care, and staff accountability; screening, assessment/reassessment and communication of pain and its treatment, patient/family education, individualized evidence-based treatment, embedded in safe, effective, patient-centered, timely, efficient, and equitable services; and reduced pain severity and functional interference, decreased prevalence/severity of adverse consequences from pain or pain treatment, and increase in patient satisfaction. QPM is a multifaceted concept that remains poorly defined in the literature. Studies should aim to develop valid, reliable, and operational measures of the pillars of QPM and to look at the relationship among these factors. Authors need to state how they define and what aspects of QPM they are measuring. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Empiric systemic antibiotics for hospitalized patients with severe odontogenic infections.

    PubMed

    Zirk, Matthias; Buller, Johannes; Goeddertz, Peter; Rothamel, Daniel; Dreiseidler, Timo; Zöller, Joachim E; Kreppel, Matthias

    2016-08-01

    Odontogenic infections may lead to severe head and neck infections with potentially great health risk. Age, location of purulent affected sites and beta-lactam allergy are some mentionable factors regarding patients' in-hospital stay and course of disease. Are there new challenges regarding bacteria' antibiotic resistance for empiric treatment and what influences do they have on patients' clinical course? We analyzed in a 4-year retrospective study the medical records of 294 in-hospital patients with severe odontogenic infections. On a routine base bacteria were identified and susceptibility testing was performed. Length of stay in-hospital was evaluated regarding patients' age, beta-lactam allergy profile, affected sites and bacteria susceptibility to empiric antibiotics. Length of stay in-hospital was detected to be associated with affected space and penicillin allergy as well (p < 0.05). Isolates presented large amounts of aerobic gram-positive bacteria (64.2%), followed by facultative anaerobic bacteria (gram+/15.8%, gram-/12.7%). Tested ampicillin in combination with sulbactam (or without) and cephalosporins displayed high susceptibility rates, revealing distinguished results regarding clindamycin (p < 0.05). Co-trimoxazol and moxifloxacin showed high overall susceptibility rates (MOX: 94.7%, COTRIM: 92.6%). This study demonstrates ampicillin/sulbactam in addition to surgical intervention is a good standard in treatment of severe odontogenic neck infections. Cephalosporins seem to be a considerable option as well. If beta-lactam allergy is diagnosed co-trimoxazol and moxifloxacin represent relevant alternatives. Age, allergic profile and bacteria' resistance patterns for empiric antibiotics have an influence on patients in-hospital stay. Ampicillin/sulbactam proves itself to be good for empiric antibiosis in severe odontogenic infections. Furthermore cephalosporins could be considered as another option in treatment. However moxifloxacin and co

  1. Pre-Occupancy Evaluation of Patient Satisfaction in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    van der Zwart, Johan; van der Voordt, Theo J M

    2015-01-01

    To explore analytical drawing techniques as a means to assess the attainment of preset objectives in the design phase of hospital buildings and to test ex ante if the building fits with these objectives, with a focus on view on nature, wayfinding, daylight, visibility of patient areas from reception desks, privacy, and communication between medical staff and patients, and noise reduction. The impact of the build environment on user value is at the core of evidence-based design, but these values are normally only experienced by users after the building is constructed. Therefore, assessment of these values during the design phase could improve the outcome for patients. An analysis of available assessment tools showed that research by drawing and the use of space syntax methods is an adequate means to visualize the strengths and weaknesses of floor plans in relation to spatial user experience. This approach is illustrated by an assessment of a nursing ward of the Deventer hospital in the Netherlands. Floor plan analysis by using space syntax techniques makes it possible to visualize various aspects of user value and supports the incorporation of usability issues in the discussion between the designer, the client, and the users during the design process. It is recommended to test the findings of the design assessment by a post-occupancy evaluation of the building-in-use and to conduct similar studies in other hospitals, as a means to build a body of knowledge for user-oriented design and management of hospital buildings. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Thermal comfort of patients in hospital ward areas.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, R. M.; Rae, A.

    1977-01-01

    The patient is identified as being of prime importance for comfort standards in hospital ward areas, other ward users being expected to adjust their dress to suit the conditions necessary for patients comfort. A study to identify the optimum steady state conditions for patients comfort is then described. Although this study raises some doubts as to the applicability of the standard thermal comfort assessment techniques to ward areas, it is felt that its results give a good indication of the steady-state conditions preferred by the patients. These were an air temperature of between 21-5 degrees and 22 degrees C and a relative humidity of between 30% and 70%, where the air velocity was less than 0-1 m/s and the mean radiant temperature was close to air temperature. PMID:264497

  3. Access disparities to Magnet hospitals for patients undergoing neurosurgical operations

    PubMed Central

    Missios, Symeon; Bekelis, Kimon

    2017-01-01

    Background Centers of excellence focusing on quality improvement have demonstrated superior outcomes for a variety of surgical interventions. We investigated the presence of access disparities to hospitals recognized by the Magnet Recognition Program of the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) for patients undergoing neurosurgical operations. Methods We performed a cohort study of all neurosurgery patients who were registered in the New York Statewide Planning and Research Cooperative System (SPARCS) database from 2009–2013. We examined the association of African-American race and lack of insurance with Magnet status hospitalization for neurosurgical procedures. A mixed effects propensity adjusted multivariable regression analysis was used to control for confounding. Results During the study period, 190,535 neurosurgical patients met the inclusion criteria. Using a multivariable logistic regression, we demonstrate that African-Americans had lower admission rates to Magnet institutions (OR 0.62; 95% CI, 0.58–0.67). This persisted in a mixed effects logistic regression model (OR 0.77; 95% CI, 0.70–0.83) to adjust for clustering at the patient county level, and a propensity score adjusted logistic regression model (OR 0.75; 95% CI, 0.69–0.82). Additionally, lack of insurance was associated with lower admission rates to Magnet institutions (OR 0.71; 95% CI, 0.68–0.73), in a multivariable logistic regression model. This persisted in a mixed effects logistic regression model (OR 0.72; 95% CI, 0.69–0.74), and a propensity score adjusted logistic regression model (OR 0.72; 95% CI, 0.69–0.75). Conclusions Using a comprehensive all-payer cohort of neurosurgery patients in New York State we identified an association of African-American race and lack of insurance with lower rates of admission to Magnet hospitals. PMID:28684152

  4. Adverse Drug Reactions Related to Drug Administration in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Gallelli, Luca; Siniscalchi, Antonio; Palleria, Caterina; Mumoli, Laura; Staltari, Orietta; Squillace, Aida; Maida, Francesca; Russo, Emilio; Gratteri, Santo; De Sarro, Giovambattista

    2017-01-01

    Drug treatment may be related to the development of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). In this paper, we evaluated the ADRs in patients admitted to Catanzaro Hospital. After we obtained the approval by local Ethical Committee, we performed a retrospective study on clinical records from March 01, 2013 to April 30, 2015. The association between drug and ADR or between drug and drug-drug-interactions (DDIs) was evaluated using the Naranjo's probability scale and Drug Interaction Probability Scale (DIPS), respectively. During the study period, we analyzed 2870 clinical records containing a total of 11,138 prescriptions, and we documented the development of 770 ADRs. The time of hospitalization was significantly higher (P<0.05) in women with ADRs (12.6 ± 1.2 days) with respect to men (11.8± 0.83 days). Using the Naranjo score, we documented a probable association in 78% of these reactions, while DIPS revealed that about 22% of ADRs were related to DDIs. Patients with ADRs received 3052 prescriptions on 11,138 (27.4%) having a mean of 6.1±0.29 drugs that was significantly higher (P<0.01) with respect to patients not experiencing ADRs (mean of 3.4±0.13 drugs). About 19% of ADRs were not diagnosed and were treated as new diseases. Our results indicate that drug administration induces the development of ADRs also during the hospitalization, particularly in elderly women. Moreover, we also documented that ADRs in some patients are under-diagnosed, therefore, it is important to motivate healthcare to report the ADRs in order to optimize the patients' safety. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bruno Prata; Batista, Anne Karine Menezes Santos; Gomes, Isabela Barboza; Olivieri, Flávia Milholo; Camelier, Fernanda Warken Rosa; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2015-05-06

    Sarcopenia is an important public health problem that affects mainly elders, and has negative consequences, such as disability and even death. Due to the lack of studies evaluating sarcopenia in elderly persons hospitalized in Brazil, the aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of sarcopenia and associated factors among elders in a hospital in the city of Salvador-Brazil. This cross-sectional study included 110 hospitalized elderly patients in a multi-specialty hospital in Salvador-BA, Brazil. Inclusion criteria: were elders aged ≥60 years between the first and fifth day of hospitalization; who were able to walk without external assistance; with medical permission to walk, and who did not take vasoactive and inotropic drugs. The diagnosis of sarcopenia was determined by combining the reduction in skeletal muscle mass with muscle weakness (women, <20 kg; men, <30 kg) and/or poor physical performance (gait speed ≤0.8 m/s). To obtain reduced skeletal muscle mass, the skeletal muscle mass index ≤6.37 kg/m(2) for women and ≤8.90 kg/m(2) for men was used. Cognitive function, Charlson index, admission profile (clinical and surgical), smoking, falls suffered in the last year and physical inactivity prior to admission were also evaluated. The frequency of sarcopenia was described in percentages with their respective confidence intervals and logistic regression was performed for multivariate analysis of factors associated with sarcopenia. Among the 110 patients included, the frequency of sarcopenia was 21.8%, with 10.0% being of the severe type. There was a predominance of clinical profile (59.1%), such as heart disease (20.0%), pneumonia (13.6%) and skin infections (9.1%), with a Charlson index of 5.4 ± 1.8. The factors associated with sarcopenia were age (OR = 1.14; 95% CI = 1.06 to 1.23), clinical profile on admission (OR = 5.15; 95% CI = 1.16-22.9) and smoking (OR = 7.8; 95% CI = 1.53-39.9). The frequency of sarcopenia

  6. Quality of Care and Patient Outcomes in Critical Access Hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Joynt, Karen E.; Harris, Yael; Orav, E. John; Jha, Ashish K.

    2012-01-01

    Context Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs) play a crucial role in the nation’s rural safety net. Current policy efforts have focused primarily on helping these small, isolated hospitals remain financially viable to ensure access for Americans living in rural areas. However, we know little about the quality of care they provide, or the outcomes their patients achieve. Objective To examine the quality of care and patient outcomes at CAHs, and to understand why patterns of care might differ for CAHs versus non-CAHs. Design Retrospective analysis of national data from Medicare and other sources. Setting U.S. hospitals. Patients Medicare fee-for-service beneficiaries with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), congestive heart failure (CHF), and pneumonia, discharged in 2008–2009. Main Outcome Measures Clinical capabilities, performance on processes of care, and 30-day mortality rates. Results Compared to other hospitals, CAHs were less likely to have intensive care units (30.0% versus 74.4%, p<0.001), cardiac catheterization capabilities (0.5% versus 47.7%, p<0.001), and at least basic electronic health records (4.6% versus 9.9%, p<0.001). CAHs had lower performance on process measures than non-CAHs for all three conditions examined (Hospital Quality Alliance summary score for AMI 91.0% versus 97.8%, for CHF, 80.6% versus 93.5%, and for pneumonia 89.3% versus 93.7%, p<0.001 for each). Patients admitted to a CAH had higher 30-day mortality rates for each condition than those admitted to non-CAHs (for AMI, 23.5% versus 16.2%, Odds Ratio (OR) 1.70 (95% confidence interval 1.61, 1.80), p<0.001; for CHF, 13.4% versus 10.9%, OR 1.28 (1.23, 1.32), p<0.001; and for pneumonia 14.1% versus 12.1%, OR 1.20 (1.16, 1.24) p<0.001). Conclusions Care in CAHs, compared with non-CAHs, is associated with worse processes of care and higher mortality rates. PMID:21730240

  7. [Use of midazolam in hospitalized patients: analysis of medical practice].

    PubMed

    Giroud, Mathilde; Sellier, Elodie; Laval, Guillemette

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence and the characteristics of use of midazolam among hospitalized patients and to analyze physicians' representation of this medicine. We conducted a retrospective study between 1st May and 22nd May 2011 in Grenoble University Hospital in France. All patients receiving midazolam during the study period were included, excepted if the prescription was performed in intensive care units, operating rooms or in pediatric units. Physicians from the different units were asked about the characteristics of patients receiving midazolam and about their practice concerning the use of midazolam. Forty-four patients were included, 82 % of whom having a cancer. The prevalence of prescription of midazolam was 3.3 % (44/1,323), 2.8 % (37/1,323) for anxiety relieving and 0.8 % (11/1,323) for sedation. The main refractory symptoms that justified the prescription were dyspnea (36.4 %), confusion (29.5 %), pain (27.3 %) and psychological suffering (27.3 %). Twenty-eight physicians were asked about their practice. The main representations of midazolam were the stop of active treatment (46.5 %) and premature cause of death (46.5 %). Practice of sedation is under-estimated by physicians as they have difficulties to differentiate anxiety relieving and sedation and they have difficulties to initiate a sedation. A guideline to help physicians using midazolam could improve practice.

  8. [Home hospital for advanced stage cancer patients: costs and benefits].

    PubMed

    Tanneberger, S; Pannuti, F; Mirri, R; Panetta, A; Mariano, P; Giordani, S; Strocchni, E; Farabegoli, G

    1997-03-01

    15,290 patients have been treated in the Bologna home hospital (BHH) until June 30, 1996. The average daily costs in BHH were estimated as 118789 Liras (ranging from 108 569-129027 Lire depending on the nursing category). Care intensity and patient's quality of life in the BHH are high. 98% of patients were content with the setting in which they were nursed. A questionnaire on the degree of satisfaction with the care was completed by 134 BHH patients and 102 patients of Division Oncologia Medica. Azienda Ospedaliera Sant, Orsola Malpighi, Bologna. Satisfaction with respect to sleeping, meals and family communications was expressed more often by BHH patients. Less patients of the BHH evaluated "quality of life" reduced or bad (51% vs. 67%) or requested a transfer to the alternative setting (03% vs. 47%). Advocating step by step introduction of home care, quality of life aspects have priority. Certainly, home care deserves greatest attention providing care during the life with cancer. However the final decision about the settings of nursing has to be made by the patients themselves in accordance with his understanding of quality of life.

  9. Sepsis in a university hospital: a prospective study for the cost analysis of patients' hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Barreto, Maynara Fernanda Carvalho; Dellaroza, Mara Solange Gomes; Kerbauy, Gilselena; Grion, Cintia Magalhães Carvalho

    2016-04-01

    To estimate the cost of hospitalization of patients with severe sepsis or septic shock admitted or diagnosed in the Urgent and Emergency sector at a university hospital and followed until the clinical outcome. An epidemiological, prospective, observational study conducted in a public hospital in southern Brazil for the period of one year (August 2013 to August 2014). Sepsis notification forms, medical records and data of the cost sector were used for the collection of clinical and epidemiological data. The sample comprised 95 patients, resulting in a total high cost of hospitalization (R$ 3,692,421.00), and an average of R$ 38,867.60 per patient. Over half of the total value of the treatment of sepsis (R$ 2,215,773.50) was assigned to patients who progressed to death (59.0%). The higher costs were related to discharge, diagnosis of severe sepsis, the pulmonary focus of infection and the age group of up to 59 years. The high cost of the treatment of sepsis justifies investments in training actions and institution of protocols that can direct preventive actions, and optimize diagnosis and treatment in infected and septic patients. Estimar o custo da internação de pacientes com sepse grave ou choque séptico admitidos ou diagnosticados no setor de Urgências e Emergências de um hospital universitário e seguidos até o desfecho clínico. Estudo epidemiológico, prospectivo e observacional, realizado em um hospital público do sul do Brasil, no período de 1 ano (agosto de 2013 a agosto de 2014). A coleta dos dados clínico-epidemiológicos utilizou fichas de notificação de sepse, prontuários e dados do setor de custos. Foi realizada análise de tendência central, dispersão e quartis dos custos das internações. Amostra composta por 95 pacientes que totalizaram elevado custo da internação (R$ 3.692.421,00), com média de R$ 38.867,60 por paciente. Mais da metade do valor total do tratamento da sepse (R$ 2.215.773,50) destinou-se a pacientes que evoluíram a

  10. Transforming Patient Value: Comparison of Hospital, Surgical, and General Surgery Patients.

    PubMed

    Pitt, Henry A; Tsypenyuk, Ella; Freeman, Susan L; Carson, Steven R; Shinefeld, Jonathan A; Hinkle, Sally M; Powers, Benjamin D; Goldberg, Amy J; DiSesa, Verdi J; Kaiser, Larry R

    2016-04-01

    Patient value (V) is enhanced when quality (Q) is increased and cost (C) is diminished (V = Q/C). However, calculating value has been inhibited by a lack of risk-adjusted cost data. The aim of this analysis was to measure patient value before and after implementation of quality improvement and cost reduction programs. Multidisciplinary efforts to improve patient value were initiated at a safety-net hospital in 2012. Quality improvement focused on adoption of multiple best practices, and minimizing practice variation was the strategy to control cost. University HealthSystem Consortium (UHC) risk-adjusted quality (patient mortality + safety + satisfaction + effectiveness) and cost (length of stay + direct cost) data were used to calculate patient value over 3 fiscal years. Normalized ranks in the UHC Quality and Accountability Scorecard were used in the value equation. For all hospital patients, quality scores improved from 50.3 to 66.5, with most of the change occurring in decreased mortality. Similar trends were observed for all surgery patients (42.6 to 48.4) and for general surgery patients (30.9 to 64.6). For all hospital patients, cost scores improved from 71.0 to 2.9. Similar changes were noted for all surgical (71.6 to 27.1) and general surgery (85.7 to 23.0) patients. Therefore, value increased more than 30-fold for all patients, 3-fold for all surgical patients, and almost 8-fold for general surgery patients. Multidisciplinary quality and cost efforts resulted in significant improvements in value for all hospitalized patients as well as general surgery patients. Mortality improved the most in general surgery patients, and satisfaction was highest among surgical patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. “Not Just a Receiver”: Understanding Patient Behavior in the Hospital Environment

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Sonali R.; Haldar, Shefali; Pollack, Ari H.; Kendall, Logan; Miller, Andrew D.; Khelifi, Maher; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Patient engagement leads to better health outcomes and experiences of health care. However, existing patient engagement systems in the hospital environment focus on the passive receipt of information by patients rather than the active contribution of the patient or caregiver as a partner in their care. Through interviews with hospitalized patients and their caregivers, we identify ways that patients and caregivers actively participate in their care. We describe the different roles patients and caregivers assume in interacting with their hospital care team. We then discuss how systems designed to support patient engagement in the hospital setting can promote active participation and help patients achieve better outcomes. PMID:28345079

  12. Respecting the privacy of hospitalized patients: An integrative review.

    PubMed

    Hasan Tehrani, Tayebeh; Seyed Bagher Maddah, Sadat; Fallahi-Khoshknab, Masoud; Ebadi, Abbas; Mohammadi Shahboulaghi, Farahnaz; Gillespie, Mark

    2018-01-01

    Privacy is a complicated and obscure concept, which has special meanings in the healthcare environment; therefore, it is essential for healthcare providers to fully understand this concept. However, there is no universally accepted definition for this concept in the texts, and it has been interpreted differently, based on its application. To analyze and provide a clear and scientific definition for respect of privacy of hospitalized patients and identify the common aspects of this concept. This study was conducted using the Whittemore and Knafl's modified framework as a conceptual analysis method. Ethical consideration: This study was approved by the Research Council of the University of Social Welfare and Rehabilitation Sciences. We have respected the ethical requirements required regarding the sources and authorship. Research context and data sources: Using integrative review, a search was performed using national and international databases, including CINAHL, Scopus, Medline, Web of Science, and ISI (with no date restriction). The keywords employed during the search process were "privacy of patients," "confidentiality," "and patients' rights." In total, 1345 articles were retrieved from the databases. After the elimination of repetitive studies and with regard to the study objectives, 124 articles, 3 books, and 4 theses were entered into the study. The data were analyzed using the conventional content analysis approach. The results were extracted in the form of four, seven, and two themes related to attributes such as physical, informational, social, and psychological and the antecedents and consequences of respecting patient privacy, respectively. Respect for hospitalized patient privacy contains multiple dimensions. Factors affecting the achievement of this concept include individual backgrounds, nature of the disease, and rule of paternalism. The fulfillment of patient privacy leads to such consequences as protection and improvement of human dignity as well

  13. Association of Dermatology Consultations With Patient Care Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases.

    PubMed

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Zhang, Myron; Kaffenberger, Benjamin H

    2017-06-01

    The value of inpatient dermatology consultations has traditionally been demonstrated with frequency in changes of diagnosis and management; however, the impact of dermatology consultations on metrics such as hospital length of stay and readmission rates remains unknown. To determine the association of dermatology consultations with patient care in hospitalized patients using objective values. We retrospectively queried the deidentified database of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, at a single university medical center. A total of 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis and 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were selected. Hospital length of stay and 1-year readmission with inflammatory skin conditions. The 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis were 61.0% female and had a mean (SD) age of 55.1 (16.4) years. The 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were 50.8% female and had a mean (SD) age of 57.8 (15.9) years. Multivariable modeling showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction of 1-year inflammatory skin condition readmissions among patients who were discharged primarily with an inflammatory skin condition (readmission probability, 0.0025; 95% CI, 0.00020-0.030 with dermatology consult vs 0.026; 95% CI, 0.0065-0.10 without; odds ratio, 0.093; 95% CI, 0.010-0.840; P = .03). No other confounding variable was associated with reduction in readmissions. Multivariable modeling also showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction in the adjusted hospital length of stay by 2.64 days (95% CI, 1.75-3.53 days; P < .001). Dermatology consultations were associated with improvements of outcomes among hospitalized patients. The expansion of the role of dermatology consultation services may improve patient care in a cost-effective manner.

  14. Intravenous heparin dosing strategy in hospitalized patients with atrial dysrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Roswell, Robert O; Greet, Brian; Shah, Sunny; Bernard, Samuel; Milin, Alexandra; Lobach, Iryna; Guo, Yu; Radford, Martha J; Berger, Jeffrey S

    2016-08-01

    Patients with non-valvular atrial fibrillation (AF) have an elevated stroke risk that is 2-7 times greater than in those without AF. Intravenous unfractionated heparin (UFH) is commonly used for hospitalized patients with atrial fibrillation and atrial flutter (AFL) to prevent stroke. Dosing strategies exist for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with acute coronary syndromes and venous thromboembolic diseases, but there are no data to guide providers on a dosing strategy for intravenous anticoagulation in patients with AF/AFL. 996 hospitalized patients with AF/AFL on UFH were evaluated. Bolus dosing and initial infusion rates of UFH were recorded along with rates of stroke, thromboemobolic events, and bleeding events as defined by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis criteria. Among 226 patients included in the analysis, 76 bleeding events occurred. Using linear regression analysis, initial rates of heparin infusion ranging from 9.7 to 11.8 units/kilogram/hour (U/kg/h) resulted in activated partial thromboplastin times that were within therapeutic range. The median initial infusion rate in patients with bleeding was 13.3 U/kg/h, while in those without bleeding it was 11.4 U/kg/h; p = 0.012. An initial infusion rate >11.0 U/kg/h yielded an OR 1.95 (1.06-3.59); p = 0.03 for any bleeding event. Using IV heparin boluses neither increased the probability of attaining a therapeutic aPTT (56.1 vs 56.3 %; p = 0.99) nor did it significantly increase bleeding events in the study (35.7 vs 31.3 %; p = 0.48). The results suggest that higher initial rates of heparin are associated with increased bleeding risk. From this dataset, initial heparin infusion rates of 9.7-11.0 U/kg/h without a bolus can result in therapeutic levels of anticoagulation in hospitalized patients with AF/AFL without increasing the risk of bleeding.

  15. Risk factors of refeeding syndrome in malnourished older hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Pourhassan, Maryam; Cuvelier, Ingeborg; Gehrke, Ilse; Marburger, Christian; Modreker, Mirja Katrin; Volkert, Dorothee; Willschrei, Hans-Peter; Wirth, Rainer

    2017-06-10

    Despite the high prevalence of malnutrition among older hospitalized persons, it is unknown how many of these malnourished patients are at risk of developing the refeeding syndrome (RFS). In this study, we sought to compare the prevalence and severity of malnutrition among older hospitalized patients with prevalence of known risk factors of RFS. This cross-sectional multicenter-study investigated older participants who were consecutively admitted to the geriatric acute care ward. Malnutrition screening was conducted using Nutritional Risk Screening (NRS-2002), Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool (MUST) and Mini Nutritional Assessment-Short Form (MNA-SF). The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) criteria were applied for assessing patients at risk of RFS. Weight and height were measured. Degree of weight loss (WL) was obtained by interview. Serum phosphate, magnesium, potassium, sodium, calcium, creatinine and urea were analyzed according to standard procedures. The study group comprised 342 participants (222 females) with a mean age of 83.1 ± 6.8 and BMI range of 14.7-43.6 kg/m 2 . More participants were assessed at risk of malnutrition using NRS-2002 (n = 253, 74.0%) compared to MUST (n = 170, 49.7%) and MNA-SF (n = 191, 55.8%). Of total participants, 239 (69.9%; 157 females) were considered to be at risk of RFS. Based on NRS-2002, 75.9% (n = 192) of patients at risk of malnutrition are at risk of RFS whereas according to MUST and MNA-SF, 85.9% (n = 146) and 69.1% (n = 132) of patients at risk of malnutrition are exposed to high risk of RFS, respectively. In addition, the prevalence of risk of RFS is significantly increased with higher score of NRS-2002 and MUST and lower score of MNA-SF. In a stepwise multiple regression analysis, disease severity (38.2%), WL in 3 months (20.3%) and BMI (33.3%) mainly explained variance in NRS-2002, MUST and MNA-SF scores, respectively, in patients with risk of RFS. Nearly three

  16. Pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization costs of patients with neurocysticercosis treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) in Mexico City, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Rachana; Carabin, Hélène; Flores-Rivera, Jose; Corona, Teresa; Proaño, Jefferson V; Flisser, Ana; Budke, Christine M

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to estimate the direct costs associated with the diagnosis and treatment of neurocysticercosis (NCC) during pre-hospitalization, hospitalization, and post-hospitalization periods for 108 NCC patients treated at the Instituto Nacional de Neurologia y Neurocirugia (INNN) in Mexico City, Mexico. Information on clinical manifestations, diagnostic tests, hospitalizations, surgical procedures, prescription medication, and other treatments was collected via medical chart reviews. Uncertain values for costs and frequency of treatments were imputed using bootstrap techniques. The average per-patient pre-hospitalization and hospitalization costs were US$ 257 (95% CI: 185 - 329) and US$ 2,576 (95% CI: 2,244 - 2,908), respectively. Post-hospitalization costs tended to decrease over time, with estimates for the first five years post-hospitalization of US$ 475 (95% CI: 423 - 527), US$ 228 (95% CI: 167 - 288), US$ 157 (95% CI: 111 - 202), US$ 150 (95% CI: 106 - 204), and US$ 91 (95% CI: 27 - 154), respectively. NCC results in a significant economic burden for patients requiring hospitalization, with this burden continuing years post-hospitalization.

  17. Urine Cultures in Hospitalized Geriatric Patients Presenting With Fever.

    PubMed

    Shimoni, Zvi; Avdiaev, Ruslan; Froom, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Urine cultures are commonly ordered in geriatric patients presenting with fever in the emergency department, but it is unclear if indiscriminate urine culture testing is warranted. We selected 708 consecutive geriatric patients with a chief complaint of fever to determine the clinical usage (changes in antibiotic therapy according to culture results) and the costs of culturing the urine that included the need for catheterization to obtain a sample for culture and complications from catheterization. We divided the patients into those with and without an extraurinary tract source for fever on admission. Urine cultures were performed in 74.9% (233/312) of the patients with a source for the fever outside the urinary tract and required urinary catheterization to obtain a sample in 36.8% (95/233) of those patients. Cultures were positive for bacteria 29.6% of the time (69/233), but did not result in the change of antibiotic treatment in any of the patients. Urine cultures were performed in 92.6% (326/352) of the patients without an extraurinary tract source for the fever, required catheterization in 49.7% (162/326) of the patients and 58.3% (190/326) of the cultures were positive for bacteria. Urine culture sensitivities changed antibiotic therapy in 24.2% (46/190) of the patients. There were no patients in either group with complications from urinary catheterization, but indwelling catheter rates increased inappropriately in both the groups. We conclude that urine culture testing is unnecessary in hospitalized geriatric patients who on admission have an extraurinary tract source for their fever, but it has clinical usage when the source for the fever on admission is unclear. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hospitalized patients with COPD: analysis of prior treatment*

    PubMed Central

    Giacomelli, Irai Luis; Steidle, Leila John Marques; Moreira, Frederico Fernandes; Meyer, Igor Varela; Souza, Ricardo Goetten; Pincelli, Mariângela Pimentel

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Although COPD is a prevalent disease, it is undertreated, and there are no available data regarding previous treatment of COPD in Brazil. This study aimed to determine the appropriateness of maintenance treatment in COPD patients prior to their hospitalization and to identify variables associated with inappropriate treatment. Methods: This was an observational, cross-sectional, analytical study involving 50 inpatients with COPD at two hospitals in the city of Florianópolis, Brazil. The patients completed a questionnaire on parameters related to the maintenance treatment of COPD. Non-pharmacological management and pharmacological treatment were assessed based on the recommendations made by the Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) in 2011 and by the Brazilian National Ministry of Health in the chronic respiratory diseases section of its Caderno de Atenção Básica (CAB, Primary Care Guidebook). Results: In most of the patients, the COPD was classified as being severe or very severe. Regarding non-pharmacological management, 33% of the patients were smokers, only 32% had been advised to receive the flu vaccine, 28% had received pneumococcal vaccine, and only 6.5% of the patients in the B, C, and D categories received pulmonary rehabilitation. Regarding GOLD and CAB recommendations, pharmacological treatment was inappropriate in 50% and 74% of the patients, respectively. Based on GOLD recommendations, 38% were undertreated. A low level of education, low income, not receiving oxygen therapy, and not receiving the flu vaccine were associated with inappropriate treatment. Conclusions: The application of various non-pharmacological management recommendations was unsatisfactory. Regarding the GOLD recommendations, the high rate of inappropriate maintenance treatment was mainly due to undertreatment. In Brazil, even in severe COPD cases, optimizing treatment to achieve greater benefits continues to be a challenge. PMID:25029645

  19. A Proactive Approach to Penicillin Allergy Testing in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Chen, Justin R; Tarver, Scott A; Alvarez, Kristin S; Tran, Trang; Khan, David A

    Penicillin allergy testing is underutilized in inpatients despite its potential to immediately impact antibiotic treatment. Although most tested patients are able to tolerate penicillin, limited availability and awareness of this tool leads to the use of costly and harmful substitutes. We established an inpatient service at a large academic hospital to identify and test patients with a history of penicillin allergy with the goals of removing inaccurate diagnoses, reducing the use of beta-lactam alternatives, and educating patients and clinicians about the procedure. Eligible inpatients were flagged daily through the electronic medical record and prioritized via a specialized algorithm. A trained clinical pharmacist performed penicillin skin tests and challenges preemptively or by provider request. Clinical characteristics and antibiotic use were analyzed in tested patients. A total of 1203 applicable charts were detected by our system leading to 252 direct evaluations over 18 months. Overall, 228 subjects (90.5%) had their penicillin allergy removed. Of these, 223 were cleared via testing and 5 by discovery of prior penicillin tolerance. Among patients testing negative, 85 (38%) subsequently received beta-lactams, preventing 504 inpatient days and 648 outpatient days on alternative agents. Penicillin allergy testing using a physician-pharmacist team model effectively removes reported allergies in hospitalized patients. The electronic medical record is a valuable asset for locating and stratifying individuals who benefit most from intervention. Proactive testing substantially reduces unnecessary inpatient and outpatient use of beta-lactam alternatives that may otherwise go unaddressed. Copyright © 2016 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Patients' evaluation of hospital foodservice quality in Italy: what do patients really value?

    PubMed

    Messina, Gabriele; Fenucci, Roberto; Vencia, Francesco; Niccolini, Fabrizio; Quercioli, Cecilia; Nante, Nicola

    2013-04-01

    Patients often do not eat/drink enough during hospitalization. To enable patients to meet their energy and nutritional requirements, food and catering service quality and staff support are therefore important. We assessed patients' satisfaction with hospital food and investigated aspects influencing it. We conducted a cross-sectional study collecting patients' preferences using a slightly modified version of the Acute Care Hospital Foodservice Patient Satisfaction Questionnaire (ACHFPSQ). Factor analysis was carried out to reduce the number of food-quality and staff-issue variables. Univariate and multivariate ordinal categorical regression models were used to assess the association between food quality, staff issues, patients' characteristics, hospital recovery aspects and overall foodservice satisfaction (OS). A university hospital in Florence, Italy, in the period November-December 2009. Hospital patients aged 18+ years (n 927). Of the 1288 questionnaires distributed, 927 were returned completely or partially filled in by patients and 603 were considered eligible for analysis. Four factors (explained variance 64·3 %, Cronbach's alpha α(C) = 0.856), i.e. food quality (FQ; α(C) = 0·74), meal service quality (MSQ; α(C) = 0·73), hunger and quantity (HQ; α(C) = 0·74) and staff/service issues (SI; α(C) = 0·65), were extracted from seventeen items. Items investigating staff/service issues were the most positively rated while certain items investigating food quality were the least positively rated. After ordinal multiple regression analysis, OS was only significantly associated with the four factors: FQ, MSQ, HQ and SI (OR = 17·2, 6·16, 3·09 and 1·75, respectively, P < 0·001), and gender (OR = 1·53, P = 0·024). The most positively scored aspects of foodservice concerned staff/service, whereas food quality was considered less positive. The aspects that most influenced patients' satisfaction were those related to food quality.

  1. An analysis of the hospital-patient marketing relationship in the health care industry.

    PubMed

    Paul, D P; Honeycutt, E D

    1995-01-01

    For many years hospitals have viewed patients paternalistically and failed to address many customers' needs and wants in the health care market. Early attempts at marketing by hospitals were haphazard and focused primarily upon advertising and public relations. Through a review and discussion of documented hospital marketing practices, the hospital-patient marketing relationship is examined. Conclusions about hospital marketing practices and suggestions for future research are also provided.

  2. Serum magnesium levels and cognitive impairment in hospitalized hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Corsonello, A; Pedone, C; Pahor, M; Malara, A; Carosella, L; Mazzei, B; Onder, G; Corsonello, F; Carbonin, P; Corica, F

    2001-12-01

    We performed this cross-sectional case control study to investigate the association between low serum magnesium levels and cognitive impairment in hypertensive hospitalized patients. The study was carried out in general medical care units at 81 hospitals participating in the Gruppo Italiano di Farmacovigilanza nell'Anziano (GIFA) study throughout Italy, and a total of 1058 patients with diagnoses of hypertension at the discharge were studied. The occurrence of cognitive impairment at discharge was the primary outcome of our study. Cognitive impairment was ascertained using the Hodkinson Abbreviated Mental Test (HAMT). Sociodemographic variables, body mass index, laboratory parameters, comorbidity, use of antihypertensive drugs and number of drugs were considered as potential confounders. Twenty-nine percent of the selected hypertensive patients were classified as having cognitive impairment. In univariate analysis, older age, female sex, and low educational level showed a significant trend for association to cognitive impairment. Moreover the proportion of subjects with cognitive impairment decreased with increasing alcohol consumption, and the prevalence of ex smokers and smokers was significantly lower in patients with cognitive impairment. The lower tertiles for serum albumin and creatinine clearance were more frequent among patients with cognitive impairment, and the lower tertile for serum magnesium levels was significantly more frequent in these patients. Number of drugs was slightly lower in cognitively impaired patients, while number of diagnoses and length of hospital stay were higher in these subjects. In the multivariate logistic regression analysis cognitive impairment decreased with increasing education level (highest education: OR 0.11; 95 per cent CI 0.05-0.25). The lower tertile for serum albumin (< 3.5 g/dl) was significantly associated to cognitive impairment (OR 2.14; 95 per cent CI 1.31-3.49), as well as the lower tertiles for serum magnesium (0

  3. Will Hospital Peer Grouping by Patient Socioeconomic Status Fix the Medicare Hospital Readmission Reduction Program or Create New Problems?

    PubMed

    Fuller, Richard L; Hughes, John S; Goldfield, Norbert I; Averill, Richard F

    2018-04-01

    In 2016 the U.S. Congress directed the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) to implement the 21st Century Cures Act to fix a flaw in the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP). One section of the Act is intended to remove bias in calculating penalties for hospitals treating large percentages of low socioeconomic status (SES) patients. A study was conducted to analyze the effect of the introduction of SES hospital peer groups on the number and distribution of the hospitals being penalized. The CMS analysis files for the fiscal year 2017 HRRP final rule and Disproportionate Share Hospital adjustments were used to assign hospital peer groups. The median excess readmission ratios for hospital peer groups were calculated, and the resulting pattern of hospital penalties within peer groups was analyzed. The findings suggest that because CMS assigns individual HRRP penalties on six clinical conditions but proposes to assign hospitals to a single SES peer group based on all admissions, it will ignore substantial differences in the distribution of peer group medians across these conditions. For surgical cases, as expected, hospitals with fewer patients had higher readmission rates, while for medical cases, hospitals with fewer patients had fewer readmissions. These findings may result in distortion of the peer group adjustment intended to correct for SES. Hospital peer groups may create unintended redistributions of penalties through distortion of peer group medians. An observed relationship between lower-volume hospitals and fewer readmissions for medical conditions requires additional research to establish its basis. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Urine Creatinine Concentrations in Drug Monitoring Participants and Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Love, Sara A; Seegmiller, Jesse C; Kloss, Julie; Apple, Fred S

    2016-10-01

    Urine drug testing is commonly performed in both clinical and forensic arenas for screening, monitoring and compliance purposes. We sought to determine if urine creatinine concentrations in monitoring program participants were significantly different from hospital in-patients and out-patients undergoing urine drug testing. We retrospectively reviewed urine creatinine submitted in June through December 2015 for all specimens undergoing urine drug testing. The 20,479 creatinine results were categorized as hospitalized patients (H) and monitoring/compliance groups for pain management (P), legal (L) or recovery (R). Median creatinine concentrations (interquartile range, mg/dL) were significantly different (P < 0.001) between groups: H 126 (122-136); P 138 (137-143); L 147 (144-154); R 95 (92-97). In the two groups subject to on-demand sampling time pressures, median creatinine concentrations were significantly lower in the R vs. L group (P<0.001). In conclusion, recovery (R) participants have more dilute specimens, reflected by significantly lower creatinine concentration and may indicate participants' attempts to tamper with their drug test results through dilution means. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Patient Bypass Behavior and Critical Access Hospitals: Implications for Patient Retention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liu, Jiexin (Jason); Bellamy, Gail R.; McCormick, Melissa

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the extent of bypass for inpatient care among patients living in Critical Access Hospital (CAH) service areas, and to determine factors associated with bypass, the reasons for bypass, and what CAHs can do to retain patients locally. Methods: Six hundred and forty-seven subjects, aged 18 years and older, who had been admitted to…

  6. [Short-term prognosis and treatment of patients hospitalized for acute heart failure in a regional hospital without a cardiocentre].

    PubMed

    Zeman, K; Pohludková, L; Spinar, J; Jarkovský, J; Littnerová, S; Dušek, L; Miklík, R; Felšöci, M; Pařenica, J

    2012-04-01

    Heart failure is a syndrome with increasing prevalence and poor prognosis. The aim of the article is to describe the characteristics, etiology, treatment and short-term prognosis of consecutive patients hospitalized for acute heart failure (AHF) in a regional hospital without Cardiocentre. From 1/2007 to 5/2009 in total 752 patients were hospitalized in Hospital in Frýdek-Místek with diagnosis of AHF, 18% of them were in that period re-hospitalized. Data collection was performed by doctors using the National registry of acute heart failure AHEAD. Systematic sorting of patients with heart failure was made on the basis of guidelines for the diagnosis and treatment of acute heart failure (2005). Statistical analysis was performed at the Institute of Biostatistics and Analyses Masaryk University in Brno. AHF was a reason of 9% of all hospital admissions. This represents approximately 250 hospitalizations due to AHF per 100 000 inhabitants/year. A median of hospital stay was 6.5 days. Patients with de-novo AHF formed 40.8% of all hospitalizations. The most common syndromes of AHF were acute decompensated heart failure (57.7%) and pulmonary oedema (19.8%). According to laboratory tests the incidence of renal insufficiency was in 35.6% of patients, anemia in 39.9%, blood glucose on admission above 10 mmol/l in 29.5% and hyponatremia < 135 mmol/l in 19.1%. During hospitalization, there was a significant increase in the treatment of heart failure. Diuretics were receiving 91% of discharged patients, ACE inhibitors and/or AT2 blockers 85.7% and beta-blockers 69.6% of patients. A total of 30% of discharged patients were not self-sufficient. The total 30-day mortality was 16.8%. Using univariante logistic regression factors most affecting the 30-day mortality were identified: cardiogenic shock, female gender, age over 70 years, acute coronary syndrome, hypotension on admission, atrial fibrillation, renal insufficiency, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, anemia

  7. Micafungin treatment and eradication of candiduria among hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Gabardi, Steven; Martin, Spencer; Sura, Mihir; Mohammed, Anisa; Golan, Yoav

    2016-11-01

    In high-risk patients, candiduria may be associated with the development of urinary tract infections (UTI) and invasive candidiasis. The triazole antifungals achieve good urine concentrations, but their use is limited by the emergence of non-albicans Candida spp. with low-triazole susceptibility. The echinocandins remain fungicidal against many azole-resistant Candida spp., but low urine concentrations limit their use. We examined the rates of candiduria elimination in micafungin-treated patients. This retrospective analysis evaluated consecutive patients with candiduria (1/2008-4/2011) who were treated with micafungin (100 mg/day) and had post-micafungin urine cultures. Patients were deemed to have either candiduria or UTI and were assessed for short-term (within 2 weeks post-micafungin) and long-term (>1 month post-micafungin) urine sterilization. Thirty-three patients meeting our inclusion criteria were identified. Of these, 16 (48 %) were diagnosed with a Candida UTI. A total of 25 patients (76 %) had Foley catheters, which were replaced in 11 (44 %) cases. The majority of patients had Candida albicans (39 %), but Candida krusei and Candida glabrata (33 %) were also isolated. Eight patients (24 %) were immunocompromised, and 29 (88 %) received broad-spectrum antibiotics. Rates of urine sterilization during micafungin treatment, 2 weeks after micafungin, and >1 month after micafungin were 81, 78, and 75 %, respectively. Among hospitalized patients with candiduria, micafungin administration was frequently associated with both short- and long-term urine sterilization. This was observed among patients with or without Foley removal and among those with Candida albicans, as well as non-albicans Candida spp.

  8. Public Reporting of Hospital Patient Satisfaction: The Rhode Island Experience

    PubMed Central

    Barr, Judith K.; Boni, Cathy E.; Kochurka, Kimberly A.; Nolan, Patricia; Petrillo, Marcia; Sofaer, Shoshanna; Waters, William

    2002-01-01

    This article describes a collaborative process for legislatively mandated public reporting of health care performance in Rhode Island that began with hospital patient satisfaction. The goals of the report were both quality improvement and public accountability. Key features addressed include: the legislative context for public reporting; widespread participation of stakeholders; the structure for decisionmaking; and the use of formative testing with cognitive interviews to get responses of consumers and others about the report's readability and comprehensibility. This experience and the lessons learned can guide other States considering public reporting on health care performance. PMID:12500470

  9. Addressing Medicaid Expansion from the Perspective of Patient Experience in Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sandra S; Wen, Yu-Ping; Mohan, Soumya; Bae, Jaeyong; Becker, Edmund R

    2016-10-01

    More Medicaid holders are entering the healthcare system consequential to Medicaid expansion. Their experience has financial consequences for hospitals and crucial implications for the provision of patient-centered care. This study examined how the hospital characteristics, especially the rates of Medicaid coverage and racial/ethnic minorities, impact the quality of inpatient care. Using data for years 2009-2011 for 870 observations of California hospitals, and data collected from patients via the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems survey coupled with data from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project and American Hospital Association Annual Survey, we used a generalized estimating equation approach to evaluate patients' experience with hospital care. Our multivariate model includes a comprehensive set of characteristics capturing market, structural, process, and patient demographics associated with the patient's hospital stay. The findings indicate that high concentrations of Medicaid patients in the hospital negatively impact the perceived patient experience. In addition, all things being equal, hospitals with higher concentrations of Hispanic, Black, and Asian patients received lower patient satisfaction results on 28 of the 30 regression coefficients capturing patient satisfaction, with 22 of the 30 negative coefficients statistically significant. Hospitals serving higher concentrations of Medicaid patients and more racial/ethnic diverse patients experienced a less satisfactory patient experience than patients utilizing other payers or patients who were White. Our research magnifies the challenge for addressing the disparities that exist in healthcare. Further research is called for clarifying the underlying reasons for these disparities and the optimal strategies for addressing these problems.

  10. Patient and hospital correlates of clinical outcomes and resource utilization in severe pediatric sepsis.

    PubMed

    Odetola, Folafoluwa O; Gebremariam, Achamyeleh; Freed, Gary L

    2007-03-01

    Our goal was to describe patient and hospital characteristics associated with in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and charges for critically ill children with severe sepsis. Our study consisted of a retrospective study of children 0 to 19 years of age hospitalized with severe sepsis using the 2003 Kids' Inpatient Database. We generated national estimates of rates of hospitalization and then compared in-hospital mortality, length of stay, and total charges according to patient and hospital characteristics using multivariable regression methods. Severity of illness was measured by using all-patient refined diagnosis-related group severity of illness classification into minor, moderate, major, and extreme severity. There were an estimated 21,448 hospitalizations for severe pediatric sepsis nationally in 2003. The in-hospital mortality rate was 4.2%. Comorbid illness was present in 34% of hospitalized children. Most (70%) of the extremely ill children were admitted to children's hospitals. Length of stay was longer among patients with higher illness severity and nonsurvivors compared with survivors (13.5 vs 8.5 days). Hospitalizations at urban or children's hospitals were also associated with longer length of stay than nonchildren's or rural hospitals, respectively. Higher charges were associated with higher illness severity, and nonsurvivors had 2.5-fold higher total charges than survivors. Also, higher charges were observed among hospitalizations in urban or children's hospitals. In multivariable regression analysis, multiple comorbid illnesses, multiple organ dysfunction, and greater severity of illness were associated with higher odds of mortality and longer length of stay. Higher hospital charges and longer length of stay were observed among transfer hospitalizations and among hospitalizations to children's hospitals and nonchildren's teaching hospitals compared with hospitals, which had neither children's nor teaching status. Mortality from severe pediatric

  11. Brucellosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Bouley, Andrew J.; Biggs, Holly M.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Afwamba, Isaac A.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Cleaveland, Sarah; Crump, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Acute and convalescent serum samples were collected from febrile inpatients identified at two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed brucellosis was defined as a positive blood culture or a ≥ 4-fold increase in microagglutination test titer, and probable brucellosis was defined as a single reciprocal titer ≥ 160. Among 870 participants enrolled in the study, 455 (52.3%) had paired sera available. Of these, 16 (3.5%) met criteria for confirmed brucellosis. Of 830 participants with ≥ 1 serum sample, 4 (0.5%) met criteria for probable brucellosis. Brucellosis was associated with increased median age (P = 0.024), leukopenia (odds ratio [OR] 7.8, P = 0.005), thrombocytopenia (OR 3.9, P = 0.018), and evidence of other zoonoses (OR 3.2, P = 0.026). Brucellosis was never diagnosed clinically, and although all participants with brucellosis received antibacterials or antimalarials in the hospital, no participant received standard brucellosis treatment. Brucellosis is an underdiagnosed and untreated cause of febrile disease among hospitalized adult and pediatric patients in northern Tanzania. PMID:23091197

  12. Gap analysis of cultural and religious needs of hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Davidson, Judy E; Boyer, Merri Lynn; Casey, Debra; Matzel, Stephen Chavez; Walden, Chaplain David

    2008-01-01

    Identify patient and family needs specifically related to an in-hospital birth or death. This study aimed to perform a gap analysis between identified needs and current hospital practice, services, and resources. With the IRB approval, and purposive sampling using the demographics of a community hospital plus subgroups from problematic cases. Twenty-two semistructured interviews were audiotaped, and 6 lectures and 2 panel discussions were videotaped. Transcriptions were distributed to the research team and manually coded for gaps between current practices versus stated needs. Group process was used to form consensus regarding findings. The following subgroups were targeted: Muslim, Baha'i, Catholic, Protestant, Jewish, Buddhist, Mormon, Jehovah's Witness, Latino, Filipino, Chinese, African American. Gaps in available resources, such as prayer books, rugs, and compasses, were identified. Knowledge gaps included many issues such as the Muslim preference for decreasing sedatives at end of life to be able to recite the sacred prayer while dying. Practice issues such as respecting plain-clothed clergy, the impact of "rule-orientation" on family needs, and the universal need to call clergy early were identified.

  13. Microbial skin flora of selected cancer patients and hospital personnel.

    PubMed Central

    McBride, M E; Duncan, W C; Bodey, G P; McBride, C M

    1976-01-01

    The bacterial flora of the skin from five anatomical sites on 10 leukemia patients, 10 patients with malignant melanoma, and a control group of 10 medical personnel was examined quantitatively and qualitatively. This was done to determine whether malignant disease results in changes in skin flora and to establish carrier rates of gram-negative bacteria on the skin of personnel in hospital environments. Gram-negative bacteria were isolated more frequently (74 isolates from 100 cultures) from the skin of leukemia patients than from either patients with malignant melanoma (8 isolates from 100 cultures) or the medical personnel (9 isolates from 100 cultures). Klebsiella pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were isolated exclusively from leukemia patients. Relative proportions of gram-negative bacteria in total populations were determined. The axilla was the only site with a uniformly high proportion of gram-negative bacteria. From all other sites cultured, gram-negative populations were low (1 to 5 bacteria/cm2 of skin), although a high proportion of gram-negative populations occurred randomly throughout all subject groups. It was concluded that leukemia patients tend to carry gram-negative bacteria on the skin. The factors permitting colonization of skin by gram-negative bacteria are discussed. PMID:943418

  14. Leadership in nursing and patient satisfaction in hospital context.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Elisabete Maria Garcia Teles; Gaspar, Maria Filomena Mendes

    2016-06-01

    Objectives to know the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of a chief nurse and nurse, patient satisfaction, the relationship between the quality of the relationship perceived for both and patient satisfaction. Methods a quantitative, transverse and correlational approach. Non-probabilistic convenience sample consists of 15 chief nurses, 342 nurses, 273 patients. Data collected at the Central Lisbon Hospital Center, between January and March 2013, through the LMX-7, CLMX-7 and SUCEH21 scales. Statistical analysis was performed through SPSS ® Statistics 19. Results the chief nurse considers the quality of the leadership relationship good, the nurses consider it satisfactory, patients are considered to be satisfied with nursing care; there is a statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship from the perspective of chief nurses and patient satisfaction, there is no statistically significant correlation between the quality of the leadership relationship in the nurse's perspective and satisfaction. Conclusion the chief nurse has a major role in patient satisfaction.

  15. Hospital volume and other risk factors for in-hospital mortality among diverticulitis patients: A nationwide analysis

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Michael J; Coward, Stephanie; Buie, W Donald; MacLean, Anthony; Dixon, Elijah; Ball, Chad G; Schaffer, Samuel; Kaplan, Gilaad G

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous studies have found that a higher volume of colorectal surgery was associated with lower mortality rates. While diverticulitis is an increasingly common condition, the effect of hospital volume on outcomes among diverticulitis patients is unknown. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the relationship between hospital volume and other factors on in-hospital mortality among patients admitted for diverticulitis. METHODS: Data from the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (years 1993 to 2008) were analyzed to identify 822,865 patients representing 4,108,726 admissions for diverticulitis. Hospitals were divided into quartiles based on the volume of diverticulitis cases admitted over the study period, adjusted for years contributed to the dataset. Mortality according to hospital volume was modelled using logistic regression adjusting for age, sex, race, comorbidities, health care insurance, admission type, calendar year, colectomy, disease severity and clustering. Risk estimates were expressed as adjusted ORs with 95% CIs. RESULTS: Patients at high-volume hospitals were more likely to be admitted emergently, undergo surgical treatment and have more severe disease. In-hospital mortality was higher among the lowest quartile of hospital volume compared with the highest volume (OR 1.13 [95% CI 1.05 to 1.21]). In-hospital mortality was increased among patients admitted emergently (OR 2.58 [95% CI 2.40 to 2.78]) as well as those receiving surgical treatment (OR 3.60 [95% CI 3.42 to 3.78]). CONCLUSIONS: Diverticulitis patients admitted to hospitals with a low volume of diverticulitis cases had an increased risk for death compared with those admitted to high-volume centres. PMID:25965439

  16. Respiratory Complications in Iranian Hospitalized Patients with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Alinaghi, Seyed Ahmad Seyed; Vaghari, Bahram; Roham, Maryam; Badie, Banafsheh Moradmand; Jam, Sara; Foroughi, Maryam; Djavid, Gholamreza Esmaeeli; Hajiabdolbaghi, Mahboubeh; Hosseini, Mostafa; Mohraz, Minoo; McFarland, Willi

    2011-01-01

    The respiratory tract has been the most commonly affected site of illness in HIV-infected patients. The current study was done to identify the frequency of respiratory complications in a consecutive case series of HIV-positive patients in Iran. This study was a retrospective analysis at the national academic reference medical center of Imam-Khomeini Hospital, in Tehran, Iran. The study included 199 new admissions for 177 HIV-infected patients between 2000 and 2005. Demographic characteristics, risk factors for HIV infection, respiratory complications, and CD4+ lymphocyte counts were evaluated in these patients. All patients were males. The mean age was 35 years (age range: 15 to 63 years). Among 34 cases with available CD4+ lymphocyte count results, 70.6% had results <200 cells/mm(3). Nearly half the patients (47.7%) had respiratory symptoms. The most common pulmonary complications were cough (86.3%), sputum (71.6%), dyspnea (54.7%), and hemoptysis (10.5%). The most common diagnosis was pulmonary tuberculosis (27.1%), followed by other bacterial pneumonias (16.6%) and pneumocystis carinii pneumonia (4.5%). Intravenous drug users who had history of incarceration had the highest risk factors for Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection (59%), and other bacterial pneumonias (52%). Our study demonstrates that respiratory complications are highly frequent in HIV patients in Iran and that pulmonary tuberculosis is still a common complication in HIV infected patients, despite the availability of effective treatment. Results suggest the need for more effective preventive and prophylactic measures, wider use of antiretroviral treatment and effective chemotherapy for Iranian patients with HIV/AIDS.

  17. Can net income from non-patient-care activities continue to save hospitals?

    PubMed

    Schuhmann, Thomas M

    2010-05-01

    A recent study found that U.S. hospitals are losing billions of dollars per year caring for patients. Hospitals have been able to offset patient care losses with substantial net income from sources not directly connected to patient care. However, this net income declined sharply with the economic downturn in 2008 and 2009, resulting in a decline in overall hospital profitability and putting a cloud of uncertainty over future hospital profitability.

  18. Health education for STD patients in a New Delhi hospital.

    PubMed

    Hiramani, A B; Srivastava, U; Misra, R S

    1985-09-01

    The impact of sexually transmitted disease (STD) education on patients who presented for treatment of syphillis, gonorrhea, chancroid, or gonorrhea and chancroid at the STD clinic of a hospital in New Delhi, India, was assessed. 1st a pilot study of 31 patients was undertaken to determine their level of knowledge about syphilis, gonorrhea, and chancroid. This information was then used to design appropriate educational materials, including folders, photographs, flip-charts, and posters. The impact of these materials on the knowledge level of a group of patients with 1 or more of the 3 diseases was then assessed. 107 patients who presented at the clinic for treatment were interviewed in order to obtain baseline information on their STD knowledge levels. Individual education sessions were held with 80 of the 107 patients. Some of the educational materials were used during the education sessions and the patients were instructed to read the remaining materials on their own. Approximately 18 days following the education sessions, 56 of the 80 patients were retested on their knowledge of STDs. The remaining patients were lost to followup. Analysis of the data indicated that the majority of the 107 respondents were unmarried, between 20-25 years of age, and earning less than Rs.600. The baseline test indicated that most of the patients had some knowledge about their own diseases, but little knowledge about the other 2 diseases. Many of the respondents had misconceptions about the causes and effects of the diseases. The results of the retests following the educational sessions indicated that the patients with syphilis or gonorrhea tripled their knowledge level of the 3 STDs and that patients with chancroid more than doubled their STD knowledge level. 2/3 of the 56 patients said that the program increased their understanding of STDs. The educational method preferred by the largest proportion of respondents (64%) was the individual educational sessions. The folders and

  19. Using case-mix information in strategic hospital marketing. Deriving market research from patient data.

    PubMed

    Little, A

    1992-01-01

    Hospital survival requires adaptation, adaptation requires understanding, and understanding requires information. These are the basic equations behind hospital strategic marketing, and one of the answers may lie in hospitals' own patient-data systems. Marketers' and administrators' enlightened application of case-mix information could become one more hospital survival tool.

  20. Complications Requiring Hospital Admission and Causes of In-Hospital Death over Time in Alcoholic and Nonalcoholic Cirrhosis Patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee Yeon; Kim, Chang Wook; Choi, Jong Young; Lee, Chang Don; Lee, Sae Hwan; Kim, Moon Young; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Wo, Hyun Young

    2016-01-01

    Data on the epidemiology of alcoholic cirrhosis, especially in Asian countries, are limited. We compared the temporal evolution of patterns of alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis over the last decade. We retrospectively examined the inpatient datasets of five referral centers during 2002 and 2011. The study included patients who were admitted due to specific complications of liver cirrhosis. We compared the causes of hospital admissions and in-hospital deaths between patients with alcoholic and nonalcoholic cirrhosis. Among the included 2,799 hospitalizations (2,165 patients), 1,496 (1,143 patients) were from 2002, and 1,303 (1,022 patients) were from 2011. Over time, there was a reduction in the rate of hepatic encephalopathy (HE) as a cause of hospitalization and an increase in the rate of hepatocellular carcinoma. Deaths that were attributable to HE or spontaneous bacterial peritonitis (SBP) significantly decreased, whereas those due to hepatorenal syndrome (HRS) significantly increased over time in patients with alcoholic cirrhosis. However, in patients with nonalcoholic cirrhosis, hepatic failure and HRS remained the principal causes of in-hospital death during both time periods. The major causes of in-hospital deaths have evolved from acute cirrhotic complications, including HE or SBP to HRS in alcoholic cirrhosis, whereas those have remained unchanged in nonalcoholic cirrhosis during the last decade.

  1. Nurses' knowledge and attitudes about pain in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Jarrett, Anna; Church, Terri; Fancher-Gonzalez, Kim; Shackelford, Jamie; Lofton, Annelle

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to measure knowledge and attitudes of nursing about pain management in patients before education, immediately after, and 6 months later. The end-point measure was Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems quarterly scores and percentile rank. This longitudinal, quasi-experimental, quantitative study used survey method with pretest and posttest scores to measure immediate learning and 6 months later to measure sustained changes in knowledge and attitudes for nurses in this facility. The setting was a 360-bed acute care community hospital in the midsouth. The sample consisted of approximately 206 bedside nurses who worked in an acute care facility and 164 final posttest participants. The survey was used in a group setting immediately prior to a didactic learning experience. Immediately after the session, a posttest survey was administered. The 6-month follow-up occurred via an online module developed by the principal investigator. A repeated-measures analysis of variance, a pairwise comparison with a paired t test, and a Bonferroni correction were performed to determine if sustained knowledge and attitudes have changed. Posttest scores were significantly higher than pretest scores on the Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain immediately after a didactic education session and 6 months later (P < .017). Six months later, scores remained higher than pretest or immediate posttest scores. Nurses with a stronger knowledge base may lead to better pain management, improved outcomes, and higher patient satisfaction scores.

  2. Instruments to assess patient comfort during hospitalization: A psychometric review.

    PubMed

    Lorente, Sonia; Losilla, Josep-Maria; Vives, Jaume

    2018-05-01

    To analyse the psychometric properties and the utility of instruments used to measure patient comfort, physical, social, psychospiritual and/or environmental, during hospitalization. There are no systematic reviews nor psychometric reviews of instruments used to measure comfort, which is considered an indicator of quality in health care associated with quicker discharges, increased patient satisfaction and better cost-benefit ratios for the institution. Psychometric review. MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Knowledge, ProQuest Thesis&Dissertations, Google. We limited our search to studies published between 1990-2015. The psychometric analysis was performed using the COnsensus-based Standards for the selection of health status Measurement INstruments (COSMIN), along with the Quality Criteria for Measurement Properties. The utility of the instruments was assessed according to their cost-efficiency, acceptability and educational impact. Protocol registration in PROSPERO, CRD42016036290. Instruments reviewed showed moderate methodological quality and their utility was poorly reported. Thus, we cannot recommend any questionnaire without reservations, but the Comfort Scale, the General Comfort Questionnaire and their adaptations in adults and older patients, the Psychosocial Comfort Scale and the Incomfort des Patients de Reanimation are the most recommendable instruments to measure comfort. The methodology of the studies should be more rigorous and authors should adequately report the utility of instruments. This review provides a strategy to select the most suitable instrument to assess patient comfort according to their psychometric properties and utility, which is crucial for nurses, clinicians, researchers and institutions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Patient satisfaction with a hospital-based neuropsychology service.

    PubMed

    Foran, Amie; Millar, Elisa; Dorstyn, Diana

    2016-09-01

    Objective The aim of the present study was to develop and pilot a measure of patient satisfaction that encompasses themes, activities, settings and interactions specific to the neuropsychological assessment process. Methods A focus group of out-patients (n=15) was surveyed to identify the factors commonly associated with a satisfactory neuropsychological experience. Responses informed a purposely designed 14-item patient satisfaction scale (α=0.88) that was completed by 66 hospital out-patients with mild to moderate cognitive impairment. Results Satisfaction with the neuropsychological assessment process was generally reported, with the testing phase (85%) rated significantly more favourably than the pre-assessment (79%) and feedback (70%) phases. Commentaries provided by 32 respondents identified interpersonal facilitators to a satisfactory neuropsychological assessment experience, but also dissatisfaction with physical aspects of the testing environment in addition to service availability. Conclusions The patient satisfaction scale can be used as a quality assurance tool to evaluate neuropsychological service delivery. Large-scale research is needed to confirm the scale's psychometric properties. Further research may also include a broader perspective on the consumers' experience of neuropsychological services.

  4. Technology advances in hospital practices: robotics in treatment of patients.

    PubMed

    Rosiek, Anna; Leksowski, Krzysztof

    2015-06-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy is widely considered as the treatment of choice for acute cholecystitis. The safety of the procedure and its minimal invasiveness made it a valid treatment option for a patient not responding to antibiotic therapy. Our research shows that patients positively assess this treatment method, but the world's tendency is to turn to a more sophisticated method utilizing robot-assisted surgery as a gold standard. Providing patient with minimally invasive surgical procedures that utilize the state-of-the-art equipment like the da Vinci Robotic Surgical System underscores the commitment to high-quality patient care while enhancing patient safety. The advantages include minimal invasive scarring, less pain and bleeding, faster recovery time, and shorter hospital stay. The move toward less invasive and less morbid procedures and a need to re-create the true open surgical experience have paved the way for the development and application of robotic and computer-assisted systems in surgery in Poland as well as the rest of the world. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Patient safety climate and worker safety behaviours in acute hospitals in Scotland.

    PubMed

    Agnew, Cakil; Flin, Rhona; Mearns, Kathryn

    2013-06-01

    To obtain a measure of hospital safety climate from a sample of National Health Service (NHS) acute hospitals in Scotland and to test whether these scores were associated with worker safety behaviors, and patient and worker injuries. Data were from 1,866 NHS clinical staff in six Scottish acute hospitals. A Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire measured hospital safety climate (Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture), worker safety behaviors, and worker and patient injuries. The associations between the hospital safety climate scores and the outcome measures (safety behaviors, worker and patient injury rates) were examined. Hospital safety climate scores were significantly correlated with clinical workers' safety behavior and patient and worker injury measures, although the effect sizes were smaller for the latter. Regression analyses revealed that perceptions of staffing levels and managerial commitment were significant predictors for all the safety outcome measures. Both patient-specific and more generic safety climate items were found to have significant impacts on safety outcome measures. This study demonstrated the influences of different aspects of hospital safety climate on both patient and worker safety outcomes. Moreover, it has been shown that in a hospital setting, a safety climate supporting safer patient care would also help to ensure worker safety. The Scottish Hospital Safety Questionnaire has proved to be a usable method of measuring both hospital safety climate as well as patient and worker safety outcomes. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Pattern Of Leukaemia Patients Admitted In Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad.

    PubMed

    Khan, Tariq Mehmood

    2016-01-01

    Any tissue of the body can give rise to cancer. However, those tissues which multiply rapidly are at high risk of developing cancer and haematopoietic system is one of them. Neoplasms of this system are known as leukaemia and lymphoma, according to the types of white cells involved. Study of cancer patterns in different societies, however can contribute a substantial knowledge about the aetiology of cancer. The present Study was designed and aimed to estimate the frequency of different types of leukaemia in patients admitted in Ayub Teaching hospital Abbottabad. Data from the patients admitted at oncology Department of Ayub Teaching Hospital Abbottabad from 2010 to 2015 was collected and analysed to calculate cumulative and year-wise frequency of leukaemia and its major types. Frequency distribution with reference to gender and age was also calculated. In our analysis about 16% patients had acute myelocytic leukaemia and 32% patients had acute lymphocytic leukaemia; while chronic myeloid leukaemia outnumbered chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (11% and 3%); Hodgkin lymphoma was seen in 18% cases while Non Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) was present in 20% cases. Out of the total, 150 cases (75%) belonged to mountainous areas of Hazara, i.e., 40 cases belonged to Kohistan, another 40 cases were residents of Battagram, 45 cases belonged to hilly areas of Mansehra and 25 cases to Kaghan valley, while only 50 (25%) cases were from the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts, i.e., 20 and 30 cases respectively. Leukaemia is more common in hilly areas of Hazara, since majority of the cases belonged to well-known mountainous regions of Kohistan, Battagram, Kaghan or Mansehra and only few cases belonged to the plain areas of Abbottabad and Haripur districts.

  7. INTESTINAL PARASITES IN DIABETIC PATIENTS IN SOHAG UNIVERSITY HOSPITALS, EGYPT.

    PubMed

    Elnadi, Nada A; Hassanien, Hassan A; Ahmad, Amal M; Abd Ellah, Asmaa K

    2015-08-01

    Intestinal parasites usually create benign diseases, though they may induce complications with high morbidity and mortality to the immunocompromised, including diabetic patients. The study detected the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections in diabetic patients, comparing to non-diabetic controls and other parameters. A total of 100 fecal samples were collected from diabetic patients at the outpatient clinic of Sohag University Hospitals and another 100 from cross matched controls. The samples were examined macroscopically and microscopically by direct smear and different concentration methods then stained by Modified Ziehl-Neelsen Acid fast stain. Glycated hemoglobin (Hb Alc) was measured to detect DM controlled patients. The data were organized, tabulated, and statistically analyzed. Intestinal parasites were found in 25 (25%) cases out of 100 patients in diabetic group and 7(7%) cases out of 100 controls with high significance (P<0.001)). In the diabetic group, Giardia lamblia was detected in 22 cases (22%) and 5 (5%) among controls, Entamoeba histolytica in 7 cases (7%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Hymenolypis nana in 5 cases (5%) and 3 (3%) among controls, Entamoeba coli in 8 patients (8%), Entamoeba hartmanni in 3 cases (3%), Dientamoeba fragilis in a case (1%), Cryptosporidium parvum in 5 cases (5%) and microsporidia in 3 cases (3%). But, E. coli, E. hartmanni, D. fragilis and C. parvum nor microsporidia were detected in controls. The rate of G. lamblia in DM patients compared to controls was high significant (P<0.001). Hymenolepis nana was 5% (5 cases) in diabetic patients compared to 3% (3 cases) in controls. Residence and sex differences were not significant, while age, >10 years showed the highest prevalence (P< 0.003), type I infection rate was significantly higher than type II (P<0.001). DM control was also significantly affected the infection rates (P<0.007 in type I and P< 0.01 in type II).

  8. Why not ask the patient? An evaluation of the aesthetic surroundings in hospitals by patients.

    PubMed

    Caspari, Synnøve; Nåden, Dagfinn; Eriksson, Katie

    2007-01-01

    The first part of this comprehensive study examined and analyzed strategic plans for the general hospitals in Norway. The concern was to discover the way in which the aesthetic dimension is taken into consideration and what guidelines the strategic plans provide. The result showed a general lack of guidelines, and it was therefore decided to ask patients how they would characterize and evaluate the aesthetics in their environments. The aim of the second part of the study was to find out how the patients evaluate the aesthetics in the general hospitals, and to ascertain their opinion as to how aesthetics influences health and wellness. The theoretical background for the investigation was based on literature studies from the caring sciences, philosophical theories, and results of international research. The purpose of this article is to present the results from the second part of the study addressing the human need for aesthetics in the surroundings and in life in general. The investigation was carried out at 6 general hospitals in Norway. A questionnaire was constructed in which the patients were asked to give their opinion on the aesthetics in the hospital environment and the influence aesthetics might have on health and wellness. The questionnaire contained 22 main questions, each with detailed and specific subquestions. For instance, concerning the question about "art," patients were asked to evaluate paintings, pictures, tapestries, sculptures, decorations, mosaic works and water decorations, fountains, etc. The results in general showed that aesthetic surroundings are important for health and wellness, according to the patients' opinion. The aesthetics in the hospital environment was evaluated and generally considered to be less than satisfactory by the patients. They felt that the aesthetic issues are not attended to as well as they would have liked. In summary it can be concluded that according to the patient experiences, the aesthetic area is a neglected

  9. Polypharmacy, length of hospital stay, and in-hospital mortality among elderly patients in internal medicine wards. The REPOSI study.

    PubMed

    Nobili, Alessandro; Licata, Giuseppe; Salerno, Francesco; Pasina, Luca; Tettamanti, Mauro; Franchi, Carlotta; De Vittorio, Luigi; Marengoni, Alessandra; Corrao, Salvatore; Iorio, Alfonso; Marcucci, Maura; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio

    2011-05-01

    We evaluated the prevalence and factors associated with polypharmacy and investigated the role of polypharmacy as a predictor of length of hospital stay and in-hospital mortality. Thirty-eight internal medicine wards in Italy participated in the Registro Politerapie SIMI (REPOSI) study during 2008. One thousand three hundred and thirty-two in-patients aged ≥65 years were enrolled. Polypharmacy was defined as the concomitant use of five or more medications. Linear regression analyses were used to evaluate predictors of length of hospital stay and logistic regression models for predictors of in-hospital mortality. Age, sex, Charlson comorbidity index, polypharmacy, and number of in-hospital clinical adverse events (AEs) were used as possible confounders. The prevalence of polypharmacy was 51.9% at hospital admission and 67.0% at discharge. Age, number of drugs at admission, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, heart failure, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease were independently associated with polypharmacy at discharge. In multivariate analysis, the occurrence of at least one AE while in hospital was the only predictor of prolonged hospitalization (each new AE prolonged hospital stay by 3.57 days, p < 0.0001). Age [odds ratio (OR) 1.04; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.01-1.08; p = 0.02), comorbidities (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.12-1.24; p < 0.0001), and AEs (OR 6.80; 95% CI 3.58-12.9; p < 0.0001) were significantly associated with in-hospital mortality. Although most elderly in-patients receive polypharmacy, in this study, it was not associated with any hospital outcome. However, AEs were strongly correlated with a longer hospital stay and higher mortality risk.

  10. Lack of nephrotoxicity of gadodiamide in unselected hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Hariprasad; Raman, Lakshmi; Benjamin, Heather; Batwara, Ruchika

    2009-09-01

    The nephrotoxicity of gadolinium-based magnetic resonance contrast media has not been adequately studied. We evaluated the nephrotoxicity of gadolinium-based contrast media in hospitalized patients who underwent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as part of routine clinical care. Subjects who had a serum creatinine measurement during the 7 days before MRI and at least 1 other measurement 2 to 3 days after MRI were included. Patients who underwent noncontrasted MRI served as controls. There were 162 subjects (mean age, 57.8 +/- 16.9 years; 91 men and 71 women) and 125 controls (mean age, 64.6 +/- 18 years; 62 men and 63 women). All contrast-enhanced MRI studies utilized gadodiamide (Omniscan; GE Healthcare, Waukesha, WI). Subjects who received gadodiamide showed no difference in the incidence of acute renal insufficiency compared with controls (increase in serum creatinine >or= 25%, 11.1% vs 12.9%, respectively; P = 0.6; increase in serum creatinine by 0.5 mg/dL, 5.6% vs 3.2%, respectively; P = 0.4). There was no significant increase in serum creatinine baseline versus 48 hours in either the subjects who received gadodiamide (0.95 +/- 0.58 vs 0.96 +/- 0.65 mg/dL; P = 0.7) or controls (0.96 +/- 0.65 vs 0.88 +/- 0.43 mg/dL; P = 0.7). Our findings showed a lack of significant nephrotoxicity of gadodiamide in unselected hospitalized patients.

  11. Patient opinion of the doctor-patient relationship in a public hospital in Qatar.

    PubMed

    Weber, Alan S; Verjee, Mohamud A; Musson, David; Iqbal, Navid A; Mosleh, Tayseer M; Zainel, Abdulwahed A; Al-Salamy, Yassir

    2011-03-01

    To analyze the factors associated with the level of satisfaction of outpatients in their relationship with their doctor at the largest public hospital in Qatar. This study was a cross-sectional survey of attitudes. Researchers surveyed 626 outpatients at Hamad General Hospital in Doha, Qatar from September 2009 to January 2010 using a novel questionnaire assessing satisfaction with patients' interaction(s) with their doctor (spent time with patient, took case seriously, maintained confidentiality, and the overall quality of visit). Mean responses on 4 Likert scale items (one to 5) were as follows: "spent enough time with patient" = 4.39; "doctor took case seriously" = 4.57; "satisfaction with doctor-patient confidentiality" = 4.71; "overall quality of visit" = 4.46. Age, gender, citizenship, level of education, and number of visits did not significantly impact the level of satisfaction. For 73.1% of patients, the physician's qualification was the most important factor in choosing a doctor. Of those surveyed, 40.7% of men and 28.1% of women preferred to see a doctor of their own gender. A positive correlation between perceived communication and satisfaction with the doctor-patient encounter was established. This study found that patients in the Out-Patient Department at Hamad Hospital were highly satisfied with their relationships with their doctors, and physician qualification was the most significant factor in choosing a doctor. A significant number of males and females preferred a physician of their own gender. Communication difficulty correlated with lower satisfaction.

  12. Antimicrobial Stewardship Among Hospitalized Patients with Influenza Respiratory Tract Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Patrick; Taggart, Linda; Leung, Elizabeth; Havey, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background Overlap between Influenza and bacterial respiratory illnesses contributes to the inappropriate use of antibiotics. One major study from the United States suggests a significant number of patients are being treated with antibiotics inappropriately. This paper however, did not perform an intervention to evaluate whether an Antimicrobial Stewardship Program (ASP) is effective in decreasing inappropriate antibiotic use. Appropriate use of antibiotics in Influenza patients has not been formally assessed in Canadian healthcare systems. Given ASP’s have been shown to be effective in previous studies, an opportunity has arisen for implementation in the setting of antibiotics in patients with Influenza, which has not previously been studied Methods We retrospectively identified all adults admitted to hospital who tested positive for Influenza from January 2016 to January 2017. We assessed the appropriateness of antibiotic use during the patient’s admission, evaluating whether antibiotics have been used according to standard of care for community acquired pneumonia. Antibiotic use and length of duration pre and post Stewardship implementation will be analyzed. After data has been collected, the results of this retrospective cohort study will inform the implementation of an ASP Results Eighty-one patients recorded positive Influenza tests. Twenty-six were collected from ICU patients and were excluded. Mean time to diagnosis from swab collection and final diagnosis was 2.8 days. Of the 55 non-ICU patients, 13 (24%) patients were continued on antibiotics after the diagnosis of Influenza was confirmed, with an average of 4.7 days of antibiotic use. It was deemed that 9 of these patients were continued appropriately on antibiotics with 4 patients having CXR infiltrate, 4 patients immunocompromised and 1 blood culture positive with strep pneumonia. Four (8%) patients were treated inappropriately with antibiotics for >24 hours after positive Influenza

  13. A tale of two cultures: examining patient-centered care in a forensic mental health hospital

    PubMed Central

    Livingston, James D.; Nijdam-Jones, Alicia; Brink, Johann

    2012-01-01

    Several questions remain unanswered regarding the extent to which the principles and practices of patient-centered care are achievable in the context of a forensic mental health hospital. This study examined patient-centered care from the perspectives of patients and providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patient-centered care was assessed using several measures of complementary constructs. Interviews were conducted with 30 patients and surveys were completed by 28 service providers in a forensic mental health hospital. Patients and providers shared similar views of the therapeutic milieu and recovery orientation of services; however, providers were more likely to perceive the hospital as being potentially unsafe. Overall, the findings indicated that characteristics of patient-centered care may be found within a forensic mental health hospital. The principles of patient-centered care can be integrated into service delivery in forensic mental health hospitals, though special attention to providers’ perceptions of safety is needed. PMID:22815648

  14. Predicting Patients' Expectations of Hospital Chaplains: A Multisite Survey

    PubMed Central

    Piderman, Katherine M.; Marek, Dean V.; Jenkins, Sarah M.; Johnson, Mary E.; Buryska, James F.; Shanafelt, Tait D.; O'Bryan, Floyd G.; Hansen, Patrick D.; Howick, Priscilla H.; Durland, Heidi L.; Lackore, Kandace A.; Lovejoy, Laura A.; Mueller, Paul S.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify patient expectations regarding chaplain visitation, characteristics of patients who want to be visited by a chaplain, and what patients deem important when a chaplain visits. PARTICIPANTS AND METHODS: Three weeks after discharge, 4500 eligible medical and surgical patients from hospitals in Minnesota, Arizona, and Florida were surveyed by mail to collect demographic information and expectations regarding chaplain visitation. The survey was conducted during the following time periods: Minnesota participants, April 6 until April 25, 2006; Arizona participants, October 16, 2008, until January 13, 2009; Florida participants, October 16, 2008, until January 20, 2009. Categorical variables were summarized with frequencies or percentages. Associations between responses and site were examined using χ2 tests. Multivariate logistic regression was used to assess the likelihood of wanting chaplain visitation on the basis of patient demographics and perceived importance of reasons for chaplain visitation. RESULTS: About one-third of those surveyed responded from each site. Most were male, married, aged 56 years or older, and Protestant or Catholic. Of the respondents, nearly 70% reported wanting chaplain visitation, 43% were visited, and 81% indicated that visitation was important. The strongest predictor of wanting chaplain visitation was denomination vs no indicated religious affiliation (Catholic: odds ratio [OR], 8.11; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4.49-14.64; P<.001; evangelical Protestant: OR, 4.95; 95% CI, 2.74-8.91; P<.001; mainline Protestant: OR, 4.34; 95% CI, 2.58-7.29; P<.001). Being female was a weak predictor (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.05-2.09; P=.03), as was site. Among the reasons given by respondents for wanting chaplain visitation, the most important were that chaplains served as reminders of God's care and presence (OR, 4.37; 95% CI, 2.58-7.40; P<.001) and that they provided prayer or scripture reading (OR, 2.54; 95% CI, 1.53-4.20; P<.001

  15. Every penny counts: interest-free loan programs could benefit both hospitals and patients.

    PubMed

    Hinderks, Jackie; Wreede, Amanda

    2015-11-01

    Patients' average deductibles have more than quadrupled, and their out-of-pocket costs are much higher now than even a decade ago. The higher a hospital bill, the less likely a patient is to pay. Zero-interest loan programs encourage patients to pay, helping both patient and hospital stay afloat.

  16. Pre-hospital physical activity status affects in-hospital course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Takamichi; Obayashi, Tohru; Hattori, Eijirou; Yamauchi, Yasuteru; Niwa, Akihiro; Isobe, Mitsuaki

    2010-03-01

    The clinical course of elderly patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can sometimes unexpectedly result in an adverse outcome even when therapy appears to be successful. We suspect that specific factors may characterize this worsening of status during hospitalization. This study examines whether the pre-hospital physical activity status of the elderly treated with percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) for AMI affects their in-hospital course. We studied 110 consecutive patients, aged 80 or older, who had undergone emergent PCI for AMI. Patients were divided into two groups based on clinical presentation: Better Killip class (Killip classes I and II) and Worse Killip class (Killip classes III and IV). Patients were also divided into two groups based on pre-hospital physical activity status, determined retrospectively by review of medical records: Good physical activity (n=57) comprising those able to go out alone independently and Poor physical activity comprising those mainly confined to home (n=53). The overall in-hospital mortality rate was 9.1% for the study population. The Worse Killip class group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Better Killip class group (27.8% vs 5.4%, respectively; p=0.0102). In addition, the Poor physical activity group had a higher in-hospital mortality rate than the Good physical activity group (15.1% vs. 3.5%, respectively; p=0.047). These data suggest that pre-hospital physical activity status in elderly patients with AMI may affect in-hospital mortality as well as Killip class.

  17. Factors associated with Salmonella shedding among equine colic patients at a veterinary teaching hospital.

    PubMed

    Kim, L M; Morley, P S; Traub-Dargatz, J L; Salman, M D; Gentry-Weeks, C

    2001-03-01

    To evaluate factors potentially associated with fecal Salmonella shedding among equine patients hospitalized for colic at a veterinary teaching hospital and to determine the effects of probiotic treatment on fecal Salmonella shedding and clinical signs. Longitudinal study and controlled trial. 246 equine colic patients. History and medical information were obtained from patient records. Fecal and environmental samples were submitted for aerobic bacterial culture for Salmonella enterica. Fifty-one patients were treated with a commercially available probiotic; 46 were treated with a placebo. Logistic regression was used to evaluate data. Salmonella organisms were detected in feces from 23 (9%) patients at least once during hospitalization. Patients were more likely to shed Salmonella organisms if diarrhea was evident < or = 6 hours after hospitalization and duration of hospitalization exceeded 8 days (odds ratio [OR], 20.3), laminitis developed during hospitalization (OR, 12.0), results of nasogastric intubation were abnormal (OR, 4.9), leukopenia was evident < or =6 hours after hospitalization (OR, 4.6), or travel time to the teaching hospital exceeded 1 hour (OR, 3.5). Horses treated with the probiotic did not differ from control horses in regard to likelihood of fecal Salmonella shedding (OR, 1.5) or prevalence of clinical signs. Results suggest that certain risk factors are associated with fecal shedding of S enterica among equine patients hospitalized at a veterinary teaching hospital because of colic and that pathogen monitoring in patients and the hospital environment and use of barrier nursing precautions for equine colic patients are beneficial.

  18. Factors influencing the hospitalization costs of patients with type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ping; Wang, Kaixiu; Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Rongzhi; Li, Chenglong

    2015-03-01

    This study aims to research the factors influencing the hospitalization costs of patients with type 2 diabetes, so as to provide some references for reducing their economic burden. Based on the Hospital Information System of a 3A grade hospital in China, we analyzed 2970 cases with type 2 diabetes during 2005-2012. Both the number of inpatients and the hospitalization costs had increased in the study period. Using multiple linear regression analysis, we found that patients in Urban Employee Basic Medical Insurance had higher costs than those in New Rural Cooperative Medical Scheme. We also found hospitalization costs to be higher in male patients and older patients, patients who stayed more days at hospital and who had surgeries, patients who had at least 1 complication, and patients whose admission status was emergency. After standardizing the regression coefficients, we found that the hospital stay, the forms of payment, and presence of complications were the first 3 factors influencing hospitalization costs in our study. In conclusion, the hospitalization costs of patients with type 2 diabetes could be influenced by age, gender, forms of payment, hospital stay, admission status, complications, and surgery. Medical workers in the studied region should take actions to reduce the duration of hospital stay for diabetic patients and prevent relevant complications. What is more, medical insurance needs further improvement. © 2015 APJPH.

  19. Hospital Costs of Foreign Non-Resident Patients: A Comparative Analysis in Catalonia, Spain

    PubMed Central

    Arroyo-Borrell, Elena; Renart-Vicens, Gemma; Saez, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Although patient mobility has increased over the world, in Europe there is a lack of empirical studies. The aim of the study was to compare foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients for the particular Catalan case, focusing on patient characteristics, hospitalisation costs and differences in costs depending on the typology of the hospital they are treated. We used data from the 2012 Minimum Basic Data Set-Acute Care hospitals (CMBD-HA) in Catalonia. We matched two case-control groups: first, foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients and, second, foreign non-resident patients treated by Regional Public Hospitals versus other type of hospitals. Hospitalisation costs were modelled using a GLM Gamma with a log-link. Our results show that foreign non-resident patients were significantly less costly than domestic patients (12% cheaper). Our findings also suggested differences in the characteristics of foreign non-resident patients using Regional Public Hospitals or other kinds of hospitals although we did not observe significant differences in the healthcare costs. Nevertheless, women, 15–24 and 35–44 years old patients and the days of stay were less costly in Regional Public Hospitals. In general, acute hospitalizations of foreign non-resident patients while they are on holiday cost substantially less than domestic patients. The typology of hospital is not found to be a relevant factor influencing costs. PMID:28906459

  20. Hospital Costs of Foreign Non-Resident Patients: A Comparative Analysis in Catalonia, Spain.

    PubMed

    Arroyo-Borrell, Elena; Renart-Vicens, Gemma; Saez, Marc; Carreras, Marc

    2017-09-14

    Although patient mobility has increased over the world, in Europe there is a lack of empirical studies. The aim of the study was to compare foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients for the particular Catalan case, focusing on patient characteristics, hospitalisation costs and differences in costs depending on the typology of the hospital they are treated. We used data from the 2012 Minimum Basic Data Set-Acute Care hospitals (CMBD-HA) in Catalonia. We matched two case-control groups: first, foreign non-resident patients versus domestic patients and, second, foreign non-resident patients treated by Regional Public Hospitals versus other type of hospitals. Hospitalisation costs were modelled using a GLM Gamma with a log-link. Our results show that foreign non-resident patients were significantly less costly than domestic patients (12% cheaper). Our findings also suggested differences in the characteristics of foreign non-resident patients using Regional Public Hospitals or other kinds of hospitals although we did not observe significant differences in the healthcare costs. Nevertheless, women, 15-24 and 35-44 years old patients and the days of stay were less costly in Regional Public Hospitals. In general, acute hospitalizations of foreign non-resident patients while they are on holiday cost substantially less than domestic patients. The typology of hospital is not found to be a relevant factor influencing costs.

  1. High survival rates and associated factors among ebola virus disease patients hospitalized at donka national hospital, conakry, Guinea.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Chughtai, Morad; Bah, Elhadj Ibrahima; Barry, Moumié; Béavogui, Kézély; Loua, Tokpagnan Oscar; Malik, Ahmed A

    2015-02-01

    Anecdotal reports suggesting that survival rates among hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in Guinea are higher than the 29.2% rate observed in the current epidemic in West Africa. Survival after symptom onset was determined using Kaplan Meier survival methods among patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease treated in Conakry, Guinea from March 25, 2014, to August 5, 2014. We analyzed the relationship between survival and patient factors, including demographics and clinical features. Of the 70 patients analyzed [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 34 ± 14.1; 44 were men], 42 were discharged alive with a survival rate among hospitalized patients of 60% (95% confidence interval, 41.5-78.5%). The survival rate was 28 (71.8%) among 39 patients under 34 years of age, and 14 (46.7%) among 30 patients aged 35 years or greater (p = 0.034). The rates of myalgia (3 of 42 versus 7 of 28, p = 0.036) and hiccups (1 of 42 versus 5 of 28, p = 0.023) were significantly lower among patients who survived. Our results provide insights into a cohort of hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in whom survival is prominently higher than seen in other cohorts of hospitalized patients.

  2. High Survival Rates and Associated Factors Among Ebola Virus Disease Patients Hospitalized at Donka National Hospital, Conakry, Guinea

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Adnan I.; Chughtai, Morad; Bah, Elhadj Ibrahima; Barry, Moumié; Béavogui, Kézély; Loua, Tokpagnan Oscar; Malik, Ahmed A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Anecdotal reports suggesting that survival rates among hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in Guinea are higher than the 29.2% rate observed in the current epidemic in West Africa. Methods Survival after symptom onset was determined using Kaplan Meier survival methods among patients with confirmed Ebola virus disease treated in Conakry, Guinea from March 25, 2014, to August 5, 2014. We analyzed the relationship between survival and patient factors, including demographics and clinical features. Results Of the 70 patients analyzed [mean age ± standard deviation (SD), 34 ± 14.1; 44 were men], 42 were discharged alive with a survival rate among hospitalized patients of 60% (95% confidence interval, 41.5–78.5%). The survival rate was 28 (71.8%) among 39 patients under 34 years of age, and 14 (46.7%) among 30 patients aged 35 years or greater (p = 0.034). The rates of myalgia (3 of 42 versus 7 of 28, p = 0.036) and hiccups (1 of 42 versus 5 of 28, p = 0.023) were significantly lower among patients who survived. Conclusions Our results provide insights into a cohort of hospitalized patients with Ebola virus disease in whom survival is prominently higher than seen in other cohorts of hospitalized patients. PMID:25992182

  3. Prevalence of malnutrition and associated factors among hospitalized elderly patients in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alzahrani, Sami H; Alamri, Sultan H

    2017-07-03

    Malnutrition is a nutritional disorder that adversely affects the body from a functional or clinical perspective. It is very often observed in the elderly population. This study aimed to estimate the prevalence of malnutrition among hospitalized elderly patients and its associated factors and outcomes in terms of length of stay and mortality in King Abdulaziz University Hospital, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. In a cross-sectional study, we evaluated the nutritional status of hospitalized elderly patients using the most recent version of the short form of Mini Nutritional Assessment (MNA-SF). A total of 248 hospitalized patients were included (70.0 ± 7.7 years; 60% female). According to the MNA-SF, a total of 76.6% patients were either malnourished or at risk of malnutrition. Malnourished patients had significantly lower levels of serum albumin (28.2 ± 7.7), hemoglobin (10.5 ± 1.8), and lymphocyte (1.7 ± 0.91). They had increased tendency to stay in the hospital for longer durations (IQR, 5-11 days; median = 7 days) and had a mortality rate of 6.9%. Malnutrition was highly prevalent among hospitalized elderly and was associated with increased length of stay and mortality.

  4. Insulin Therapy for the Management of Hyperglycemia in Hospitalized Patients

    PubMed Central

    McDonnell, Marie E.; Umpierrez, Guillermo E.

    2013-01-01

    It has long been established that hyperglycemia with or without a prior diagnosis of diabetes increases both mortality and disease-specific morbidity in hospitalized patients1–4 and that goal-directed insulin therapy can improve outcomes.5–9 During the past decade, since the widespread institutional adoption of intensified insulin protocols after the publication of a landmark trial,5,10 the pendulum in the inpatient diabetes literature has swung away from achieving intensive glucose control and toward more moderate and individualized glycemic targets.11,12 This change in clinical practice is the result of several factors, including challenges faced by hospitals to coordinate glycemic control across all levels of care,13,14 publication of negative prospective trials,15,16 revised recommendations from professional organizations,17,18 and increasing evidence on the deleterious effect of hypoglycemia.19–22 This article reviews the pathophysiology of hyperglycemia during illness, the mechanisms for increased complications and mortality due to hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, beneficial mechanistic effects of insulin therapy and provides updated recommendations for the inpatient management of diabetes in the critical care setting and in the general medicine and surgical settings.23,24 PMID:22575413

  5. A nationwide hospital survey on patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals: setting priorities at the launch of a 5-year patient safety plan.

    PubMed

    Vlayen, Annemie; Hellings, Johan; Claes, Neree; Peleman, Hilde; Schrooten, Ward

    2012-09-01

    To measure patient safety culture in Belgian hospitals and to examine the homogeneous grouping of underlying safety culture dimensions. The Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture was distributed organisation-wide in 180 Belgian hospitals participating in the federal program on quality and safety between 2007 and 2009. Participating hospitals were invited to submit their data to a comparative database. Homogeneous groups of underlying safety culture dimensions were sought by hierarchical cluster analysis. 90 acute, 42 psychiatric and 11 long-term care hospitals submitted their data for comparison to other hospitals. The benchmark database included 55 225 completed questionnaires (53.7% response rate). Overall dimensional scores were low, although scores were found to be higher for psychiatric and long-term care hospitals than for acute hospitals. The overall perception of patient safety was lower in French-speaking hospitals. Hierarchical clustering of dimensions resulted in two distinct clusters. Cluster I grouped supervisor/manager expectations and actions promoting safety, organisational learning-continuous improvement, teamwork within units and communication openness, while Cluster II included feedback and communication about error, overall perceptions of patient safety, non-punitive response to error, frequency of events reported, teamwork across units, handoffs and transitions, staffing and management support for patient safety. The nationwide safety culture assessment confirms the need for a long-term national initiative to improve patient safety culture and provides each hospital with a baseline patient safety culture profile to direct an intervention plan. The identification of clusters of safety culture dimensions indicates the need for a different approach and context towards the implementation of interventions aimed at improving the safety culture. Certain clusters require unit level improvements, whereas others demand a hospital-wide policy.

  6. Does hospital ownership affect patient experience? An investigation into public-private sector differences in England.

    PubMed

    Pérotin, Virginie; Zamora, Bernarda; Reeves, Rachel; Bartlett, Will; Allen, Pauline

    2013-05-01

    Using patient experience survey data, the paper investigates whether hospital ownership affects the level of quality reported by patients whose care is funded by the National Health Service in areas other than clinical quality. We estimate a switching regression model that accounts for (i) some observable characteristics of the patient and the hospital episode; (ii) selection into private hospitals; and (iii) unmeasured hospital characteristics captured by hospital fixed effects. We find that the experience reported by patients in public and private hospitals is different, i.e. most dimensions of quality are delivered differently by the two types of hospitals, with each sector offering greater quality in certain specialties or to certain groups of patients. However, the sum of all ownership effects is not statistically different from zero at sample means. In other words, hospital ownership in and of itself does not affect the level of quality of the average patient's reported experience. Differences in mean reported quality levels between the private and public sectors are entirely attributable to patient characteristics, the selection of patients into public or private hospitals and unobserved characteristics specific to individual hospitals, rather than to hospital ownership. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Nurses' solutions to prevent inpatient falls in hospital patient rooms.

    PubMed

    Tzeng, Huey-Ming; Yin, Chang-Yi

    2008-01-01

    Patient fall rates are perceived as the indicator that could be most improved through nurse-led safety strategies or interventions. A safety-driven design with a goal to prevent inpatient fall-related injuries should be a hospital design principle. In this qualitative study, researchers used inductive and deductive methods to understand the clinically accessible solutions to minimize the extrinsic risk factors of inpatient falls. The findings from the nurse interviews were compared with the intervention strategies toward the five primary root causes of fatal falls as suggested by the Joint Commission (2005b). Twenty-four solutions were identified from the nurse interview transcriptions: five were related to the dimension of inadequate caregiver communication, none was associated with the dimension of inadequate staff orientation and training, three were related to inadequate assessment and reassessment, 15 were associated with unsafe care environment, and one was related to inadequate care planning and provision.

  8. Association of Dermatology Consultations With Patient Care Outcomes in Hospitalized Patients With Inflammatory Skin Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Milani-Nejad, Nima; Zhang, Myron

    2017-01-01

    Importance The value of inpatient dermatology consultations has traditionally been demonstrated with frequency in changes of diagnosis and management; however, the impact of dermatology consultations on metrics such as hospital length of stay and readmission rates remains unknown. Objective To determine the association of dermatology consultations with patient care in hospitalized patients using objective values. Design, Setting, and Participants We retrospectively queried the deidentified database of patients hospitalized between January 1, 2012, and December 31, 2014, at a single university medical center. A total of 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis and 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were selected. Main Outcomes and Measures Hospital length of stay and 1-year readmission with inflammatory skin conditions. Results The 413 patients with a primary inflammatory skin condition discharge diagnosis were 61.0% female and had a mean (SD) age of 55.1 (16.4) years. The 647 patients with primary inflammatory skin condition admission diagnosis were 50.8% female and had a mean (SD) age of 57.8 (15.9) years. Multivariable modeling showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction of 1-year inflammatory skin condition readmissions among patients who were discharged primarily with an inflammatory skin condition (readmission probability, 0.0025; 95% CI, 0.00020-0.030 with dermatology consult vs 0.026; 95% CI, 0.0065-0.10 without; odds ratio, 0.093; 95% CI, 0.010-0.840; P = .03). No other confounding variable was associated with reduction in readmissions. Multivariable modeling also showed that dermatology consultations were associated with a reduction in the adjusted hospital length of stay by 2.64 days (95% CI, 1.75-3.53 days; P < .001). Conclusions and Relevance Dermatology consultations were associated with improvements of outcomes among hospitalized patients. The

  9. Characteristic Trend Analysis of Cancer Patients Hospitalized in Shanxi Tumor Hospital for the First Time during 2001 and 2010.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Li; Wang, Yan; Han, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    To observe and analyze the characteristic trend of cancer patients hospitalized for the first time in Shanxi Tumor Hospital from 2001 to 2010, clinical data including case number, age, gender, and frequency of different tumor occurrences were collected and statistically analyzed. (i) From 2001 to 2010, the number of cancer patients hospitalized for the first time increased by 1.3-fold; (ii) The patient overall average age also increased from 51.8 to 54.4, for males from 55.5 to 58.7 and females from 48.4 to 51.1, respectively. (iii) Male patients accounted for 43-48% and females accounted for 52-57% of the total. The percentage of female patients was higher than that of male patients in every year and showed an upward trend over the years, while that of the males showed a downward trend (χ2 =7.031, p=0.008); (iv) Among the top 6 most common cancers, lung, cervical, esophageal, colorectal and breast cancers tended to increase over the years (p<0.05), but not gastric cancer (p=0.423). (i) The number of cancer patients hospitalized for the first time during the past 10 years increased year by year, and was higher for female than male; (ii) the average age of patients increased year after year and was greater for male than female; (iii) the number of patients with lung cancer, cervical cancer, esophageal cancer, colorectal cancer and breast cancer increased over years.

  10. Association Between Medicare Summary Star Ratings for Patient Experience and Clinical Outcomes in US Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Trzeciak, Stephen; Gaughan, John P; Bosire, Joshua; Mazzarelli, Anthony J

    2016-03-01

    In 2015, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) released new summary star ratings for US hospitals based on patient experience. We aimed to test the association between CMS patient experience star ratings and clinical outcomes. We analyzed risk-adjusted data for more than 3000 US hospitals from CMS Hospital Compare using linear regression. We found that better patient experience was associated with favorable clinical outcomes. Specifically, a higher number of stars for patient experience had a statistically significant association with lower rates of many in-hospital complications. A higher patient experience star rating also had a statistically significant association with lower rates of unplanned readmissions to the hospital within 30 days. Better patient experience according to the CMS star ratings is associated with favorable clinical outcomes. These results support the inclusion of patient experience data in the framework of how hospitals are paid for services.

  11. Utility of Continuous EEG Monitoring in Noncritically lll Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Billakota, Santoshi; Sinha, Saurabh R

    2016-10-01

    Continuous EEG (cEEG) monitoring is used in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting to detect seizures, especially nonconvulsive seizures and status epilepticus. The utility and impact of such monitoring in non-ICU patients are largely unknown. Hospitalized patients who were not in an ICU and underwent cEEG monitoring in the first half of 2011 and 2014 were identified. Reason for admission, admitting service (neurologic and nonneurologic), indication for cEEG, comorbid conditions, duration of recording, EEG findings, whether an event/seizure was recorded, and impact of EEG findings on management were reviewed. We evaluated the impact of the year of recording, admitting service, indication for cEEG, and neurologic comorbidity on the yield of recordings based on whether an event was captured and/or a change in antiepileptic drug management occurred. Two hundred forty-nine non-ICU patients had cEEG monitoring during these periods. The indication for cEEG was altered mental status (60.6%), observed seizures (26.5%), or observed spells (12.9%); 63.5% were on neuro-related services. The average duration of recording was 1.8 days. EEG findings included interictal epileptiform discharges (14.9%), periodic lateralized discharges (4%), and generalized periodic discharges (1.6%). Clinical events were recorded in 28.1% and seizures in 16.5%. The cEEG led to a change in antiepileptic drug management in 38.6% of patients. There was no impact of type of admitting service; there was no significant impact of indication for cEEG. In non-ICU patients, cEEG monitoring had a relatively high yield of event/seizures (similar to ICU) and impact on management. Temporal trends, admitting service, and indication for cEEG did not alter this.

  12. Shaping Patient Education in Rural Hospitals: Learning from the Experiences of Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scheckel, Martha; Hedrick-Erickson, Jennifer; Teunis, Jamie; Deutsch, Ashley; Roers, Anna; Willging, Anne; Pittman, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Patient education is a crucial aspect of nursing practice, but much of the research about it is quantitative and has been conducted in urban medical centers. These urban-based studies have limited utility for nurses working in rural hospitals where the populations they serve often have unique and challenging health contexts and cultures. Since…

  13. Association of heart rate at hospital discharge with mortality and hospitalizations in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Habal, Marlena V; Liu, Peter P; Austin, Peter C; Ross, Heather J; Newton, Gary E; Wang, Xuesong; Tu, Jack V; Lee, Douglas S

    2014-01-01

    Heart failure (HF) is associated with a high burden of morbidity and mortality. Hospital discharge is an opportunity for identification of modifiable prognostic factors in the transition to chronic HF. We examined the association of discharge heart rate with 30-day and 1-year mortality and hospitalization outcomes in a cohort of 9097 patients with HF discharged from hospital. Discharge heart rate was categorized into predefined groups: 40 to 60 (n=1333), 61 to 70 (n=2170), 71 to 80 (n=2631), 81 to 90 (n=1700), and >90 bpm (n=1263). There was a significant increase in all-cause 30-day mortality with adjusted odds ratios of 1.59 (95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-2.14; P=0.003) for discharge heart rates 81 to 90 bpm and 1.56 (95% CI, 1.13-2.16; P=0.007) for heart rates>90 bpm when compared with the reference group (heart rates, 61-70 bpm). Cardiovascular death risk at 30 days was also higher with adjusted odds ratio 1.59 (discharge heart rates, 81-90 bpm; 95% CI, 1.09-2.33; P=0.017) and 1.65 (discharge heart rates, >90 bpm; 95% CI, 1.09-2.48; P=0.017). One-year all-cause mortality (adjusted odds ratio, 1.41; 95% CI, 1.16-1.72; P<0.001) and cardiovascular death (adjusted odds ratio, 1.47; 95% CI, 1.12-1.92; P=0.005) were higher with discharge heart rates>90 bpm when compared with the reference group (heart rates, 40-60 bpm). Readmissions for HF (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.26; 95% CI, 1.04-1.54; P=0.021) and cardiovascular disease (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.29; 95% CI, 1.08-1.54; P=0.004) within 30 days were also higher with discharge heart rates>90 bpm. Higher discharge heart rates were associated with greater risk of all-cause and cardiovascular mortality≤1-year follow-up and an elevated risk of 30-day readmission for HF and cardiovascular disease.

  14. A randomised controlled trial of domiciliary and hospital-based rehabilitation for stroke patients after discharge from hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Gladman, J R; Lincoln, N B; Barer, D H

    1993-01-01

    This study compared the functional ability and perceived health status of stroke patients treated by a domiciliary rehabilitation team or by routine hospital-based services after discharge from hospital. Patients discharged from two acute and three rehabilitation hospitals in Nottingham were randomly allocated in three strata (Health Care of the Elderly, General Medical and Stroke Unit) to receive domiciliary or hospital-based care after discharge. Functional recovery was assessed by the Extended Activities of Daily Living (ADL) scale three and six months after discharge and perceived health at six months was measured by the Nottingham Health Profile. A total of 327 eligible patients of 1119 on a register of acute stroke admissions were recruited over 16 months. Overall there were no differences between the groups in their Extended ADL scores at three or six months, or their Nottingham Health Profile scores at six months. In the Stroke Unit stratum, patients treated by the domiciliary team had higher household (p = 0.02) and leisure activity (p = 0.04) scores at six months than those receiving routine care. In the Health Care of the Elderly stratum, death or a move into long-term institutional care at six months occurred less frequently in patients allocated to the routine service, about half of whom attended a geriatric day hospital. Overall there was no difference in the effectiveness of the domiciliary and hospital-based services, although younger stroke unit patients appeared to do better with home therapy while some frail elderly patients might have benefited from day hospital attendance. PMID:8410035

  15. Hospital Differences Drive Antibiotic Delays for Black Patients Compared With White Patients With Suspected Septic Shock.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Stephanie Parks; Karvetski, Colleen H; Templin, Megan A; Taylor, Brice T

    2018-02-01

    Evaluate racial disparities in sepsis processes of care. Observational cohort study. Nine hospitals in the Southeastern United States between 2014 and 2016. Two thousand two hundred twenty-one white and 707 black patients treated in the emergency department through "code sepsis" pathway for suspected septic shock. Black patients were less likely to receive timely antibiotics than were white patients using multiple definitions (1 hr from code sepsis activation [odds ratio, 0.57; 95% CI, [0.44-0.74]; 85.6% vs. 91.2%; p < 0.0001]; 1 hr from triage [odds ratio, 0.83; 95% CI, [0.69-1.00]; 28.0% vs. 31.8%; p = 0.06]; 3 hr from triage [odds ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, [0.57-0.88]; 80.1% vs. 85.0%; p = 0.002]). Focusing on antibiotic administration within 1 hour of triage, these differences were enhanced after adjusting for patient-level factors (adjusted odds ratio, 0.80; 95% CI, [0.66-0.96]; p = 0.02), but attenuated after adjusting for hospital-level differences (adjusted odds ratio, 0.90; 95% CI, [0.81-1.01]; p = 0.07). Black and white patients did not differ on other sepsis quality indicators or adjusted mortality. Black patients appear to be less likely than white patients to receive timely antibiotic therapy for sepsis. These differences were largely explained by variation in care among hospitals, such that hospitals that disproportionately treat black patients were less likely to provide timely antibiotic therapy overall. There were no differences between races in other sepsis quality measures or adjusted mortality.

  16. 78 FR 6819 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ..., Center for Quality Improvement and Patient Safety, AHRQ, 540 Gaither Road, Rockville, MD 20850; Telephone... DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From The Connecticut Hospital Association Federal Patient Safety...

  17. Pre-Hospital Intubation Factors and Pneumonia in Trauma Patients

    PubMed Central

    Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M.; Sharar, Sam R.; Maier, Ronald V.; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. Methods The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007–July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥104 colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Results Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Conclusion Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease

  18. Pre-hospital intubation factors and pneumonia in trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Evans, Heather L; Warner, Keir; Bulger, Eileen M; Sharar, Sam R; Maier, Ronald V; Cuschieri, Joseph

    2011-10-01

    We reported similar rates of ventilator-associated pneumonia (VAP) previously in trauma patients intubated either in a pre-hospital (PH) venue or the emergency department. A subset of PH intubations with continuous quality assessment was re-examined to identify the intubation factors associated with VAP. The subgroup was derived from an existing data set of consecutive adult trauma patients intubated prior to Level I trauma center admission July 2007-July 2008. Intubation details recorded included bag-valve mask ventilation (BVM) and the presence of material in the airway. The diagnosis of VAP was made preferentially by quantitative bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cultures (≥ 10⁴ colony-forming units indicating infection). Baseline data, injury characteristics, and circumstances of intubation of patients with and without VAP were compared by univariable analysis. Detailed data were available for 197 patients; 32 (16.2%) developed VAP, on average 6.0±0.7 days after admission. Baseline characteristics were similar in the groups, but diabetes mellitus was more common in the VAP group (4 [12.5%] vs. 5 [3.0%]; p=0.02). There was a higher rate of blunt injury in the VAP patients (28 [87.5%] vs. 106 [64.2%]; p=0.01) and higher injury severity scores (33.1±2.8 vs. 23.0±1.0; p=0.0002) and chest Abbreviated Injury Scores (2.6±0.3 vs. 1.5±0.1; p=0.002). Lower Glasgow Coma Scale scores (7.9±0.9 vs. 9.9±0.4; p=0.04) and greater use of BVM (18 [56.3%] vs. 56 [34.0%]; p=0.02) were observed in patients who developed VAP. Among aspirations, 10 (31.3%) of patients with emesis developed VAP compared with only 4 (12.5%) with blood in the airway (p=0.003). Aspiration, along with depressed consciousness and greater injury severity, may predispose trauma patients to VAP. Prospective studies should focus on the quality and timing of aspiration relative to intubation to determine if novel interventions can prevent aspiration or decrease the risk of VAP after aspiration.

  19. The Citadel cannot hold: technologies go outside the hospital, patients and doctors too.

    PubMed

    Stoeckle, J D

    1995-01-01

    Use of the acute hospital has markedly decreased over the past four decades for various reasons: the decentralization of diagnostic treatment technologies to out-of-hospital sites; the clinical substitutions of quick diagnostic testing of the ambulatory patient for the longer diagnostic testing of the hospitalized patient; the diminished use of hospital bed rest and the expanded use of exercise for treatment; the corporate organization of hospital work that emphasizes efficiency; and the group practice organization of generalists and specialists that avoids hospital use for the diagnosis of complex disorders in ambulatory patients. A smaller domain for hospital bed care and renewed attention to chronic disease and prevention in the community diminish the hold of the acute hospital on care. The evolution of more collaborative, decentralized arrangements promises to be a positive development for community care.

  20. Hospital collaboration with emergency medical services in the care of patients with acute myocardial infarction: perspectives from key hospital staff.

    PubMed

    Landman, Adam B; Spatz, Erica S; Cherlin, Emily J; Krumholz, Harlan M; Bradley, Elizabeth H; Curry, Leslie A

    2013-02-01

    Evidence suggests that active collaboration between hospitals and emergency medical services (EMS) is significantly associated with lower acute myocardial infarction mortality rates; however, the nature of such collaborations is not well understood. We seek to characterize views of key hospital staff about collaboration with EMS in the care of patients hospitalized with acute myocardial infarction. We performed an exploratory analysis of qualitative data previously collected from site visits and detailed interviews with 11 US hospitals that ranked in the top or bottom 5% of performance on 30-day risk-standardized acute myocardial infarction mortality rates, using Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services data from 2005 to 2007. We selected all codes from the previous analysis in which EMS was most likely to have been discussed. A multidisciplinary team analyzed the data with the constant comparative method to generate recurrent themes. Both higher- and lower-performing hospitals reported that EMS is critical to the provision of timely care for patients with acute myocardial infarction. However, close collaborative relationships with EMS were more apparent in the higher-performing hospitals, which demonstrated specific investment in and attention to EMS through respect for EMS as valued professionals and colleagues, strong communication and coordination with EMS and active engagement of EMS in hospital acute myocardial infarction quality improvement efforts. Hospital staff from higher-performing hospitals described broad, multifaceted strategies to support collaboration with EMS in providing acute myocardial infarction care. The association of these strategies with hospital performance should be tested quantitatively in a larger representative study. Copyright © 2012. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  1. A preliminary study of Patient Dignity Inventory validation among patients hospitalized in an acute psychiatric ward

    PubMed Central

    Di Lorenzo, Rosaria; Cabri, Giulio; Carretti, Eleonora; Galli, Giacomo; Giambalvo, Nina; Rioli, Giulia; Saraceni, Serena; Spiga, Giulia; Del Giovane, Cinzia; Ferri, Paola

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the perception of dignity among patients hospitalized in a psychiatric setting using the Patient Dignity Inventory (PDI), which had been first validated in oncologic field among terminally ill patients. Patients and methods After having modified two items, we administered the Italian version of PDI to all patients hospitalized in a public psychiatric ward (Service of Psychiatric Diagnosis and Treatment of a northern Italian town), who provided their consent and completed it at discharge, from October 21, 2015 to May 31, 2016. We excluded minors and patients with moderate/severe dementia, with poor knowledge of Italian language, who completed PDI in previous hospitalizations and/or were hospitalized for <72 hours. We collected the demographic and clinical variables of our sample (n=135). We statistically analyzed PDI scores, performing Cronbach’s alpha coefficient and principal factor analysis, followed by orthogonal and oblique rotation. We concomitantly administered to our sample other scales (Hamilton Rating Scales for Depression and Anxiety, Global Assessment of Functioning and Health of the Nation Outcome Scales) to analyze the PDI concurrent validity. Results With a response rate of 93%, we obtained a mean PDI score of 48.27 (±19.59 SD) with excellent internal consistency (Cronbach’s alpha coefficient =0.93). The factorial analysis showed the following three factors with eigenvalue >1 (Kaiser’s criterion), which explained >80% of total variance with good internal consistency: 1) “Loss of self-identity and social role”, 2) “Anxiety and uncertainty for future” and 3) “Loss of personal autonomy”. The PDI and the three-factor scores were statistically significantly positively correlated with the Hamilton Scales for Depression and Anxiety but not with other scale scores. Conclusion Our preliminary research suggests that PDI can be a reliable tool to assess patients’ dignity perception in a psychiatric setting, until now

  2. Handgrip strength and associated factors in hospitalized patients.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Rita S; Fonseca, Isabel; Pichel, Fernando; Restivo, Maria T; Amaral, Teresa F

    2015-03-01

    Handgrip strength (HGS) is a marker of nutrition status. Many factors are associated with HGS. Age, height, body mass index, number of diagnoses, and number and type of drugs have been shown to modify the association between undernutrition and HGS. Nevertheless, other patient characteristics that could modify this association and its joint modifier effect have not been studied yet. To evaluate the association of inpatients' HGS and undernutrition considering the potential modifier effect of cognitive status, functional activity, disease severity, anthropometrics, and other patient characteristics on HGS. A cross-sectional study was conducted in a university hospital. Sex, age, abbreviated mental test score, functional activity score, Charlson index, number of drugs, Patient-Generated Subjective Global Assessment (PG-SGA) score, body weight, mid-arm muscle circumference, adductor pollicis muscle thickness, body height, wrist circumference, hand length, and palm width were included in a linear regression model to identify independent factors associated with HGS (dependent variable). The study sample was composed of 688 inpatients (18-91 years old). All variables included in the model were associated with HGS (β, -0.16 to 0.38; P ≤ .049) and explained 68.5% of HGS. Age, functional activity decline, Charlson index, number of drugs, PG-SGA score, body weight, and wrist circumference had a negative association with HGS. All other studied variables were positively associated with HGS. Nutrition status evaluated by PG-SGA was still associated with HGS after considering the joint effect of other patient characteristics, which reinforces the value of HGS as an indicator of undernutrition. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  3. Association of Adverse Events With Antibiotic Use in Hospitalized Patients.

    PubMed

    Tamma, Pranita D; Avdic, Edina; Li, David X; Dzintars, Kathryn; Cosgrove, Sara E

    2017-09-01

    Estimates of the incidence of overall antibiotic-associated adverse drug events (ADEs) in hospitalized patients are generally unavailable. To describe the incidence of antibiotic-associated ADEs for adult inpatients receiving systemic antibiotic therapy. Retrospective cohort of adult inpatients admitted to general medicine wards at an academic medical center. At least 24 hours of any parenteral or oral antibiotic therapy. Medical records of 1488 patients were examined for 30 days after antibiotic initiation for the development of the following antibiotic-associated ADEs: gastrointestinal, dermatologic, musculoskeletal, hematologic, hepatobiliary, renal, cardiac, and neurologic; and 90 days for the development of Clostridium difficile infection or incident multidrug-resistant organism infection, based on adjudication by 2 infectious diseases trained clinicians. In 1488 patients, the median age was 59 years (interquartile range, 49-69 years), and 758 (51%) participants were female. A total of 298 (20%) patients experienced at least 1 antibiotic-associated ADE. Furthermore, 56 (20%) non-clinically indicated antibiotic regimens were associated with an ADE, including 7 cases of C difficile infection. Every additional 10 days of antibiotic therapy conferred a 3% increased risk of an ADE. The most common ADEs were gastrointestinal, renal, and hematologic abnormalities, accounting for 78 (42%), 45 (24%), and 28 (15%) 30-day ADEs, respectively. Notable differences were identified between the incidence of ADEs associated with specific antibiotics. Although antibiotics may play a critical role when used appropriately, our findings underscore the importance of judicious antibiotic prescribing to reduce the harm that can result from antibiotic-associated ADEs.

  4. The use of patient feedback by hospital boards of directors: a qualitative study of two NHS hospitals in England

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Robert; Baeza, Juan I; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-01-01

    Background Although previous research suggests that different kinds of patient feedback are used in different ways to help improve the quality of hospital care, there have been no studies of the ways in which hospital boards of directors use feedback for this purpose. Objectives To examine whether and how boards of directors of hospitals use feedback from patients to formulate strategy and to assure and improve the quality of care. Methods We undertook an in-depth qualitative study in two acute hospital National Health Service foundation trusts in England, purposively selected as contrasting examples of the collection of different kinds of patient feedback. We collected and analysed data from interviews with directors and other managers, from observation of board meetings, and from board papers and other documents. Results The two boards used in-depth qualitative feedback and quantitative feedback from surveys in different ways to help develop strategies, set targets for quality improvement and design specific quality improvement initiatives; but both boards made less subsequent use of any kinds of feedback to monitor their strategies or explicitly to assure the quality of services. Discussion and conclusions We have identified limitations in the uses of patient feedback by hospital boards that suggest that boards should review their current practice to ensure that they use the different kinds of patient feedback that are available to them more effectively to improve, monitor and assure the quality of care. PMID:28754814

  5. 76 FR 79192 - Patient Safety Organizations: Voluntary Relinquishment From the Georgia Hospital Association...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ... The Georgia Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA... Hospital Association Research and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA-PSO), PSO number... and Education Foundation Patient Safety Organization (GHA-PSO) was delisted effective at 12:00...

  6. Deep vein thrombosis in hospitalized patients: a review of evidence-based guidelines for prevention.

    PubMed

    Kehl-Pruett, Wendy

    2006-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis affects many hospitalized patients because of decreased activity and therapeutic equipment. This article reviews known risk factors for developing deep vein thrombosis, current prevention methods, and current evidence-based guidelines in order to raise nurses' awareness of early prevention methods in all hospitalized patients. Early prophylaxis can reduce patient risk of deep vein thrombosis and its complications.

  7. Anti-Smoking Practice in Hospitals: An Intercept Survey among Patients in Hubei Province, China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhou, Dunjin; Yan, Yaqiong; Yu, Huihong; Xia, Qinghua; Yang, Niannian; Zhang, Zhifeng; Zhu, Zhaoyang; Li, Fang; Gong, Jie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to examine whether, in the opinion of patients selected in 13 hospitals of Hubei province, China, hospitals are smoke free. Patients were also asked whether their physicians had inquired about their smoking status. Design/methodology/approach: Patients were recruited through an intercept method (i.e. stopped by the…

  8. Leptospirosis among Hospitalized Febrile Patients in Northern Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Biggs, Holly M.; Bui, Duy M.; Galloway, Renee L.; Stoddard, Robyn A.; Shadomy, Sean V.; Morrissey, Anne B.; Bartlett, John A.; Onyango, Jecinta J.; Maro, Venance P.; Kinabo, Grace D.; Saganda, Wilbrod; Crump, John A.

    2011-01-01

    We enrolled consecutive febrile admissions to two hospitals in Moshi, Tanzania. Confirmed leptospirosis was defined as a ≥ 4-fold increase in microscopic agglutination test (MAT) titer; probable leptospirosis as reciprocal MAT titer ≥ 800; and exposure to pathogenic leptospires as titer ≥ 100. Among 870 patients enrolled in the study, 453 (52.1%) had paired sera available, and 40 (8.8%) of these met the definition for confirmed leptospirosis. Of 832 patients with ≥ 1 serum sample available, 30 (3.6%) had probable leptospirosis and an additional 277 (33.3%) had evidence of exposure to pathogenic leptospires. Among those with leptospirosis the most common clinical diagnoses were malaria in 31 (44.3%) and pneumonia in 18 (25.7%). Leptospirosis was associated with living in a rural area (odds ratio [OR] 3.4, P < 0.001). Among those with confirmed leptospirosis, the predominant reactive serogroups were Mini and Australis. Leptospirosis is a major yet underdiagnosed cause of febrile illness in northern Tanzania, where it appears to be endemic. PMID:21813847

  9. Determining the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalized paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Marino, L V; Goddard, E; Workman, L

    2006-09-01

    To determine the prevalence of malnutrition in hospitalised paediatric patients at Red Cross War Memorial Children's Hospital. A 1-day cross-sectional survey was completed in all medical and surgical wards and some specialist outpatient clinics. A total of 227 children participated in the study. Thirty-five per cent of patients were moderately malnourished (< or = -2 z-score), of whom 70% had no road to health card with them. Thirty-four per cent of children under 60 months of age received supplements in addition to a normal ward diet, 7.8% were enterally fed and less than 1% were parenterally fed. Almost 14% of children were found to be overweight/obese, which is higher than the national average of 6%. The prevalence of HIV infection on the day of the audit was 18% across all age groups compared with the Western Cape antenatal prevalence of 15.7% (2005). The overall prevalence of undernutrition was 34%, which is comparable with similar studies. However, the proportion of overweight children (14%) was greater than the national average. In view of the level of malnutrition seen, a nutrition risk-screening tool, identifying risk factors for malnutrition such as food access and vulnerability, should be developed. The tool should be used to assess nutrition status and risk during the course of hospitalisation, in addition to planning appropriate nutrition care plan interventions for discharge.

  10. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient.

    PubMed

    Haverkort, J J Mark; Minderhoud, A L C Ben; Wind, Jelte D D; Leenen, Luke P H; Hoepelman, Andy I M; Ellerbroek, Pauline M

    2016-02-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital's preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery.

  11. Pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge of transplant patients: strategy for patient safety

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Lívia Falcão; Martins, Bruna Cristina Cardoso; de Oliveira, Francisco Roberto Pereira; Cavalcante, Rafaela Michele de Andrade; Magalhães, Vanessa Pinto; Firmino, Paulo Yuri Milen; Adriano, Liana Silveira; da Silva, Adriano Monteiro; Flor, Maria Jose Nascimento; Néri, Eugenie Desirée Rabelo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To describe and analyze the pharmaceutical orientation given at hospital discharge of transplant patients. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, descriptive and retrospective study that used records of orientation given by the clinical pharmacist in the inpatients unit of the Kidney and Liver Transplant Department, at Hospital Universitário Walter Cantídio, in the city of Fortaleza (CE), Brazil, from January to July, 2014. The following variables recorded at the Clinical Pharmacy Database were analyzed according to their significance and clinical outcomes: pharmaceutical orientation at hospital discharge, drug-related problems and negative outcomes associated with medication, and pharmaceutical interventions performed. Results: The first post-transplant hospital discharge involved the entire multidisciplinary team and the pharmacist was responsible for orienting about drug therapy. The mean hospital discharges/month with pharmaceutical orientation during the study period was 10.6±1.3, totaling 74 orientations. The prescribed drug therapy had a mean of 9.1±2.7 medications per patient. Fifty-nine drug-related problems were identified, in which 67.8% were related to non-prescription of medication needed, resulting in 89.8% of risk of negative outcomes associated with medications due to untreated health problems. The request for inclusion of drugs (66.1%) was the main intervention, and 49.2% of the medications had some action in the digestive tract or metabolism. All interventions were classified as appropriate, and 86.4% of them we able to prevent negative outcomes. Conclusion: Upon discharge of a transplanted patient, the orientation given by the clinical pharmacist together with the multidisciplinary team is important to avoid negative outcomes associated with drug therapy, assuring medication reconciliation and patient safety. PMID:27759824

  12. Viability of gait speed test in hospitalized elderly patients.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bruno Prata; Batista, Anne Karine Menezes Santos; Ramos, Isis Resende; Dantas, Júlio Cesar; Gomes, Isabela Barboza; Forgiarini, Luiz Alberto; Camelier, Fernanda Rosa Warken; Camelier, Aquiles Assunção

    2016-01-01

    The gait speed test (GST) is a physical test that can predict falls and aid in the diagnosis of sarcopenia in the elderly. However, to our knowledge, there have been no studies evaluating its reproducibility in hospitalized elderly patients. The objective of this study was to evaluate the safety and reproducibility of the six-meter GST (6GST) in hospitalized elderly patients. This repeated measures study involved hospitalized elderly patients (≥ 60 years of age) who underwent the 6GST by the fifth day of hospitalization, were able to walk without assistance, and presented no signs of dyspnea or pain that would prevent them from performing the test. The 6GST was performed three times in sequence, with a rest period between each test, in a level corridor. Gait speed was measured in meters/second. Reproducibility was assessed by comparing the means, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) and Bland-Altman plots. We evaluated 110 elderly patients in a total of 330 tests. All participants completed all of the tests. The comparisons between the speeds obtained during the three tests showed high ICCs and a low mean bias (Bland-Altman plots). The correlation and accuracy were greatest when the mean maximum speed was compared with that obtained in the third test (1.26 ± 0.44 m/s vs. 1.22 ± 0.44 m/s; ICC = 0.99; p = 0.001; mean bias = 0.04; and limits of agreement = -0.27 to 0.15). The 6GST was proven to be safe and to have good reproducibility in this sample of hospitalized elderly patients. The third measurement seems to correspond to the maximum speed, since the first two measurements underestimated the actual performance. O teste de velocidade de marcha (TVM) é um teste físico que pode predizer quedas e auxiliar no diagnóstico de sarcopenia em idosos da comunidade. Entretanto, pelo que sabemos, não há estudos que avaliaram sua reprodutibilidade em idosos hospitalizados. O objetivo deste estudo foi avaliar a segurança e a reprodutibilidade do TVM de seis

  13. Facilitators and Threats to the Patient Dignity in Hospitalized Patients with Heart Diseases: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Borhani, Fariba; Abbaszadeh, Abbas; Rabori, Roghayeh Mehdipour

    2016-01-01

    Background: Patient’s dignity is an important issue which is highlighted in nursing It is an issue that is highly dependent on context and culture. Heart disease is the most common disease in Iran and the world. Identification of facilitator and threatening patient dignity in heart patients is vital. This study aimed to explore facilitator and threatening patient dignity in hospitalized patients with heart disease. Methods: This qualitative content analysis study was performed in 2014 in Kerman, Iran. 20 patients admitted to coronary care units and 5 personnel were selected using purposeful sampling in semi-structured and in depth interviews. Researchers also used documentation and field notes until data saturation. Qualitative data analysis was done constantly and simultaneously with data collection Results: Three central themes emerged: a) Care context which includes human environment and physical environment, b) Holistic safe care including meeting the needs of patients both in the hospital and after discharge, c) Creating a sense of security and an effective relationship between patient and nurse, including a respectful relationship and account the family in health team. Conclusion: The results of this study showed that care context is important for patient dignity as well as physical environment and safe holistic care. PMID:26793729

  14. Association Between Hospitals Caring for a Disproportionately High Percentage of Minority Trauma Patients and Increased Mortality

    PubMed Central

    Haider, Adil H.; Ong’uti, Sharon; Efron, David T.; Oyetunji, Tolulope A.; Crandall, Marie L.; Scott, Valerie K.; Haut, Elliott R.; Schneider, Eric B.; Powe, Neil R.; Cooper, Lisa A.; Cornwell, Edward E.

    2012-01-01

    Objective To determine whether there is an increased odds of mortality among trauma patients treated at hospitals with higher proportions of minority patients (ie, black and Hispanic patients combined). Design Hospitals were categorized on the basis of the percentage of minority patients admitted with trauma. The adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality were compared between hospitals with less than 25% of patients who were minorities (the reference group) and hospitals with 25% to 50% of patients who were minorities and hospitals with more than 50% of patients who were minorities. Multivariate logistic regression (with generalized linear modeling and a cluster-correlated robust estimate of variance) was used to control for multiple patient and injury severity characteristics. Setting A total of 434 hospitals in the National Trauma Data Bank. Participants Patients aged 18 to 64 years whose medical records were included in the National Trauma Data Bank for the years 2007 and 2008 with an Injury Severity Score of 9 or greater and who were white, black, or Hispanic. Main Outcome Measures Crude mortality and adjusted odds of in-hospital mortality. Results A total of 311 568 patients were examined. Hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was more than 50% also had younger patients, fewer female patients, more patients with penetrating trauma, and the highest crude mortality. After adjustment for potential confounders, patients treated at hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was 25% to 50% and at hospitals in which the percentage of minority patients was more than 50% demonstrated increased odds of death (adjusted odds ratio, 1.16 [95% confidence interval, 1.01–1.34] and adjusted odds ratio, 1.37 [95% confidence interval, 1.16–1.61], respectively), compared with the reference group. This disparity increased further on subset analysis of patients with a blunt injury. Uninsured patients had significantly increased odds of mortality within

  15. Ethics, patient rights and staff attitudes in Shanghai's psychiatric hospitals

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Adherence to ethical principles in clinical research and practice is becoming topical issue in China, where the prevalence of mental illness is rising, but treatment facilities remain underdeveloped. This paper reports on a study aiming to understand the ethical knowledge and attitudes of Chinese mental health professionals in relation to the process of diagnosis and treatment, informed consent, and privacy protection in clinical trials. Methods A self-administered survey was completed by 1110 medical staff recruited from Shanghai’s 22 psychiatric hospitals. Simple random selection methods were used to identify target individuals from the computerized registry of staff. Results The final sample for analysis consisted 1094 medical staff (including 523 doctors, 542 nurses, 8 pharmacologists and 21 other staff). The majority reported that their medical institutions had not established an Ethics Committee (87.8%) and agreed that Ethics Committees should be set up in their institutions (72.9%). Approximately half (52%) had not received systematic education in ethics, and almost all (89.1%) of the staff thought it was necessary. Nearly all participants (90.0%) knew the Shanghai Mental Health Regulations which was the first local regulations relating to mental health in China, but only 11% and 16.6% respectively knew of the Nuremberg Code and the Declaration of Helsinki. About half (51.8%) thought that the guardian should make the decision as to whether the patient participated in clinical trials or not. Conclusions The study indicates that most psychiatric hospitals in Shanghai have no Medical Ethics Committee. More than half the medical staff had not received systematic education and training in medical ethics and they have insufficient knowledge of the ethical issues related to clinical practice and trials. Training in ethics is recommended for medical staff during their training and as ongoing professional development. PMID:22595041

  16. Association of patient case-mix adjustment, hospital process performance rankings, and eligibility for financial incentives.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Rajendra H; Liang, Li; Karve, Amrita M; Hernandez, Adrian F; Rumsfeld, John S; Fonarow, Gregg C; Peterson, Eric D

    2008-10-22

    While most comparisons of hospital outcomes adjust for patient characteristics, process performance comparisons typically do not. To evaluate the degree to which hospital process performance ratings and eligibility for financial incentives are altered after accounting for hospitals' patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and mix of treatment opportunities. Using data from the American Heart Association's Get With the Guidelines program between January 2, 2000, and March 28, 2008, we analyzed hospital process performance based on the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services' defined core measures for acute myocardial infarction. Hospitals were initially ranked based on crude composite process performance and then ranked again after accounting for hospitals' patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and eligibility for measures using a hierarchical model. We then compared differences in hospital performance rankings and pay-for-performance financial incentive categories (top 20%, middle 60%, and bottom 20% institutions). Hospital process performance ranking and pay-for-performance financial incentive categories. A total of 148,472 acute myocardial infarction patients met the study criteria from 449 centers. Hospitals for which crude composite acute myocardial infarction performance was in the bottom quintile (n = 89) were smaller nonacademic institutions that treated a higher percentage of patients from racial or ethnic minority groups and also patients with greater comorbidities than hospitals ranked in the top quintile (n = 90). Although there was overall agreement on hospital rankings based on observed vs adjusted composite scores (weighted kappa, 0.74), individual hospital ranking changed with adjustment (median, 22 ranks; range, 0-214; interquartile range, 9-40). Additionally, 16.5% of institutions (n = 74) changed pay-for-performance financial status categories after accounting for patient and treatment opportunity mix. Our findings suggest that

  17. Differences in Patient Experience Between Hispanic and Non-Hispanic White Patients Across U.S. Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Jose F; Reimold, Kimberly E; Zheng, Jie; Orav, Endel John

    2017-12-15

    Despite the increased emphasis on patient experience, little is known about whether there are meaningful differences in hospital satisfaction between Hispanic and non-Hispanic whites. To determine if satisfaction differs, we used Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey data (2009-2010) reported by hospitals to compare responses between Hispanic and non-Hispanic white patients. Clustered logistic regression models identified within-hospital and between-hospital differences in satisfaction. Of the 3,864,938 respondents, 6.2% were Hispanics, who were more often younger and females and less likely to have graduated from high school. Hispanics were overall more likely to recommend their hospital (74.1% vs. 70.9%, p < .001) and to rate it 9 or 10 (72.5% vs. 65.9%, p < .001) than whites. Increased satisfaction among Hispanics was more pronounced when compared with whites within the same hospitals, with significantly higher ratings on all HCAHPS measures. However, hospitals serving a higher percentage of Hispanics had lower satisfaction scores for both Hispanic and white patients than other hospitals. There were significant but only modest-sized differences in patient experience between Hispanic and white patients across U.S. hospitals. Hispanics tended to be more satisfied with their care but received care at lower-performing hospitals.

  18. Nurses' Perceptions of Patient Safety Culture in Three Hospitals in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alquwez, Nahed; Cruz, Jonas Preposi; Almoghairi, Ahmed Mohammed; Al-Otaibi, Raid Salman; Almutairi, Khalid Obaid; Alicante, Jerico G; Colet, Paolo C

    2018-05-14

    To assess the present patient safety culture of three general hospitals in Saudi Arabia, as perceived by nurses. This study utilized a descriptive, cross-sectional design. A convenience sample of 351 nurses working in three general hospitals in the central region of Saudi Arabia was surveyed in this study using the Hospital Survey of Patients' Safety Culture (HSOPSC) from October 2016 to April 2017. From the 12 composites of the HSOPSC, the nurses perceived only the following two patient safety areas as strengths: teamwork within units and organizational learning-continuous improvement. Six areas of patient safety were identified as weaknesses, namely overall perception of patient safety, handoffs and transitions, communication openness, staffing, frequency of events reported, and nonpunitive response to errors. Nationality, educational attainment, hospital, length of service in the hospital, work area or unit, length of service in the current work area or unit, current position, and direct patient contact or interaction were significant predictors of the nurses' perceived patient safety culture. The findings in this study clarify the current status of patient safety culture in three hospitals in the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia. The present findings should be considered by policymakers, hospital leaders, and nurse executives in creating interventions aimed at improving the patient safety culture in hospitals. A multidimensional network intervention targeting the different dimensions of patient safety culture and involving different organizational levels should be implemented to improve patient safety. © 2018 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  19. How patients perceive the role of hospital chaplains: a preliminary exploration.

    PubMed

    Ellis, J M; McManus, C; Newton, B A

    1995-09-01

    An exploratory study of the attitudes of hospital patients to the service provided by hospital chaplains. Questionnaire study of hospital inpatients in December 1992. One large teaching hospital in London. 180 hospital inpatients in 14 different general wards, 168 (93%) of whom agreed to take part. Attitudes to chaplains and their role contained in 12 questions developed during a pilot study on hospital inpatients (16) and staff (14) and their relation to patients' age, sex, length of hospital stay, and religious beliefs, according to Kendall rank order correlations. Of 168(93%) respondents, 72(43%) were women; mean age of patients was 63.1 (SD 16.8) years. Forty five (27%) were inpatients of three days or less and 22(13%) for one month or more. 136(81%) were Christian; 17(10%) atheist, agnostic, or had no religion; and 15(9%) were of other religions. In general, patients showed positive attitudes towards the role of hospital chaplains and to the services they provided. The correlation analysis showed that there was a significant tendency for older patients, those who had been inpatients for longer, and those with religious beliefs to be more sympathetic to the role of hospital chaplains. Hospital chaplains provide a service which is appreciated by patients. This study provides a simple instrument for assessing patients' attitudes to chaplains.

  20. Predictors of thirty-day readmission among hospitalized family medicine patients.

    PubMed

    Garrison, Gregory M; Mansukhani, Meghna P; Bohn, Bradley

    2013-01-01

    Hospital readmissions within 30 days of initial discharge occur frequently. In studies of elderly patients receiving Medicare, readmissions have been associated with poor-quality inpatient care, ineffective hospital-to-home transitions, patient characteristics, disease burden, and socioeconomic status. Among adult family medicine patients spanning a wide age range, we hypothesize that previous hospitalizations, length of stay, number of discharge medications, medical comorbidities, and patient demographics are associated with a greater risk of hospital readmission within 30 days. A retrospective case-control study of 276 family medicine inpatients was conducted to determine the factors associated with 30-day readmission. Bivariate statistics were computed and a multivariate analysis using logistic regression was performed to determine the independent effects of each factor. Patients readmitted within 30 days had more hospitalizations, more emergency department visits, longer hospital stays, more comorbidities, and more discharge medications and were less likely to be married. Multivariate logistic regression found that hospitalization within the previous 12 months (odds ratio, 2.71) and long hospital stays (odds ratio, 2.16) were associated with 30-day readmission; being married (odds ratio, 0.54) had a protective effect. This study demonstrates that factors previously found to be associated with 30-day readmission among elderly patients receiving Medicare also apply to family medicine patients of all ages. It also demonstrates prior hospitalizations, length of stay, and marital status are useful proxies for many more complicated factors, such as disease burden, medical complexity, and social issues, that influence hospital readmission.

  1. Bilateral effects of hospital patient-safety procedures on nurses' job satisfaction.

    PubMed

    Inoue, T; Karima, R; Harada, K

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to examine how hospital patient-safety procedures affect the job satisfaction of hospital nurses. Additionally, we investigated the association between perceived autonomy and hospital patient-safety procedures and job satisfaction. Recently, measures for patient safety have been recognized as an essential requirement in hospitals. Hospital patient-safety procedures may enhance the job satisfaction of nurses by improving the quality of their work. However, such procedures may also decrease their job satisfaction by imposing excessive stress on nurses because they cannot make mistakes. The participants included 537 nurses at 10 private hospitals in Japan (The surveys were collected from March to July 2012). Factors related to hospital patient-safety procedures were demonstrated using factor analysis, and the associations between these factors and nurses' self-perceived autonomy and job satisfaction were examined using structural equation modelling. Five factors regarding hospital patient-safety procedures were extracted. Additionally, structural equation modelling revealed statistically significant associations between these factors and the nurses' self-perceived autonomy and job satisfaction. The findings showed that nurses' perceived autonomy of the workplace enhanced their job satisfaction and that their perceptions of hospital patient-safety procedures promoted their job satisfaction. However, some styles of chief nurses' leadership regarding patient safety restrict nurses' independent and autonomous decision-making and actions, resulting in a lowering of job satisfaction. This study demonstrated that hospital patient-safety procedures have ambiguous effects on nurses' job satisfaction. In particular, chief nurses' leadership relating to patient safety can have a positive or negative effect on nurses' job satisfaction. The findings indicated that hospital managers should demonstrate positive attitudes to improve patient safety for

  2. Meeting patients' health information needs in breast cancer center hospitals - a multilevel analysis.

    PubMed

    Kowalski, Christoph; Lee, Shoou-Yih D; Ansmann, Lena; Wesselmann, Simone; Pfaff, Holger

    2014-11-25

    Breast cancer patients are confronted with a serious diagnosis that requires them to make important decisions throughout the journey of the disease. For these decisions to be made it is critical that the patients be well informed. Previous studies have been consistent in their findings that breast cancer patients have a high need for information on a wide range of topics. This paper investigates (1) how many patients feel they have unmet information needs after initial surgery, (2) whether the proportion of patients with unmet information needs varies between hospitals where they were treated and (3) whether differences between the hospitals account for some of these variation. Data from 5,024 newly-diagnosed breast cancer patients treated in 111 breast center hospitals in Germany were analyzed and combined with data on hospital characteristics. Multilevel linear regression models were calculated taking into account hospital characteristics and adjusting for patient case mix. Younger patients, those receiving mastectomy, having statutory health insurance, not living with a partner and having a foreign native language report higher unmet information needs. The data demonstrate small between-hospital variation in unmet information needs. In hospitals that provide patient-specific information material and that offer health fairs as well as those that are non-teaching or have lower patient-volume, patients are less likely to report unmet information needs. We found differences in proportions of patients with unmet information needs between hospitals and that hospitals' structure and process-related attributes of the hospitals were associated with these differences to some extent. Hospitals may contribute to reducing the patients' information needs by means that are not necessarily resource-intensive.

  3. Distinct enough? A national examination of Catholic hospital affiliation and patient perceptions of care

    PubMed Central

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Melendez-Torres, G.J.; McHugh, Matthew D.; Wall, Barbra Mann

    2014-01-01

    Background Catholic hospitals play a critical role in the provision of health care in the United States; yet, empirical evidence of patient outcomes in these institutions is practically absent in the literature. Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether patient perceptions of care are more favorable in Catholic hospitals as compared with non-Catholic hospitals in a national sample of hospitals. Methodology This cross-sectional secondary analysis used linked data from the 2008 American Hospital Association Annual Survey, the 2008 Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey, the 2008 Medicare Case Mix Index file, and the 2010 Religious Congregations and Membership Study. The study included over 3,400 hospitals nationwide, including 494 Catholic hospitals. Propensity score matching and ordinary least-squares regression models were used to examine the relationship between Catholic affiliation and various HCAHPS measures. Findings Our findings revealed that patients treated in Catholic hospitals appear to rate their hospital experience similar to patients treated in non-Catholic hospitals. Catholic hospitals maintain a very slight advantage above their non-Catholic peers on five HCAHPS measures related to nurse communication, receipt of discharge information, quietness of the room at night, overall rating, and recommendation of the hospital; yet, these differences were minimal. Practice Implications If the survival of Catholic health care services is contingent upon how its provision of care is distinct, administrators of Catholic hospitals must show differences more clearly. Given the great importance of Catholic hospitals to the health of millions of patients in the United States, this study provides Catholic hospitals with a set of targeted areas on which to focus improvement efforts, especially in light of current pay-for-performance initiatives. PMID:23493045

  4. Evaluation of factors influencing patient satisfaction in social security hospitals in Mazandaran province, North of Iran.

    PubMed

    Jafari Kelarijani, Seyed Ebrahim; Jamshidi, Reza; Heidarian, Ali Reza; Khorshidi, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Patient satisfaction is affected by hospital services and may have an effect on the cultural, social and personal conditions of the people living in the region. This research aimed to evaluate the patient satisfaction in social security hospitals in Mazandaran province. From Spring 2012 to Summer 2013, all patients admitted to social security hospitals in Mazandaran province were entered in the study. Data regarding to inhabitation, sex, income and patients' educational level and satisfaction with the hospital services were collected. Seven hundred seventy-six patients with mean age of 47.35±7.41 years were analyzed. Patient's inhabitant, educational attainment and income level had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction level (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding patients' gender. The results show that the patient's inhabitant, educational and income level are related to attain patients' satisfaction.

  5. Hospital characteristics and favourable neurological outcome among patients with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest in Osaka, Japan.

    PubMed

    Matsuyama, Tasuku; Kiyohara, Kosuke; Kitamura, Tetsuhisa; Nishiyama, Chika; Nishiuchi, Tatsuya; Hayashi, Yasuyuki; Kawamura, Takashi; Ohta, Bon; Iwami, Taku

    2017-01-01

    To assess the association between favourable neurological outcome and hospital characteristics such as hospital volume and number of critical care centres (CCMCs) after out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA). This retrospective, population-based observational study conducted in Osaka Prefecture, Japan included adult patients with OHCA, aged ≥18 years who were transported to acute care hospitals between January 2005 and December 2012. We divided acute care hospitals into CCMCs or non-CCMCs, the latter of which were divided into the following three groups according to the annual average number of transported OHCA cases: low-volume (≤10 cases), middle-volume (11-39 cases), and high-volume (≥40 cases) groups. Random effects logistic regression models, with hospital treated as a random effect, were used to assess factors potentially associated with a favourable neurological outcome. A total of 44,474 patients were eligible. The proportions of favourable neurological outcome from OHCA were 0.9% (31/3559) in the low-volume group, 1.2% (106/9171) in the middle-volume group, 1.6% (222/14,007) in the high-volume group, and 4.3% (766/17,737) in the CCMC group (P<0.001). In the multivariable analysis, transport to CCMCs was significantly associated with favourable neurological outcome, compared with transport to non-CCMCs (adjusted odds ratio 1.63; 95% confidence interval, 1.60-1.66). Among the non-CCMC group, there was no significant relationship between hospital volume and favourable neurological outcome. In this population, transport of OHCA patients to CCMCs led to significantly higher one-month survival rates with favourable neurological outcome from OHCA, whereas no significant association was noted among the hospitals with different volumes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Variations in injury characteristics among paediatric patients following trauma: A retrospective descriptive analysis comparing pre-hospital and in-hospital deaths at Kamuzu Central Hospital, Lilongwe, Malawi.

    PubMed

    Purcell, Laura; Mabedi, Charles E; Gallaher, Jared; Mjuweni, Steven; McLean, Sean; Cairns, Bruce; Charles, Anthony

    2017-06-01

    Trauma is a major cause of paediatric mortality in sub-Saharan Africa. In absence of pre-hospital care, the injury mechanism and cause of death is difficult to characterise. Injury characteristics of pre-hospital deaths (PHD) versus in-hospital deaths (IHD) were compared. Using our trauma surveillance database, a retrospective, descriptive analysis of children (<18 years) presenting to Kamuzu Central Hospital in Lilongwe, Malawi from 2008 to 2013 was performed. Patient and injury characteristics of pre-hospital and in-hospital deaths were compared with univariate and bivariate analysis. Of 30,462 paediatric trauma patients presenting between 2008 and 2013, 170 and 173 were PHD and IHD, respectively. In PHD and IHD patients mean age was 7.3±4.9 v 5.2±4.3 (p<0.001), respectively. IHD patients were more likely transported via ambulance than those PHD, 51.2% v 8.3% (p<0.001). The primary mechanisms of injury for PHD were road traffic injuries (RTI) (45.8%) and drowning (22.0%), with head injury (46.7%) being the predominant cause of death. Burns were the leading mechanism of injury (61.8%) and cause of death (61.9%) in IHD, with a mean total body surface area involvement of 24.7±16.0%. RTI remains Malawi's major driver of paediatric mortality. A majority of these deaths attributed to head injury occur prior to hospitalisation; therefore the mortality burden is underestimated if accounting for IHD alone. Death in burn patients is likely due to under-resuscitation or sepsis. Improving pre-hospital care and head injury and burn management can improve injury related paediatric mortality.

  7. Hospital Value-Based Purchasing: The Association Between Patient Experience and Clinical Outcome.

    PubMed

    Haley, D Rob; Hamadi, Hanadi; Zhao, Mei; Xu, Jing; Wang, Yi

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 introduced a Hospital Value-Based Purchasing Total Performance Score for payment purposes and to evaluate hospital quality of care. In fiscal year 2016, Total Performance Score was composed of (1) Clinical Processes of Care, (2) Patient Experience of Care, (3) Outcome, and (4) Efficiency domains. The objective of this study was to examine the association between the Patient Experience of Care and Outcome domains. The Donabedian model of structure, process, and outcome was used as a conceptual framework for this study. Data from the 2015-2016 Area Health Resource File, the 2016 American Hospital Association database, and the 2016 Hospital Value-Based Purchasing were used. Univariate, bivariate, and multivariate analyses were conducted to examine the impact of patient experience on outcome of care and hospitals. From a sample of 1866 hospitals across the United States, patient experience was significantly and positively associated with patient outcome. In addition, for-profit hospitals, hospitals with more beds, nonteaching hospitals, and hospitals located in less competitive markets were found to have a significant association with better outcomes. The study's findings are important as policy makers consider additional or alternative indicators that may better represent and encourage higher quality of care within acute care hospitals.

  8. The Influence of Hospital Market Competition on Patient Mortality and Total Performance Score.

    PubMed

    Haley, Donald Robert; Zhao, Mei; Spaulding, Aaron; Hamadi, Hanadi; Xu, Jing; Yeomans, Katelyn

    2016-01-01

    The Affordable Care Act of 2010 launch of Medicare Value-Based Purchasing has become the platform for payment reform. It is a mechanism by which buyers of health care services hold providers accountable for high-quality and cost-effective care. The objective of the study was to examine the relationship between quality of hospital care and hospital competition using the quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior. The quality-quantity behavioral model of hospital behavior was used as the conceptual framework for this study. Data from the American Hospital Association database, the Hospital Compare database, and the Area Health Resources Files database were used. Multivariate regression analysis was used to examine the effect of hospital competition on patient mortality. Hospital market competition was significantly and negatively related to the 3 mortality rates. Consistent with the literature, hospitals located in more competitive markets had lower mortality rates for patients with acute myocardial infarction, heart failure, and pneumonia. The results suggest that hospitals may be more readily to compete on quality of care and patient outcomes. The findings are important because policies that seek to control and negatively influence a competitive hospital environment, such as Certificate of Need legislation, may negatively affect patient mortality rates. Therefore, policymakers should encourage the development of policies that facilitate a more competitive and transparent health care marketplace to potentially and significantly improve patient mortality.

  9. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed

    Armstrong, Susan J; Rispel, Laetitia C; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers' recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high-quality patient care.

  10. The activities of hospital nursing unit managers and quality of patient care in South African hospitals: a paradox?

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, Susan J.; Rispel, Laetitia C.; Penn-Kekana, Loveday

    2015-01-01

    Background Improving the quality of health care is central to the proposed health care reforms in South Africa. Nursing unit managers play a key role in coordinating patient care activities and in ensuring quality care in hospitals. Objective This paper examines whether the activities of nursing unit managers facilitate the provision of quality patient care in South African hospitals. Methods During 2011, a cross-sectional, descriptive study was conducted in nine randomly selected hospitals (six public, three private) in two South African provinces. In each hospital, one of each of the medical, surgical, paediatric, and maternity units was selected (n=36). Following informed consent, each unit manager was observed for a period of 2 hours on the survey day and the activities recorded on a minute-by-minute basis. The activities were entered into Microsoft Excel, coded into categories, and analysed according to the time spent on activities in each category. The observation data were complemented by semi-structured interviews with the unit managers who were asked to recall their activities on the day preceding the interview. The interviews were analysed using thematic content analysis. Results The study found that nursing unit managers spent 25.8% of their time on direct patient care, 16% on hospital administration, 14% on patient administration, 3.6% on education, 13.4% on support and communication, 3.9% on managing stock and equipment, 11.5% on staff management, and 11.8% on miscellaneous activities. There were also numerous interruptions and distractions. The semi-structured interviews revealed concordance between unit managers’ recall of the time spent on patient care, but a marked inflation of their perceived time spent on hospital administration. Conclusion The creation of an enabling practice environment, supportive executive management, and continuing professional development are needed to enable nursing managers to lead the provision of consistent and high

  11. Influenza Illness among Case-Patients Hospitalized for Suspected Dengue, El Salvador, 2012.

    PubMed

    Chacon, Rafael; Clara, Alexey Wilfrido; Jara, Jorge; Armero, Julio; Lozano, Celina; El Omeiri, Nathalie; Widdowson, Marc-Alain; Azziz-Baumgartner, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    We estimate the proportion of patients hospitalized for suspected dengue that tested positive for influenza virus in El Salvador during the 2012 influenza season. We tested specimens from 321 hospitalized patients: 198 patients with SARI and 123 patients with suspected dengue. Among 121 hospitalized suspected dengue (two co-infected excluded) patients, 28% tested positive for dengue and 19% positive for influenza; among 35 with suspected dengue and respiratory symptoms, 14% were positive for dengue and 39% positive for influenza. One percent presented co-infection between influenza and dengue. Clinicians should consider the diagnosis of influenza among patients with suspected dengue during the influenza season.

  12. The aesthetic and cultural interests of patients attending an acute hospital--a phenomenological study.

    PubMed

    Moss, Hilary; O'Neill, Desmond

    2014-01-01

    To describe the aesthetic and cultural pursuits of older patients in hospital. Although there is much discussion of the importance of arts - used in this paper to refer to all art forms, as currently listed by the Arts Council of Ireland www.artscouncil.ie - in health, little is known about the salience of aesthetic and cultural pursuits of hospital patients. A qualitative, hermeneutic phenomenological study examined artistic and cultural interests and experiences of older hospital patients and their perceptions of aesthetics of hospital. A phenomenological study was carried out in 2011, using purposeful sampling with 20 inpatients aged over 65. Patients were selected from the geriatric medicine day hospital of a university teaching hospital, 10 had experience of the hospital arts programme. Seven themes identified: loss and the impact of illness on leisure activities; patients' interests and passions; a lack of expectation of arts in hospital; the positive impact of arts in hospital for those who had experienced them; varying preference between receptive and participative arts activity according to phase of illness; aesthetic aspects of the hospital experience; recommendations for changes to improve arts in hospital. Aesthetic and cultural interests are important in the lives of older patients admitted to hospital. Illness can create barriers to artistic engagement. Participation in arts activities may be more important during recovery and rehabilitation, with receptive arts being more popular during the acute phase of illness in hospital. Further research recommended on the role of the aesthetic environment for patients' health and well-being as well as receptive arts in hospital. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Specialist payment schemes and patient selection in private and public hospitals.

    PubMed

    Wright, Donald J

    2007-09-01

    It has been observed that specialist physicians who work in private hospitals are usually paid by fee-for-service while specialist physicians who work in public hospitals are usually paid by salary. This paper provides an explanation for this observation. Essentially, fee-for-service aligns the interests of income preferring specialists with profit maximizing private hospitals and results in private hospitals treating a high proportion of short stay patients. On the other hand, salary aligns the interests of fairness preferring specialists with benevolent public hospitals that commit to admit all patients irrespective of their expected length of stay.

  14. Does Hospital Competition Save Lives? Evidence from the English NHS Patient Choice Reforms*

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Zack; Gibbons, Stephen; Jones, Simon; McGuire, Alistair

    2011-01-01

    Recent substantive reforms to the English National Health Service expanded patient choice and encouraged hospitals to compete within a market with fixed prices. This study investigates whether these reforms led to improvements in hospital quality. We use a difference-in-difference-style estimator to test whether hospital quality (measured using mortality from acute myocardial infarction) improved more quickly in more competitive markets after these reforms came into force in 2006. We find that after the reforms were implemented, mortality fell (i.e. quality improved) for patients living in more competitive markets. Our results suggest that hospital competition can lead to improvements in hospital quality. PMID:25821239

  15. Perception of situational stress associated with hospitalization among selected Nigerian patients.

    PubMed

    Fajemilehin, B R; Fabayo, A O

    1991-04-01

    The study identified those hospital experiences perceived as stressful during hospitalization by patients, which will help clinical nurses to modify the nursing care provided. A Hospital Stress Rating Scale questionnaire of 40 items tested for reliability and validity was used to elicit responses from 100 patients from the medical and surgical wards of the selected health care institutions. Data collected were analysed using descriptive statistics. The study reveals that the most frequently perceived stressful hospital experiences for all the respondents were those related to social isolation, economy, inconveniences of the physical environment and unconcerned attitudes of hospital personnel.

  16. "Hospital at home" for neuromuscular disease patients with respiratory tract infection: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Vianello, Andrea; Savoia, Francesca; Pipitone, Emanuela; Nordio, Beatrice; Gallina, Giulia; Paladini, Luciana; Concas, Alessandra; Arcaro, Giovanna; Gallan, Federico; Pegoraro, Elena

    2013-12-01

    The "hospital-at-home" model may provide adequate care without an adverse effect on clinical outcome, and is generally well received by users. Our objective was to compare hospital-at-home and in-patient hospital care for neuromuscular disease (NMD) patients with respiratory tract infections. We conducted a prospective randomized controlled trial in a university teaching hospital offering secondary care service to a population of approximately 500,000. We recruited selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infection for whom hospital admission had been recommended after medical assessment. Hospital-at-home was provided as an alternative to in-patient admission. The main outcome measures were need for hospitalization, treatment failure, time to recovery, death during the first 3 months following exacerbation, and cost of patient care. Among 59 consecutive NMD patients eligible for the study, 53 met the criteria for hospital-at-home. Twenty-six subjects were randomized to home care and 27 to hospital care. No significant differences were found in treatment failure (8/26 vs 13/27, P = .19), time to recovery (8.9 ± 4.6 vs 9 ± 8.9 d, P = .21), or mortality at 3 months (3/26 vs 4/27 deaths, P = .42) between the groups. Hospital-at-home failure was independently correlated with type of NMD (P = .004) with an odds ratio of failure of 17.3 (95% CI 2.1 to infinity) for subjects with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. The total and daily direct cost of patient healthcare was significantly lower for the subjects who were successfully treated at home, compared to the hospitalized individuals. Hospital-at-home is an effective alternative to hospital admission for selected NMD patients with respiratory tract infections.

  17. [Use of mobile phones in hospitals do not jeopardise the safety of the patients].

    PubMed

    Pommergaard, Hans-Christian; Burcharth, Jakob; Rosenberg, Jacob

    2013-03-25

    Cellular telephones are increasingly used in hospitals both among employees, patients and visiting relatives. The feared medical equipment malfunctions due to electromagnetic interference have resulted in restrictions in the use of mobile phones in hospitals. However, these restrictions are not consistent between different hospitals, and not based on solid evidence. This article presents the evidence in this field and concludes that by maintaining a distance of one metre to sensitive medical equipment, mobile phones can be used safely in all hospital areas.

  18. Comparing safety climate in naval aviation and hospitals: implications for improving patient safety.

    PubMed

    Singer, Sara J; Rosen, Amy; Zhao, Shibei; Ciavarelli, Anthony P; Gaba, David M

    2010-01-01

    with naval aviation. Major interventions to bolster hospital safety climate continue to be required to improve patient safety.

  19. Cost of management in epistaxis admission: Impact of patient and hospital characteristics.

    PubMed

    Goljo, Erden; Dang, Rajan; Iloreta, Alfred M; Govindaraj, Satish

    2015-12-01

    To investigate patient and hospital characteristics associated with increased cost and length of stay in the inpatient management of epistaxis. Retrospective cross-sectional study of the 2008 to 2012 National (Nationwide) Inpatient Sample. Patient and hospital characteristics of epistaxis admissions were analyzed. Multiple linear regression analysis was used to ascertain variables associated with increased cost and length of hospital stay. Variables significantly associated with high cost were further analyzed to determine the contribution of operative intervention and total procedures to cost. A total of 16,828 patients with an admitting diagnosis of epistaxis were identified. The average age was 67.5; 52.3% of the patients were male; 73.3% of the patients were Caucasian; and 70.7% of the hospital stays were government funded. The average length of stay was 3.24 days, and average hospitalization cost was $6,925. Longer length of stay was associated with black race, alcohol abuse, sinonasal disease, renal disease, Medicaid, and care at a northeastern U.S. hospital. Increased hospitalization costs of > $1,000 were associated with Asian/Pacific Islander race; sinonasal disease; renal disease; top income quartile; and care at urban teaching, northeastern, and western hospitals in the United States. High costs were predicted by procedural intervention in patients with comorbid alcohol abuse, sinonasal disease, renal disease, patients with private insurance, and patients managed at large hospitals. Although hospitalization costs are complex and multifactorial, we were able to identify patient and hospital characteristics associated with high costs in the management of epistaxis. Early identification and intervention, combined with implementation of targeted hospital management protocols, may improve outcomes and reduce financial burden. 2C. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  20. The Effects of Hospital-Level Factors on Patients' Ratings of Physician Communication.

    PubMed

    Al-Amin, Mona; Makarem, Suzanne C

    2016-01-01

    The quality of physician-patient communication influences patient health outcomes and satisfaction with healthcare delivery. Yet, little is known about contextual factors that influence physicians' communication with their patients. The main purpose of this article is to examine organizational-level factors that influence patient perceptions of physician communication in inpatient settings. We used the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey and American Hospital Association data to determine patients' ratings of physician communication at the hospital level, and to collect information about hospital-level factors that can potentially influence physician communication. Our sample consisted of 2,756 hospitals. We ran a regression analysis to determine the predictors of poor physician communication, measured as the percentage of patients in a hospital who reported that physicians sometimes or never communicated well. In our sample of hospitals, this percentage ranged between 0% and 21%, with 25% of hospitals receiving poor ratings from more than 6% of patients. Three organizational factors had statistically significant negative associations with physician communication: for-profit ownership, hospital size, and hospitalists providing care in the hospital, On the other hand, the number of full-time-equivalent physicians and dentists per 10,000 inpatient days, physician ownership of the hospital, Medicare share of inpatient days, and public ownership were positively associated with patients' ratings of physician communication. Physician staffing levels are an understudied area in healthcare research. Our findings indicate that physician staffing levels affect the quality of physician communication with patients. Moreover, for-profit and larger hospitals should invest more in physician communication given the role that HCAHPS plays in value-based purchasing.

  1. A companionship between strangers - the hospital environment as a challenge in patient-patient interaction in oncology wards.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Lene Søndergård; Larsen, Birte Hedegaard; Birkelund, Regner

    2014-02-01

    To present an identification and discussion of the impact of the hospital environment on interaction among people with cancer. In recent years, researchers have focused on identifying and describing features of the hospital environment that promote healing, recovery and well-being. It has been discovered that architectural features affect hospitalized patients both positively and negatively. But the research has failed to include fellow patients as part of the hospital environment. A qualitative approach influenced by ethnography. Participant observation and individual qualitative interviews were used to collect data. From a total of 85 observed people with cancer 10 men and 10 women were interviewed. Data were collected over 6 months in 2010-2011 and analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Patients had ambiguous views regarding their fellow patients and the hospital environment. The hospital environment imposed conditions that caused stress factors such as the loss of personal privacy and control, but it also offered the possibility of good company and support from fellow patients. Refuge from fellow patients was hard to achieve and the fact that personal conversations might be overheard by fellow patients caused patients to withhold important information from healthcare professionals. Nevertheless, patients accepted the hospital environment uncritically, with resignation or with silent rebellion. Despite the challenges, 18 of 20 patients preferred multiple-bed rooms with the company of fellow patients. The influence of the hospital environment on hospitalized people with cancer and their interpersonal interaction needs to be acknowledged by healthcare professionals. In addition, evidence-based hospital design must include research into patient preferences and arguments. Further investigation is needed. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Implementation of subcutaneous insulin protocol for non-critically ill hospitalized patients in andalusian tertiary care hospitals.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Brocca, María Asunción; Morales, Cristóbal; Rodríguez-Ortega, Pilar; González-Aguilera, Beatriz; Montes, Cristina; Colomo, Natalia; Piédrola, Gonzalo; Méndez-Muros, Mariola; Serrano, Isabel; Ruiz de Adana, Maria Soledad; Moreno, Alberto; Fernández, Ignacio; Aguilar, Manuel; Acosta, Domingo; Palomares, Rafael

    2015-02-01

    In 2009, the Andalusian Society of Endocrinology and Nutrition designed a protocol for subcutaneous insulin treatment in hospitalized non-critically ill patients (HIP). To analyze implementation of HIP at tertiary care hospitals from the Andalusian Public Health System. A descriptive, multicenter study conducted in 8 tertiary care hospitals on a random sample of non-critically ill patients with diabetes/hyperglycemia (n=306) hospitalized for ≥48 hours in 5 non-surgical (SM) and 2 surgical (SQ) departments. Type 1 and other specific types of diabetes, pregnancy and nutritional support were exclusion criteria. 288 patients were included for analysis (62.5% males; 70.3±10.3 years; 71.5% SM, 28.5% SQ). A scheduled subcutaneous insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction protocol was started in 55.9% (95%CI: 50.5-61.2%) of patients, 63.1% SM vs. 37.8% SQ (P<.05). Alternatives to insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction included sliding scale insulin (43.7%), diet (31.3%), oral antidiabetic drugs (17.2%), premixed insulin (1.6%), and others (6.2%). For patients previously on oral antidiabetic drugs, in-hospital insulin dose was 0.32±0.1 IU/kg/day. In patients previously on insulin, in-hospital insulin dose was increased by 17% [-13-53], and in those on insulin plus oral antidiabetic drugs, in-hospital insulin dose was increased by 26.4% [-6-100]. Supplemental insulin doses used for<40 IU/day and 40-80 IU/day were 72.2% and 56.7% respectively. HbA1c was measured in 23.6% of patients (95CI%: 18.8-28.8); 27.7% SM vs. 13.3% SQ (P<.05). Strategies are needed to improve implementation of the inpatient subcutaneous insulin protocol, particularly in surgical departments. Sliding scale insulin is still the most common alternative to insulin regimen based on basal-bolus-correction scheduled insulin. Metabolic control assessment during hospitalization should be encouraged. Copyright © 2014 SEEN. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. How elderly patients with femoral fracture develop pressure sores in hospital.

    PubMed Central

    Versluysen, M

    1986-01-01

    The routine hospital management of 100 consecutive elderly patients was studied to determine the reason for the high incidence of pressure sores among patients admitted to hospital for femoral fractures. Of these patients, 66 developed sores, 83% occurring by the fifth day in hospital. This was due to the long periods that patients were immobilised on high pressure surfaces in the casualty department, wards, and theatres before repair of the fracture and restoration of their weight bearing function. Sores are not simply a ward or nursing problem, but an unintended consequence of hospital treatment. To reduce the incidence of sores elderly patients should be treated on low pressure patient support systems from the point of entry to hospital until mobility is restored. PMID:3085827

  4. Complementary effect of patient volume and quality of care on hospital cost efficiency.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jeong Hoon; Park, Imsu; Jung, Ilyoung; Dey, Asoke

    2017-06-01

    This study explores the direct effect of an increase in patient volume in a hospital and the complementary effect of quality of care on the cost efficiency of U.S. hospitals in terms of patient volume. The simultaneous equation model with three-stage least squares is used to measure the direct effect of patient volume and the complementary effect of quality of care and volume. Cost efficiency is measured with a data envelopment analysis method. Patient volume has a U-shaped relationship with hospital cost efficiency and an inverted U-shaped relationship with quality of care. Quality of care functions as a moderator for the relationship between patient volume and efficiency. This paper addresses the economically important question of the relationship of volume with quality of care and hospital cost efficiency. The three-stage least square simultaneous equation model captures the simultaneous effects of patient volume on hospital quality of care and cost efficiency.

  5. How patients think about social responsibility of public hospitals in China?

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenbin; Shi, Lizheng; Pong, Raymond W; Chen, Yingyao

    2016-08-11

    Hospital social responsibility is receiving increasing attention, especially in China where major changes to the healthcare system have taken place. This study examines how patients viewed hospital social responsibility in China and explore the factors that influenced patients' perception of hospital social responsibility. A cross-sectional survey was conducted, using a structured questionnaire, on a sample of 5385 patients from 48 public hospitals in three regions of China: Shanghai, Hainan, and Shaanxi. A multilevel regression model was employed to examine factors influencing patients' assessments of hospital social responsibility. Intra-class correlation coefficients (ICCs) were calculated to estimate the proportion of variance in the dependent variables determined at the hospital level. The scores for service quality, appropriateness, accessibility and professional ethics were positively associated with patients' assessments of hospital social responsibility. Older outpatients tended to give lower assessments, while inpatients in larger hospitals scored higher. After adjusted for the independent variables, the ICC rose from 0.182 to 0.313 for inpatients and from 0.162 to 0.263 for outpatients. The variance at the patient level was reduced by 51.5 and 48.6 %, respectively, for inpatients and outpatients. And the variance at the hospital level was reduced by 16.7 % for both groups. Some hospital and patient characteristics and their perceptions of service quality, appropriateness, accessibility and professional ethics were associated with their assessments of public hospital social responsibility. The differences were mainly determined at the patient level. More attention to law-abiding behaviors, cost-effective health services, and charitable works could improve perceptions of hospitals' adherence to social responsibility.

  6. Privacy Policy Implementation on the Nation-Wide EHR in Japan for Hospitals and Patients.

    PubMed

    Kume, Naoto; Kobayashi, Shinji; Araki, Kenji; Yoshihara, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Shared clinical information is an important contribution to regional medicine. Clinical information sharing with patients is also recommended to motivate patients and promote health. On the other hand, the threat of information leaks, caused by internet connected records, is critical to hospitals. The traditional approach is complete isolation of hospital networks, instead of information sharing. The authors propose methods here to maximize information sharing by following hospital preferences for electronic health records.

  7. Estimating Treatment and Treatment Times for Special and Nonspecial Patients in Hospital Ambulatory Dental Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Dara J.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    A study compared the treatments and the amount of time needed for treatment of the dental needs of developmentally disabled, severely compromised, and moderately compromised patients with those of nondisabled patients in a hospital ambulatory dental clinic. (MSE)

  8. Hospitalization and rehospitalization in Parkinson disease patients: Data from the National Parkinson Foundation Centers of Excellence

    PubMed Central

    De Jesus, Sol; Wu, Samuel S.; Pei, Qinglin; Hassan, Anhar; Armstrong, Melissa J.; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Schmidt, Peter; Okun, Michael S.

    2017-01-01

    Background Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) are at high risk of hospital encounters with increasing morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the rate of hospital encounters in a cohort followed over 5 years and to identify associated factors. Methods We queried the data from the International Multicenter National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement study. Multivariate logistic regression with backward selection was performed to identify factors associated with hospital encounter prior to baseline visit. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained and Cox regression performed on time to hospital encounter after the baseline visit. Results Of the 7,507 PD patients (mean age 66.5±9.9 years and disease duration 8.9±6.4 years at baseline visit), 1919 (25.6%) had a history of a hospital encounter prior to their baseline visit. Significant factors associated with a history of a hospital encounter prior to baseline included race (white race: OR 0.49), utilization of physical therapy (OR 1.47), history of deep brain stimulation (OR 1.87), number of comorbidities (OR 1.30), caregiver strain (OR 1.17 per standard deviation), and the standardized Timed Up and Go Test (OR 1.21). Patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline were more likely to have a re-hospitalization (HR1.67, P<0.0001) compared to those without a prior hospitalization. In addition, the time to hospital encounter from baseline was significantly associated with age and number of medications. In patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline visit, time to a second hospital encounter was significantly associated with caregiver strain and number of comorbidities. Conclusion Hospitalization and re-hospitalization were common in this cohort of people with PD. Our results suggest addressing caregiver burden, simplifying medications, and emphasizing primary and multidisciplinary care for comorbidities are potential avenues to explore for reducing hospitalization

  9. Hospitalization and rehospitalization in Parkinson disease patients: Data from the National Parkinson Foundation Centers of Excellence.

    PubMed

    Shahgholi, Leili; De Jesus, Sol; Wu, Samuel S; Pei, Qinglin; Hassan, Anhar; Armstrong, Melissa J; Martinez-Ramirez, Daniel; Schmidt, Peter; Okun, Michael S

    2017-01-01

    Patients with Parkinson disease (PD) are at high risk of hospital encounters with increasing morbidity and mortality. This study aimed to determine the rate of hospital encounters in a cohort followed over 5 years and to identify associated factors. We queried the data from the International Multicenter National Parkinson Foundation Quality Improvement study. Multivariate logistic regression with backward selection was performed to identify factors associated with hospital encounter prior to baseline visit. Kaplan-Meier estimates were obtained and Cox regression performed on time to hospital encounter after the baseline visit. Of the 7,507 PD patients (mean age 66.5±9.9 years and disease duration 8.9±6.4 years at baseline visit), 1919 (25.6%) had a history of a hospital encounter prior to their baseline visit. Significant factors associated with a history of a hospital encounter prior to baseline included race (white race: OR 0.49), utilization of physical therapy (OR 1.47), history of deep brain stimulation (OR 1.87), number of comorbidities (OR 1.30), caregiver strain (OR 1.17 per standard deviation), and the standardized Timed Up and Go Test (OR 1.21). Patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline were more likely to have a re-hospitalization (HR1.67, P<0.0001) compared to those without a prior hospitalization. In addition, the time to hospital encounter from baseline was significantly associated with age and number of medications. In patients with a history of hospitalization prior to the baseline visit, time to a second hospital encounter was significantly associated with caregiver strain and number of comorbidities. Hospitalization and re-hospitalization were common in this cohort of people with PD. Our results suggest addressing caregiver burden, simplifying medications, and emphasizing primary and multidisciplinary care for comorbidities are potential avenues to explore for reducing hospitalization rates.

  10. Can Hospital Cultural Competency Reduce Disparities in Patient Experiences with Care?

    PubMed Central

    Weech-Maldonado, Robert; Elliott, Marc N.; Pradhan, Rohit; Schiller, Cameron; Hall, Allyson; Hays, Ron D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Cultural competency has been espoused as an organizational strategy to reduce health disparities in care. Objective To examine the relationship between hospital cultural competency and inpatient experiences with care. Research Design The first model predicted Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) scores from hospital random effects, plus fixed effects for hospital cultural competency, individual race/ethnicity/language, and case-mix variables. The second model tested if the association between a hospital’s cultural competency and HCAHPS scores differed for minority and non-Hispanic white patients. Subjects The National CAHPS® Benchmarking Database’s (NCBD) HCAHPS Surveys and the Cultural Competency Assessment Tool of Hospitals (CCATH) Surveys for California hospitals were merged, resulting in 66 hospitals and 19,583 HCAHPS respondents in 2006. Measures Dependent variables include ten HCAHPS measures: six composites (communication with doctors, communication with nurses, staff responsiveness, pain control, communication about medications, and discharge information), two individual items (cleanliness, and quietness of patient rooms), and two global items (overall hospital rating, and whether patient would recommend hospital). Results Hospitals with greater cultural competency have better HCAHPS scores for doctor communication, hospital rating, and hospital recommendation. Furthermore, HCAHPS scores for minorities were higher at hospitals with greater cultural competency on four other dimensions: nurse communication, staff responsiveness, quiet room, and pain control. Conclusions Greater hospital cultural competency may improve overall patient experiences, but may particularly benefit minorities in their interactions with nurses and hospital staff. Such effort may not only serve longstanding goals of reducing racial/ethnic disparities in inpatient experience, but may also contribute to general quality improvement

  11. An evidence-based strategy for transitioning patients from the hospital to the community.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Lynn

    2012-01-01

    Improving transitional care from hospital to home requires comprehensive and highly coordinated intervention during the immediate days following discharge. The Hospital to Home Program addresses both medical and social needs, prevents unnecessary readmissions, promotes improvements in patient perceptions of physical and mental health, and results in excellent patient satisfaction.

  12. Post-Acute Home Care and Hospital Readmission of Elderly Patients with Congestive Heart Failure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Hong; Morrow-Howell, Nancy; Proctor, Enola K.

    2004-01-01

    After inpatient hospitalization, many elderly patients with congestive heart failure (CHF) are discharged home and receive post-acute home care from informal (family) caregivers and formal service providers. Hospital readmission rates are high among elderly patients with CHF, and it is thought that use of informal and formal services may reduce…

  13. Roadmap to an effective quality improvement and patient safety program implementation in a rural hospital setting.

    PubMed

    Ingabire, Willy; Reine, Petera M; Hedt-Gauthier, Bethany L; Hirschhorn, Lisa R; Kirk, Catherine M; Nahimana, Evrard; Nepomscene Uwiringiyemungu, Jean; Ndayisaba, Aphrodis; Manzi, Anatole

    2015-12-01

    Implementation lessons: (1) implementation of an effective quality improvement and patient safety program in a rural hospital setting requires collaboration between hospital leadership, Ministry of Health and other stakeholders. (2) Building Quality Improvement (QI) capacity to develop engaged QI teams supported by mentoring can improve quality and patient safety. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The Emergence of Suicidal Ideation during the Post-Hospital Treatment of Depressed Patients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gaudiano, Brandon A.; Andover, Margaret S.; Miller, Ivan W.

    2008-01-01

    There is a paucity of research on the emergence of suicidal ideation in recently hospitalized patients undergoing treatment for depression. As part of a larger clinical trial, patients (N = 103) with major depression without suicidal ideation at hospital discharge were followed for up to 6 months while receiving study-related outpatient…

  15. Reason for hospital admission: a pilot study comparing patient statements with chart reports.

    PubMed

    Berger, Zackary; Dembitzer, Anne; Beach, Mary Catherine

    2013-01-01

    Providers and patients bring different understandings of health and disease to their encounters in the hospital setting. The literature to date only infrequently addresses patient and provider concordance on the reported reason for hospitalization, that is, whether they express this reason in similar ways. An agreement or common ground between such understandings can serve as a basis for future communication regarding an illness and its treatment. We interviewed a convenience sample of patients on the medical wards of an urban academic medical center. We asked subjects to state the reason why their doctors admitted them to the hospital, and then compared their statement with the reason in the medical record. We defined concordance on reported reason for hospitalization as agreement between the patient's report and the reason abstracted from the chart. We interviewed and abstracted chart data from a total of 46 subjects. Concordance on reported reason for hospitalization was present in 24 (52%) and discordance in 17 (37%); 5 patients (11%) could not give any reason for their hospitalization. Among the 17 patients whose report was discordant with their chart, 12 (71%) reported a different organ system than was recorded in the chart. A significant proportion of medical inpatients could not state their physicians' reason for admission. In addition, patients who identify a different reason for hospitalization than the chart often give a different organ system altogether. Providers should explore patient understanding of the reason for their hospitalization to facilitate communication and shared decision making.

  16. Stroke Patients Communicating Their Healthcare Needs in Hospital: A Study within the ICF Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Halloran, Robyn; Worrall, Linda; Hickson, Louise

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previous research has identified that many patients admitted into acute hospital stroke units have communication-related impairments such as hearing, vision, speech, language and/or cognitive communicative impairment. However, no research has identified how many patients in acute hospital stroke units have difficulty actually…

  17. Differences in emergency colorectal surgery in Medicaid and uninsured patients by hospital safety net status.

    PubMed

    Bradley, Cathy J; Dahman, Bassam; Sabik, Lindsay M

    2015-02-01

    We examined whether safety net hospitals reduce the likelihood of emergency colorectal cancer (CRC) surgery in uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients. If these patients have better access to care through safety net providers, they should be less likely to undergo emergency resection relative to similar patients at non- safety net hospitals. Using population-based data, we estimated the relationship between safety net hospitals, patient insurance status, and emergency CRC surgery. We extracted inpatient admission data from the Virginia Health Information discharge database and matched them to the Virginia Cancer Registry for patients aged 21 to 64 years who underwent a CRC resection between January 1, 1999, and December 31, 2005 (n = 5488). We differentiated between medically defined emergencies and those that originated in the emergency department (ED). For each definition of emergency surgery, we estimated the linear probability models of the effects of being treated at a safety net hospital on the probability of having an emergency resection. Safety net hospitals reduce emergency surgeries among uninsured and Medicaid CRC patients. When defining an emergency resection as those that involved an ED visit, these patients were 15 to 20 percentage points less likely to have an emergency resection when treated in a safety net hospital. Our results suggest that these hospitals provide a benefit, most likely through the access they afford to timely and appropriate care, to uninsured and Medicaid-insured patients relative to hospitals without a safety net mission.

  18. Determinants of mortality and prolonged hospital stay among dengue patients attending tertiary care hospital: a cross-sectional retrospective analysis

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Amer Hayat; Sarriff, Azmi; Adnan, Azreen Syazril; Khan, Yusra Habib

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Dengue imposes substantial economic, societal and personal burden in terms of hospital stay, morbidity and mortality. Early identification of dengue cases with high propensity of increased hospital stay and death could be of value in isolating patients in need of early interventions. The current study was aimed to determine the significant factors associated with dengue-related prolonged hospitalisation and death. Design Cross-sectional retrospective study. Setting Tertiary care teaching hospital. Participants Patients with confirmed dengue diagnosis were stratified into two categories on the basis of prolonged hospitalisation (≤3 days and >3 days) and mortality (fatal cases and non-fatal cases). Clinico-laboratory characteristics between these categories were compared by using appropriate statistical methods. Results Of 667 patients enrolled, 328 (49.2%) had prolonged hospitalisation. The mean hospital stay was 4.88±2.74 days. Multivariate analysis showed that dengue haemorrhagic fever (OR 2.3), elevated alkaline phosphatase (ALP) (OR 2.3), prolonged prothrombin time (PT) (OR 1.7), activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) (OR 1.9) and multiple-organ dysfunctions (OR 2.1) were independently associated with prolonged hospitalisation. Overall case fatality rate was 1.1%. Factors associated with dengue mortality were age >40 years (p=0.004), secondary infection (p=0.040), comorbidities (p<0.05), acute kidney injury (p<0.001), prolonged PT (p=0.022), multiple-organ dysfunctions (p<0.001), haematocrit >20% (p=0.001), rhabdomyolosis (p<0.001) and respiratory failure (p=0.007). Approximately half of the fatal cases in our study had prolonged hospital stay of greater than three days. Conclusions The results underscore the high proportion of dengue patients with prolonged hospital stay. Early identification of factors relating to prolonged hospitalisation and death will have obvious advantages in terms of appropriate decisions about treatment and

  19. Hospitalizations in patients with atrial fibrillation: an analysis from ROCKET AF.

    PubMed

    DeVore, Adam D; Hellkamp, Anne S; Becker, Richard C; Berkowitz, Scott D; Breithardt, Guenter; Hacke, Werner; Halperin, Jonathan L; Hankey, Graeme J; Mahaffey, Kenneth W; Nessel, Christopher C; Singer, Daniel E; Fox, Keith A A; Patel, Manesh R; Piccini, Jonathan P

    2016-08-01

    The high costs associated with treatment for atrial fibrillation (AF) are primarily due to hospital care, but there are limited data to understand the reasons for and predictors of hospitalization in patients with AF. The ROCKET AF trial compared rivaroxaban with warfarin for stroke prophylaxis in AF. We described the frequency of and reasons for hospitalization during study follow-up and utilized Cox proportional hazards models to assess for baseline characteristics associated with all-cause hospitalization. Of 14 171 patients, 14% were hospitalized at least once. Of 2614 total hospitalizations, 41% were cardiovascular including 4% for AF; of the remaining, 12% were for bleeding. Compared with patients not hospitalized, hospitalized patients were older (74 vs. 72 years), and more frequently had diabetes (46 vs. 39%), prior MI (23 vs. 16%), and paroxysmal AF (19 vs. 17%), but less frequently had prior transient ischaemic attack/stroke (49 vs. 56%). After multivariable adjustment, lung disease [hazard ratio (HR) 1.46, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.29-1.66], diabetes [1.22, (1.11-1.34)], prior MI [1.27, (1.13-1.42)], and renal dysfunction [HR 1.07 per 5 unit GFR < 65 mL/min, (1.04-1.10)] were associated with increased hospitalization risk. Treatment assignment was not associated with differential rates of hospitalization. Nearly 1 in 7 of the moderate-to-high-risk patients with AF enrolled in this trial was hospitalized within 2 years, and both AF and bleeding were rare causes of hospitalization. Further research is needed to determine whether care pathways directed at comorbid conditions among AF patients could reduce the need for and costs associated with hospitalization. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology.

  20. Building a patient-centered hospital web site: best practices in china.

    PubMed

    Huang, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    In this case study, based on six criteria, four Chinese hospitals were chosen from a national sample to showcase, through content analysis and in-depth interviews, the best practices of serving patients online. The extensive findings have addressed the following three questions: what these hospitals have in common in their Web development, what problems and challenges they are facing, and how they have excelled in serving their patients online. The study concludes that, like larger hospitals, smaller hospitals can also excel in creating an outstanding Web site to serve their patients so long as they truly care about their patients, have a clear vision and strong expertise in IT development. The study also concludes that Chinese private hospitals can learn from these state-owned hospitals in establishing a good reputation through professional and responsible interaction with patients. The four hospitals studied may shed light on the Web development in many other Chinese hospitals that are going through the same healthcare new media adoption. The findings from this study can also help Chinese hospitals form their visions in serving patients online.

  1. Measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals using Twitter.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Jared B; Brownstein, John S; Tuli, Gaurav; Runels, Tessa; Broecker, Katherine; Nsoesie, Elaine O; McIver, David J; Rozenblum, Ronen; Wright, Adam; Bourgeois, Florence T; Greaves, Felix

    2016-06-01

    Patients routinely use Twitter to share feedback about their experience receiving healthcare. Identifying and analysing the content of posts sent to hospitals may provide a novel real-time measure of quality, supplementing traditional, survey-based approaches. To assess the use of Twitter as a supplemental data stream for measuring patient-perceived quality of care in US hospitals and compare patient sentiments about hospitals with established quality measures. 404 065 tweets directed to 2349 US hospitals over a 1-year period were classified as having to do with patient experience using a machine learning approach. Sentiment was calculated for these tweets using natural language processing. 11 602 tweets were manually categorised into patient experience topics. Finally, hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets were surveyed to understand how they use Twitter to interact with patients. Roughly half of the hospitals in the US have a presence on Twitter. Of the tweets directed toward these hospitals, 34 725 (9.4%) were related to patient experience and covered diverse topics. Analyses limited to hospitals with ≥50 patient experience tweets revealed that they were more active on Twitter, more likely to be below the national median of Medicare patients (p<0.001) and above the national median for nurse/patient ratio (p=0.006), and to be a non-profit hospital (p<0.001). After adjusting for hospital characteristics, we found that Twitter sentiment was not associated with Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) ratings (but having a Twitter account was), although there was a weak association with 30-day hospital readmission rates (p=0.003). Tweets describing patient experiences in hospitals cover a wide range of patient care aspects and can be identified using automated approaches. These tweets represent a potentially untapped indicator of quality and may be valuable to patients, researchers, policy makers and hospital

  2. Length of stay and hospital costs among high-risk patients with hospital-origin Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Rebecca; Dean, Bonnie; Nathanson, Brian; Haidar, Tracy; Strauss, Marcie; Thomas, Sheila

    2013-01-01

    Hospital-onset Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea (HO-CDAD) has been associated with longer length of stay (LOS) and higher hospital costs among patients in general. The burden of HO-CDAD is unknown among patients who may be at particular risk of poor outcomes: older patients, those with complex or chronic conditions (renal disease, cancer, inflammatory bowel disease [IBD]), and those with concomitant antibiotic (CAbx) use during treatment for CDAD. A retrospective analysis (2005-2011) of the Health Facts® database (Cerner Corp., Kansas City, MO) containing comprehensive clinical records from 186 US hospitals identified hospitalized adult patients with HO-CDAD based on a positive C. difficile toxin collected >48 h after admission. Control patients were required to have total hospital LOS ≥2 days. Separate logistic regression models to estimate propensities were developed for each study group, with HO-CDAD vs controls as the outcome. Differences in LOS and costs were calculated between cases and controls for each group. A total of 4521 patients with HO-CDAD were identified. Mean age was 70 years, 54% were female, and 13% died. After matching, LOS was significantly greater among HO-CDAD patients (vs controls) in each group except IBD. The significant difference in LOS ranged from 3.0 (95% CI = 1.4-4.6) additional days in older patients to 7.8 (95% CI = 5.7-9.9) days in patients with CAbx exposure. HO-CDAD was associated with significantly higher costs among older patients (p < 0.001) and among those with renal impairment (p = 0.012) or CAbx use (p < 0.001). Missing cost data and potential misclassification of colonized patients as infected. Renal impairment, advanced age, cancer, and CAbx use are associated with significantly longer LOS among HO-CDAD patients, with CAbx users being the most resource intensive. Early identification and aggressive treatment of HO-CDAD in these groups may be warranted.

  3. Partners in Care: Design Considerations for Caregivers and Patients During a Hospital Stay

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Andrew D.; Mishra, Sonali R.; Kendall, Logan; Haldar, Shefali; Pollack, Ari H.; Pratt, Wanda

    2016-01-01

    Informal caregivers, such as close friends and family, play an important role in a hospital patient’s care. Although CSCW researchers have shown the potential for social computing technologies to help patients and their caregivers manage chronic conditions and support health behavior change, few studies focus on caregivers’ role during a multi-day hospital stay. To explore this space, we conducted an interview and observation study of patients and caregivers in the inpatient setting. In this paper, we describe how caregivers and patients coordinate and collaborate to manage patients’ care and wellbeing during a hospital stay. We define and describe five roles caregivers adopt: companion, assistant, representative, navigator, and planner, and show how patients and caregivers negotiate these roles and responsibilities throughout a hospital stay. Finally, we identify key design considerations for technology to support patients and caregivers during a hospital stay. PMID:27148596

  4. Measuring the Burden of Hospitalization in Patients with Parkinson´s Disease in Spain

    PubMed Central

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Pascual-Garcia, Raquel; San-Roman-Montero, Jesus; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Castrodeza-Sanz, Javier; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2016-01-01

    Introduction This epidemiological survey estimates the hospitalization burden related to Parkinson´s Disease in Spain. Methods This observational retrospective survey was performed by reviewing data from the National Surveillance System for Hospital Data, which includes more than 98% of Spanish hospitals. All hospitalizations of patients with Parkinson´s disease that were reported from 1997–2012 were analyzed. Codes were selected using the 9th International Classification of Diseases: ICD-9-CM: 332.0. Results A total of 438,513 hospital discharges of patients with Parkinson´s Disease were reported during the study period. The annual hospitalization rate was 64.2 cases per 100,000. The average length of hospital stay was 10 days. The trend for the annual hospitalization rate differed significantly depending on whether Parkinson´s disease was the main cause of hospitalization (n = 23,086, 1.14% annual increase) or was not the main cause of hospitalization (n = 415,427, 15.37% annual increase). The overall case-fatality rate among hospitalized patients was 10%. The case fatality rate among patient´s hospitalized with Parkinson´s disease as the main cause of hospitalization was 2.5%. The hospitalization rate and case-fatality rate significantly increased with age. The primary causes of hospitalization when Parkinson´s disease was not coded as the main cause of hospitalization were as follows: respiratory system diseases (24%), circulatory system diseases (19%), injuries and poisoning, including fractures (12%), diseases of the digestive system (10%) and neoplasms (5%). The annual average cost for National Health Care System was € 120 M, with a mean hospitalization cost of €4,378. Conclusions Parkinson´s disease poses a significant health threat in Spain, particularly in the elderly. While hospitalizations due to Parkinson´s Disease are relatively stable over time, the number of patients presenting with Parkinson´s disease as an important comorbidity has

  5. Measuring the Burden of Hospitalization in Patients with Parkinson´s Disease in Spain.

    PubMed

    Gil-Prieto, Ruth; Pascual-Garcia, Raquel; San-Roman-Montero, Jesus; Martinez-Martin, Pablo; Castrodeza-Sanz, Javier; Gil-de-Miguel, Angel

    2016-01-01

    This epidemiological survey estimates the hospitalization burden related to Parkinson´s Disease in Spain. This observational retrospective survey was performed by reviewing data from the National Surveillance System for Hospital Data, which includes more than 98% of Spanish hospitals. All hospitalizations of patients with Parkinson´s disease that were reported from 1997-2012 were analyzed. Codes were selected using the 9th International Classification of Diseases: ICD-9-CM: 332.0. A total of 438,513 hospital discharges of patients with Parkinson´s Disease were reported during the study period. The annual hospitalization rate was 64.2 cases per 100,000. The average length of hospital stay was 10 days. The trend for the annual hospitalization rate differed significantly depending on whether Parkinson´s disease was the main cause of hospitalization (n = 23,086, 1.14% annual increase) or was not the main cause of hospitalization (n = 415,427, 15.37% annual increase). The overall case-fatality rate among hospitalized patients was 10%. The case fatality rate among patient´s hospitalized with Parkinson´s disease as the main cause of hospitalization was 2.5%. The hospitalization rate and case-fatality rate significantly increased with age. The primary causes of hospitalization when Parkinson´s disease was not coded as the main cause of hospitalization were as follows: respiratory system diseases (24%), circulatory system diseases (19%), injuries and poisoning, including fractures (12%), diseases of the digestive system (10%) and neoplasms (5%). The annual average cost for National Health Care System was € 120 M, with a mean hospitalization cost of €4,378. Parkinson´s disease poses a significant health threat in Spain, particularly in the elderly. While hospitalizations due to Parkinson´s Disease are relatively stable over time, the number of patients presenting with Parkinson´s disease as an important comorbidity has increased dramatically. Medical staff must

  6. Current management of patients hospitalized with community-acquired pneumonia across Europe: outcomes from REACH.

    PubMed

    Blasi, Francesco; Garau, Javier; Medina, Jesús; Ávila, Marco; McBride, Kyle; Ostermann, Helmut

    2013-04-15

    Data describing real-life management and treatment of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) in Europe are limited. REACH (http://NCT01293435) was a retrospective, observational study collecting data on the management of EU patients hospitalized with CAP. Patients were aged ≥18 years, hospitalized with CAP between March 2010 and February 2011, and requiring in-hospital treatment with intravenous antibiotics. An electronic Case Report Form was used to collect patient, disease and treatment variables, including type of CAP, medical history, treatment setting, antibiotics administered and clinical outcomes. Patients (N = 2,039) were recruited from 128 centres in ten EU countries (Belgium, France, Germany, Greece, Italy, the Netherlands, Portugal, Spain, Turkey, UK). The majority of patients were aged ≥65 years (56.4%) and had CAP only (78.8%). Initial antibiotic treatment modification occurred in 28.9% of patients and was more likely in certain groups (patients with comorbidities; more severely ill patients; patients with healthcare-associated pneumonia, immunosuppression or recurrent episodes of CAP). Streamlining (de-escalation) of therapy occurred in 5.1% of patients. Mean length of hospital stay was 12.6 days and overall mortality was 7.2%. These data provide a current overview of clinical practice in patients with CAP in EU hospitals, revealing high rates of initial antibiotic treatment modification. The findings may precipitate reassessment of optimal management regimens for hospitalized CAP patients.

  7. Nutritional screening in hospitalized pediatric patients: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Adriana Fonseca; Viana, Kátia Danielle Araújo Lourenço

    2016-01-01

    This systematic review aimed to verify the available scientific evidence on the clinical performance and diagnostic accuracy of nutritional screening tools in hospitalized pediatric patients. A search was performed in the Medline (National Library of Medicine United States), LILACS (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences), PubMed (US National Library of Medicine National Institutes of Health), in the SCIELO (Scientific Electronic Library Online), through CAPES portal (Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior), bases Scopus e Web of Science. The descriptors used in accordance with the Descriptors in Health Sciences (DeCS)/Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) list were "malnutrition", "screening", and "pediatrics", as well as the equivalent words in Portuguese. The authors identified 270 articles published between 2004 and 2014. After applying the selection criteria, 35 were analyzed in full and eight articles were included in the systematic review. We evaluated the methodological quality of the studies using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies (QUADAS). Five nutritional screening tools in pediatrics were identified. Among these, the Screening Tool for the Assessment of Malnutrition in Pediatrics (STAMP) showed high sensitivity, almost perfect inter-rater agreement and between the screening and the reference standard; the Screening Tool Risk on Nutritional Status and Growth (STRONGkids) showed high sensitivity, lower percentage of specificity, substantial intra-rater agreement, and ease of use in clinical practice. The studies included in this systematic review showed good performance of the nutritional screening tools in pediatrics, especially STRONGkids and STAMP. The authors emphasize the need to perform for more studies in this area. Only one tool was translated and adapted to the Brazilian pediatric population, and it is essential to carry out studies of tool adaptation and validation for this population. Copyright

  8. Hospital revenue cycle management and payer mix: do Medicare and Medicaid undermine hospitals' ability to generate and collect patient care revenue?

    PubMed

    Rauscher, Simone; Wheeler, John R C

    2010-01-01

    The continuing efforts of government payers to contain hospital costs have raised concerns among hospital managers that serving publicly insured patients may undermine their ability to manage the revenue cycle successfully. This study uses financial information from two sources-Medicare cost reports for all US hospitals for 2002 to 2007 and audited financial statements for all bond-issuing, not-for-profit hospitals for 2000 to 2006 to examine the relationship between hospitals' shares of Medicare and Medicaid patients and the amount of patient care revenue they generate as well as the speed with which they collect their revenue. Hospital-level fixed effects regression analysis finds that hospitals with higher Medicare and Medicaid payer mix collect somewhat higher average patient care revenues than hospitals with more privately insured and self-pay patients. Hospitals with more Medicare patients also collect on this revenue faster; serving more Medicaid patients is not associated with the speed of patient revenue collection. For hospital managers, these findings may represent good news. They suggest that, despite increases in the number of publicly insured patients served, managers have frequently been able to generate adequate amounts of patient revenue and collect it in a timely fashion.

  9. The use of patient feedback by hospital boards of directors: a qualitative study of two NHS hospitals in England.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robert; Baeza, Juan I; Fulop, Naomi J

    2018-02-01

    Although previous research suggests that different kinds of patient feedback are used in different ways to help improve the quality of hospital care, there have been no studies of the ways in which hospital boards of directors use feedback for this purpose. To examine whether and how boards of directors of hospitals use feedback from patients to formulate strategy and to assure and improve the quality of care. We undertook an in-depth qualitative study in two acute hospital National Health Service foundation trusts in England, purposively selected as contrasting examples of the collection of different kinds of patient feedback. We collected and analysed data from interviews with directors and other managers, from observation of board meetings, and from board papers and other documents. The two boards used in-depth qualitative feedback and quantitative feedback from surveys in different ways to help develop strategies, set targets for quality improvement and design specific quality improvement initiatives; but both boards made less subsequent use of any kinds of feedback to monitor their strategies or explicitly to assure the quality of services. We have identified limitations in the uses of patient feedback by hospital boards that suggest that boards should review their current practice to ensure that they use the different kinds of patient feedback that are available to them more effectively to improve, monitor and assure the quality of care. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  10. Early hospital discharge versus continued hospitalization in febrile pediatric cancer patients with prolonged neutropenia: A randomized, prospective study.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Nabil; El-Mahallawy, Hadir A; Ahmed, Ibrahim A; Nassif, Shimaa; El-Beshlawy, Aamal; El-Haddad, Alaa

    2007-11-01

    Hospitalization with single or multi-agent antibiotic therapy has been the standard of care for treatment of febrile neutropenia in cancer patients. We hypothesized that an empiric antibiotic regimen that is effective and that can be administered once-daily will allow for improved hospital utilization by early transition to outpatient care. Febrile pediatric cancer patients with anticipated prolonged neutropenia were randomized between a regimen of once-daily ceftriaxone plus amikacin (C + A) and imipenem monotherapy (control). Afebrile patients on C + A satisfying "Early Discharge Criteria" at 72 hr continued treatment as outpatients. We compared the outcome, adverse events, duration of hospitalization, and cost between both groups. A prospective randomized controlled clinical trial was conducted on 129 febrile episodes in pediatric cancer patients with prolonged neutropenia. No adverse events were seen in 32 children (84% of study arm) treated on an outpatient basis. We found a statistically significant difference between the duration of hospitalization of the C + A group [median 5 days] and control [median 9 days](P < 0.001), per episode antibiotic cost (P < 0.001) and total episode cost (P < 0.001). There was no statistically significant difference in the response to treatment at 72 hr or after necessary antimicrobial modifications. We conclude that pediatric febrile cancer patients initially considered at risk for sepsis due to prolonged neutropenia can be re-evaluated at 72 hr for outpatient therapy. The convenience, low incidence of adverse effects, and cost benefit of the once-daily regimen of C + A may be particularly useful to reduce the overall treatment costs and duration of hospitalization. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  11. Evaluation of factors influencing patient satisfaction in social security hospitals in Mazandaran province, North of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Jafari Kelarijani, Seyed Ebrahim; Jamshidi, Reza; Heidarian, Ali Reza; Khorshidi, Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    Background: Patient satisfaction is affected by hospital services and may have an effect on the cultural, social and personal conditions of the people living in the region. This research aimed to evaluate the patient satisfaction in social security hospitals in Mazandaran province. Methods: From Spring 2012 to Summer 2013, all patients admitted to social security hospitals in Mazandaran province were entered in the study. Data regarding to inhabitation, sex, income and patients’ educational level and satisfaction with the hospital services were collected. Results: Seven hundred seventy-six patients with mean age of 47.35±7.41 years were analyzed. Patient's inhabitant, educational attainment and income level had a significant relationship with patient satisfaction level (p<0.05). There was no significant difference regarding patients’ gender. Conclusion: The results show that the patient's inhabitant, educational and income level are related to attain patients’ satisfaction. PMID:25489436

  12. Intensive Care Unit Utilization Among Medicare Patients Hospitalized with Non-ST-Segment Elevation Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Fanaroff, Alexander C; Peterson, Eric D; Chen, Anita Y; Thomas, Laine; Doll, Jacob D; Fordyce, Christopher B; Newby, L Kristin; Amsterdam, Ezra A; Kosiborod, Mikhail N; de Lemos, James A; Wang, Tracy Y

    2018-01-01

    Importance Intensive care unit (ICU) utilization may have important implications for the care and outcomes of patients with non-ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (NSTEMI). Objectives To examine inter-hospital variation in ICU utilization in the United States for older adults with hemodynamically stable NSTEMI and outcomes associated with ICU utilization among patients with at low, moderate, or high mortality risk. Design, Settings and Participants Retrospective analysis of 28,018 Medicare patients ≥65 years old admitted with NSTEMI to 346 hospitals participating in ACTION Registry-GWTG between April 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. Patients with cardiogenic shock or cardiac arrest on presentation were excluded. Exposure Hospitals with high (>70% NSTEMI patients treated in an ICU during the index hospitalization), intermediate (30–70%), or low (< 30%) ICU utilization rates Main Outcome and Measure 30-day mortality Results Of NSTEMI patients ≥ 65 years old, 11,934 (43%) had an ICU stay. The proportion of NSTEMI patients treated in the ICU varied across hospitals (median 38% [26%, 54%]), but there were no significant differences in hospital characteristics or NSTEMI patient characteristics between hospitals with high, intermediate, or low ICU utilization rates. Compared with high ICU utilization hospitals, hospitals with low or intermediate ICU utilizations rates were only marginally more selective of higher risk patients, as determined by ACTION in-hospital mortality risk score or initial troponin level. Thirty-day mortality rates did not significantly differ based on hospital ICU utilization (high vs. low: 8.7% vs. 8.7%, adjusted OR 0.91, 95% CI 0.76–1.08; intermediate vs. low: 9.6% vs. 8.7%, adjusted OR 1.06, 95% CI 0.94–1.20). The relationship between hospital ICU utilization and mortality was similar in analyses stratified by low, moderate, or high ACTION risk score categories (adjusted interaction p 0.86). Conclusions and Relevance ICU

  13. [The opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition in psychiatric hospitalization].

    PubMed

    Marques de Oliveira, Renata; Furegato, Antonia Regina Ferreira

    2014-06-01

    To identify the opinion of patients with mental disorder about tobacco and its prohibition during psychiatric hospitalization. An exploratory study with 96 patients smokers with mental disorders hospitalized in a psychiatric ward of a general hospital. The interviews were conducted individually, using an instrument designed for this study. The content from the interviews was recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. The patients with mental disorder were identified as perceiving smoking during the psychiatric hospitalization as a help to support the difficulties in socialization and in the lack of activities. The permission for smoking is seen as a signal of respect to their needs. The subjects mentioned to not accept the total smoking prohibition. Tobacco helps to face difficulties and conflicts in the psychiatric hospitalization. There is resistance regarding the possibility to totally withdraw the smoking permission during hospitalization.

  14. Changes in Patient and Nurse Outcomes Associated with Magnet Hospital Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Kutney-Lee, Ann; Stimpfel, Amy Witkoski; Sloane, Douglas M.; Cimiotti, Jeannie P.; Quinn, Lisa W.; Aiken, Linda H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Research has documented an association between Magnet hospitals and better outcomes for nurses and patients. However, little longitudinal evidence exists to support a causal link between Magnet recognition and outcomes. Objective To compare changes over time in surgical patient outcomes, nurse-reported quality, and nurse outcomes in a sample of hospitals that attained Magnet recognition between 1999 and 2007 with hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Research Design Retrospective, two-stage panel design using four secondary data sources. Subjects 136 Pennsylvania hospitals (11 “emerging” Magnets and 125 non-Magnets) Measures American Nurses Credentialing Center Magnet recognition; risk-adjusted rates of surgical 30-day mortality and failure-to-rescue, nurse-reported quality measures, and nurse outcomes; the Practice Environment Scale of the Nursing Work Index Methods Fixed effects difference models were used to compare changes in outcomes between emerging Magnet hospitals and hospitals that remained non-Magnet. Results Emerging Magnet hospitals demonstrated markedly greater improvements in their work environments than other hospitals. On average, the changes in 30-day surgical mortality and failure-to-rescue rates over the study period were more pronounced in emerging Magnet hospitals than in non-Magnet hospitals, by 2.4 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (p<.01) and 6.1 fewer deaths per 1000 patients (p=0.02), respectively. Similar differences in the changes for emerging Magnet hospitals and non-Magnet hospitals were observed in nurse-reported quality of care and nurse outcomes. Conclusions In general, Magnet recognition is associated with significant improvements over time in the quality of the work environment, and in patient and nurse outcomes that exceed those of non-Magnet hospitals. PMID:25906016

  15. [Hospital at home: assessment of early discharge in terms of patients mortality and satisfaction].

    PubMed

    Damiani, G; Pinnarelli, L; Ricciardi, G

    2006-01-01

    New organizational models are essentials for European Hospitals because of restraining budget and ageing of population. Hospital at home is an alternative to inpatient care, effective both in clinical and economic ground. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of Hospital at Home in terms of decreased mortality and patient satisfaction. We carried out a meta-analysis of the literature about hospital at home interventions. We searched Medline (to December 2002), the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (to October 2002) and other bibliographical databases, with a supplementary handsearching of literature. We used the following keywords: hospital at home, home hospitalization, mortality, patient satisfaction, cost, acute hospital care, conventional hospitalization. We included studies respecting the following criteria: analytical or experimental studies aimed at compare early discharge to hospital at home and continued care in an acute hospital. Review Manager 4.2 software was used to collect data and perform statistical analysis. We found 2420 articles searching for the chosen keywords. Twelve studies (2048 patients) were included for death outcome and six studies (1382 patients) were included for satisfaction outcome. The selected studies indicated a greater effect size of patient satisfaction in home patients than hospitalized ones (Odds Ratio: 1.58 95% CI: 1.25, 2.00) and showed no difference in terms of mortality (Risk Difference: -0.01 95% CI: -0.03, 0.02). Our results underline the effectiveness of this organizational model, as an alternative to continued care in an acute hospital. Further useful considerations could be drawn by economic evaluation studies carried out on field.

  16. Clinical audit of COPD patients requiring hospital admissions in Spain: AUDIPOC study.

    PubMed

    Pozo-Rodríguez, Francisco; López-Campos, Jose Luis; Alvarez-Martínez, Carlos J; Castro-Acosta, Ady; Agüero, Ramón; Hueto, Javier; Hernández-Hernández, Jesús; Barrón, Manuel; Abraira, Victor; Forte, Anabel; Sanchez Nieto, Juan Miguel; Lopez-Gabaldón, Encarnación; Cosío, Borja G; Agustí, Alvar

    2012-01-01

    AUDIPOC is a nationwide clinical audit that describes the characteristics, interventions and outcomes of patients admitted to Spanish hospitals because of an exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (ECOPD), assessing the compliance of these parameters with current international guidelines. The present study describes hospital resources, hospital factors related to case recruitment variability, patients' characteristics, and adherence to guidelines. An organisational database was completed by all participant hospitals recording resources and organisation. Over an 8-week period 11,564 consecutive ECOPD admissions to 129 Spanish hospitals covering 70% of the Spanish population were prospectively identified. At hospital discharge, 5,178 patients (45% of eligible) were finally included, and thus constituted the audited population. Audited patients were reassessed 90 days after admission for survival and readmission rates. A wide variability was observed in relation to most variables, hospital adherence to guidelines, and readmissions and death. Median inpatient mortality was 5% (across-hospital range 0-35%). Among discharged patients, 37% required readmission (0-62%) and 6.5% died (0-35%). The overall mortality rate was 11.6% (0-50%). Hospital size and complexity and aspects related to hospital COPD awareness were significantly associated with case recruitment. Clinical management most often complied with diagnosis and treatment recommendations but rarely (<50%) addressed guidance on healthy life-styles. The AUDIPOC study highlights the large across-hospital variability in resources and organization of hospitals, patient characteristics, process of care, and outcomes. The study also identifies resources and organizational characteristics associated with the admission of COPD cases, as well as aspects of daily clinical care amenable to improvement.

  17. Pre-hospital transfusion of plasma in hemorrhaging trauma patients independently improves hemostatic competence and acidosis.

    PubMed

    Henriksen, Hanne H; Rahbar, Elaheh; Baer, Lisa A; Holcomb, John B; Cotton, Bryan A; Steinmetz, Jacob; Ostrowski, Sisse R; Stensballe, Jakob; Johansson, Pär I; Wade, Charles E

    2016-12-09

    The early use of blood products has been associated with improved patient outcomes following severe hemorrhage or traumatic injury. We aimed to investigate the influence of pre-hospital blood products (i.e. plasma and/or RBCs) on admission hemostatic properties and patient outcomes. We hypothesized that pre-hospital plasma would improve hemostatic function as evaluated by rapid thrombelastography (rTEG). We conducted a prospective observational study recruiting 257 trauma patients admitted to a Level I trauma center having received either blood products pre-hospital or in-hospital within 6 hours of admission. Clinical data on patient demographics, blood biochemistry, injury severity score and mortality were collected. Admission rTEG was conducted to characterize the coagulation profile and hemostatic function. 75 patients received pre-hospital plasma and/or RBCs (PH group; nearly half received both RBCs and plasma) whereas 182 patients only received in-hospital blood products (RBCs, Plasma and Platelets) within 6 hours of admission (IH group). PH patients had lower Glasgow coma scale (GCS) scores, more penetrating injuries, lower systolic blood pressures, lower hemoglobin levels, lower platelet counts and greater acidosis upon ED admission than the IH group (all p < 0.05). Despite differences in type of injury and admission vitals indicating that the PH group had more signs of bleeding than the IH group, there were no significant differences in in-hospital mortality (PH 26.7% vs. IH 20.9% p = 0.31). When comparing rTEG variables between PH patients transfused with 0, 1 or 2 units of plasma, more pre-hospital plasma transfusion was tendency towards improved rTEG variables. When adjusting for pre-hospital RBC, pre-hospital plasma was associated with significantly higher rTEG MA (p = 0.012) at hospital admission. After adjusting for pre-hospital RBCs, pre-hospital plasma transfusion was independently associated with increased rTEG MA, as well as arrival indices of

  18. The financial burden of malnutrition in hospitalized pediatric patients under five years of age.

    PubMed

    Kittisakmontri, Kulnipa; Sukhosa, Onwaree

    2016-10-01

    Under-five children are a medically fragile group which is compromised by hospitalization. Malnutrition in those patients not only increases complications and mortality but also affects hospital resource utilization. Therefore, this study was conducted to clarify the impact of malnutrition on hospital expenditures. This prospective cohort study was performed at a tertiary hospital in Thailand. Under-five children who were admitted to general pediatric wards were included. Demographic data, the length of stay (LOS), and anthropometric measurements at admission were recorded. The classification of wasting and stunting were defined according to the World Health Organization (WHO) classification. Moreover, all hospital expenses were calculated directly based on the actual billing including the total hospital cost, cost of bed, enteral formula, medications, medical apparatus and procedures, nursing care, investigations and surgery. One-hundred and five patients with a mean age of 26.8 ± 1.8 months were included. The majority of them were males (61%) with the leading cause of infectious disease. According to the prevalence of malnutrition, the percentage of patients who had only stunting or wasting were 24.8% and 10.5%, respectively while 15.2% of all patients had both stunting and wasting. Regardless of stunting, the wasting patients had a significantly higher cost of bed, enteral formula, nursing care, and medical apparatus. Particularly, the highest costs of all expenditures including the total hospital cost were found in patients who were both stunted and wasting. Apart from the financial burdens, the wasting patients stayed longer in the hospital and the LOS also significantly correlated with the total hospital cost (r = 0.84, p = 0.01). The present study underscores the high prevalence of malnutrition in under-five pediatric patients. The malnourished patients, in particular the wasting group, had longer LOS and consequently had increased hospital expenses

  19. Tuberculosis patients hospitalized in the Albert Schweitzer Hospital, Lambaréné, Gabon-a retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Stolp, S M; Huson, M A M; Janssen, S; Beyeme, J O; Grobusch, M P

    2013-11-01

    Epidemiological data on tuberculosis in Central Africa are limited. We performed a retrospective observational study on clinical characteristics of 719 hospitalized tuberculosis patients in Lambaréné, Gabon. Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) co-infection rate was high (34%) and in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in HIV-positive patients (10% versus 2%). Long-term information on patient outcome was limited; however, from 2008 to 2011, loss to follow up was noted in 28% of cases. Our data illustrate the high burden of TB in Gabon, where loss to follow up and emerging drug resistance are important problems for which comprehensive data are still lacking. © 2013 The Authors Clinical Microbiology and Infection © 2013 European Society of Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases.

  20. Predictors of hospitalization of tuberculosis patients in Montreal, Canada: a retrospective cohort study.

    PubMed

    Ronald, Lisa A; FitzGerald, J Mark; Benedetti, Andrea; Boivin, Jean-François; Schwartzman, Kevin; Bartlett-Esquilant, Gillian; Menzies, Dick

    2016-11-15

    Hospitalization is the most costly health system component of tuberculosis (TB) control programs. Our objectives were to identify how frequently patients are hospitalized, and the factors associated with hospitalizations and length-of-stay (LOS) of TB patients in a large Canadian city. We extracted data from the Montreal TB Resource database, a retrospective cohort of all active TB cases reported to the Montreal Public Health Department between January 1996 and May 2007. Data included patient demographics, clinical characteristics, and dates of treatment and hospitalization. Predictors of hospitalization and LOS were estimated using logistic regression and Cox proportional hazards regression, respectively. There were 1852 active TB patients. Of these, 51% were hospitalized initially during the period of diagnosis and/or treatment initiation (median LOS 17.5 days), and 9.0% hospitalized later during treatment (median LOS 13 days). In adjusted models, patients were more likely to be hospitalized initially if they were children, had co-morbidities, smear-positive symptomatic pulmonary TB, cavitary or miliary TB, and multi- or poly-TB drug resistance. Factors predictive of longer initial LOS included having HIV, renal disease, symptomatic pulmonary smear-positive TB, multi- or poly-TB drug resistance, and being in a teaching hospital. We found a high hospitalization rate during diagnosis and treatment of patients with TB. Diagnostic delay due to low index of suspicion may result in patients presenting with more severe disease at the time of diagnosis. Earlier identification and treatment, through interventions to increase TB awareness and more targeted prevention programs, might reduce costly TB-related hospital use.

  1. Acute Complex Care Model: An organizational approach for the medical care of hospitalized acute complex patients.

    PubMed

    Pietrantonio, Filomena; Orlandini, Francesco; Moriconi, Luca; La Regina, Micaela

    2015-12-01

    Chronic diseases are the major cause of death (59%) and disability worldwide, representing 46% of global disease burden. According to the Future Hospital Commission of the Royal College of Physicians, Medical Division (MD) will be responsible for all hospital medical services, from emergency to specialist wards. The Hospital Acute Care Hub will bring together the clinical areas of the MD that focus on the management of acute medical patients. The Chronic Care Model (CCM) places the patient at the center of the care system enhancing the community's social and health support, pathways and structures to keep chronic, frail, poly-pathological people at home or out of the hospital. The management of such patients in the hospital still needs to be solved. Hereby, we propose an innovative model for the management of the hospital's acute complex patients, which is the hospital counterpart of the CCM. The target population are acutely ill complex and poly-pathological patients (AICPPs), admitted to hospital and requiring high technology resources. The mission is to improve the management of medical admissions through pre-defined intra-hospital tracks and a global, multidisciplinary, patient-centered approach. The ACCM leader is an internal medicine specialist (IMS) who summarizes health problems, establishes priorities, and restores health balance in AICPPs. The epidemiological transition leading to a progressive increase in "chronically unstable" and complex patients needing frequent hospital treatment, inevitably enhances the role of hospital IMS in the coordination and delivery of care. ACCM represents a practical response to this epochal change of roles. Copyright © 2015 European Federation of Internal Medicine. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. California's Hospital Fair Pricing Act reduced the prices actually paid by uninsured patients.

    PubMed

    Bai, Ge

    2015-01-01

    California's Hospital Fair Pricing Act, passed in 2006, aims to protect uninsured patients from paying hospital gross charges: the full, undiscounted prices based on each hospital's chargemaster. In this study I examined how the law affects the net price actually paid by uninsured patients--a question critical for evaluating the law's impact. I found that from 2004 to 2012 the net price actually paid by uninsured patients shrank from 6 percent higher than Medicare prices to 68 percent lower than Medicare prices; the adjusted collection ratio, essentially the amount the hospital actually collected for every dollar in gross price charged, for uninsured patients dropped from 32 percent to 11 percent; and although hospitals have been increasingly less able to generate revenues from uninsured patients, they have raised the proportion of services provided to them in relation to total services provided to all patients. The substantial protection provided to uninsured patients by the California Hospital Fair Pricing Act has important implications for federal and state policy makers seeking to achieve a similar goal. States or Congress could legislate criteria determining the eligibility for discounted charges, mandate a lower price ceiling, and regulate for-profit hospitals in regard to uninsured patients. Project HOPE—The People-to-People Health Foundation, Inc.

  3. Hospital Variation in Utilization of Life-Sustaining Treatments among Patients with Do Not Resuscitate Orders.

    PubMed

    Walkey, Allan J; Weinberg, Janice; Wiener, Renda Soylemez; Cooke, Colin R; Lindenauer, Peter K

    2018-06-01

    To determine between-hospital variation in interventions provided to patients with do not resuscitate (DNR) orders. United States Agency of Healthcare Research and Quality, Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project, California State Inpatient Database. Retrospective cohort study including hospitalized patients aged 40 and older with potential indications for invasive treatments: in-hospital cardiac arrest (indication for CPR), acute respiratory failure (mechanical ventilation), acute renal failure (hemodialysis), septic shock (central venous catheterization), and palliative care. Hierarchical logistic regression to determine associations of hospital "early" DNR rates (DNR order placed within 24 hours of admission) with utilization of invasive interventions. California State Inpatient Database, year 2011. Patients with DNR orders at high-DNR-rate hospitals were less likely to receive invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure or hemodialysis for acute renal failure, but more likely to receive palliative care than DNR patients at low-DNR-rate hospitals. Patients without DNR orders experienced similar rates of invasive interventions regardless of hospital DNR rates. Hospitals vary widely in the scope of invasive or organ-supporting treatments provided to patients with DNR orders. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  4. Equitable access to elective hospital services: the introduction of patient choice in a decentralised healthcare system.

    PubMed

    Ringard, Ånen

    2012-02-01

    During the 1980s and 1990s, increased waiting times for elective surgery was perceived to be a major accessibility problem in many countries. In an attempt to improve access, hospital choice reforms were introduced in a number of countries. In Norway, a nationwide reform to improve access came into effect in 2001. At the same time, renewed support was expressed for the long-standing political aim of ensuring equal access to healthcare services for all citizens regardless of their social position. The current aim is to analyse the relationship of the hospital choice reform and the goal of equitable access to hospital services. A survey conducted among Norwegian patients in 2004 provided information about whether a choice of hospital had been made. Information from the survey was merged with administrative data from the hospital that performed the treatment. The survey provided data on patients' socioeconomic position. Demographics, medical need, and prior use of healthcare services were controlled for to determine the effect of socioeconomic position on hospital choice. The patient's socioeconomic position, measured by education, was found to be significantly associated with hospital choice. The relationship resembled that of a social gradient. Patients with a primary education were less likely to have made a choice, followed by those with secondary education or a lower university degree. Patients with higher university education were most likely to have chosen. Hospital selection is a demanding task for many patients. Policymakers should therefore focus on crafting and implementing tools necessary for supporting uptake of choice in disadvantaged groups.

  5. Out-of-hospital characteristics and care of patients with severe sepsis: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Seymour, Christopher W.; Band, Roger A.; Cooke, Colin R.; Mikkelsen, Mark E.; Hylton, Julie; Rea, Tom D.; Goss, Christopher H.; Gaieski, David F.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Early recognition and treatment in severe sepsis improves outcomes. Yet, out-of-hospital patient characteristics and emergency medical services (EMS) care in severe sepsis is understudied. Our goal was to describe out-of-hospital characteristics and EMS care in patients with severe sepsis, and evaluate associations between out-of-hospital characteristics and severity of organ dysfunction in the emergency department (ED). Materials & Methods We performed a secondary data analysis of existing data from patients with severe sepsis transported by EMS to an academic medical center. We constructed multivariable linear regression models to determine if out-of-hospital factors are associated with serum lactate and SOFA in the ED. Results Two hundred sixteen patients with severe sepsis arrived by EMS. Median serum lactate in the ED was 3.0 mmol/L (IQR:2.0-5.0) and median SOFA score was 4 (IQR:2-6). Sixty-three percent (135) of patients were transported by advanced life support providers and 30% (62) received IV fluid. Lower out-of-hospital Glasgow coma scale (GCS) was independently associated with elevated serum lactate (p<0.01). Out-of-hospital hypotension, greater respiratory rate, and lower GCS were associated with greater SOFA (p<0.01). Conclusions Out-of-hospital fluid resuscitation occurred in less than one-third of patients with severe sepsis, and routinely measured out-of-hospital variables were associated with greater serum lactate and SOFA in the ED. PMID:20381301

  6. Costs of terminal patients who receive palliative care or usual care in different hospital wards.

    PubMed

    Simoens, Steven; Kutten, Betty; Keirse, Emmanuel; Berghe, Paul Vanden; Beguin, Claire; Desmedt, Marianne; Deveugele, Myriam; Léonard, Christian; Paulus, Dominique; Menten, Johan

    2010-11-01

    In addition to the effectiveness of hospital care models for terminal patients, policy makers and health care payers are concerned about their costs. This study aims to measure the hospital costs of treating terminal patients in Belgium from the health care payer perspective. Also, this study compares the costs of palliative and usual care in different types of hospital wards. A multicenter, retrospective cohort study compared costs of palliative care with usual care in acute hospital wards and with care in palliative care units. The study enrolled terminal patients from a representative sample of hospitals. Health care costs included fixed hospital costs and charges relating to medical fees, pharmacy and other charges. Data sources consisted of hospital accountancy data and invoice data. Six hospitals participated in the study, generating a total of 146 patients. The findings showed that palliative care in a palliative care unit was more expensive than palliative care in an acute ward due to higher staffing levels in palliative care units. Palliative care in an acute ward is cheaper than usual care in an acute ward. This study suggests that palliative care models in acute wards need to be supported because such care models appear to be less expensive than usual care and because such care models are likely to better reflect the needs of terminal patients. This finding emphasizes the importance of the timely recognition of the need for palliative care in terminal patients treated in acute wards.

  7. Outcomes of In-Hospital Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation in Patients with CKD.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Fahad; Adil, Malik M; Kaleem, Umar M; Zafar, Taqi T; Khan, Abdus Salam; Holley, Jean L; Nally, Joseph V

    2016-10-07

    Advance care planning, including code/resuscitation status discussion, is an essential part of the medical care of patients with CKD. There is little information on the outcomes of cardiopulmonary resuscitation in these patients. We aimed to measure cardiopulmonary resuscitation outcomes in these patients. Our study is observational in nature. We compared the following cardiopulmonary resuscitation-related outcomes in patients with CKD with those in the general population by using the Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2005-2011): ( 1 ) survival to hospital discharge, ( 2 ) discharge destination, and ( 3 ) length of hospital stay. All of the patients were 18 years old or older. During the study period, 71,961 patients with CKD underwent in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation compared with 323,620 patients from the general population. Unadjusted in-hospital mortality rates were higher in patients with CKD (75% versus 72%; P <0.001) on univariate analysis. After adjusting for age, sex, and potential confounders, patients with CKD had higher odds of mortality (odds ratio, 1.24; 95% confidence interval, 1.11 to 1.34; P ≤0.001) and length of stay (odds ratio, 1.11; 95% confidence interval, 1.07 to 1.15; P =0.001). Hospitalization charges were also greater in patients with CKD. There was no overall difference in postcardiopulmonary resuscitation nursing home placement between the two groups. In a separate subanalysis of patients ≥75 years old with CKD, higher odds of in-hospital mortality were also seen in the patients with CKD (odds ratio, 1.10; 95% confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.17; P =0.01). In conclusion, we observed slightly higher in-hospital mortality in patients with CKD undergoing in-hospital cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  8. Nurse staffing and patient outcomes in Belgian acute hospitals: cross-sectional analysis of administrative data.

    PubMed

    Van den Heede, Koen; Sermeus, Walter; Diya, Luwis; Clarke, Sean P; Lesaffre, Emmanuel; Vleugels, Arthur; Aiken, Linda H

    2009-07-01

    Studies have linked nurse staffing levels (number and skill mix) to several nurse-sensitive patient outcomes. However, evidence from European countries has been limited. This study examines the association between nurse staffing levels (i.e. acuity-adjusted Nursing Hours per Patient Day, the proportion of registered nurses with a Bachelor's degree) and 10 different patient outcomes potentially sensitive to nursing care. DESIGN-SETTING-PARTICIPANTS: Cross-sectional analyses of linked data from the Belgian Nursing Minimum Dataset (general acute care and intensive care nursing units: n=1403) and Belgian Hospital Discharge Dataset (general, orthopedic and vascular surgery patients: n=260,923) of the year 2003 from all acute hospitals (n=115). Logistic regression analyses, estimated by using a Generalized Estimation Equation Model, were used to study the association between nurse staffing and patient outcomes. The mean acuity-adjusted Nursing Hours per Patient Day in Belgian hospitals was 2.62 (S.D.=0.29). The variability in patient outcome rates between hospitals is considerable. The inter-quartile ranges for the 10 patient outcomes go from 0.35 for Deep Venous Thrombosis to 3.77 for failure-to-rescue. No significant association was found between the acuity-adjusted Nursing Hours per Patient Day, proportion of registered nurses with a Bachelor's degree and the selected patient outcomes. The absence of associations between hospital-level nurse staffing measures and patient outcomes should not be inferred as implying that nurse staffing does not have an impact on patient outcomes in Belgian hospitals. To better understand the dynamics of the nurse staffing and patient outcomes relationship in acute hospitals, further analyses (i.e. nursing unit level analyses) of these and other outcomes are recommended, in addition to inclusion of other study variables, including data about nursing practice environments in hospitals.

  9. Patient safety challenges in a case study hospital--of relevance for transfusion processes?

    PubMed

    Aase, Karina; Høyland, Sindre; Olsen, Espen; Wiig, Siri; Nilsen, Stein Tore

    2008-10-01

    The paper reports results from a research project with the objective of studying patient safety, and relates the finding to safety issues within transfusion medicine. The background is an increased focus on undesired events related to diagnosis, medication, and patient treatment in general in the healthcare sector. The study is designed as a case study within a regional Norwegian hospital conducting specialised health care services. The study includes multiple methods such as interviews, document analysis, analysis of error reports, and a questionnaire survey. Results show that the challenges for improved patient safety, based on employees' perceptions, are hospital management support, reporting of accidents/incidents, and collaboration across hospital units. Several of these generic safety challenges are also found to be of relevance for a hospital's transfusion service. Positive patient safety factors are identified as teamwork within hospital units, a non-punitive response to errors, and unit manager's actions promoting safety.

  10. A new casemix adjustment index for hospital mortality among patients with congestive heart failure.

    PubMed

    Polanczyk, C A; Rohde, L E; Philbin, E A; Di Salvo, T G

    1998-10-01

    Comparative analysis of hospital outcomes requires reliable adjustment for casemix. Although congestive heart failure is one of the most common indications for hospitalization, congestive heart failure casemix adjustment has not been widely studied. The purposes of this study were (1) to describe and validate a new congestive heart failure-specific casemix adjustment index to predict in-hospital mortality and (2) to compare its performance to the Charlson comorbidity index. Data from all 4,608 admissions to the Massachusetts General Hospital from January 1990 to July 1996 with a principal ICD-9-CM discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure were evaluated. Massachusetts General Hospital patients were randomly divided in a derivation and a validation set. By logistic regression, odds ratios for in-hospital death were computed and weights were assigned to construct a new predictive index in the derivation set. The performance of the index was tested in an internal Massachusetts General Hospital validation set and in a non-Massachusetts General Hospital external validation set incorporating data from all 1995 New York state hospital discharges with a primary discharge diagnosis of congestive heart failure. Overall in-hospital mortality was 6.4%. Based on the new index, patients were assigned to six categories with incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates ranging from 0.5% to 31%. By logistic regression, "c" statistics of the congestive heart failure-specific index (0.83 and 0.78, derivation and validation set) were significantly superior to the Charlson index (0.66). Similar incrementally increasing hospital mortality rates were observed in the New York database with the congestive heart failure-specific index ("c" statistics 0.75). In an administrative database, this congestive heart failure-specific index may be a more adequate casemix adjustment tool to predict hospital mortality in patients hospitalized for congestive heart failure.

  11. Worsening renal function in patients hospitalized with acute heart failure: risk factors and prognostic significances.

    PubMed

    Verdiani, Valerio; Lastrucci, Vieri; Nozzoli, Carlo

    2010-10-11

    Objectives. To determine the prevalence, the clinical predictors, and the prognostic significances of Worsening Renal Function (WRF) in hospitalized patients with Acute Heart Failure (AHF). Methods. 394 consecutively hospitalized patients with AHF were evaluated. WRF was defined as an increase in serum creatinine of ≥0.3 mg/dL from baseline to discharge. Results. Nearly 11% of patients developed WRF. The independent predictors of WRF analyzed with a multivariable logistic regression were history of chronic kidney disease (P = .047), age >75 years (P = .049), and admission heart rates ≥100 bpm (P = .004). Mortality or rehospitalization rates at 1 month, 6 months, and 1year were not significantly different between patients with WRF and those without WRF. Conclusion. Different clinical predictors at hospital admission can be used to identify patients at increased risk for developing WRF. Patients with WRF compared with those without WRF experienced no significant differences in hospital length of stay, mortality, or rehospitalization rates.

  12. Hospitals' organizational variables and patients' perceptions of individualized nursing care in Finland.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, Riitta; Välimäki, Maritta; Katajisto, Jouko; Leino-Kilpi, Helena

    2007-03-01

    To examine the association between hospitals' organizational variables and patients' perceptions of individualized care. There is lack of evidence related to the effects that the hospital environment has on patient perceptions of the individuality of care they receive. A cross-sectional design was used. The questionnaire survey data were obtained from 861 (response rate 82%) hospital patients and 35 (100%) nurse managers in Finland. Results An inverse relationship between the size of the hospital and ward and patients' perceptions of individualized care was found. Increased staffing or skill mix failed to predict a higher patient perception of individualized care, but primary nursing care delivery did. Instead of increasing the amount of nursing staff, there is a need to improve the quality of the nurse-patient interactions to facilitate individualized care. The generalizability of the study is limited by the regional nature of the setting.

  13. Hospital Preparations for Viral Hemorrhagic Fever Patients and Experience Gained from Admission of an Ebola Patient

    PubMed Central

    Minderhoud, A.L.C. (Ben); Wind, Jelte D.D.; Leenen, Luke P.H.; Hoepelman, Andy I.M.; Ellerbroek, Pauline M.

    2016-01-01

    The Major Incident Hospital of the University Medical Centre of Utrecht has a longstanding history of preparing for the management of highly pathogenic and infectious organisms. An assessment of the hospital’s preparations for an outbreak of viral hemorrhagic fever and its experience during admission of a patient with Ebola virus disease showed that the use of the buddy system, frequent training, and information sessions for staff and their relatives greatly increased the sense of safety and motivation among staff. Differing procedures among ambulance services limited the number of services used for transporting patients. Waste management was the greatest concern, and destruction of waste had to be outsourced. The admission of an Ebola patient proceeded without incident but led to considerable demands on staff. The maximum time allowed for wearing personal protective equipment was 45 minutes to ensure safety, and an additional 20 minutes was needed for recovery. PMID:26812146

  14. Patients' Awareness, Usage and Impact of Hospital Report Cards in the US.

    PubMed

    Emmert, Martin; Schlesinger, Mark

    2017-12-01

    Little knowledge is available about the importance of hospital report cards in the US from the patients' perspective. It also remains unknown whether specific report cards with a stronger emphasis on clinical measures have a greater impact on hospital choice than general report cards that focus on online-derived ratings. The aim of this study was to determine the awareness and usage of hospital report cards as well as their impact on hospital choice in the US. We conducted a cross-sectional study by surveying a stratified online sample (N = 1332) to ensure representativeness to the US online population (February 2015). Overall, 75% of all respondents (mean age 45.4 years; 54% female) were aware of hospital report cards. Among these, 56% had used a report card to search for a hospital, and 80% of report card users stated having been influenced by a report card. Both the awareness and usage of general report cards were shown to be higher than for specific report cards. No significant differences could be detected regarding the impact between general or specific report cards on hospital choice. Our results indicate that hospital report cards play a considerable role among patients when searching for a hospital in the US; however, patients do not seem to have a preference regarding the type of report cards they use when selecting a hospital.