Science.gov

Sample records for narcotic antagonists

  1. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  2. Retention and Outcome in a Narcotic Antagonist Treatment Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capone, Thomas; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Patients in an outpatient narcotic antagonist treatment program were followed through their course of treatment. Those who remained longer were found to enter treatment with more stable employment records and less recent opiate use. They also appeared more successful at termination, with better vocational stability, less extraneous drug use, and…

  3. Editing and Scaling of Instrument Packets for the Clinical Evaluation of Narcotic Antagonists. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boldt, Robert F.; Gitomer, Nancy L.

    Efforts of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) as a contractor to the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) include: (1) assessment of the usefulness of naltrexone, a narcotic antagonist, in the rehabilitation of several types of opiate-dependent individuals; (2) assessment of any drawbacks to the use of naltrexone; and (3) appraisal of…

  4. Effects of narcotic analgesics and antagonists on the in vivo release of acetylcholine from the cerebral cortex of the cat

    PubMed Central

    Jhamandas, K.; Phillis, J. W.; Pinsky, C.

    1971-01-01

    1. In cats under light allobarbitone anaesthesia, the effects of intravenous injections of narcotic and non-narcotic analgesics, of a general depressant, and of narcotic antagonists were investigated on the spontaneous release of acetylcholine (ACh) from the surface of the sensorimotor cortex. 2. The narcotic analgesics morphine (0·1, 1·0 and 5 mg/kg), meperidine (1·0 and 2·0 mg/kg), methadone (1·0 mg/kg) and codeine (5·0 and 10·0 mg/kg) greatly reduced ACh release. 3. The non-narcotic analgesics pentazocine (1·0 and 2·0 mg/kg) and propoxyphene (5·0 and 10·0 mg/kg) as well as the depressant chlorpromazine (0·25, 0·5 and 1·0 mg/kg) also greatly reduced ACh release. 4. Two of the three narcotic antagonists examined, levallorphan (0·1, 1·0 and 5 mg/kg) and nalorphine (1·0 mg/kg) had the property of reducing ACh release. They were thus partial agonists. With levallorphan the greatest reduction occurred with the smallest dose injected and the effect was regularly obtained, whereas with nalorphine a reduction was obtained in some experiments only. The third, naloxone, was a specific narcotic antagonist and did not reduce the ACh release in any dose (0·01, 0·1, 0·5 and 1·0 mg/kg) examined. In a dose of 1·0 mg/kg it actually produced a small increase in Ach release. 5. Naloxone (0·1-1·0 mg/kg) restored the reduction in ACh release produced by the narcotic analgesics and by the partial agonist levallorphan. It partially restored the reduction produced by the non-narcotic analgesics and by nalorphine, but had no effect on the reduction produced by chlorpromazine. 6. The relevance of these results with regard to analgesia and to the narcotic abstinence syndrome is discussed. PMID:5136464

  5. Pharmacological and clinical importance of narcotic antagonists and mixed antagonists — use in cardiology

    PubMed Central

    Coltart, D. John; Malcolm, Alasdair D.

    1979-01-01

    1 The treatment of pain of cardiac origin requires a knowledge of the haemodynamic action of the analgesic agents used. 2 The haemodynamic effects of morphine, diamorphine, pavaveretum, pethidine and pentazocine are reviewed. 3 Clinical experience with the new antagonist analgesic buprenorphine is reported. 4 These studies indicate that buprenorphine may be the agent of choice for the relief of severe pain in patients with unstable circulation. PMID:465292

  6. Use of narcotic antagonists to modify stereotypic self-licking, self-chewing, and scratching behavior in dogs.

    PubMed

    Dodman, N H; Shuster, L; White, S D; Court, M H; Parker, D; Dixon, R

    1988-10-01

    We evaluated 2 narcotic antagonists, naltrexone and nalmefene, for treatment of refractory self-licking, self-chewing, and scratching behavior in dogs. Eleven dogs with various irritative or pruritic disorders were medicated with naltrexone (1 mg/kg of body weight, sc) or nalmefene (1 to 4 mg/kg, sc), after a period of control observation during which the dogs had not been medicated. The time for which the dogs were involved in self-licking, self-chewing, or scratching was determined retrospectively by analysis of videotapes. The rates of involvement in either activity before and after treatment were calculated and compared statistically. Treatment with a narcotic antagonist significantly reduced the time spent self-licking, self-chewing, or scratching in 7 of 11 dogs, was partially effective in 3 dogs, and was ineffective in one dog. Dogs with acral lick dermatitis responded most to treatment.

  7. In vivo and in vitro evaluation of a microencapsulated narcotic antagonist.

    PubMed

    Mason, N; Thies, C; Cicero, T J

    1976-06-01

    Injectable microcapsules containing 75% (w/w) cyclazocine, a narcotic antagonist, were prepared with dl-poly(lactic acid) as the coating material. Capsule fractions falling between 105 and 295 mum released about 90% of their cyclazocine in 8 days of rotating-bottle extraction at 37 degrees in pH 7.4 phosphate buffer. Although larger capsules released the drug somewhat more slowly, all capsules released cyclazocine far more rapidly than an ideal capsule should. This rapid release is attributed to macroscopic defects located in the capsule walls. The ability of the capsules to block the action of morphine in vivo was assessed by injection of a sesame seed oil suspension into Holtzman rats. A hot-plate test procedure was used to evaluate animal behavior. Capsule doses of 100-250 mg/kg to rats caused significant antagonism of morphine's analgesic effect for 14 days after injection. By Day 17, no antagonism occurred, indicating that the capsules completely released the drug in vivo between 14 and 17 days after injection.

  8. Stereospecific reduction by narcotic antagonists of clonidine-induced food intake.

    PubMed

    Katz, N L; Schlemmer, R F; Waller, D P

    1985-04-01

    The present study examined the effect of opiate antagonists on clonidine-induced feeding in rabbits. The change in food intake induced by clonidine was blocked by naltrexone. The active (-)-isomer of the antagonist 5,9 alpha-diethyl-2-(3-furylmethyl)-2'-hydroxy-6,7-benzomorphan had an effect similar to naltrexone. Similar doses of the (+)-isomer were inactive, except at the highest dose used in the study. The results suggest that opiate antagonists block feeding elicited by a specific noradrenoreceptor agonist and that this inhibition is due to a direct interaction with opiate systems.

  9. Effect of intravenously-administered putative and potential antagonists of ethanol on sleep time in ethanol-narcotized mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hatch, R.C.; Jernigan, A.D.

    1988-01-01

    Groups of male CD-1 mice (n = 12/group) were injected intraperitoneally (IP) with 5 g ethanol/kg of body weight. After loss of righting reflex, they were given vehicle or one of 2-3 doses of reputed or potential antagonists of ethanol intravenously (IV). Sleep time was measured from loss to return of righting reflex. Mean sleep time (MST) was increased significantly by a large dose of dl-amphetamine and by 4-aminopyridine. Significant increases were also produced by small and large doses of aminophylline and by yohimbine. MST was not altered significantly by small and medium doses of dl-amphetamine, a medium dose of aminophylline, or by any doses of naloxone, thyrotropin-releasing hormone, propranolol, physostigmine, doxapram, or Ro 15-4513. When Ro 15-4513 was given IP 15 minutes before ethanol (n = 6/group), onset and duration of narcosis were not altered. None of the compounds tested was an effective IV antidote for deep ethanol narcosis because of drug side effects, toxicity, prolongation of MST, or insufficient shortening of MST. 36 references, 1 table.

  10. Narcotic Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Fern, B. J.

    1976-01-01

    This article presents the major features of narcotic addictions, focusing on the role of methadone as a means of controlling or removing the addiction. It concludes with some observations on society's attitude towards addicts, addictions and programs for control of addiction. PMID:21308103

  11. What Are Narcotic Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  12. What Are Narcotic Drugs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todays Educ, 1969

    1969-01-01

    Part of "Students and Drug Abuse, prepared by the Public Information Branch and Center for Studies of Narcotic and Drug Abuse, National Institute of Mental Health, in cooperation with the staff of Today's Education.

  13. Taking narcotics for back pain

    MedlinePlus

    ... patch that sticks to your skin. Hydrocodone (Vicodin) Hydromorphone (Dilaudid) Meperidine (Demerol) Morphine (MS Contin) Oxycodone (Oxycontin, ... of children and others in your home. Common Side Effects of Narcotics Narcotics can make you sleepy and ...

  14. NDTA narcotics standard development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulvick, Sydney J.; Cui, Jing; Kunz, Terry D.; Hoglund, David E.; Pilon, Pierre; Lawrence, Andre H.; Drolet, Gerry; Su, Chih-Wu; Rigdon, Stephen W.; Demirgian, Jack C.; Shier, Patrick

    1997-01-01

    The Narcotics Detection Technology Assessment (NDTA) program is a series of studies conducted to evaluate illicit substance detection devices. The ability to effectively detect cocaine and heroin particles is directly related to the efficiency of a detection device's sample collection design. The NDTA tests are therefore structured to require sampling of narcotics from a surface. Tests standards are required which permit subnanogram to microgram quantities of narcotic to be dispensed onto a target surface for sampling. Optimally, the standard should not adversely affect the performance of the device under test. The NDTA test team has developed and experimentally characterized solution- deposited substrate standards, solution-deposited substrate- free standards, vapor-deposited standards, suspension standards, and dry mix standards, and dry mix standards. A variety of substrates and dry-mix fillers have been evaluated, including sand, fullerenes, copper powder, nickel powder, pulverized paper, and aluminum. Suspension standards were explored with a variety of liquids. The narcotic standards with the best performance were found to be dry mixes of cocaine with silver-coated nickel powder, and dry mixes of heroin with silanized glass beads.

  15. Bacteriological Studies with Morphine-Like Narcotics: Relevance to Narcotic Actions in Mammals?

    PubMed Central

    Wolfe, Alan D.; Olenick, John G.; Hahn, Fred E.

    1975-01-01

    A search for active bacterial growth inhibitors among seven highly potent morphine-like narcotics revealed that NIH 7591 and etorphine inhibited the rates of growth of Escherichia coli by 50% at 1.9 × 10−4 M. Bacterial cultures escaped from growth inhibition by NIH 7591 after times which were proportional to the drug concentrations and inversely proportional to the initial bacterial densities. Populations of E. coli could adapt to resist and cross-resist growth inhibitions by NIH 7591 and phenazocine. Resistance was lost after growth in drug-free medium for a few doubling times. The agonist-antagonist pair, etorphine and diprenorphine, inhibited growth of E. coli additively without any indication of antagonism. Actions of narcotics in bacteria is considered a theme in its own right. PMID:1094948

  16. Narcotic Drug and Marihuana Controls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Donald E.

    As a background paper for the National Association of Student Personnel Administrators Drug Education Conference held in November, 1966, this paper focuses first on narcotic control in general, and second, on the reasons for insisting on marijuana control. Brief descriptions are given of the currently existing narcotics acts at federal and state…

  17. Narcotics in Rheumatology

    PubMed Central

    Tehrani, Mahsa; Aguiar, Mathia; Katz, James D.

    2013-01-01

    Patients with rheumatic conditions often suffer from related chronic pain. When first-line traditional medications such as acetaminophen and anti-inflammatory medications do not suffice, then other options are needed. The traditional medications may ultimately not provide sufficient pain relief, or alternatively, they can pose as a contraindication due to underlying hypertension, renal, and/or hepatic disease. Therefore, narcotics are an alluring alternative, which if used in a multidisciplinary and systematic approach to the patient, can prove to be quite beneficial in the lives of these patients. PMID:25114559

  18. New narcotics in anesthesia.

    PubMed

    Borel, J D

    1983-01-01

    Recent research has led to the development of a new family of synthetic narcotic fentanyl derivatives. Two of these, sufentanil and alfentanil, are already in clinical use abroad and are presently under clinical investigation in the United States. Sufentanil is more potent than fentanyl and is claimed to have fewer side effects and less variability in patient cardiovascular responses under stress. It appears that its primary application will be for high-dose narcotic anesthesia in patients with cardiovascular disease. Alfentanil has a shorter duration of action and is claimed to have less postoperative ventilatory depression than fentanyl. It is being recommended for use via continuous intravenous infusion. It will probably become a popular anesthetic agent for outpatient and short surgical procedures. It should be remembered that at this time very little information concerning these agents is in print. Most of the research has been done by a handful of investigators and much has not been published in peer review publications. Based on the clinical impressions of our European colleagues, one can say that these agents should be as safe and as reliable as fentanyl, but any clinically significant advantages over their parent compound, especially in the case of sufentanil, will have to await more widespread use and controlled investigation.

  19. Prescribing Narcotics to Habitual and Addicted Narcotic Users

    PubMed Central

    Tennant, Forest S.; Uelmen, Gerald F.

    1980-01-01

    Confusion exists among physicians over the legal requirements and appropriate prescribing of narcotics to addicted or habitual users of narcotics. The result has often been either (1) the deprivation of appropriate treatment for patients who desire detoxification or adequate pain relief, or (2) illegal prescribing by physicians. Because most narcotics are potent and dangerous substances, certain legal restrictions are necessary to protect the general public. State-approved programs have been established to prescribe methadone and propoxyphene napsylate for addiction treatment. Current laws and regulations in California permit every practicing physician to provide effective and safe treatment for addiction and pain relief. PMID:7467311

  20. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity undertaken...

  1. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity to...

  2. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit...

  3. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity undertaken...

  4. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity undertaken...

  5. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity to...

  6. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311... OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity...

  7. 31 CFR 536.311 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 536.311 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.311 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any activity undertaken...

  8. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity to...

  9. 31 CFR 598.310 - Narcotics trafficking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Narcotics trafficking. 598.310 Section... FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.310 Narcotics trafficking. The term narcotics trafficking means any illicit activity to...

  10. Pain medications - narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... analgesics and antagonists. In: Brenner GM, Stevens CW. Pharmacology . 4th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap ... In: Bennett PN, Brown MJ, Sharma P. Clinical Pharmacology . 11th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier; 2012:chap 18. ...

  11. [Provision System of Medical Narcotics].

    PubMed

    Kushida, Kazuki; Toshima, Chiaki; Fujimaki, Yoko; Watanabe, Mutsuko; Hirohara, Masayoshi

    2015-12-01

    Patients with cancer are increasingly opting for home health care, resulting in a rapid increase in the number of prescriptions for narcotics aimed at pain control. As these narcotics are issued by pharmacies only upon presentation of valid prescriptions, the quantity stored in the pharmacies is of importance. Although many pharmaceutical outlets are certified for retail sale of narcotic drugs, the available stock is often extremely limited in variety and quantity. Affiliated stores of wholesale(or central wholesale)dealers do not always have the necessary certifications to provide medical narcotics. Invariably, the quantity stored by individual branches or sales offices is also limited. Hence, it may prove difficult to urgently secure the necessary and appropriate drugs according to prescription in certain areas of the community. This report discusses the problems faced by wholesalers and pharmacies during acquisition, storage, supply, and issue of prescription opioids from a stockpiling perspective.

  12. Side-effects of mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics used in sequential anaesthesia

    PubMed Central

    Devaux, C.; Schoepffler, P.; Gauthier-Lafaye, J. P.

    1979-01-01

    1 Mixed agonist-antagonist analgesics have analgesic action but also possess a range of side-effects. 2 Narcotic antagonists do not reverse the non-specific effects of opiates. 3 Under certain circumstances the effects of agonists and mixed agonist-antagonists can be additive. 4 Chronic dosage of mixed agonist-antagonists leads to a lower level of dependence than that observed with the standard narcotics. 5 Mixed agonist-antagonists may not antagonize the respiratory effects of narcotics and may result in potentiation of such depression. PMID:465294

  13. Preoperative narcotic utilization: accuracy of patient self-reporting and its association with postoperative narcotic consumption.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Junyoung; Bohl, Daniel D; Tabaraee, Ehsan; Aboushaala, Khaled; Elboghdady, Islam M; Singh, Kern

    2016-01-01

    Little is known about the accuracy of reporting of preoperative narcotic utilization in spinal surgery. As such, the purpose of this study is to compare postoperative narcotic consumption between preoperative narcotic utilizers who do and do not accurately self-report preoperative utilization. Patients who underwent anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, minimally invasive lumbar discectomy, or minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion procedures between 2013 and 2014 were prospectively identified. The accuracy of self-reporting preoperative narcotic consumption was determined utilizing the Illinois Prescription Monitoring Program. Total inpatient narcotic consumption during postoperative Days 0 and 1 was compared according to the demographics and preoperative narcotic reporting accuracy. Similarly, the proportion of patients who continued to be dependent on narcotic medications at each postoperative visit was compared according to the demographics and preoperative narcotic reporting accuracy. A total of 195 patients met the inclusion criteria. Of these, 25% did not use narcotics preoperatively, while 47% and 28% did do so with accurate and inaccurate reporting, respectively. Patients who used narcotics preoperatively were more likely to demonstrate elevated inpatient narcotic consumption (adjusted RR 5.3; 95% CI 1.4-20.1; p = 0.013). However, such patients were no more or less likely to be dependent on narcotic medications at the first (p = 0.618) or second (p = 0.798) postoperative visit. Among patients who used narcotics preoperatively, no differences were demonstrated in terms of inpatient narcotic consumption (p = 0.182) or narcotic dependence following the first (p = 0.982) or second (p = 0.866) postoperative visit according to the self-reported accuracy of preoperative narcotic utilization. The only preoperative factors that were independently associated with elevated inpatient narcotic consumption were workers' compensation status and

  14. Narcotics and Sedative Use in Preterm Neonates.

    PubMed

    Borenstein-Levin, Liron; Synnes, Anne; Grunau, Ruth E; Miller, Steven P; Yoon, Eugene W; Shah, Prakesh S

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate patterns of narcotic and sedative use in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) across Canada using data collected by the Canadian Neonatal Network. We conducted a retrospective observational cohort study of preterm neonates at <33 weeks' gestation and admitted to a participating Canadian Neonatal Network NICU. The proportion of all neonates who received sedative(s), narcotic(s), or either sedative(s), narcotic(s), or both during their NICU stay was calculated for each year. Because opioids are used for premedication before intubation, only continuous infusions of a narcotic drug were included. Variation in narcotics and sedative usage between sites in 2014 was determined using logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for gestational age, surgery, and mechanical ventilation. Of 20 744 neonates, 29% of neonates received a narcotic, a sedative, or both; 23% received a narcotic and 17% a sedative. Although no clinically significant changes in drug exposure were documented during the 5-year period, there were statistically significant differences in narcotic and sedative use between sites, ranging from 3% to 41% for narcotic and 2% to 48% for sedative use (aORs 0.2-5.7 and 0.1-15, respectively, P < .05). Exposure to narcotic or sedative agents is highly variable in preterm neonates across Canada despite concerns of adverse outcomes associated with these drugs. The tremendous variation in practice suggests that further research on their current usage, as well as identifying optimal practice procedures is warranted. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Narcotic Drug Control in New York State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Legislature, Albany.

    This report concentrates on the analysis and evaluation of programs utilized by New York State's Narcotics Addiction Control Commission (NACC) and concerned with control of narcotic drugs and with those individuals who abuse them. The three key premises, basic to the narcotic drug control programs approved by the state legislature, are: (1) there…

  16. Probes for narcotic receptor mediated phenomena. 44. Synthesis of an N-substituted 4-hydroxy-5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)morphan with high affinity and selective μ-antagonist activity

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Malliga R.; Lee, Yong Sok; Deschamps, Jeffrey R.; Dersch, Christina M.; Rothman, Richard B.; Jacobson, Arthur E.; Rice, Kenner C.

    2012-01-01

    A simple three-step synthesis of 5-(3-hydroxyphenyl)-2-methyl-2-azabicyclo[3.3.1]nonan-4-ol (3a) was achieved using an osmium tetroxide mediated oxidation of the known intermediate 6. A pyrrolidine-ring variant of 3a (3-(7-(hydroxymethyl)-6-methyl-6-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octan-1-yl)phenol (5)) was isolated when other routes were used. The epimeric hydroxy analogue 4a was synthesized by simple inversion of the stereochemistry at C-4. Both N-methyl (3a and 4a) and N-phenethyl (3b and 4b) derivatives were synthesized. The compounds were examined for their opioid receptor affinity and the N-phenethyl analogue 3b was found to have relatively weak affinity for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 74 nM). However, the N-phenethyl analogue of the C-4 epimer, 4b, had about 15 fold higher affinity than 3b and was selective for the μ-opioid receptor (Ki = 4.6 nM). Compound 4b was a moderately potent μ-opioid antagonist (Ke = 12 nM), as determined by [35S]GTP-γ-S assays. Compounds 3b and 4b were energy minimized at the level of B3LYP/6-31G*, and then overlaid onto the 5-phenylmorphan, the (1R,5R,9S)-(−)-enantiomer of 2b (Fig. 1) with the α or β-OH group at the C-9 position. The spatial orientation of the hydroxyl moiety in 3b, 4b, 2a, and 2b is proposed to be the structural requirement for high μ-opioid receptor binding affinity and their agonist or antagonist activity. The modest change in spatial position of the hydroxyl moiety, and not the N-substituent, induced the change from potent agonist to an antagonist of moderate potency. PMID:22341895

  17. Narcotics detection using piezoelectric ringing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; Magnuson, Erik E.; West, Rebecca; Lyndquist, R.

    1997-02-01

    Piezo-electric ringing (PER) has been demonstrated to be an effective means of scanning cargo for the presence of hidden narcotics. The PER signal is characteristic of certain types of crystallized material, such as cocaine hydrochloride. However, the PER signal cannot be used to conclusively identify all types of narcotic material, as the signal is not unique. For the purposes of cargo scanning, the PER technique is therefore most effective when used in combination with quadrupole resonance analysis (QRA). PER shares the same methodology as QRA technology, and can therefore be very easily and inexpensively integrated into existing QRA detectors. PER can be used as a pre-scanning technique before the QRA scan is applied and, because the PER scan is of a very short duration, can effectively offset some of the throughput limitations of standard QRA narcotics detectors. Following is a discussion of a PER detector developed by Quantum Manetics under contract to United States Customs. Design philosophy and performance are discussed, supported by results from recent tests conducted by the U.S. Drug Enforcement Agency and U.S. Customs.

  18. Narcotic use and misuse in Crohn's disease.

    PubMed

    Crocker, Justin A; Yu, Huimin; Conaway, Mark; Tuskey, Anne G; Behm, Brian W

    2014-12-01

    The rate of narcotic misuse in the inflammatory bowel disease population is not well studied. The primary aim of this study was to determine in Crohn's disease (CD) whether a concurrent functional gastrointestinal disorder (FGID) was associated with increased rates of chronic narcotic use. Second, we aimed to identify potential risk factors for narcotic misuse. A retrospective chart review of patients with CD followed at the University of Virginia's Gastroenterology Clinic from 2006 to 2011 was performed. The prescription monitoring program was accessed to confirm narcotic prescription filling histories. Narcotic misuse was defined as narcotic prescriptions filled from 4 or more prescribers and at 4 or more different pharmacies. Nine hundred thirty-one patients with CD were included in the study cohort. Eighty-seven (9.3%) patients were identified as having a concurrent FGID, and 192 (20%) were taking chronic narcotics. Patients with FGID were more likely to be taking chronic narcotics (44% versus 18%, P < 0.001). Thirty-seven percent (32/87) of patients with an FGID were misusing narcotics, compared with 9.6% (81/844) (P < 0.0001). Multivariate logistic regression demonstrated a significant association of misuse in patients with a concurrent FGID (odds ratio = 3.33, 95% confidence interval, 1.87-5.93). Twenty percent of patients with CD were using chronic narcotics with higher rates in those with FGID. Using the prescription monitoring program, a significant proportion of patients with CD with an FGID were misusing narcotics. We would recommend screening for narcotic misuse in patients with CD with a concomitant FGID and consider using prescription monitoring programs to identify others at risk for misuse.

  19. 76 FR 25407 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property are blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics ] traffickers and their organizations on a...

  20. 77 FR 4400 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their...

  1. 76 FR 25405 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide...

  2. 76 FR 5857 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide...

  3. 77 FR 14592 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-12

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... whose property and interests in property have ] been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide...

  4. 77 FR 2347 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-17

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It...

  5. 78 FR 28289 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-14

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis....

  6. 78 FR 42589 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  7. 78 FR 59766 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-27

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act''). DATES: The designation by the Director of OFAC of the... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics ] traffickers and...

  8. 75 FR 64782 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-20

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  9. 76 FR 5858 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  10. 76 FR 10668 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on...

  11. 75 FR 10557 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-08

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  12. 75 FR 65554 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... interests in property are blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act... they are owned or controlled by a specially designated narcotics trafficker. FOR FURTHER...

  13. 77 FR 838 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities) whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on...

  14. 77 FR 56271 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-12

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides...

  15. 77 FR 58912 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entity whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on...

  16. Quadrupole resonance scanner for narcotics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Julian D.; Moeller, C. R.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.

    1994-10-01

    Interest in non-invasive, non-hazardous, bulk detection technologies for narcotics interdiction has risen over the last few years. As part of our continuing research and development programs in detection of narcotics and explosives using sensitive magnetic measuring devices, we present the first commercially available prototype Quadrupole Resonance (QR) scanner for narcotics detection. The portable narcotics detection system was designed in modular form such that a single QR base system could be easily used with a variety of custom detection heads. The QR system presented in this paper is suitable for scanning items up to 61 X 35 X 13 cm in size, and was designed to scan mail packages and briefcase-sized items for the presence of narcotics. System tests have shown that detection sensitivity is comparable that obtained in laboratory systems.

  17. 30 CFR 57.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 57.20001... Miscellaneous § 57.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  18. 30 CFR 56.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 56.20001... § 56.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  19. 19 CFR 12.36 - Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. 12.36 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Narcotic Drugs § 12.36 Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. The importation and exportation of narcotic drugs are governed by regulations of the Drug...

  20. 30 CFR 57.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 57.20001... Miscellaneous § 57.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  1. 30 CFR 56.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 56.20001... § 56.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  2. 30 CFR 56.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 56.20001... § 56.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  3. 19 CFR 12.36 - Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. 12.36 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Narcotic Drugs § 12.36 Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. The importation and exportation of narcotic drugs are governed by regulations of the Drug...

  4. 30 CFR 57.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 57.20001... Miscellaneous § 57.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  5. 19 CFR 12.36 - Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. 12.36 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Narcotic Drugs § 12.36 Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. The importation and exportation of narcotic drugs are governed by regulations of the Drug...

  6. 19 CFR 12.36 - Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. 12.36 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Narcotic Drugs § 12.36 Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. The importation and exportation of narcotic drugs are governed by regulations of the Drug...

  7. 19 CFR 12.36 - Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. 12.36 Section... OF THE TREASURY SPECIAL CLASSES OF MERCHANDISE Narcotic Drugs § 12.36 Regulations of Bureau of Narcotics. The importation and exportation of narcotic drugs are governed by regulations of the Drug...

  8. 30 CFR 57.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 57.20001... Miscellaneous § 57.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  9. 30 CFR 57.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 57.20001... Miscellaneous § 57.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  10. 30 CFR 56.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 56.20001... § 56.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  11. 30 CFR 56.20001 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 56.20001... § 56.20001 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Intoxicating beverages and narcotics shall not be permitted or used in or around mines. Persons under the influence of alcohol or narcotics shall not be...

  12. Narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... Search for HOME ABOUT Mission History Office Locations Domestic Office Locations Foreign Office Locations Leadership Museum Wall ... Facts STAY CONNECTED Stay Connected About Mission History Domestic Office Locations Foreign Office Locations Leadership Museum Wall ...

  13. Narcotics

    MedlinePlus

    ... meaning, is “ opioid. ” Examples include the illicit drug heroin and pharmaceutical drugs like OxyContin ® , Vicodin ® , codeine, morphine, ... H, Black Tar, Brown Sugar, Dover's Powder, Hilbilly Heroin, Horse, Junk, Lean or Purple Drank, MPTP (New ...

  14. Toxicity on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri (Beijerinck). I: QSAR equation for narcotics and polar narcotics.

    PubMed

    Vighi, Marco; Migliorati, Sonia; Monti, Gianna Serafina

    2009-01-01

    Toxicity data on chemicals, supposed to have a narcotic or polar narcotic toxicological mode of action, have been produced on the luminescent bacterium Vibrio fischeri using the Microtox test procedure. Advanced statistical methods have been used to calculate statistically sound values for ecotoxicological endpoints. Simple quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) equations were developed for narcotics and polar narcotics. These equations were compared with those proposed by the European Technical Guidance Document on Risk Assessment for other aquatic organisms (algae, Daphnia, and fish). Similarities and differences are discussed. The need for including the bacterial component in the ecotoxicological risk assessment for aquatic ecosystems is highlighted.

  15. Naloxone for narcotic exposed newborn infants: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, W; Fowlie, P

    2003-01-01

    Background: Naloxone, a specific opiate antagonist, is available for the treatment of newborn infants with respiratory depression that may be due to transplacentally acquired opiates. Aims: To determine if this treatment has any clinically important benefits, and whether there are any harmful effects. Methods: Randomised controlled trials that compared naloxone with placebo or no drug for newborn infants with transplacental exposure to narcotics were systematically reviewed. The Cochrane Controlled Trials Register (CCTR; 2002, Issue 3), Medline (1966 to June 2002), and Embase (1988 to June 2002) were searched. Data were extracted, analysed, and synthesised using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Collaborative Review Group. Results: Nine trials were found that fulfilled the specified inclusion criteria. Although there was evidence that naloxone increased alveolar ventilation, no data were found on the specified primary outcomes of this review: the need for assisted ventilation or admission to a neonatal unit. Conclusions: There is a need for a randomised controlled trial to determine if naloxone confers any clinically important benefits on newborn infants with respiratory depression that may be due to transplacentally acquired narcotic. PMID:12819163

  16. International Narcotics Control Strategy Report, 1997.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    encourage or facilitate the illicit production or distribution of narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other controlled substances or the laundering...production or distribution of narcotic or psychotropic drugs or other controlled substances, or the laundering of proceeds from illegal drug transactions... psychotropic drugs . Demand reduction is an integral part of Pakistan’s five-year master plan for drug control. UNDCP’s demand reduction project

  17. 78 FR 66990 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-07

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... individual whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics.... The Kingpin Act establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign...

  18. 75 FR 65554 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-25

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... interests in property has been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin..., 1999. The Kingpin Act establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign...

  19. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. 25.8 Section 25.8... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.8 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. Operating a motor vehicle... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited...

  20. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. 25.8 Section 25.8... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.8 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. Operating a motor vehicle... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited...

  1. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2014-01-01 2013-01-01 true Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. 25.8 Section 25.8... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.8 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. Operating a motor vehicle... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is prohibited...

  2. 31 CFR 407.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering or being on the property, or operating a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic...

  3. 7 CFR 502.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 502.8 Section..., MARYLAND § 502.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering BARC property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug, hallucinogen...

  4. 31 CFR 536.312 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.312 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  5. 78 FR 8701 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entity whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  6. 31 CFR 598.313 - Significant foreign narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Significant foreign narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.313 Significant foreign narcotics trafficker. The term significant...

  7. 28 CFR 2.3 - Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. 2.3 Section 2.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... § 2.3 Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. A Federal prisoner committed under the Narcotic Addict...

  8. 31 CFR 598.314 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.314 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  9. 31 CFR 598.313 - Significant foreign narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Significant foreign narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.313 Significant foreign narcotics trafficker. The term significant...

  10. 31 CFR 598.314 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.314 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  11. 31 CFR 407.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering or being on the property, or operating a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic...

  12. 7 CFR 502.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 502.8 Section..., MARYLAND § 502.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering BARC property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug, hallucinogen...

  13. 78 FR 13760 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  14. 31 CFR 407.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering or being on the property, or operating a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic...

  15. 31 CFR 598.314 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.314 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  16. 7 CFR 501.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 501.7 Section... § 501.7 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering Research Center property or the operating of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug...

  17. 7 CFR 502.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 502.8 Section..., MARYLAND § 502.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering BARC property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug, hallucinogen...

  18. 31 CFR 536.312 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.312 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  19. 7 CFR 502.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 502.8 Section..., MARYLAND § 502.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering BARC property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug, hallucinogen...

  20. 78 FR 47828 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). DATES: The... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their...

  1. 78 FR 66105 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  2. 7 CFR 501.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 501.7 Section... § 501.7 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering Research Center property or the operating of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug...

  3. 31 CFR 598.304 - Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.304 Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The term Foreign...

  4. 31 CFR 598.304 - Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.304 Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The term Foreign...

  5. 7 CFR 501.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 501.7 Section... § 501.7 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering Research Center property or the operating of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug...

  6. 31 CFR 407.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering or being on the property, or operating a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic...

  7. 31 CFR 598.313 - Significant foreign narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Significant foreign narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.313 Significant foreign narcotics trafficker. The term significant...

  8. 77 FR 48609 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-14

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act''). DATES: The designation by the Director of OFAC of the... of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It...

  9. 28 CFR 2.3 - Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. 2.3 Section 2.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... § 2.3 Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. A Federal prisoner committed under the Narcotic Addict...

  10. 77 FR 6191 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-07

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). DATES: The... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their...

  11. 31 CFR 536.312 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.312 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  12. 77 FR 28670 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-15

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  13. 31 CFR 536.312 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.312 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  14. 78 FR 29814 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property has been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  15. 78 FR 53007 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-27

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  16. 77 FR 38140 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-26

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entities) whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a...

  17. 76 FR 23644 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-27

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a statutory framework for...

  18. 78 FR 5562 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-25

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). DATES: The... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their...

  19. 31 CFR 598.313 - Significant foreign narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Significant foreign narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.313 Significant foreign narcotics trafficker. The term significant...

  20. 7 CFR 501.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 501.7 Section... § 501.7 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering Research Center property or the operating of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug...

  1. 77 FR 36041 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  2. 7 CFR 501.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 501.7 Section... § 501.7 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering Research Center property or the operating of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug...

  3. Uniform Evaluation of Programs to Combat Narcotic Addiction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friends of Psychiatric Research, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    Early in 1967, the Office of Economic Opportunity was authorized to formulate and carry out programs for the prevention of narcotic addiction and the rehabilitation of narcotic addicts. Such programs were required to include provisions for the detoxification, guidance, training and job placement of narcotic addicts. The programs were aimed at…

  4. 31 CFR 598.304 - Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.304 Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The term Foreign...

  5. 31 CFR 407.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics... TREASURY ANNEX § 407.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering or being on the property, or operating a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic...

  6. 7 CFR 502.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 502.8 Section..., MARYLAND § 502.8 Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. Entering BARC property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon, by a person under the influence of intoxicating beverages or narcotic drug, hallucinogen...

  7. 77 FR 22846 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property has been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a...

  8. 31 CFR 598.304 - Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.304 Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The term Foreign...

  9. 31 CFR 598.304 - Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.304 Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The term Foreign...

  10. 31 CFR 598.313 - Significant foreign narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Significant foreign narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.313 Significant foreign narcotics trafficker. The term significant...

  11. 31 CFR 598.314 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.314 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term specially...

  12. 28 CFR 2.3 - Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. 2.3 Section 2.3 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND... § 2.3 Same: Narcotic Addict Rehabilitation Act. A Federal prisoner committed under the Narcotic Addict...

  13. 15 CFR 265.37 - Narcotics and other drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Narcotics and other drugs. 265.37..., GAITHERSBURG, MARYLAND, AND BOULDER AND FORT COLLINS, COLORADO Buildings and Grounds § 265.37 Narcotics and other drugs. The possession, sale, consumption, or use on the site of narcotic or other drugs illegal...

  14. Impact of preoperative narcotic use on outcomes in migraine surgery.

    PubMed

    Adenuga, Paul; Brown, Matthew; Reed, Deborah; Guyuron, Bahman

    2014-07-01

    This study focuses on the impact of preoperative narcotic medication use on outcomes of surgical treatment of migraine headaches. A retrospective comparative review was conducted with patients undergoing migraine surgery. Data gathered included demographic information, baseline migraine headache characteristics, migraine surgery sites, postoperative migraine headache characteristics 1 year or more following surgery, and preoperative migraine medication use. Patients were grouped based on preoperative narcotic medication use. The narcotic users were subdivided into low and high narcotic user groups. Preoperative migraine characteristics were comparable between groups and the outcomes of migraine surgery were compared between the groups. Outcomes in 90 narcotic users were compared with those for 112 patients not using narcotic medications preoperatively. Narcotic users showed statistically significantly less reduction in frequency, severity, and duration of migraine headaches after surgery. Narcotic users had clinical improvement in 66.7 percent of patients and elimination in 18.9 percent versus 86.6 and 36.6 percent, respectively, in the nonnarcotic group. The group that consumed narcotics had significantly lower rates of improvement in all migraine indices. Previous studies have discouraged the routine use of narcotic medications in the management of migraine medications. The authors' study demonstrates that narcotic medication use before migraine headache surgery may predispose patients to worse outcomes postoperatively. Because pain cannot be objectively documented, the question remains of whether this failure to improve the pain was indeed a suboptimal response to surgery or the need for narcotic substances. Risk, II.

  15. 15 CFR 265.37 - Narcotics and other drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Narcotics and other drugs. 265.37... other drugs. The possession, sale, consumption, or use on the site of narcotic or other drugs illegal... with respect to the possession, sale, consumption, or use of narcotic or other drugs. ...

  16. 15 CFR 265.37 - Narcotics and other drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Narcotics and other drugs. 265.37... other drugs. The possession, sale, consumption, or use on the site of narcotic or other drugs illegal... with respect to the possession, sale, consumption, or use of narcotic or other drugs. ...

  17. 15 CFR 265.37 - Narcotics and other drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Narcotics and other drugs. 265.37... other drugs. The possession, sale, consumption, or use on the site of narcotic or other drugs illegal... with respect to the possession, sale, consumption, or use of narcotic or other drugs. ...

  18. 15 CFR 265.37 - Narcotics and other drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 15 Commerce and Foreign Trade 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Narcotics and other drugs. 265.37... other drugs. The possession, sale, consumption, or use on the site of narcotic or other drugs illegal... with respect to the possession, sale, consumption, or use of narcotic or other drugs. ...

  19. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... narcotics. 15.9 Section 15.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.9 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. At both Mt. Weather and the... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21...

  20. 77 FR 14859 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-13

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a statutory framework...

  1. 78 FR 22620 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-16

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). DATES: The... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and...

  2. 77 FR 74915 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-18

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... entity whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a statutory framework...

  3. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... narcotics. 15.9 Section 15.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.9 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. At both Mt. Weather and the... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21...

  4. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... narcotics. 15.9 Section 15.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.9 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. At both Mt. Weather and the... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21...

  5. Uniform Evaluation of Programs to Combat Narcotic Addiction. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friends of Psychiatric Research, Inc., Baltimore, MD.

    Early in 1967, the Office of Economic Opportunity was authorized to formulate and carry out programs for the prevention of narcotic addiction and the rehabilitation of narcotic addicts. Such programs were required to include provisions for the detoxification, guidance, training and job placement of narcotic addicts. The programs were aimed at…

  6. 76 FR 58562 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis with the objective of denying...

  7. 77 FR 71480 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-30

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C. 1182). DATES: The... establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and...

  8. 31 CFR 598.314 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.314 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term...

  9. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. 25.8 Section 25.8... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.8 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. Operating a motor vehicle... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is...

  10. 76 FR 25406 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a statutory framework...

  11. 4 CFR 25.8 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 4 Accounts 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. 25.8 Section 25.8... OFFICE BUILDING AND ON ITS GROUNDS § 25.8 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. Operating a motor vehicle... alcoholic beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates, or amphetamines is...

  12. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... narcotics. 15.9 Section 15.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.9 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. At both Mt. Weather and the... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21...

  13. 76 FR 58562 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-21

    ... THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin... individuals whose property and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics... activities of significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis with...

  14. 31 CFR 536.312 - Specially designated narcotics trafficker.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Specially designated narcotics... (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY NARCOTICS TRAFFICKING SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 536.312 Specially designated narcotics trafficker. The term...

  15. 44 CFR 15.9 - Alcoholic beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... narcotics. 15.9 Section 15.9 Emergency Management and Assistance FEDERAL EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY... NATIONAL EMERGENCY TRAINING CENTER § 15.9 Alcoholic beverages and narcotics. At both Mt. Weather and the... beverages, narcotic drugs, hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines as defined in Title 21...

  16. 75 FR 24773 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... and interests in property have been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides a statutory framework...

  17. The Narcotics Situation and the Prevention of Narcotics Use in Higher Educational Institutions of Krasnoiarsk Krai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevirko, D. D.; Shinkevich, V. E.; Korobitsina, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Research on narcotics use among students in Russia shows that many are under pressure become involved, and that knowledge of and willingness to participate in clinics and other sources of help are not widespread.

  18. The Narcotics Situation and the Prevention of Narcotics Use in Higher Educational Institutions of Krasnoiarsk Krai

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevirko, D. D.; Shinkevich, V. E.; Korobitsina, T. V.

    2013-01-01

    Research on narcotics use among students in Russia shows that many are under pressure become involved, and that knowledge of and willingness to participate in clinics and other sources of help are not widespread.

  19. Bibliography for Drug Abuse and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    SCOPE, Stony Brook, NY.

    The material presented deals with the many facets of: (1) drug abuse, (2) drug addiction, (3) treatment, (4) alcoholism, (5) glue sniffing, (6) narcotic laws, (7) drugs and youth, and (8) the kinds of drugs used. The types of materials listed are: (1) pamphlets, (2) lay periodicals, (3) periodicals and professional articles, (4) books, and (5)…

  20. Annotated Bibliography of Literature on Narcotic Addiction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bowden, R. Renee

    Nearly 150 abstracts have been included in this annotated bibliography; its purpose has been to scan the voluminous number of documents on the problem of drug addiction in order to summarize the present state of knowledge on narcotic addiction and on methods for its treatment and control. The literature reviewed has been divided into the following…

  1. Marathon Group Therapy with Female Narcotic Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kilmann, Peter R.

    This study evaluated the impact of structured and unstructured marathon therapy on institutionalized female narcotic addicts. Subjects were randomly assigned to one of five groups: two structured therapy groups, two unstructured therapy groups, and a no-treatment control group. The Personal Orientation Inventory, the Adjective Check List, and a…

  2. INFORMATION ABOUT NARCOTICS - RESOURCE MATERIAL FOR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABRAMS, IRVING; HAWKINS, BARBARA A.

    A SHORT HISTORY OF NARCOTICS AND THEIR LEGAL CONTROL IN THE UNITED STATES IS PRESENTED WITH AN EXPLANATION OF ADDICTION AND METHODS OF ITS PREVENTION. TEACHERS ARE INFORMED OF WAYS IN WHICH TO IDENTIFY ADDICTED STUDENTS. FOR EXAMPLE, THEY MAY BE CLOSELY OBSERVED IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES, AND ABNORMALITIES INVESTIGATED BY A PHYSICIAN.…

  3. Narcotics Anonymous: Understanding the "Bridge of Recovery."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronel, Natti

    1998-01-01

    Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is investigated as a subculture of recovery bridging the drug subculture and the prevailing culture. A phenomenological study of NA in Israel is reported. Innovation, cultural conflict, the value of recovery and its norms, supporting social mechanisms, limitations of the program, and intercultural attributes are…

  4. ALCOHOL. . . .NARCOTICS EDUCATION, A HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHRISTIAN, FLOYD T.

    THIS HANDBOOK WHICH THE TEACHER MAY USE IN PLANNING COURSES OF STUDY IS INTENDED TO SUPPLY FACTUAL DATA IN REGARD TO THE USES OF ALCOHOL AND NARCOTICS. THE INFORMATION IS APPLICABLE TO ANY GROUP OR GRADE LEVEL, BUT IT IS PRIMARILY DIRECTED FOR K-12 PROGRAMS. THE HANDBOOK IS IN THREE SECTIONS. THE FIRST INCLUDES FACTS ABOUT BEVERAGE ALCOHOL.…

  5. Hospital security response to narcotics theft.

    PubMed

    Bogardus, Donald E

    2005-01-01

    Diversion of narcotics by health professionals is increasing, the author says, and professional security can be helpful to Pharmacy and Nursing in conducting a successful investigation. However, Security must recognize the reluctance of other departments to prosecute offenders, and utilize a team approach to develop a working relationship with those departments.

  6. ALCOHOL. . . .NARCOTICS EDUCATION, A HANDBOOK FOR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CHRISTIAN, FLOYD T.

    THIS HANDBOOK WHICH THE TEACHER MAY USE IN PLANNING COURSES OF STUDY IS INTENDED TO SUPPLY FACTUAL DATA IN REGARD TO THE USES OF ALCOHOL AND NARCOTICS. THE INFORMATION IS APPLICABLE TO ANY GROUP OR GRADE LEVEL, BUT IT IS PRIMARILY DIRECTED FOR K-12 PROGRAMS. THE HANDBOOK IS IN THREE SECTIONS. THE FIRST INCLUDES FACTS ABOUT BEVERAGE ALCOHOL.…

  7. Narcotics Anonymous: Understanding the "Bridge of Recovery."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ronel, Natti

    1998-01-01

    Narcotics Anonymous (NA) is investigated as a subculture of recovery bridging the drug subculture and the prevailing culture. A phenomenological study of NA in Israel is reported. Innovation, cultural conflict, the value of recovery and its norms, supporting social mechanisms, limitations of the program, and intercultural attributes are…

  8. INFORMATION ABOUT NARCOTICS - RESOURCE MATERIAL FOR TEACHERS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ABRAMS, IRVING; HAWKINS, BARBARA A.

    A SHORT HISTORY OF NARCOTICS AND THEIR LEGAL CONTROL IN THE UNITED STATES IS PRESENTED WITH AN EXPLANATION OF ADDICTION AND METHODS OF ITS PREVENTION. TEACHERS ARE INFORMED OF WAYS IN WHICH TO IDENTIFY ADDICTED STUDENTS. FOR EXAMPLE, THEY MAY BE CLOSELY OBSERVED IN PHYSICAL EDUCATION CLASSES, AND ABNORMALITIES INVESTIGATED BY A PHYSICIAN.…

  9. Terminology matters: patient understanding of "opioids" and "narcotics".

    PubMed

    Wallace, Lorraine S; Keenum, Amy J; Abdurraqeeb, Obaydah; Miser, William F; Wexler, Randy K

    2013-02-01

     The terms "opioid" and "narcotic" are often used interchangeably by healthcare providers. The purpose of this study was to compare understanding "narcotics" vs. "opioids."  A convenience sample of English-speaking women (n = 188), aged 21-45 years, seeking care at a primary care clinic were asked (1) "What is an opioid/narcotic?" (2) "Give an example of an opioid/narcotic?" (3) "Why does someone take an opioid/narcotic?" and (4) "What happens when someone takes an opioid/narcotic for a long time?" Responses were recorded verbatim by a research assistant and then coded independently by two investigators.  More than half of respondents (55.9%) responded "don't know" to all 4 opioid questions, while just 3.2% responded "don't know" to all 4 narcotic questions (P < 0.01). Most women were unfamiliar with the term opioid (76.3%) and did not know why someone would take an opioid (68.8%). About two-thirds of respondents were able to give an example of a narcotic (64.2%) and knew the consequences of long-term narcotic use (63.2%).  While more women were more familiar with narcotic, many identified negative connotations with this term. Future research should explore how to improve patient understanding and attitudes regarding both the terms opioids and narcotics. © 2012 The Authors. Pain Practice © 2012 World Institute of Pain.

  10. Development of injectable microcapsules for use in the treatment of narcotic addiction.

    PubMed

    Thies, C

    1976-01-01

    Injectible microcapsules containing narcotic antagonists have been prepared with dl-poly (lactic acid) as the coating material. The encapsulation technology has developed to the point that high yields of less than 180 mu capsules can be prepared routinely. Such capsules with an initial payload of 50 wt. % naltrexone pamoate provide 60-90% antagonism to the action of morphine 28 days after injection into mice as a peanut oil/aluminum monostearate suspension at a dose level of 40 miligrams naltrexone pamoate/ kg. mouse.

  11. Development of injectable microcapsules for use in the treatment of narcotic addiction.

    PubMed

    Thies, C

    1975-01-01

    Injectible microcapsules containing narcotic antagonists have been prepared with dl-poly (lactic acid) as the coating material. The encapsulation technology has been developed to the point that high yields of less than 180 mu capsules can be prepared routinely. Such capsules with an initial payload of 50 wt. per cent naltrexone pamoate provide 60-90 per cent antagonism to the action of morphine 28 days after injection into mice as a peanut oil/aluminum monostearate suspension at a dose level of 40 miligrams naltrexone pamoate/kg. mouse.

  12. Lethal body burdens of polar narcotics: Chlorophenols

    SciTech Connect

    Wezel, A.P. van; Punte, S.S.; Opperhuizen, A.

    1995-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to measure in fathead minnow (Pimephales promelas) the lethal body burden (LBB) of three chlorophenols that are known as polar narcotic chemicals. The LBBs of the chlorophenols were compared to LBBs of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to consider if the two classes of narcotic chemicals differ on a body burden level. The LBB of the most acidic chlorophenol was measured at two different levels of pH exposure to determine the influence of the degree of ionization on the magnitude of the LBB. Both n-octanol/water partition coefficients and n-hexane/water partition coefficients of the chlorophenols were determined at different pH levels to consider the influence of ionization on the partition coefficient and to determine the importance of a polar group in the organic phase on the partitioning behavior. Partitioning to n-octanol and n-hexane was used as input in a model to simulate the equilibrium partitioning between hydrophobic and nonhydrophobic and target and nontarget compartments in the fish.

  13. Detection of narcotics with an immunoassay film badge

    SciTech Connect

    Lukens, H.R.

    1993-12-31

    Efficient personnel performance, a major requirement for a safe nuclear industry, is jeopardized where personnel use narcotics. However, detection of narcotics at nuclear plants is a challenge. The unique specificity and sensitivity of an immunoassay has been implemented in the form of a small, dry immunoassay film badge (IFB) for the detection of vapors emitted by narcotics. The device is suitable as an area monitor, and its characteristics are suitable for use as a breath monitor for the detection of drug use.

  14. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President declared a national emergency with respect to significant narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia...

  15. 21 CFR 1301.74 - Other security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. 1301.74 Section 1301.74 Food... for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. (a... narcotic substances by a narcotic treatment program shall be made only by a licensed practitioner employed...

  16. 21 CFR 1301.74 - Other security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. 1301.74 Section 1301.74 Food... for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. (a... narcotic substances by a narcotic treatment program shall be made only by a licensed practitioner employed...

  17. 21 CFR 1301.74 - Other security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. 1301.74 Section 1301.74 Food... for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs. (a... narcotic substances by a narcotic treatment program shall be made only by a licensed practitioner...

  18. 31 CFR 700.7 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and... a person under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs... IN OR ON THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.7 Alcoholic...

  19. 7 CFR 500.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... USNA property is prohibited. (c) The sale of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the USNA is... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 500.7 Section... Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. (a) Entering USNA property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon...

  20. 7 CFR 500.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... USNA property is prohibited. (c) The sale of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the USNA is... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 500.7 Section... Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. (a) Entering USNA property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon...

  1. 31 CFR 700.7 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and... a person under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs... IN OR ON THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.7 Alcoholic...

  2. 31 CFR 700.7 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and... a person under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs... IN OR ON THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.7 Alcoholic...

  3. 31 CFR 700.7 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and... a person under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs... IN OR ON THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.7 Alcoholic...

  4. 7 CFR 500.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... USNA property is prohibited. (c) The sale of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the USNA is... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 500.7 Section... Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. (a) Entering USNA property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon...

  5. 31 CFR 700.7 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, and... a person under the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs... IN OR ON THE FEDERAL LAW ENFORCEMENT TRAINING CENTER (FLETC) BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 700.7 Alcoholic...

  6. 7 CFR 500.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... USNA property is prohibited. (c) The sale of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the USNA is... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 500.7 Section... Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. (a) Entering USNA property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon...

  7. 7 CFR 500.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... USNA property is prohibited. (c) The sale of alcoholic beverages on the grounds of the USNA is... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 500.7 Section... Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. (a) Entering USNA property or the operation of a motor vehicle thereon...

  8. Neonatal Narcotic Dependence. Report Series 29, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    This brief report suggests that it is evident that many uncertainties still remain with regard to neonatal narcotic dependence. Discussion centers on the precise causes and symptoms of neonatal narcotic dependence, the most efficacious treatment procedures, the relative severity of heroin dependence as compared with methadone dependence in the…

  9. 77 FR 69707 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... property and interests in property has been blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation...

  10. Respiratory depression due to unsuspected narcotic ingestion treated with naloxone.

    PubMed Central

    Curnock, D A

    1978-01-01

    Two patients are presented with respiratory depression for which no cause was apparent. Both had ingested narcotics without the parents' knowledge. Narcotic ingestion should be suspected if signs of respiratory failure with constricted pupils are present, and a diagnostic test with naloxone should be performed. PMID:686779

  11. Quality of parenting in alcoholics and narcotic addicts.

    PubMed

    Bernardi, E; Jones, M; Tennant, C

    1989-05-01

    Alcoholics and heroin addicts were compared with a normal control group to determine whether there were differences in quality of parenting during childhood, assessed using the Parental Bonding Instrument. Maternal and paternal overprotection were reported more commonly by narcotic addicts. Maternal overprotection alone was implicated in alcoholics. Narcotic addicts seem to have more disturbed parenting than alcoholics, especially paternal parenting.

  12. 77 FR 29755 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-18

    ..., Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION... to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (``Kingpin Act'') (21 U.S.C. 1901-1908, 8 U.S.C.... The Kingpin Act establishes a program targeting the activities of significant foreign...

  13. Allergy to illicit drugs and narcotics.

    PubMed

    Swerts, S; Van Gasse, A; Leysen, J; Faber, M; Sabato, V; Bridts, C H; Jorens, P G; De Clerck, L S; Ebo, D G

    2014-03-01

    Despite their frequent use, allergy to illicit drugs and narcotics is rarely reported in literature. We present a review of the different classes of drugs of abuse that might be involved in allergies: central nervous system (CNS) depressants (such as cannabis, opioids and kava), CNS stimulants (cocaine, amphetamines, khat and ephedra) and hallucinogens such as ketamine and nutmeg. Diagnosis of drug and narcotic allergy generally relies upon careful history taking, complemented with skin testing eventually along with quantification of sIgE. However, for various reasons, correct diagnosis of most of these drug allergies is not straightforward. For example, the native plant material applied for skin testing and sIgE antibody tests might harbour irrelevant IgE-binding structures that hamper correct diagnosis. Diagnosis might also be hampered due to uncertainties associated with the non-specific histamine releasing characteristics of some compounds and absence of validated sIgE tests. Whether the introduction of standardized allergen components and more functional tests, that is, basophil activation and degranulation assays, might be helpful to an improved diagnosis needs to be established. It is anticipated that due to the rare character of these allergies further validation is although necessary. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Quadrupole resonance spectroscopic study of narcotic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rayner, Timothy J.; West, Rebecca; Garroway, Allen N.; Lyndquist, R.; Yesinowski, James P.

    1997-02-01

    Bulk narcotic detection systems based upon Quadrupole Resonance Analysis (QRA) technology have a major advantage over imaging technologies, in that QRA is chemical-specific and consequently has a lower rate of false alarms. QRA is a magnetic resonance technology which occurs as a result of the inherent molecular properties of the atomic nuclei in crystalline and amorphous solids. The QRA response is characterized by 1) the precessional frequency of the nucleus, and 2) the nature of the electric field gradient experienced by the nucleus,due to its molecular environment. Another important detection parameter is linewidth, resonant quality. All of these parameters depend on sample purity and manufacturing process. Quantum Magnetics recently carried out a study on the QRA signatures of various narcotic materials with the support of the US Army, US Customs, and the Office of National Drug Control Policy. The aim of the study was to fully characterize the variation in QRA spectroscopic parameters of different samples of cocaine base and cocaine hydrochloride. The results from this study ar discussed here.

  15. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the penalties...

  16. 19 CFR 162.65 - Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.65 Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana. (a) Cargo or baggage containing unmanifested narcotic drugs or marihuana. When a package of regular...

  17. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the penalties...

  18. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the penalties...

  19. 19 CFR 162.65 - Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.65 Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana. (a) Cargo or baggage containing unmanifested narcotic drugs or marihuana. When a package of regular...

  20. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the penalties...

  1. 19 CFR 162.65 - Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.65 Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana. (a) Cargo or baggage containing unmanifested narcotic drugs or marihuana. When a package of regular...

  2. 19 CFR 162.65 - Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.65 Penalties for failure to manifest narcotic drugs or marihuana. (a) Cargo or baggage containing unmanifested narcotic drugs or marihuana. When a package of regular...

  3. 19 CFR 162.66 - Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana... Substances, Narcotics, and Marihuana § 162.66 Penalties for unlading narcotic drugs or marihuana without a permit. In every case where a narcotic drug or marihuana is unladen without a permit, the...

  4. Narcotic tapering in pregnancy using long-acting morphine

    PubMed Central

    Dooley, Roisin; Dooley, Joe; Antone, Irwin; Guilfoyle, John; Gerber-Finn, Lianne; Kakekagumick, Kara; Cromarty, Helen; Hopman, Wilma; Muileboom, Jill; Brunton, Nicole; Kelly, Len

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To document the management of and outcomes for patients receiving narcotic replacement and tapering with long-acting morphine preparations during pregnancy. Design A prospective cohort study over 18 months. Setting Northwestern Ontario. Participants All 600 births at Meno Ya Win Health Centre in Sioux Lookout, Ont, from January 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, including 166 narcotic-exposed pregnancies. Intervention Narcotic replacement and tapering of narcotic use with long-acting morphine preparations. Main outcome measures Prenatal management of maternal narcotic use, incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome, and other neonatal outcomes. Results The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome fell significantly to 18.1% of pregnancies exposed to narcotics (from 29.5% in a previous 2010 study, P = .003) among patients using narcotic replacement and tapering with long-acting morphine preparations. Neonatal outcomes were otherwise equivalent to those of the nonexposed pregnancies. Conclusion In many patients, long-acting morphine preparations can be safely used and tapered in pregnancy, with a subsequent decrease in observed neonatal withdrawal symptoms. PMID:25821873

  5. Kisspeptin antagonists.

    PubMed

    Roseweir, Antonia Kathryn; Millar, Robert P

    2013-01-01

    Kisspeptin is now known to be an important regulator of the hypothalamic--pituitary-gonadal axis and is the target of a range of regulators, such as steroid hormone feedback, nutritional and metabolic regulation. Kisspeptin binds to its cognate receptor, KISS1R (also called GPR54), on GnRH neurons and stimulates their activity, which in turn provides an obligatory signal for GnRH secretion-thus gating down-stream events supporting reproduction. The development of peripherally active kisspeptin antagonists could offer a unique therapeutic agent for treating hormone-dependent disorders of reproduction, including precocious puberty, endometriosis, and metastatic prostate cancer. The following chapter discusses the advances made in the search for both peptide and small molecule kisspeptin antagonists and their use in delineating the role of kisspeptin within the reproductive system. To date, four peptide antagonists and one small molecule antagonist have been designed.

  6. Counter-narcotic acoustic buoy (CNAB)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bailey, Mark E.

    2004-09-01

    As a means to detect drug trafficking in a maritime environment, the Counter Narcotic Acoustic Buoy is part of an inexpensive system designed to detect "Go Fast" boats and report via satellite to a designated location. A go fast boat for this evaluation is defined as any boat with twin 200 horsepower outboard engines. The buoy is designed for deployment in salt water at depths ranging from 50 to 600 feet and can be easily deployed by one or two persons. Detections are based on noise energy exceeding a preset level within a frequency band associated with the go fast boat's acoustic signature. Detection ranges have been demonstrated to greater than three nautical miles.

  7. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  8. Reliability of a Personality Test for Narcotic Addicts in Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Elisabeth; Goldstein, Marvin

    1977-01-01

    The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) was used to determine retest reliability (7-day interval) and motivational distortion for a sample of narcotic addicts (N=141) legally committed to treatment and tested by staff for routine diagnostic purposes. (Author)

  9. Reliability of a Personality Test for Narcotic Addicts in Treatment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaestner, Elisabeth; Goldstein, Marvin

    1977-01-01

    The Sixteen Personality Factor Questionnaire (16PF) was used to determine retest reliability (7-day interval) and motivational distortion for a sample of narcotic addicts (N=141) legally committed to treatment and tested by staff for routine diagnostic purposes. (Author)

  10. Short-Term Follow-Up of Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swartz, June; Jabara, Raymond

    1974-01-01

    A follow-up questionnaire was mailed to 144 narcotic addict veterans approximately six months after termination from treatment at a multimodality drug program. It was found that 75 percent continued to use drugs, and 38 percent became readdicted. (Author)

  11. Amplification of acute focal ischemic deficit by narcotics.

    PubMed

    Dubow, Jordan; Bernstein, Richard A

    2008-01-01

    This article describes two patients with major ischemic stroke symptoms who had extremely small areas of acute brain infarction, suggestive of acute intrahemispheric diaschisis. Both patients were using narcotic analgesics during their stroke, and in both cases the clinical deficits improved dramatically with naloxone. We postulate that the narcotics amplified the ischemic stroke symptoms and that this effect was antagonized by naloxone. This suggests that the opiate system may be involved in the process of intrahemispheric diaschisis.

  12. Multimodal analgesia without routine parenteral narcotics for total hip arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Aditya Vikram; Boutary, Myriam; Yun, Andrew G; Sirianni, Leigh Ellen; Dorr, Lawrence D

    2006-12-01

    Methods for managing pain after a total hip replacement have changed substantially in the past 5 years. We documented the outcome of patients treated with a multimodal pain program designed to avoid parenteral narcotics. Avoidance of parenteral narcotics can essentially eliminate the complications of respiratory depression, ileus, and narcotic-induced hypotension. It can minimize nausea and vomiting which cause dissatisfaction with an operation. Twenty-one of 140 patients (15%) needed parenteral narcotics postoperatively with only nine patients (6.4%) using parenteral narcotics after the day of surgery. Mean pain scores were below 3 of 10 on all postoperative days. There were no patients with respiratory depression or ileus, and four (2.9%) with urinary retention. Nausea occurred with 35 patients (25%) in the recovery room and in 28 patients (20%) thereafter. Emesis occurred in five patients (3.6%) with two incidences in the recovery room. One hundred and thirty-eight patients (98.6%) were discharged home at a mean of 2.7 seven days postoperatively with 98 (70%) on a single assistive device. The multimodal pain management program, which avoided parenteral narcotics, was effective in providing pain relief, nearly eliminating emesis, and eliminating the severe complications of respiratory depression, urinary tract infection and ileus, as well as accelerating function.

  13. [Individual differences in analgesic effects of narcotics].

    PubMed

    Ide, Soichiro; Kasai, Shinya; Ikeda, Kazutaka

    2008-02-01

    Narcotic analgesics have been widely used for management of severe pain, especially for cancer pain. Most of these drugs are opioids, and they show their analgesic effects by acting through opioid receptors. Significant individual differences in opioid sensitivity can hamper effective pain treatments and increase side effects, which is associated with decreased quality of life. It is thought that genetic factors may affect individual differences in opioid sensitivity. Recent studies using various inbred and knockout mice have revealed that the mu-opioid receptor (MOP) plays a mandatory role in the analgesic properties of opioids. There is also increasing evidence that differences in the sequence of the MOP gene might significantly affect the amount of MOP gene mRNA expression and sensitivity to opioids. Furthermore, it can be thought that individual differences in opioid sensitivity are caused by genetic differences in not only MOP but other biomolecules, such as endogenous opioid peptides, molecules related with metabolic process and second messenger systems. Rapid advances in this research field are leading to a better understanding of relationships between gene polymorphisms and opioid sensitivities, which, in turn, will allow us to more accurately predict opioid sensitivity and opioid requirements in individual patients.

  14. Portable narcotics detector with identification capability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Pierce, R. M.; Dotson, K. C.; Jadamec, Joseph R.; Su, Chih-Wu

    1994-10-01

    A portable hand held hidden substance detector has been developed and manufactured. Neutrons from a californium-252 source are emitted through the front face of the Compact Integrated Narcotics Detection Instrument (CINDI) and penetrate dense compartment materials with little change in energy, but are backscattered by hydrogen rich materials such as drugs. These backscattered neutrons can be readily detected. CINDI incorporates a highly sensitive detection scheme which permits the use of weak radioactive sources for safety without compromising detectability. CINDI is able to detect hydrogen-dense materials most effectively directly behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls, or small sealed containers. The present CINDI version selectively detects hydrogen rich substances only. The new technique will detect both neutrons and gamma rays simultaneously. The backscatter mechanism of gamma rays and neutrons are sufficiently different that they complement each other and lead to a higher likelihood of identifying the concealed material.

  15. Narcotics detection using fast-neutron interrogation

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.

    1995-12-31

    Fast-neutron interrogation techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in luggage and cargo containers. This paper discusses two different fast-neutron techniques. The first uses a pulsed accelerator or sealed-tube source to produce monoenergetic fast neutrons. Gamma rays characteristic of carbon and oxygen are detected and the elemental densities determined. Spatial localization is accomplished by either time of flight or collimators. This technique is suitable for examination of large containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the high-energy gamma rays. The second technique uses an accelerator to produce nanosecond pulsed beams of deuterons that strike a target to produce a pulsed beam of neutrons with a continuum of energies. Elemental distributions are obtained by measuring the neutron spectrum after the source neutrons pass through the items being interrogated. Spatial variation of elemental densities is obtained by tomographic reconstruction of projection data obtained for three to five angles and relatively low (2 cm) resolution. This technique is best suited for examination of luggage or small containers with average neutron transmissions greater than about 0.01. Analytic and Monte-Carlo models are being used to investigate the operational characteristics and limitations of both techniques.

  16. Factors Associated With Narcotic Use After Clavicle Fractures.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, Douglas S; Napora, Joshua K; West, William H; Grimberg, Dominic C; Vallier, Heather A

    2016-09-01

    Clavicle fractures are common in adults. Recent studies have shown that operative treatment of clavicle fractures has benefits in many situations. However, there is controversy about the indications. Data on social outcomes are limited. A total of 434 patients with 436 clavicle fractures treated both operatively and nonoperatively at a level 1 trauma center were identified. Narcotic use was recorded 2, 4, 6, 8, 10, 12, 14, and 16 weeks after injury for both treatment groups. Other descriptive data included age, sex, laterality, hand dominance, rib fractures, smoking, alcohol use, employment, long bone or spine fracture, open clavicle fracture, and mechanism of injury. Logistic regression analysis was performed to determine the independent predictors of narcotic use after clavicle fracture. Open reduction and internal fixation was performed in 105 fractures (24%), and 329 fractures were managed nonoperatively. A total of 154 patients (35%) reported some narcotic use 2 weeks after injury, and 15% were still using narcotics 16 weeks after injury. Narcotic use decreased over time in patients treated with open reduction and internal fixation (10% vs 15% after nonoperative management). Patients treated with open reduction and internal fixation reported reduced narcotic use at 16 weeks (odds ratio [OR], 0.454; P=.070). Concurrent rib fracture (OR, 5.668; P<.001), smoking (OR, 3.095; P=.013), unemployment (OR, 5.429; P<.0005), and long bone or spine fracture (OR, 6.761; P<.001) were predictors of narcotic use. Further studies of the social, economic, and financial outcomes of clavicle fracture and osteosynthesis are warranted. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(5):e917-e923.]. Copyright 2016, SLACK Incorporated.

  17. Opioid antagonists for smoking cessation

    PubMed Central

    David, Sean P; Lancaster, Tim; Stead, Lindsay F; Evins, A. Eden; Prochaska, Judith J

    2014-01-01

    Background The reinforcing properties of nicotine may be mediated through release of various neurotransmitters both centrally and systemically. People who smoke report positive effects such as pleasure, arousal, and relaxation as well as relief of negative affect, tension, and anxiety. Opioid (narcotic) antagonists are of particular interest to investigators as potential agents to attenuate the rewarding effects of cigarette smoking. Objectives To evaluate the efficacy of opioid antagonists in promoting long-term smoking cessation. The drugs include naloxone and the longer-acting opioid antagonist naltrexone. Search methods We searched the Cochrane Tobacco Addiction Group Specialised Register for trials of naloxone, naltrexone and other opioid antagonists and conducted an additional search of MEDLINE using ’Narcotic antagonists’ and smoking terms in April 2013. We also contacted investigators, when possible, for information on unpublished studies. Selection criteria We considered randomised controlled trials comparing opioid antagonists to placebo or an alternative therapeutic control for smoking cessation. We included in the meta-analysis only those trials which reported data on abstinence for a minimum of six months. We also reviewed, for descriptive purposes, results from short-term laboratory-based studies of opioid antagonists designed to evaluate psycho-biological mediating variables associated with nicotine dependence. Data collection and analysis We extracted data in duplicate on the study population, the nature of the drug therapy, the outcome measures, method of randomisation, and completeness of follow-up. The main outcome measure was abstinence from smoking after at least six months follow-up in patients smoking at baseline. Abstinence at end of treatment was a secondary outcome. We extracted cotinine- or carbon monoxide-verified abstinence where available. Where appropriate, we performed meta-analysis, pooling risk ratios using a Mantel

  18. Medicines submitted to narcotics regulations in France, 1992-2007.

    PubMed

    Baumevieille, Marie; Daveluy, Amélie; Maurain, Catherine; Bégaud, Bernard; Haramburu, Françoise

    2009-06-01

    The objective was to study the current narcotics regulations which are the most restrictive regarding prescription and dispensation practice in France, and their evolution over the period 1992-2007. This is an example of regulation in a European member state regarding medicines with a risk of abuse or dependence. Narcotics regulations were studied in the French public health code. Status and indications of medicines concerned were found on the French medicine agency website, and the retrospective part of the study was conducted using the French public statute law website. Seventeen medicines were found. Three were psychotropics and fourteen narcotics. The prescription rules could be different for a given substance according to the route of administration or indication. In 2007, half of the narcotic opioids could be prescribed for 28 days, whereas in 1992, most of them could be prescribed for only 7 days. These results show the adaptation of French narcotics regulations, with the development of medicines indicated in acute or chronic pain treatment or opioid maintenance treatment.

  19. The Narcotic Bowel Syndrome: Clinical Features, Pathophysiology and Management

    PubMed Central

    Grunkemeier, David M.S.; Cassara, Joseph E.; Dalton, Christine B.; Drossman, Douglas A.

    2007-01-01

    Narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS) is a subset of opioid bowel dysfunction that is characterized by chronic or frequently recurring abdominal pain that worsens with continued or escalating dosages of narcotics. This syndrome is under recognized and may be becoming more prevalent. This may be due in the United States to increases in using narcotics for chronic non-malignant painful disorders, and the development of maladaptive therapeutic interactions around its use. NBS can occur in patients with no prior gastrointestinal disorder who receive high dosages of narcotics after surgery or acute painful problems, among patients with functional GI disorders or other chronic gastrointestinal diseases who are managed by physicians unaware of the hyperalgesic effects of chronic opioids. The evidence for the enhanced pain perception is based on: a) activation of excitatory anti-analgesic pathways within a bimodal opioid regulation system, b) descending facilitation of pain at the Rostral Ventral Medulla and pain facilitation via dynorphin and CCK activation, and c) glial cell activation that produces morphine tolerance and enhances opioid induced pain. Treatment involves early recognition of the syndrome, an effective physician patient relationship, graded withdrawal of the narcotic according to a specified withdrawal program and the institution of medications to reduce withdrawal effects. PMID:17916540

  20. Portable narcotics detector and the results obtained in field tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumer, Tumay O.; Su, Chih-Wu; Kaplan, Christopher R.; Rigdon, Stephen W.

    1997-02-01

    A compact integrated narcotics detection instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R&D, Inc. with funding provided by the U.S. Coast Guard. CINDI is designed as a portable sensitive neutron backscatter detector which has excellent penetration for thick and high Z compartment barriers. It also has a highly sensitive detection system for backscattered neutrons and, therefore, uses a very weak californium-252 neutron source. Neutrons backscatter profusely from materials that have a large hydrogen content, such as narcotics. The rate of backscattered neutrons detected is analyzed by a microprocessor and displayed on the control panel. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and displays in real time the backscattered neutron rate. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls or small sealed containers. The strong response of CINDI to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics makes it an effective tool for detecting concealed drugs. Its response has been field tested by NOVA, the U.S. Coast Guard and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotic drugs. Several large shipments of concealed drugs have been discovered during these trials and the results are presented and discussed.

  1. 3 CFR - Delegation of Functions Under Subsection 804(h)(2)(A) of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act Presidential Documents Other Presidential Documents Memorandum of May 31, 2013 Delegation of Functions Under Subsection 804(h)(2)(A) of the Foreign Narcotics...) of the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act (21 U.S.C. 1903(h)(2)(A)), to the Secretary of the...

  2. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in...

  3. 21 CFR 1306.07 - Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs... PRESCRIPTIONS General Information § 1306.07 Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs. (a) A practitioner may administer or dispense directly (but not prescribe) a narcotic drug listed in any schedule to a...

  4. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in...

  5. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Narcotic drug; controlled substance... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical...

  6. 21 CFR 1306.07 - Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs... PRESCRIPTIONS General Information § 1306.07 Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs. (a) A practitioner may administer or dispense directly (but not prescribe) a narcotic drug listed in any schedule to a...

  7. 21 CFR 1306.07 - Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs... PRESCRIPTIONS General Information § 1306.07 Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs. (a) A practitioner may administer or dispense directly (but not prescribe) a narcotic drug listed in any schedule to a...

  8. 76 FR 65353 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect To Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-20

    ... With Respect To Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered In Colombia #0; #0; #0; Presidential... Emergency With Respect To Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered In Colombia On October 21, 1995, by... narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia and the extreme level of violence, corruption, and harm such...

  9. 75 FR 64107 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Notice of October 14, 2010--Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics... ] Notice of October 14, 2010 Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics... the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia...

  10. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Narcotic drug; controlled substance... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical...

  11. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Narcotic drug; controlled substance... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical...

  12. 78 FR 62341 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President declared a national emergency with respect to significant narcotics traffickers centered in... States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia and the...

  13. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in...

  14. 3 CFR - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia Presidential Documents Other Presidential... Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by Executive Order 12978, the President... economy of the United States constituted by the actions of significant narcotics traffickers centered in...

  15. 21 CFR 1306.07 - Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs... PRESCRIPTIONS General Information § 1306.07 Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs. (a) A practitioner may administer or dispense directly (but not prescribe) a narcotic drug listed in any schedule to a...

  16. 77 FR 64221 - Continuation of the National Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Emergency With Respect to Significant Narcotics Traffickers Centered in Colombia On October 21, 1995, by... narcotics traffickers centered in Colombia and the extreme level of violence, corruption, and harm such actions cause in the United States and abroad. Because the actions of significant narcotics traffickers...

  17. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance:Treasury 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Narcotic drug; controlled substance... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical...

  18. 21 CFR 1306.07 - Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs... PRESCRIPTIONS General Information § 1306.07 Administering or dispensing of narcotic drugs. (a) A practitioner may administer or dispense directly (but not prescribe) a narcotic drug listed in any schedule to a...

  19. 31 CFR 598.309 - Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Narcotic drug; controlled substance... Finance (Continued) OFFICE OF FOREIGN ASSETS CONTROL, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY FOREIGN NARCOTICS KINGPIN SANCTIONS REGULATIONS General Definitions § 598.309 Narcotic drug; controlled substance; listed chemical...

  20. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.9 Prohibition on narcotics and illegal... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a...

  1. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances... DEFENSE (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS SECURITY PROTECTIVE FORCE § 228.9 Prohibition on narcotics and illegal... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a...

  2. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within...

  3. 31 CFR 91.8 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics... BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.8 Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs is prohibited....

  4. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within...

  5. 75 FR 42487 - Supplementary Identifying Information of Previously-Designated Individual, Foreign Narcotics...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-21

    ... Individual, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury... interests in property continue to be blocked pursuant to the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act... significant foreign narcotics traffickers and their organizations on a worldwide basis. It provides...

  6. 31 CFR 91.8 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics... BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.8 Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs is prohibited....

  7. 31 CFR 91.8 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics... BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.8 Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs is prohibited....

  8. 31 CFR 91.8 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics... BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.8 Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and... the influence of alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic or dangerous drugs is prohibited....

  9. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within the...

  10. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within the...

  11. 32 CFR 700.1138 - Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Responsibilities concerning marijuana, narcotics... concerning marijuana, narcotics, and other controlled substances. (a) All personnel shall endeavor to prevent and eliminate the unauthorized use of marijuana, narcotics and other controlled substances within the...

  12. Narcotics Misuse Victims: Is Physical Exercise for Their Fitness Needed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarigan, B.

    2017-03-01

    This research is purposed to find out whether physical exercise needed to improve physical fitness of narcotics misuse victims in Social Rehabilitation Center Pamardi Putera West Java Province. Survey method and field test were applied in this research. Population is all members of rehabilitation in BRSPP and the sampling technique used in this research was purposive sampling. Indonesia Physical Fitness Test (TKJI) was used as the instrument. The result of the research showed that level of narcotics misuse victims’ physical fitness is in ‘low’ category so that regular and measurable physical activity is needed in developing their physical fitness.

  13. 21 CFR 1301.72 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs; storage areas. 1301.72 Section... security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment...

  14. 21 CFR 1301.72 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs; storage areas. 1301.72 Section... security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment...

  15. 21 CFR 1301.72 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs; storage areas. 1301.72 Section... security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment...

  16. 21 CFR 1301.72 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs; storage areas. 1301.72 Section... security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic...

  17. 21 CFR 1301.72 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic treatment programs; storage areas. 1301.72 Section... security controls for non-practitioners; narcotic treatment programs and compounders for narcotic...

  18. Opiate-induced Changes in Brain Adenosine Levels and Narcotic Drug Responses

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Manhong; Sahbaie, Peyman; Zheng, Ming; Lobato, Robert; Boison, Detlev; Clark, J. David; Peltz, Gary

    2012-01-01

    We have very little information about the metabolomic changes that mediate neurobehavioral responses, including addiction. It was possible that opioid-induced metabolomic changes in brain could mediate some of the pharmacodynamic effects of opioids. To investigate this, opiate-induced brain metabolomic responses were profiled using a semi-targeted method in C57BL/6 and 129Sv1 mice, which exhibit extreme differences in their tendency to become opiate dependent. Escalating morphine doses (10–40 mg/kg) administered over a 4-day period selectively induced a two-fold decrease (p<0.00005) in adenosine abundance in the brainstem of C57BL/6 mice, which exhibited symptoms of narcotic drug dependence; but did not decrease adenosine abundance in 129Sv1 mice, which do not exhibit symptoms of dependence. Based on this finding, the effect of adenosine on dependence was investigated in genetically engineered mice with alterations in adenosine tone in the brain and in pharmacologic experiments. Morphine withdrawal behaviors were significantly diminished (P<0.0004) in genetically engineered mice with reduced adenosine tone in the brainstem, and by treatment with an adenosine receptor1 (A1) agonist (2-chloro-N6-cyclopentyladenosine, 0.5 mg/kg) or an A2a receptor (A2a) antagonist (SCH 58261 1 mg/kg). These results indicate that adenosine homeostasis plays a crucial role in narcotic drug responses. Opiate-induced changes in brain adenosine levels may explain many important neurobehavioral features associated with opiate addiction and withdrawal. PMID:23098802

  19. The Narcotics Situation in Russia as a Social Pedagogical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the use of narcotics in Russia has been complicated by the spread of new kinds of drugs that are less visible than more traditional kinds. A worsening of the situation must be prevented. This requires studying the accumulation of world experience, searching for up-to-date approaches to prevention, combining the efforts of science…

  20. The Narcotics Situation in Russia as a Social Pedagogical Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Popov, V. A.

    2012-01-01

    The increase in the use of narcotics in Russia has been complicated by the spread of new kinds of drugs that are less visible than more traditional kinds. A worsening of the situation must be prevented. This requires studying the accumulation of world experience, searching for up-to-date approaches to prevention, combining the efforts of science…

  1. 7 CFR 503.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 503.8 Section 503.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.8 Intoxicating...

  2. 7 CFR 503.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 503.8 Section 503.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.8 Intoxicating...

  3. 7 CFR 503.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 503.8 Section 503.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.8 Intoxicating...

  4. 7 CFR 503.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 503.8 Section 503.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.8 Intoxicating...

  5. 7 CFR 503.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 503.8 Section 503.8 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CONDUCT ON PLUM ISLAND ANIMAL DISEASE CENTER § 503.8 Intoxicating...

  6. 75 FR 44311 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-28

    ... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The list of designees is as follows: Entities: 1. ARTE Y DISENO DE CULIACAN S.A. DE C.V., Calle Rio Santa Maria, No. 1252, Colonia Los Pinos, Culiacan, Sinaloa, Mexico; R.F.C. ADC- 000927-SY9 (Mexico); (ENTITY) 2. AUTOTRANSPORTES JYM S.A. DE C.V., Calle Primera S/N 820, Poste...

  7. 75 FR 20425 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-19

    ... Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act. The names of the two individuals are as follows: 1. NA TCHUTO, Jose Americo Bubo (a.k.a. NA TCHUTE, Jose Americo Bubo); DOB 12 Jun 1952; POB N'cala, Guinea-Bissau... (a.k.a. CAMARA, Ibrahima Papa); nationality ] Guinea-Bissau; Air Force Chief of Staff of Guinea...

  8. Legal Position of School Personnel -- Drugs and Narcotics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shannon, Thomas A.

    California educators have been given broad discretionary powers to control students who misuse drugs or narcotics, and to develop drug education programs. This paper outlines and discusses legislation dealing with disciplinary actions against drug offenders, and delineates school responsibilities for developing and implementing effective drug…

  9. The Vocational Maturity of Inner-City Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    The maturity of vocational attitudes of 103 narcotic addicts from New York City and of 46 of their peers was assessed. Comparison between scores of the addicts and their peers showed the former to have significantly lower maturity of vocational attitudes. (Author)

  10. Neonatal Narcotic Dependence. Report Series 29, No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. on Drug Abuse (DHEW/PHS), Rockville, MD. National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information.

    This brief report from the National Clearinghouse for Drug Abuse Information is intended to give the general public an overview of the subject of neonatal narcotic dependence. It discusses the problems which the addicted mother and her baby present hospital staffs as they relate to improper postnatal care and infant mortality rates. The report…

  11. Interpersonal and Emotional Problem Solving among Narcotic Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Philip W.; Kaestner, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Measured problem-solving abilities of narcotics abusers using the modified means-ends problem-solving procedure. Good subjects had more total relevent means (RMs) for solving problems, used more introspective and emotional RMs, and were better at RM recognition, but did not have more sufficient narratives than poor subjects. (Author/BEF)

  12. The narcotic clinic in New Orleans, 1919-21.

    PubMed

    Tallaksen, Amund

    2017-09-01

    This paper traces the history of the narcotic clinic in New Orleans, Louisiana, comparing its merits to a similar clinic in Shreveport. How do the clinics compare, and why did the Shreveport clinic operate for longer than its New Orleans counterpart? Qualitative analysis of contemporary medical journals and newspapers, as well as archival materials from the Narcotic Division. In addition, the records of Louisiana Governor John M. Parker, the papers of Dr Willis P. Butler in Shreveport, as well as the records of the Orleans Parish Medical Society have been utilized. The narcotic clinic in Shreveport benefited from strong local support, while the New Orleans clinic faced a more vocal opposition. In addition, the Shreveport clinic offered a broad array of services and was a pillar of the community; the New Orleans clinic was newly established and offered fewer services. It was especially the influx of out-of-state addicts that angered many New Orleanians, many of whom witnessed the addicts lined up in the French Quarter. The effectiveness of the narcotic clinics in Louisiana (1919-23) was influenced by local opinion. The New Orleans clinic faced a tougher political climate than its counterpart in Shreveport, and therefore proved less resilient in the face of federal opposition. © 2017 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  13. 78 FR 36635 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-18

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the names of 18 individuals and 15...

  14. 77 FR 51616 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC'') is publishing the names of 2 individuals and 24...

  15. 78 FR 70630 - Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-26

    ...] [FR Doc No: 2013-28290] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Foreign Assets Control Additional Designations, Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The U.S. Department of the Treasury 's Office of Foreign Assets Control (``OFAC...

  16. Interpersonal and Emotional Problem Solving among Narcotic Drug Abusers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Appel, Philip W.; Kaestner, Elisabeth

    1979-01-01

    Measured problem-solving abilities of narcotics abusers using the modified means-ends problem-solving procedure. Good subjects had more total relevent means (RMs) for solving problems, used more introspective and emotional RMs, and were better at RM recognition, but did not have more sufficient narratives than poor subjects. (Author/BEF)

  17. The Vocational Maturity of Inner-City Narcotic Addicts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Robert J.

    1974-01-01

    The maturity of vocational attitudes of 103 narcotic addicts from New York City and of 46 of their peers was assessed. Comparison between scores of the addicts and their peers showed the former to have significantly lower maturity of vocational attitudes. (Author)

  18. Patterns of growth and development in narcotic-exposed children.

    PubMed

    Lifschltz, M H; Wilson, G S

    1991-01-01

    The results of the studies reviewed indicate that intrauterine growth is adversely affected by drug use during pregnancy. Whether the impairment is a direct effect of narcotic exposure or is the result of the interaction of deleterious health, environmental, and socioeconomic factors closely associated with the lifestyle of the woman who abuses drugs cannot be determined at present. Reports on the long-term effects of drug use on growth and intellectual functioning in the offspring of women who abuse drugs are not consistent. While some studies indicate that most of the exposed infants exhibit catchup growth by 6 months of age (Lifschitz et al. 1983, 1985), one methodologically strong study suggests that methadone may have a small direct teratogenic effect reflected in reduced head size at 2 years of age (Hans 1989). Unexplained is the pattern of growth deceleration observed in some narcotic-exposed children (Lifschitz et al. 1983, 1985). The few available reports on long-term outcome concur that narcotic-exposed children have a high incidence of behavioral and learning problems (Strauss et al. 1979; Rosen and Johnson 1985; Wilson 1989), but population studies have been too small to demonstrate that they differ significantly from controls. There is a suggestion that narcotic use during pregnancy promotes a biological vulnerability to adverse environments, manifested in the neurobehavioral and intellectual areas.

  19. 36 CFR 520.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 520.8 Section 520.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION...

  20. 36 CFR 520.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 520.8 Section 520.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION...

  1. 36 CFR 504.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 504.7 Section 504.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.7 Intoxicating beverages and...

  2. 36 CFR 520.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 520.8 Section 520.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION...

  3. 36 CFR 504.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 504.7 Section 504.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.7 Intoxicating beverages and...

  4. 36 CFR § 520.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. § 520.8 Section § 520.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION...

  5. 36 CFR § 504.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2013-07-01 2012-07-01 true Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. § 504.7 Section § 504.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.7 Intoxicating beverages and...

  6. 36 CFR 504.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 504.7 Section 504.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.7 Intoxicating beverages and...

  7. 36 CFR 520.8 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 520.8 Section 520.8 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING THE BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS OF THE NATIONAL ZOOLOGICAL PARK OF THE SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION...

  8. 36 CFR 504.7 - Intoxicating beverages and narcotics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intoxicating beverages and narcotics. 504.7 Section 504.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION RULES AND REGULATIONS GOVERNING SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 504.7 Intoxicating beverages and...

  9. Narcotic Use for Inflammatory Bowel Disease and Risk Factors During Hospitalization

    PubMed Central

    Long, Millie D.; Barnes, Edward L.; Herfarth, Hans H.; Drossman, Douglas A.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims Growing evidence demonstrates adverse effects of narcotics in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We sought to study the relationship between narcotic use, objective measures of disease activity and other associated factors in hospitalized patients with IBD. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all adult IBD patients admitted to a general medical or surgical ward service at a United States tertiary care center over a 1 year period. We collected demographic and disease specific information, inpatient narcotic use and disease activity measurements from endoscopic and radiologic reports. Bivariate comparisons were made between characteristics and narcotic use. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent effects of characteristics on narcotic use. Results A total of 117 IBD patients were included. Narcotics were given to 70.1% of hospitalized patients. Factors significantly associated with any inpatient narcotic use: Crohn’s disease (CD); p=<0.01, duration of IBD, p=0.02, prior psychiatric diagnosis, p=0.02, outpatient narcotic use, p=<0.01, current smoking, p=<0.01, prior IBD-specific surgery, p<0.02, and prior IBD-IBS diagnosis, p=0.02. Narcotic use was not significantly associated with disease severity on computed tomography (CT) scan or endoscopy. On multivariate analysis, smoking (OR 4.34, 95% CI 1.21–15.6) and prior outpatient narcotic use (OR 5.41, 95% CI 1.54–19.0) were independently associated with inpatient narcotic use. Conclusions A majority of patients with IBD are prescribed narcotics during hospitalization in spite of data on increased complications. Risk factors for narcotic use include CD and associated factors (disease duration, surgeries), substance abuse (outpatient narcotics and smoking), psychiatric diagnoses and IBD-IBS. PMID:21739533

  10. Narcotic use for inflammatory bowel disease and risk factors during hospitalization.

    PubMed

    Long, Millie D; Barnes, Edward L; Herfarth, Hans H; Drossman, Douglas A

    2012-05-01

    Growing evidence demonstrates the adverse effects of narcotics in inflammatory bowel disease (IBD). We sought to study the relationship between narcotic use, objective measures of disease activity, and other associated factors in hospitalized patients with IBD. We performed a retrospective cohort study of all adult IBD patients admitted to a general medical or surgical ward service at a United States tertiary care center over a 1-year period. We collected demographic and disease-specific information, inpatient narcotic use, and disease activity measurements from endoscopic and radiologic reports. Bivariate comparisons were made between characteristics and narcotic use. Logistic regression was used to evaluate the independent effects of characteristics on narcotic use. A total of 117 IBD patients were included. Narcotics were given to 70.1% of hospitalized patients. Factors significantly associated with any inpatient narcotic use: Crohn's disease (CD); P ≤ 0.01, duration of IBD, P = 0.02, prior psychiatric diagnosis, P = 0.02, outpatient narcotic use, P ≤ 0.01, current smoking, P ≤ 0.01, prior IBD-specific surgery, P < 0.02, and prior IBD / irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) diagnosis, P = 0.02. Narcotic use was not significantly associated with disease severity on computed tomography (CT) scan or endoscopy. On multivariate analysis, smoking (odds ratio [OR] 4.34, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.21-15.6) and prior outpatient narcotic use (OR 5.41, 95% CI 1.54-19.0) were independently associated with inpatient narcotic use. A majority of patients with IBD are prescribed narcotics during hospitalization in spite of data on increased complications. Risk factors for narcotic use include CD and associated factors (disease duration, surgeries), substance abuse (outpatient narcotics and smoking), psychiatric diagnoses, and IBD-IBS. Copyright © 2011 Crohn's & Colitis Foundation of America, Inc.

  11. ACTH Antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Adrian John; Forfar, Rachel; Hussain, Mashal; Jerman, Jeff; McIver, Ed; Taylor, Debra; Chan, Li

    2016-01-01

    Adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) acts via a highly selective receptor that is a member of the melanocortin receptor subfamily of type 1 G protein-coupled receptors. The ACTH receptor, also known as the melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R), is unusual in that it is absolutely dependent on a small accessory protein, melanocortin receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for cell surface expression and function. ACTH is the only known naturally occurring agonist for this receptor. This lack of redundancy and high degree of ligand specificity suggests that antagonism of this receptor could provide a useful therapeutic aid and a potential investigational tool. Clinical situations in which this could be useful include (1) Cushing’s disease and ectopic ACTH syndrome – especially while preparing for definitive treatment of a causative tumor, or in refractory cases, or (2) congenital adrenal hyperplasia – as an adjunct to glucocorticoid replacement. A case for antagonism in other clinical situations in which there is ACTH excess can also be made. In this article, we will explore the scientific and clinical case for an ACTH antagonist, and will review the evidence for existing and recently described peptides and modified peptides in this role. PMID:27547198

  12. State and Local Narcotics Law Enforcement Conference. Hearing before the Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control.

    This document contains the proceedings from a conference of state and local narcotics enforcement officials from 24 states and 14 city agencies. Statements from three members of the Select Committee on Narcotics are followed by discussions involving committee members, attendees from state and local agencies, and participants from several federal…

  13. An integrated QCM-based narcotics sensing microsystem.

    PubMed

    Frisk, Thomas; Sandström, Niklas; Eng, Lars; van der Wijngaart, Wouter; Månsson, Per; Stemme, Göran

    2008-10-01

    We present the design, fabrication and successful testing of a 14x14x4 mm3 integrated electronic narcotics sensing system which consists of only four parts. The microsystem absorbs airborne narcotics molecules and performs a liquid assay using an integrated quartz crystal microbalance (QCM). A vertically conductive double-sided adhesive foil (VCAF) was used and studied as a novel material for LOC and MEMS applications and provides easy assembly, electrical contacting and liquid containment. The system was tested for measuring cocaine and ecstasy, with successful detection of amounts as small as 100 ng and 200 ng, respectively. These levels are of interest in security activities in customs, prisons and by the police.

  14. [Treatment of Cancer Pain and Medical Narcotics].

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tsutomu

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization has reported that when morphine is used to control pain in cancer patients, psychological dependence is not a major concern. Our studies were undertaken to ascertain the modulation of psychological dependence on morphine under a chronic pain-like state in rats. Morphine induced a dose-dependent place preference. We found that inflammatory and neuropathic pain-like states significantly suppressed the morphine-induced rewarding effect. In an inflammatory pain-like state, the suppressive effect was significantly recovered by treatment with a κ-opioid receptor antagonist. In addition, in vivo microdialysis studies clearly showed that the morphine-induced increase in the extracellular levels of dopamine (DA) in the nucleus accumbens (N.Acc.) was significantly decreased in rats pretreated with formalin. This effect was in turn reversed by the microinjection of a specific dynorphin A antibody into the N.Acc. These findings suggest that the inflammatory pain-like state may have caused the sustained activation of the κ-opioidergic system within the N.Acc., resulting in suppression of the morphine-induced rewarding effect in rats. On the other hand, we found that attenuation of the morphine-induced place preference under neuropathic pain may result from a decrease in the morphine-induced DA release in the N.Acc with a reduction in the μ-opioid receptor-mediated G-protein activation in the ventral tegmental area (VTA). Moreover, nerve injury results in the continuous release of endogenous β-endorphin to cause the dysfunction of μ-opioid receptors in the VTA. This paper also provides a review to clarify misunderstandings of opioid analgesic use to control pain in cancer patients.

  15. The Efficacy of Foreign Assistance in Counter Narcotics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    by ADAM, 30,910 hectares were converted from coca to coffee57. Figure 3. Coffee Prices Versus the Amount of Cultivated Coca Oil palm has also... cultivation has grown to 452435 hectares.58 Requiring approximately one worker per eight hectares, the palm oil industry employs...for cocaine. In a 2006 study, Stella M. Rouse and Moises Arce analyzed the effects of U.S. counter narcotic policy on coca cultivation in Peru

  16. Effect of narcotic premedication of scintigraphic evaluation of gallbladder perforation

    SciTech Connect

    Sefczek, D.M.; Sharma, P.; Isaacs, G.H.; Brodmerkel, G.J. Jr.; Adatepe, M.H.; Powell, O.M.; Nichols, K.

    1985-01-01

    A case of gallbladder perforation is presented in which a small bile leak was demonstrated by cholescintigraphy while the patient was receiving meperidine, but not after meperidine was discontinued. The scintigrams obtained during meperidine therapy also showed a pattern of bile-duct obstruction. It is suggested that increased biliary pressure secondary to meperidine admininstration permitted visualization of the leak. Use of narcotic drugs may be a useful pharmocologic intervention in cases of peritonitis due to small obscure bile leaks.

  17. Gamma detectors in explosives and narcotics detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bystritsky, V. M.; Zubarev, E. V.; Krasnoperov, A. V.; Porohovoi, S. Yu.; Rapatskii, V. L.; Rogov, Yu. N.; Sadovskii, A. B.; Salamatin, A. V.; Salmin, R. A.; Slepnev, V. M.; Andreev, E. I.

    2013-11-01

    Gamma detectors based on BGO crystals were designed and developed at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research. These detectors are used in explosives and narcotics detection systems. Key specifications and design features of the detectors are presented. A software temperature-compensation method that makes it possible to stabilize the gamma detector response and operate the detector in a temperature range from -20 to 50°C is described.

  18. [An attitude survey on the medical use of narcotics for cancer pain relief].

    PubMed

    Sato, Yasuo

    2007-12-01

    Narcotic medications are the major drug therapy for cancer pain relief. A clinical use of fentanyl patches and oxycodone extended-release tablets has recently become available, which led to more choices of narcotics to be used medically. On the other hand, palliative care systems have not yet been fully established by medical institutions. The management of symptoms including pain, therefore, actually has to be performed by "care doctors" involved in cancer care. We conducted a survey on the medical use of narcotics for 500 people, including cancer patients and their family members. The result showed that the recognition rate of morphine used for cancer pain relief was 88%, while the recognition rate of narcotics for medical use other than morphine available for cancer pain relief was 20%. The most acceptable dosage form of narcotics was a skin patch, followed by an oral preparation. A response percentage that the dosage form of medical narcotics should be selectable by users was 93%.

  19. Opioid Bowel Dysfunction and Narcotic Bowel Syndrome: A Population-Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Choung, Rok Seon; Locke, G. Richard; Zinsmeister, Alan R.; Schleck, Cathy D.; Talley, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVES Opioid prescription use is increasing. Narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS) refers to chronic abdominal pain aggravated by narcotic use. Despite increasing narcotic use, NBS may be under-recognized. The aim of this study was to assess whether gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms in the community are associated with chronic narcotic use and estimate the likely prevalence of NBS. METHODS Validated self-report GI symptom questionnaires were mailed to 4,898 randomly selected people in the community. The medical charts of all respondents were reviewed to identify participants who had used narcotics and to determine whether they were taking an opioid for > 5 weeks for the treatment of chronic pain (malignant or nonmalignant). NBS was defined as abdominal pain developing in those taking chronic narcotics. The associations between GI symptoms and chronic narcotics use were assessed using logistic regression analysis. RESULTS A total of 2,913 respondents returned a completed questionnaire (overall response rate 59%, mean age 62, 52% female); 117 participants (4.1%, 95% confidence interval (CI): 3.3, 4.5) were taking narcotics. Five participants (0.17%; 95% CI: 0.06, 0.40%) met the criteria for NBS. Participants using narcotics had an increased use of laxatives (17 vs. 8% in those not using narcotics, P < 0.05). GI symptom reporting was more common in participants on narcotics, although the adjusted (for age, gender, somatic symptom complaints, and use of laxatives) odds ratios (ORs) were significantly increased only for frequent abdominal pain and stool frequency. CONCLUSIONS NBS may be relatively uncommon. Those on narcotics report additional GI symptoms (abdominal pain and stool frequency) and use more laxatives. PMID:19367263

  20. Prevalence of chronic narcotic use among children with inflammatory bowel disease.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Jessie P; Cook, Suzanne F; Allen, Jeffery K; Kappelman, Michael D

    2015-02-01

    Narcotic analgesics are not recommended for long-term management of pain for patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), particularly pediatric patients. We compared chronic use of narcotics among children with IBD and the general population and investigated factors associated with narcotic use in the pediatric IBD population. This cross-sectional study included children (younger than 18 years old) with continuous enrollment in a large administrative claims database from 2010 through 2011 (n = 4,911,286). Children with IBD were identified through diagnosis codes and dispensation of IBD medication (n = 4344); they were matched for age, sex, and region with 5 children without IBD (n = 21,720). Chronic narcotic use was defined as ≥3 dispensements of narcotics. We estimated prevalence odds ratios (PORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs), comparing narcotic use on the basis of IBD status and evaluating variables associated with narcotic use by patients with IBD by using conditional and unconditional logistic regression. The prevalence of chronic narcotic use was 5.6% among children with IBD vs 2.3% in the general population (POR, 2.6; 95% CI, 2.2-3.0). Compared with the general population, POR for chronic narcotic use was significantly higher for pediatric IBD patients with psychological impairment (POR, 6.8; 95% CI, 4.3-10.6) than those without (POR, 2.3; 95% CI, 1.9-2.7). Older age, increased healthcare utilization, fracture, and psychological impairment were strongly associated with chronic use of narcotics among children with IBD. Chronic narcotic use is common in pediatric IBD patients, particularly among those with anxiety and depression. Increased awareness of psychological comorbidity, screening, and treatment may reduce symptoms that lead to narcotic use and its complications. Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. A microarray chip for label-free detection of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Klenkar, Goran; Liedberg, Bo

    2008-07-01

    A protein array chip for label-free optical detection of low molecular weight compounds has been developed. As a proof of principle, the chip is proven capable of rapidly (approximately 1 min) determining hits from aqueous cocktails composed of four common narcotics, cocaine, ecstasy, heroin, and amphetamine, using imaging surface plasmon resonance (SPR) as the detection principle. The chip is produced by injecting a mixture of antibodies and letting them self-sort and bind to narcotic analog coupled proteins already present in a predefined pattern on the supporting substrate. An indirect detection method, where antibodies are displaced from the surface upon recognition of their corresponding narcotics, is used to obtain the optical contrast and thus a detectable SPR and/or ellipsometric signal. Two types of readouts are possible from the present setup: intensity SPR images and SPR/ellipsometric sensorgrams. Positive hits were routinely obtained for analyte concentrations of 50 pg/microL and the limit of detection, without any parameter optimizations, seems to fall in the range 0.5 pg/microL (1.4 nM) for heroin, 2.5 pg/microL (8.2 nM) for cocaine, and 5 pg/microL for the other two narcotics (26 nM for ecstasy and 37 nM for amphetamine). With improved readout possibilities (sampling frequency), signal evaluation algorithms, and antibody-antigen design strategies, we believe this limit can be further improved. The chip is shown to work for many measurement cycles with excellent reproducibility. Moreover, with a more advanced fluidic system, excess injected antibodies could be collected and reused for many cycles, which could make the running costs of the system very low. The chip is in no way limited to detection of narcotics. Other low molecular weight compounds could easily be detected on the same chip. For example, trinitrotoluene detection has already been demonstrated using our chip. Possible areas of application for the system are therefore envisaged in airport

  2. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply in...

  3. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply in...

  4. 32 CFR 228.9 - Prohibition on narcotics and illegal substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... narcotic drug, hallucinogen, marijuana, barbiturate or amphetamine is prohibited. Operation of a motor..., hallucinogens, marijuana, barbiturates or amphetamines is also prohibited. These prohibitions shall not apply in...

  5. From mouse to man: the 5-HT3 receptor modulates physical dependence on opioid narcotics

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Larry F.; Liang, De-Yong; Li, Xiangqi; Sahbaie, Peyman; D'Arcy, Nicole; Liao, Guochun; Peltz, Gary; Clark, J. David

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Addiction to opioid narcotics represents a major public health challenge. Animal models of one component of addiction, physical dependence, show this trait to be highly heritable. The analysis of opioid dependence using contemporary in-silico techniques offers an approach to discover novel treatments for dependence and addiction. Methods In these experiments, opioid withdrawal behavior in 18 inbred strains of mice was assessed. Mice were treated for 4 days with escalating doses of morphine before the administration of naloxone allowing the quantification of opioid dependence. After haplotypic analysis, experiments were designed to evaluate the top gene candidate as a modulator of physical dependence. Behavioral studies as well as measurements of gene expression on the mRNA and protein levels were completed. Finally, a human model of opioid dependence was used to quantify the effects of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron on signs and symptoms of withdrawal. Results The Htr3a gene corresponding to the 5-HT3 receptor emerged as the leading candidate. Pharmacological studies using the selective 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron supported the link in mice. Morphine strongly regulated the expression of the Htr3a gene in various central nervous system regions including the amygdala, dorsal raphe, and periaqueductal gray nuclei, which have been linked to opioid dependence in previous studies. Using an acute morphine administration model, the role of 5-HT3 in controlling the objective signs of withdrawal in humans was confirmed. Conclusion These studies show the power of in-silico genetic mapping, and reveal a novel target for treating an important component of opioid addiction. PMID:19214139

  6. From mouse to man: the 5-HT3 receptor modulates physical dependence on opioid narcotics.

    PubMed

    Chu, Larry F; Liang, De-Yong; Li, Xiangqi; Sahbaie, Peyman; D'arcy, Nicole; Liao, Guochun; Peltz, Gary; David Clark, J

    2009-03-01

    Addiction to opioid narcotics represents a major public health challenge. Animal models of one component of addiction, physical dependence, show this trait to be highly heritable. The analysis of opioid dependence using contemporary in-silico techniques offers an approach to discover novel treatments for dependence and addiction. In these experiments, opioid withdrawal behavior in 18 inbred strains of mice was assessed. Mice were treated for 4 days with escalating doses of morphine before the administration of naloxone allowing the quantification of opioid dependence. After haplotypic analysis, experiments were designed to evaluate the top gene candidate as a modulator of physical dependence. Behavioral studies as well as measurements of gene expression on the mRNA and protein levels were completed. Finally, a human model of opioid dependence was used to quantify the effects of the 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron on signs and symptoms of withdrawal. The Htr3a gene corresponding to the 5-HT3 receptor emerged as the leading candidate. Pharmacological studies using the selective 5-HT3 antagonist ondansetron supported the link in mice. Morphine strongly regulated the expression of the Htr3a gene in various central nervous system regions including the amygdala, dorsal raphe, and periaqueductal gray nuclei, which have been linked to opioid dependence in previous studies. Using an acute morphine administration model, the role of 5-HT3 in controlling the objective signs of withdrawal in humans was confirmed. These studies show the power of in-silico genetic mapping, and reveal a novel target for treating an important component of opioid addiction.

  7. Effects of Interventions on Relapse to Narcotics Addiction: An Event-History Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Event-history analysis was applied to the life history data of 581 male narcotics addicts to specify the concurrent, postintervention, and durational effects of social interventions on relapse to narcotics use. Results indicate the advisability of supporting methadone maintenance with other prevention strategies. (SLD)

  8. A Moving Target: Reasons Given by Adolescents for Alcohol and Narcotics Use, 1984 and 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmqvist, Riia A.; Martikainen, Liisa K.; von Wright, Maijaliisa Rauste

    2003-01-01

    Studied the reasons given by Finnish adolescents for alcohol use and the use of alcohol and narcotics by others. Findings for 396 adolescents in 1984 and 488 in 1999 suggest that adolescents' attitudes have become more liberal toward alcohol and narcotics use and that prevention campaigns may be aiming at a moving target of cultural opinion. (SLD)

  9. Effects of Interventions on Relapse to Narcotics Addiction: An Event-History Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hser, Yih-Ing; And Others

    1995-01-01

    Event-history analysis was applied to the life history data of 581 male narcotics addicts to specify the concurrent, postintervention, and durational effects of social interventions on relapse to narcotics use. Results indicate the advisability of supporting methadone maintenance with other prevention strategies. (SLD)

  10. A Moving Target: Reasons Given by Adolescents for Alcohol and Narcotics Use, 1984 and 1999.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmqvist, Riia A.; Martikainen, Liisa K.; von Wright, Maijaliisa Rauste

    2003-01-01

    Studied the reasons given by Finnish adolescents for alcohol use and the use of alcohol and narcotics by others. Findings for 396 adolescents in 1984 and 488 in 1999 suggest that adolescents' attitudes have become more liberal toward alcohol and narcotics use and that prevention campaigns may be aiming at a moving target of cultural opinion. (SLD)

  11. Carbon camera detection of vehicular-transported bulk narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trower, W. Peter; Saunders, Anna W.; Shvedunov, Vasiliy I.

    1997-02-01

    We describe a nuclear technique, the carbon camera, with which we have produced images of elemental carbon in concentrations and with surface densities typical in kilo quantities of narcotics. The signal is all high-energy gamma rays detected in a short time interval after irradiation of a target pixel by photons produced with an electron beam. Our carbon marker, the photoproton reaction on the minority carbon isotope, gives a robust signal with no interfering signals. We describe here the physics of the carbon camera and sketch our efforts to develop the technology of a fieldable instrument.

  12. [Mode of action of non-narcotic analgesics].

    PubMed

    Bannwarth, B; Chaslerie, A; Schaeverbeke, T; Vinçon, G; Dehais, J; Begaud, B

    1992-04-01

    According to Lim's experiments, non-narcotic analgesics are usually considered as "peripherally" acting drugs. Conversely, most of these compounds were shown to easily cross the blood-brain barrier, and hence partly produce their effects by a central mechanism. The relative contribution of each site of action may vary from one drug to another. Aspirin-like drugs may act by inhibiting arachidonate cyclooxygenase in both the damaged tissues and the central nervous system. Finally, these drugs appear to be either selective, or dose-dependent, or nonspecific inhibitors of prostaglandin-synthetases.

  13. 21 CFR 1304.25 - Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. 1304.25 Section 1304.25 Food and Drugs DRUG....25 Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. Each person registered or authorized by § 1301.22 of this chapter to compound narcotic drugs for off...

  14. 14 CFR 91.19 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.19 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or... operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marihuana, and...

  15. 21 CFR 1304.25 - Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. 1304.25 Section 1304.25 Food and Drugs DRUG....25 Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. Each person registered or authorized by § 1301.22 of this chapter to compound narcotic drugs for off...

  16. 14 CFR 91.19 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.19 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or... operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marihuana, and...

  17. 14 CFR 91.19 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.19 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or... operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marihuana, and...

  18. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs...

  19. 14 CFR 91.19 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.19 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or... operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marihuana, and...

  20. 21 CFR 1304.25 - Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. 1304.25 Section 1304.25 Food and Drugs DRUG....25 Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. Each person registered or authorized by § 1301.22 of this chapter to compound narcotic drugs for off...

  1. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs...

  2. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs...

  3. 21 CFR 1304.25 - Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. 1304.25 Section 1304.25 Food and Drugs DRUG....25 Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. Each person registered or authorized by § 1301.22 of this chapter to compound narcotic drugs for off...

  4. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs...

  5. 41 CFR 102-74.400 - What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs? 102-74.400 Section 102-74.400 Public... MANAGEMENT REGULATION REAL PROPERTY 74-FACILITY MANAGEMENT Conduct on Federal Property Narcotics and Other Drugs § 102-74.400 What is the policy concerning the possession and use of narcotics and other drugs...

  6. 21 CFR 1304.25 - Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. 1304.25 Section 1304.25 Food and Drugs DRUG....25 Records for treatment programs which compound narcotics for treatment programs and other locations. Each person registered or authorized by § 1301.22 of this chapter to compound narcotic drugs for...

  7. 14 CFR 91.19 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and... OPERATING AND FLIGHT RULES General § 91.19 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or... operate a civil aircraft within the United States with knowledge that narcotic drugs, marihuana,...

  8. Prevalence of Narcotic Bowel Syndrome in Opioid Abusers in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Bizhan; Arab, Peyman; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafieipour, Sara; Drossman, Douglas A.; Banivaheb, Ghodseyeh

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND In spite of the increasing trend in opioid abusers worldwide, the prevalence of narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS) is undetermined. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of NBS and other opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) in opioid abusers in Kerman, southeast Iran. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the prevalence of NBS in opioid abusers. METHODS By referring to addiction treatment centers in Kerman city and in a cross-sectional study, 577 subjects with opium or opioid subtracts abuse were included in our study. A validated questionnaire was used for OBD assessment and diagnosis of NBS was made according to both the presence of chronic abdominal pain despite increasing the opioid dose and ruling out other causes of abdominal pain. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Constipation, regurgitation, and heartburn were the most gastrointestinal complaints that were found in 132(22.9%), 123(21.3%) and 91(15.8%) subjects, respectively. Only 16(2.8%) participants fulfilled all the NBS criteria. Simultaneous use of non-narcotic sedative drugs increased the risk of NBS significantly (the odds ratio 3:1 and p=0.049). CONCLUSION NBS is not rare among opioid abusers and should be considered as a cause of chronic abdominal pain in this group. PMID:25349684

  9. Personalised performance feedback reduces narcotic prescription errors in a NICU

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, Kevin M; Suh, Sanghee; Monk, Heather; Chuo, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective Neonates are at high risk for significant morbidity and mortality from medication prescribing errors. Despite general awareness of these risks, mistakes continue to happen. Alerts in computerised physician order entry intended to help prescribers avoid errors have not been effective enough. This improvement project delivered feedback of prescribing errors to prescribers in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), and measured the impact on medication error frequency. Methods A front-line multidisciplinary team doing multiple Plan Do Study Act cycles developed a system to communicate prescribing errors directly to providers every 2 weeks in the NICU. The primary outcome measure was number of days between medication prescribing errors with particular focus on antibiotic and narcotic errors. Results A T-control chart showed that the number of days between narcotic prescribing errors rose from 3.94 to 22.63 days after the intervention, an 83% improvement. No effect in the number of days between antibiotic prescribing errors during the same period was found. Conclusions An effective system to communicate mistakes can reduce some types of prescribing errors. PMID:23038410

  10. Screening technologies for detection of swallowed packages of narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnett, Lowell J.; Magnuson, Erik E.; Sheldon, Alan G.; Kumar, Sankaran

    1997-01-01

    An increasingly popular method of transporting modest quantities of narcotics across international borders is to employ 'swallowers'. These are people who typically enter the country as international airline passengers after swallowing small, water-tight packages of heroin and/or cocaine. Rapid and accurate identification of swallowers in the airport environment poses difficult technical changes. Commonly used medical inspection technologies fall into one of two categories. Either they are unsuitable for widespread use, or they do not provide adequate information. An example of the former is x-ray scanning, while an example of the latter is ultrasonic imaging. Quantum Magnetics has developed a system to screen selected airline passengers for the presence of swallowed narcotics. The system utilizes magnetic resonance, which provides the physical basis for the magnetic resonance imaging systems widely used in the medical community as an alternative to x-rays. The system is currently operational, and laboratory performance testing is complete. Both the design of the system and its performance will be discussed. This work was sponsored in part by the Office of National Drug Control Policy and the US Customs Service.

  11. Liquid contents verification for explosives, chemical agents, and dissolved narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Sankaran; McMichael, W. Casey; Magnuson, Erik E.; Lee, Young K.; Moeller, Charles R.; Czipott, Peter V.; Rayner, Timothy J.; Newman, David E.; Wroblewski, Dariusz

    2001-02-01

    An increasingly important need today is to guard against terrorist attacks at key locations such as airports and public buildings. Liquid explosives can avoid detection at security checkpoints by being concealed as beverages or other benign liquids. Magnetic resonance (MR) offers a safe, non-invasive technology for probing and classifying the liquid contents inside sealed non-metallic containers or packages. Quantum Magnetics has developed a Liquid Explosives Screening System or `Bottle Scanner' to screen for liquid explosives and flammables, described at an earlier SPIE conference in 1996. Since then, the Bottle Scanner's performance has been significantly improved by the incorporation of neural network-based liquid classification. Recently we have shown that the incorporation of additional discrimination parameters can further enhance liquid classification. In addition to screening for explosives and flammables, the Bottle Scanner can be effective against chemical agents, many of which contain fluorine or phosphorous, both of which have MR signatures. Finally, we have evidence that the Bottle Scanner may also be able to detect narcotics dissolved in beverages, one of the methods used to smuggle narcotics across international borders. The development of the Bottle Scanner has been funded by the Federal Aviation Administration.

  12. Prevalence of narcotic bowel syndrome in opioid abusers in iran.

    PubMed

    Ahmadi, Bizhan; Arab, Peyman; Zahedi, Mohammad Javad; Shafieipour, Sara; Drossman, Douglas A; Banivaheb, Ghodseyeh

    2014-10-01

    BACKGROUND In spite of the increasing trend in opioid abusers worldwide, the prevalence of narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS) is undetermined. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of NBS and other opioid bowel dysfunction (OBD) in opioid abusers in Kerman, southeast Iran. According to the best of our knowledge, this is the first study to assess the prevalence of NBS in opioid abusers. METHODS By referring to addiction treatment centers in Kerman city and in a cross-sectional study, 577 subjects with opium or opioid subtracts abuse were included in our study. A validated questionnaire was used for OBD assessment and diagnosis of NBS was made according to both the presence of chronic abdominal pain despite increasing the opioid dose and ruling out other causes of abdominal pain. SPSS software version 16 was used for data analysis. p value<0.05 was considered as statistically significant. RESULTS Constipation, regurgitation, and heartburn were the most gastrointestinal complaints that were found in 132(22.9%), 123(21.3%) and 91(15.8%) subjects, respectively. Only 16(2.8%) participants fulfilled all the NBS criteria. Simultaneous use of non-narcotic sedative drugs increased the risk of NBS significantly (the odds ratio 3:1 and p=0.049). CONCLUSION NBS is not rare among opioid abusers and should be considered as a cause of chronic abdominal pain in this group.

  13. Imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations for narcotics and explosives screening

    SciTech Connect

    Trower, W.P.

    1993-12-31

    The author describes a nuclear technique for imaging carbon and nitrogen concentrations with surface densities characteristics of bulk narcotics and concealed explosives, the Carbon and the Nitrogen Camera. The physics is rooted in the tightly bound carbon-12 nucleus to which its neighboring isobars, nitrogen-12 and boron-12, decay rapidly (11 and 20 ms), mostly to its ground state, by emitting energetic beta particles (E{sub {beta}}{sup max} {approximately} 13 and 17 MeV) all of which produce bremsstrahlung and some yield annihilate radiation. The signal, photons detected in the multiscalar mode, results from the reactions {sup 13}C({gamma},p){sup 12}{Beta} for the bulk narcotics application and {sup 14}N({gamma},2n){sup 12}N and 14N({gamma},2p){sup 12}{Beta} for explosives detection and are initiated by a stepped pulsed electron beam with energy of {approximately} 30 and {approximately} 50 MeV, respectively. Images of 180 {approximately} 5 cm{sup 2} pixels taken in {approximately} 7 seconds will be presented of the carbon in a kilo of cocaine and the nitrogen in 125 grams of SEMTEX.

  14. Early intravenous ibuprofen decreases narcotic requirement and length of stay after traumatic rib fracture.

    PubMed

    Bayouth, Lilly; Safcsak, Karen; Cheatham, Michael L; Smith, Chadwick P; Birrer, Kara L; Promes, John T

    2013-11-01

    Pain control after traumatic rib fracture is essential to avoid respiratory complications and prolonged hospitalization. Narcotics are commonly used, but adjunctive medications such as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs may be beneficial. Twenty-one patients with traumatic rib fractures treated with both narcotics and intravenous ibuprofen (IVIb) (Treatment) were retrospectively compared with 21 age- and rib fracture-matched patients who received narcotics alone (Control). Pain medication requirements over the first 7 hospital days were evaluated. Mean daily IVIb dose was 2070 ± 880 mg. Daily intravenous morphine-equivalent requirement was 19 ± 16 vs 32 ± 24 mg (P < 0.0001). Daily narcotic requirement was significantly decreased in the Treatment group on Days 3 through 7 (P < 0.05). Total weekly narcotic requirement was significantly less among Treatment patients (P = 0.004). Highest and lowest daily pain scores were lower in the Treatment group (P < 0.05). Hospital length of stay was 4.4 ± 3.4 versus 5.4 ± 2.9 days (P = 0.32). There were no significant complications associated with IVIb therapy. Early IVIb therapy in patients with traumatic rib fractures significantly decreases narcotic requirement and results in clinically significant decreases in hospital length of stay. IVIb therapy should be initiated in patients with traumatic rib fractures to improve patient comfort and reduce narcotic requirement.

  15. Patients With Short Bowel on Narcotics During 2 Randomized Trials Have Abdominal Complaints Independent of Teduglutide.

    PubMed

    Fujioka, Ken; Jeejeebhoy, Khursheed; Pape, Ulrich-Frank; Li, Benjamin; Youssef, Nader N; Schneider, Stéphane M

    2016-08-09

    Narcotic agents are frequently administered to manage increased intestinal motility in patients with short bowel syndrome, but long-term use is associated with gastrointestinal (GI) complaints. This analysis evaluated the incidence of narcotic use and abdominal adverse events among patients with short bowel syndrome receiving teduglutide. Pooled data from patients who received ≥1 dose of teduglutide 0.05 mg/kg/d (n = 77) or placebo (n = 59) in either of 2 randomized, double-blind, phase III studies were analyzed. Of 136 patients, 52 (38%) received narcotics. GI adverse events occurred more often among patients who received narcotics than among those who did not (abdominal pain, 51% vs 21%; nausea, 42% vs 11%; abdominal distension, 17% vs 8%; vomiting, 19% vs 6%). Logistic regression analysis indicated that the probability of GI adverse events was significantly increased in patients with narcotic use (P = .0009). In contrast, teduglutide treatment, as well as the interaction between teduglutide and narcotic use, did not affect the probability of GI adverse events. These results suggest that patients with short bowel syndrome receiving narcotics have chronic GI complaints independent of teduglutide treatment. Data included in this analysis were derived from ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00081458 and NCT00798967 (EudraCT 2004-000438-35 and 2008-006193-15). © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  16. Narcotic tapering in pregnancy using long-acting morphine: an 18-month prospective cohort study in northwestern Ontario.

    PubMed

    Dooley, Roisin; Dooley, Joe; Antone, Irwin; Guilfoyle, John; Gerber-Finn, Lianne; Kakekagumick, Kara; Cromarty, Helen; Hopman, Wilma; Muileboom, Jill; Brunton, Nicole; Kelly, Len

    2015-02-01

    To document the management of and outcomes for patients receiving narcotic replacement and tapering with long-acting morphine preparations during pregnancy. A prospective cohort study over 18 months. Northwestern Ontario. All 600 births at Meno Ya Win Health Centre in Sioux Lookout, Ont, from January 1, 2012, to June 30, 2013, including 166 narcotic-exposed pregnancies. Narcotic replacement and tapering of narcotic use with long-acting morphine preparations. Prenatal management of maternal narcotic use, incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome, and other neonatal outcomes. The incidence of neonatal abstinence syndrome fell significantly to 18.1% of pregnancies exposed to narcotics (from 29.5% in a previous 2010 study, P = .003) among patients using narcotic replacement and tapering with long-acting morphine preparations. Neonatal outcomes were otherwise equivalent to those of the nonexposed pregnancies. In many patients, long-acting morphine preparations can be safely used and tapered in pregnancy, with a subsequent decrease in observed neonatal withdrawal symptoms.

  17. Early family adversity as a precursor to narcotic addiction.

    PubMed

    Nurco, D N; Kinlock, T W; O'Grady, K E; Hanlon, T E

    1996-12-02

    This retrospective study examined differences among three groups of urban males in the prevalence of various family risk factors occurring before age 11 and their independent contributions to subsequent deviance. The groups included: narcotic addicts; never-addicted peer controls who were associates of the addicts at age 11; and never-addicted community controls not associated with the addicts. Sixty-four percent of the addicts, compared to slightly under 40% of both control groups, reportedly experienced one or more family risk factors involving deviant behavior among family members and family disruption before age 11. While community controls differed from addicts on both family deviance and disruption in family structure, peer controls differed from addicts only on disruption of family structure. For the total sample, both family deviance and family disruption experienced before age 11 were significantly associated with crime severity level at age 11. Implications of these findings for future substance abuse research and intervention are discussed.

  18. Recent advances in immunosensor for narcotic drug detection

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Sonu; Suman, Pankaj; Kumar, Ashok; Sharma, Prince; Capalash, Neena; Suri, C. Raman

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Immunosensor for illicit drugs have gained immense interest and have found several applications for drug abuse monitoring. This technology has offered a low cost detection of narcotics; thereby, providing a confirmatory platform to compliment the existing analytical methods. Methods: In this minireview, we define the basic concept of transducer for immunosensor development that utilizes antibodies and low molecular mass hapten (opiate) molecules. Results: This article emphasizes on recent advances in immunoanalytical techniques for monitoring of opiate drugs. Our results demonstrate that high quality antibodies can be used for immunosensor development against target analyte with greater sensitivity, specificity and precision than other available analytical methods. Conclusion: In this review we highlight the fundamentals of different transducer technologies and its applications for immunosensor development currently being developed in our laboratory using rapid screening via immunochromatographic kit, label free optical detection via enzyme, fluorescence, gold nanoparticles and carbon nanotubes based immunosensing for sensitive and specific monitoring of opiates. PMID:26929925

  19. Narcotic bowel syndrome and opioid-induced constipation.

    PubMed

    Szigethy, Eva; Schwartz, Marc; Drossman, Douglas

    2014-10-01

    Prescription opioid use for chronic non-cancer pain has reached epidemic levels in the USA. With this increased use is the recognition of serious opioid-related gastrointestinal complications such as narcotic bowel syndrome (NBS) and opioid-induced constipation (OIC). NBS consists of a paradoxical worsening of abdominal pain with escalating doses of opioids and is likely mediated by the central nervous system. Therapy requires an intensive multidisciplinary approach to detoxification. OIC is the most common gastrointestinal side effect of opioids. Several novel therapeutics are available to treat OIC that fails to respond to laxative therapy. This review will summarize recent findings on the pathophysiology and treatment approaches to NBS and OIC with a focus on controversies about diagnosis and intervention.

  20. Does preoperative narcotic use adversely affect outcomes and complications after spinal deformity surgery? A comparison of nonnarcotic- with narcotic-using groups.

    PubMed

    Mesfin, Addisu; Lenke, Lawrence G; Bridwell, Keith H; Akhtar, Usman; Jupitz, Jennifer M; Fogelson, Jeremy L; Hershman, Stuart H; Kim, Han J; Koester, Linda A

    2014-12-01

    The role of preoperative (preop) narcotic use and its influence on outcomes after spinal deformity surgery are unknown. It is important to determine which patient factors and comorbidities can affect the success of spinal deformity surgery, a challenging surgery with high rates of complications at baseline. To evaluate if preop narcotic use persists after spinal deformity surgery and whether the outcomes are adversely affected by preop narcotic use. Retrospective evaluation of prospectively collected data. Two hundred fifty-three adult patients (230 females/23 males) undergoing primary spinal deformity surgery were enrolled from 2000 to 2009. Preoperative and postoperative (postop) narcotic use and changes in Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Scoliosis Research Society (SRS) pain, and SRS total scores. Preoperative, 2-year postop, and latest follow-up pain medication use were collected along with ODI, SRS pain, and SRS scores. Preoperative insurance status, surgical and hospitalization demographics, and complications were collected. All patients had a minimum 2-year follow-up (average 47.4 months). One hundred sixty-eight nonnarcotic (NoNarc) patients were taking no pain meds or only nonsteroidal anti-inflammatories preoperatively. Eighty-five patients were taking mild/moderate/heavy narcotics before surgery. The average age was 48.2 years for the NoNarc group versus 53.6 years for the Narc group (p<.005). There were significantly more patients with degenerative than adult scoliosis in the Narc group (47 vs. 28, p<.001; mild 19 vs. 24, p<.02; moderate 6 vs. 14, p<.0003; heavy 3 vs. 10, p<.0002). Insurance status (private/Medicare/Medicaid) was similar between the groups (p=.39). At latest follow-up, 137/156 (88%) prior NoNarc patients were still not taking narcotics whereas 48/79 (61%) prior narcotic patients were now off narcotics (p<.001). Significant postop improvements were seen in Narc versus NoNarc groups with regard to ODI (26-15 vs. 44-30.3, p<.001), SRS

  1. Coordinated outpatient care of the narcotic-dependent infant.

    PubMed

    Oei, J; Feller, J M; Lui, K

    2001-06-01

    Concern regarding parental capacity to manage their infant's drug withdrawal traditionally leads to prolonged hospitalization for both mother and infant. This study examines the impact of a multidisciplinary follow-up clinic for infants discharged home on morphine. Records of full-term infants born to mothers with narcotic dependency were reviewed retrospectively. Two periods were compared: 1995-1997 (period A) and 1998 to September 1999 with clinic established (period B). Twenty-five and 26 mothers were identified in periods A and B, respectively. Almost half had fewer than four antenatal clinic visits and most were on methadone with other substance usage. Despite higher maternal methadone doses (mean 48.5 vs 89.5 mg/day, P = 0.009) and withdrawal rates, the mean length of stay was significantly shorter for period B mothers (7.8 +/- 4.8 vs 5.4 +/- 3.3 days, P = 0.01) and babies (14.8 +/- 9.7 vs 8.7 +/- 7.2, P = 0.01). Median duration of morphine treatment was significantly shorter in period A (17 vs 60 days, P = 0.0001) when only four babies were discharged on morphine. In contrast, 18 treated period B babies were discharged on morphine. No families were lost to follow up. Compliance with clinic attendance was 92%. Hospital stay was reduced with establishment of the clinic. The shorter treatment duration before establishment of the clinic could have been related to a lesser abstinence severity or a perceived need of a more rapid weaning prior to discharge. Further studies are needed to assess the impact of this model of care on the health outcome of the narcotic-dependent mother and infant unit.

  2. Serratia marcescens Bacteremia: Nosocomial Cluster Following Narcotic Diversion.

    PubMed

    Schuppener, Leah M; Pop-Vicas, Aurora E; Brooks, Erin G; Duster, Megan N; Crnich, Christopher J; Sterkel, Alana K; Webb, Aaron P; Safdar, Nasia

    2017-09-01

    OBJECTIVE To describe the investigation and control of a cluster of Serratia marcescens bacteremia in a 505-bed tertiary-care center. METHODS Cluster cases were defined as all patients with S. marcescens bacteremia between March 2 and April 7, 2014, who were found to have identical or related blood isolates determined by molecular typing with pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Cases were compared using bivariate analysis with controls admitted at the same time and to the same service as the cases, in a 4:1 ratio. RESULTS In total, 6 patients developed S. marcescens bacteremia within 48 hours after admission within the above period. Of these, 5 patients had identical Serratia isolates determined by molecular typing, and were included in a case-control study. Exposure to the post-anesthesia care unit was a risk factor identified in bivariate analysis. Evidence of tampered opioid-containing syringes on several hospital units was discovered soon after the initial cluster case presented, and a full narcotic diversion investigation was conducted. A nurse working in the post-anesthesia care unit was identified as the employee responsible for the drug diversion and was epidemiologically linked to all 5 patients in the cluster. No further cases were identified once the implicated employee's job was terminated. CONCLUSION Illicit drug use by healthcare workers remains an important mechanism for the development of bloodstream infections in hospitalized patients. Active mechanisms and systems should remain in place to prevent, detect, and control narcotic drug diversions and associated patient harm in the healthcare setting. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol 2017;38:1027-1031.

  3. Skills of Medical Students and House Officers in Prescribing Narcotic Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Stuart A.; Sheidler, Vivian R.

    1985-01-01

    Patient management questions were used to assess ability to convert from one narcotic regimen to an approximately equal analgesic dose of a second regimen. Only eight percent of the answers were within the correct range. (Author/MLW)

  4. Skills of Medical Students and House Officers in Prescribing Narcotic Medications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grossman, Stuart A.; Sheidler, Vivian R.

    1985-01-01

    Patient management questions were used to assess ability to convert from one narcotic regimen to an approximately equal analgesic dose of a second regimen. Only eight percent of the answers were within the correct range. (Author/MLW)

  5. Classification of narcotics in solid mixtures using principal component analysis and Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ryder, Alan G

    2002-03-01

    Eighty-five solid samples consisting of illegal narcotics diluted with several different materials were analyzed by near-infrared (785 nm excitation) Raman spectroscopy. Principal Component Analysis (PCA) was employed to classify the samples according to narcotic type. The best sample discrimination was obtained by using the first derivative of the Raman spectra. Furthermore, restricting the spectral variables for PCA to 2 or 3% of the original spectral data according to the most intense peaks in the Raman spectrum of the pure narcotic resulted in a rapid discrimination method for classifying samples according to narcotic type. This method allows for the easy discrimination between cocaine, heroin, and MDMA mixtures even when the Raman spectra are complex or very similar. This approach of restricting the spectral variables also decreases the computational time by a factor of 30 (compared to the complete spectrum), making the methodology attractive for rapid automatic classification and identification of suspect materials.

  6. Dispositional, ecological and biological influences on adolescent tranquilizer, Ritalin, and narcotics misuse.

    PubMed

    Fleary, Sasha A; Heffer, Robert W; McKyer, E Lisako J

    2011-08-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two of the three sources of risk-taking--dispositional and ecological--in adolescence and demographic variables were related to Ritalin, tranquilizer and narcotics misuse. The secondary aim of this study was to distinguish subgroups of Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics misusers using dispositional, ecological and demographic variables. An archival dataset containing 1672 participants (11-18 years old) was used. Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics misuse were dichotomized and hierarchical logistic regressions were computed for dispositional and ecological sources of risk-taking and demographics. To distinguish subgroups of misusers, hierarchical multinomial regressions were computed. Dispositional, ecological, and demographic variables were related to Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics misuse and distinguished among non-users, experimenters/occasional misusers, and frequent misusers. Prescription drug prevention programs should incorporate demographic, dispositional, and ecological variables and should parallel the guidelines currently used for developing effective substance abuse prevention programs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. [The characteristics of the morphological changes to the parenchymatous organs in persons who used street narcotics].

    PubMed

    Solodun, Iu V; Leliukh, T D; Maslauskene, L S; Proskurin, V N; Posel'skaia, L N

    1998-01-01

    Morphologic signs of narcomania in subjects using primitively prepared narcotics from opium-containing raw material are described. Sites of injections and inflammatory reactions in the parenchymatous organs are described. Special attention is paid to productive hypersensitive inflammation, which can serve as a sign confirming narcomania in subjects using poorly purified narcotic mixture. The authors classify the granulomas in such patients as toxic allergic granulomatosis.

  8. Anesthesia for a patient with morbid obesity using dexmedetomidine without narcotics.

    PubMed

    Hofer, Roger E; Sprung, Juraj; Sarr, Michael G; Wedel, Denise J

    2005-02-01

    To describe the anesthetic management of a patient with extreme obesity undergoing bariatric surgery whose intraoperative narcotic management was entirely substituted with dexmedetomidine. We describe a 433-kg morbidly obese patient with obstructive sleep apnea and pulmonary hypertension who underwent Roux-en-Y gastric bypass. Because of the concern that the use of narcotics might cause postoperative respiratory depression, we substituted their intraoperative use with a continuous infusion of dexmedetomidine (0.7 microg.kg(-1).hr(-1)). The anesthesia course was uneventful, and the intraoperative use of dexmedetomidine was associated with low anesthetic requirements (0.5 minimum alveolar concentration). After completion of the operation and after tracheal extubation, the dexmedetomidine infusion was continued uninterrupted throughout the end of the first postoperative day. The analgesic effects of dexmedetomidine extended narcotic-sparing effects into the postoperative period; the patient had lower narcotic requirements during the first postoperative day [48 mg of morphine by patient-controlled analgesia (PCA)] while still receiving dexmedetomidine, compared to the second postoperative day (morphine 148 mg by PCA) with similar pain scores. Dexmedetomidine may be a useful anesthetic adjunct for patients who are susceptible to narcotic-induced respiratory depression. In this morbidly obese patient the narcotic-sparing effects of dexmedetomidine were evident both intraoperatively and postoperatively.

  9. Decreasing postoperative narcotics in reconstructive pelvic surgery: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Reagan, Krista M L; O'Sullivan, David M; Gannon, Richard; Steinberg, Adam C

    2017-09-01

    Postoperative pain control is crucial to any successful recovery plan. Many currently used medication regimens are narcotic-focused. The objective of our study was to evaluate the efficacy of a multimodal pain regimen after pelvic reconstructive surgery. The primary outcome measure was narcotic use. Secondary outcomes included pain, nausea, and constipation. Patients were randomized to either usual care postoperative treatment or multimodal pain regimen. Usual care included no specific preoperative or intraoperative medications, and postoperative narcotics with ibuprofen. Multimodal pain regimen included preoperative and postoperative celecoxib, gabapentin, intraoperative and postoperative intravenous and oral acetaminophen and ibuprofen, and narcotics as needed. All narcotics were converted to milligram equivalents of oral morphine for standardization according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention guidelines where conversion factors for oral hydrocodone = 1, oral oxycodone = 1.5, and oral hydromorphone = 4. Patients were given the validated Brief Pain Inventory survey preoperatively (baseline), at postoperative day 1, and 1 week postoperatively. At 1 week, bowel function and narcotics usage was assessed. Seventy patients were randomized to the usual care arm and 68 to the multimodal pain regimen arm. Patients in the multimodal pain regimen arm used significantly fewer intravenous narcotics in the operating room (90.7 ± 39.1 mg vs 104.6 ± 33.5 mg; P = .026) and while in the hospital (10.8 ± 15.1 mg vs 31.2 ± 29.6 mg; P < .001) and were more likely to use 0 oral narcotics after discharge to home (34.8% of patients vs 10.6%; P = .001). Of the patients who did use oral narcotics after discharge to home, there was no difference in amount used between groups (121.3 ± 103.7 mg in the multimodal pain regimen arm vs 153.0 ± 113.8 mg in the usual care arm; P = .139). Total narcotic usage (operating room + hospital + home) was significantly less in

  10. A simple mechanistic model to interpret the effects of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Baas, J; Spurgeon, D; Broerse, M

    2015-01-01

    In this research we will show the advantages of using a time-independent dose metric in a mechanistic model to evaluate toxic effects for different narcotic compounds on different species. We will show how different already existing QSARs can be combined within a mechanistic framework to 1) make predictions of lethal thresholds; 2) show some limitations in the use of existing QSARs; 3) show how a mechanistic framework solves some conceptual problems in current approaches and 4) show how such a framework can be used to be of aid in an experimental setup in predicting the outcome of a survival experiment. The approach we chose is based on the simplest mechanistic model available, a scaled one-compartment model to describe uptake and elimination and hazard model to link the exposure to effects on survival. Within this theoretical framework a prediction for an internal threshold for effects on survival of 3 mmol/kg bw can be made, which should be similar for different species and independent of the partitioning characteristics of the toxicant. To demonstrate this, a threshold for 51 different species was derived, which indeed appeared to lie in a relatively small range, typically between 1 and 10 mmol/kg bw.

  11. [Identification of narcotics in urine by capillary gas chromatography].

    PubMed

    Akalaev, A N; Shpagin, M G; Shabolenko, V P; Kovalenko, A E

    2004-01-01

    It is demonstrated that gas chromatography with quartz capillary columns (QCC) and with cross-sewn SE-52 by polysiloxane provides for the possibility to divide and identify, in human urine, 16 narcotic substances of the amphetamine, 1.4-benzodiazepine, morphine and other groups. The suggested extraction method makes it possible to isolate the above compounds from urine simultaneously and, after derivatization, to determine them by gas chromatography (GC) with programmed temperature within one stage analysis session. GC tests were performed on 2 both foreign and Russian QCC with SE-52. There is a description of 2 methods of how to obtain the trifluor-acetyl derivatives (TFA-derivatives) by using trifluor-acetate anhydride and N-methyl-bis-trifluor-acetamide. The limit of detecting the TFA-derivatives was 1-2 ng for the plasma-ionizing detector. The extraction method as well as the positive and negative aspects of using the TFA-derivatives are under discussion. The method of gas-chromatography/mass-spectrometry confirms that the positive results of radioreceptor assay are verified by GC in 92% of cases.

  12. Predictive spatial modeling of narcotic crop growth patterns

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Waltz, Frederick A.; Moore, D.G.

    1986-01-01

    Spatial models for predicting the geographic distribution of marijuana crops have been developed and are being evaluated for use in law enforcement programs. The models are based on growing condition preferences and on psychological inferences regarding grower behavior. Experiences of local law officials were used to derive the initial model, which was updated and improved as data from crop finds were archived and statistically analyzed. The predictive models are changed as crop locations are moved in response to the pressures of law enforcement. The models use spatial data in a raster geographic information system. The spatial data are derived from the U.S. Geological Survey's US GeoData, standard 7.5-minute topographic quadrangle maps, interpretations of aerial photographs, and thematic maps. Updating of cultural patterns, canopy closure, and other dynamic features is conducted through interpretation of aerial photographs registered to the 7.5-minute quadrangle base. The model is used to numerically weight various data layers that have been processed using spread functions, edge definition, and categorization. The building of the spatial data base, model development, model application, product generation, and use are collectively referred to as the Area Reduction Program (ARP). The goal of ARP is to provide law enforcement officials with tactical maps that show the most likely locations for narcotic crops.

  13. Muscarinic Receptor Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Matera, Maria Gabriella; Cazzola, Mario

    2017-01-01

    Parasympathetic activity is increased in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma and appears to be the major reversible component of airway obstruction. Therefore, treatment with muscarinic receptor antagonists is an effective bronchodilator therapy in COPD and also in asthmatic patients. In recent years, the accumulating evidence that the cholinergic system controls not only contraction by airway smooth muscle but also the functions of inflammatory cells and airway epithelial cells has suggested that muscarinic receptor antagonists could exert other effects that may be of clinical relevance when we must treat a patient suffering from COPD or asthma. There are currently six muscarinic receptor antagonists licenced for use in the treatment of COPD, the short-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (SAMAs) ipratropium bromide and oxitropium bromide and the long-acting muscarinic receptor antagonists (LAMAs) aclidinium bromide, tiotropium bromide, glycopyrronium bromide and umeclidinium bromide. Concerns have been raised about possible associations of muscarinic receptor antagonists with cardiovascular safety, but the most advanced compounds seem to have an improved safety profile. Further beneficial effects of SAMAs and LAMAs are seen when added to existing treatments, including LABAs, inhaled corticosteroids and phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors. The importance of tiotropium bromide in the maintenance treatment of COPD, and likely in asthma, has spurred further research to identify new LAMAs. There are a number of molecules that are being identified, but only few have reached the clinical development.

  14. Physiological and molecular effect assessment versus physico-chemistry based mode of action schemes: Daphnia magna exposed to narcotics and polar narcotics.

    PubMed

    Dom, Nathalie; Vergauwen, Lucia; Vandenbrouck, Tine; Jansen, Mieke; Blust, Ronny; Knapen, Dries

    2012-01-03

    Structural analogues are assumed to elicit toxicity via similar predominant modes of action (MOAs). Currently, MOA categorization of chemicals in environmental risk assessment is mainly based on the physicochemical properties of potential toxicants. It is often not known whether such classification schemes are also supported by mechanistic biological data. In this study, the toxic effects of two groups of structural analogues (alcohols and anilines) with predefined MOA (narcotics and polar narcotics) were investigated at different levels of biological organization (gene transcription, energy reserves, and growth). Chemical similarity was not indicative of a comparable degree of toxicity and a similar biological response. Categorization of the test chemicals based on the different biological responses (growth, energy use, and gene transcription) did not result in a classification of the predefined narcotics versus the predefined polar narcotics. Moreover, gene transcription based clustering profiles were indicative of the observed effects at higher level of biological organization. Furthermore, a small set of classifier genes could be identified that was discriminative for the clustering pattern. These classifier genes covaried with the organismal and physiological responses. Compared to the physico-chemistry based MOA classification, integrated biological multilevel effect assessment can provide the necessary MOA information that is crucial in high-quality environmental risk assessment. Our findings support the view that transcriptomics tools hold considerable promise to be used in biological response based mechanistic profiling of potential (eco)toxicants.

  15. [Dealing with (no longer) needed narcotics in the outpatient palliative care setting].

    PubMed

    Thöns, M; Flender, H J; Mertzlufft, F; Zenz, M

    2010-08-01

    For the provision of home care for dying patients the availability of potent pain medication is essential. The aim of this survey directed at community palliative care physicians was to assess and evaluate the current situation of provision and supply of pain medication in the community palliative care setting, including hospices and specialised palliative care teams. A total of 489 palliative care doctors were identified from registers held by the Practitioners Associations. These professionals received a letter requesting information about the provision of narcotics in ambulatory and community practice. The answers were evaluated and analysed with descriptive statistics. Of the 489 palliative care specialists, 208 (43%) responded. Almost all of the doctors (99%) considered the availability of a constant supply of narcotics as vital for their practice; 86.3% considered the service provided by public pharmacies as inadequate. Some incidents of flagrant mismanagement were reported. Only 11% of the doctors considered the transfer of narcotics from one patient to the other in hospices and retirement homes via a new narcotics prescription as practicable; 89% of the doctors judged this procedure to lack practicability. Despite the fact that the need for unrestricted opioid provision in specialised community palliative care is indisputable and recognised, the implementation is nevertheless hindered by a multitude of legal red tape. One solution to the problem would be the legalisation of emergency supplies of narcotics to be held by specialised facilities, such as hospices or specialised palliative care teams. This could, for instance, be implemented via the narcotics requisition form currently used for inpatient supplies in hospitals or for emergency services. Hospices and care homes must be enabled to receive their supplies directly without bureaucratic hindrance and without the need for renewed narcotic prescription.

  16. [Narcotics and illicit drug market. Status and 10-year development].

    PubMed

    Lindholst, Christian; Andreasen, Mette Findal; Kaa, Elisabet

    2008-01-07

    A description of the illicit drug market in Denmark's second largest city is provided based upon the prevalence of narcotics and illicitly sold medicals during the years 2002 and 2003. The changes on the illicit drug market are described by comparing the results to a similar study conducted ten years earlier. The study is comprised of 469 cases of seized material by Aarhus Police during the period January 1st 2002-December 31st 2003. Additional information relating to the 341 persons charged is also included in the study. Heroine, cocaine and amphetamine were seized in 31%, 30% and 28% of the cases, respectively, and comprise the most frequently encountered hard drugs on the market. The prevalence of cocaine in Aarhus Police District has increased more than tenfold during the past ten years. The purity of the three drugs decreased significantly during the same period, although large variations in the quality of drugs were observed. Medicals were found in 16% of the seizures (containing 32 different active substances). The most frequent group of medicals was benzodiazepines, which made up a total of 74% of the medicals in the study. Anabolic steroids, ecstasy and methamphetamine were each found in 4% of the seizures. Men with an average age of 29.1 years comprised 92% of the persons charged in the study. Persons with a foreign nationality comprised 15% of the charged, while 25% had a birthplace outside Denmark. The prevalence of stimulants especially cocaine have increased significantly during the past ten years. Meanwhile the purity of the drugs has decreased. The benzodiazepines are still the most frequent group of medicals on the illicit market.

  17. Moguisteine: a novel peripheral non-narcotic antitussive drug.

    PubMed Central

    Gallico, L.; Borghi, A.; Dalla Rosa, C.; Ceserani, R.; Tognella, S.

    1994-01-01

    1. The antitussive effects of moguisteine have been compared with codeine in several experimental models of cough in guinea-pigs and dogs. 2. Moguisteine and codeine dose-dependently (respective ED50 values are given in parentheses) inhibited cough induced in guinea-pigs by 7.5% citric acid aerosol (25.2 and 29.2 mg kg-1, p.o.), by 30 microM capsaicin aerosol (19.3 and 15.2 mg kg-1, p.o.), by mechanical stimulation (22.9 and 26.4 mg kg-1, p.o.) and by tracheal electrical stimulation (12.5 and 13.9 mg kg-1, p.o.). 3. Moguisteine was effective against cough induced by tracheal electrical stimulation in dogs (ED50 17.2 mg kg-1, p.o.); codeine was not tested because of its emetic effect. 4. After repeated dosing (12-15 days), moguisteine did not induce tolerance in either guinea-pigs or dogs. 5. Moguisteine did not interact with opiate receptors, since it did not show affinity for [3H]-naloxone binding sites and furthermore naloxone (5 mg kg-1, s.c.) did not antagonize its antitussive effects. 6. Moguisteine had no antitussive effect after i.c.v. administration (20 micrograms), whilst codeine (2-10 micrograms) and dextromethorphan (2.5-20 micrograms) were highly effective. 7. Our findings demonstrate that moguisteine is a novel peripherally acting non-narcotic antitussive agent, the mode of action of which remains to be elucidated fully. PMID:7921605

  18. CCR2 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Struthers, Mary; Pasternak, Alexander

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of CCR2 has been considered as a target for multiple therapeutic diseases including autoimmune disease, atherosclerosis, pain, and metabolic disease, based in part on the critical role this receptor plays on monocyte migration. Numerous companies have reported programs to identify CCR2 antagonists. Common challenges to the development of CCR2 agents have included poor activity at the rodent receptor and selectivity for both other chemokine receptors and ion channels. This review summarizes the rationale for targeting CCR2 in disease, the recent progress in the identification of potent and select CCR2 antagonists, and the current status of clinical trials for CCR2 agents.

  19. Early deviance and related risk factors in the children of narcotic addicts.

    PubMed

    Nurco, D N; Blatchley, R J; Hanlon, T E; O'Grady, K E

    1999-02-01

    This descriptive study examines the self-reported behaviors of 285 male and female adolescent children (ages 12-17) of narcotic addicts participating in methadone maintenance programs. These children responded to an extensive 2.5-hour interview questionnaire focusing on current and past activities, including criminal activities prior to age 12. The findings revealed that early deviance, assessed by self-report measures of both severity and variety, is related to current adolescent drug and alcohol use, association with deviant peers, a negative view of home atmosphere, and psychological symptomatology. These results are contrasted with the retrospective reports of adolescent behavior obtained from adult male narcotic addicts in a prior study of vulnerability to addiction. The comparability of study results is discussed in the context of developmental risk factors, prevention and treatment strategies, and other considerations specifically related to the development of children of narcotic addicts.

  20. Administering caudal anesthesia at completion of clubfoot surgery does not affect postoperative use of narcotics.

    PubMed

    Black, Molly D; Olney, Brad; Vitztum, Coley; Hassanein, Khatab

    2003-03-01

    In the pediatric population, control of postoperative pain is a challenging and important issue. We conducted this retrospective study to determine whether single-dose caudal anesthesia administered after club-foot surgery helps to decrease postoperative use of narcotics. Fifty-one patients given an injection of caudal anesthesia (bupivacaine) at completion of clubfoot surgery were compared with 41 patients who did not receive a caudal block. Postoperative pain control was assessed by recording how much narcotic was used by each patient during time in the recovery room and during the first 8 hours after surgery. Results show that a single dose of caudal anesthesia administered at completion of clubfoot surgery is not associated with a statistically significant change in use of narcotics during either postoperative period.

  1. 14 CFR 125.39 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 125.39 Section 125.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... AIRCRAFT Certification Rules and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.39 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana...

  2. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If a...

  3. 14 CFR 125.39 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 125.39 Section 125.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... AIRCRAFT Certification Rules and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.39 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana...

  4. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Certification Rules § 137.23 Carriage of narcotic...

  5. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If a...

  6. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  7. 21 CFR 1301.73 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding areas. 1301.73 Section 1301.73 Food... controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding...

  8. 14 CFR 135.41 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 135.41 Section 135.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT General § 135.41 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or...

  9. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If a...

  10. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Certification Rules § 137.23 Carriage of narcotic...

  11. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  12. 14 CFR 135.41 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 135.41 Section 135.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT General § 135.41 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or...

  13. 14 CFR 135.41 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 135.41 Section 135.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT General § 135.41 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or...

  14. 21 CFR 1301.73 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding areas. 1301.73 Section 1301.73 Food... controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding...

  15. 14 CFR 125.39 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 125.39 Section 125.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... AIRCRAFT Certification Rules and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.39 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana...

  16. 21 CFR 1301.73 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding areas. 1301.73 Section 1301.73 Food... controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding...

  17. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  18. 14 CFR 135.41 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 135.41 Section 135.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT General § 135.41 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or...

  19. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Certification Rules § 137.23 Carriage of narcotic...

  20. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If a...

  1. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a certificate...

  2. 14 CFR 125.39 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 125.39 Section 125.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... AIRCRAFT Certification Rules and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.39 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana...

  3. 21 CFR 1301.73 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding areas. 1301.73 Section 1301.73 Food... controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding...

  4. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Certification Rules § 137.23 Carriage of narcotic...

  5. 14 CFR 125.39 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 125.39 Section 125.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... AIRCRAFT Certification Rules and Miscellaneous Requirements § 125.39 Carriage of narcotic drugs,...

  6. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  7. 14 CFR 135.41 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 135.41 Section 135.41 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... PERSONS ON BOARD SUCH AIRCRAFT General § 135.41 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant...

  8. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or...

  9. 14 CFR 121.15 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 121.15 Section 121.15 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION....15 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If...

  10. 14 CFR 133.14 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 133.14 Section 133.14 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. If the holder of a...

  11. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances...

  12. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances...

  13. 14 CFR 141.18 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 141.18 Section 141.18 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION... General § 141.18 Carriage of narcotic drugs, marijuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances...

  14. 21 CFR 1312.30 - Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled... Controlled Substances § 1312.30 Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit. The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have...

  15. 21 CFR 1312.30 - Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled... Controlled Substances § 1312.30 Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit. The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have...

  16. 21 CFR 1312.30 - Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled... Controlled Substances § 1312.30 Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit. The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have...

  17. 21 CFR 1312.30 - Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled... Controlled Substances § 1312.30 Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit. The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have...

  18. 21 CFR 1312.30 - Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled... Controlled Substances § 1312.30 Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances requiring an import and export permit. The following Schedule III, IV, and V non-narcotic controlled substances have...

  19. Authority for practitioners to dispense or prescribe approved narcotic controlled substances for maintenance or detoxification treatment. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2005-06-23

    DEA is amending its regulations to allow qualified practitioners not otherwise registered as a narcotic treatment program to dispense and prescribe to narcotic dependent persons Schedule III, IV, and V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for use in maintenance or detoxification treatment. This Final Rule is in response to amendments to the Controlled Substances Act by the Drug Addiction Treatment Act of 2000 (DATA) that are designed to expand and improve treatment of narcotic addiction. This Final Rule is intended to accomplish the goals of DATA while preventing the diversion of Schedule III, IV, and V narcotic controlled drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration specifically for maintenance / detoxification treatment.

  20. Development of a portable preconcentrator/ion mobility spectrometer system for the trace detection of narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Parmeter, J.E.; Custer, C.A.

    1997-08-01

    This project was supported by LDRD funding for the development and preliminary testing of a portable narcotics detection system. The system developed combines a commercial trace detector known as an ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) with a preconcentrator originally designed by Department 5848 for the collection of explosives molecules. The detector and preconcentrator were combined along with all necessary accessories onto a push cart, thus yielding a fully portable detection unit. Preliminary testing with both explosives and narcotics molecules shown that the system is operational, and that it can successfully detect drugs as marijuana, methamphetamine (speed), and cocaine based on their characteristics IMS signatures.

  1. Transcultural use of narcotic water lilies in ancient Egyptian and Maya drug ritual.

    PubMed

    Emboden, W A

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons are made between ancient ritual uses of the flowers of Nymphaea (Nymphaeaceae) in Maya and Egyptian civilizations. Recurrent motifs encountered in the art of both of these ancient civilizations suggests that the role fo the water lily was that of a narcotic (psychodysleptic) used to mediate ecstasis among a priestly caste. Relevant literature is reviewed as are chemical data. Elements in the complex belief systems of these two civilizations need to be reinterpreted in view of the use of two water lilies as ritual narcotics. The species implicated are Nymphaea caerulea Sav., in Egypt, and N. ampla DC., among the Maya.

  2. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  3. Opioid Antagonist Impedes Exposure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merluzzi, Thomas V.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Thirty spider-phobic adults underwent exposure to 17 phobic-related, graded performance tests. Fifteen subjects were assigned to naltrexone, an opioid antagonist, and 15 were assigned to placebo. Naltrexone had a significant effect on exposure, with naltrexone subjects taking significantly longer to complete first 10 steps of exposure and with…

  4. Diabetics on Narcotics Are Less Likely to Achieve Excellent Bowel Preparation Than Are Patients with Either Condition.

    PubMed

    Madhoun, Mohammad F; Bitar, Hussein; Bhatti, Owais; Zia, Hassaan; Parava, Pratyusha; Bashir, Muhammad H

    2017-03-01

    Diabetes and chronic narcotic use negatively affect the quality of bowel preparation before colonoscopy. To investigate whether narcotic use and diabetes have an additive negative impact on bowel preparation. We performed a retrospective study of 2841 patients (mean age 61 ± 10.2; 94% male) who received outpatient colonoscopies at our Veterans Affairs Medical Center between June 2012 and December 2014. We collected information related to demographics, body mass index, indications, and medical/surgical history (diabetes mellitus, stroke, cirrhosis, dementia, constipation, hypothyroidism, and use of narcotics or antidepressants/anxiolytics for more than three months). Patients were classified into four groups: (1) diabetics on narcotics, (2) diabetics only, (3) on narcotics only, and (4) neither diabetic nor using narcotics. Quality of the bowel preparation was scored using the Boston Bowel Preparation Scale (BBPS) and categorized as either excellent (BBPS ≥7, with no individual segment scoring <2) or not excellent (BBPS <7). Multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify the combined impact of narcotic use and diabetes on bowel preparation. Bowel preparation quality was excellent in 49%. Thirty-eight percent of patients with diabetes who were using narcotics (adjusted OR 0.6, CI [0.4, 0.8]) achieved excellent bowel preparation compared with 44% (adjusted OR 0.7, CI [0.6, 0.9]) of patients on narcotics only, 48% (adjusted OR 0.8, CI [0.7, 0.9]) of diabetics only, and 54% of patients with neither condition. Concomitant narcotic use and diabetes have a compounding effect on the quality of bowel preparation prior to colonoscopy.

  5. AN ADDRESS DELIVERED BEFORE SCOPE'S CONFERENCE FOR EDUCATORS ON NARCOTICS AND SMOKING. (TITLE SUPPLIED).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    RICE, JULIUS T.

    A SHORT HISTORY OF NARCOTICS USAGE IS PRESENTED. THE TERM DRUG DEPENDENCE IS BEING SUBSTITUTED FOR DRUG ADDICTION AND DRUG HABITUATION. THE ADVANTAGES AND DISADVANTAGES OF VARIOUS ANTIDOTES FOR OPIATES ARE DESCRIBED. THE EFFECTS OF LSD AND MARIJUANA ON PHYSICAL AND MENTAL PROCESSES ARE DESCRIBED. THE USE OF LSD FOR MEDICAL PURPOSES IS DISCUSSED.…

  6. 31 CFR 91.8 - Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Alcoholic beverages, narcotics, hallucinogenic and dangerous drugs. 91.8 Section 91.8 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance REGULATIONS GOVERNING CONDUCT IN OR ON THE BUREAU OF THE MINT BUILDINGS AND GROUNDS § 91.8...

  7. Involvement in a Drug Subculture and Abstinence Following Treatment Among Puerto Rican Narcotic Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snarr, Richard W.; Ball, John C.

    The study investigated the life career of a sample of native Puerto Rican narcotic addicts who were treated at the Lexington, Kentucky Public Health Service Hospital. Specifically, it deals with the relationship between the addicts' involvement in a drug subculture and their subsequent drug use and abstinence. The hypothesis presented states that…

  8. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micklich, Bradley J.; Fink, Charles L.; Sagalovsky, Leonid

    1995-09-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutron is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: fast-neutron transmission spectroscopy (FNTS) and pulsed fast-neutron analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ration is greater than about 0.01. The Monte Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projections angles and modest (2 cm) reolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and the reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA technqiues are presented.

  9. Narcotics Abuse among Young People in the Northern Territories: Characteristics and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisimova, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    There is a persistent opinion that the spread of narcotics abuse is taking in more and more young people and having an impact on the economic, political, and cultural development of society. Data obtained by sociologists and criminologists make it possible to single out the factors, conditions, and channels of the spread of psychoactive substances…

  10. Birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Barclay, Kieron; Myrskylä, Mikko; Tynelius, Per; Berglind, Daniel; Rasmussen, Finn

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that birth order is an important predictor of later life health as well as socioeconomic attainment. In this study, we examine the relationship between birth order and hospitalization for alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. We study the relationship between birth order and hospitalization related to alcohol and narcotics use before and after the age of 20 using Swedish register data for cohorts born 1987-1994. We apply Cox proportional hazard models and use sibling fixed effects, eliminating confounding by factors shared by the siblings. Before age 20 we find that later born siblings are hospitalized for alcohol use at a higher rate than first-borns, and there is a monotonic increase in the hazard of hospitalization with increasing birth order. Second-borns are hospitalized at a rate 47% higher than first-borns, and third-borns at a rate 65% higher. Similar patterns are observed for hospitalization for narcotics use. After age 20 the pattern is similar, but the association is weaker. These patterns are consistent across various sibling group sizes. Later born siblings are more likely to be hospitalized for both alcohol and narcotics use in Sweden. These birth order effects are substantial in size, and larger than the estimated sex differences for the risk of hospitalization related to alcohol and drug use before age 20, and previous estimates for socioeconomic status differences in alcohol and drug abuse. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. Controlled fabrication of silver nanoneedles array for SERS and their application in rapid detection of narcotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Yong; Li, Zhi-Yuan; Yamaguchi, Kohei; Tanemura, Masaki; Huang, Zhengren; Jiang, Dongliang; Chen, Yuhui; Zhou, Fei; Nogami, Masayuki

    2012-03-01

    Novel surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrates with high SERS-activity are ideal for novel SERS sensors, detectors to detect illicitly sold narcotics and explosives. The key to the wider application of SERS technique is to develop plasmon resonant structure with novel geometries to enhance Raman signals and to control the periodic ordering of these structures over a large area to obtain reproducible Raman enhancement. In this work, a simple Ar+-ion sputtering route has been developed to fabricate silver nanoneedles arrays on silicon substrates for SERS-active substrates to detect trace-level illicitly sold narcotics. These silver nanoneedles possess a very sharp apex with an apex diameter of 15 nm and an apex angle of 20°. The SERS enhancement factor of greater than 1010 was reproducibly achieved by the well-aligned nanoneedles arrays. Furthermore, ketamine hydrochloride molecules, one kind of illicitly sold narcotics, can be detected down to 27 ppb by using our SERS substrate within 3 s, indicating the sensitivity of our SERS substrates for trace amounts of narcotics and that SERS technology can become an important analytical technique in forensic laboratories because it can provide a rapid and nondestructive method for trace detection.

  12. An ethnobotanical study of medicinal plants with narcotic, sedative and analgesic effects in west of Iran.

    PubMed

    Saki, K; Bahmani, M; Rafieianb-Kopaei, M D; Asadollahi, K; Emaneini, M; Taherikalani, M

    2016-01-01

    The first step for identification of medicinal plants and their therapeutic effects is to determine their use by local people, traditional medicine books and personal experiences. The aim of this study was to document the medicinal plants used as analgesic, sedative or narcotic agents by local residents of Dehloran, Iran. Interviews conducted with 53 informants (38 male and 15 female) revealed that a total of 32 medicinal plants belonging to 22 families are used in Dehloran as narcotic, sedative and analgesic agents. The most utilized plant families were Asteraceae, Rosaceae and Fabaceae. Approximately 74% of the utilized plants was attributed to herbs, followed by trees (13%) and shrubs (13%). Sixty-six percent of the medicinal plants used in the study area were perennial and the rest were annual or biannual. The most widely used plant parts were flowers (34%) followed by leaves (24%) and fruits (14%). Thirty-nine percent of the medicinal plants were used as sedatives, 39% as analgesics, and 24% as narcotics. Recommended plants in this study can be good candidates for further clinical and laboratory trials on diseases that are associated with pain, suffering, stress and depression. They also can be used to develop new sedative, narcotic and analgesic drugs.

  13. Reliability and Validity of Retrospective Behavioral Self-Report by Narcotics Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anglin, M. Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reliability and validity of self-reported behavior within a deviant population are examined using data from 2 interviews with 323 narcotics addicts conducted 10 years apart (1974-75 and 1985-86). Results complement existing reliability and validity studies of alcohol use, and suggest that quality information can be obtained from heroin users. (SLD)

  14. Feigning terminal illness to get narcotics: a cautionary tale for hospices.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez, Faustino; Galante, Mirta

    2012-08-01

    We present the case of a woman who enrolled in the hospice benefit in order to obtain narcotics. We believe this is a cautionary tale for hospices because of our propensity to enroll patients with minimal corroborating information, in order not to delay symptom management. Also we are philosophically predisposed to believe a patient's self-report of pain and other distressing symptoms.

  15. Patterns of rates of mortality from narcotics and cocaine overdose in Texas, 1976-87.

    PubMed Central

    Harlow, K C

    1990-01-01

    Drug overdose mortality data for narcotics and cocaine for Texas for 1976-87 reveal a cyclic pattern of narcotics mortality falling from 0.92 per 100,000 population in 1976 to a low of 0.13 in 1979, and rising to 0.62 in 1986. The data also show a sharp increase in cocaine mortality from 0.07 per 100,000 in 1983 to 0.38 in 1987. The data indicate that men consistently are at higher risk than women for overdose from both categories of drugs. Hispanics in the El Paso and San Antonio areas were found to have much higher risk of mortality from narcotics than expected, while blacks in the Houston and Dallas areas were at higher risk of cocaine mortality. The evidence suggests that narcotics and cocaine mortality is highest among the blue collar categories of the work force. The cyclical pattern of drug overdose mortality suggests the need for more examination of the historical interplay of public policies and social factors against the magnitude of the drug problems. The differences in mortality patterns by sex, ethnicity, and location indicate the need to develop policies and programs that address the unique characteristics of different at-risk populations. PMID:2120721

  16. Transport simulation and image reconstruction for fast-neutron detection of explosives and narcotics

    SciTech Connect

    Micklich, B.J.; Fink, C.L.; Sagalovsky, L.

    1995-07-01

    Fast-neutron inspection techniques show considerable promise for explosive and narcotics detection. A key advantage of using fast neutrons is their sensitivity to low-Z elements (carbon, nitrogen, and oxygen), which are the primary constituents of these materials. We are currently investigating two interrogation methods in detail: Fast-Neutron Transmission Spectroscopy (FNTS) and Pulsed Fast-Neutron Analysis (PFNA). FNTS is being studied for explosives and narcotics detection in luggage and small containers for which the transmission ratio is greater than about 0.01. The Monte-Carlo radiation transport code MCNP is being used to simulate neutron transmission through a series of phantoms for a few (3-5) projection angles and modest (2 cm) resolution. Areal densities along projection rays are unfolded from the transmission data. Elemental abundances are obtained for individual voxels by tomographic reconstruction, and these reconstructed elemental images are combined to provide indications of the presence or absence of explosives or narcotics. PFNA techniques are being investigated for detection of narcotics in cargo containers because of the good penetration of the fast neutrons and the low attenuation of the resulting high-energy gamma-ray signatures. Analytic models and Monte-Carlo simulations are being used to explore the range of capabilities of PFNA techniques and to provide insight into systems engineering issues. Results of studies from both FNTS and PFNA techniques are presented.

  17. [A possible molecular mechanism of the narcotic action of noble gases].

    PubMed

    Dovgusha, V V; Fok, M V; Zaritskaia, G A

    2005-01-01

    A molecular mechanism of the narcotic action of noble gases is suggested, which is based on the fact that noble gas atoms change the orientation of water molecules absorbed on the surface of axon membrane. The resulting change in the transmembrane potential deteriorates the propagation of nerve pulse.

  18. Reliability and Validity of Retrospective Behavioral Self-Report by Narcotics Addicts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anglin, M. Douglas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Reliability and validity of self-reported behavior within a deviant population are examined using data from 2 interviews with 323 narcotics addicts conducted 10 years apart (1974-75 and 1985-86). Results complement existing reliability and validity studies of alcohol use, and suggest that quality information can be obtained from heroin users. (SLD)

  19. Dispositional, Ecological and Biological Influences on Adolescent Tranquilizer, Ritalin, and Narcotics Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleary, Sasha A.; Heffer, Robert W.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two of the three sources of risk-taking--dispositional and ecological--in adolescence and demographic variables were related to Ritalin, tranquilizer and narcotics misuse. The secondary aim of this study was to distinguish subgroups of Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics…

  20. Understanding the Role of Storytelling in the Transformation of Female Cocaine Addicts in Narcotics Anonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventresca, Melissa Weida

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the role of storytelling in the transformation of female cocaine addicts in Narcotics Anonymous. For this research the primary investigator utilized a theoretical orientation of transformative learning theory and storytelling. The rationale for employing transformative learning theory is that…

  1. Narcotics Abuse among Young People in the Northern Territories: Characteristics and Prevention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anisimova, S. G.

    2012-01-01

    There is a persistent opinion that the spread of narcotics abuse is taking in more and more young people and having an impact on the economic, political, and cultural development of society. Data obtained by sociologists and criminologists make it possible to single out the factors, conditions, and channels of the spread of psychoactive substances…

  2. Understanding the Role of Storytelling in the Transformation of Female Cocaine Addicts in Narcotics Anonymous

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ventresca, Melissa Weida

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to understand the role of storytelling in the transformation of female cocaine addicts in Narcotics Anonymous. For this research the primary investigator utilized a theoretical orientation of transformative learning theory and storytelling. The rationale for employing transformative learning theory is that…

  3. Dispositional, Ecological and Biological Influences on Adolescent Tranquilizer, Ritalin, and Narcotics Misuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleary, Sasha A.; Heffer, Robert W.; McKyer, E. Lisako J.

    2011-01-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to examine the extent to which two of the three sources of risk-taking--dispositional and ecological--in adolescence and demographic variables were related to Ritalin, tranquilizer and narcotics misuse. The secondary aim of this study was to distinguish subgroups of Ritalin, tranquilizer, and narcotics…

  4. Advantages of an antagonist: bicuculline and other GABA antagonists

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, Graham AR

    2013-01-01

    The convulsant alkaloid bicuculline continues to be investigated more than 40 years after the first publication of its action as an antagonist of receptors for the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. This historical perspective highlights key aspects of the discovery of bicuculline as a GABA antagonist and the sustained interest in this and other GABA antagonists. The exciting advances in the molecular biology, pharmacology and physiology of GABA receptors provide a continuing stimulus for the discovery of new antagonists with increasing selectivity for the myriad of GABA receptor subclasses. Interesting GABA antagonists not structurally related to bicuculline include gabazine, salicylidene salicylhydrazide, RU5135 and 4-(3-biphenyl-5-(4-piperidyl)-3-isoxazole. Bicuculline became the benchmark antagonist for what became known as GABAA receptors, but not all ionotropic GABA receptors are susceptible to bicuculline. In addition, not all GABAA receptor antagonists are convulsants. Thus there are still surprises in store as the study of GABA receptors evolves. PMID:23425285

  5. Indications for Opioid Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Coppes, O J Michael; Sang, Christine N

    2017-06-01

    As opioids have become more common in clinical practice for the treatment of both acute and chronic pain, so too has the need for a deeper understanding of the clinical applications of opioid antagonists. The purpose of this review is to present both the longstanding and potential new indications for the use of drugs that block the effects of opioid receptors. There is a growing body of data demonstrating the modulation of pain by opioid antagonists. Additional clinical studies that show their direct antinociceptive effects and/or enhancement of the analgesic potency of opioid agonists are warranted. We briefly discuss the well-established role that these agents play in the reversal of life-threatening opioid toxicity and explore both existing and expanding clinical applications, including their apparent paradox that they may themselves be associated with analgesia.

  6. alpha2-Adrenoreceptor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Mayer, P; Imbert, T

    2001-06-01

    A review of the literature relating to the therapeutic potential of alpha2-adrenoceptor antagonists published between 1990 and 2000 is presented. Although extensively studied since the early 1970s in a wide spectrum of therapeutic applications, the distinction of alpha2-adrenoceptor subtypes and some emerging evidence concerning new applications in neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases, obesity and schizophrenia, have refreshed an interest in this class of agents.

  7. Calcium antagonists and vasospasm.

    PubMed

    Meyer, F B

    1990-04-01

    A critical review of the clinical data supports the conclusion that nimodipine decreases the severity of neurologic deficits and improves outcome after subarachnoid hemorrhage. The mechanisms by which mortality and morbidity are reduced are still controversial. First, the frequency of vasospasm is not altered (Figs. 5 and 6). Second, the consistent reversal of vasospasm once present has not been demonstrated either angiographically or by noninvasive cerebral blood flow studies. These observations suggest that there is either modification of microcirculatory flow (i.e., dilation of pial conducting vessels or decreased platelet aggregation) or a direct neuronal protective effect. As suggested previously, support for either mechanism is not resolute, and further investigation is necessary. Currently, nimodipine has been the most thoroughly investigated calcium antagonist both from an experimental and clinical perspective. Oral administration has had few reported complications. Therefore, the benefit/risk ratio clearly supports the prophylactic use of this calcium antagonist in patients of all clinical grades after subarachnoid hemorrhage. Evidence also indicates that starting nimodipine after the onset of delayed ischemic deficits is of benefit. Finally, it can be predicted that in the future additional calcium antagonists with more selective vascular or neuronal effects will be developed for use in neurologic disorders.

  8. Narcotic Use and Postoperative Doctor Shopping by Patients with Nephrolithiasis Requiring Operative Intervention: Implications for Patient Safety.

    PubMed

    Kappa, Stephen F; Green, Elizabeth A; Miller, Nicole L; Herrell, Stanley D; Mitchell, Christopher R; Mir, Hassan R; Resnick, Matthew J

    2016-09-01

    We sought to determine perioperative patterns of narcotic use and the prevalence of postoperative doctor shopping among patients with nephrolithiasis requiring operative management. We retrospectively reviewed the records of consecutive patients residing in Tennessee who required ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy for nephrolithiasis at a single institution from January to December 2013. Using the Tennessee CSMD (Controlled Substances Medication Database) patients were categorized by the number of postoperative narcotic providers. Doctor shopping behavior was identified as any patient seeking more than 1 narcotic provider within 3 months of surgery. Demographic and clinical characteristics associated with doctor shopping behavior were identified. During the study period 200 eligible patients underwent ureteroscopy with laser lithotripsy for nephrolithiasis, of whom 48 (24%) were prescribed narcotics by more than 1 provider after surgery. Compared to those receiving narcotics from a single provider, patients with multiple narcotic providers were younger (48.1 vs 54.2 years, p <0.001), less educated (high school education or less in 83.3% vs 58.7%, p = 0.014), more likely to have a history of mental illness (37.5% vs 16%, p <0.01) and more likely to have undergone prior stone procedures (66% vs 42%, p <0.01). Additionally, these patients demonstrated more frequent preoperative narcotic use (87.5% vs 63.2%), longer postoperative narcotic use (39.1 vs 6.0 days) and a higher morphine equivalent dose per prescription (44.7 vs 35.2 dose per day, each p <0.001). Postoperative doctor shopping is common among patients with nephrolithiasis who require operative management. Urologists should be aware of available registry data to decrease the likelihood of redundant narcotic prescribing. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A four year survey of neonatal narcotic withdrawal: evaluation and treatment.

    PubMed

    Lifshitz, M; Gavrilov, V; Galil, A; Landau, D

    2001-01-01

    Narcotic abuse has steadily become more prevalent in Israel and may result in an increasing number of children exposed prenatally to narcotics, with a consequent increase in the number of infants born with neonatal abstinence syndrome. To report our experience with infants born to narcotic-addicted women between the years 1995 and 1998 at the Soroka University Medical Center. The medical records of 24 newborns and their drug-addicted mothers admitted to our Medical Center for parturition were analyzed retrospectively. A diagnosis of NAS was established on the basis of the clinical presentation and anamnesis. The Finnegan Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System was used to assess drug withdrawal. Urine toxicological analysis for narcotics was done only for the year 1998. Of the 24 newborn infants exposed prenatally to narcotics 23 (96%) developed NAS, and 78% (18 of the 23) had a Finnegan score of 8 or more. These 18 infants were treated pharmacologically (tincture of opium and/or phenobarbital) until the score was reduced to less than 8, after which they received supportive treatment. In one child who became lethargic after the first dose of tincture of opium, the medication was stopped and supportive treatment alone was given. Four of the five neonates with scores of 7 and less were given supportive treatment. One of five infants who had a low Finnegan score at birth nevertheless received pharmacological therapy to prevent further deterioration of his physical state since he was born with severe dyspnea. Ten of the 24 children (42%) were followed for lengths of time ranging from 6 to 22 months after discharge, all of whom showed normal development. About three-quarters of newborns exhibiting withdrawal syndrome required pharmacological therapy. Previous information on maternal drug abuse is a crucial criterion for early detection and treatment.

  10. Personality Disorders, Narcotics, and Stimulants; Relationship in Iranian Male Substance Dependents Population

    PubMed Central

    Noorbakhsh, Simasadat; Zeinodini, Zahra; Khanjani, Zeynab; Poorsharifi, Hamid; Rajezi Esfahani, Sepideh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Individuals with certain personality disorders, especially the antisocial and borderline personality disorders, are more prone to substance use disorders. Objectives: Regarding the importance of substance use disorders, this study aimed to explore the association between personality disorders and types of used drugs (narcotics and stimulants) in Iranian male substance users. Patients and Methods: The current study was a correlation study. We evaluated 285 male substance users and excluded 25 according to exclusion criteria. A total of 130 narcotic users and 130 stimulant users were recruited randomly in several phases from January 2013 to October 2013. All participants were referred to Substance Dependency Treatment Clinics in Tehran, Iran. Data collection process was accomplished by means of clinical interview based on DSM-V criteria for substance use disorders, Iranian version of addiction severity index (ASI), and Millon clinical multi-axial inventory-III (MCMI-III). Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression, the. Results: There was a significant correlation between stimulant use and histrionic personality disorder (P < 0.001) and antisocial and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between avoidant, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05) and depressed, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders (P < 0.001) with narcotics consumption were significant. In clusters, there was a significant correlation between cluster B personality disorders, and narcotic and stimulants consumption (P < 0.001). In addition, this association was explored between cluster C personality disorder and narcotics (P < 0.001). Conclusions: The results of this study in terms of personality disorders and types of used drugs were in accordance with the previous studies results. It is necessary to design appropriate treatment plans for medical treatment of those with personality

  11. Personality Disorders, Narcotics, and Stimulants; Relationship in Iranian Male Substance Dependents Population.

    PubMed

    Noorbakhsh, Simasadat; Zeinodini, Zahra; Khanjani, Zeynab; Poorsharifi, Hamid; Rajezi Esfahani, Sepideh

    2015-06-01

    Individuals with certain personality disorders, especially the antisocial and borderline personality disorders, are more prone to substance use disorders. Regarding the importance of substance use disorders, this study aimed to explore the association between personality disorders and types of used drugs (narcotics and stimulants) in Iranian male substance users. The current study was a correlation study. We evaluated 285 male substance users and excluded 25 according to exclusion criteria. A total of 130 narcotic users and 130 stimulant users were recruited randomly in several phases from January 2013 to October 2013. All participants were referred to Substance Dependency Treatment Clinics in Tehran, Iran. Data collection process was accomplished by means of clinical interview based on DSM-V criteria for substance use disorders, Iranian version of addiction severity index (ASI), and Millon clinical multi-axial inventory-III (MCMI-III). Data were analyzed by SPSS 21 using Pearson correlation coefficient and regression, the. There was a significant correlation between stimulant use and histrionic personality disorder (P < 0.001) and antisocial and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05). In addition, correlation between avoidant, histrionic, and narcissistic personality disorders (P < 0.05) and depressed, antisocial, and borderline personality disorders (P < 0.001) with narcotics consumption were significant. In clusters, there was a significant correlation between cluster B personality disorders, and narcotic and stimulants consumption (P < 0.001). In addition, this association was explored between cluster C personality disorder and narcotics (P < 0.001). The results of this study in terms of personality disorders and types of used drugs were in accordance with the previous studies results. It is necessary to design appropriate treatment plans for medical treatment of those with personality disorders.

  12. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    PubMed

    Naeem, Mohammed; Al Alem, Hala; Al Shehri, Ali; Al-Jeraisy, Majed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM) is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT). Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2-14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p = 0.127). Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435.

  13. Effect of N-Methyl-D-Aspartate Receptor Antagonist Dextromethorphan on Opioid Analgesia in Pediatric Intensive Care Unit

    PubMed Central

    Al Alem, Hala; Al Shehri, Ali; Al-Jeraisy, Majed

    2016-01-01

    Objective. Pain control is an essential goal in the management of critical children. Narcotics are the mainstay for pain control. Patients frequently need escalating doses of narcotics. In such cases an adjunctive therapy may be beneficial. Dextromethorphan (DM) is NMDA receptor antagonist and may prevent tolerance to narcotics; however, its definitive role is still unclear. We sought whether dextromethorphan addition could decrease the requirements of fentanyl to control pain in critical children. Design. Double-blind, randomized control trial (RCT). Setting. Pediatric multidisciplinary ICU in tertiary care center. Patients. Thirty-six pediatric patients 2–14 years of age in a multidisciplinary PICU requiring analgesia were randomized into dextromethorphan and placebo. The subjects in both groups showed similarity in most of the characteristics. Interventions. Subjects while receiving fentanyl for pain control received dextromethorphan or placebo through nasogastric/orogastric tubes for 96 hours. Pain was assessed using FLACC and faces scales. Measurements and Main Results. This study found no statistical significant difference in fentanyl requirements between subjects receiving dextromethorphan and those receiving placebo (p = 0.127). Conclusions. Dextromethorphan has no effect on opioid requirement for control of acute pain in children admitted with acute critical care illness in PICU. The registration number for this trial is NCT01553435. PMID:27867308

  14. Association of Preoperative Narcotic Use With Postoperative Complications and Prolonged Length of Hospital Stay in Patients With Crohn Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Yi; Stocchi, Luca; Cherla, Deepa; Liu, Xiaobo; Remzi, Feza H

    2016-08-01

    The use of narcotics among patients with Crohn disease (CD) is endemic. To evaluate the association between preoperative use of narcotics and postoperative outcomes in patients with CD. Patients undergoing abdominal surgery for CD at a tertiary referral center between January 1998 and June 2014 were identified from an institutional prospectively maintained CD database. Primary end points were overall morbidity, postoperative hospital length of stay, and readmission. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to assess possible associations between postoperative outcomes and demographic and clinical variables, including preoperative narcotic use. Of the 1331 patients included, the mean age for patients who had at least 1 pharmacy claim for narcotics within 1 month before surgery was 41.5 years and 41.1 years for patients without a pharmacy claim. Of 1461 abdominal operations for CD, 267 (18.3%) were performed on patients receiving preoperative narcotics. Patients receiving narcotics were more likely to have a current smoking habit (P < .001) with perianal disease (P = .046) and undergoing treatment with biologics (P = .04). Patients with preoperative narcotic use had a longer mean (SD) length of stay (11.2 [8.9] vs 7.7 [5.5]; P < .001) and were more likely to develop postoperative complications (52.8% vs 40.8%; P < .001). Multivariable analysis indicated that preoperative narcotic use was the only independent risk factor associated with both postoperative morbidity (odds ratio = 1.36; 95% CI = 1.02-1.82; P = .04) and prolonged hospital stay (estimate = 2.91; SE = 0.44; P < .001). Subgroup analysis indicated that outpatient narcotic users had increased incidence of adverse postoperative outcomes compared with inpatient-only narcotic users. Preoperative use of narcotics in patients undergoing abdominal surgery for CD is associated with worse postoperative outcomes. Before starting regular narcotic use, patients with

  15. Tetrahydroindolizinone NK1 antagonists.

    PubMed

    Bao, Jianming; Lu, Huagang; Morriello, Gregori J; Carlson, Emma J; Wheeldon, Alan; Chicchi, Gary G; Kurtz, Marc M; Tsao, Kwei-Lan C; Zheng, Song; Tong, Xinchun; Mills, Sander G; DeVita, Robert J

    2010-04-01

    A new class of potent NK(1) receptor antagonists with a tetrahydroindolizinone core has been identified. This series of compounds demonstrated improved functional activities as compared to previously identified 5,5-fused pyrrolidine lead structures. SAR at the 7-position of the tetrahydroindolizinone core is discussed in detail. A number of compounds displayed high NK(1) receptor occupancy at both 1 h and 24 h in a gerbil foot tapping model. Compound 40 has high NK(1) binding affinity, good selectivity for other NK receptors and promising in vivo properties. It also has clean P(450) inhibition and hPXR induction profiles. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Clinical features and outcome of patients with inflammatory bowel disease who use narcotics: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Karen A; Loftus, Edward V; Harmsen, W Scott; Diehl, Nancy N; Zinsmeister, Alan R; Sandborn, William J

    2009-05-01

    The role of narcotic use in patients with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is poorly defined. We sought to determine the clinical features of patients with IBD who use narcotics and factors associated with the discontinuation of narcotics. A centralized index was used to identify 100 cases (patients with IBD receiving narcotics) and 100 matched controls evaluated in an IBD clinic between 1999 and 2002. Associations of clinical factors with case or control status were summarized as overall percentages and assessed using conditional logistic regression. Associations within cases were assessed using Fisher's exact test. Review of 361 charts identified 100 patients with IBD receiving narcotics (cases). One hundred matched controls were then identified. Cases were significantly associated with: female gender (64% cases versus 45% controls, P = 0.01), >or=2 IBD-related surgeries (42% versus 17%, P < 0.001), moderate-to-severe pain (93% versus 20%, P < 0.001), and moderate-to-severe symptoms (83% versus 33%, P < 0.001). Significant associations were detected for depression (42% versus 19%, P < 0.001), anxiety (19% versus 7%, P = 0.02), history of abuse (sexual, emotional, or physical, 17% versus 3%, P = 0.006), and for substance abuse (excluding alcohol) (14% versus 1%, P = 0.01). Of 39 cases that returned for follow-up, 22 (56%) had discontinued narcotics. Discontinuing narcotics was associated with medical treatment adherence (100% versus 53%), none-to-mild pain (73% versus 18%), and none-to-mild clinical activity (80% versus 24%). Narcotic use in IBD patients is associated with female gender, >or=2 previous surgeries, moderate to severe pain, and clinical disease activity, depression, anxiety, sexual, emotional and physical abuse, and substance abuse.

  17. Effect of Structured Teaching Programme on Levels of Knowledge regarding Narcotic Policy among Staff Nurses in Selected Hospitals of Bangalore.

    PubMed

    Swapna, Mary A; Parvathy, Mohan

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to determine the level of knowledge among staff nurses on Narcotic policy and ascertain their knowledge by structured teaching programme with pre-test, post-test method The study attempted to assess the knowledge on Narcotic policy among staff nurses before and after structured teaching programme; evaluate the effectiveness of structured teaching programme on narcotic policy among staff nurses; and to find out the association between post level of knowledge among staff nurses on narcotic policy and selected demographic variables. A quasi-experimental study was carried out with 60 staff nurses from BGS & Jeevani Sarvodaya Hospital, Bangalore. A structured knowledge questionnaire was used to evaluate the knowledge level on narcotic policy before & after an STP. Data were analysed with chi-square and t test. The result showed that there was a significant difference between pre-test and post-test knowledge scores as assessed by the paired t-test value at 36.766 (HS p = 0.001). There was significant association between knowledge and the selected demographic variables (age, area of experience and years of experience (p ≤ 0.05). Thus for this study one can conclude that STP could be an effective strategy to improve the knowledge of staff nurses on narcotic policy.

  18. Discovery of Some Piperine-Based Phenylsulfonylhydrazone Derivatives as Potent Botanically Narcotic Agents

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Huan; Lv, Min; Yu, Xiang; Lian, Xihong; Xu, Hui

    2015-01-01

    By structural modification of piperine, some piperine-based phenylsulfonylhydrazone derivatives exhibited an unprecedented and potent narcotic activity against the oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata (Walker). The ND50 values of compounds 6c and 6e against the third-instar larvae of M. separata, which were more potent than those of wilfortrine and wilforgine, were 0.0074 μmol (after 3.5 h), and 0.0075 μmol (after 7 h) per larvae, respectively. By transmission electron microscope, it demonstrated that mitochondria were vacuolated and swollen in the ganglion cell of M. separata after treatment with 6c. More importantly, 6c selectively displayed the inhibition activity on acetylcholine esterase (AchE) of M. separata. This work paved the way for further studying the insecticidal mechanism of 6c as a new and promising botanical narcotic agent. PMID:26268805

  19. Withdrawal after narcotic therapy: a survey of neonatal and pediatric clinicians.

    PubMed

    Scott, C S; Decker, J L; Edwards, M L; Freid, E B

    1998-01-01

    Pharmacists at the 1995 American College of Clinical Pharmacy Pediatric Practice and Research Network meeting volunteered to act as coordinators at their sites and survey pediatric and neonatal nurses, pharmacists, and physicians regarding dependency in neonatal and pediatric patients after therapeutic administration of narcotics. Thirteen (60%) of 21 coordinators returned 244 surveys. Primary symptoms of withdrawal reported by clinicians were agitation (100%), irritability (100%), inconsolability (100%), crying (99%), tremors (98%), high heart rate (98%), fidgets (98%), high blood pressure (97%), less sleep (96%), and sweating (94%). Most clinicians considered narcotic withdrawal to be a problem (74%) that should be treated (87%). A dependency scale is being developed and will include symptoms reported by more than 75% of respondents.

  20. Comparison of preparation and narcotic-sedative premedication in children undergoing surgery.

    PubMed

    Mansson, M E; Fredrikzon, B; Rosberg, B

    1992-01-01

    A psychological preparation program was developed for use prior to emergency surgery in children. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that provision of specific information prior to an emergency operation would reduce the need for premedication to control anxiety and stress. Children were randomly assigned to either a verbally prepared group given narcotic-sedative premedication (control) or to a psychologically prepared group given only atropine as premedication. The child and parent rated their own anxiety on a Visual Analogue Scale (VAS). The children and parents were also assessed by a nurse preoperatively and postoperatively using a similar scale. The children's pulse, blood pressure, and cortisol were also measured. The results showed no significant difference between the psychologically prepared group and the premedicated group, suggesting that psychological preparation compares favorably with narcotic-sedative premedication.

  1. Narcotic Drug Use Among Patients with Lower Back Pain in Employer Health Plans: A Retrospective Analysis of Risk Factors and Health Care Services

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, YongJoo; Taitel, Michael S.; Walker, David R.; Lau, Denys T.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: This study examines the risk factors of narcotic drug use, medical and pharmacy claim costs, and health services use among lower back pain (LBP) patients who use narcotic medications. Methods: This retrospective study used administrative claims data between September 2002 and March 2004 from 3 employer health plans that collectively contained records of 165,569 employees 18 to 64 years of age. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine risk factors and health care services use consequences of narcotic drug use in patients with LBR Results: The study sample included 13,760 patients with LBP due to mechanical causes. Nearly 60% were female and the average age was 47 years. Almost half of the patients with LBP (45%) used narcotic drugs. Narcotic-using patients with LBP had significantly higher rates of comorbid conditions than patients with LBP not using narcotic drugs; hypertension (23% vs 13%), arthritis (14% vs 4%), depression (10% vs 5%), anxiety (6% vs 3%), and cancer (2% vs 1%) (P < 0.001). Patients with LBP with 2 identified psychological comorbid conditions, depression and anxiety, on average used more narcotic medications. Patients with LBP who had surgery were significantly more likely to use narcotic drugs within 1 week of procedure than those patients without surgery (P < 0.001). In contrast, patients with LBP who had chiropractic services for LBP were less likely to take narcotic drugs within 7 days after services compared to those without chiropractic services (P < 0.001). Furthermore, controlling for health conditions, patients with LBP who took narcotic medications were significantly more likely than patients not taking narcotics to have an emergency room visit within 30 days after the initial narcotic drug prescription dates (P < 0.001). Narcotic-using patients with LBP accounted for 62% of health care costs among all patients with LBP. The average monthly health care cost for a narcotic-using LBP patient was $1222, compared

  2. Narcotic drug use among patients with lower back pain in employer health plans: a retrospective analysis of risk factors and health care services.

    PubMed

    Rhee, YongJoo; Taitel, Michael S; Walker, David R; Lau, Denys T

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the risk factors of narcotic drug use, medical and pharmacy claim costs, and health services use among lower back pain (LBP) patients who use narcotic medications. This retrospective study used administrative claims data between September 2002 and March 2004 from 3 employer health plans that collectively contained records of 165,569 employees 18 to 64 years of age. Multivariate regression analyses were performed to examine risk factors and health care services use consequences of narcotic drug use in patients with LBP. The study sample included 13,760 patients with LBP due to mechanical causes. Nearly 60% were female and the average age was 47 years. Almost half of the patients with LBP (45%) used narcotic drugs. Narcotic-using patients with LBP had significantly higher rates of comorbid conditions than patients with LBP not using narcotic drugs; hypertension (23% vs 13%), arthritis (14% vs 4%), depression (10% vs 5%), anxiety (6% vs 3%), and cancer (2% vs 1%) (P<0.001). Patients with LBP with 2 identified psychological comorbid conditions, depression and anxiety, on average used more narcotic medications. Patients with LBP who had surgery were significantly more likely to use narcotic drugs within 1 week of procedure than those patients without surgery (P<0.001). In contrast, patients with LBP who had chiropractic services for LBP were less likely to take narcotic drugs within 7 days after services compared to those without chiropractic services (P<0.001). Furthermore, controlling for health conditions, patients with LBP who took narcotic medications were significantly more likely than patients not taking narcotics to have an emergency room visit within 30 days after the initial narcotic drug prescription dates (P<0.001). Narcotic-using patients with LBP accounted for 62% of health care costs among all patients with LBP. The average monthly health care cost for a narcotic-using LBP patient was $1222, compared to $430 for a LBP patient not using

  3. Experience in the use of hyperspectral data for the detection of vegetation containing narcotic substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sedelnikov, V. P.; Lukashevich, E. L.; Karpukhina, O. A.

    2014-12-01

    This paper provides the characteristics of an experimental sample of a hyperspectral videospectrometer Sokol-SCP and presents examples of the hyperspectral data received as a result of flight tests. The results of the detection of vegetation containing narcotic substances by spectral attributes using the obtained hyperspectral information are considered. The opportunity for using the hyperspectral data for detection of cannabis and papaver sites, including those in mixed crops with masking vegetation, is confirmed.

  4. Inhibition of ganglionic transmission by narcotic analgesics; an effect antagonized by naloxone, nalorphine and calcium.

    PubMed

    Minker, E; Végh, A; Blazsó, G

    1981-01-01

    Methadone, azidomorphine, oxycodone and fentanyl inhibit synaptic transmission in isolated sympathetic ganglia of the frog and rat, just as did morphine and pethidine in our previous investigations. This inhibitory effect can be antagonized not only by naloxone and nalorphine but also by increasing calcium concentration of the perfusion fluid of the ganglia. The inhibitory effect on transmission of narcotic analgesics takes place on specific opiate receptors of the peripheral ganglia.

  5. Qualitative analysis using Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics: a comprehensive model system for narcotics analysis.

    PubMed

    O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Ryder, Alan G; Leger, Marc N; Howley, Tom

    2010-10-01

    The rapid, on-site identification of illicit narcotics, such as cocaine, is hindered by the diverse nature of the samples, which can contain a large variety of materials in a wide concentration range. This sample variance has a very strong influence on the analytical methodologies that can be utilized and in general prevents the widespread use of quantitative analysis of illicit narcotics on a routine basis. Raman spectroscopy, coupled with chemometric methods, can be used for in situ qualitative and quantitative analysis of illicit narcotics; however, careful consideration must be given to dealing with the extensive variety of sample types. To assess the efficacy of combining Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics for the identification of a target analyte under real-world conditions, a large-scale model sample system (633 samples) using a target (acetaminophen) mixed with a wide variety of excipients was created. Materials that exhibit problematic factors such as fluorescence, variable Raman scattering intensities, and extensive peak overlap were included to challenge the efficacy of chemometric data preprocessing and classification methods. In contrast to spectral matching analyte identification approaches, we have taken a chemometric classification model-based approach to account for the wide variances in spectral data. The first derivative of the Raman spectra from the fingerprint region (750-1900 cm(-1)) yielded the best classifications. Using a robust segmented cross-validation method, correct classification rates of better than ∼90% could be attained with regression-based classification, compared to ∼35% for SIMCA. This study demonstrates that even with very high degrees of sample variance, as evidenced by dramatic changes in Raman spectra, it is possible to obtain reasonably reliable identification using a combination of Raman spectroscopy and chemometrics. The model sample set can now be used to validate more advanced chemometric or machine learning

  6. Regime change: re-visiting the 1961 Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs.

    PubMed

    Bewley-Taylor, David; Jelsma, Martin

    2012-01-01

    March 2011 marked the 50th anniversary of the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs. This legal instrument, the bedrock of the current United Nations based global drug control regime, is often viewed as merely a consolidating treaty bringing together the multilateral drug control agreements that preceded it; an erroneous position that does little to provide historical context for contemporary discussions surrounding revision of the international treaty system. This article applies both historical and international relations perspectives to revisit the development of the Convention. Framing discussion within the context of regime theory, a critique of the foundational pre-1961 treaties is followed by detailed content analysis of the official records of the United Nations conference for the adoption of a Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs and, mindful of later treaties, an examination of the treaty's status as a 'single' convention. The Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs represents a significant break with the regulative focus of the preceding multilateral treaties; a shift towards a more prohibitive outlook that within international relations terms can be regarded as a change of regime rather than the straightforward codification of earlier instruments. In this respect, the article highlights the abolition of drug use that for centuries had been embedded in the social, cultural and religious traditions of many non-Western states. Further, although often-overlooked, the Convention has failed in its aim of being the 'single' instrument within international drug control. The supplementing treaties developed in later years and under different socio-economic and political circumstances have resulted in significant inconsistencies within the control regime. Having established that a shift in normative focus has taken place in the past, the article concludes that it is timely for the international community to revisit the Single Convention on Narcotic Drugs with a view to

  7. A Rare Case of Adult Onset Intussusception Complicated By Narcotic Dependence

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saira J; Desmarais, Ashley M; Joseph, Bellal

    2017-01-01

    This report describes a rare case of adult intussusception in a patient with a history of a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure; complicated by a history of narcotic abuse, methadone dependence, and methamphetamine abuse. Adult patients who have undergone a Roux-en-Y gastric bypass procedure may be at an increased risk of developing intussusception, and clinicians involved in their care should be aware of this potential complication. PMID:28191368

  8. Narcotic and benzodiazepine use after withdrawal of life support: association with time to death?

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeannie D; Treece, Patsy D; Engelberg, Ruth A; Crowley, Lauren; Rubenfeld, Gordon D; Steinberg, Kenneth P; Curtis, J Randall

    2004-07-01

    To determine whether the dose of narcotics and benzodiazepines is associated with length of time from mechanical ventilation withdrawal to death in the setting of withdrawal of life-sustaining treatment in the ICU. Retrospective chart review. University-affiliated, level I trauma center. Consecutive critically ill patients who had mechanical ventilation withdrawn and subsequently died in the ICU during two study time periods. There were 75 eligible patients with a mean age of 59 years. The primary ICU admission diagnoses included intracranial hemorrhage (37%), trauma (27%), acute respiratory failure (27%), and acute renal failure (20%). Patients died during a median of 35 min (range, 1 to 890 min) after ventilator withdrawal. On average, 16.2 mg/h opiates in morphine equivalents and 7.5 mg/h benzodiazepine in lorazepam equivalents were administered during the time period starting 1 h before ventilator withdrawal and ending at death. There was no statistically significant relationship between the average hourly narcotic and benzodiazepine use during the 1-h period prior to ventilator withdrawal until death, and the time from ventilator withdrawal to death. The restriction of medication assessment in the last 2 h of life showed an inverse association between the use of benzodiazepines and time to death. For every 1 mg/h increase in benzodiazepine use, time to death was increased by 13 min (p = 0.015). There was no relationship between narcotic dose and time to death during the last 2 h of life (p = 0.11). We found no evidence that the use of narcotics or benzodiazepines to treat discomfort after the withdrawal of life support hastens death in critically ill patients at our center. Clinicians should strive to control patient symptoms in this setting and should document the rationale for escalating drug doses.

  9. Tooth retention, tooth loss and use of dental care among long-term narcotics abusers.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jing; Hser, Yih-Ing; Herbeck, Diane

    2006-06-01

    This study examined tooth retention, tooth loss and use of dental care among aging male narcotics abusers being followed-up for more than 33 years. The cohort of 581 male narcotics addicts admitted to California Civil Addict Program in 1962-1964 was tracked until 1996-1997. As of 1997, 284 (48.9%) were confirmed to be dead. A total of 108 surviving participants completed the oral examination and survey of use of dental services. African American addicts showed the least number of remaining teeth; and African Americans and Hispanics were less likely to utilize dental services compare to Whites. Factors significantly related to tooth retention were abusers' age (p = 0.0006), ethnicity (p = 0.01), income (p < 0.0001), smoking status (p = 0.03), and dental visits during the 12 months prior to the survey (p < 0.0001). These findings suggest that settings such as prisons and drug treatment programs that include dental care referral and follow-up would be expected to enhance oral and general health among narcotics-addicted individuals.

  10. Effects of narcotics, including morphine, on visual evoked potential in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuroda, Ken; Fujiwara, Akinori; Takeda, Yasuhiro; Kamei, Chiaki

    2009-01-14

    The side effects of narcotics, including morphine, on the visual system are still unclear; therefore, the present study was undertaken to examine the effects of narcotics on the visual system at each antinociceptive dose by using the evoked potential (VEP) in rats. Morphine (2 or 5 mg/kg) caused a significant increase in the amplitude of early and late VEP components (P(1)-N(1), N(1)-P(2), P(3)-N(3) and N(3)-P(4)). Fentanyl (0.02 mg/kg) also showed a significant increase in the amplitude of late VEP components (P(3)-N(3), N(3)-P(4)). The effects of morphine and fentanyl on VEP components were antagonized by naloxone (1 mg/kg). On the other hand, (+/-)-pentazocine (20 mg/kg) reduced the amplitude of the late VEP component (N(3)-P(4)), and this effect was not antagonized by naloxone. Butorphanol showed no significant changes in early and late VEP components. In conclusion, morphine stimulated the retino-geniculate-cortex pathway and the thalamus-cortical circuit through the opioid receptors, and fentanyl stimulated the thalamus-cortical circuit through the opioid receptors. It can therefore be assumed that VEP is a useful tool for examining the side effects of drugs, including narcotics, on the visual system.

  11. Comprehensive screening method for the qualitative detection of narcotics and stimulants using single step derivatisation.

    PubMed

    Van Thuyne, W; Van Eenoo, P; Delbeke, F T

    2007-10-01

    A selective and sensitive screening method for the detection of prohibited narcotic and stimulating agents in doping control is described and validated. This method is suitable for the detection of all narcotic agents mentioned on the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) doping list in addition to numerous stimulants. The analytes are extracted from urine by a combined extraction procedure using CH(2)Cl(2)/MeOH (9/1, v/v) and t-butylmethyl ether as extraction solvents at pH 9.5 and 14, respectively. Prior to GC-MS analysis the obtained residues are combined and derivatised with MSTFA. The mass spectrometer is operated in the full scan mode in the range between m/z 40 and 550. The obtained limits of detection (LOD) for all components included in this extensive screening method are in the range 20-500 ng/ml, which is in compliance with the requirements set by WADA. Besides narcotic and stimulating agents, this method is also capable of detecting several agents with anti-estrogenic activity and some beta-agonists. As an example, a positive identification of hydroxyl-methoxy-tamoxyfen is shown.

  12. Rapid identification of a narcotic plant Papaver bracteatum using flow cytometry.

    PubMed

    Aragane, Masako; Watanabe, Daisuke; Nakajima, Jun'ichi; Yoshida, Masao; Yoshizawa, Masao; Abe, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Rei; Suzuki, Jin; Moriyasu, Takako; Nakae, Dai; Sudo, Hiroshi; Sato, Hiroyuki; Hishida, Atuyuki; Kawahara, Nobuo; Makabe, So; Nakamura, Ikuo; Mii, Masahiro

    2014-10-01

    In May 2011, numerous poppy plants closely resembling Papaver bracteatum Lindl., a type of narcotic plant that is illegal in Japan, were distributed directly from several large flower shops or through online shopping throughout Japan, including the Tokyo Metropolitan area. In order to better identify the narcotic plants, the relative nuclear DNA content at the vegetative stage was measured by flow cytometric (FCM) analysis in 3 closely-related species of the genus Papaver section Oxytona, namely P. orientale, P. pseudo-orientale, and P. bracteatum, based on the difference between the chromosome numbers of these species. The results showed that the nuclear DNA content differed between these 3 species, and that most of the commercially distributed plants examined in this study could be identified as P. bracteatum. The remaining plants were P. pseudo-orientale, a non-narcotic plant. In addition, the FCM results for the identification of P. bracteatum completely agreed with the results obtained by the morphological analysis, the inter-genic spacer sequence of rpl16-rpl14 (PS-ID sequence) of chloroplast DNA, and the presence of thebaine. These results clearly indicate the usefulness of FCM analysis for the identification of P. bracteatum plants, including when they are in their vegetative stage.

  13. Small Molecule CXCR3 Antagonists.

    PubMed

    Andrews, Stephen P; Cox, Rhona J

    2016-04-14

    Chemokines and their receptors are known to play important roles in disease. More than 40 chemokine ligands and 20 chemokine receptors have been identified, but, to date, only two small molecule chemokine receptor antagonists have been approved by the FDA. The chemokine receptor CXCR3 was identified in 1996, and nearly 20 years later, new areas of CXCR3 disease biology continue to emerge. Several classes of small molecule CXCR3 antagonists have been developed, and two have shown efficacy in preclinical models of inflammatory disease. However, only one CXCR3 antagonist has been evaluated in clinical trials, and there remain many opportunities to further investigate known classes of CXCR3 antagonists and to identify new chemotypes. This Perspective reviews the known CXCR3 antagonists and considers future opportunities for the development of small molecules for clinical evaluation.

  14. THE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE OF MUSCLE DURING THE ACTION OF NARCOTICS AND OTHER AGENTS

    PubMed Central

    Guttman, Rita

    1939-01-01

    1. The effect of certain inorganic cations upon the electrical impedance of the sartorius muscle of the frog was investigated. While Na, K, and Mg have little effect upon the resistance of muscle, Ba and Ca cause it to fall. The use of physiologically "unbalanced" salt solution does not in itself seem to affect muscle impedance. 2. The time course of the effect upon muscle impedance of the penetration of substances into the intercellular spaces was studied by treating the muscle with sugar solutions. Half of the effect is over in three-quarters of a minute when the sugar solution is permitted to circulate past both sides of the muscle. This sets an upper limit for the time necessary for inorganic cations and organic narcotics to reach the cell surfaces. The action of inorganic cations and organic narcotics upon muscle is slow compared to the time necessary for them to reach the scene of action. The penetration of the sugar solutions into the intercellular spaces of muscle was found to follow the well known diffusion law, the amount diffusing in being proportional to the square root of the time. Average values of 77.7 per cent for ρ, the volume concentration of fibers; 231 ohms specific resistance for r2, the resistance of the interior of the fibers; and 71.0° for θ, the phase angle of the impedance locus, were obtained for the muscle in Ringer's solution. How these values change when the muscle is placed in various concentrations of sugar was also studied. 3. The action of a number of organic narcotics upon muscle was studied. All decrease 1000 cycle resistance if the concentration is sufficiently high. A detailed analysis of the action of the narcotic, iso-amyl carbamate, was made, and it was noted that low concentrations increase resistance while higher concentrations decrease it. By investigating the effect of narcotics upon muscle impedance over a wide frequency range, it was found that during narcosis the resistance of the fiber membranes first increases

  15. THE ELECTRICAL IMPEDANCE OF MUSCLE DURING THE ACTION OF NARCOTICS AND OTHER AGENTS.

    PubMed

    Guttman, R

    1939-05-20

    1. The effect of certain inorganic cations upon the electrical impedance of the sartorius muscle of the frog was investigated. While Na, K, and Mg have little effect upon the resistance of muscle, Ba and Ca cause it to fall. The use of physiologically "unbalanced" salt solution does not in itself seem to affect muscle impedance. 2. The time course of the effect upon muscle impedance of the penetration of substances into the intercellular spaces was studied by treating the muscle with sugar solutions. Half of the effect is over in three-quarters of a minute when the sugar solution is permitted to circulate past both sides of the muscle. This sets an upper limit for the time necessary for inorganic cations and organic narcotics to reach the cell surfaces. The action of inorganic cations and organic narcotics upon muscle is slow compared to the time necessary for them to reach the scene of action. The penetration of the sugar solutions into the intercellular spaces of muscle was found to follow the well known diffusion law, the amount diffusing in being proportional to the square root of the time. Average values of 77.7 per cent for rho, the volume concentration of fibers; 231 ohms specific resistance for r(2), the resistance of the interior of the fibers; and 71.0 degrees for theta, the phase angle of the impedance locus, were obtained for the muscle in Ringer's solution. How these values change when the muscle is placed in various concentrations of sugar was also studied. 3. The action of a number of organic narcotics upon muscle was studied. All decrease 1000 cycle resistance if the concentration is sufficiently high. A detailed analysis of the action of the narcotic, iso-amyl carbamate, was made, and it was noted that low concentrations increase resistance while higher concentrations decrease it. By investigating the effect of narcotics upon muscle impedance over a wide frequency range, it was found that during narcosis the resistance of the fiber membranes first

  16. Differences in prescription of narcotic pain medication after operative treatment of hip and ankle fractures in the United States and The Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Lindenhovius, Anneluuk L C; Lindenhovious, Anneluuk L C; Helmerhorst, Gijs T T; Helmerhorts, Gijs T T; Schnellen, Alexandra C; Vrahas, Mark; Ring, David; Kloen, Peter

    2009-07-01

    Interactions between American and Dutch surgeons suggested differences in prescription habits for pain medication after fracture treatment. The percentages of 190 American [100 after hip open reduction and internal fixation (ORIF) and 90 after ankle ORIF] and 116 Dutch patients (69 after hip ORIF and 47 after ankle ORIF) receiving inpatient and outpatient prescriptions for narcotics were retrospectively compared between countries, to test the hypothesis that narcotics are prescribed more frequently in the United States as compared with The Netherlands after operative fracture treatment. Among patients with hip fractures, 85% of American and 58% of Dutch patients were prescribed narcotics during hospitalization (p < 0.001). After discharge, 77% of American and none of the Dutch patients were prescribed narcotics (p < 0.001). The multivariate model including country accounted for 11% of the variation in inpatient narcotic prescription (p < 0.001), and the model including country and surgeon accounted for 55% of the variation in outpatient narcotic prescription (p < 0.001). Among patients with ankle fracture, 98% of American and 64% of Dutch patients were prescribed narcotics during hospitalization (p < 0.001). After discharge, 82% of American patients and 6% of Dutch patients were prescribed narcotics (p < 0.001). Predictors included country and surgeon and they accounted for 20% of the variation in inpatient narcotics prescription (p < 0.001) and 49% of the variation in outpatient narcotic prescription (p < 0.001). American patients are prescribed significantly more inpatient and outpatient narcotic pain medication than Dutch patients after operative treatment of hip and ankle fractures.

  17. Narcotic administration and fall-related injury in the hospital: implications for patient safety programs and providers.

    PubMed

    Pierce, J Rush; Shirley, Michael; Johnson, Emma F; Kang, Huining

    2013-01-01

    Identify factors that predict fall-related injury in hospitalized adults. Retrospective records review. 435-bed university hospital. Inpatients with reported falls in 2010. Medical records were available for 286/293 (98%) of reported falls in 251 patients. 25% (63/286) of falls were associated with injury, 4% (11/286) with serious injury. Compared to all fallers, patients with injury did not differ by gender or age. In univariate analysis, patients who reported hitting their head, had pre-fall confusion, or who received narcotics within 24 hours before falling were more likely to suffer injury (estimated odds ratios 6.04, 2.00 and 5.1, respectfully). In multivariate analysis, receiving a narcotic prior to falling was the strongest predictor of injury (estimated odds ratio 5.38; 95% confidence intervals 2.07-13.98, p < 0.001). In this single-institution study, 25% of patients who fell suffered injury and 4% serious injury. Neither age nor gender predicted fall-related injury. Recent narcotic administration was the strongest predictor of injury. Strategies to prevent fall-related injury in the hospital should target patients receiving narcotics. When evaluating inpatients who have fallen, providers should be especially vigilant about injury in patients who have pre-fall confusion, hit their head, or have received recent narcotics.

  18. A nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor antagonist.

    PubMed

    Miner, Jeffrey N; Tyree, Curtis; Hu, Junlian; Berger, Elaine; Marschke, Keith; Nakane, Masaki; Coghlan, Michael J; Clemm, Dave; Lane, Ben; Rosen, Jon

    2003-01-01

    Selective intracellular receptor antagonists are used clinically to ameliorate hormone-dependent disease states. Patients with Cushing's syndrome have high levels of the glucocorticoid, cortisol, and suffer significant consequences from this overexposure. High levels of this hormone are also implicated in exacerbating diabetes and the stress response. Selectively inhibiting this hormone may have clinical benefit in these disease states. To this end, we have identified the first selective, nonsteroidal glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonist. This compound is characterized by a tri-aryl methane core chemical structure. This GR-specific antagonist binds with nanomolar affinity to the GR and has no detectable binding affinity for the highly related receptors for mineralocorticoids, androgens, estrogens, and progestins. We demonstrate that this antagonist inhibits glucocorticoid-mediated transcriptional regulation. This compound binds competitively with steroids, likely occupying a similar site within the ligand-binding domain. Once bound, however, the compound fails to induce critical conformational changes in the receptor necessary for agonist activity.

  19. Trace Contraband Detection Field-Test by the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, David W.; Shannon, Gary W.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNL’s Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories’ (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  20. Trace Contraband Detection Field-Test by the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force

    SciTech Connect

    Hannum, David W.; Shannon, Gary W.

    2006-04-01

    This report describes the collaboration between the South Texas Specialized Crimes and Narcotics Task Force (STSCNTF) and Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) in a field test that provided prototype hand-held trace detection technology for use in counter-drug operations. The National Institute of Justice (NIJ)/National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center (NLECTC)/Border Research and Technology Center (BRTC) was contacted by STSCNTF for assistance in obtaining cutting-edge technology. The BRTC created a pilot project for Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) and the STSCNTF for the use of SNL’s Hound, a hand-held sample collection and preconcentration system that, when combined with a commercial chemical detector, can be used for the trace detection of illicit drugs and explosives. The STSCNTF operates in an area of high narcotics trafficking where methods of concealment make the detection of narcotics challenging. Sandia National Laboratories’ (SNL) Contraband Detection Department personnel provided the Hound system hardware and operational training. The Hound system combines the GE VaporTracer2, a hand-held commercial chemical detector, with an SNL-developed sample collection and preconcentration system. The South Texas Task force reported a variety of successes, including identification of a major shipment of methamphetamines, the discovery of hidden compartments in vehicles that contained illegal drugs and currency used in drug deals, and the identification of a suspect in a nightclub shooting. The main advantage of the hand-held trace detection unit is its ability to quickly identify the type of chemical (drugs or explosives) without a long lag time for laboratory analysis, which is the most common analysis method for current law enforcement procedures.

  1. Surgical management of infected pseudoaneurysms of femoral artery caused by narcotics injection.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanming; Shu, Chang; Jiang, Xiaohua; Li, Ming; Li, Xin; He, Hao

    2009-06-01

    To investigate the surgical management of infected pseudoaneurysms of femoral artery caused by narcotics injection. The clinical data of 63 cases of infected pseudoaneurysms of femoral artery caused by narcotics injection were reviewed retrospectively. The tumors in 52 cases ruptured. Rupture hemorrhoea first occurred in 45 patients before admission and in 7 during hospitalization. Twenty-six patients suffered from recurrent or multiple hemorrhoea while in hospital. Forty-nine patients received external iliac artery-superficial femoral artery extra-anatomic bypass reconstruction with banded vascular grafts and the other 14 received ligation operations of the external iliac artery or the femoral artery. No one died in the perioperative period. One patient with vascular graft reconstruction developed graft infection during hospitalization and 5 developed graft infection during the follow-up. No ischemic necrosis occurred in the affected limbs after the infected vascular grafts were removed. One patient developed necrosis in the affected limb after the femoral artery was ligated and then above-knee amputation was performed. The others recovered well. Unobstructed blood circulation in the vascular graft was exhibited by color Doppler ultrasonography in 36 cases during the follow-up. Operation as early as possible is the only way to rescue patients' lives threatened by infected pseudoaneurysms of femoral artery caused by narcotics injection. Thorough debridement and drainage, revascularization between external iliac artery and superficial femoral artery using band artificial blood vessel, and controlling infection are therapeutic modus operandi. Ligation of external iliac artery or femoral artery is also a feasible measure to rescue patients' lives when pseudoaneurysms are infected severely.

  2. Cocaethylene, the in vivo product of cocaine and ethanol, is a narcotic more potent than its precursors.

    PubMed

    Maia, Angélica Faleiros da Silva; Martins, Felipe T; Silva Neto, Leonardo da; Alves, Rosemeire Brondi; De Fátima, Ângelo

    2017-10-01

    The molecular conformation and supramolecular architecture of cocaethylene [systematic name: ethyl (1R,2R,3S,5S)-3-benzoyloxy-8-methyl-8-azabicyclo[3.2.1]octane-2-carboxylate], C18H23NO4, have been determined for the first time. Cocaethylene is a narcotic produced in vivo when cocaine and ethanol are administered concomitantly. The intra- and intermolecular features of cocaethylene and its less potent narcotic precursor cocaine are very similar. The only molecular difference is in the conformation of the methyl group of the ethoxycarbonyl group. Similar to cocaine, the carboxylate atoms and the α-C atom are coplanar in cocaethylene, but the methyl C atom of the ethyl group is bent by ca 90° away from this plane in the narcotic reported here. The main supramolecular motif is a one-dimensional chain stabilized by weak C-H...O contacts.

  3. A sensitive, selective, and portable detector for contraband: The compact integrated narcotics detection instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Tuemer, T.O.; Doan, L.; Su, C.W.; Baritelle, J.; Rhoton, B.

    2000-07-01

    A Compact Integrated Narcotics Detection Instrument (CINDI) has been developed at NOVA R and D, Inc., in cooperation with the US Coast Guard. This detector utilizes neutrons emitted from {sup 252}Cf. Neutrons emitted from the front face of CINDI penetrate dense compartment barrier materials with little change in energy but are backscattered by hydrogen-rich materials such as drugs. The backscattered neutrons are detected, and the rate is displayed by a microprocessor-controller integrated into CINDI. The operator guides the detector along a suspected area and receives immediate feedback from the state-of-the-art electronics. For user safety, the device incorporates a highly sensitive detection scheme to permit the use of a very weak radioactive source, without compromising detectability. CINDI is capable of detecting narcotics effectively behind panels made of steel, wood, fiberglass, or even lead-lined materials. This makes it useful for inspecting marine vessels, ship bulkheads, automobiles, structure walls, or small sealed containers. Figure 2 shows three views of the CINDI instrument. CINDI responds strongly to hydrogen-rich materials such as narcotics. It has been tested at NOVA, the US Coast Guard, and Brewt Power Systems. The results of the tests show excellent response and specificity to narcotics. CINDI has led to a new technology that shows promise for identifying the concealed contraband. The new technique uses a fusion of two independent but complementary signals for detecting and possibly identifying concealed drugs in a variety of carriers such as vehicles, marine vessels, airplanes, containers, cargo, and luggage. The carriers will be scanned using both neutron and gamma-ray sources. The signal from both the neutron and gamma-ray backscattering and/or transmission can be used simultaneously to detect and possibly identify the contrabands it has been trained for. A system that can produce three-dimensional images for both signals may also be developed

  4. Trends in the annual incidence rates of narcotics felons arrested over the last 30 years in metropolitan Bursa, Turkey.

    PubMed

    Akgoz, Semra; Akkaya, Cengiz; Berkay, Fugen; Turkmen, Nursel; Kan, Ismet; Kirli, Selcuk

    2007-07-01

    Illegal substance use is a serious problem all over the world. In order to effectively combat substance abuse it is important that both the particular features of drug users and the culture-specific risk factors that go along with drug abuse be identified. The present study was carried out in Bursa, Turkey, in order to document annual changes in the frequency of felons arrested of narcotics offenses and to establish the socio-demographics of these narcotics felons. Among the 2,230 narcotics felons reviewed, 24.3% had been charged with drug dealing but not consumption (profit-driven felons [PDFs]), 19.0% were narcotics felons charged with both dealing and consumption ([hard core drug users HCDUs]), and 56.7% were narcotics felons charged only with consumption and possession (not so hard core drug users [NHCDUs]). The NHCDUs were younger (< 30 years) than both the HCDUs and PDFs, while most of the PDFs and HCDUs were married. Despite the fact that the male/female ratio of the Bursa population was nearly 1:1 for the past 30 years, 93.0%, 95.0% and 96.0% of the PDFs, HCDUs, and NHCDUs, respectively, were male. It was also found that the most commonly used illicit substance in Bursa over this period of time was cannabis. Over the course of the 30-year period examined, the annual incidence rate of narcotics felons arrested increased from 0.4257 per 10,000 to 1.2389 per 10,000. Determining the socio-demographic characteristics of HCDUs and NHCDUs would be useful in preventing substance use before substance users become addicted.

  5. Postoperative Pain Scores and Narcotic Use in Robotic-assisted Versus Laparoscopic Hysterectomy for Endometrial Cancer Staging.

    PubMed

    Turner, Taylor B; Habib, Ashraf S; Broadwater, Gloria; Valea, Fidel A; Fleming, Nicole D; Ehrisman, Jessie A; Di Santo, Nicola; Havrilesky, Laura J

    2015-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate perioperative pain and analgesic and antiemetic use in patients who underwent surgical staging for endometrial cancer using traditional versus robotic-assisted laparoscopy. We identified women in a single institution who underwent minimally hysterectomy for endometrial cancer from 2008 to 2012. Patient characteristics and perioperative outcomes, including analgesic and antiemetic use and pain scores, were analyzed. After univariate analysis, a multivariate linear regression model was generated to determine factors associated with narcotic use in the post anesthesia care unit (PACU) (Canadian Task Force Classification II-3). A single academic institution in the United States from 2008 to 2012. Women undergoing total laparoscopic hysterectomy or robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy for endometrial cancer. Laparoscopic or robotic-assisted laparoscopic hysterectomy. Three hundred thirty-five women were included (213 laparoscopy and 122 robotic-assisted laparoscopy). There was no difference in pain scores at 0 to 6 and 6 to 12 hours after surgery; at 12 to 24 hours, robotic-assisted surgery was associated with higher median pain scores (5/10 vs 4/10, p = .012). Robotic-assisted surgery was associated with a longer anesthesia time (289 vs 255 minutes, p < .001), similar antiemetic use (p = .40), and lower narcotic use in the postanesthesia care unit (PACU) (1.3 mg vs 2.5 mg morphine equivalents, p = .003). There was no difference in narcotic use on the postoperative floor (p = .46). In multivariate analysis controlling for age, menopausal status, anesthesia duration, and local anesthetic use, hysterectomy type was not a significant predictor of PACU narcotic use (p = .86). In a retrospective analysis, a robotic-assisted approach to endometrial cancer was not associated with reduced PACU narcotic or antiemetic use compared with the traditional laparoscopic approach. Twenty-four-hour narcotic and antiemetic use was also not different

  6. Are We Prescribing Our Patients Too Much Pain Medication? Best Predictors of Narcotic Usage After Spinal Surgery for Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Grant, Daniel R; Schoenleber, Scott J; McCarthy, Alicia M; Neiss, Geraldine I; Yorgova, Petya K; Rogers, Kenneth J; Gabos, Peter G; Shah, Suken A

    2016-09-21

    Physicians play a role in the current prescription drug-abuse epidemic. Surgeons often prescribe more postoperative narcotic pain medication than patients routinely need. Although narcotics are effective for severe, acute, postoperative pain, few evidence-based guidelines exist regarding the routinely required amount and duration of use post-hospital discharge. Patients in a prospective cohort undergoing posterior spinal fusion for idiopathic scoliosis were asked preoperatively to rate their pain level, the level of pain expected each week postoperatively, and their pain tolerance. Post-discharge pain scores and narcotic use were reported at weekly intervals for 4 weeks postoperatively. Demographic data, preoperative Scoliosis Research Society (SRS)-22 scores, operative details, perioperative data, and self-reported pain levels were analyzed with respect to their association with total medication use and refills received. Disposal plans were also assessed. Seventy-two patients were enrolled, and 85% completed the surveys. The mean patient age was 14.9 years; 69% of the patients were female. The cohort was divided into 3 groups on the basis of total medication usage. The mean number of pills used in the middle (average-use) group was 49 pills. In postoperative week 4, narcotic usage was minimal (a mean of 2.9 pills by the highest-use group). Also by this time point, pain scores had, on average, returned to preoperative levels. Older age, male sex, a higher body mass index, and a higher preoperative pain score were associated with increased narcotic use. Sixty-seven percent of the patients planned to dispose of their unused medication, although only 59% of those patients planned on doing so in a manner recommended by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Postoperative narcotic dosing may be improved by considering patient age, weight, sex, and preoperative pain score. The precise estimation of individual narcotic needs is complex. Patient and family education on the

  7. Standing Up a Narcotic Confirmation Laboratory for the Russian Federation Ministry of Defense Nuclear Personnel Reliability Program

    SciTech Connect

    LukyanenkoMD, Victor; Eisele, Gerhard R; Coates, Cameron W

    2010-01-01

    Through a cooperative effort between the U. S. Department of Energy and the Russian Federation (RF) Ministry of Defense (MOD) a Personnel Reliability Program (PRP) for the nuclear handlers within the RF MOD has been implemented. A key element in the RF MOD PRP is the detection and confirmation of narcotic use in subject military and civilian personnel. This paper describes the process of narcotics screening and testing in the RF MOD and explains the confirmation process once screening has shown a positive result. Issues of laboratory certification, employee certification, employee training, sample chain-of-custody, and equipment needs will be addressed.

  8. Platelet-activating factor antagonists.

    PubMed

    Negro Alvarez, J M; Miralles López, J C; Ortiz Martínez, J L; Abellán Alemán, A; Rubio del Barrio, R

    1997-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF), identified as 1-O-alkyl-2-acetyl-sn-glyceryl-3-phosphorylcholine, exhibits potent proinflammatory properties. PAF is produced by numerous cell types, including endothelial cells, neutrophils, monocytes, macrophages, basophils, eosinophils and mastocytes. Since the discovery and identification of the chemical structure of PAF, a large variety of specific PAF-receptor antagonists, both natural and synthetic compounds, have been described. Intensive research has been conducted and development programs set up by more 25 pharmaceutical companies world-wide, studying the therapeutic interest of more than 50 PAF-receptors antagonists in various pathophysiological conditions. Medline (1966-1996), Embase (Excerpta Medica; 1974-1996), and other biomedical and drug directory databases were searched to identify English-language articles (basic science, clinical trial research, and review articles) and abstracts of conference proceedings on PAF receptor antagonists and related terms. The most important PAF receptor antagonists are reviewed with their effectiveness in various experimental tests. Fundamentally, PAF antagonists may be divided in two groups: natural and synthetic compounds. Natural (Ginkgolides, Kadsurenone, Chantancin, Phomactin, Swietemohonin A, Prehispalone, THC-7-oic acid, Aglafoline, FR 900452, PCA 4248 and SCH 37370), and synthetic antagonists (CV-3988, CV-6209, SRI 63-072, SRI 63-441, UR-10324, UR-11353, E-5880, CL 184005, 6-Mono and Bis-aryl phosphate antagonists, TCV-309, Ro-74719, WEB 2086, Y 24180, BN 50726, BN 50727, BN 50730, BN 50739, Ro 24-4736, Ro 24-0238, RP 55778, RP 59227, RP 66681, YM 264, YM 461, SM 10661, SR 27417, UK 74505, BB 182, BB 823, BB 654, SDZ 64-412, SDZ 65-123, L 652731, L 659898, L 668750, L 671284, L680573, L 680574, CIS 19, ABT-299 and Pinusolide) have a great variability in their chemical structure that might have importance in their different pharmacological profile. The great majority of these

  9. Infants born to narcotic dependent mothers: physical growth patterns in the first 12 months of life.

    PubMed

    Vance, J C; Chant, D C; Tudehope, D I; Gray, P H; Hayes, A J

    1997-12-01

    To describe the physical growth patterns of infants born to narcotic dependent mothers (INDM) over a 12 months period and, if possible, to relate the growth to drug taking patterns during pregnancy. The growth of a cohort of 43 INDM was measured during the first 12 months of life. Weight and length measurements were compared with percentile charts and converted to Z scores. Questionnaire data about drug taking practices, demographic variables and the neonatal period (including withdrawal scores) were obtained. Twenty-four (55.8%) of INDM had evidence of neonatal drug withdrawal requiring treatment with phenobarbitone. At birth, Z scores for weight and length indicated relative intrauterine growth retardation. By 12 months, there had been some catch up growth, but Z scores for weight and length were still below zero. Persistent weight retardation at 12 months was correlated with methadone dosage during pregnancy, but not the need for phenobarbitone therapy. The growth patterns of INDM in the first 12 months of life indicated that at birth there was evidence of intrauterine growth retardation, but by 12 months the growth was little different from the rest of the community. There appears to be some influence of narcotic agents taken while pregnant on subsequent growth of INDM.

  10. [Analysis of nine narcotics in urine by microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography-field samplified sample injection].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu; Li, Qin; Lu, Minghua; Zhang, Lan; Chen, Guonan; Cai, Zongwei

    2011-08-01

    A simple, sensitive and reproducible method using microemulsion electrokinetic chromatography (MEEKC)-field amplified sample injection (FASI) was developed for the analysis of nine narcotics (morphine, codeine, naloxone, heroin, thebaine, cocaine, pethidine, fentanyl and methadone) in urine. In the MEEKC method, sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), 1-butanol and ethyl acetate were used as surfactant, co-surfactant and organic solvent, respectively. The effects of the acidity and concentration of borate buffer, SDS, 1-butanol and ethyl acetate contents were investigated. The optimum concentrations (by mass fraction) of microemulsion system were 0.6% SDS, 1.2% 1-butanol, 0.6% ethyl acetate and 97.6% 10 mmol/L Na2B4O7 buffer (pH 9.5). The applied voltage was 25 kV. FASI was coupled with the MEEKC method to increase the sensitivity. Under the optimum conditions, the nine narcotics were baseline separated within 15 min and the detection limits (S/N = 3) were in the range of 0.3 - 8.0 microg/L. The spiked recoveries in urine samples were between 79.4% and 119.9% with the intraday relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.5%. The developed method has been successfully applied to the analysis of methadone in the samples from in vitro metabolism study.

  11. New, high-efficiency ion trap mobility detection system for narcotics and explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGann, William J.; Bradley, V.; Borsody, A.; Lepine, S.

    1994-10-01

    A new patented Ion Trap Mobility Spectrometer (ITMS) design is presented. Conventional IMS designs typically operate below 0.1% efficiency. This is due primarily to electric field driven, sample ion discharge on a shutter grid. Since 99.9% of the sample ions generated in the reaction region are lost in this discharge process, the sensitivity of conventional systems is limited. The new design provides greater detection efficiency than conventional designs through the use of an `ion trap' concept. The paper describes the plasma and sample ion dynamics in the reaction region of the new detector and discusses the advantages of utilizing a `field-free' space to generate sample ions with high efficiency. Fast electronic switching is described which is used to perturb the field-free space and pulse the sample ions into the drift region for separation and subsequent detection using pseudo real-time software for analysis and display of the data. Many applications for this new detector are now being considered including the detection of narcotics and explosives. Preliminary ion spectra, reduced mobility data and sensitivity data are presented for fifteen narcotics, including cocaine, THC and LSD are reported.

  12. Component Analysis of Iranian Crack; A Newly Abused Narcotic Substance in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Farhoudian, Ali; Sadeghi, Mandana; Khoddami Vishteh, Hamid Reza; Moazen, Babak; Fekri, Monir; Rahimi Movaghar, Afarin

    2014-01-01

    Iranian crack is a new form of narcotic substance that has found widespread prevalence in Iran in the past years. Crack only nominally resembles crack cocaine as it is widely different in its clinical signs. Thus the present study aims to quantify the chemical combination of this drug. The samples included 18 specimen of Crack collected from different zones of Tehran, Iran. All specimens were in the form of inodorous cream solid powdery substance. TLC and HPLC methods were used to perform semi-quantitative and quantitative analysis of the components, respectively. The TLC analysis showed no cocaine compound in the specimens while they all revealed to contain heroin, codeine, morphine and caffeine. All but two specimens contained thebaine. None of the specimens contained amphetamine, benzodiazepines, tricyclic antidepressants, aspirin, barbiturates, tramadol and buprenorphine. Acetaminophen was found in four specimens. HPLC revealed heroin to be the foundation substance in all specimens and most of them contained a significant amount of acetylcodeine. The present analysis of the chemical combination of Crack showed that this substance is a heroin-based narcotic which is basically different from the cocaine-based crack used in Western countries. Studies like the present one at different time points, especially when abnormal clinical signs are detected, can reveal the chemical combination of the target substance and contribute to the clinical management of its acute or chronic poisoning. PMID:24734089

  13. [Characterization of drug, narcotic and psychotropic drug chirality by statistical methods].

    PubMed

    Noszál, B; Schiller, Z

    1999-04-01

    The percentage of chiral entities among drug, narcotic drug and psychotropic compounds is steadily increasing. Receptors of the human body recognize the enantiomeric forms of constitutionally identical compounds as entirely different chemical agents. Based upon these facts, this paper reports the percentage of chiral compounds in the various pharmacological classes, and related data. Pertinent terms, such as eutomer, distomer, eudismic index, eudismic affinity quotient are defined. Differences in biological activity between eutomers and distomers are exemplified. The pharmacological classes and subclasses of highest chirality, and the "most chiral" active principles are shown. Some puzzling observations on pharmacological behaviour of stereoisomers are highlighted. The necessity of "racemate switch" in the pharmaceutical industry, and the significance of stereo-specific interactions between the drug, narcotic drug and psychotropic ligands, and complementary, "pocket" moieties of the human body are emphasized. Some features of enantiopharmacology, a fledgling science in the interface of stereochemistry and traditional pharmacology are introduced. The statistical treatment of asymmetric compounds in pharmacological classes and subclasses shows that presently, the percentage of chirality in drug categories is more characteristic of the origin of the compound than its target molecule.

  14. Development of a computerized monitoring program to identify narcotic diversion in a pediatric anesthesia practice.

    PubMed

    Brenn, B Randall; Kim, Margaret A; Hilmas, Elora

    2015-08-15

    Development of an operational reporting dashboard designed to correlate data from multiple sources to help detect potential drug diversion by automated dispensing cabinet (ADC) users is described. A commercial business intelligence platform was used to create a dashboard tool for rapid detection of unusual patterns of ADC transactions by anesthesia service providers at a large pediatric hospital. By linking information from the hospital's pharmacy information management system (PIMS) and anesthesia information management system (AIMS) in an associative data model, the "narcotic reconciliation dashboard" can generate various reports to help spot outlier activity associated with ADC dispensing of controlled substances and documentation of medication waste processing. The dashboard's utility was evaluated by "back-testing" the program with historical data on an actual episode of diversion by an anesthesia provider that had not been detected through traditional methods of PIMS and AIMS data monitoring. Dashboard-generated reports on key metrics (e.g., ADC transaction counts, discrepancies in dispensed versus reconciled amounts of narcotics, PIMS-AIMS documentation mismatches) over various time frames during the period of known diversion clearly indicated the diverter's outlier status relative to other authorized ADC users. A dashboard program for correlating ADC transaction data with pharmacy and patient care data may be an effective tool for detecting patterns of ADC use that suggest drug diversion. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Intrathecal narcotics are associated with prolonged second-stage labor and increased oxytocin use.

    PubMed

    Fontaine, P; Adam, P

    2000-06-01

    Safe and effective labor analgesia is an important part of obstetric care. Intrathecally injected narcotics (ITN) are an effective alternative to epidural anesthesia, and are perceived less likely to interfere with the course and outcome of labor. Data on their effects, however, are sparse and contradictory. Our retrospective study compared labor length, oxytocin use, delivery type, maternal side effects, and neonatal outcomes among women who received ITN (n=100) and a group who received intravenous narcotics or no analgesia during labor (n=100). We randomly sampled medical records with stratification for parity and collected data through systematic chart review. Women receiving ITN were more likely to be white. They experienced longer second-stage labors (73 minutes vs 40 minutes, P=.000) and used oxytocin twice as often. These differences remained significant after controlling for potential confounding factors. ITN use was also associated with a trend toward more cesarean sections (7% vs 1%, P=.06). More of the women receiving ITN required urinary catheterization (25% vs 5%, P=.000) and experienced significant pruritus (10% vs 0%, P=.001). Neonatal outcomes were similar for both groups. In our retrospective study, ITN use was associated with a significant prolongation of second-stage labor, which may be clinically relevant for women having their first child. ITN were also associated with increased oxytocin use and a trend toward more cesarean births. Whether these relationships are causal or a proxy for more difficult labors is a question for future prospective studies.

  16. The combined toxic effects of nonpolar narcotic chemicals to Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Shih-Hung; Tsai, Kuo-Pei; Chen, Chung-Yuan

    2006-06-01

    This paper presents the toxicity data of 10 nonpolar narcotic chemicals on Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata (green algae) assessed by a new algal toxicity testing technique conducted under air-tight environment. Based on DO production, median effective concentration (EC50) varies from 1.73 mg/L (1-octanol) to 8,040 mg/L (2-propanol). The endpoint of algal growth rate reveals similar sensitivity as that from DO production. Compared to literature data, Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and Nitrosomonas are apparently more sensitive to nonpolar narcotics than other organisms such as minnow, daphnia, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. Furthermore, good correlations between toxic effects observed from Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and other aquatic organisms were found. Hence, algal toxicity test can be considered as a surrogate test for estimating the toxicity of nonpolar chemicals to fathead minnow, Microtox, activated sludge, Daphina magna, and Tetrahymena pyriformis. The combined effects of 13 binary mixtures of nonpolar chemicals were investigated using both additive-index method and isobologram analysis. Overall speaking, the joint actions between these chemicals are strictly additive. Model analyses indicate that these compounds act on identical reaction sites or receptors, which verify that these chemicals are of the same toxicity mechanism (narcosis).

  17. Long-acting liposomal bupivacaine decreases inpatient narcotic requirements in men undergoing penile prosthesis implantation

    PubMed Central

    Cotta, Brittney H.; Welliver, Charles; Brahmamdam, Anand; Bednarchik, Cynthia L.; Dynda, Danuta; Köhler, Tobias S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A new extended-release bupivacaine suspension bupivacaine (ERSB) delivers 3 days of local anesthetic and has been shown to reduce pain and narcotic usage in some patient groups but this issue is largely unstudied in urologic surgery. Material and methods We performed a single-surgeon retrospective chart review of the patients who underwent penile prosthesis implantation. Pain scores and standardized morphine equivalent (ME) dose data were collected during 23 hour- observation period. Subjects who received ERSB were compared with those who received standard bupivacaine or no local anesthesia. Results In a study population of 37 patients, those who received (n=13), and did not receive (n=24) ERSB were grouped, respectively. The groups were comparable demographically. ME was used 3.2 fold more frequently in the non-ERSB group (18.0, and 5.6 for non-ERSB, and ESRB groups, respectively (p=0.04). Mean overall pain scores were 3.8/10 for ERSB and 3.9/10 for non-ERSB group, respectively. Per patient medication cost for the control, and ERSB groups were $5.16 and $285.54, respectively. Conclusion The use of a new ERSB in penile prosthesis implants did lead to reduced narcotic consumption with comparable postoperative pain control to the non-ERSB group. However, the cost of the ERSB ($285/dose) may be prohibitive for its use. PMID:27909614

  18. 21 CFR 1301.73 - Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Physical security controls for non-practitioners; compounders for narcotic treatment programs; manufacturing and compounding areas. 1301.73 Section 1301.73 Food..., DISTRIBUTORS, AND DISPENSERS OF CONTROLLED SUBSTANCES Security Requirements § 1301.73 Physical security...

  19. 14 CFR 137.23 - Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Carriage of narcotic drugs, marihuana, and depressant or stimulant drugs or substances. 137.23 Section 137.23 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION...: CERTIFICATION AND OPERATIONS AGRICULTURAL AIRCRAFT OPERATIONS Certification Rules § 137.23 Carriage of...

  20. Narcotic prescribing habits and other methods of pain control by oral and maxillofacial surgeons after impacted third molar removal.

    PubMed

    Mutlu, Ibrahim; Abubaker, A Omar; Laskin, Daniel M

    2013-09-01

    It has been suggested that a source of narcotics used for nonmedical purposes by young adults is the unused opioids prescribed for the management of pain after the removal of impacted third molars. The purpose of the present study was to determine whether oral and maxillofacial surgeons routinely prescribe larger amounts of a narcotic than would generally be needed for adequate postoperative pain control. A secondary goal was to determine whether they use methods other than analgesic drugs to minimize postoperative pain and thereby reduce the amount of narcotic that might be needed. An 8-question survey was sent to 100 randomly selected oral and maxillofacial surgeon members of the American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons in each of the 6 association districts. The questions asked were related to whether a narcotic was routinely prescribed for patients who have had impacted teeth removed, the most common drug used, and the dosage and number of tablets prescribed. The participants were also asked whether they had pretreated patients with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug or had prescribed one along with the narcotic, had injected a steroid, or had used a long-lasting local anesthetic postoperatively. Only 2 of the 384 respondents stated that they did not prescribe a narcotic for patients who had had impacted teeth removed. Hydrocodone (5 mg) was the most frequently prescribed narcotic. The number of tablets varied from 10 to 40, but the most common number was 20 tablets. However, 80 respondents (22%) prescribed more, with 40 prescribing 30 tablets. Also, 80% of the respondents injected their patients with a steroid, and 62% injected a long-lasting local anesthetic postoperatively. Only 34% pretreated their patients with a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, but 66% recommended such use postoperatively. Most oral and maxillofacial surgeons prescribe analgesic drugs of an appropriate type and dosage and use proper adjunctive pain control measures

  1. Early predictors of narcotics-dependent patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wei-Che; Lin, Hsing-Lin; Kuo, Liang-Chi; Chen, Chao-Wen; Cheng, Yuan-Chia; Lin, Tsung-Ying; Soo, Kwan-Ming; Chan, Hon-Man

    2013-06-01

    It is not unusual that narcotics-dependent patients fulfill their medical requirements in the emergency department (ED). The behavior of these patients varies, and their manifestations and predictors are still not fully studied. We performed this retrospective study by prospectively collecting data on patients with suspected drug dependence who were undiagnosed at first and then treated for some kind of reported pain at the ED. Patients who were confirmed to have narcotics dependence were compared with control patients in a ratio of 1:3 matching for age, gender, disease, and clinical diagnoses. From January 2006 to October 2009, 26 of 223 patients treated for pain were found to be drug dependent (12 males and 14 females). The average dose of narcotics used was higher than the control group [3.23 ± 1.14 vs. 1.12 ± 0.36, p < 0.001, confidence interval (CI): 1.648-2.583]. Numbers of patients making unscheduled returns to the ED within 24 hours were significant [24/26 vs. 8/78, p ≤ 0.001, odds ratio (OR) 105.00, 95% CI 20.834-529.175]. In addition, patients showing aggressive attitudes were significant (17/26 vs. 2/78, p < 0.001, OR 71.78, 95% CI 14.206-362.663). In the case group, six of them told the physician that they were allergic to medicines other than the particular one they wanted, and three of the six presented injuries that were reported to be in the same (or repeated) place for unscheduled returns, which were not found in the control group. In this study, some behaviors were commonly observed in the at-risk group. These patients were prone to manifest some types of symptoms and behaviors, such as uncontrolled pain with three doses of analgesics, aggressive attitude, returning to the ED within 24 hours with the complaint of the same severe pain, repeating the same injury, claiming allergy to other analgesics, and asking for certain analgesics. All these behaviors should alert the physician to suspect a drug-seeking problem. Copyright © 2012

  2. Overprescription of postoperative narcotics: a look at postoperative pain medication delivery, consumption and disposal in urological practice.

    PubMed

    Bates, Cory; Laciak, Robert; Southwick, Andrew; Bishoff, Jay

    2011-02-01

    Prescription narcotic abuse is a significant social problem. Surplus medication following surgery is 1 source of prescription diversion. We assessed prescribing practices, consumption and disposal of prescribed narcotics after urological surgery. Surveys were administered to a 3-month consecutive sample of adult patients who underwent surgery performed by full and adjunct University of Utah Urology faculty. Surveys were performed 2 to 4 weeks postoperatively. With the exception of the investigators, prescribing physicians had no prior knowledge of the study. Data collected included perception of pain control, type and quantity of medication prescribed, quantity of leftover medication, refills needed, disposal instructions and surplus medication disposition. Overall 47% of 586 patients participated in the study. Hydrocodone was prescribed most commonly (63%), followed by oxycodone (35%), and 86% of the patients were satisfied with pain control. Of the dispensed narcotics 58% was consumed and 12% of patients requested refills. A total of 67% of patients had surplus medication from the initial prescription and 92% received no disposal instructions for surplus medication. Of those patients with leftover medication 91% kept the medication at home while 6% threw it in the trash, 2% flushed it down the toilet and less than 1% returned it to a pharmacy. Overprescription of narcotics is common and retained surplus medication presents a readily available source of opioid diversion. It appears that no entity on the prescribing or dispensing ends of prescription opioid delivery is fulfilling the responsibility to accurately educate patients on proper surplus medication disposal. Surgeons should analyze prescribing practices and consider decreasing the quantity of postoperative narcotics prescribed. Copyright © 2011 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Narcotics Anonymous participation and changes in substance use and social support.

    PubMed

    Toumbourou, John Winston; Hamilton, Margaret; U'Ren, Alison; Stevens-Jones, Pru; Storey, Gordon

    2002-07-01

    In Victoria (a southern Australian state) in 1995, Narcotics Anonymous had a small but growing membership providing an opportunity to study the early experience of new self-help members. Ninety-one new members were interviewed and 62 (68%) were reinterviewed after 12 months. Three measures of self-help participation were examined: service role involvement, step work, and stable meeting attendance. Lower prior involvement in treatment services and greater participation in self-help predicted subsequent self-help participation. Higher levels of secondary school education predicted service role involvement and longer periods in stable meeting attendance. Higher self-help participation through the 12 months prior to follow-up was associated with lower levels of hazardous alcohol use and higher emotional support at reinterview. Multivariate regression analysis suggested stable self-help meeting attendance and step work continued to predict reductions in hazardous alcohol use and improvements in social support, after controlling for a range of alternative predictors.

  4. A Sensitive, Selective, and Portable Detector for Contraband: The Compact Integrated Narcotics Detection Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    T. O. Tuemer; L. Doan; C. W. Su; J. Baritelle; B. Rhoton

    2000-06-04

    This paper describes the design and operation of a Compact Integrated Narcotics Detection Instrument (CINDI), which utilizes neutrons emitted from {sup 252}Cf. Neutrons emitted from the front face of CINDI penetrate dense compartment barrier materials with little change in energy but are backscattered by hydrogen-rich materials such as drugs. CINDI has led to a new technology that shows promise for identifying the concealed contraband. Carriers such as vehicles, marine vessels, airplanes, containers, cargo, and luggage will be scanned using both neutron and gamma-ray sources. The signal from both the neutron and gamma-ray backscattering and/or transmission can be used simultaneously to detect and possibly identify the contrabands it has been trained for.

  5. The family experiences of narcotic addicts and their subsequent parenting practices.

    PubMed

    Nurco, D N; Blatchley, R J; Hanlon, T E; O'Grady, K E; McCarren, M

    1998-02-01

    This survey study of male and female narcotic addicts participating in methadone maintenance programs examined self-reported retrospective data on parental behavior experienced by addicts during their adolescent years. These findings were contrasted with the addicts' self-report of their current parenting practices with their own adolescent children. Results showed addicts as perceiving their mothers as significantly more functional in their parenting practices than their fathers on indices of parental involvement, attachment, and responsibility. Significant parenting differences between addicts and their parents were reported for the three indices mentioned, as well as for parent discipline and punitive actions, with the addicts rating their current parenting practices as more effective than those of their parents. Reported parenting practices were further analyzed in the context of how the ratings of parental functioning were related to problems of drug and alcohol abuse exhibited in the home. Findings are discussed in terms of the implications for prevention and treatment approaches for addicts and their children.

  6. Suprofen: the pharmacology and clinical efficacy of a new non-narcotic peripheral analgesic.

    PubMed

    Tolman, E L; Rosenthale, M E; Capetola, R J; McGuire, J L

    1984-08-01

    Suprofen is a potent, peripherally-acting, non-narcotic analgesic agent. The mechanism of action of the compound involves inhibition of prostaglandin biosynthesis and, perhaps, direct antagonism of the peripheral, pain inducing actions of prostaglandins, bradykinin and other pain mediators. Suprofen at a dose of 200 mg appears to be equal or greater in efficacy as an analgesic modality than those of ibuprofen, propoxyphene, naproxen and diflunisal or a combination of 650 mg aspirin plus 60 mg codeine. Its clinical utility has been amply demonstrated in the treatment of a number of types of pain including general and orthopedic surgery, episiotomy, post-partum pain, dysmenorrhea, dental pain and musculoskeletal disorders. Suprofen represents a new class of orally effective nonnarcotic analgesics with potential for effective clinical use in the treatment of pain.

  7. [The effect of blood serum proteins from the seal on the analgetic action of narcotic analgesics].

    PubMed

    Aslaniants, Zh K; Melik-Eganov, G R; Evstratov, A V; Ivanov, M P; Batrakov, S G; Korobov, N V; Iasnetsov, V V

    1991-11-01

    The protein fraction isolated from blood of seal, Phoca groenlandica, has been found to produce hyperalgesic effect on rats exposed to thermic or electrocutaneous nociceptive stimulation, but fail to affect writhes provoked by intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid solution on mice. When combined with morphine, the fraction lowered completely its narcotic analgetic action in the above mentioned tests. On the contrary, these same proteins combined with promedol or fentanil enhanced and prolonged analgetic effect of the latter. Tested in vitro the protein showed neither opioid nor anti-opioid activity. Therefore it is reasonable to suppose that neurophysiological activity of the isolated fraction is due to the peptides formed on enzymatic hydrolysis of proteins in vivo rather than these proteins as such.

  8. THE USE OF CHANGES IN CAPILLARY PERMEABILITY IN MICE TO DISTINGUISH BETWEEN NARCOTIC AND NONNARCOTIC ALALGESICS.

    PubMed

    WHITTLE, B A

    1964-04-01

    An extension of the "squirming test" is described which makes the method specific for nonnarcotic analgesics. The intraperitoneal injection of acetic acid causes squirming and an increase in capillary permeability that is measured by direct estimation of plasma-bound dye (Pontamine Sky Blue) which has leaked into the peritoneal cavity. Nonnarcotic analgesics inhibit squirming and leakage of dye. Values for the oral ED50s for both effects are given for a number of typical compounds. Narcotic analgesics, in doses that produce analgesia, inhibit squirming but do not significantly affect leakage of dye. Drugs that stimulate the central nervous system and also inhibit squirming have no significant effect on leakage of dye over the range of doses which inhibit squirming. Corticosteroids do not significantly inhibit either squirming or leakage of dye.

  9. Mechanism of action of narcotics in the production of menstrual dysfunction in women.

    PubMed

    Santen, F J; Sofsky, J; Bilic, N; Lippert, R

    1975-06-01

    The ability of morphine to block ovulation in animals prompted investigation of the frequency and mechanisms of menstrual abnormalities in women addicted to narcotic analgesics. Menstrual histories obtained from 76 former heroin addicts receiving daily methadone maintenance revealed that more than one-half of these women had experienced menstrual abnormalities while taking heroin or methadone. In order to determine the specific physiologic effects of narcotic analgesics on reproductive function, detailed endocrinologic studies were carried out in seven of these patients who complained of amenorrhea or irregular menses while receiving methadone. Four of the seven women manifested abnormalities of the control of gonadotropin secretion. Three of these four failed to exhibit cyclic gonadotropin release, as evidenced by an absence of increased levels of follicular phase follicle-stimulating hormone, midcycle gonadotropin peaks or luteal phase progesterone increments. In the fourth patient a prolonged follicular phase (30 days) of the menstrual cycle was detected. One of these four patients also had low basal gonadotropin levels and failed to exhibit luteinizing hormone increments greater than control levels in response to ethinyl estradiol (positive feedback). The remaining three women exhibited normal patterns of gonadotropin secretion during the observation period. In these women, menstrual bleeding occurred in response to withdrawal from luteal phase (10 to 20 ng/ml) progesterone levels and to exogenous ethinyl estradiol, suggesting normal uterine responsivity to progesterone and estrogen. Although not documented, it is likely that oligo-ovulation was the cause of the irregular menses in these three patients. Amenorrhea is commonly associated with methadone ingestion or heroin addiction and appears to be related to an alteration of the hypothalamic mechanisms controlling gonadotropin secretion. Tolerance to these effects of methadone may develop after chronic

  10. Ice packs reduce postoperative midline incision pain and narcotic use: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Watkins, Ammara A; Johnson, Timothy V; Shrewsberry, Adam B; Nourparvar, Paymon; Madni, Tarik; Watkins, Colyn J; Feingold, Paul L; Kooby, David A; Maithel, Shishir K; Staley, Charles A; Master, Viraj A

    2014-09-01

    Postoperative pain is an unavoidable consequence of open abdominal surgery. Although cryotherapy, the application of ice to a surgical wound site, has been shown to be effective in reducing postoperative pain in orthopaedic, gynecologic, and hernia operations, it has not been assessed in patients who undergo major open abdominal operations. We hypothesized that patients who receive cryotherapy would report lower pain scores as a primary outcomes measure. Patients undergoing abdominal operations with midline incisions were randomized to receive cryotherapy for a minimum of 24 hours in time intervals dictated by patient preference vs no cryotherapy. The primary outcome of pain relief was assessed with visual analog pain scores (VAS). The study was powered to detect a clinically significant difference in VAS between the control and cryotherapy group. Comparisons between groups were measured by Student's t-test or Mann-Whitney U test for parametric and nonparametric data, respectively. There were 55 patients randomized: 28 to the control group and 27 to the cryotherapy group. For the primary measure, mean postoperative pain score on postoperative days (PODs) 1 and 3 after surgery was significantly lower between the control and cryotherapy groups on the visual analog pain scale (p < 0.005). Narcotic use was decreased in the cryotherapy group on POD 1 by 3.9 morphine equivalents (p = 0.008). No statistically significant difference was found between the 2 treatment groups with respect to length of hospital stay, pulmonary complications, and wound infection rate in terms of secondary measures. Ice packs are a simple, cost-effective adjuvant for decreasing postoperative pain and narcotic use in patients undergoing major abdominal operations. Copyright © 2014 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Regional analgesia combined with avoidance of narcotics may reduce the incidence of postoperative vomiting in children.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Samia N; Farag, Adel; Hanna, Ehab; Govindaraj, Ranganathan; Chuang, Alice Z

    2005-02-01

    The anesthesia literature cites a high incidence of postoperative vomiting (POV) after pediatric ochidopexy and hernia repair (34-50%) and after penile procedures (37-49%). We hypothesized that regional analgesia combined with avoidance of narcotics administered to children scheduled for lower abdominal or urologic procedures may be associated with a lower incidence of POV. The aim of this prospective study was to 1) assess the incidence of POV in children in the hospital and during a 24-h post-anesthesia study period, and 2) evaluate the effect of age on POV. After obtaining institutional and parental consent, 110 pediatric outpatients, 1-12 yr old, ASA physical status I or II, scheduled for elective outpatient urologic or lower abdominal procedures, were enrolled. Children were fasting and premedicated with midazolam, 0.5 mg/kg p.o. They received a combined light general anesthesia and a presurgical caudal block. Anesthesia was induced via a mask and consisted of halothane and nitrous oxide in oxygen. For the caudal block 1 ml/kg of 0.25% bupivacaine or 0.2% ropivacaine were used to provide intra- and postoperative pain relief. No prophylactic antiemetics were administered. All caudal blocks provided adequate intraoperative pain relief. The incidence of POV was low, 12% at the hospital, 13% for the 24-h study period, and was not affected by age. We concluded that regional analgesia combined with the avoidance of narcotics administered to children scheduled for elective urologic or lower abdominal procedures, is associated with a lower incidence of POV and that age did not affect the incidence of POV.

  12. [Relevance of toxicological identification of narcotics in hair for maintenance therapy of opiate addicts].

    PubMed

    Karakiewicz, Beata; Kozielec, Tadeusz; Stanaszek, Roman; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2003-04-01

    The study was done in 57 psychoactive drug addicts (18 females and 39 males) who entered a methadone maintenance program in Szczecin. The age of participants ranged from 21 to 49 years (mean 32.14 years) and the mean duration of drug abuse as determined during history-taking was 11.6 years. Some of the patients became addicted at the age of just 11 years. The objectives of this work were: a) to apply segmental analysis of hair for studying psychoactive agents and their derivatives in drug abusers during the acute intoxication phase and maintenance therapy; b) to determine if narcotics found in hair matched with findings during history-taking; c) to check the relevance of toxicological tests for psychoactive drug content in hair for monitoring abstinence in maintenance programs. The material consisted of hair sampled from 57 patients who were visited the Outpatient Department for Drug Abusers of the Regional Mental Care Center in Szczecin (Poland). Opioids (morphine, codeine, 6-mono-acetyl-morphine, methadone) were determined using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS-ITD) and a Varian 3400 gas chromatography (USA) coupled to a mass spectrometer (Magnum ionic trapping system, Finnigan Mat, USA). Amphetamines (EP, MK, MA, AMP, MDA, MDMA, MDEA) were analyzed with a liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) system (LC/MS HP-1100, Hewlett-Packard, USA), equipped with an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) chamber and dedicated software. Statistical analysis of the results was done. The following conclusions were drawn: toxicological examination of narcotic content in hair is a useful method for studying the history of drug addiction during the period of time equivalent, to the length of hair. Psychoactive substances detected in hair were in most cases consistent with the history of drug abuse. Analysis of psychoactive substances in hair may be applied for identification of addicting drugs and for abstinence control in therapeutic and

  13. Study to investigate the trace levels of contamination on surfaces when narcotic contraband is concealed in a vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Rod; Brittain, Alan H.

    1997-01-01

    When a vehicle is used to transport narcotic contraband material trace levels of that material can be found on surfaces of the vehicle, people associated with the vehicle and surface they contact. The detection of these trace levels can help to target vehicles associated with the smuggling of the contraband. A study to determine the typical levels of narcotic material that can be detected from these surfaces has been performed by personnel from Graseby, using a variety of drug materials. The size and packaging of the drug materials has been prepared to try to reflect that typically found in smuggling operations. These tests show that for all hard drugs easily detectable traces of drug material can be found on the vehicle, the proxy and secondary surfaces handled by the proxy. For detection of cannabis, the condition of the original material had a great bearing ont he reliability of detection.

  14. The Narcotics Emirate of Afghanistan: Armed Polities and Their Roles in Illicit Drug Production and Conflict 1980-2010

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    more than just profit and resources. Participants stand to gain political leverage, the social and political legitimacy derived from “protecting” the...support. This study also suggests that one additional factor, social control, is a key motivator for an actor’s participation in the narcotics...political leverage, the social and political legitimacy derived from “protecting” the livelihoods of rural farmers, as well as “freedom of action

  15. Multimodal analgesia reduces narcotic requirements and antiemetic rescue medication in laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery.

    PubMed

    Ziemann-Gimmel, Patrick; Hensel, Priscilla; Koppman, John; Marema, Robert

    2013-01-01

    After bariatric surgery, patients are at risk for narcotic-related side effects. Multimodal pain management strategies should be used when possible to reduce the consumption of narcotic medication. The purpose of this study was to investigate whether multimodal analgesia reduces narcotic consumption and may have an influence on opioid-related side effects in patients undergoing laparoscopic Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery (LRYGB). In this retrospective data analysis, we examined the data of a total of 181 consecutive patients undergoing LRYGB. In January 2011, i.v. acetaminophen became clinically available. Hydromorphone patient controlled analgesia (PCA) was replaced by i.v. acetaminophen and i.v. ketorolac (TNT-Tylenol and Toradol). The first 89 patients received postoperative hydromorphone PCA (PCA group). The next 92 patients received i.v. acetaminophen and i.v. ketorolac every 6 hours for the first 24 hours (TNT group). In the TNT group, 8 patients were excluded in the analysis. There were no differences in clinical characteristics between the groups except for smoking history. Patients treated with PCA required 4.2 mg hydromorphone in the postoperative period. Patients in the TNT group required 1.1 mg hydromorphone. This was a statistically significant reduction of opioids by 73.8%. After discharge from postanesthesia care unit, 34.8% of patients required antiemetic rescue medication (AERM) compared with 20.2% in the TNT group (P<.001). The relative risk (AERM/no AERM) in the postoperative period after postanesthesia care unit discharge is 1.75 (95% CI, 1.05-2.92). This study suggests that a multimodal analgesic regimen (TNT) can reduce postoperative narcotic consumption, which may lead to a reduction in the number of patients requiring AERM. Copyright © 2013 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation vs intrathecal narcotic pump infusion for pain control in chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Noureddine, Lama; Howard, Thomas; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-04-28

    To evaluate pain control in chronic pancreatitis patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation or intrathecal narcotic pump infusion. We recognized 13 patients who underwent intrathecal narcotic pump (ITNP) infusion and 57 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation (TP + ICT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) pain control between 1998 and 2008 at Indiana University Hospital. All patients had already failed multiple other modalities for pain control and the decision to proceed with either intervention was made at the discretion of the patients and their treating physicians. All patients were evaluated retrospectively using a questionnaire inquiring about their pain control (using a 0-10 pain scale), daily narcotic dose usage, and hospital admission days for pain control before each intervention and during their last follow-up. All 13 ITNP patients and 30 available TP + ICT patients were evaluated. The mean age was approximately 40 years in both groups. The median duration of pain before intervention was 6 years and 7 years in the ITNP and TP + ICT groups, respectively. The median pain score dropped from 8 to 2.5 (on a scale of 0-10) in both groups on their last follow up. The median daily dose of narcotics also decreased from 393 mg equivalent of morphine sulfate to 8 mg in the ITNP group and from 300 mg to 40 mg in the TP + ICT group. No patient had diabetes mellitus (DM) before either procedure whereas 85% of those who underwent pancreatectomy were insulin dependent on their last evaluation despite ICT. ITNP and TP + ICT are comparable for pain control in patients with CP however with high incidence of DM among those who underwent TP + ICT. Prospective comparative studies and longer follow up are needed to better define treatment outcomes.

  17. Total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation vs intrathecal narcotic pump infusion for pain control in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Mokadem, Mohamad; Noureddine, Lama; Howard, Thomas; McHenry, Lee; Sherman, Stuart; Fogel, Evan L; Watkins, James L; Lehman, Glen A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To evaluate pain control in chronic pancreatitis patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with islet cell transplantation or intrathecal narcotic pump infusion. METHODS: We recognized 13 patients who underwent intrathecal narcotic pump (ITNP) infusion and 57 patients who underwent total pancreatectomy with autologous islet cell transplantation (TP + ICT) for chronic pancreatitis (CP) pain control between 1998 and 2008 at Indiana University Hospital. All patients had already failed multiple other modalities for pain control and the decision to proceed with either intervention was made at the discretion of the patients and their treating physicians. All patients were evaluated retrospectively using a questionnaire inquiring about their pain control (using a 0-10 pain scale), daily narcotic dose usage, and hospital admission days for pain control before each intervention and during their last follow-up. RESULTS: All 13 ITNP patients and 30 available TP + ICT patients were evaluated. The mean age was approximately 40 years in both groups. The median duration of pain before intervention was 6 years and 7 years in the ITNP and TP + ICT groups, respectively. The median pain score dropped from 8 to 2.5 (on a scale of 0-10) in both groups on their last follow up. The median daily dose of narcotics also decreased from 393 mg equivalent of morphine sulfate to 8 mg in the ITNP group and from 300 mg to 40 mg in the TP + ICT group. No patient had diabetes mellitus (DM) before either procedure whereas 85% of those who underwent pancreatectomy were insulin dependent on their last evaluation despite ICT. CONCLUSION: ITNP and TP + ICT are comparable for pain control in patients with CP however with high incidence of DM among those who underwent TP + ICT. Prospective comparative studies and longer follow up are needed to better define treatment outcomes. PMID:27122666

  18. EFFECT OF HIV PREVENTION AND TREATMENT PROGRAM ON HIV AND HCV TRANSMISSION AND HIV MORTALITY AT AN INDONESIAN NARCOTIC PRISON.

    PubMed

    Nelwan, Erni J; Indrati, Agnes K; Isa, Ahmad; Triani, Nurlita; Alam, Nisaa Nur; Herlan, Maria S; Husen, Wahid; Pohan, Herdiman T; Alisjahbana, Bachti; Meheus, Andre; Van Crevel, Reinout; van der Ven, Andre Jam

    2015-09-01

    Validated data regarding HIV-transmission in prisons in developing countries is scarce. We examined sexual and injecting drug use behavior and HIV and HCV transmission in an Indonesian narcotic prison during the implementation of an HIV prevention and treatment program during 2004-2007 when the Banceuy Narcotic Prison in Indonesia conducted an HIV transmission prevention program to provide 1) HIV education, 2) voluntary HIV testing and counseling, 3) condom supply, 4) prevention of rape and sexual violence, 5) antiretroviral treatment for HIV-positive prisoners and 6) methadone maintenance treatment. During a first survey that was conducted between 2007 and 2009, new prisoners entered Banceuy Narcotics Prison were voluntary tested for HIV and HCV-infection after written informed consent was obtained. Information regarding sexual and injecting risk behavior and physical status were also recorded at admission to the prison. Participants who tested negative for both HIV and HCV during the first survey were included in a second survey conducted during 2008-2011. During both surveys, data on mortality among HIV-seropositive patients were also recorded. All HIV-seropositive participants receive treatment for HIV. HIV/ AIDS-related deaths decreased: 43% in 2006, 18% in 2007, 9% in 2008 and 0% in 2009. No HIV and HCV seroconversion inside Banceuy Narcotic Prison were found after a median of 23 months imprisonment (maximum follow-up: 38 months). Total of 484.8 person-years observation was done. Participants reported HIV transmission risk-behavior in Banceuy Prison during the second survey was low. After implementation of HIV prevention and treatment program, no new HIV or HCV cases were detected and HIV-related mortality decreased.

  19. Long-term usage of narcotic analgesics by chronic intractable noncancer pain patients in Taiwan from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Cheng, I-Chen; Chang, Chih-Shiuh; Tsay, Wen-Ing

    2016-09-01

    Chronic pain is a common and important medical problem worldwide. Patients with chronic intractable noncancer pain (CINCP) are treated primarily with narcotics. We analyzed the characteristics of patients with CINCP and the pain prescriptions of Taiwan's physicians. We enrolled 644 patients from 66 hospitals approved by the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration to use long-term narcotics for CINCP between 2003 and 2012. The majority (61.8%) of patients were 40-49-year-old men who had been treated with pethidine more often than with fentanyl in the 20-49 years age group. More than 50% of CINCP patients live in northern Taiwan, and most were treated in the department of pain; the major diagnosis (men 28.9%; women 27.7%) was neuropathy. The most frequently prescribed single analgesic was morphine (52.2%); the most frequently prescribed two-drug combination was morphine plus fentanyl (50.8%). Pethidine, however, was the most frequently prescribed analgesic in the neurology (78.0%) and plastic surgery (50.0%) departments. To decrease malaise and addiction in patients with CINCP, Taiwan's physicians need more education on narcotic analgesics, and greater professional cooperation to develop therapeutic guidelines that will improve pain care for patients with CINCP. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Mineralcorticoid antagonists in heart failure.

    PubMed

    D'Elia, Emilia; Krum, Henry

    2014-10-01

    Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists (MRAs) have become mandated therapy in patients with reduced ejection fraction (systolic) heart failure (HF) across all symptom classes. These agents should also be prescribed in the early post-myocardial infarction setting in those with reduced ejection fraction and either HF symptoms or diabetes. This article explores the pathophysiological role of aldosterone, an endogenous ligand for the mineralcorticoid receptor (MR), and summarizes the clinical data supporting guideline recommendations for these agents in systolic HF. The use of MRAs in novel areas beyond systolic HF ejection is also explored. Finally, the current status of newer agents will be examined.