Science.gov

Sample records for narrow pion-proton states

  1. Cross-Section Parameterizations for Pion and Nucleon Production From Negative Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norbury, John W.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Norman, Ryan; Tripathi, R. K.

    2002-01-01

    Ranft has provided parameterizations of Lorentz invariant differential cross sections for pion and nucleon production in pion-proton collisions that are compared to some recent data. The Ranft parameterizations are then numerically integrated to form spectral and total cross sections. These numerical integrations are further parameterized to provide formula for spectral and total cross sections suitable for use in radiation transport codes. The reactions analyzed are for charged pions in the initial state and both charged and neutral pions in the final state.

  2. Do narrow {Sigma}-hypernuclear states exist?

    SciTech Connect

    Chrien, R.E.

    1995-12-31

    Reports of narrow states in {Sigma}-hypernucleus production have appeared from time to time. The present experiment is a repeat of the first and seemingly most definitive such experiment, that on a target of {sup 9}Be, but with much better statistics. No narrow states were observed.

  3. Enrico Fermi: The First Chain Reactor (with Film) and Pion-Proton Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, Ron

    2003-01-08

    A twenty minute film will be shown depicting the first nuclear chain reactor at the University of Chicago on December 2, 1942. The film was made of a re-enactment in 1952 and is narrated by Arthur Compton and Enrico Fermi. After the film, Ronald Martin will talk about his experiences on pion-proton scattering with Enrico Fermi at the Chicago synchrocyclotron in the fifties.

  4. Exotic Meson Spectroscopy in Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adams, Gary

    2000-10-01

    Although the form of the QCD Lagrangian is well established, the structure of the low lying hadrons is still an open question. The existence of gluonic states has emerged as one of the most promising avenues for further study. Lattice gauge calculations of hybrid meson masses lead one to believe that there should be numerous states below 2.5 GeV/c^2 in mass.[1] Flux-tube model predictions suggest that many of these states should have decay widths comparable to those of other mesons.[2] The predictions for exotic hybrids, for example those with J^pc= 1^-+, are particularly noteworthy since those states are excluded in the conventional quark-model picture for mesons. Previous attempts to locate these exotic states met with rather limited success. The present experiment, E852 at Brookhaven National Laboratory, has carried out a high-statistics search for exotic mesons by measuring multi-meson final-state decays. The measurements were made with 18 GeV negative pions incident on a proton target. Partial wave analyses of the exclusive final states allow one to extract resonance parameters even in the presence of many overlapping states. The results of these fits demonstrate the existence of isovector exotic mesons at 1.4 and 1.6 GeV/c^2. The latter state dominates the η 'π ^- decay spectrum. The data on η π ^+ π ^-π ^- decay show large strength in several exotic waves as well. 1. C. Bernard, et al., Phys.Rev. D56, 7039 (1997); P. Lacock, et al., Phys. Lett. B401, 308 (1997). 2. N. Isgur and J. Paton, Phys. Rev. D31, 2910 (1985); T. Barnes, F.E. Close and E.S. Swanson, Phys. Rev. D52, 5242 (1995).

  5. Analyzing power in pion-proton bremsstrahlung, and the. Delta. sup ++ (1232) magnetic moment

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Schaad, M.; Riedlberger, J.; Truoel, P. ); Bistirlich, J.A.; Crowe, K.M.; Ljungfelt, S.; Meyer, C.A. ); van den Brandt, B.; Konter, J.A.; Mango, S.; Renker, D. ); Loude, J.F.; Perroud, J.P. ); Haddock, R.P. ); Sober, D.I. )

    1991-10-01

    We report on a first measurement of the polarized-target asymmetry of the pion-proton bremsstrahlung cross section ({pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup {minus}}{ital p}{gamma}). As in previous cross section measurements the pion energy (298 MeV) and the detector geometry for this experiment was chosen to optimize the sensitivity to the radiation from the magnetic dipole moment of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232) resonance {mu}{sub {Delta}}. Comparison to a recent isobar model for pion-nucleon bremsstrahlung yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=(1.62{plus minus}0.18){mu}{sub {ital p}}, where {mu}{sub {ital p}} is the proton magnetic moment. Since the asymmetry depends less than the cross section on the choice of the other input parameters for the model, their uncertainties affect this analysis by less than the experimental error. However the theory fails to represent both the cross section and the asymmetry data at the highest photon energies. Hence further improvements in the calculations are needed before the model dependence of the magnetic moment analysis can be fully assessed. The present result agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}. As a by-product, the analyzing power for elastic {pi}{sup +}{ital p} scattering at 415 MeV/{ital c} was also measured. This second result is in good agreement with phase shift calculations.

  6. Theory of current states in narrow superconducting channels

    SciTech Connect

    Ivlev, B.I.; Kopnin, N.B.

    1984-03-01

    The properties of narrow superconducting channels carrying a direct current are reviewed. Among the topics covered are the stability of the normal state of the current-carrying channel and the mechanism for a transition from this normal state to the superconducting state. In a homogeneous channel, the transition occurs through the formation of a critical nucleus and is a first-order phase transition. In a channel with inhomogeneities, the transition is quite different. In this case the normal state can exist only down to a certain value of the current, below which the normal state is absolutely unstable. The review is devoted primarily to the theory of the resistive state of narrow channels, which exists at currents above the critical Ginzburg-Landau current. The description is based on the concept of phase-slippage centers. Phenomenological models are discussed, as is a model of a fluctuational excitation of phase-slippage centers. The results obtained from the microscopic dynamic theory of superconductivity are discussed at length. Among these results are the voltage-current characteristic of the resistive state, the abrupt change in the voltage on this characteristic, and the structure of the phase-slippage centers.

  7. Narrow chaotic compound autoionizing states in atomic spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Flambaum, V.V.; Gribakina, A.A.; Gribakin, G.F.

    1996-09-01

    Simultaneous excitation of several valence electrons in atoms gives rise to a dense spectrum of compound autoionizing states (AIS). These states are almost chaotic superpositions of large numbers of many-electron basis states built of single-electron orbitals. The mean level spacing {ital D} between such states is very small (e.g., {ital D}{lt}0.01 eV for the numerical example of {ital J}{sup {pi}}=4{sup {minus}} states of Ce just above the ionization threshold). The autoionization widths of these states estimated by perturbations, {gamma}=2{pi}{vert_bar}{ital W}{vert_bar}{sup 2}, where {ital W} is the Coulomb matrix element coupling the AIS to the continuum, are also small, but comparable with {ital D} in magnitude: {gamma}{approximately}{ital D}. Hence the nonperturbative interaction of AIS with each other via the continuum is very essential. It suppresses greatly the widths of the autoionizing resonances ({Gamma}{approx_equal}{ital D}{sup 2}/3{gamma}{lt}{ital D}), and leads to the emergence of a {open_quote}{open_quote}collective{close_quote}{close_quote} doorway state which accumulates a large share of the total width. This state is in essence a modified single-particle continuum decoupled from the resonances due to its large width. Narrow compound AIS should be a common feature of atomic spectra at energies sufficient for excitation of several electrons above the ground-state configuration. The narrow resonances can be observed as peaks in the photoabsorption, or, in electron-ion scattering, as Fano-type profiles on the background provided by the wide doorway-state resonance. It is also shown that the statistics of electromagnetic and autoionization amplitudes involving compound states are close to Gaussian. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  8. A search for narrow states in radiative upsilon decays

    SciTech Connect

    Lowe, S.T.

    1986-12-01

    A search for new states produced in radiative UPSILON(1S) decays is accomplished by observing the inclusive photon energy spectrum. A narrow resonance in the energy spectrum indicates the existence of a new state X produced by the process UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X. The analysis is based on approximately 0.44 x 10/sup 6/ UPSILON(1S) events produced at the DORIS II e/sup +/e/sup -/ storage ring. These data were collected with the Crystal Ball detector between April 1983 and May 1986. This analysis finds no evidence for a new state, so upper limits on the branching ratio BR(UPSILON ..-->.. ..gamma..X) are derived, assuming the state X decays primarily to high-multiplicity hadronic final states. In particular, if the state X were a minimal Higgs particle, its primary decay mode would be to the heaviest fermion-antifermion pair energetically available. For the radiative UPSILON(1S) decays studied here, the heavy fermions would be c anti c or s anti s quark states, over most of the relevant Higgs' mass range. The resulting upper limit for BR(UPSILON(1S) ..-->.. ..gamma..X) is highly energy dependent but for X mass between 1.5 GeV and 8.0 GeV, the 90% confidence level upper limit is better than 8.0 x 10/sup -4/. For a Higgs' mass near 5.0 GeV, the upper limit is about 2.0 x 10/sup -4/ which is approximately equal to the lowest order calculation for the Wilczek mechanism. The Wilczek calculation with QCD radiative corrections predict branching ratios below the limits set here for all Higgs' masses.

  9. Spectral narrowing of solid state lasers by narrow-band PTR Bragg mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, T.; Rapaport, A.; Chen, Y.; Smirnov, V.; Hemmer, M.; Glebov, L. B.; Richardson, M. C.; Bass, M.

    2006-05-01

    Dramatic spectral narrowing of normally broad band lasers, Ti:Sapphire,Cr:LiSAF, and alexandrite was achieved by simply replacing the output mirror with a reflective, volumetric Bragg grating recorded in photo thermal refractive (PTR) glass. The output power of each laser was changed very slightly from that obtained using dielectric coated output mirrors with the same output coupling as the Bragg grating while spectral brightness increased by about three orders of magnitude.

  10. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C.B.; Hackel, L.A.

    1997-11-18

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications. 5 figs.

  11. Long-pulse-width narrow-bandwidth solid state laser

    DOEpatents

    Dane, C. Brent; Hackel, Lloyd A.

    1997-01-01

    A long pulse laser system emits 500-1000 ns quasi-rectangular pulses at 527 nm with near diffraction-limited divergence and near transform-limited bandwidth. The system consists of one or more flashlamp-pumped Nd:glass zig-zag amplifiers, a very low threshold stimulated-Brillouin-scattering (SBS) phase conjugator system, and a free-running single frequency Nd:YLF master oscillator. Completely passive polarization switching provides eight amplifier gain passes. Multiple frequency output can be generated by using SBS cells having different pressures of a gaseous SBS medium or different SBS materials. This long pulse, low divergence, narrow-bandwidth, multi-frequency output laser system is ideally suited for use as an illuminator for long range speckle imaging applications. Because of its high average power and high beam quality, this system has application in any process which would benefit from a long pulse format, including material processing and medical applications.

  12. A reef in the sea of instability: Observation of a narrow state in {sup 15}F

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveira Santos, F. de [GANIL, CEA Collaboration: E521S Collaboration

    2011-11-30

    The properties of the low lying states of {sup 15}F were studied by measuring the resonant elastic scattering of an {sup 14}O radioactive beam on protons. This experiment was performed at GANIL with a post-accelerated beam produced by the SPIRAL1 facility. We confirm the existence of a second excited state in {sup 15}F with a narrow width, which may seem particularly surprising for a state located above the Coulomb barrier.

  13. Solid-State Laser Source of Tunable Narrow-Bandwidth Ultraviolet Radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Lew; Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffrey P.

    1998-01-01

    A solid-state laser source of tunable and narrow-bandwidth UV light is disclosed. The system relies on light from a diode laser that preferably generates light at infrared frequencies. The light from the seed diode laser is pulse amplified in a light amplifier, and converted into the ultraviolet by frequency tripling, quadrupling, or quintupling the infrared light. The narrow bandwidth, or relatively pure light, of the seed laser is preserved, and the pulse amplifier generates high peak light powers to increase the efficiency of the nonlinear crystals in the frequency conversion stage. Higher output powers may be obtained by adding a fiber amplifier to power amplify the pulsed laser light prior to conversion.

  14. Preparation of RNA samples with narrow line widths for solid state NMR investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Wei; Bardaro, Michael F.; Varani, Gabriele; Drobny, Gary P.

    2012-10-01

    Solid state NMR can provide detailed structural and dynamic information on biological systems that cannot be studied under solution conditions, and can investigate motions which occur with rates that cannot be fully studied by solution NMR. This approach has successfully been used to study proteins, but the application of multidimensional solid state NMR to RNA has been limited because reported line widths have been too broad to execute most multidimensional experiments successfully. A reliable method to generate spectra with narrow line widths is necessary to apply the full range of solid state NMR spectroscopic approaches to RNA. Using the HIV-1 transactivation response (TAR) RNA as a model, we present an approach based on precipitation with polyethylene glycol that improves the line width of 13C signals in TAR from >6 ppm to about 1 ppm, making solid state 2D NMR studies of selectively enriched RNAs feasible at ambient temperature.

  15. TheX(4350) Narrow Structure Described As a 1{sup -+} Exotic State

    SciTech Connect

    Dias, Jorgivan M.; Albuquerque, Raphael M.; Nielsen, Marina

    2010-11-12

    We use the QCD sum rules to test if the narrow structure X(4350) can be described as a J{sup PC} = 1{sup -+} exotic D{sub s}*D{sub s0}* molecular state. We consider the contribution of the condensates up to dimension eight and we keep terms wich are linear in the strange quark mass m{sub s}. We obtain m{sub D{sub sD{sub s{sub 0*}}}} (5.05{+-}0.19) GeV which is much bigger than the X(4350) experimental mass.

  16. Two Active States of the Narrow-Line Gamma-Ray-Loud AGN GB 1310 + 487

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sokolovsky, K. V.; Schinzel, F. K.; Tanaka, Y. T.; Abolmasov, P. K.; Angelakis, E.; Bulgarelli, A.; Carrasco, L.; Cenko, S. B.; Cheung, C. C.; Clubb, K. I.; D'Ammando, F.; Escande, L.; Fegan, S. J.; Filippenko, A. V.; Finke, J. D.; Fuhrmann, L.; Fukazawa, Y.; Hays, E.; Healey, S. E.; Ikejiri, Y.; Itoh, R.; Kawabata, K. S.; Komatsu, T.; Kovalev, Yu. A.; Kovalev, Y. Y.; Krichbaum, T. P.

    2014-01-01

    Context. Previously unremarkable, the extragalactic radio source GB1310 487 showed gamma-ray flare on 2009 November 18, reaching a daily flux of approximately 10(exp -6) photons cm(exp -2) s(exp -1) at energies E greater than 100MeV and became one of the brightest GeV sources for about two weeks. Its optical spectrum shows strong forbidden-line emission while lacking broad permitted lines, which is not typical for a blazar. Instead, the spectrum resembles those of narrow emission-line galaxies. Aims. We investigate changes in the object's radio-to-GeV spectral energy distribution (SED) during and after the prominent gamma-ray flare with the aim of determining the nature of the object and of constraining the origin of the variable high-energy emission. Methods. The data collected by the Fermi and AGILE satellites at gamma-ray energies; Swift at X-ray and ultraviolet (UV); the Kanata, NOT, and Keck telescopes at optical; OAGH and WISE at infrared (IR); and IRAM30m, OVRO 40m, Effelsberg 100m, RATAN-600, and VLBA at radio are analyzed together to trace the SED evolution on timescales of months. Results. The gamma-ray radio-loud narrow-line active galactic nucleus (AGN) is located at redshift z = 0.638. It shines through an unrelated foreground galaxy at z = 0.500. The AGN light is probably amplified by gravitational lensing. The AGN SED shows a two-humped structure typical of blazars and gamma-ray-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies, with the high-energy (inverse-Compton) emission dominating by more than an order of magnitude over the low-energy (synchrotron) emission during gamma-ray flares. The difference between the two SED humps is smaller during the low-activity state. Fermi observations reveal a strong correlation between the gamma-ray flux and spectral index, with the hardest spectrum observed during the brightest gamma-ray state. The gamma-ray flares occurred before and during a slow rising trend in the radio, but no direct association between gamma-ray and

  17. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Paola, D. M.; Kesaria, M.; Makarovsky, O.; Velichko, A.; Eaves, L.; Mori, N.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.

    2016-08-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as “stepping stones” for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics.

  18. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode

    PubMed Central

    Di Paola, D. M.; Kesaria, M.; Makarovsky, O.; Velichko, A.; Eaves, L.; Mori, N.; Krier, A.; Patanè, A.

    2016-01-01

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as “stepping stones” for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics. PMID:27535896

  19. Resonant Zener tunnelling via zero-dimensional states in a narrow gap diode.

    PubMed

    Di Paola, D M; Kesaria, M; Makarovsky, O; Velichko, A; Eaves, L; Mori, N; Krier, A; Patanè, A

    2016-08-18

    Interband tunnelling of carriers through a forbidden energy gap, known as Zener tunnelling, is a phenomenon of fundamental and technological interest. Its experimental observation in the Esaki p-n semiconductor diode has led to the first demonstration and exploitation of quantum tunnelling in a condensed matter system. Here we demonstrate a new type of Zener tunnelling that involves the resonant transmission of electrons through zero-dimensional (0D) states. In our devices, a narrow quantum well of the mid-infrared (MIR) alloy In(AsN) is placed in the intrinsic (i) layer of a p-i-n diode. The incorporation of nitrogen in the quantum well creates 0D states that are localized on nanometer lengthscales. These levels provide intermediate states that act as "stepping stones" for electrons tunnelling across the diode and give rise to a negative differential resistance (NDR) that is weakly dependent on temperature. These electron transport properties have potential for the development of nanometre-scale non-linear components for electronics and MIR photonics.

  20. Achievement Gaps for Students with Disabilities: Stable, Widening, or Narrowing on a State-Wide Reading Comprehension Test?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schulte, Ann C.; Stevens, Joseph J.; Elliott, Stephen N.; Tindal, Gerald; Nese, Joseph F. T.

    2016-01-01

    Reading comprehension growth trajectories from 3rd to 7th grade were estimated for 99,919 students on a state reading comprehension assessment. We examined whether differences between students in general education (GE) and groups of students identified as exceptional learners were best characterized as stable, widening, or narrowing. The groups…

  1. Birefringence of solid-state laser media: broadband tuning discontinuities and application to laser line narrowing

    SciTech Connect

    Krasinski, J.S.; Band, Y.B.; Chin, T.; Heller, D.F.; Morris, R.C.; Papanestor, P.

    1989-04-15

    Spectral consequences that result from using birefringent media with broadband gain inside of laser cavities containing polarizing elements are described. We show that the laser intensity is modulated as a function of the output frequency unless the cavity elements are carefully aligned so that their polarization axis coincides with a principal optical axis of the gain medium. Analysis of the tuning characteristics of a birefringent polarization-dependent gain medium is exploited to provide a simple method for line narrowing the laser output. By introduction of an intracavity birefringent compensator the narrow-band output can be continuously tuned. Experimental results for alexandrite lasers are presented.

  2. Search for narrow diquonium states in π -p interactions at 10 GeV/ c

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evangelista, C.; Ghidini, B.; Palano, A.; Zito, G.; Mättig, P.; Muller, K.; Paul, E.; French, B. R.; Palazzi-Cerrina, C.; Strub, R.; Thompson, A. S.; Smith, I. L.; Armstrong, T.; Hughes, I.; Lewis, G. M.; Turnbull, R.; Best, C.; Ronald, R.; Edwards, D. N.; Houlden, M. A.; Costa, G.; Mandelli, L.; Pensotti, S.; Perini, L.; Tamborini, M.; Mitaroff, W. A.; Bari-Bonn-CERN-Daresbury-Glasgow-Liverpool-Milano-Vienna Collaboration

    Narrow diquonium production in the reactions π -p→ overlinepπ -pp, overlinepπ -pπ +n andoverlinepπ -ppπ 0 is investigated in a 5.3 ev/nb experiment performed at the Omega Spectrometer. The computed upper limits are compared with the predictions of the Chan-Høgaasen model.

  3. Subanesthetic doses of ketamine stabilize the fusion pore in a narrow flickering state in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lasič, Eva; Rituper, Boštjan; Jorgačevski, Jernej; Kreft, Marko; Stenovec, Matjaž; Zorec, Robert

    2016-09-01

    Ketamine is an anesthetic that exhibits analgesic, psychotomimetic, and rapid antidepressant effects that are of particular neuropharmacological interest. Recent studies revealed astrocytic Ca(2+) signaling and regulated exocytosis as ketamine-targeted processes. Thus high-resolution cell-attached membrane capacitance measurements were performed to examine the influence of ketamine on individual vesicle interactions with the plasma membrane in cultured rat astrocytes. Ketamine evoked long-lasting bursts of repetitive opening and closing of the fusion pore that were both time- and concentration-dependent. Moreover, acute application and subanesthetic doses of ketamine elicited a significant increase in the occurrence of bursts that were characterized by a decreased fusion pore conductance, indicating that the fusion pore was stabilized in a narrow configuration. The time- and concentration-dependent increase in burst occurrence was correlated with a decrease in full fission events. This study has demonstrated a novel effect of ketamine manifested as stabilization of a fusion pore incapable of transiting to full vesicle fission, suggestive of an inhibitory effect on vesicle retrieval. This until now unrecognized effect of ketamine on the vesicle fusion pore might play a role in astroglial release and (re)uptake of molecules, modulating synaptic activity. This study demonstrates a novel effect of ketamine on the fusion pore. High-resolution cell-attached membrane capacitance measurements revealed that ketamine evokes long-lasting flickering of a narrow fusion pore that is incapable of transiting to full fission. Astrocytic vesicle fusion/retrieval modified by subanesthetic ketamine doses most likely affects gliotransmission and indicates a non-neuronal mechanism of ketamine action that may contribute to its behavioral effects.

  4. Evidence for a narrow massive state in the radiative decays of the Upsilon

    SciTech Connect

    Crystal Ball Collaboration

    1984-07-01

    Evidence is presented for a state, which we call zeta, with a mass M = (8322 +- 8 +- 24) MeV and a line width GAMMA < 80 MeV (90% confidence level) obtained using the Crystal Ball (NaI(Tl) detector at DORIS II. Radiative transitions to this state are observed from about 100,000 UPSILON(1S) decays in two independent sets of data: one in which zeta ..-->.. multiple hadrons, and one which is strongly biased towards zeta ..-->.. 2 low multiplicity jets. The branching ratio to this state from the UPSILON(1S) is of order 0.5%.

  5. Narrow carbonyl resonances in proton-diluted proteins facilitate NMR assignments in the solid-state.

    PubMed

    Linser, Rasmus; Fink, Uwe; Reif, Bernd

    2010-05-01

    HNCO/HNCACO type correlation experiments are an alternative for assignment of backbone resonances in extensively deuterated proteins in the solid-state, given the fact that line widths on the order of 14-17 Hz are achieved in the carbonyl dimension without the need of high power decoupling. The achieved resolution demonstrates that MAS solid-state NMR on extensively deuterated proteins is able to compete with solution-state NMR spectroscopy if proteins are investigated with correlation times tau(c) that exceed 25 ns. PMID:20232230

  6. A search for narrow states in antineutron-proton total and annihilation cross sections near N¯N threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T.; Chu, C.; Clement, J.; Elinon, C.; Furic, M.; Hartman, K.; Hicks, A.; Hungerford, E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kruk, J.; Lewis, R.; Lowenstein, D.; Lochstet, W.; Mayes, B.; Moss, B.; Mutchler, G.; Pinsky, L.; Smith, G. A.; Tang, L.; von Witsch, W.; Xue, Y.

    1986-08-01

    The n¯p total and annihilation cross section have been measured from near N¯N threshold (1880 MeV) to 1940 MeV with RMS resolution ranging from 0.08 MeV (1880 MeV) to 6.7 MeV (1940 MeV). No significant narrow meson structures were seen, with 90% CL upper limits of 40-180 mb-MeV on σΓ for states with width less than our resolution. Combined with increasing unitarity bounds on σ as one approaches threshold, these limits confine widths of possible predicted states below 1900 MeV to less than ∼ 1 MeV.

  7. A search for narrow states in antineutron-proton total and annihilation cross-sections near N¯N threshold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armstrong, T.; Chu, C.; Clement, J.; Elinon, C.; Furic, M.; Hartman, K.; Hicks, A.; Hungerford, E.; Kishimoto, T.; Kruk, J.; Lewis, R.; Lowenstein, D.; Lochstet, W.; Mayes, B.; Moss, B.; Mutchler, G.; Pinsky, L.; Smith, G. A.; Tang, L.; von Witsch, W.; Xue, Y.

    1986-10-01

    The n¯p total and annihilation cross sections have been measured from near N¯N threshold (1880 MeV) to 1940 MeV with RMS resolution ranging from 0.08 MeV (1880 MeV) to 6.7 MeV (1940 MeV). No significant narrow meson structures were seen, with 90% C.L. upper limits of 40-180 mb-MeV on σT for states with width less than our resolution. Combined with increasing unitarity bounds on σ as one approaches threshold, these limits confine widths of possible predicted states below 1900 MeV to less than ˜1 MeV.

  8. Economic Goals, Quality Discourse and the Narrowing of European State Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillies, Donald

    2010-01-01

    Quality management theory pervades education policy across Europe. In this article its prevalence is examined through analysis of policy texts drawn from 16 different state systems in Europe, as well as from the European Union and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The article argues that Quality discourse has…

  9. Narrow depression in the density of states at the Dirac point in disordered graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweitzer, L.

    2009-12-01

    The electronic properties of noninteracting particles moving on a two-dimensional bricklayer lattice are investigated numerically. In particular, the influence of disorder in form of a spatially varying random magnetic flux is studied. In addition, a strong perpendicular constant magnetic field B is considered. The density of states ρ(E) goes to zero for E→0 as in the ordered system but with a much steeper slope. This happens for both cases: at the Dirac point for B=0 and at the center of the central Landau band for finite B . Close to the Dirac point, the dependence of ρ(E) on the system size, on the disorder strength, and on the constant magnetic flux density is analyzed and fitted to an analytical expression proposed previously in connection with the thermal quantum-Hall effect. Additional short-range on-site disorder completely replenishes the indentation in the density of states at the Dirac point.

  10. Total n cross section from 50 to 400 MeV/c and hint for a narrow n state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iazzi, F.

    1999-08-01

    The measurement of the n total cross section in the momentum range 50-400 MeV/c has been performed in the OBELIX experiment at the LEAR machine at CERN. The results are reported for the first time together with a preliminary analysis in terms of scattering length and scattering volume approximation: from this analysis the contributions of the S and P wave to the n interaction in the full range have been evaluated as well as the isospin dependence of the total cross section in the range 200-400 MeV/c. The most striking result is the strong indication in the data of a narrow n state near the p threshold.

  11. Measurement of semileptonic branching fractions of B mesons to narrow D** states.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Agelou, M; Agram, J-L; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Arnoud, Y; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Balm, P W; Banerjee, P; Banerjee, S; Barberis, E; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barnes, C; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Bean, A; Beauceron, S; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Bellavance, A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Binder, M; Biscarat, C; Black, K M; Blackler, I; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Blumenschein, U; Boehnlein, A; Boeriu, O; Bolton, T A; Borcherding, F; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Busato, E; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chandra, A; Chapin, D; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christiansen, T; Christofek, L; Claes, D; Clément, B; Clément, C; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Coppage, D; Corcoran, M; Cothenet, A; Cousinou, M-C; Cox, B; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; da Motta, H; Das, M; Davies, B; Davies, G; Davis, G A; De, K; de Jong, P; de Jong, S J; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; Martins, C De Oliveira; Dean, S; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Demine, P; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Doidge, M; Dong, H; Doulas, S; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Edwards, T; Ellison, J; Elmsheuser, J; Elvira, V D; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Eroshin, O V; Estrada, J; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Fast, J; Fatakia, S N; Feligioni, L; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Fleck, I; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gardner, J; Gavrilov, V; Gay, A; Gay, P; Gelé, D; Gelhaus, R; Genser, K; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Golling, T; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Gounder, K; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greder, S; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Groer, L; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Gurzhiev, S N; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Hagopian, S; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, C; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Huang, J; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jain, V; Jakobs, K; Jenkins, A; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Kesisoglou, S; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kotcher, J; Kothari, B; Koubarovsky, A; Kozelov, A V; Kozminski, J; Kryemadhi, A; Krzywdzinski, S; Kulik, Y; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lager, S; Lahrichi, N; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Le Bihan, A-C; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Leonidopoulos, C; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linn, S L; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lueking, L; Lynker, M; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Magnan, A-M; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martens, M; Mattingly, S E K; Mayorov, A A; McCarthy, R; McCroskey, R; Meder, D; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Michaut, M; Miettinen, H; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mundim, L; Mutaf, Y D; Nagy, E; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Nelson, S; Neustroev, P; Noeding, C; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; Nurse, E; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Oguri, V; Oliveira, N; Oshima, N; Otero y Garzón, G J; Padley, P; Parashar, N; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Perea, P M; Perez, E; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Silva, W L Prado da; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Rapidis, P A; Ratoff, P N; Reucroft, S; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Rud, V I; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shephard, W D; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Sidwell, R A; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smith, R P; Smolek, K; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Song, X; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stanton, N R; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stevenson, K; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Titov, M; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torborg, J; Towers, S; Trefzger, T; Trincaz-Duvoid, S; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Turcot, A S; Tuts, P M; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vlimant, J-R; Von Toerne, E; Vreeswijk, M; Vu Anh, T; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weerts, H; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; White, V; Wicke, D; Wijngaarden, D A; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wittlin, J; Wobisch, M; Womersley, J; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xu, Q; Xuan, N; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yen, Y; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yurkewicz, A; Zabi, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zdrazil, M; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhang, X; Zhao, T; Zhao, Z; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zitoun, R; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2005-10-21

    Using the data accumulated in 2002-2004 with the D0 detector in proton-antiproton collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron collider with a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV, the branching fractions of the decays B --> D0(1)(2420)mu+ vmuX and B --> D2(*0)(2460)mu+ vmuX and their ratio have been measured: B(b --> B) x B(B --> D0(1)mu+ vmuX) x B(D0(*0) --> D*- pi+) = [0.087 +/- 0.007(stat) +/- 0.014(syst)]%; B(b --> B) x B(B --> D2(*0) mu+ vmuX) x B(D2(*0) --> D*- pi+) = [0.035 +/- 0.007(stat) +/- 0.008(syst)]% and [B(B --> D2(*0)mu+ vmuX) x B(D2(*0) --> D*- pi+)]/[B(B --> D0(1)mu+ vmuX) x B(D0(1) --> D*- pi+)] = 0.39 +/- 0.09(stat) +/- 0.12 (syst), where the charge conjugated states are always implied. PMID:16383819

  12. I Search of Narrow Proton-Antiproton Bound States: High Resolution Gamma and Charged Flow Pion Spectra from Protonium.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petridou, Chariclia I.

    We studied the pp annihilations at rest looking for narrow bound states in the proton-antiproton system. We looked, with high energy resolution, for radiative and pionic transitions in the gamma and charged pion spectra. The detector for the (gamma)(--->)e+e- and the (pi)('(+OR-)) was a magnetic pair spectrometer. The directions of the incident particles (e(+OR-) and (pi)(+OR-)) were determined by a drift chamber module in front of the magnet and the final directions of the particles, if reflected in the magnet, by the same chamber; if transversing the magnet, by an identical module at the rear of the magnet. The momentum was calculated from the directions of the particle. The following gamma spectra were obtained. Gammas with both e+, e- reflected in the magnet at a field of about 6 Kgauss (RR-gammas). That covers the region between 80 and 180 MeV, corresponding to a missing mass 1794 to 1686 MeV/c. The energy resolution is about 2.5 MeV ((sigma)) at 129 MeV (confirmed by the observed Panofsky gammas from stopping (pi)('-)p data) and 5 MeV ((sigma)) at 80 MeV. We have no evidence for narrow peaks except for the Panofsky gamma produced with a branching ratio of 3.3 x 10('-3) from (pi)('-) stops in the target. Upper limits for (gamma) -transitions in the region between 80 to 180 MeV were set at about 10('-3). Gammas with one e+(e-) reflected and the other transversing the magnet (RP-gammas) for fields of about 6 and 12 Kgauss, covering the region (GREATERTHEQ) 200 MeV, which corresponds to missing mass (LESSTHEQ) 1664 MeV/c('2). The gamma energy resolution in MeV is 51(.)E('2) (GeV) and 25.5(.)E('2)(GeV) for the low and high field respectively. Finally the charged pion spectra for those transversing the magnet are given for both magnet settings and as a function of charge multiplicity, covering the momentum region from (GREATERTHEQ) 150 MeV/c. The momentum resolution is the same as that for the RP-gammas. The two body annihilations (pi)('+)(pi)('-) and (pi

  13. Is Perceptual Narrowing Too Narrow?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashon, Cara H.; Denicola, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    There is a growing list of examples illustrating that infants are transitioning from having earlier abilities that appear more "universal," "broadly tuned," or "unconstrained" to having later abilities that appear more "specialized," "narrowly tuned," or "constrained." Perceptual narrowing, a well-known phenomenon related to face, speech, and…

  14. 31. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST ACROSS TOLL PLAZA, 29 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, LOOKING WEST ACROSS TOLL PLAZA, 29 AUGUST 1940. (ELDRIDGE, CLARK M. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, TACOMA, WASHINGTON, FINAL REPORT ON DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, 1941) - Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows at State Route 16, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  15. 30. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST THROUGH TOLL LANES, 29 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, LOOKING EAST THROUGH TOLL LANES, 29 AUGUST 1940. (ELDRIDGE, CLARK H. TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, TACOMA, WASHINGTON, FINAL REPORT ON DESIGN AND CONSTRUCTION, 1941) - Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows at State Route 16, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  16. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-08-15

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb⁻¹, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ, where the Υ(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst) GeV/c², which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  17. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ in pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Alverson, G.; Aoki, M.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Barreto, J.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bezzubov, V. A.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Bose, T.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Brown, J.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Chevalier-Théry, S.; Cho, D. K.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Croc, A.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duggan, D.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Dyshkant, A.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Facini, G.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Fuess, S.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; García-Guerra, G. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Gay, P.; Geng, W.; Gerbaudo, D.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Golovanov, G.; Goussiou, A.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haas, A.; Hagopian, S.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hohlfeld, M.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jesik, R.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kaadze, K.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Kasper, P. A.; Katsanos, I.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kulikov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Landsberg, G.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lellouch, J.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Lubatti, H. J.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Maravin, Y.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Naimuddin, M.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nunnemann, T.; Obrant, G.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Osta, J.; Padilla, M.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Rangel, M. S.; Ranjan, K.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Renkel, P.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Salcido, P.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Sanghi, B.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schlobohm, S.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Shivpuri, R. K.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Smirnov, D.; Smith, K. J.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Stutte, L.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Takahashi, M.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tschann-Grimm, K.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verdier, P.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; White, A.; Wicke, D.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, W.-C.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2012-08-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3fb-1, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ, where the Υ(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551±0.014(stat)±0.017(syst)GeV/c2, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  18. Fast Hearing-Threshold Estimation Using Multiple Auditory Steady-State Responses with Narrow-Band Chirps and Adaptive Stimulus Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Mühler, Roland; Mentzel, Katrin; Verhey, Jesko

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the estimation of hearing thresholds in normal-hearing and hearing-impaired subjects on the basis of multiple-frequency auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs). The ASSR was measured using two new techniques: (i) adaptive stimulus patterns and (ii) narrow-band chirp stimuli. ASSR thresholds in 16 normal-hearing and 16 hearing-impaired adults were obtained simultaneously at both ears at 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz, using a multiple-frequency stimulus built up of four one-octave-wide narrow-band chirps with a repetition rate of 40 Hz. A statistical test in the frequency domain was used to detect the response. The recording of the steady-state responses was controlled in eight independent recording channels with an adaptive, semiautomatic algorithm. The average differences between the behavioural hearing thresholds and the ASSR threshold estimate were 10, 8, 13, and 15 dB for test frequencies of 500, 1000, 2000, and 4000 Hz, respectively. The average overall test duration of 18.6 minutes for the threshold estimations at the four frequencies and both ears demonstrates the benefit of an adaptive recording algorithm and the efficiency of optimised narrow-band chirp stimuli. PMID:22619622

  19. Improved 1H amide resonance line narrowing in oriented sample solid-state NMR of membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, George J.; Park, Sang Ho; Opella, Stanley J.

    2012-07-01

    We demonstrate 1H amide resonance line widths <300 Hz in 1H/15N heteronuclear correlation (HETCOR) spectra of membrane proteins in aligned phospholipid bilayers. This represents a substantial improvement over typically observed line widths of ˜1 kHz. Furthermore, in a proton detected local field (PDLF) version of the experiment that measures heteronuclear dipolar couplings, line widths <130 Hz are observed. This dramatic line narrowing of 1H amide resonances enables many more individual signals to be resolved and assigned from uniformly 15N labeled membrane proteins in phospholipid bilayers under physiological conditions of temperature and pH. Finding that the decrease in line widths occurs only for membrane proteins that undergo fast rotational diffusion around the bilayer normal, but not immobile molecules, such as peptide single crystals, identifies a potential new direction for pulse sequence development that includes overall molecular dynamics in their design.

  20. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at √{s }=8 TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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M.; Fahim, A.; Khakzad, M.; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M.; Naseri, M.; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S.; Rezaei Hosseinabadi, F.; Safarzadeh, B.; Zeinali, M.; Felcini, M.; Grunewald, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Calabria, C.; Caputo, C.; Colaleo, A.; Creanza, D.; Cristella, L.; De Filippis, N.; De Palma, M.; Fiore, L.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, G.; Maggi, M.; Miniello, G.; My, S.; Nuzzo, S.; Pompili, A.; Pugliese, G.; Radogna, R.; Ranieri, A.; Selvaggi, G.; Silvestris, L.; Venditti, R.; Abbiendi, G.; Battilana, C.; Bonacorsi, D.; Braibant-Giacomelli, S.; Brigliadori, L.; Campanini, R.; Capiluppi, P.; Castro, A.; Cavallo, F. R.; Chhibra, S. S.; Codispoti, G.; Cuffiani, M.; Dallavalle, G. M.; Fabbri, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fasanella, D.; Giacomelli, P.; Grandi, C.; Guiducci, L.; Marcellini, S.; Masetti, G.; Montanari, A.; Navarria, F. L.; Perrotta, A.; Rossi, A. M.; Rovelli, T.; Siroli, G. 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M.; Lanza, G.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Sciacca, C.; Thyssen, F.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Benato, L.; Bisello, D.; Boletti, A.; Carlin, R.; Carvalho Antunes De Oliveira, A.; Checchia, P.; Dall'Osso, M.; De Castro Manzano, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dosselli, U.; Gasparini, F.; Gasparini, U.; Gozzelino, A.; Lacaprara, S.; Margoni, M.; Meneguzzo, A. T.; Pazzini, J.; Pozzobon, N.; Ronchese, P.; Simonetto, F.; Torassa, E.; Tosi, M.; Zanetti, M.; Zotto, P.; Zucchetta, A.; Zumerle, G.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Ratti, S. P.; Re, V.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Alunni Solestizi, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Leonardi, R.; Mantovani, G.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Santocchia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Bagliesi, G.; Bernardini, J.; Boccali, T.; Castaldi, R.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Donato, S.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Ligabue, F.; Lomtadze, T.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Palla, F.; Rizzi, A.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Tonelli, G.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Barone, L.; Cavallari, F.; Cipriani, M.; D'imperio, G.; Del Re, D.; Diemoz, M.; Gelli, S.; Jorda, C.; Longo, E.; Margaroli, F.; Meridiani, P.; Organtini, G.; Paramatti, R.; Preiato, F.; Rahatlou, S.; Rovelli, C.; Santanastasio, F.; Amapane, N.; Arcidiacono, R.; Argiro, S.; Arneodo, M.; Bartosik, N.; Bellan, R.; Biino, C.; Cartiglia, N.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Degano, A.; Demaria, N.; Finco, L.; Kiani, B.; Mariotti, C.; Maselli, S.; Migliore, E.; Monaco, V.; Monteil, E.; Obertino, M. M.; Pacher, L.; Pastrone, N.; Pelliccioni, M.; Pinna Angioni, G. L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Ruspa, M.; Sacchi, R.; Shchelina, K.; Sola, V.; Solano, A.; Staiano, A.; Traczyk, P.; Belforte, S.; Candelise, V.; Casarsa, M.; Cossutti, F.; Della Ricca, G.; La Licata, C.; Schizzi, A.; Zanetti, A.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, G. N.; Kim, M. S.; Lee, S.; Lee, S. W.; Oh, Y. D.; Sekmen, S.; Son, D. C.; Yang, Y. C.; Kim, H.; Lee, A.; Brochero Cifuentes, J. A.; Kim, T. J.; Cho, S.; Choi, S.; Go, Y.; Gyun, D.; Ha, S.; Hong, B.; Jo, Y.; Kim, Y.; Lee, B.; Lee, K.; Lee, K. S.; Lee, S.; Lim, J.; Park, S. K.; Roh, Y.; Almond, J.; Kim, J.; Oh, S. B.; Seo, S. h.; Yang, U. K.; Yoo, H. D.; Yu, G. B.; Choi, M.; Kim, H.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. H.; Lee, J. S. H.; Park, I. C.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Kwon, E.; Lee, J.; Yu, I.; Dudenas, V.; Juodagalvis, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Ahmed, I.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Komaragiri, J. R.; Md Ali, M. A. B.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Yusli, M. N.; Zolkapli, Z.; Casimiro Linares, E.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Hernandez-Almada, A.; Lopez-Fernandez, R.; Mejia Guisao, J.; Sanchez-Hernandez, A.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pedraza, I.; Salazar Ibarguen, H. A.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Morelos Pineda, A.; Krofcheck, D.; Butler, P. H.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmad, M.; Hassan, Q.; Hoorani, H. R.; Khan, W. A.; Qazi, S.; Shoaib, M.; Waqas, M.; Bialkowska, H.; Bluj, M.; Boimska, B.; Frueboes, T.; Górski, M.; Kazana, M.; Nawrocki, K.; Romanowska-Rybinska, K.; Szleper, M.; Zalewski, P.; Bunkowski, K.; Byszuk, A.; Doroba, K.; Kalinowski, A.; Konecki, M.; Krolikowski, J.; Misiura, M.; Olszewski, M.; Walczak, M.; Bargassa, P.; Beirão Da Cruz E Silva, C.; Di Francesco, A.; Faccioli, P.; Ferreira Parracho, P. G.; Gallinaro, M.; Hollar, J.; Leonardo, N.; Lloret Iglesias, L.; Nemallapudi, M. V.; Rodrigues Antunes, J.; Seixas, J.; Toldaiev, O.; Vadruccio, D.; Varela, J.; Vischia, P.; Bunin, P.; Gavrilenko, M.; Golutvin, I.; Gorbounov, N.; Gorbunov, I.; Karjavin, V.; Kozlov, G.; Lanev, A.; Malakhov, A.; Matveev, V.; Moisenz, P.; Palichik, V.; Perelygin, V.; Savina, M.; Shmatov, S.; Shulha, S.; Skatchkov, N.; Smirnov, V.; Zarubin, A.; Chtchipounov, L.; Golovtsov, V.; Ivanov, Y.; Kim, V.; Kuznetsova, E.; Murzin, V.; Oreshkin, V.; Sulimov, V.; Vorobyev, A.; Andreev, Yu.; Dermenev, A.; Gninenko, S.; Golubev, N.; Karneyeu, A.; Kirsanov, M.; Krasnikov, N.; Pashenkov, A.; Tlisov, D.; Toropin, A.; Epshteyn, V.; Gavrilov, V.; Lychkovskaya, N.; Popov, V.; Pozdnyakov, I.; Safronov, G.; Spiridonov, A.; Toms, M.; Vlasov, E.; Zhokin, A.; Chadeeva, M.; Danilov, M.; Zhemchugov, E.; Andreev, V.; Azarkin, M.; Dremin, I.; Kirakosyan, M.; Leonidov, A.; Rusakov, S. V.; Terkulov, A.; Baskakov, A.; Belyaev, A.; Boos, E.; Dubinin, M.; Dudko, L.; Ershov, A.; Gribushin, A.; Klyukhin, V.; Kodolova, O.; Lokhtin, I.; Miagkov, I.; Obraztsov, S.; Petrushanko, S.; Savrin, V.; Snigirev, A.; Azhgirey, I.; Bayshev, I.; Bitioukov, S.; Elumakhov, D.; Kachanov, V.; Kalinin, A.; Konstantinov, D.; Krychkine, V.; Petrov, V.; Ryutin, R.; Sobol, A.; Troshin, S.; Tyurin, N.; Uzunian, A.; Volkov, A.; Adzic, P.; Cirkovic, P.; Devetak, D.; Milosevic, J.; Rekovic, V.; Alcaraz Maestre, J.; Calvo, E.; Cerrada, M.; Chamizo Llatas, M.; Colino, N.; De La Cruz, B.; Delgado Peris, A.; Escalante Del Valle, A.; Fernandez Bedoya, C.; Fernández Ramos, J. P.; Flix, J.; Fouz, M. C.; Garcia-Abia, P.; Gonzalez Lopez, O.; Goy Lopez, S.; Hernandez, J. M.; Josa, M. I.; Navarro De Martino, E.; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A.; Puerta Pelayo, J.; Quintario Olmeda, A.; Redondo, I.; Romero, L.; Soares, M. S.; de Trocóniz, J. F.; Missiroli, M.; Moran, D.; Cuevas, J.; Fernandez Menendez, J.; Gonzalez Caballero, I.; Palencia Cortezon, E.; Sanchez Cruz, S.; Vizan Garcia, J. M.; Cabrillo, I. J.; Calderon, A.; Castiñeiras De Saa, J. R.; Curras, E.; Fernandez, M.; Garcia-Ferrero, J.; Gomez, G.; Lopez Virto, A.; Marco, J.; Martinez Rivero, C.; Matorras, F.; Piedra Gomez, J.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz-Jimeno, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Trevisani, N.; Vila, I.; Vilar Cortabitarte, R.; Abbaneo, D.; Auffray, E.; Auzinger, G.; Bachtis, M.; Baillon, P.; Ball, A. 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B.; Schäfer, C.; Schwick, C.; Seidel, M.; Sharma, A.; Silva, P.; Simon, M.; Sphicas, P.; Steggemann, J.; Stoye, M.; Takahashi, Y.; Treille, D.; Triossi, A.; Tsirou, A.; Veckalns, V.; Veres, G. I.; Wardle, N.; Zagozdzinska, A.; Zeuner, W. D.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Ingram, Q.; Kaestli, H. C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Rohe, T.; Bachmair, F.; Bäni, L.; Bianchini, L.; Casal, B.; Dissertori, G.; Dittmar, M.; Donegà, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Heidegger, C.; Hits, D.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lecomte, P.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Meinhard, M. T.; Meister, D.; Micheli, F.; Musella, P.; Nessi-Tedaldi, F.; Pandolfi, F.; Pata, J.; Pauss, F.; Perrin, G.; Perrozzi, L.; Quittnat, M.; Rossini, M.; Schönenberger, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Tavolaro, V. R.; Theofilatos, K.; Wallny, R.; Aarrestad, T. K.; Amsler, C.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, M. F.; Chiochia, V.; De Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hinzmann, A.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Rauco, G.; Robmann, P.; Salerno, D.; Yang, Y.; Doan, T. H.; Jain, Sh.; Khurana, R.; Konyushikhin, M.; Kuo, C. M.; Lin, W.; Lu, Y. J.; Pozdnyakov, A.; Yu, S. S.; Kumar, Arun; Chang, P.; Chang, Y. H.; Chang, Y. W.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chen, P. H.; Dietz, C.; Fiori, F.; Hou, W.-S.; Hsiung, Y.; Liu, Y. F.; Lu, R.-S.; Miñano Moya, M.; Paganis, E.; Psallidas, A.; Tsai, J. f.; Tzeng, Y. M.; Asavapibhop, B.; Singh, G.; Srimanobhas, N.; Suwonjandee, N.; Adiguzel, A.; Cerci, S.; Damarseckin, S.; Demiroglu, Z. S.; Dozen, C.; Dumanoglu, I.; Girgis, S.; Gokbulut, G.; Guler, Y.; Gurpinar, E.; Hos, I.; Kangal, E. E.; Onengut, G.; Ozdemir, K.; Sunar Cerci, D.; Tali, B.; Topakli, H.; Zorbilmez, C.; Bilin, B.; Bilmis, S.; Isildak, B.; Karapinar, G.; Yalvac, M.; Zeyrek, M.; Gülmez, E.; Kaya, M.; Kaya, O.; Yetkin, E. A.; Yetkin, T.; Cakir, A.; Cankocak, K.; Sen, S.; Vardarlı, F. I.; Grynyov, B.; Levchuk, L.; Sorokin, P.; Aggleton, R.; Ball, F.; Beck, L.; Brooke, J. J.; Burns, D.; Clement, E.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Heath, G. P.; Heath, H. F.; Jacob, J.; Kreczko, L.; Lucas, C.; Meng, Z.; Newbold, D. M.; Paramesvaran, S.; Poll, A.; Sakuma, T.; Seif El Nasr-storey, S.; Senkin, S.; Smith, D.; Smith, V. J.; Bell, K. W.; Belyaev, A.; Brew, C.; Brown, R. M.; Calligaris, L.; Cieri, D.; Cockerill, D. J. A.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Harper, S.; Olaiya, E.; Petyt, D.; Shepherd-Themistocleous, C. H.; Thea, A.; Tomalin, I. R.; Williams, T.; Baber, M.; Bainbridge, R.; Buchmuller, O.; Bundock, A.; Burton, D.; Casasso, S.; Citron, M.; Colling, D.; Corpe, L.; Dauncey, P.; Davies, G.; De Wit, A.; Della Negra, M.; Dunne, P.; Elwood, A.; Futyan, D.; Haddad, Y.; Hall, G.; Iles, G.; Lane, R.; Laner, C.; Lucas, R.; Lyons, L.; Magnan, A.-M.; Malik, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Nash, J.; Nikitenko, A.; Pela, J.; Penning, B.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Richards, A.; Rose, A.; Seez, C.; Tapper, A.; Uchida, K.; Vazquez Acosta, M.; Virdee, T.; Zenz, S. C.; Cole, J. E.; Hobson, P. R.; Khan, A.; Kyberd, P.; Leslie, D.; Reid, I. D.; Symonds, P.; Teodorescu, L.; Turner, M.; Borzou, A.; Call, K.; Dittmann, J.; Hatakeyama, K.; Liu, H.; Pastika, N.; Charaf, O.; Cooper, S. I.; Henderson, C.; Rumerio, P.; Arcaro, D.; Avetisyan, A.; Bose, T.; Gastler, D.; Rankin, D.; Richardson, C.; Rohlf, J.; Sulak, L.; Zou, D.; Benelli, G.; Berry, E.; Cutts, D.; Ferapontov, A.; Garabedian, A.; Hakala, J.; Heintz, U.; Jesus, O.; Laird, E.; Landsberg, G.; Mao, Z.; Narain, M.; Piperov, S.; Sagir, S.; Spencer, E.; Syarif, R.; Breedon, R.; Breto, G.; Burns, D.; Calderon De La Barca Sanchez, M.; Chauhan, S.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Cox, P. T.; Erbacher, R.; Flores, C.; Funk, G.; Gardner, M.; Ko, W.; Lander, R.; Mclean, C.; Mulhearn, M.; Pellett, D.; Pilot, J.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Shalhout, S.; Smith, J.; Squires, M.; Stolp, D.; Tripathi, M.; Wilbur, S.; Yohay, R.; Cousins, R.; Everaerts, P.; Florent, A.; Hauser, J.; Ignatenko, M.; Saltzberg, D.; Takasugi, E.; Valuev, V.; Weber, M.; Burt, K.; Clare, R.; Ellison, J.; Gary, J. W.; Hanson, G.; Heilman, J.; Jandir, P.; Kennedy, E.; Lacroix, F.; Long, O. R.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo Negrete, M.; Paneva, M. I.; Shrinivas, A.; Wei, H.; Wimpenny, S.; Yates, B. R.; Branson, J. G.; Cerati, G. B.; Cittolin, S.; D'Agnolo, R. T.; Derdzinski, M.; Gerosa, R.; Holzner, A.; Kelley, R.; Klein, D.; Letts, J.; Macneill, I.; Olivito, D.; Padhi, S.; Pieri, M.; Sani, M.; Sharma, V.; Simon, S.; Tadel, M.; Vartak, A.; Wasserbaech, S.; Welke, C.; Wood, J.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Bhandari, R.; Bradmiller-Feld, J.; Campagnari, C.; Dishaw, A.; Dutta, V.; Flowers, K.; Franco Sevilla, M.; Geffert, P.; George, C.; Golf, F.; Gouskos, L.; Gran, J.; Heller, R.; Incandela, J.; Mccoll, N.; Mullin, S. D.; Ovcharova, A.; Richman, J.; Stuart, D.; Suarez, I.; West, C.; Yoo, J.; Anderson, D.; Apresyan, A.; Bendavid, J.; Bornheim, A.; Bunn, J.; Chen, Y.; Duarte, J.; Mott, A.; Newman, H. B.; Pena, C.; Spiropulu, M.; Vlimant, J. R.; Xie, S.; Zhu, R. Y.; Andrews, M. B.; Azzolini, V.; Calamba, A.; Carlson, B.; Ferguson, T.; Paulini, M.; Russ, J.; Sun, M.; Vogel, H.; Vorobiev, I.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Jensen, F.; Johnson, A.; Krohn, M.; Mulholland, T.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Mirman, N.; Nicolas Kaufman, G.; Patterson, J. R.; Rinkevicius, A.; Ryd, A.; Skinnari, L.; Sun, W.; Tan, S. M.; Tao, Z.; Thom, J.; Tucker, J.; Wittich, P.; Winn, D.; Abdullin, S.; Albrow, M.; Apollinari, G.; Banerjee, S.; Bauerdick, L. A. T.; Beretvas, A.; Berryhill, J.; Bhat, P. C.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J. N.; Cheung, H. W. K.; Chlebana, F.; Cihangir, S.; Cremonesi, M.; Elvira, V. D.; Fisk, I.; Freeman, J.; Gottschalk, E.; Gray, L.; Green, D.; Grünendahl, S.; Gutsche, O.; Hare, D.; Harris, R. M.; Hasegawa, S.; Hirschauer, J.; Hu, Z.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Joshi, U.; Klima, B.; Kreis, B.; Lammel, S.; Linacre, J.; Lincoln, D.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Lopes De Sá, R.; Lykken, J.; Maeshima, K.; Marraffino, J. M.; Maruyama, S.; Mason, D.; McBride, P.; Merkel, P.; Mrenna, S.; Nahn, S.; Newman-Holmes, C.; O'Dell, V.; Pedro, K.; Prokofyev, O.; Rakness, G.; Ristori, L.; Sexton-Kennedy, E.; Soha, A.; Spalding, W. J.; Spiegel, L.; Stoynev, S.; Strobbe, N.; Taylor, L.; Tkaczyk, S.; Tran, N. V.; Uplegger, L.; Vaandering, E. W.; Vernieri, C.; Verzocchi, M.; Vidal, R.; Wang, M.; Weber, H. A.; Whitbeck, A.; Acosta, D.; Avery, P.; Bortignon, P.; Bourilkov, D.; Brinkerhoff, A.; Carnes, A.; Carver, M.; Curry, D.; Das, S.; Field, R. D.; Furic, I. K.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Ma, P.; Matchev, K.; Mei, H.; Milenovic, P.; Mitselmakher, G.; Rank, D.; Shchutska, L.; Sperka, D.; Thomas, L.; Wang, J.; Wang, S.; Yelton, J.; Linn, S.; Markowitz, P.; Martinez, G.; Rodriguez, J. L.; Ackert, A.; Adams, J. R.; Adams, T.; Askew, A.; Bein, S.; Diamond, B.; Hagopian, S.; Hagopian, V.; Johnson, K. F.; Khatiwada, A.; Prosper, H.; Santra, A.; Weinberg, M.; Baarmand, M. M.; Bhopatkar, V.; Colafranceschi, S.; Hohlmann, M.; Kalakhety, H.; Noonan, D.; Roy, T.; Yumiceva, F.; Adams, M. R.; Apanasevich, L.; Berry, D.; Betts, R. R.; Bucinskaite, I.; Cavanaugh, R.; Evdokimov, O.; Gauthier, L.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kurt, P.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, I. D.; Turner, P.; Varelas, N.; Wu, Z.; Zakaria, M.; Zhang, J.; Bilki, B.; Clarida, W.; Dilsiz, K.; Durgut, S.; Gandrajula, R. P.; Haytmyradov, M.; Khristenko, V.; Merlo, J.-P.; Mermerkaya, H.; Mestvirishvili, A.; Moeller, A.; Nachtman, J.; Ogul, H.; Onel, Y.; Ozok, F.; Penzo, A.; Snyder, C.; Tiras, E.; Wetzel, J.; Yi, K.; Anderson, I.; Blumenfeld, B.; Cocoros, A.; Eminizer, N.; Fehling, D.; Feng, L.; Gritsan, A. V.; Maksimovic, P.; Osherson, M.; Roskes, J.; Sarica, U.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Xin, Y.; You, C.; Al-bataineh, A.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Bowen, J.; Bruner, C.; Castle, J.; Kenny, R. P.; Kropivnitskaya, A.; Majumder, D.; Mcbrayer, W.; Murray, M.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Tapia Takaki, J. D.; Wang, Q.; Ivanov, A.; Kaadze, K.; Khalil, S.; Makouski, M.; Maravin, Y.; Mohammadi, A.; Saini, L. K.; Skhirtladze, N.; Toda, S.; Lange, D.; Rebassoo, F.; Wright, D.; Anelli, C.; Baden, A.; Baron, O.; Belloni, A.; Calvert, B.; Eno, S. C.; Ferraioli, C.; Gomez, J. A.; Hadley, N. J.; Jabeen, S.; Kellogg, R. G.; Kolberg, T.; Kunkle, J.; Lu, Y.; Mignerey, A. C.; Shin, Y. H.; Skuja, A.; Tonjes, M. B.; Tonwar, S. C.; Apyan, A.; Barbieri, R.; Baty, A.; Bi, R.; Bierwagen, K.; Brandt, S.; Busza, W.; Cali, I. A.; Demiragli, Z.; Di Matteo, L.; Gomez Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; Gulhan, D.; Hsu, D.; Iiyama, Y.; Innocenti, G. M.; Klute, M.; Kovalskyi, D.; Krajczar, K.; Lai, Y. S.; Lee, Y.-J.; Levin, A.; Luckey, P. D.; Marini, A. C.; Mcginn, C.; Mironov, C.; Narayanan, S.; Niu, X.; Paus, C.; Roland, C.; Roland, G.; Salfeld-Nebgen, J.; Stephans, G. S. F.; Sumorok, K.; Tatar, K.; Varma, M.; Velicanu, D.; Veverka, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, T. W.; Wyslouch, B.; Yang, M.; Zhukova, V.; Benvenuti, A. C.; Chatterjee, R. M.; Dahmes, B.; Evans, A.; Finkel, A.; Gude, A.; Hansen, P.; Kalafut, S.; Kao, S. C.; Klapoetke, K.; Kubota, Y.; Lesko, Z.; Mans, J.; Nourbakhsh, S.; Ruckstuhl, N.; Rusack, R.; Tambe, N.; Turkewitz, J.; Acosta, J. G.; Oliveros, S.; Avdeeva, E.; Bartek, R.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Kamalieddin, R.; Knowlton, D.; Kravchenko, I.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Siado, J. E.; Snow, G. R.; Stieger, B.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Harrington, C.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Parker, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Roozbahani, B.; Alverson, G.; Barberis, E.; Baumgartel, D.; Chasco, M.; Hortiangtham, A.; Massironi, A.; Morse, D. M.; Nash, D.; Orimoto, T.; Teixeira De Lima, R.; Trocino, D.; Wang, R.-J.; Wood, D.; Bhattacharya, S.; Hahn, K. A.; Kubik, A.; Low, J. F.; Mucia, N.; Odell, N.; Pollack, B.; Schmitt, M. H.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Velasco, M.; Dev, N.; Hildreth, M.; Hurtado Anampa, K.; Jessop, C.; Karmgard, D. J.; Kellams, N.; Lannon, K.; Marinelli, N.; Meng, F.; Mueller, C.; Musienko, Y.; Planer, M.; Reinsvold, A.; Ruchti, R.; Rupprecht, N.; Smith, G.; Taroni, S.; Valls, N.; Wayne, M.; Wolf, M.; Woodard, A.; Alimena, J.; Antonelli, L.; Brinson, J.; Bylsma, B.; Durkin, L. S.; Flowers, S.; Francis, B.; Hart, A.; Hill, C.; Hughes, R.; Ji, W.; Liu, B.; Luo, W.; Puigh, D.; Rodenburg, M.; Winer, B. L.; Wulsin, H. W.; Cooperstein, S.; Driga, O.; Elmer, P.; Hardenbrook, J.; Hebda, P.; Luo, J.; Marlow, D.; Medvedeva, T.; Mooney, M.; Olsen, J.; Palmer, C.; Piroué, P.; Stickland, D.; Tully, C.; Zuranski, A.; Malik, S.; Barker, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Benedetti, D.; Folgueras, S.; Gutay, L.; Jha, M. K.; Jones, M.; Jung, A. W.; Jung, K.; Miller, D. H.; Neumeister, N.; Radburn-Smith, B. 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    2016-07-01

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8 fb-1 . The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance ZB' to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV.

  1. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting.

    PubMed

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Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N

    2016-07-15

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8  fb^{-1}. The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance Z_{B}^{'} to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV. PMID:27472109

  2. Search for Narrow Resonances in Dijet Final States at sqrt[s]=8  TeV with the Novel CMS Technique of Data Scouting.

    PubMed

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Smith, W H; Taylor, D; Verwilligen, P; Woods, N

    2016-07-15

    A search for narrow resonances decaying into dijet final states is performed on data from proton-proton collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 18.8  fb^{-1}. The data were collected with the CMS detector using a novel technique called data scouting, in which the information associated with these selected events is much reduced, permitting collection of larger data samples. This technique enables CMS to record events containing jets at a rate of 1 kHz, by collecting the data from the high-level-trigger system. In this way, the sensitivity to low-mass resonances is increased significantly, allowing previously inaccessible couplings of new resonances to quarks and gluons to be probed. The resulting dijet mass distribution yields no evidence of narrow resonances. Upper limits are presented on the resonance cross sections as a function of mass, and compared with a variety of models predicting narrow resonances. The limits are translated into upper limits on the coupling of a leptophobic resonance Z_{B}^{'} to quarks, improving on the results obtained by previous experiments for the mass range from 500 to 800 GeV.

  3. Observation of the narrow state x (3872) --> j/psi pi+ pi- in pbar p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96 tev

    SciTech Connect

    Acosta, D.; CDF Collaboration

    2004-02-27

    The authors report the observation of a narrow state decaying into J/{psi}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -} and produced in 220 pb{sup -1} of {bar p}p collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV in the CDF II experiment. They observe 730 {+-} 90 decays. The mass is measured to be 3871.3 {+-} 0.7(stat) {+-} 0.4(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}, with an observed width consistent with the detector resolution. This is in agreement with the recent observation by the Belle Collaboration of the X(3872) meson.

  4. Observation of the narrow state X(3872)-->J/psipi+pi- in pp collisions at sqaure root of s=1.96 TeV.

    PubMed

    Acosta, D; Affolder, T; Ahn, M H; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Ambrose, D; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arguin, J-F; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asakawa, T; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Bacchetta, N; Bachacou, H; Badgett, W; Bailey, S; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barker, G; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Barone, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Belforte, S; Bell, W H; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bishai, M; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Bloom, K; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Booth, P S L; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Bourov, S; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calafiura, P; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canepa, A; Carlsmith, D; Carron, S; Carosi, R; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cerri, A; Cerri, C; Cerrito, L; Chapman, J; Chen, C; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chu, M L; Chung, J Y; Chung, W-H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A G; Clark, D; Coca, M N; Connolly, A; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cranshaw, J; Culbertson, R; Currat, C; Cyr, D; Dagenhart, D; DaRonco, S; D'Auria, S; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lentdecker, G; Dell'Agnello, S; Dell'Orso, M; Demers, S; Demortier, L; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Dionisi, C; Dittmann, J R; Doksus, P; Dominguez, A; Donati, S; D'Onofrio, M; Dorigo, T; Drollinger, V; Ebina, K; Eddy, N; Ely, R; Erbacher, R; Erdmann, M; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H-C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferretti, C; Field, R D; Fiori, I; Flanagan, G; Flaugher, B; Flores-Castillo, L R; Foland, A; Forrester, S; Foster, G W; Franklin, M; Frisch, H; Fujii, Y; Furic, I; Gaijar, A; Gallas, A; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia-Sciveres, M; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Gerdes, D W; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, A; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C; Giolo, K; Giordani, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, D; Goldstein, J; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Gotra, Y; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Guenther, M; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hall, C; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartmann, F; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Hayward, H; Heider, E; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Hennecke, M; Herndon, M; Hill, C; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hoffman, K D; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M A; Huang, Y; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Huston, J; Ikado, K; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ishizawa, Y; Issever, C; Ivanov, A; Iwata, Y; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jarrell, J; Jeans, D; Jensen, H; Jones, M; Jun, S Y; Junk, T; Kamon, T; Kang, J; Karagoz Unel, M; Karchin, P E; Kartal, S; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, B J; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, M S; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, T H; Kim, Y K; King, B T; Kirby, M; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kobayashi, H; Koehn, P; Kondo, K; Konigsberg, J; Kordas, K; Korn, A; Korytov, A; Kotelnikov, K; Kotwal, A V; Kovalev, A; Kraus, J; Kravchenko, I; Kreymer, A; Kroll, J; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuznetsova, N; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, J; Lancaster, M; Lander, R; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lauhakangas, R; Lazzizzera, I; Le, Y; Lecci, C; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, S W; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Li, K; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Liss, T M; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Liu, Y; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loken, J; Loreti, M; Loverre, P; Lucchesi, D; Lukens, P; Lyons, L; Lys, J; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Maksimovic, P; Malferrari, L; Manca, G; Marginean, R; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martinez, M; Maruyama, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McGivern, D; McIntyre, P M; McNamara, P; McNulty, R; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Meyer, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, L; Miller, R; Miller, J S; Miquel, R; Miscetti, S; Mishina, M; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Miyazaki, Y; Moggi, N; Moore, R; Morello, M; Moulik, T; Mukherjee, A; Mulhearn, M; Muller, T; Mumford, R; Munar, A; Murat, P; Nachtman, J; Nahn, S; Nakamura, I; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Napora, R; Necula, V; Niell, F; Nielsen, J; Nelson, C; Nelson, T; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Newman-Holmes, C; Nicollerat, A-S; Nigmanov, T; Nodulman, L; Oesterberg, K; Ogawa, T; Oh, S; Oh, Y D; Ohsugi, T; Oishi, R; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Orejudos, W; Pagliarone, C; Palmonari, F; Paoletti, R; Papadimitriou, V; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Pauly, T; Paus, C; Pellett, D; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pitts, K T; Pompos, A; Pondrom, L; Pope, G; Poukhov, O; Prakoshyn, F; Pratt, T; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Rademacker, J; Rakitine, A; Rappoccio, S; Ratnikov, F; Ray, H; Reichold, A; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Rimondi, F; Rinnert, K; Ristori, L; Robertson, W J; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rolli, S; Rosenson, L; Roser, R; Rossin, R; Rott, C; Russ, J; Ruiz, A; Ryan, D; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; St Denis, R; Sakumoto, W K; Saltzberg, D; Sanchez, C; Sansoni, A; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schemitz, P; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semeria, F; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfiligoi, I; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Sidoti, A; Siket, M; Sill, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Skiba, A; Slaughter, A J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Somalwar, S V; Spalding, J; Spezziga, M; Spiegel, L; Spinella, F; Spiropulu, M; Squillacioti, P; Stadie, H; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Sukhanov, A; Sumorok, K; Sun, H; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Tafirout, R; Takach, S F; Takano, H; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Takikawa, K; Tamburello, P; Tanaka, M; Tanaka, R; Tanimoto, N; Tapprogge, S; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Tether, S; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Thurman-Keup, R; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tollefson, K; Tonelli, D; Tönnesmann, M; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Trischuk, W; Tseng, J; Tsuchiya, R; Tsuno, S; Tsybychev, D; Turini, N; Turner, M; Ukegawa, F; Unverhau, T; Uozumi, S; Usynin, D; Vacavant, L; Vaiciulis, T; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vejcik, S; Velev, G; Veramendi, G; Vickey, T; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Volobouev, I; von der Mey, M; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wallace, N; Walter, T; Wan, Z; Wang, M J; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Ward, B; Waschke, S; Waters, D; Watts, T; Weber, M; Wester, W; Whitehouse, B; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolter, M; Worcester, M; Worm, S; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wyatt, A; Yagil, A; Yamashita, T; Yamamoto, K; Yang, U K; Yao, W; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yoon, P; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, I; Yu, S; Yu, Z; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zetti, F; Zhou, J; Zsenei, A; Zucchelli, S

    2004-08-13

    We report the observation of a narrow state decaying into J/psipi+pi- and produced in 220 pb(-1) of p p-bar collisions at =1.96 Tesqaure root of sV in the CDF II experiment. We observe 730+/-90 decays. The mass is measured to be 3871.3+/-0.7(stat)+/-0.4(syst) MeV/c2, with an observed width consistent with the detector resolution. This is in agreement with the recent observation by the Belle Collaboration of the X(3872) meson.

  5. Observation of a Narrow Meson State Decaying to D+sπ0 at a Mass of 2.32 GeV/c2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Gaillard, J.-M.; Hicheur, A.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J. P.; Robbe, P.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Palano, A.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J. C.; Qi, N. D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y. S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B.; Abrams, G. S.; Borgland, A. W.; Breon, A. B.; Brown, D. N.; Button-Shafer, J.; Cahn, R. N.; Charles, E.; Day, C. T.; Gill, M. S.; Gritsan, A. V.; Groysman, Y.; Jacobsen, R. G.; Kadel, R. W.; Kadyk, J.; Kerth, L. T.; Kolomensky, Yu. G.; Kral, J. F.; Kukartsev, G.; Leclerc, C.; Levi, M. E.; Lynch, G.; Mir, L. M.; Oddone, P. J.; Orimoto, T. J.; Pripstein, M.; Roe, N. A.; Romosan, A.; Ronan, M. T.; Shelkov, V. G.; Telnov, A. V.; Wenzel, W. A.; Ford, K.; Harrison, T. J.; Hawkes, C. M.; Knowles, D. J.; Morgan, S. E.; Penny, R. C.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, N. K.; Deppermann, T.; Goetzen, K.; Koch, H.; Lewandowski, B.; Pelizaeus, M.; Peters, K.; Schmuecker, H.; Steinke, M.; Barlow, N. R.; Boyd, J. T.; Chevalier, N.; Cottingham, W. N.; Kelly, M. P.; Latham, T. E.; Mackay, C.; Wilson, F. F.; Abe, K.; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T.; Hearty, C.; Mattison, T. S.; McKenna, J. A.; Thiessen, D.; Kyberd, P.; McKemey, A. K.; Blinov, V. E.; Bukin, A. D.; Golubev, V. B.; Ivanchenko, V. N.; Kravchenko, E. A.; Onuchin, A. P.; Serednyakov, S. I.; Skovpen, Yu. I.; Solodov, E. P.; Yushkov, A. N.; Best, D.; Chao, M.; Kirkby, D.; Lankford, A. J.; Mandelkern, M.; McMahon, S.; Mommsen, R. K.; Roethel, W.; Stoker, D. P.; Buchanan, C.; del Re, D.; Hadavand, H. K.; Hill, E. J.; Macfarlane, D. B.; Paar, H. P.; Rahatlou, Sh.; Schwanke, U.; Sharma, V.; Berryhill, J. W.; Campagnari, C.; Dahmes, B.; Kuznetsova, N.; Levy, S. L.; Long, O.; Lu, A.; Mazur, M. A.; Richman, J. D.; Verkerke, W.; Beck, T. W.; Beringer, J.; Eisner, A. M.; Heusch, C. A.; Lockman, W. S.; Schalk, T.; Schmitz, R. E.; Schumm, B. A.; Seiden, A.; Turri, M.; Walkowiak, W.; Williams, D. C.; Wilson, M. G.; Albert, J.; Chen, E.; Dubois-Felsmann, G. P.; Dvoretskii, A.; Hitlin, D. G.; Narsky, I.; Porter, F. C.; Ryd, A.; Samuel, A.; Yang, S.; Jayatilleke, S.; Mancinelli, G.; Meadows, B. T.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Abe, T.; Barillari, T.; Blanc, F.; Bloom, P.; Clark, P. J.; Ford, W. T.; Nauenberg, U.; Olivas, A.; Rankin, P.; Roy, J.; Smith, J. G.; van Hoek, W. C.; Zhang, L.; Harton, J. L.; Hu, T.; Soffer, A.; Toki, W. H.; Wilson, R. J.; Zhang, J.; Altenburg, D.; Brandt, T.; Brose, J.; Colberg, T.; Dickopp, M.; Dubitzky, R. S.; Hauke, A.; Lacker, H. M.; Maly, E.; Müller-Pfefferkorn, R.; Nogowski, R.; Otto, S.; Schubert, K. R.; Schwierz, R.; Spaan, B.; Wilden, L.; Bernard, D.; Bonneaud, G. R.; Brochard, F.; Cohen-Tanugi, J.; Thiebaux, Ch.; Vasileiadis, G.; Verderi, M.; Khan, A.; Lavin, D.; Muheim, F.; Playfer, S.; Swain, J. E.; Tinslay, J.; Andreotti, M.; Bettoni, D.; Bozzi, C.; Calabrese, R.; Cibinetto, G.; Luppi, E.; Negrini, M.; Piemontese, L.; Sarti, A.; Treadwell, E.; Anulli, F.; Baldini-Ferroli, R.; Calcaterra, A.; de Sangro, R.; Falciai, D.; Finocchiaro, G.; Patteri, P.; Peruzzi, I. M.; Piccolo, M.; Zallo, A.; Buzzo, A.; Contri, R.; Crosetti, G.; Lo Vetere, M.; Macri, M.; Monge, M. R.; Passaggio, S.; Pastore, F. C.; Patrignani, C.; Robutti, E.; Santroni, A.; Tosi, S.; Bailey, S.; Morii, M.; Aspinwall, M. L.; Bhimji, W.; Bowerman, D. A.; Dauncey, P. D.; Egede, U.; Eschrich, I.; Morton, G. W.; Nash, J. A.; Sanders, P.; Taylor, G. P.; Grenier, G. J.; Lee, S.-J.; Mallik, U.; Cochran, J.; Crawley, H. B.; Lamsa, J.; Meyer, W. T.; Prell, S.; Rosenberg, E. I.; Yi, J.; Davier, M.; Grosdidier, G.; Höcker, A.; Laplace, S.; Le Diberder, F.; Lepeltier, V.; Lutz, A. M.; Petersen, T. C.; Plaszczynski, S.; Schune, M. H.; Tantot, L.; Wormser, G.; Brigljević, V.; Cheng, C. H.; Lange, D. J.; Wright, D. M.; Bevan, A. J.; Coleman, J. P.; Fry, J. R.; Gabathuler, E.; Gamet, R.; Kay, M.; Parry, R. J.; Payne, D. J.; Sloane, R. J.; Touramanis, C.; Back, J. J.; Harrison, P. F.; Shorthouse, H. W.; Strother, P.; Vidal, P. B.; Brown, C. L.; Cowan, G.; Flack, R. L.; Flaecher, H. U.; George, S.; Green, M. G.; Kurup, A.; Marker, C. E.; McMahon, T. R.; Ricciardi, S.; Salvatore, F.; Vaitsas, G.; Winter, M. A.; Brown, D.; Davis, C. L.; Allison, J.; Barlow, R. J.; Forti, A. C.; Hart, P. A.; Jackson, F.; Lafferty, G. D.; Lyon, A. J.; Weatherall, J. H.; Williams, J. C.; Farbin, A.; Jawahery, A.; Kovalskyi, D.; Lae, C. K.; Lillard, V.; Roberts, D. A.; Blaylock, G.; Dallapiccola, C.; Flood, K. T.; Hertzbach, S. S.; Kofler, R.; Koptchev, V. B.; Moore, T. B.; Saremi, S.; Staengle, H.; Willocq, S.; Cowan, R.; Sciolla, G.; Taylor, F.; Yamamoto, R. K.; Mangeol, D. J.; Milek, M.; Patel, P. M.; Lazzaro, A.; Palombo, F.; Bauer, J. M.; Cremaldi, L.; Eschenburg, V.; Godang, R.; Kroeger, R.; Reidy, J.; Sanders, D. A.; Summers, D. J.; Zhao, H. W.; Hast, C.; Taras, P.; Nicholson, H.; Cartaro, C.; Cavallo, N.; de Nardo, G.; Fabozzi, F.; Gatto, C.; Lista, L.; Paolucci, P.; Piccolo, D.; Sciacca, C.; Baak, M. A.; Raven, G.; Losecco, J. M.; Gabriel, T. A.; Brau, B.; Pulliam, T.; Brau, J.; Frey, R.; Potter, C. T.; Sinev, N. B.; Strom, D.; Torrence, E.; Colecchia, F.; Dorigo, A.; Galeazzi, F.; Margoni, M.; Morandin, M.; Posocco, M.; Rotondo, M.; Simonetto, F.; Stroili, R.; Tiozzo, G.; Voci, C.; Benayoun, M.; Briand, H.; Chauveau, J.; David, P.; de La Vaissière, Ch.; del Buono, L.; Hamon, O.; John, M. J.; Leruste, Ph.; Ocariz, J.; Pivk, M.; Roos, L.; Stark, J.; T'jampens, S.; Manfredi, P. F.; Re, V.; Gladney, L.; Guo, Q. H.; Panetta, J.; Angelini, C.; Batignani, G.; Bettarini, S.; Bondioli, M.; Bucci, F.; Calderini, G.; Carpinelli, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Marchiori, G.; Martinez-Vidal, F.; Morganti, M.; Neri, N.; Paoloni, E.; Rama, M.; Rizzo, G.; Sandrelli, F.; Walsh, J.; Haire, M.; Judd, D.; Paick, K.; Wagoner, D. E.; Danielson, N.; Elmer, P.; Lu, C.; Miftakov, V.; Olsen, J.; Smith, A. J.; Varnes, E. W.; Bellini, F.; Cavoto, G.; Faccini, R.; Ferrarotto, F.; Ferroni, F.; Gaspero, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Morganti, S.; Pierini, M.; Piredda, G.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Voena, C.; Christ, S.; Wagner, G.; Waldi, R.; Adye, T.; de Groot, N.; Franek, B.; Geddes, N. I.; Gopal, G. P.; Olaiya, E. O.; Xella, S. M.; Aleksan, R.; Emery, S.; Gaidot, A.; Ganzhur, S. F.; Giraud, P.-F.; de Monchenault, G. Hamel; Kozanecki, W.; Langer, M.; London, G. W.; Mayer, B.; Schott, G.; Vasseur, G.; Yeche, Ch.; Zito, M.; Purohit, M. V.; Weidemann, A. W.; Yumiceva, F. X.; Aston, D.; Bartelt, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Berger, N.; Boyarski, A. M.; Buchmueller, O. L.; Convery, M. R.; Coupal, D. P.; Dong, D.; Dorfan, J.; Dujmic, D.; Dunwoodie, W.; Field, R. C.; Glanzman, T.; Gowdy, S. J.; Grauges-Pous, E.; Hadig, T.; Halyo, V.; Hryn'ova, T.; Innes, W. R.; Jessop, C. P.; Kelsey, M. H.; Kim, P.; Kocian, M. L.; Langenegger, U.; Leith, D. W.; Luitz, S.; Luth, V.; Lynch, H. L.; Marsiske, H.; Menke, S.; Messner, R.; Muller, D. R.; O'Grady, C. P.; Ozcan, V. E.; Perazzo, A.; Perl, M.; Petrak, S.; Ratcliff, B. N.; Robertson, S. H.; Roodman, A.; Salnikov, A. A.; Schindler, R. H.; Schwiening, J.; Simi, G.; Snyder, A.; Soha, A.; Stelzer, J.; Su, D.; Sullivan, M. K.; Tanaka, H. A.; Va'Vra, J.; Wagner, S. R.; Weaver, M.; Weinstein, A. J.; Wisniewski, W. J.; Wright, D. H.; Young, C. C.; Burchat, P. R.; Edwards, A. J.; Meyer, T. I.; Roat, C.; Ahmed, S.; Alam, M. S.; Ernst, J. A.; Saleem, M.; Wappler, F. R.; Bugg, W.; Krishnamurthy, M.; Spanier, S. M.; Eckmann, R.; Kim, H.; Ritchie, J. L.; Schwitters, R. F.; Izen, J. M.; Kitayama, I.; Lou, X. C.; Ye, S.; Bianchi, F.; Bona, M.; Gallo, F.; Gamba, D.; Borean, C.; Bosisio, L.; della Ricca, G.; Dittongo, S.; Grancagnolo, S.; Lanceri, L.; Poropat, P.; Vitale, L.; Vuagnin, G.; Panvini, R. S.; Banerjee, Sw.; Brown, C. M.; Fortin, D.; Jackson, P. D.; Kowalewski, R.; Roney, J. M.; Band, H. R.; Dasu, S.; Datta, M.; Eichenbaum, A. M.; Hu, H.; Johnson, J. R.; Kutter, P. E.; Li, H.; Liu, R.; di Lodovico, F.; Mihalyi, A.; Mohapatra, A. K.; Pan, Y.; Prepost, R.; Sekula, S. J.; von Wimmersperg-Toeller, J. H.; Wu, J.; Wu, S. L.; Yu, Z.; Neal, H.

    2003-06-01

    We have observed a narrow state near 2.32 GeV/c2 in the inclusive D+sπ0 invariant mass distribution from e+e- annihilation data at energies near 10.6GeV. The observed width is consistent with the experimental resolution. The small intrinsic width and the quantum numbers of the final state indicate that the decay violates isospin conservation. The state has natural spin-parity and the low mass suggests a JP=0+ assignment. The data sample corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 91 fb-1 recorded by the BABAR detector at the SLAC PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- storage ring.

  6. Hearing threshold estimation by auditory steady-state responses with narrow-band chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns: implementation in clinical routine.

    PubMed

    Seidel, David Ulrich; Flemming, Tobias Angelo; Park, Jonas Jae-Hyun; Remmert, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    Objective hearing threshold estimation by auditory steady-state responses (ASSR) can be accelerated by the use of narrow-band chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns. This modification has been examined in only a few clinical studies. In this study, clinical data is validated and extended, and the applicability of the method in audiological diagnostics routine is examined. In 60 patients (normal hearing and hearing impaired), ASSR and pure tone audiometry (PTA) thresholds were compared. ASSR were evoked by binaural multi-frequent narrow-band chirps with adaptive stimulus patterns. The precision and required testing time for hearing threshold estimation were determined. The average differences between ASSR and PTA thresholds were 18, 12, 17 and 19 dB for normal hearing (PTA ≤ 20 dB) and 5, 9, 9 and 11 dB for hearing impaired (PTA > 20 dB) at the frequencies of 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, respectively, and the differences were significant in all frequencies with the exception of 1 kHz. Correlation coefficients between ASSR and PTA thresholds were 0.36, 0.47, 0.54 and 0.51 for normal hearing and 0.73, 0.74, 0.72 and 0.71 for hearing impaired at 500, 1,000, 2,000 and 4,000 Hz, respectively. Mean ASSR testing time was 33 ± 8 min. In conclusion, auditory steady-state responses with narrow-band-chirps and adaptive stimulus patterns is an efficient method for objective frequency-specific hearing threshold estimation. Precision of threshold estimation is most limited for slighter hearing loss at 500 Hz. The required testing time is acceptable for the application in everyday clinical routine. PMID:24305781

  7. Search for a narrow baryonic state decaying to p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 in deep inelastic scattering at HERA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramowicz, H.; Abt, I.; Adamczyk, L.; Adamus, M.; Antonelli, S.; Aushev, V.; Behnke, O.; Behrens, U.; Bertolin, A.; Bhadra, S.; Bloch, I.; Boos, E. G.; Brock, I.; Brook, N. H.; Brugnera, R.; Bruni, A.; Bussey, P. J.; Caldwell, A.; Capua, M.; Catterall, C. D.; Chwastowski, J.; Ciborowski, J.; Ciesielski, R.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Corradi, M.; Dementiev, R. K.; Devenish, R. C. E.; Dusini, S.; Foster, B.; Gach, G.; Gallo, E.; Garfagnini, A.; Geiser, A.; Gizhko, A.; Gladilin, L. K.; Golubkov, Yu. A.; Grzelak, G.; Guzik, M.; Gwenlan, C.; Hain, W.; Hlushchenko, O.; Hochman, D.; Hori, R.; Ibrahim, Z. A.; Iga, Y.; Ishitsuka, M.; Januschek, F.; Jomhari, N. Z.; Kadenko, I.; Kananov, S.; Karshon, U.; Kaur, P.; Kisielewska, D.; Klanner, R.; Klein, U.; Korzhavina, I. A.; Kotański, A.; Kötz, U.; Kovalchuk, N.; Kowalski, H.; Krupa, B.; Kuprash, O.; Kuze, M.; Levchenko, B. B.; Levy, A.; Limentani, S.; Lisovyi, M.; Lobodzinska, E.; Löhr, B.; Lohrmann, E.; Longhin, A.; Lontkovskyi, D.; Lukina, O. Yu.; Makarenko, I.; Malka, J.; Mastroberardino, A.; Mohamad Idris, F.; Mohammad Nasir, N.; Myronenko, V.; Nagano, K.; Nobe, T.; Nowak, R. J.; Onishchuk, Yu.; Paul, E.; Perlański, W.; Pokrovskiy, N. S.; Polini, A.; Przybycień, M.; Roloff, P.; Ruspa, M.; Saxon, D. H.; Schioppa, M.; Schneekloth, U.; Schörner-Sadenius, T.; Shcheglova, L. M.; Shevchenko, R.; Shkola, O.; Shyrma, Yu.; Singh, I.; Skillicorn, I. O.; Słomiński, W.; Solano, A.; Stanco, L.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stern, A.; Stopa, P.; Sztuk-Dambietz, J.; Tassi, E.; Tokushuku, K.; Tomaszewska, J.; Tsurugai, T.; Turcato, M.; Turkot, O.; Tymieniecka, T.; Verbytskyi, A.; Wan Abdullah, W. A. T.; Wichmann, K.; Wing, M.; Yamada, S.; Yamazaki, Y.; Zakharchuk, N.; Żarnecki, A. F.; Zawiejski, L.; Zenaiev, O.; Zhautykov, B. O.; Zotkin, D. S.

    2016-08-01

    A search for a narrow baryonic state in the p KS0 and p ‾ KS0 system has been performed in ep collisions at HERA with the ZEUS detector using an integrated luminosity of 358pb-1 taken in 2003-2007. The search was performed with deep inelastic scattering events at an ep centre-of-mass energy of 318GeV for exchanged photon virtuality, Q2, between 20 and 100GeV2. Contrary to evidence presented for such a state around 1.52 GeV in a previous ZEUS analysis using a sample of 121 pb-1 taken in 1996-2000, no resonance peak was found in the p (p ‾) KS0 invariant-mass distribution in the range 1.45-1.7 GeV. Upper limits on the production cross section are set.

  8. Extremely supercharged proteins in mass spectrometry: profiling the pH of electrospray generated droplets, narrowing charge state distributions, and increasing ion fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Zenaidee, Muhammad A; Donald, William A

    2015-03-21

    The effects of 12 acids, 4 solvents, and 8 low-volatility additives that increase analyte charging (i.e., superchargers) on the charge state distributions (CSDs) of protein ions in ESI-MS were investigated. We discovered that (i) relatively low concentrations [5% (v/v)] of 1,2-butylene carbonate (and 4-vinyl-1,3-dioxolan-2-one) can be added to ESI solutions to form higher charge states of cytochrome c and myoglobin ions than by using more traditional additives (e.g., propylene carbonate, sulfolane, or m-nitrobenzyl alcohol) under these conditions and (ii) the width of CSDs narrow as the effectiveness of superchargers increase, which concentrates protein ions into fewer detection channels. The use of strong acids (pKa values < 0) results in essentially no protein supercharging, higher adduction of acid molecules, and wider CSDs for many superchargers and proteins, whereas the use of weak acids (pKa > 0) results in significantly higher protein ion charging, less acid adduction, and narrower CSDs, indicating that protein ion supercharging in ESI can be significantly limited by the binding of conjugate base anions of acids that neutralize charge sites and broaden CSDs. The extent of protein charging as a function of acid identity (HA) does not strongly correlate with gas-phase proton transfer data (i.e., gas-phase basicity and proton affinity values for HA and A(-)), solution-phase protein secondary structures (as determined by circular dichroism spectroscopy), and/or acid molecule volatility data. For protein-denaturing solutions, these data were used to infer that the "effective" pH of ESI generated droplets near the moment of ion formation can be ∼0, which is ca. 1 to 3 pH units lower than the pH of the solutions prior to ESI. Electron capture dissociation (ECD) of [ubiquitin, 17H](17+) resulted in the identification of 223 cleavages, 74 of 75 inter-residue sites, and 92% ECD fragmentation efficiency, which correspond to highest of these values that have been

  9. Neutron-proton final-state interaction in. pi. d breakup: Vector analyzing power

    SciTech Connect

    List, W.; Boschitz, E.T.; Garcilazo, H.; Gyles, W.; Ottermann, C.R.; Tacik, R.; Mango, S.; Konter, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Smith, G.R.; and others

    1988-04-01

    The vector analyzing power iT/sub 11/ has been measured for the ..pi..d breakup reaction in a kinematically complete experiment. The dependence of iT/sub 11/ on the momentum of the proton has been obtained for 36 pion-proton angle pairs at T/sub ..pi../ = 134 and 228 MeV. The data are compared with predictions from the new relativistic Faddeev theory of Garcilazo. The sensitivity of the observable iT/sub 11/, in particular in the np final-state interaction region, to details of the theory is investigated.

  10. Narrow rings - Observations and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porco, C. C.

    Voyager 1 and 2 observations have revealed that within the rings of Saturn lies a set of narrow, eccentric rings resembling those of Uranus. Voyager 2 observations have proven crucial in refining the Uranian ring orbit models to a remarkable level of precision. All these rings share some common structural and kinematical characteristics, such as spatially variable radial widths and uniform precession; however, interesting differences exist which provoke attention and may be related to the differing dynamical environments in which these rings dwell. The current state of the knowledge of the shape, behavior, and confinement of narrow rings is discussed.

  11. Anger perceptually and conceptually narrows cognitive scope.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip A; Poole, Bryan D; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2015-07-01

    For the last 50 years, research investigating the effect of emotions on scope of cognitive processing was based on models proposing that affective valence determined cognitive scope. More recently, our motivational intensity model suggests that this past work had confounded valence with motivational intensity. Research derived from this model supports the idea that motivational intensity, rather than affective valence, explains much of the variance emotions have on cognitive scope. However, the motivational intensity model is limited in that the empirical work has examined only positive affects high in approach and negative affects high in avoidance motivation. Thus, perhaps only approach-positive and avoidance-negative states narrow cognitive scope. The present research was designed to clarify these conceptual issues by examining the effect of anger, a negatively valenced approach-motivated state, on cognitive scope. Results revealed that anger narrowed attentional scope relative to a neutral state and that attentional narrowing to anger was similar to the attentional narrowing caused by high approach-motivated positive affects (Study 1). This narrowing of attention was related to trait approach motivation (Studies 2 and Study 3). Anger also narrowed conceptual cognitive categorization (Study 4). Narrowing of categorization related to participants' approach motivation toward anger stimuli. Together, these results suggest that anger, an approach-motivated negative affect, narrows perceptual and conceptual cognitive scope. More broadly, these results support the conceptual model that motivational intensity per se, rather than approach-positive and avoidance-negative states, causes a narrowing of cognitive scope.

  12. STRONG UV AND X-RAY VARIABILITY OF THE NARROW LINE SEYFERT 1 GALAXY WPVS 007-ON THE NATURE OF THE X-RAY LOW STATE

    SciTech Connect

    Grupe, Dirk; Barlow, Brad N.; Komossa, S.; Scharwaechter, Julia; Dietrich, Matthias; Leighly, Karen M.; Lucy, Adrian E-mail: julia.scharwaechter@obspm.fr

    2013-10-01

    We report on multi-wavelength observations of the X-ray transient Narrow Line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxy WPVS 007. The galaxy was monitored with Swift between 2005 October and 2013 July, after it had previously undergone a dramatic drop in its X-ray flux. For the first time, we are able to repeatedly detect this NLS1 in X-rays again. This increased number of detections in the last couple of years may suggest that the strong absorber that has been found in this active galactic nucleus (AGN) is starting to become leaky and may eventually disappear. The X-ray spectra obtained for WPVS 007 are all consistent with a partial covering absorber model. A spectrum based on the data during the extreme low X-ray flux states shows that the absorption column density is of the order of 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 23} cm{sup -2} with a covering fraction of 95%. WPVS 007 also displays one of the strongest UV variabilities seen in NLS1s. The UV continuum variability anti-correlates with the optical/UV slope {alpha}{sub UV}, which suggests that the variability may be primarily due to reddening. The UV variability timescales are consistent with moving dust ''clouds'' located beyond the dust sublimation radius of R{sub sub} Almost-Equal-To 20 lt-days. We present for the first time near-infrared JHK data of WPVS 007, which reveal a rich emission-line spectrum. Recent optical spectroscopy does not indicate significant variability in the broad permitted and Fe II emission lines, implying that the ionizing continuum seen by those gas clouds has not significantly changed over the last decades. All X-ray and UV observations are consistent with a scenario in which an evolving broad absorption line (BAL) flow obscures the continuum emission. As such, WPVS 007 is an important target for our understanding of BAL flows in low-mass AGNs.

  13. Observation of a narrow mass state decaying into Υ(1S)+γ in pp[over ¯] collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, Victor Mukhamedovich; et al.

    2012-08-01

    Using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.3 fb{sup -1}, we observe a narrow mass state decaying into {Upsilon}(1S) + {gamma}, where the {Upsilon}(1S) meson is detected by its decay into a pair of oppositely charged muons, and the photon is identified through its conversion into an electron-positron pair. The significance of this observation is 5.6 standard deviations. The mass of the state is centered at 10.551 {+-} 0.014(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}, which is consistent with that of the state recently observed by the ATLAS Collaboration.

  14. Narrowness and Liberality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Agresto, John

    2003-01-01

    John Agresto, whose task has been to rebuild the war-ravaged infrastructure of a Middle-Eastern university system, is discouraged to see that narrow expertise is the only goal of education there, to the utter exclusion of intellectual breadth. He comments that, although it is not that bad in the U.S., he feels that doctoral programs as currently…

  15. Dynamics of narrow rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    The ring models described here were developed to account for the dynamical problems posed by the narrow rings of Uranus. Some of these rings are now known to be eccentric, inclined, nonuniform in width, optically thick, and narrow, with very sharp edges. The eccentric rings have common pericenters and large, positive eccentricity gradients. The theory of shepherding satellites successfully accounts for most of these features and can also account for some features of the narrow Saturnian rings, in particular, waves, kinks, and periodic variations in brightness. Outstanding problems include the putative relation between eccentricity and inclination displayed by eight of the nine Uranian rings, and the magnitudes of the tidal torques acting on the shepherding satellites. The horseshoe-orbit model, although viable, probably has more application to the narrow rings from which the Saturnian coorbital satellites formed. The angular momentum flow rate due to particle collisions is a minimum at the Lagrangian equilibrium points L(4) and L(5), and one can expect accretion to be rapid at these points.

  16. Spectral Narrowing in Semiconductor Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La Rocca, G. C.; Bassani, F.; Agranovich, V. M.

    1998-03-01

    The notion of in-plane motional narrowing of cavity polariton (CP) lines has been recently considered ( D.M. Whittaker et al.), Phys. Rev. Lett. 77, 4792 (1996); V. Savona et al.. Phys. Rev. Lett. 78, 4470 (1997). We point out that, in the presence of N>1 resonating quantum wells (QWs), the exciton component in a CP is coherently delocalized over all the individual QWs. Besides the two CP branches, also a dark exciton branch is present given by N-1 states similarly delocalized, but orthogonal to the cavity photon mode. If the QW disorder potential is weak compared to the Rabi splitting, it is seen by a CP as reduced by a factor 1/√N because of averaging along the cavity axis (G.C. La Rocca, F. Bassani, V.M. Agranovich, JOSA B 15), (1998). As for the in-plane motional narrowing, a simple scaling procedure shows that it would imply that the inhomogeneous linewidth of a CP be reduced by about four orders of magnitude compared to a QW exciton, which is incompatible with the experimental observations. The physical reason of such a shortcoming is that the disorder introduces localized exciton states which can resonantly scatter CPs, mixing them with states having a large k vector as well as with dark exciton states.

  17. How vessels narrow.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, S M

    1995-01-01

    Vascular narrowing, the clinical dilatation of narrowed vessels, and the restenosis of those vessels are central topics in modern cardiology. This review discusses the cellular basis both for the spontaneous narrowing of vessels and for the restenotic process that occurs after angioplasty. The central issue, as discussed in this review, is likely to be remodeling of the vessel wall rather than simple accretion of lipid mass in atherosclerosis or simple physical dilatation following angioplasty. While it is true that the atherosclerotic lesion grows by accretion of lipid mass, this by itself does not narrow vessels. As we will discuss, the vessel has a phenomenal ability to accommodate changes of this sort. Narrowing must occur, at least in part, because of a failure of this normal ability to accommodate. In a similar manner, one might expect the restonotic vessel to simply remodel itself down to its preangioplasty size. The issue for cell and molecular biologists is what "remodeling" means. Until recently, the assertion has been that remodeling occurred as the result of the formation of new intimal mass; that is, the atherosclerotic vessel was seen as returning to its original dimensions following angioplasty as a result of forming a new intimal mass that filled in the dilated space. Recent studies using cell kinetic methods as well as intravascular ultrasound, however, have cast doubt upon this hypothesis. It now appears that the loss of gain following angioplasty is likely to be due to the formation of new tissues which remodel the vessel wall without necessarily adding mass to it. This is the same sort of process that is well described in wound healing. The nature of this new tissue is of great interest. Studies in this laboratory and others have identified genes which may be unique to this tissue and explain the remodeling response. PMID:8585265

  18. The narrow pentaquark

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri

    2007-02-01

    The experimental status of the pentaquark searches is briefly reviewed. Recent null results by the CLAS collaboration are commented, and new strong evidence of a very narrow Θ+ resonance by the DIANA collaboration is presented. On the theory side, I revisit the argument against the existence of the pentaquark — that of Callan and Klebanov — and show that actually a strong resonance is predicted in that approach, however its width is grossly overestimated. A recent calculation gives 2 MeV for the pentaquark width, and this number is probably still an upper bound.

  19. Atomic momentum patterns with narrower intervals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Baoguo; Jin, Shengjie; Dong, Xiangyu; Liu, Zhe; Yin, Lan; Zhou, Xiaoji

    2016-10-01

    We studied the atomic momentum distribution of a superposition of Bloch states in the lowest band of an optical lattice after the action of the standing-wave pulse. By designing the imposing pulse on this superposed state, an atomic momentum pattern appears with a narrow interval between the adjacent peaks that can be far less than double recoil momentum. The patterns with narrower interval come from the effect of the designed pulse on the superposition of many Bloch states with quasimomenta throughout the first Brillouin zone. Our experimental result of narrow interval peaks is consistent with the theoretical simulation. The patterns of multiple modes with different quasimomenta may be helpful for precise measurement and atomic manipulation.

  20. Narrow Angle movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This brief three-frame movie of the Moon was made from three Cassini narrow-angle images as the spacecraft passed by the Moon on the way to its closest approach with Earth on August 17, 1999. The purpose of this particular set of images was to calibrate the spectral response of the narrow-angle camera and to test its 'on-chip summing mode' data compression technique in flight. From left to right, they show the Moon in the green, blue and ultraviolet regions of the spectrum in 40, 60 and 80 millisecond exposures, respectively. All three images have been scaled so that the brightness of Crisium basin, the dark circular region in the upper right, is the same in each image. The spatial scale in the blue and ultraviolet images is 1.4 miles per pixel (2.3 kilometers). The original scale in the green image (which was captured in the usual manner and then reduced in size by 2x2 pixel summing within the camera system) was 2.8 miles per pixel (4.6 kilometers). It has been enlarged for display to the same scale as the other two. The imaging data were processed and released by the Cassini Imaging Central Laboratory for Operations (CICLOPS) at the University of Arizona's Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, AZ.

    Photo Credit: NASA/JPL/Cassini Imaging Team/University of Arizona

    Cassini, launched in 1997, is a joint mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and Italian Space Agency. The mission is managed by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington DC. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA.

  1. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Washington

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Washington's test score trends through 2008-09. Three years of comparable mean scale score data were not available from the state. In 2004, 77% of non-Title I 4th graders and 60% of Title I 4th graders scored at the proficient level on the state reading test. In 2009, 75% of non-Title I 4th graders and 61% of Title I 4th…

  2. NFC - Narrow Field Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukal, J.; Srba, J.; Gorková, S.

    2015-01-01

    We have been introducing a low-cost CCTV video system for faint meteor monitoring and here we describe the first results from 5 months of two-station operations. Our system called NFC (Narrow Field Camera) with a meteor limiting magnitude around +6.5mag allows research on trajectories of less massive meteoroids within individual parent meteor showers and the sporadic background. At present 4 stations (2 pairs with coordinated fields of view) of NFC system are operated in the frame of CEMeNt (Central European Meteor Network). The heart of each NFC station is a sensitive CCTV camera Watec 902 H2 and a fast cinematographic lens Meopta Meostigmat 1/50 - 52.5 mm (50 mm focal length and fixed aperture f/1.0). In this paper we present the first results based on 1595 individual meteors, 368 of which were recorded from two stations simultaneously. This data set allows the first empirical verification of theoretical assumptions for NFC system capabilities (stellar and meteor magnitude limit, meteor apparent brightness distribution and accuracy of single station measurements) and the first low mass meteoroid trajectory calculations. Our experimental data clearly showed the capabilities of the proposed system for low mass meteor registration and for calculations based on NFC data to lead to a significant refinement in the orbital elements for low mass meteoroids.

  3. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? California

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles California's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2004, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 341 for non-Title I students and 315 for Title I students. In 2008, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 379 for non-Title I students and 340 for Title I students. Between 2004 and 2008, the mean scale…

  4. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Maryland

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Maryland's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2004, 82% of non-Title I 4th graders and 61% of Title I 4th graders scored at the proficient level on the state reading test. In 2009, 90% of non-Title I 4th graders and 78% of Title I 4th graders scored at the proficient level in reading. Between 2004 and 2009, the percentage…

  5. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Massachusetts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Massachusetts's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, 59% of non-Title I 4th graders and 29% of Title I 4th graders scored at the proficient level on the state reading test. In 2009, 64% of non-Title I 4th graders and 31% of Title I 4th graders scored at the proficient level in reading. Between 2006 and 2009, the…

  6. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Arizona

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Arizona's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2005, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 478 for non-Title I students and 445 for Title I students. In 2008, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 477 for non-title I students and 450 for title I students. Between 2005 and 2008, the mean scale…

  7. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Kansas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Kansas' test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 80 for non-Title I students and 73 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 84 for non-Title I students and 78 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean scale score…

  8. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Texas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Texas's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2005, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 2297 for non-Title I students and 2207 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 2334 for non-Title I students and 2235 for Title I students. Between 2005 and 2009, the mean scale…

  9. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Pennsylvania

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Pennsylvania's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 1390 for non-Title I students and 1220 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 1420 for non-Title I students and 1270 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

  10. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Rhode Island

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Rhode Island's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 435 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 440 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

  11. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Tennessee

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Tennessee's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2004, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 501 for non-Title I students and 486 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 512 for non-Title I students and 495 for Title I students. Between 2004 and 2009, the mean scale…

  12. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Utah

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Utah's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2004, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 167 for non-Title I students and 164 for Title I students. In 2009 the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 168 for non-Title I students and 164 for Title I students. Between 2004 and 2009, the mean scale score…

  13. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Maine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Maine's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 438 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 477 for non-Title I students and 441 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean scale score…

  14. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Colorado

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Colorado's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2003, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 598 for non-Title I students and 558 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 599 for non-Title I students and 556 for Title I students. Between 2003 and 2009, the mean scale…

  15. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? North Carolina

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles North Carolina's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade math test was 351 for non-Title I students and 347 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade math was 354 for non-Title I students and 350 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean scale…

  16. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Missouri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Missouri's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 661 for non-Title I students and 642 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 661 for non-Title I students and 648 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, there was no…

  17. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? New Hampshire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles New Hampshire's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 445 for non-Title I students and 438 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 448 for non-Title I students and 441 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean…

  18. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Kentucky

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Kentucky's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2007, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 455 for non-Title I students and 451 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 455 for non-Title I students and 451 for Title I students. Between 2007 and 2009, the mean scale…

  19. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Delaware

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Delaware's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2006, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 474 for non-Title I students and 464 for Title I students. In 2009, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 478 for non-Title I students and 467 for Title I students. Between 2006 and 2009, the mean scale…

  20. State Test Score Trends through 2008-09, Part 4: Is Achievement Improving and Are Gaps Narrowing for Title I Students? Idaho

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center on Education Policy, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This paper profiles Idaho's test score trends through 2008-09. In 2007, the mean scale score on the state 4th grade reading test was 209 for non-Title I students and 205 for Title I students. In 2007, the mean scale score in 4th grade reading was 211 for non-Title I students and 208 for Title I students. Between 2007 and 2009, the mean scale score…

  1. Decay Modes of Narrow Molecular Resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Courtin, S.; Haas, F.; Salsac, M.-D.; Lebhertz, D.; Michalon, A.; Beck, C.; Rousseau, M.; Zafra, A. Sanchez I.; Hutcheon, D.; Davis, C.; Pearson, J. E.; Lister, C. J.

    2006-08-14

    The heavy-ion radiative capture reactions 12C(12C,{gamma})24Mg and 12C(16O,{gamma})28Si have been performed on and off resonance at TRIUMF using the Dragon separator and its associated BGO array. The decay of the studied narrow resonances has been shown to proceed predominantly through quasi-bound doorway states which cluster and deformed configurations would have a large overlap with the entry resonance states.

  2. Narrow-headed garter snake (Thamnophis rufipunctatus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nowak, Erika M.

    2006-01-01

    The narrow-headed garter snake is a harmless, nonvenomous snake that is distinguished by its elongated, triangular-shaped head and the red or dark spots on its olive to tan body. Today, the narrow-headed garter snake is a species of special concern in the United States because of its decline over much of its historic range. Arizona's Oak Creek has historically contained the largest population of narrow-headed garter snakes in the United States. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Arizona Game and Fish Department jointly funded research by USGS scientists in Oak Creek to shed light on the factors causing declining population numbers. The research resulted in better understanding of the snake's habitat needs, winter and summer range, and dietary habits. Based on the research findings, the U.S. Forest Service has developed recommendations that visitors and local residents can adopt to help slow the decline of the narrow-headed garter snake in Oak Creek.

  3. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow CMEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2002-12-01

    Coronal mass ejections (CMEs) are commonly described as new, discrete, bright features appearing in the field of view of a white light coronagraph and moving outward over a period of minutes to hours. Apparent angular widths of the CMEs cover a wide range, from few to 360°. The very narrow structures (narrower than ~15-20°) form only a small subset of all the observed CMEs and are usually referred to as rays, spikes, fans, etc. Recently, Gilbert et al. (2001, ApJ, 550, 1093) reported LASCO white light observations of 15 selected narrow CMEs. We extended the study and analyzed ultraviolet spectroscopy of narrow ejections, including several events listed by Gilbert et al. The data were obtained by the Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS/SOHO). We present comparison of narrow and large CMEs and discuss the relation of the narrow CMEs to coronal jets and/or other narrow transient events. This work is supported by NASA under Grant NAG5-11420 to the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory, by the Italian Space Agency and by PRODEX (Swiss contribution).

  4. Exciton absorption in narrow armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monozon, B. S.; Schmelcher, P.

    2016-11-01

    We develop an analytical approach to the exciton optical absorption for narrow gap armchair graphene nanoribbons (AGNR). We focus on the regime of dominant size quantization in combination with the attractive electron-hole interaction. An adiabatic separation of slow and fast motions leads via the two-body Dirac equation to the isolated and coupled subband approximations. Discrete and continuous exciton states are in general coupled and form quasi-Rydberg series of purely discrete and resonance type character. The corresponding oscillator strengths and widths are derived. We show that the exciton peaks are blue-shifted, become broader and increase in magnitude upon narrowing the ribbon. At the edge of a subband the singularity related to the 1D density of states is transformed into finite absorption via the presence of the exciton. Our analytical results are in good agreement with those obtained by other methods including numerical approaches. Estimates of the expected experimental values are provided for realistic AGNR.

  5. Early Experience & Multisensory Perceptual Narrowing

    PubMed Central

    Lewkowicz, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing is a reflection of early experience and contributes in key ways to perceptual and cognitive development. In general, findings have shown that unisensory perceptual sensitivity in early infancy is broadly tuned such that young infants respond to, and discriminate, native as well as non-native sensory inputs, whereas older infants only respond to native inputs. Recently, my colleagues and I discovered that perceptual narrowing occurs at the multisensory processing level as well. The present article reviews this new evidence and puts it in the larger context of multisensory perceptual development and the role that perceptual experience plays in it. Together, the evidence on unisensory and multisensory narrowing shows that early experience shapes the emergence of perceptual specialization and expertise. PMID:24435505

  6. Kinetic narrowing of size distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubrovskii, V. G.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model that reveals an interesting possibility for narrowing the size distribution of nanostructures when the deterministic growth rate changes its sign from positive to negative at a certain stationary size. Such a behavior occurs in self-catalyzed one-dimensional III-V nanowires and more generally whenever a negative "adsorption-desorption" term in the growth rate is compensated by a positive "diffusion flux." By asymptotically solving the Fokker-Planck equation, we derive an explicit representation for the size distribution that describes either Poissonian broadening or self-regulated narrowing depending on the parameters. We show how the fluctuation-induced spreading of the size distribution can be completely suppressed in systems with size self-stabilization. These results can be used for obtaining size-uniform ensembles of different nanostructures.

  7. Cryogenic Detectors (Narrow Field Instruments)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoevers, H.; Verhoeve, P.

    Two cryogenic imaging spectrometer arrays are currently considered as focal plane instruments for XEUS. The narrow field imager 1 (NFI 1) will cover the energy range from 0.05 to 3 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV, or better, at 500 eV. A second narrow field imager (NFI 2) covers the energy range from 1 to 15 keV with an energy resolution of 2 eV (at 1 keV) and 5 eV (at 7 keV), creating some overlap with part of the NFI 1 energy window. Both narrow field imagers have a 0.5 arcmin field of view. Their imaging capabilities are matched to the XEUS optics of 2 to 5 arcsec leading to 1 arcsec pixels. The detector arrays will be cooled by a closed cycle system comprising a mechanical cooler with a base temperature of 2.5 K and either a low temperature 3He sorption pump providing the very low temperature stage and/or an Adiabatic Demagnetization Refrigerator (ADR). The ADR cooler is explicitly needed to cool the NFI 2 array. The narrow field imager 1} Currently a 48 times 48 element array of superconducting tunnel junctions (STJ) is envisaged. Its operating temperature is in the range between 30 and 350 mK. Small, single Ta STJs (20-50 mum on a side) have shown 3.5 eV (FWHM) resolution at E = 525 eV and small arrays have been successfully demonstrated (6 times 6 pixels), or are currently tested (10 times 12 pixels). Alternatively, a prototype Distributed Read-Out Imaging Device (DROID), consisting of a linear superconducting Ta absorber of 20 times 100 mum2, including a 20 times 20 mum STJ for readout at either end, has shown a measured energy resolution of 2.4 eV (FWHM) at E = 500 eV. Simulations involving the diffusion properties as well as loss and tunnel rates have shown that the performance can be further improved by slight modifications in the geometry, and that the size of the DROIDS can be increased to 0.5-1.0 mm without loss in energy resolution. The relatively large areas and good energy resolution compared to single STJs make DROIDS good candidates for the

  8. High average power, narrow band 248 nm alexandrite laser system

    SciTech Connect

    Kuper, J.W.; Chin, T.C.; Papanestor, P.A.

    1994-12-31

    A compact line-narrowed 248 nm solid state laser source operating at 15 mJ {at} 100 Hz PRF was demonstrated. Constraints due to thermal loading of components were addressed. Tradeoffs between pulse energy and repetition rate were investigated. A method for overcoming thermal dephasing in the THG material was achieved by scanning a slab shaped crystal.

  9. Moving beyond Idealistically Narrow Discourses in Citizenship Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fischman, Gustavo E.; Haas, Eric

    2014-01-01

    The main goal of this article is to provide conceptual guidelines to move the pedagogical debate in the field of citizenship education beyond idealistically narrow models. We begin by providing an overview of key shortcomings presented in most citizenship education programs, specifically in the United States of America. The second section presents…

  10. Finding success in ACA narrow networks.

    PubMed

    Daly, Rich

    2015-12-01

    Health systems should carefully consider the specific details of their local market before deciding to launch a narrow network plan or to join an existing insurer's narrow network. Key steps to take in the evaluation process include: Determining insurer interest in forming a true partnership. Assessing capability for greater efficiency. Assessing insurer priorities. Obtaining access to enrollee data. Identifying capabilities that differentiate it from other narrow networks. PMID:26793944

  11. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2013-10-01

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage Vrf=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density ne0 is depressed below the density nesh at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at Vrf=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  12. Narrow gap electronegative capacitive discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamura, E.; Lieberman, M. A.; Lichtenberg, A. J.

    2013-10-15

    Narrow gap electronegative (EN) capacitive discharges are widely used in industry and have unique features not found in conventional discharges. In this paper, plasma parameters are determined over a range of decreasing gap length L from values for which an electropositive (EP) edge exists (2-region case) to smaller L-values for which the EN region connects directly to the sheath (1-region case). Parametric studies are performed at applied voltage V{sub rf}=500 V for pressures of 10, 25, 50, and 100 mTorr, and additionally at 50 mTorr for 1000 and 2000 V. Numerical results are given for a parallel plate oxygen discharge using a planar 1D3v (1 spatial dimension, 3 velocity components) particle-in-cell (PIC) code. New interesting phenomena are found for the case in which an EP edge does not exist. This 1-region case has not previously been investigated in detail, either numerically or analytically. In particular, attachment in the sheaths is important, and the central electron density n{sub e0} is depressed below the density n{sub esh} at the sheath edge. The sheath oscillations also extend into the EN core, creating an edge region lying within the sheath and not characterized by the standard diffusion in an EN plasma. An analytical model is developed using minimal inputs from the PIC results, and compared to the PIC results for a base case at V{sub rf}=500 V and 50 mTorr, showing good agreement. Selected comparisons are made at the other voltages and pressures. A self-consistent model is also developed and compared to the PIC results, giving reasonable agreement.

  13. Prospects for a narrow line MOT in YO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collopy, Alejandra L.; Hummon, Matthew T.; Yeo, Mark; Yan, Bo; Ye, Jun

    2015-05-01

    In addition to being suitable for laser cooling and trapping in a magneto-optical trap (MOT) using a relatively broad (∼ 5 MHz) transition, the molecule YO possesses a narrow-line transition. This forbidden transition between the {{X}2}Σ and A{{\\prime }2}{{Δ }3/2} states has linewidth ∼ 2π × 160 kHz. After cooling in a MOT on the 614 nm {{X}2}Σ to {{A}2}{{\\Pi }1/2} (orange) transition, the narrow 690 nm (red) transition can be used to further cool the sample, requiring only minimal additions to the first stage system. We estimate that the narrow line cooling stage will bring the temperature from ∼1 mK to ∼10 μK, significantly advancing the frontier on direct cooling achievable for molecules.

  14. Infants Experience Perceptual Narrowing for Nonprimate Faces

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Varga, Krisztina; Frick, Janet E.; Fragaszy, Dorothy

    2011-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing--a phenomenon in which perception is broad from birth, but narrows as a function of experience--has previously been tested with primate faces. In the first 6 months of life, infants can discriminate among individual human and monkey faces. Though the ability to discriminate monkey faces is lost after about 9 months, infants…

  15. Narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Madan, A.; Mahan, A.H.

    1985-01-10

    Disclosed is a narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprising an alloy of amorphous silicon and a band gap narrowing element selected from the group consisting of Sn, Ge, and Pb, with an electron donor dopant selected from the group consisting of P, As, Sb, Bi and N. The process for producing the narrow band gap amorphous silicon semiconductor comprises the steps of forming an alloy comprising amorphous silicon and at least one of the aforesaid band gap narrowing elements in amount sufficient to narrow the band gap of the silicon semiconductor alloy below that of amorphous silicon, and also utilizing sufficient amounts of the aforesaid electron donor dopant to maintain the amorphous silicon alloy as an n-type semiconductor.

  16. Coulomb and nuclear excitations of narrow resonances in 17Ne

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marganiec, J.; Wamers, F.; Aksouh, F.; Aksyutina, Yu.; Álvarez-Pol, H.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Bertulani, C. A.; Boretzky, K.; Borge, M. J. G.; Chartier, M.; Chatillon, A.; Chulkov, L. V.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Emling, H.; Ershova, O.; Fraile, L. M.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Galaviz, D.; Geissel, H.; Heil, M.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Hoffmann, J.; Johansson, H. T.; Jonson, B.; Karagiannis, C.; Kiselev, O. A.; Kratz, J. V.; Kulessa, R.; Kurz, N.; Langer, C.; Lantz, M.; Le Bleis, T.; Lemmon, R.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mahata, K.; Müntz, C.; Nilsson, T.; Nociforo, C.; Nyman, G.; Ott, W.; Panin, V.; Paschalis, S.; Perea, A.; Plag, R.; Reifarth, R.; Richter, A.; Rodriguez-Tajes, C.; Rossi, D.; Riisager, K.; Savran, D.; Schrieder, G.; Simon, H.; Stroth, J.; Sümmerer, K.; Tengblad, O.; Typel, S.; Weick, H.; Wiescher, M.; Wimmer, C.

    2016-08-01

    New experimental data for dissociation of relativistic 17Ne projectiles incident on targets of lead, carbon, and polyethylene targets at GSI are presented. Special attention is paid to the excitation and decay of narrow resonant states in 17Ne. Distributions of internal energy in the 15O + p + p three-body system have been determined together with angular and partial-energy correlations between the decay products in different energy regions. The analysis was done using existing experimental data on 17Ne and its mirror nucleus 17N. The isobaric multiplet mass equation is used for assignment of observed resonances and their spins and parities. A combination of data from the heavy and light targets yielded cross sections and transition probabilities for the Coulomb excitations of the narrow resonant states. The resulting transition probabilities provide information relevant for a better understanding of the 17Ne structure.

  17. Pion-proton backward elastic scattering between 30 and 90 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Baker, W.F.; Eartly, D.P.; Kalbach, R.M.; Klinger, J.S.; Lennox, A.J.; Polakos, P.A.; Pifer, A.E.; Rubinstein, R.

    1982-11-01

    Backward elastic scattering of ..pi..+- on protons has been measured for incident pion momenta between 30 and 90 GeV/c and 0<-u <0.5 (GeV/c)/sup 2/. The u-dependence of the cross sections is similar to that observed at lower momenta, and Regge models give acceptable fits to the data.

  18. Higher-Twist Mechanism and Inclusive Gluon Production in Pion-Proton Collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, C.; Myrzakulov, R.; Uzun, O.

    2016-01-01

    We calculate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT inclusive gluon production cross section in πp collisions incase of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches within perturbative and holographic QCD. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross section are obtained and the resummed higher-twist cross sections (Borel sum) with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross section are compared and analyzed.

  19. Higher-twist mechanism and inclusive gluon production in pion-proton collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadov, A. I.; Aydin, C.; Myrzakulov, R.; Uzun, O.

    2015-12-01

    We calculate the contribution of the higher-twist Feynman diagrams to the large-pT inclusive gluon production cross-section in πp collisions in case of the running coupling and frozen coupling approaches within perturbative and holographic QCD. The structure of infrared renormalon singularities of the higher-twist subprocess cross-section is obtained and the resummed higher-twist cross-sections (Borel sum) with the ones obtained in the framework of the frozen coupling approach and leading-twist cross-section are compared and analyzed.

  20. Proton-proton, pion-proton and pion-pion diffractive collisions at ultrahigh energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anisovich, V. V.; Nikonov, K. V.; Nikonov, V. A.; Nyiri, J.

    2014-05-01

    The LHC energies are those at which the asymptotic regime in hadron-hadron diffractive collisions (pp, πp, ππ) might be switched on. Based on results of the Dakhno-Nikonov eikonal model which is a generalization of the Good-Walker eikonal approach for a continuous set of channels, we present a picture for transformation of the constituent quark mode to the black disk one. In the black disk mode (√ {s} >= 10 TeV), we have a growth of the logarithm squared type for total and elastic cross-sections, σtot ln2 s and σel ln2 s and (τ = q⊥2&sigma_; tot)-scaling for diffractive scattering and diffractive dissociation of hadrons. The diffractive dissociation cross-section grows as σD ln s, σDD ln s, and their relative contribution tends to zero: σD/σtot → 0, σDD/σtot → 0. Asymptotic characteristics of diffractive and total cross-sections are universal, and this results in the asymptotical equality of cross-sections for all types of hadrons (the Gribov universality). The energy scale for switching on the asymptotic mode is estimated for different processes.

  1. Polarized-target asymmetry in pion-proton bremsstrahlung at 298 MeV

    SciTech Connect

    Bosshard, A.; Amsler, C.; Bistirlich, J.A.; van den Brandt, B.; Crowe, K.M.; Doebeli, M.; Doser, M.; Haddock, R.P.; Konter, J.A.; Ljungfelt, S.; Loude, J.F.; Mango, S.; Meyer, C.A.; Perroud, J.P.; Riedlberger, J.; Renker, D.; Schaad, M.; Sober, D.I.; Truoel, P.; Weymuth, P. Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory, University of California at Berkeley, Berkeley California 94720 Paul Scherrer Institut, 5232 Villigen, Paul Scherrer Institut, Department of Physics, University of California at Los Angeles, Los Angeles, California 90024 Institut de Physique Nucleaire, Universite de Lausanne, 1015 Lausanne, Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. 10024 )

    1990-05-28

    First data are presented for the polarized-target asymmetry in the reaction {pi}{sup +}{ital p}{r arrow}{pi}{sup +}{ital p}{gamma} at an incident pion energy of 298 MeV. The geometry was chosen to maximize the sensitivity to the radiation of the magnetic dipole moment {mu}{sub {Delta}} of the {Delta}{sup ++}(1232 MeV). A fit of the asymmetry in the cross section {ital d}{sup 5}{sigma}/{ital d}{Omega}{sub {pi}} {ital d}{Omega}{sub {gamma}} {ital dk} as a function of the photon energy {ital k} to predictions from a recent isobar-model calculation with {mu}{sub {Delta}} as the only free parameter yields {mu}{sub {Delta}}=1.64({plus minus}0.19exp{Delta},{plus minus}0.14 theor){mu}{sub {ital p}}. Though this value agrees with bag-model corrections to the SU(6) prediction {mu}{sub {Delta}}=2{mu}{sub {ital p}}, further clarifications on the model dependence of the result are needed, in particular since the isobar model fails to describe both the cross section and the asymmetry at the highest photon energies.

  2. Persistent currents and dissipation in narrow bilayer quantum Hall bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyriakidis, Jordan; Radzihovsky, Leo

    2001-11-01

    Bilayer quantum Hall states support a flow of nearly dissipationless staggered current which can only decay through collective channels. We study the dominant finite-temperature dissipation mechanism which in narrow bars is driven by thermal nucleation of pseudospin solitons. We find the finite-temperature resistivity, predict the resulting staggered current-voltage characteristics, and calculate the associated zero-temperature critical staggered current and gate voltage.

  3. Hot Wax Sweeps Debris From Narrow Passages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Steven K.

    1990-01-01

    Safe and effective technique for removal of debris and contaminants from narrow passages involves entrainment of undesired material in thermoplastic casting material. Semisolid wax slightly below melting temperature pushed along passage by pressurized nitrogen to remove debris. Devised to clean out fuel passages in main combustion chamber of Space Shuttle main engine. Also applied to narrow, intricate passages in internal-combustion-engine blocks, carburetors, injection molds, and other complicated parts.

  4. Possibility of narrow resonances in nucleon-nucleon channels

    SciTech Connect

    Krivoruchenko, M. I.

    2011-07-15

    Compound states manifest themselves as bound states, resonances, or primitives, and their character is determined by their interaction with the continuum. If the interaction experiences a perturbation, a compound state can change its manifestation. Phase analysis of nucleon-nucleon scattering indicates the existence of primitives in the {sup 3}S{sub 1}, {sup 1}S{sub 0}, and {sup 3}P{sub 0} channels. Electromagnetic interaction can shift primitives from the unitary cut, turning them into narrow resonances. We evaluate this effect on the {sup 1}S{sub 0} proton-proton scattering channel in the framework of the Simonov-Dyson model. We show that electromagnetic interaction turns a primitve with a mass of 2 000 MeV into a dibaryon resonance of approximately the same mass and a width of 260 keV. Narrow resonances of a similar nature may occur in other nucleon-nucleon channels. Experimental confirmation of the existence of narrow resonances would have important implications for the theory of nucleon-nucleon interaction.

  5. Riparian deforestation, stream narrowing, and loss of stream ecosystem services

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Bernard W.; Bott, Thomas L.; Jackson, John K.; Kaplan, Louis A.; Newbold, J. Denis; Standley, Laurel J.; Hession, W. Cully; Horwitz, Richard J.

    2004-01-01

    A study of 16 streams in eastern North America shows that riparian deforestation causes channel narrowing, which reduces the total amount of stream habitat and ecosystem per unit channel length and compromises in-stream processing of pollutants. Wide forest reaches had more macroinvertebrates, total ecosystem processing of organic matter, and nitrogen uptake per unit channel length than contiguous narrow deforested reaches. Stream narrowing nullified any potential advantages of deforestation regarding abundance of fish, quality of dissolved organic matter, and pesticide degradation. These findings show that forested stream channels have a wider and more natural configuration, which significantly affects the total in-stream amount and activity of the ecosystem, including the processing of pollutants. The results reinforce both current policy of the United States that endorses riparian forest buffers as best management practice and federal and state programs that subsidize riparian reforestation for stream restoration and water quality. Not only do forest buffers prevent nonpoint source pollutants from entering small streams, they also enhance the in-stream processing of both nonpoint and point source pollutants, thereby reducing their impact on downstream rivers and estuaries. PMID:15381768

  6. Narrow-bandwidth unstable laser resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Reintjes, J.F.; Tankersley, L.L.; Cooper, D.

    1988-10-21

    The present invention relates to unstable laser resonators, particularly to unstable laser resonators, and particularly to an unstable laser resonator that produces optical radiation that simultaneously has the high output power diffraction-limited divergence characteristic of an unstable laser resonator and also the narrow bandwidth that can usually be obtained only with a stable laser resonator. Some success was achieved in the frequency narrowing of the laser radiation from an unstable laser resonator cavity by using a diffraction grating. This technique was works best with lasers that have sharp line structure, such as molecular lasers. For example, selection of a single line in a hydrogen-fluoride laser has been reported in several configurations involving the insertion of a diffraction grating into a standard unstable laser resonator cavity. Although currently available, unstable laser resonators have the configuration of choice for producing high-power, low-divergence radiation from laser cavities; they are not compatible with a simultaneous requirement of narrow bandwidth.

  7. Discovery of a narrow line quasar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocke, J.; Liebert, J.; Maccacaro, T.; Griffiths, R. E.; Steiner, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    A stellar object is reported which, while having X-ray and optical luminosities typical of quasars, has narrow permitted and forbidden emission lines over the observed spectral range. The narrow-line spectrum is high-excitation, the Balmer lines seem to be recombinational, and a redder optical spectrum than that of most quasars is exhibited, despite detection as a weak radio source. The object does not conform to the relationships between H-beta parameters and X-ray flux previously claimed for a large sample of the active galactic nuclei. Because reddish quasars with narrow lines, such as the object identified, may not be found by the standard techniques for the discovery of quasars, the object may be a prototype of a new class of quasars analogous to high-luminosity Seyfert type 2 galaxies. It is suggested that these objects cannot comprise more than 10% of all quasars.

  8. Narrow-Band Applications of Communications Satellites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowlan, Bert; Horowitz, Andrew

    This paper attempts to describe the advantages of "narrow-band" applications of communications satellites for education. It begins by discussing the general controversy surrounding the use of satellites in education, by placing the concern within the larger context of the general debate over the uses of new technologies in education, and by…

  9. Progressive inflammatory subglottic narrowing responsive to steroids

    PubMed Central

    Phelan, Peter; Hey, Edmund

    1983-01-01

    Four children aged between 2½ and 13½ years developed insidious subglottic stenosis of unknown cause over 3-12 months. In all, the initial diagnosis was asthma which resulted in inappropriate treatment. Endoscopically there was circumferential subglottic narrowing, and biopsy in 3 showed non-specific inflammatory changes. Corticosteroid therapy led to rapid and complete resolution. PMID:6838258

  10. Adverse effects of prohibiting narrow provider networks.

    PubMed

    Howard, David H

    2014-08-14

    Many insurers participating in the new insurance exchanges are controlling costs by offering plans with narrow provider networks. Proposed regulations would promote network adequacy, but a pro-provider stance may not be inherently pro-consumer or even pro-patient. PMID:25119604

  11. Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of Narrow Coronal Mass Ejections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobrzycka, D.; Raymond, J. C.; Biesecker, D. A.; Li, J.; Ciaravella, A.

    2003-05-01

    We present Ultraviolet Coronagraph Spectrometer (UVCS) observations of five narrow coronal mass ejections (CMEs) that were among 15 narrow CMEs originally selected by Gilbert and coworkers. Two events (1999 March 27, April 15) were ``structured,'' i.e., in white-light data they exhibited well-defined interior features, and three (1999 May 9, May 21, June 3) were ``unstructured,'' i.e., appeared featureless. In UVCS data the events were seen as 4°-13° wide enhancements of the strongest coronal lines H I Lyα and O VI λλ1032, 1037. We derived electron densities for several of the events from the Large Angle and Spectrometric Coronagraph Experiment (LASCO) C2 white-light observations. They are comparable to or smaller than densities inferred for other CMEs. We modeled the observable properties of examples of the structured (1999 April 15) and unstructured (1999 May 9) narrow CMEs at different heights in the corona between 1.5 and 2 Rsolar. The derived electron temperatures, densities, and outflow speeds are similar for those two types of ejections. They were compared with properties of polar coronal jets and other CMEs. We discuss different scenarios of narrow CME formation as either a jet formed by reconnection onto open field lines or a CME ejected by expansion of closed field structures. Overall, we conclude that the existing observations do not definitively place the narrow CMEs into the jet or the CME picture, but the acceleration of the 1999 April 15 event resembles acceleration seen in many CMEs, rather than constant speeds or deceleration observed in jets.

  12. Tracking photosynthetic efficiency with narrow-band spectroradiometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gamon, John A.; Field, Christopher B.

    1992-01-01

    Narrow-waveband spectroradiometry presents the possibility of detecting subtle signals closely related to the current physiological state of vegetation. One such signal related to the epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle pigments, violaxanthin, antheraxanthin, and zeaxanthin is discussed. Recent advances in plant ecophysiology demonstrated a close relationship between these pigments and the regulatory state of photosystem 2 in photosynthesis. Our recent field studies of sunflower (Helianthus annuus) and oak (Quercus agrifolia) demonstrated that a 'xanthophyll signal' can be isolated from the diurnal reflectance spectra of intact canopies. Furthermore, the xanthophyll signal can be used to derive a 'physiological reflectance index' (PRI) that closely correlates with the actual photosynthetic efficiency (defined as the photosynthetic rate divided by the incident PAR) in closed canopies. If these signals were detectable in Airborne Visible/Infrared Imaging Spectrometers (AVIRIS) images, they could lead to improved remote estimates of photosynthetic fluxes.

  13. An above-barrier narrow resonance in 15F

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Grancey, F.; Mercenne, A.; de Oliveira Santos, F.; Davinson, T.; Sorlin, O.; Angélique, J. C.; Assié, M.; Berthoumieux, E.; Borcea, R.; Buta, A.; Celikovic, I.; Chudoba, V.; Daugas, J. M.; Dumitru, G.; Fadil, M.; Grévy, S.; Kiener, J.; Lefebvre-Schuhl, A.; Michel, N.; Mrazek, J.; Negoita, F.; Okołowicz, J.; Pantelica, D.; Pellegriti, M. G.; Perrot, L.; Płoszajczak, M.; Randisi, G.; Ray, I.; Roig, O.; Rotaru, F.; Saint Laurent, M. G.; Smirnova, N.; Stanoiu, M.; Stefan, I.; Stodel, C.; Subotic, K.; Tatischeff, V.; Thomas, J. C.; Ujić, P.; Wolski, R.

    2016-07-01

    Intense and purified radioactive beam of post-accelerated 14O was used to study the low-lying states in the unbound 15F nucleus. Exploiting resonant elastic scattering in inverse kinematics with a thick target, the second excited state, a resonance at ER = 4.757 (6) (10) MeV with a width of Γ = 36 (5) (14) keV was measured for the first time with high precision. The structure of this narrow above-barrier state in a nucleus located two neutrons beyond the proton drip line was investigated using the Gamow Shell Model in the coupled channel representation with a 12C core and three valence protons. It is found that it is an almost pure wave function of two quasi-bound protons in the 2s1/2 shell.

  14. Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leighly, Karen M.

    2000-01-01

    The primary work during this year has been the analysis and interpretation of our HST spectra from two extreme Narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1s) Infrared Astronomy Satellite (IRAS) 13224-3809 and 1H 0707-495. This work has been presented as an invited talk at the workshop entitled "Observational and theoretical progress in the Study of Narrow-line Seyfert 1 Galaxies" held in Bad Honnef, Germany December 8-11, as a contributed talk at the January 2000 AAS meeting in Atlanta, Georgia, and as a contributed talk at the workshop "Probing the Physics of Active Galactic Nuclei by Multiwavelength Monitoring" held at Goddard Space Flight Center June 20-22, 2000.

  15. Creep turns linear in narrow ferromagnetic nanostrips

    PubMed Central

    Leliaert, Jonathan; Van de Wiele, Ben; Vansteenkiste, Arne; Laurson, Lasse; Durin, Gianfranco; Dupré, Luc; Van Waeyenberge, Bartel

    2016-01-01

    The motion of domain walls in magnetic materials is a typical example of a creep process, usually characterised by a stretched exponential velocity-force relation. By performing large-scale micromagnetic simulations, and analyzing an extended 1D model which takes the effects of finite temperatures and material defects into account, we show that this creep scaling law breaks down in sufficiently narrow ferromagnetic strips. Our analysis of current-driven transverse domain wall motion in disordered Permalloy nanostrips reveals instead a creep regime with a linear dependence of the domain wall velocity on the applied field or current density. This originates from the essentially point-like nature of domain walls moving in narrow, line- like disordered nanostrips. An analogous linear relation is found also by analyzing existing experimental data on field-driven domain wall motion in perpendicularly magnetised media. PMID:26843125

  16. Multiwatts narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico

    2008-07-21

    Up to 4.8 W, approximately 10 MHz, 1178 nm laser is obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in standard single mode fibers pumped by an 1120 nm Yb fiber laser. More than 10% efficiency and 27 dB amplification is achieved, limited by onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ratio of Raman to Brillouin gain coefficient of a fiber is identified as a figure of merit for building a narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifier.

  17. Multiwatts narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifiers.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yan; Taylor, Luke; Bonaccini Calia, Domenico

    2008-07-21

    Up to 4.8 W, approximately 10 MHz, 1178 nm laser is obtained by Raman amplification of a distributed feedback diode laser in standard single mode fibers pumped by an 1120 nm Yb fiber laser. More than 10% efficiency and 27 dB amplification is achieved, limited by onset of stimulated Brillouin scattering. The ratio of Raman to Brillouin gain coefficient of a fiber is identified as a figure of merit for building a narrow linewidth fiber Raman amplifier. PMID:18648406

  18. Defect-induced bandgap narrowing in low-k dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; King, S. W.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Baklanov, M. R.; de Marneffe, J.-F.; Nishi, Y.; Shohet, J. L.

    2015-08-01

    In this work, core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the surface bandgap for various porous and non-porous low-k a-SiCOH dielectrics before and after ion sputtering. By examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in O 1s core-level spectra, the gap narrowing was universally found in Ar+ ion sputtered low-k dielectrics. The reduction of the bandgap ranges from 1.3 to 2.2 eV depending on the film composition. We show that the bandgap narrowing in these low-k dielectrics is caused by development of the valence-band tail as evidenced by the presence of additional electronic states above the valence-band maximum. Electron-spin-resonance measurements were made on a-SiCOH films to gain atomic insight into the nature of the sputtering-induced defects and reveal formation of carbon-related defects as the most probable origin of the gap states.

  19. Defect-induced bandgap narrowing in low-k dielectrics

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X.; Zheng, H.; Shohet, J. L.; King, S. W.; Afanas'ev, V. V.; Baklanov, M. R.; Marneffe, J.-F. de; Nishi, Y.

    2015-08-24

    In this work, core-level X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was utilized to determine the surface bandgap for various porous and non-porous low-k a-SiCOH dielectrics before and after ion sputtering. By examining the onset of inelastic energy loss in O 1s core-level spectra, the gap narrowing was universally found in Ar{sup +} ion sputtered low-k dielectrics. The reduction of the bandgap ranges from 1.3 to 2.2 eV depending on the film composition. We show that the bandgap narrowing in these low-k dielectrics is caused by development of the valence-band tail as evidenced by the presence of additional electronic states above the valence-band maximum. Electron-spin-resonance measurements were made on a-SiCOH films to gain atomic insight into the nature of the sputtering-induced defects and reveal formation of carbon-related defects as the most probable origin of the gap states.

  20. Narrowing of terrace-width distributions during growth on vicinal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, A. BH.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-10-01

    We present analytic and numerical results for the steady-state, non-equilibrium terrace-width distribution (TWD) of steps during growth on vicinal surfaces. Kinetic Monte Carlo shows that the TWD narrows progressively with increasing flux until the model breaks down. The narrowing corresponds to kinetic repulsion between moving steps, due to the intrinsic asymmetry of the adatom diffusion current on a growing surface. With a 1-dimensional (1D) model, from a Burton-Cabrera-Frank approach, we make contact with previous work, in which the attachment asymmetry can also be due to electromigration or to asymmetry in attachment rates; we deduce an expression for the narrowing via a Fokker-Planck analysis. We illustrate how Ehrlich-Schwoebel barriers (although inducing an instability in 2D) also lead to such asymmetry and narrowing.

  1. Narrow-band nonlinear sea waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tayfun, M. A.

    1980-01-01

    Probabilistic description of nonlinear waves with a narrow-band spectrum is simplified to a form in which each realization of the surface displacement becomes an amplitude-modulated Stokes wave with a mean frequency and random phase. Under appropriate conditions this simplification provides a convenient yet rigorous means of describing nonlinear effects on sea surface properties in a semiclosed or closed form. In particular, it is shown that surface displacements are non-Gaussian and skewed, as was previously predicted by the Gram-Charlier approximation; that wave heights are Rayleigh distributed, just as in the linear case; and that crests are non-Rayleigh.

  2. Narrow electron injector for ballistic electron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Kast, M.; Pacher, C.; Strasser, G.; Gornik, E.

    2001-06-04

    A three-terminal hot electron transistor is used to measure the normal energy distribution of ballistic electrons generated by an electron injector utilizing an improved injector design. A triple barrier resonant tunneling diode with a rectangular transmission function acts as a narrow (1 meV) energy filter. An asymmetric energy distribution with its maximum on the high-energy side with a full width at half maximum of {Delta}E{sub inj}=10 meV is derived. {copyright} 2001 American Institute of Physics.

  3. Narrow-angle Astrometry with SUSI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kok, Y.; Ireland, M. J.; Robertson, J. G.; Tuthill, P. G.; Warrington, B. A.; Tango, W. J.

    2014-09-01

    SUSI (Sydney University Stellar Interferometer) is currently being fitted with a 2nd beam combiner, MUSCA (Micro-arcsecond University of Sydney Companion Astrometry), for the purpose of narrow-angle astrometry. With an aim to achieve ˜10 micro-arcseconds of angular resolution at its best, MUSCA allows SUSI to search for planets around bright binary stars, which are its primary targets. While the first beam combiner, PAVO (Precision Astronomical Visible Observations), is used to track stellar fringes during an observation, MUSCA will be used to measure separations of binary stars. MUSCA is a Michelson interferometer and its setup at SUSI will be described in this poster.

  4. Global viscous overstabilities in narrow rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longaretti, Pierre-Yves; French, Richard G.; Nicholson, Philip D.

    2016-10-01

    Local viscous overstabilities have been the focus of a number of theoretical analyses in the last decades due to the rôle they are believed to play in the creation of the small scale structure of broad ring systems (Saturn, Uranus). Global viscous overstabilities have also been investigated in the 1980s and 1990s as a potential source of narrow ring eccentricities (Longaretti and Rappaport, 1995, Icarus, 116, 376).An important feature of global viscous overstabilities is that they produce slow relative librating or circulating motions of narrow ring edges; they may also produce slowly librating or circulating components of edge modes. This process is potentially relevant to explain the occurrence of unusually large apsidal shifts observed in some saturnian ringlets and may also explain the existence of the free m=2 B ring edge mode that is slowly circulating with respect to the component forced by Mimas.The time-scale of such motions is primarily controlled by the ring self-gravity and can be analytically quantified in a two-streamline analysis which yields a characteristic libration/circulation frequency Ωl = (n/π)(Mr/Mp)(a/δa)2H(q2) where n is the mean motion, Mr the ringlet or pertubed region mass, Mp the planet mass, a the semi-major axis, δa the narrow ringlet or pertubed region width and H(q2) a dimensionless factor of order unity that depends on the streamline compression parameter q. The related time-scale is of the order of a few years to a few tens of years depending on the surface density and ringlet/perturbed region geometry. Preliminary data analyzes indicate that the Maxwell and Huyghens ringlets are probably librating with periods consistent with this two-streamline estimate.The talk will briefly present the physics of global viscous overstabilities as well as more detailed applications to narrow rings, and if time permits, to edge modes.

  5. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, Thomas E.

    1996-01-01

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments.

  6. Narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method

    DOEpatents

    McEwan, T.E.

    1996-11-19

    A narrow field electromagnetic sensor system and method of sensing a characteristic of an object provide the capability to realize a characteristic of an object such as density, thickness, or presence, for any desired coordinate position on the object. One application is imaging. The sensor can also be used as an obstruction detector or an electronic trip wire with a narrow field without the disadvantages of impaired performance when exposed to dirt, snow, rain, or sunlight. The sensor employs a transmitter for transmitting a sequence of electromagnetic signals in response to a transmit timing signal, a receiver for sampling only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while excluding all other electromagnetic signals in response to a receive timing signal, and a signal processor for processing the sampled direct RF path electromagnetic signal and providing an indication of the characteristic of an object. Usually, the electromagnetic signal is a short RF burst and the obstruction must provide a substantially complete eclipse of the direct RF path. By employing time-of-flight techniques, a timing circuit controls the receiver to sample only the initial direct RF path of the electromagnetic signal while not sampling indirect path electromagnetic signals. The sensor system also incorporates circuitry for ultra-wideband spread spectrum operation that reduces interference to and from other RF services while allowing co-location of multiple electronic sensors without the need for frequency assignments. 12 figs.

  7. Studies of narrow autoionizing resonances in gadolinium

    SciTech Connect

    Bushaw, Bruce A.; Nortershauser, W.; Blaum, K.; Wendt, Klaus

    2003-06-30

    The autoionization (AI) spectrum of gadolinium between the first and second limits has been investigated by triple-resonance excitation with high-resolution cw lasers. A large number of narrow AI resonances have been observed and assigned total angular momentum J values. The resonances are further divided into members of AI Rydberg series converging to the second limit or other ''interloping'' levels. Fine structure in the Rydberg series has been identified and interpreted in terms of Jc j coupling. A number of detailed studies have been performed on the interloping resonances: These include lifetime determination by lineshape analysis, isotope shifts, hyperfine structure, and photoionization saturation parameters. The electronic structure of the interloping levels is discussed in terms of these studies. Linewidths generally decrease with increasing total angular momentum and the J = 7 resonances are extremely narrow with Lorentzian widths ranging from < 1 MHz up to 157 MHz. The strongest resonances are found to have cross-sections of {approx}10-12 cm{sup 2} and photoionization can be saturated with powers available from cw diode lasers.

  8. Development of narrow gap welding technology for extremely thick steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imai, K.; Saito, T.; Okumura, M.

    In the field of extremely thick steel, various narrow gap welding methods were developed on the basis of former welding methods and are used in practice. It is important to develop and improve automatic narrow gap welding, J edge preparation by gas cutting, the prevention of welding defects, wires for narrow gap welding and so on in order to expand the scope of application of the method. Narrow gap welding technologies are described, based on new concepts developed by Nippon Steel Corporation.

  9. Narrow line diode laser stacks for DPAL pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenning, Tobias; Irwin, David; Stapleton, Dean; Pandey, Rajiv; Guiney, Tina; Patterson, Steve

    2014-02-01

    Diode pumped alkali metal vapor lasers (DPALs) offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality, making them an attractive candidate for future defense applications. A variety of gain media are used and each requires a different pump wavelength: near 852nm for cesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm. Typical high power diode lasers achieve spectral widths around 3nm (FWHM) in the near infrared spectrum. With state of the art locking techniques, either internal to the cavity or externally mounted gratings, the spectral width can typically be reduced to 0.5nm to 1nm for kW-class, high power stacks. More narrow spectral width has been achieved at lower power levels. The diode's inherent wavelength drift over operating temperature and output power is largely, but not completely, eliminated. However, standard locking techniques cannot achieve the required accuracy on the location of the spectral output or the spectral width for efficient DPAL pumping. Actively cooled diode laser stacks with continuous wave output power of up to 100W per 10mm bar at 780nm optimized for rubidium pumping will be presented. Custom designed external volume holographic gratings (VHGs) in conjunction with optimized chip material are used to narrow and stabilize the optical spectrum. Temperature tuning on a per-bar-level is used to overlap up to fifteen individual bar spectra into one narrow peak. At the same time, this tuning capability can be used to adjust the pump wavelength to match the absorption band of the active medium. A spectral width of <0.1nm for the entire stack is achieved at <1kW optical output power. Tuning of the peak wavelength is demonstrated for up to 0.15nm. The technology can easily be adapted to other diode laser wavelengths to pump different materials.

  10. Discovery of a 1731-MeV narrow resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladimirsky, V. V.; Grigor'ev, V. K.; Erofeev, I. A.; Erofeeva, O. N.; Zaitsev, A. P.; Katinov, Yu. V.; Lisin, V. I.; Luzin, V. N.; Nozdrachev, V. N.; Sokolovsky, V. V.; Fadeeva, E. A.; Shkurenko, Yu. P.

    2007-10-01

    Results obtained by studying a previously unknown narrow meson of mass about 1731 MeV are presented. This state was found in a system of two K S mesons. The experimental-data set subjected to the present analysis was obtained with a 6-m spectrometer of the Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (ITEP, Moscow). The statistical sample of event of double K S -meson production was accumulated in π- p interactions by using a beam of 40-GeV pions from the U-70 accelerator of the Institute of High Energy Physics (IHEP, Protvino). There are 58 events at the respective maximum, its statistical significance being close to six standard deviations. The parameters of the observed meson are the following; the mass is M = 1731 ± 2.5 MeV, the width is σ = 3.2 ± 2 MeV, and the product of the production cross section and the respective branching ratio is not less than 20 nb. The fact that the observed meson is extremely narrow does not have a satisfactory theoretical explanation.

  11. 2. Photocopied July 1971 from photostat Jordan Narrows Folder #1, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Photocopied July 1971 from photostat Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. JORDAN NARROWS STATION. PLAN AND SECTION. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

  12. 33 CFR 117.561 - Kent Island Narrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Kent Island Narrows. 117.561... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.561 Kent Island Narrows. The draw of the U.S. Route 50/301 bridge, mile 1.0, Kent Island Narrows, operates as follows: (a) From November...

  13. 33 CFR 117.561 - Kent Island Narrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Kent Island Narrows. 117.561... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.561 Kent Island Narrows. The draw of the U.S. Route 50/301 bridge, mile 1.0, Kent Island Narrows, operates as follows: (a) From November...

  14. 33 CFR 117.561 - Kent Island Narrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Kent Island Narrows. 117.561... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.561 Kent Island Narrows. The draw of the U.S. Route 50/301 bridge, mile 1.0, Kent Island Narrows, operates as follows: (a) From November...

  15. 33 CFR 117.561 - Kent Island Narrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Kent Island Narrows. 117.561... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.561 Kent Island Narrows. The draw of the U.S. Route 50/301 bridge, mile 1.0, Kent Island Narrows, operates as follows: (a) From November...

  16. 33 CFR 117.561 - Kent Island Narrows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Kent Island Narrows. 117.561... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Maryland § 117.561 Kent Island Narrows. The draw of the U.S. Route 50/301 bridge, mile 1.0, Kent Island Narrows, operates as follows: (a) From November...

  17. Promoting L2 Vocabulary Learning through Narrow Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Eun Young

    2015-01-01

    Krashen (2004) has advocated that narrow reading, i.e., reading a series of texts addressing one specific topic, is an effective method to grow vocabulary. While narrow reading has been championed to have many advantages for L2 vocabulary learning, there remains a relative dearth of empirical studies that test the impact of narrow reading on L2…

  18. Indium nitride: A narrow gap semiconductor

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, J.; Walukiewicz, W.; Yu, K.M.; Ager III, J.W.; Haller, E.E.; Lu, H.; Schaff, W.J.

    2002-08-14

    The optical properties of wurtzite InN grown on sapphire substrates by molecular-beam epitaxy have been characterized by optical absorption, photoluminescence, and photomodulated reflectance techniques. All these three characterization techniques show an energy gap for InN between 0.7 and 0.8 eV, much lower than the commonly accepted value of 1.9 eV. The photoluminescence peak energy is found to be sensitive to the free electron concentration of the sample. The peak energy exhibits a very weak hydrostatic pressure dependence and a small, anomalous blueshift with increasing temperature. The bandgap energies of In-rich InGaN alloys were found to be consistent with the narrow gap of InN. The bandgap bowing parameter was determined to be 1.43 eV in InGaN.

  19. Synchrotron studies of narrow band materials

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, J.W.

    1993-01-01

    Objective was to determine the single-particle electronic structure of selected narrow band materials in order to understand the relation between their electronic structures and novel low energy properties, such as mixed valence, heavy Fermions, Kondo effect, insulator-metal transitions, non-Fermi liquid behavior, and high-temperature superconductivity. This program supports photoemission spectroscopy (PES) at various synchrotrons. The progress is reported under the following section titles: ZSA (Zaanen-Sawatzky-Allen) systematics and I-M transitions in 3d transition metal oxides, insulator-metal transitions in superconducting cuprates, Fermi liquid and non-Fermi liquid behavior in angular resolved PES lineshapes, heavy-Fermion and non-Fermi liquid 5f electron systems, and Kondo insulators.

  20. Isolating prompt photons with narrow cones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Catani, S.; Fontannaz, M.; Guillet, J. Ph.; Pilon, E.

    2013-09-01

    We discuss the isolation of prompt photons in hadronic collisions by means of narrow isolation cones and the QCD computation of the corresponding cross sections. We reconsider the occurence of large perturbative terms with logarithmic dependence on the cone size and their impact on the fragmentation scale dependence. We cure the apparent perturbative violation of unitarity for small cone sizes, which had been noticed earlier in next-to-leading-order (NLO) calculations, by resumming the leading logarithmic dependence on the cone size. We discuss possible implications regarding the implementation of some hollow cone variants of the cone criterion, which simulate the experimental difficulty to impose isolation inside the region filled by the electromagnetic shower that develops in the calorimeter.

  1. Tissue characterization by using narrow band imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2010-02-01

    NBI (Narrow Band Imaging) was first introduced in the market in 2005 as a technique enabling to enhance image contrast of capillaries on a mucosal surface(1). It is classified as an Optical-Digital Method for Image-Enhanced Endoscopy(2). To date, the application has widely spread not only to gastrointestinal fields such as esophagus, stomach and colon but also the organs such as bronchus and bladder. The main target tissue of NBI enhancement is capillaries. However, findings of many clinical studies conducted by endoscopy physicians have revealed that NBI observation enables to enhance more other structures in addition to capillaries. There is a close relationship between those enhanced structures and histological microstructure of a tissue. This report introduces the tissue microstructures enhanced by NBI and discusses the possibility of optimized illumination wavelength in observing living tissues.

  2. Ultra-narrow metallic armchair graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimouche, Amina; Ervasti, Mikko M.; Drost, Robert; Halonen, Simo; Harju, Ari; Joensuu, Pekka M.; Sainio, Jani; Liljeroth, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs)--narrow stripes of graphene--have emerged as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic devices. Recent advances in bottom-up synthesis have allowed production of atomically well-defined armchair GNRs with different widths and doping. While all experimentally studied GNRs have exhibited wide bandgaps, theory predicts that every third armchair GNR (widths of N=3m+2, where m is an integer) should be nearly metallic with a very small bandgap. Here, we synthesize the narrowest possible GNR belonging to this family (five carbon atoms wide, N=5). We study the evolution of the electronic bandgap and orbital structure of GNR segments as a function of their length using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and density-functional theory calculations. Already GNRs with lengths of 5 nm reach almost metallic behaviour with ~100 meV bandgap. Finally, we show that defects (kinks) in the GNRs do not strongly modify their electronic structure.

  3. Ultra-narrow metallic armchair graphene nanoribbons.

    PubMed

    Kimouche, Amina; Ervasti, Mikko M; Drost, Robert; Halonen, Simo; Harju, Ari; Joensuu, Pekka M; Sainio, Jani; Liljeroth, Peter

    2015-12-14

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs)-narrow stripes of graphene-have emerged as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic devices. Recent advances in bottom-up synthesis have allowed production of atomically well-defined armchair GNRs with different widths and doping. While all experimentally studied GNRs have exhibited wide bandgaps, theory predicts that every third armchair GNR (widths of N=3m+2, where m is an integer) should be nearly metallic with a very small bandgap. Here, we synthesize the narrowest possible GNR belonging to this family (five carbon atoms wide, N=5). We study the evolution of the electronic bandgap and orbital structure of GNR segments as a function of their length using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and density-functional theory calculations. Already GNRs with lengths of 5 nm reach almost metallic behaviour with ∼100 meV bandgap. Finally, we show that defects (kinks) in the GNRs do not strongly modify their electronic structure.

  4. Line Narrowing Parameter Measurement by Modulation Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dharamsi, Amin N.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate Characterization of Oxygen A-Band Line Parameters by Wavelength Modulation Spectroscopy with tunable diode lasers is an ongoing research at Old Dominion University, under sponsorship from NASA Langley research Center. The work proposed here will be undertaken under the guidance of Dr. William Chu and Dr. Lamont Poole of the Aerosol Research Branch at NASA Langley-Research Center in Hampton, Virginia. The research was started about two years ago and utilizes wavelength modulation absorption spectroscopy with higher harmonic detection, a technique that we developed at Old Dominion University, to obtain the absorption line characteristics of the Oxygen A-band rovibronic lines. Accurate characterization of this absorption band is needed for processing of data that will be obtained in experiments such as the NASA Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment III (SAGE III) as part of the US Mission to Planet Earth. The research work for Summer Fellowship undertook a measurement of the Dicke line-narrowing parameters of the Oxygen A-Band lines by using wavelength modulation spectroscopy. Our previous theoretical results had indicated that such a measurement could be done sensitively and in a convenient fashion by using this type of spectroscopy. In particular, theoretical results had indicated that the signal magnitude would depend on pressure in a manner that was very sensitive to the narrowing parameter. One of the major tasks undertaken during the summer of 1998 was to establish experimentally that these theoretical predictions were correct. This was done successfully and the results of the work are being prepared for publication. Experimental Results were obtained in which the magnitude of the signal was measured as a function of pressure, for various harmonic detection orders (N = 1, 2, 3, 4, 5). A comparison with theoretical results was made, and it was shown that the agreement between theory and experiment was very good. More importantly, however, it was shown

  5. Diluted magnetic semiconductors with narrow band gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Bo; Maekawa, Sadamichi

    2016-10-01

    We propose a method to realize diluted magnetic semiconductors (DMSs) with p - and n -type carriers by choosing host semiconductors with a narrow band gap. By employing a combination of the density function theory and quantum Monte Carlo simulation, we demonstrate such semiconductors using Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , which has a band gap of 0.2 eV. In addition, we found a nontoxic DMS Mn-doped BaZn2Sb2 , of which the Curie temperature Tc is predicted to be higher than that of Mn-doped BaZn2As2 , the Tc of which was up to 230 K in a recent experiment.

  6. Robotic chair at steep and narrow stairways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imazato, Masahiro; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Moromugi, Shunji; Ishimatsu, Takakazu

    2007-12-01

    A robotic chair is developed to support mobility of elderly and disabled people living in the house where steep and narrow stairways are installed. In order to deal with such mobility problem the developed robotic chair has a compact original configuration. The robotic chair vertically moves by actuation of electric cylinders and horizontally moves by push-pull operation given by a care-giver. In order to navigate safely every action of the chair is checked by the operator. Up-and-down motions of the robotic chair on the stairway are executed through combinations of motor and cylinder actuations. Performance of the robotic chair was evaluated through two kinds of experiments. The excellent ability of the robotic chair could be confirmed through these experiments.

  7. An Instability in Narrow Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, J. W.; Stewart, G. R.

    2003-08-01

    We will present our work investigating the behavior of narrow planetary rings with low dispersion velocities. Such narrow a ring will be initially unstable to self-gravitational collapse. After the collapse, the ring is collisionally very dense. At this stage, it is subject to a new instability. Waves appear on the inner and outer edges of the ring within half of an orbital period. The ring then breaks apart radially, taking approximately a quarter of an orbital period of do so. As clumps of ring particles expand radially away from the dense ring, Kepler shear causes these clumps to stretch out azimuthally, and eventually collapse into a new set of dense rings. Small-scale repetitions of the original instability in these new rings eventually leads to a stabilized broad ring with higher dispersion velocities than the initial ring. Preliminary results indicate that this instability may be operating on small scales in broad rings in the wake-like features seen by Salo and others. Some intriguing properties have been observed during this instability. The most significant is a coherence in the epicyclic phases of the particles. Both self-gravity and collisions in the ring operated to create and enforce this coherence. The coherence might also be responsible for the instability to radial expansion. We also observe that guiding centers of the particles do not migrate to the center of the ring during the collapse phase of the ring. In fact, guiding centers move radially away from the core of the ring during this phase, consistent with global conservation of angular momentum. We will show the results of our simulations to date, including movies of the evolution of various parameters. (Audiences members wanting popcorn are advised to bring their own.) This work is supported by a NASA Graduate Student Research Program grant and by the Cassini mission.

  8. Concurrent bandgap narrowing and polarization enhancement in epitaxial ferroelectric nanofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyunina, Marina; Yao, Lide; Chvostova, Dagmar; Dejneka, Alexandr; Kocourek, Tomas; Jelinek, Miroslav; Trepakov, Vladimir; van Dijken, Sebastiaan

    2015-04-01

    Perovskite-type ferroelectric (FE) crystals are wide bandgap materials with technologically valuable optical and photoelectric properties. Here, versatile engineering of electronic transitions is demonstrated in FE nanofilms of KTaO3, KNbO3 (KNO), and NaNbO3 (NNO) with a thickness of 10-30 unit cells. Control of the bandgap is achieved using heteroepitaxial growth of new structural phases on SrTiO3 (001) substrates. Compared to bulk crystals, anomalous bandgap narrowing is obtained in the FE state of KNO and NNO films. This effect opposes polarization-induced bandgap widening, which is typically found for FE materials. Transmission electron microscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry measurements indicate that the formation of higher-symmetry structural phases of KNO and NNO produces the desirable red shift of the absorption spectrum towards visible light, while simultaneously stabilizing robust FE order. Tuning of optical properties in FE films is of interest for nanoscale photonic and optoelectronic devices.

  9. Narrow band 3 × 3 Mueller polarimetric endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Ji; Ye, Menglong; Singh, Mohan; Clancy, Neil T.; Elson, Daniel S.

    2013-01-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging has shown potential in tissue diagnosis but is challenging to implement endoscopically. In this work, a narrow band 3 × 3 Mueller matrix polarimetric endoscope was designed by rotating the endoscope to generate 0°, 45° and 90° linearly polarized illumination and positioning a rotating filter wheel in front of the camera containing three polarisers to permit polarization state analysis for backscattered light. The system was validated with a rotating linear polarizer and a diffuse reflection target. Initial measurements of 3 × 3 Mueller matrices on a rat are demonstrated, followed by matrix decomposition into the depolarization and retardance matrices for further analysis. Our work shows the feasibility of implementing polarimetric imaging in a rigid endoscope conveniently and economically in order to reveal diagnostic information. PMID:24298405

  10. Narrow band noise response of a Belleville spring resonator.

    PubMed

    Lyon, Richard H

    2013-09-01

    This study of nonlinear dynamics includes (i) an identification of quasi-steady states of response using equivalent linearization, (ii) the temporal simulation of the system using Heun's time step procedure on time domain analytic signals, and (iii) a laboratory experiment. An attempt has been made to select material and measurement parameters so that nearly the same systems are used and analyzed for all three parts of the study. This study illustrates important features of nonlinear response to narrow band excitation: (a) states of response that the system can acquire with transitions of the system between those states, (b) the interaction between the noise source and the vibrating load in which the source transmits energy to or draws energy from the load as transitions occur; (c) the lag or lead of the system response relative to the source as transitions occur that causes the average frequencies of source and response to differ; and (d) the determination of the state of response (mass or stiffness controlled) by observation of the instantaneous phase of the influence function. These analyses take advantage of the use of time domain analytic signals that have a complementary role to functions that are analytic in the frequency domain.

  11. The Narrow-Line Region of Narrow-Line Seyfert 1 Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez-Ardila, A.; Binette, Luc; Pastoriza, Miriani G.; Donzelli, Carlos J.

    2000-08-01

    This work studies the optical emission-line properties and physical conditions of the narrow-line region (NLR) of seven narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies (NLS1's) for which high signal-to-noise ratio spectroscopic observations were available. The resolution is 340 km s-1 (at Hα) over the wavelength interval 3700-9500 Å, enabling us to separate the broad and narrow components of the permitted emission lines. Our results show that the flux carried out by the narrow component of Hβ is, on average, 50% of the total line flux. As a result, the [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratio emitted in the NLR varies from 1 to 5, instead of the universally adopted value of 10. This has strong implications for the required spectral energy distribution that ionizes the NLR gas. Photoionization models that consider a NLR composed of a combination of matter-bounded and ionization-bounded clouds are successful at explaining the low [O III] λ5007/Hβ ratio and the weakness of low-ionization lines of NLS1's. Variation of the relative proportion of these two type of clouds nicely reproduces the dispersion of narrow-line ratios found among the NLS1 sample. Assuming similar physical model parameters of both NLS1's and the normal Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 5548, we show that the observed differences of emission-line ratios between these two groups of galaxies can be explained, to a first approximation, in terms of the shape of the input ionizing continuum. Narrow emission-line ratios of NLS1's are better reproduced by a steep power-law continuum in the EUV-soft X-ray region, with spectral index α~-2. Flatter spectral indices (α~-1.5) match the observed line ratios of NGC 5548 but are unable to provide a good match to the NLS1 ratios. This result is consistent with ROSAT observations of NLS1's, which show that these objects are characterized by steeper power-law indices than those of Seyfert 1 galaxies with strong broad optical lines. Based on observations made at CASLEO. Complejo Astronómico El Leoncito

  12. Diffusion in narrow channels on curved manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón-Acosta, Guillermo; Pineda, Inti; Dagdug, Leonardo

    2013-12-01

    In this work, we derive a general effective diffusion coefficient to describe the two-dimensional (2D) diffusion in a narrow and smoothly asymmetric channel of varying width, embedded on a curved surface, in the simple diffusion of non-interacting, point-like particles under no external field. To this end, we extend the generalization of the Kalinay-Percus' projection method [J. Chem. Phys. 122, 204701 (2005); Kalinay-Percus', Phys. Rev. E 74, 041203 (2006)] for the asymmetric channels introduced in [L. Dagdug and I. Pineda, J. Chem. Phys. 137, 024107 (2012)], to project the anisotropic two-dimensional diffusion equation on a curved manifold, into an effective one-dimensional generalized Fick-Jacobs equation that is modified according to the curvature of the surface. For such purpose we construct the whole expansion, writing the marginal concentration as a perturbation series. The lowest order in the perturbation parameter, which corresponds to the Fick-Jacobs equation, contains an additional term that accounts for the curvature of the surface. We explicitly obtain the first-order correction for the invariant effective concentration, which is defined as the correct marginal concentration in one variable, and we obtain the first approximation to the effective diffusion coefficient analogous to Bradley's coefficient [Phys. Rev. E 80, 061142 (2009)] as a function of the metric elements of the surface. In a straightforward manner, we study the perturbation series up to the nth order, and derive the full effective diffusion coefficient for two-dimensional diffusion in a narrow asymmetric channel, with modifications according to the metric terms. This expression is given as D(ξ )=D_0/w^' (ξ )}√{g_1/g_2} lbrace arctan [√{g_2/g_1}(y^' }_0(ξ )+w^' }(ξ )/2)]-arctan [√{g_2/g_1}(y^' }_0(ξ )-w^' }(ξ )/2)] rbrace, which is the main result of our work. Finally, we present two examples of symmetric surfaces, namely, the sphere and the cylinder, and we study certain

  13. Tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source

    DOEpatents

    Powers, Peter E.; Kulp, Thomas J.

    2002-01-01

    A tunable pulsed narrow bandwidth light source and a method of operating a light source are provided. The light source includes a pump laser, first and second non-linear optical crystals, a tunable filter, and light pulse directing optics. The method includes the steps of operating the pump laser to generate a pulsed pump beam characterized by a nanosecond pulse duration and arranging the light pulse directing optics so as to (i) split the pulsed pump beam into primary and secondary pump beams; (ii) direct the primary pump beam through an input face of the first non-linear optical crystal such that a primary output beam exits from an output face of the first non-linear optical crystal; (iii) direct the primary output beam through the tunable filter to generate a sculpted seed beam; and direct the sculpted seed beam and the secondary pump beam through an input face of the second non-linear optical crystal such that a secondary output beam characterized by at least one spectral bandwidth on the order of about 0.1 cm.sup.-1 and below exits from an output face of the second non-linear optical crystal.

  14. Narrow bandpass cryogenic filter for microwave measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov, B. I.; Klimenko, D. N.; Sultanov, A. N.; Il'ichev, E.; Meyer, H.-G.

    2013-05-01

    An ultra-wide stopband hairpin bandpass filter with integrated nonuniform transmission lines was designed and fabricated for highly sensitive measurements at cryogenic temperatures down to millikelvin and a frequency range of 10 Hz-10 GHz. The scattering matrices of the filter were characterized at T = 4.2 K. The filter provides a stopband from 10 Hz to 2.2 GHz and from 2.3 GHz to 10 GHz with more than 50 dB and 40 dB of amplitude suppression, respectively. The center frequency of the passband is f0 = 2.25 GHz with a bandwidth Δf = 80 MHz. The maximum insertion loss in the passband is 4 dB. The filter has a 50 Ω input and output impedance, SubMiniature version A connector termination, and significantly reduced form factor. The wide stopband frequency range and narrow passband in conjunction with small dimensions make the filter suitable to use it as a part of a high sensitive readout for superconducting quantum circuits, such as superconducting quantum bits and cryogenic parametric amplifiers.

  15. Electrostatic Changes Observed with Narrow Bipolar Pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karunarathne, S.; Marshall, T. C.; Stolzenburg, M.; Karunarathna, N.

    2015-12-01

    Narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) or compact intracloud discharges are impulsive discharges that are considered to be the strongest natural emitters in the HF radio band; they usually occur at high altitudes in some thunderstorms. In the summer of 2011, we collected E-change data with wideband flat-plate antennas (0.16 Hz - 2.5 MHz) at ten stations covering an area of nearly 70 km x 100 km in and around Kennedy Space Center, Florida, USA. On one thunderstorm day, 14 August 2011, we detected 226 positive NBPs, and some observations of these pulses were published in Karunarathne et al. [2015, JGR-atmospheres]. Of these 226 NBPs, 50 (22.1 %) occurred within 10 km horizontally of at least one sensor. All of these closer sensors show electrostatic changes associated with corresponding NBPs, with a net electrostatic change in the main bipolar pulse and with a slower electrostatic change after the bipolar pulse that seems similar to short continuing current immediately after some cloud-to-ground return strokes. Although NBPs have been considered as short duration pulses (10 - 20 microseconds), the electrostatic changes after the main bipolar pulse ranged from 0.7 ms to 34 ms and associated charge moments were calculated. The total duration of the electrostatic E-change was strongly dependent on the distance to the sensors. In this presentation, we will present data for these electrostatic changes, some statistics, and physical background and reasoning for the electrostatic changes.

  16. Diging simulation of a narrow trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anghelache, D. G.; Goanta, A. M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, we realized digging process simulation for a narrow trench using special equipment located at a mini excavator. These types of machines digging perform the longitudinal direction to the direction of travel, making trenches with widths of 0.4 m and depths of 3.5 -7.0 m. These are necessary for the location of underground cables or draining water in agriculture. For Parametric modelling of parts included in ensemble has used software from Siemens NX 7.5, we produce sketches of each piece, using following commands: Sketch, Profile (Line), Arc, Circle, Quick Trim Quick Extend, Constraints. Depending on the layout of each piece can also use other commands such as: Chamfer, Rotate, Mirror Curve, Offset Curve, etc. After completion of sketch and dimensioning commands was: Extrude, Revolve, and at this stage the play may various modifications such as drilling, removal of certain volumes of piece showing various forms or change the appearance of surfaces (thread cutting, bevelling). This paper was realized with this parametric modelling software because presents major advantages including: control over the design, making design speed and increasing productivity; increasing product quality, reducing design risk recovery and time work, less human effort and reduced financial resources throughout the process.

  17. Latitude dependence of narrow bipolar pulse emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, M. R.; Esa, M. R. M.; Cooray, V.; Baharudin, Z. A.; Hettiarachchi, P.

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we present a comparative study on the occurrence of narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) and other forms of lightning flashes across various geographical areas ranging from northern regions to the tropics. As the latitude decreased from Uppsala, Sweden (59.8°N) to South Malaysia (1.5°N), the percentage of NBP emissions relative to the total number of lightning flashes increased significantly from 0.13% to 12%. Occurrences of positive NBPs were more common than negative NBPs at all observed latitudes. However, as latitudes decreased, the negative NBP emissions increased significantly from 20% (Uppsala, Sweden) to 45% (South Malaysia). Factors involving mixed-phase region elevations and vertical extents of thundercloud tops are invoked to explain the observed results. These factors are fundamentally latitude dependent. Our results suggest that the NBP emission rate is not a useful measure to monitor thunderstorm severity because regular tropical thunderstorms, where relatively high NBP emissions occur, lack suitable conditions to become severe (i.e., there is modest convective available potential energy and a lack of baroclinity in such regions). Observations of significantly high negative NBP occurrences together with very rare occurrences of positive cloud-to-ground flashes and isolated breakdown pulses in tropical thunderstorms are indicative of a stronger negative screening layer magnitude and weaker lower positive charge region magnitude than those in northern regions.

  18. Reconditioning of Cassini Narrow-Angle Camera

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    These five images of single stars, taken at different times with the narrow-angle camera on NASA's Cassini spacecraft, show the effects of haze collecting on the camera's optics, then successful removal of the haze by warming treatments.

    The image on the left was taken on May 25, 2001, before the haze problem occurred. It shows a star named HD339457.

    The second image from left, taken May 30, 2001, shows the effect of haze that collected on the optics when the camera cooled back down after a routine-maintenance heating to 30 degrees Celsius (86 degrees Fahrenheit). The star is Maia, one of the Pleiades.

    The third image was taken on October 26, 2001, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at minus 7 C (19 F). The star is Spica.

    The fourth image was taken of Spica January 30, 2002, after a weeklong decontamination treatment at 4 C (39 F).

    The final image, also of Spica, was taken July 9, 2002, following three additional decontamination treatments at 4 C (39 F) for two months, one month, then another month.

    Cassini, on its way toward arrival at Saturn in 2004, is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  19. Ultra-narrow metallic armchair graphene nanoribbons

    PubMed Central

    Kimouche, Amina; Ervasti, Mikko M.; Drost, Robert; Halonen, Simo; Harju, Ari; Joensuu, Pekka M.; Sainio, Jani; Liljeroth, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Graphene nanoribbons (GNRs)—narrow stripes of graphene—have emerged as promising building blocks for nanoelectronic devices. Recent advances in bottom-up synthesis have allowed production of atomically well-defined armchair GNRs with different widths and doping. While all experimentally studied GNRs have exhibited wide bandgaps, theory predicts that every third armchair GNR (widths of N=3m+2, where m is an integer) should be nearly metallic with a very small bandgap. Here, we synthesize the narrowest possible GNR belonging to this family (five carbon atoms wide, N=5). We study the evolution of the electronic bandgap and orbital structure of GNR segments as a function of their length using low-temperature scanning tunnelling microscopy and density-functional theory calculations. Already GNRs with lengths of 5 nm reach almost metallic behaviour with ∼100 meV bandgap. Finally, we show that defects (kinks) in the GNRs do not strongly modify their electronic structure. PMID:26658960

  20. Injury Mechanisms and Severity in Narrow Offset Frontal Impacts

    PubMed Central

    Pintar, Frank A.; Yoganandan, Narayan; Maiman, Dennis J.

    2008-01-01

    Current standard frontal crash tests include full frontal or 40% offset. Frontal impacts with offsets less than 40% and corner impacts have received little attention. Because of the limited engagement of vehicle structures that would permit less energy dissipation, these crashes have the potential for severe trauma to the near-side occupant. Narrow offset and corner-impact crashes under a frontal impact classification were analyzed using data obtained from the United States Department of Transportation National Highway Traffic Safety Administration crash databases: Crash Injury Research and Engineering Network (CIREN) and the National Automotive Sampling System (NASS) 2000–2006. A subset of crashes that could be defined clearly as narrow offset crashes were then examined. The Collision Damage Classification (CDC) classification was used to obtain only crashes with a “FLEE” code for drivers and a “FREE” code for right front passengers. These codes were used to separate out crashes that had bumper and lower vehicle engagement and less than 41 cm of front vehicle damage. The NASS data indicated that corner impacts (“Y” and “Z” type) and narrow overlap (“L” and “R” type) constitute 26 % each of all frontal impacts. When occupants were severely injured in frontal crashes 20 % of the occupants were in “L” and “R” type crashes and 31 % were in “Y” and “Z” type crashes. The percentage of near side “FLEE” and “FREE” crash occupants with severe injuries by body region demonstrated that head, thorax, upper, and lower extremity injuries dominate the data set. For the 71 CIREN cases, lower extremity injuries dominated. The injury severity score did not correlate well with assumed severity parameters like extent of crush and delta-V, however, crashes with extent zones 2–5 had a greater percentage of occupants with chest and spine injuries than crashes with extent zones 6–9. Vehicle rotation after front impact in extent zone 2

  1. Laser frequency bandwidth narrowing by photorefractive two-beam coupling.

    PubMed

    Chomsky, D; Sternklar, S; Zigler, A; Jackel, S

    1992-04-01

    We present a theoretical analysis and experimental demonstration of a new method for spectral narrowing of laser radiation. The bandwidth narrowing is experienced by a laser beam subjected to a photorefractive two-beam coupling process. Contrary to the conventional method of frequency filtering by a Fabry-Perot étalon, this technique has no intrinsic finesse limitation on its resolution. A factor of 2 in frequency bandwidth narrowing is achieved with an argon-ion laser.

  2. Impurity-induced photoconductivity of narrow-gap Cadmium–Mercury–Telluride structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlov, D. V. Rumyantsev, V. V.; Morozov, S. V.; Kadykov, A. M.; Varavin, V. S.; Mikhailov, N. N.; Dvorestky, S. A.; Gavrilenko, V. I.; Teppe, F.

    2015-12-15

    The photoconductivity (PC) spectra of CdHgTe (MCT) solid solutions with a Cd fraction of 17 and 19% are measured. A simple model for calculating the states of doubly charged acceptors in MCT solid solutions, which makes it possible to describe satisfactorily the observed photoconductivity spectra, is proposed. The found lines in the photoconductivity spectra of narrow-gap MCT structures are associated with transitions between the states of both charged and neutral acceptor centers.

  3. Narrow band gap conjugated polymers for emergent optoelectronic technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azoulay, Jason D.; Zhang, Benjamin A.; London, Alexander E.

    2015-09-01

    Conjugated organic molecules effectively produce and harvest visible light and find utility in a variety of emergent optoelectronic technologies. There is currently interest in expanding the scope of these materials to extend functionality into the infrared (IR) spectral regions and endow functionality relevant in emergent technologies. Developing an understanding of the interplay between chemical and electronic structure in these systems will require control of the frontier orbital energetics (separation, position, and alignment), ground state electronic configurations, interchain arrangements, solid-state properties, and many other molecular features with synthetic precision that has yet to be demonstrated. Bridgehead imine substituted 4H-cyclopenta[2,1-b:3,4-b']dithiophene (CPDT) structural units, in combination with strong acceptors with progressively delocalized π-systems, afford modular donor-acceptor copolymers with broad and long wavelength absorption that spans technologically relevant wavelength (λ) ranges from 0.7 < λ < 3.2 μm.1 Here we demonstrate that electronic and structural manipulation play a major role in influencing the energetics of these systems and ultimately controlling the band gap of the materials. These results bear implication in the development of very narrow band gap systems where precise control will be necessary for achieving desired properties such as interactions with longer wavelength light.

  4. Channel Narrowing and Channel Reset: Effects of a Large Flood on the Vegetated, Narrowing Rio Grande

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, D. J.; Schmidt, J. C.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2008, heavy precipitation from a tropical storm in the Sierra Madre Occidental, MX, produced large amounts of stream flow to the Rio Conchos and lower Rio Grande. This flood was well publicized in the media due to the widespread flooding in Ojinaga, Chih., and Presidio, TX. Gage records indicate that this flood had an approximate recurrence of 15 years as measured on the Rio Grande near Presidio. Nevertheless, flood stages were the highest ever recorded and resulted from a significant loss of channel capacity due to channel narrowing that had occurred during the previous 18 years. Measurements from aerial photographs indicate that channel width had decreased between 35 and 50% between 1990 and 2008 during regional drought. During this period of low stream flow, invasion by non-native riparian vegetation (Tamarix spp., Arundo donax) helped trap sediment and promote floodplain accretion. Our resurveys of the channel indicate that the 2008 flood was a reset event and that the channel was re-widened by 32 to 48%. Repeated, oblique photographs showed significant channel migration and large scale floodplain stripping during this flood. These results show that although riparian vegetation may actively promote channel narrowing and floodplain accretion, moderately large floods may cause large scale bank erosion, floodplain stripping, and vegetation removal in alluvial valleys subject to large-scale invasion by nonnative plants.

  5. 1. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 745, Jordan Narrows Folder ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 745, Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. JORDAN STATION, JULY 2, 1909. GENERAL VIEW. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

  6. 3. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 741, Jordan Narrows Folder ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Photocopied July 1971 from Photo 741, Jordan Narrows Folder #1, Engineering Department, Utah Power and Light Co., Salt Lake City, Utah. INTERIOR VIEW, JULY 2, 1909. - Salt Lake City Water & Electrical Power Company, Jordan Narrows Hydroelectric Plant, Jordan River, Riverton, Salt Lake County, UT

  7. Bayesian Face Recognition and Perceptual Narrowing in Face-Space

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-01-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to "perceptual narrowing", the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in…

  8. The Lexical Advantages of Narrow Reading for Second Language Learners.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Norbert; Carter, Ronald

    2000-01-01

    Suggests that exposure to recurrent topics and vocabulary in authentic texts helps students develop reading competence and confidence. Approaches narrow reading from three perspectives: one employing a corpus analysis of newspaper readings to demonstrate how narrow reading lowers the vocabulary load of texts, one learner-focused, reporting…

  9. Biomass production of sugarcane on narrow-rows in Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Cayton, J.E.; Eiland, B.R.

    1981-01-01

    Sugarcane production for biomass was examined on three narrow-row patterns in Florida. Equipment and production methods were modified for planting, spraying and harvesting the narrow-row patterns. No large increases in yields of vigorous varieties were found when compared to those from conventional rows. Some increases were observed in varieties which have low stalk populations. 4 refs.

  10. Unisex Math: Narrowing the Gender Gap.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tapia, Martha; Marsh, George E., II

    This study examined gender differences in attitudes toward mathematics of undergraduate students. The Attitudes Toward Mathematics Instrument (ATMI) was administered to students enrolled in introductory mathematics classes (Pre-Calculus, Calculus, and Business Calculus) at two Southeast universities, one a large state university and the other one…

  11. Measurement of the analyzing power for pion proton elastic scattering between 471 and 687 MeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Mokhtari-Amirmajdi, A.

    1985-06-01

    The analyzing power, A/sub N/, has been measured for ..pi../sup + -/p..--> pi../sup + -/p at 471, 547, 625, and 687 MeV/c in an angular range corresponding to -0.9 less than or equal to cos theta/sub cm/ less than or equal to 0.8. A polarized proton target with polarization axis normal to the scattering plane was used. The scattered pion and recoil proton were detected in coincidence, using a magnetic spectrometer and a wire chamber/scintillator array, except in cases where one of the particles was kinematically inaccessible. Statistical uncertainties in the data are as low as 0.02; systematic uncertainties are estimated to be less than 3%. The ..pi../sup -/p data are characterized by large values of analyzing power, and rapid variations in the angular distribution with incident momentum. The measurements are compared with the results of existing partial wave analysis.

  12. On Tetraquark Meson States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Virendra

    It is suggested that the narrow meson state seen in the the SELEX experiment is a (cbar {s} sbar {s}) tetraquark state. Characteristics of other possible tetraquarks formed out of c and s quarks and antiquarks are considered.

  13. High-brightness diode lasers with very narrow vertical divergence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erbert, Götz; Bugge, Frank; Eppich, Bernd; Fricke, Joerg; Hasler, Karl-Heinz; Paschke, Katrin; Pietrzak, Agnieszka; Wenzel, Hans; Tränkle, Günther

    2008-02-01

    A narrow vertical divergence of about 30° including 95% of power is highly desired in many applications. Principal designs for narrow divergence diode lasers like simple broad waveguide and more sophisticated resonant waveguide structures are discussed. Devices with narrow divergence could be realized in the wavelength range 800nm to 1060nm using very broad waveguide structures. More than 1W in fundamental mode and about 5W nearly diffraction limited output could be achieved from ridge waveguide laser and from diode lasers with tapered resonator structure, respectively.

  14. Narrowing of Terrace-width Distributions During Growth on Vicinals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamouda, Ajmi Bh.; Pimpinelli, A.; Einstein, T. L.

    2009-03-01

    Using kinetic Monte Carlo simulations for a generic minimal SOS model of vicinal surfaces, we compute the terrace-width distributions (TWDs) as a function of incident flux during homoepitaxial growth. We show that the distribution narrows markedly, U.B.P.-Clermont 2 as though there were a flux-dependent repulsion between steps, until the step picture fails at high flux. Using a Fokker-Planck approach, we analyze the evolution and saturation of this narrowing. We compare with a 1D model and with our simulations for narrowing due to an Ehrlich-Schwoebel barrier.

  15. Ring resonator based narrow-linewidth semiconductor lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ksendzov, Alexander (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for using ring resonators to produce narrow linewidth hybrid semiconductor lasers. According to one embodiment of the present invention, the narrow linewidths are produced by combining the semiconductor gain chip with a narrow pass band external feedback element. The semi conductor laser is produced using a ring resonator which, combined with a Bragg grating, acts as the external feedback element. According to another embodiment of the present invention, the proposed integrated optics ring resonator is based on plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) SiO.sub.2 /SiON/SiO.sub.2 waveguide technology.

  16. Narrow conducting channels defined by helium ion beam damage

    SciTech Connect

    Cheeks, T.L.; Roukes, M.L.; Scherer, A.; Craighead, H.G.

    1988-11-14

    We have developed a new technique for patterning narrow conducting channels in GaAs-AlGaAs two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) materials. A low-energy He ion beam successfully patterned narrow wires with little or no etching of the thin GaAs cap. The damage propagation of the He ion even at low energies was sufficient to decrease the mobility of the 2DEG located deep within the structure. The damage can be removed by a low-temperature anneal but remains stable at room temperature. Conducting channels as narrow as 300 nm have been fabricated and measured using low-temperature magnetoresistance.

  17. The blues broaden, but the nasty narrows: attentional consequences of negative affects low and high in motivational intensity.

    PubMed

    Gable, Philip; Harmon-Jones, Eddie

    2010-02-01

    Positive and negative affects high in motivational intensity cause a narrowing of attentional focus. In contrast, positive affects low in motivational intensity cause a broadening of attentional focus. The attentional consequences of negative affects low in motivational intensity have not been experimentally investigated. Experiment 1 compared the attentional consequences of negative affect low in motivational intensity (sadness) relative to a neutral affective state. Results indicated that low-motivation negative affect caused attentional broadening. Experiment 2 found that disgust, a high-motivation negative affect not previously investigated in attentional studies, narrowed attentional focus. These experiments support the conceptual model linking high-motivation affective states to narrowed attention and low-motivation affective states to broadened attention.

  18. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions.

  19. Observation of motion-dependent nonlinear dispersion with narrow-linewidth atoms in an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Westergaard, Philip G; Christensen, Bjarke T R; Tieri, David; Matin, Rastin; Cooper, John; Holland, Murray; Ye, Jun; Thomsen, Jan W

    2015-03-01

    As an alternative to state-of-the-art laser frequency stabilization using ultrastable cavities, it has been proposed to exploit the nonlinear effects from coupling of atoms with a narrow transition to an optical cavity. Here, we have constructed such a system and observed nonlinear phase shifts of a narrow optical line by a strong coupling of a sample of strontium-88 atoms to an optical cavity. The sample temperature of a few mK provides a domain where the Doppler energy scale is several orders of magnitude larger than the narrow linewidth of the optical transition. This makes the system sensitive to velocity dependent multiphoton scattering events (Dopplerons) that affect the cavity field transmission and phase. By varying the number of atoms and the intracavity power, we systematically study this nonlinear phase signature which displays roughly the same features as for much lower temperature samples. This demonstration in a relatively simple system opens new possibilities for alternative routes to laser stabilization at the sub-100 mHz level and superradiant laser sources involving narrow-line atoms. The understanding of relevant motional effects obtained here has direct implications for other atomic clocks when used in relation to ultranarrow clock transitions. PMID:25793810

  20. 33 CFR 83.09 - Narrow channels (Rule 9).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Narrow channels (Rule 9). (a) Keeping near to outer limit of channel or fairway which lies on vessel's... keep as near to the outer limit of the channel or fairway which lies on her starboard side as is...

  1. A narrow clear zone over Florida and the Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Negri, A. J.; Morris, K. R.

    1980-01-01

    A narrow cloud-free zone of large longitudinal extent was observed in visible and infrared satellite imagery on September 21, 1978. An attempt to explain the zone in terms of subsidence induced by a transverse frontal circulation is presented.

  2. The Narrow-Band Model and Semi-Conductor Theory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tanner, B. K.

    1976-01-01

    Applies the narrow-band model to the instruction of intrinsic and extrinsic semiconductors along with the phenomenon of compensation. Advocates the model for undergraduate instruction due to its intuitive appeal and mathematical simplicity. (CP)

  3. Band Gap Narrowing and Widening of ZnO Nanostructures and Doped Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Kasim, Muhd Firdaus; Rusdi, Roshidah

    2015-08-01

    Band gap change in doped ZnO is an observed phenomenon that is very interesting from the fundamental point of view. This work is focused on the preparation of pure and single phase nanostructured ZnO and Cu as well as Mn-doped ZnO for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms of band gap narrowing in the materials. ZnO, Zn0.99Cu0.01O and Zn0.99Mn0.01O materials were prepared using a wet chemistry method, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all samples were pure and single phase. UV-visible spectroscopy showed that materials in the nanostructured state exhibit band gap widening with respect to their micron state while for the doped compounds exhibited band gap narrowing both in the nano and micron states with respect to the pure ZnO materials. The degree of band gap change was dependent on the doped elements and crystallite size. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that there were shifts in the valence bands. From both UV-visible and XPS spectroscopy, it was found that the mechanism for band gap narrowing was due to the shifting of the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum of the materials. The mechanisms were different for different samples depending on the type of dopant and dimensional length scales of the crystallites.

  4. Band Gap Narrowing and Widening of ZnO Nanostructures and Doped Materials.

    PubMed

    Kamarulzaman, Norlida; Kasim, Muhd Firdaus; Rusdi, Roshidah

    2015-12-01

    Band gap change in doped ZnO is an observed phenomenon that is very interesting from the fundamental point of view. This work is focused on the preparation of pure and single phase nanostructured ZnO and Cu as well as Mn-doped ZnO for the purpose of understanding the mechanisms of band gap narrowing in the materials. ZnO, Zn0.99Cu0.01O and Zn0.99Mn0.01O materials were prepared using a wet chemistry method, and X-ray diffraction (XRD) results showed that all samples were pure and single phase. UV-visible spectroscopy showed that materials in the nanostructured state exhibit band gap widening with respect to their micron state while for the doped compounds exhibited band gap narrowing both in the nano and micron states with respect to the pure ZnO materials. The degree of band gap change was dependent on the doped elements and crystallite size. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) revealed that there were shifts in the valence bands. From both UV-visible and XPS spectroscopy, it was found that the mechanism for band gap narrowing was due to the shifting of the valance band maximum and conduction band minimum of the materials. The mechanisms were different for different samples depending on the type of dopant and dimensional length scales of the crystallites.

  5. Terahertz plasmonic laser radiating in an ultra-narrow beam

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wu, Chongzhao; Khanal, Sudeep; Reno, John L.; Kumar, Sushil

    2016-07-07

    Plasmonic lasers (spasers) generate coherent surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) and could be realized at subwavelength dimensions in metallic cavities for applications in nanoscale optics. Plasmonic cavities are also utilized for terahertz quantum-cascade lasers (QCLs), which are the brightest available solid-state sources of terahertz radiation. A long standing challenge for spasers that are utilized as nanoscale sources of radiation, is their poor coupling to the far-field radiation. Unlike conventional lasers that could produce directional beams, spasers have highly divergent radiation patterns due to their subwavelength apertures. Here, we theoretically and experimentally demonstrate a new technique for implementing distributed feedback (DFB) thatmore » is distinct from any other previously utilized DFB schemes for semiconductor lasers. The so-termed antenna-feedback scheme leads to single-mode operation in plasmonic lasers, couples the resonant SPP mode to a highly directional far-field radiation pattern, and integrates hybrid SPPs in surrounding medium into the operation of the DFB lasers. Experimentally, the antenna-feedback method, which does not require the phase matching to a well-defined effective index, is implemented for terahertz QCLs, and single-mode terahertz QCLs with a beam divergence as small as 4°×4° are demonstrated, which is the narrowest beam reported for any terahertz QCL to date. Moreover, in contrast to a negligible radiative field in conventional photonic band-edge lasers, in which the periodicity follows the integer multiple of half-wavelengths inside the active medium, antenna-feedback breaks this integer limit for the first time and enhances the radiative field of the lasing mode. Terahertz lasers with narrow-beam emission will find applications for integrated as well as standoff terahertz spectroscopy and sensing. Furthermore, the antenna-feedback scheme is generally applicable to any plasmonic laser with a Fabry–Perot cavity

  6. Vertical ocean reflectance at low altitudes for narrow laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crittenden, Eugene C., Jr.; Rodeback, G. W.; Milne, Edmund A.; Cooper, Alfred W.

    1991-09-01

    A narrow-beam laser altimeter was used to measure the reflected signal from the ocean surface as represented by the waters beneath the Golden Gate Bridge. This site allowed precise measurements as a function of angle from the vertical not possible from flying platforms. For short-wavelength water waves superimposed on swell, the signal amplitude probability distribution for the reflected signals showed periods of zero reflection, even for vertical incidence, apparently due to tipping of the water surface. The nonzero signals showed a distribution that could be fitted with an antilog-normal distribution. This is skewed toward higher signals than a normal (Gaussian) distribution. With incidence angle displaced from the vertical, the distribution shape was retained but with more frequent zero reflections. The decrease with angle of the average signal, including the zeroes, is well fitted with a Gram- Charlier distribution, as seen by earlier observers using photographic techniques which masked these details of the structure. For the simpler wave pattern due to a long sustained wind direction, the probability distribution is log-normal with no zero signal periods. At large angles from the vertical the log-normal distribution shifts toward exponential. For surface states intermediate between the above two extremes the distribution is often normal. The larger return signals resulting from the skew toward larger amplitudes from lognormal are more favorable for disposable laser altimeters than previously believed. Also, for an altimeter which may be swinging from a parachute or balloon, the return remains high at angles other than vertical. The presence of occasional zero return signal does somewhat degrade the accuracy of altitude measurement for a descending altimeter, but the signal available assures performance at larger altitudes than previously expected.

  7. Search for narrow structures in pp¯π+ and Λp¯π+/- systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, S. U.; Etkin, A.; Fernow, R. C.; Foley, K. J.; Goldman, J. H.; Kirk, H.; Kopp, J.; Lesnik, A.; Love, W. A.; Morris, T. W.; Ozaki, S.; Platner, E. D.; Protopopescu, S. D.; Saulys, A.; Weygand, D. P.; Wheeler, C. D.; Willen, E. H.; Winik, M.; Bensinger, J.; Morris, W.; Lindenbaum, S. J.; Kramer, M. A.; Mallik, U.; Bar-Yam, Z.; Dowd, J.; Kern, W.; Button-Shafer, J.; Dhar, S.; Lichti, R.

    1981-11-01

    We have performed a high-statistics search for narrow meson states (Γ<=30 MeV) produced in π-p interactions at 16 GeV/c and decaying into pp¯π+ or Λp¯π+/-. This is the first systematic search in channels requiring exchange of exotic mesons. The cross section for production of such states is ruled out at the 95% confidence level with upper limits ranging from ~10 nb at 2.3 GeV to ~40 nb at 2.8 GeV.

  8. Bayesian face recognition and perceptual narrowing in face-space.

    PubMed

    Balas, Benjamin

    2012-07-01

    During the first year of life, infants' face recognition abilities are subject to 'perceptual narrowing', the end result of which is that observers lose the ability to distinguish previously discriminable faces (e.g. other-race faces) from one another. Perceptual narrowing has been reported for faces of different species and different races, in developing humans and primates. Though the phenomenon is highly robust and replicable, there have been few efforts to model the emergence of perceptual narrowing as a function of the accumulation of experience with faces during infancy. The goal of the current study is to examine how perceptual narrowing might manifest as statistical estimation in 'face-space', a geometric framework for describing face recognition that has been successfully applied to adult face perception. Here, I use a computer vision algorithm for Bayesian face recognition to study how the acquisition of experience in face-space and the presence of race categories affect performance for own and other-race faces. Perceptual narrowing follows from the establishment of distinct race categories, suggesting that the acquisition of category boundaries for race is a key computational mechanism in developing face expertise.

  9. Diffusion in narrow domains and application to phototransduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reingruber, Jürgen; Holcman, David

    2009-03-01

    The mean time for a Brownian particle to find a small target inside a narrow domain is a key parameter for many chemical reactions occurring in cellular microstructures. Although current estimations are given for a large class of domains, they cannot be used for narrow domains often encountered in cellular biology, such as the synaptic cleft, narrow compartments in the outer segment of vertebrate photoreceptors, or neuron-glia contact. We compute here the mean time for a Brownian particle to hit a small target placed on the surface of a narrow cylinder. We then use this result to estimate the rate constant of cyclic-GMP (cGMP) hydrolysis by the activated enzyme phosphodiesterase (PDE) in the narrow microdomains that build up the outer segment of a rod photoreceptor. By controlling the cGMP concentration, PDE activity is at the basis of the early photoresponse chemical reaction cascade. Our approach allows us to compute the cGMP rate constant as a function of biophysical parameters.

  10. On the narrow emission line components of the LMC novae 2004 (YY Doradus) and 2009a

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Elena; Munari, Ulisse

    2014-09-01

    We present early decline spectra of the two Large Magellanic Cloud novae: LMC 2004 (YY Dor) and LMC 2009a and discuss their spectral an line profile evolution with special emphasis on the existence and appearance of a sharp component. We show that the narrow component that characterizes the emission lines in the maximum spectra of nova LMC 2004 originates in the ejecta. The He ii 4686 Å narrow emission which appears at the onset of the nebular phase in both novae is somewhat controversial. Our observations suggest that the corresponding line forming region is physically separated from the rest of the ejecta (the broad line region) and environmentally different. However, the lack of late time observations covering the super-soft source (SSS) phase, the post-SSS phase and the quiescence state does not allow to securely establish any non-ejecta origin/contribution as, instead, in the case of U Sco and KT Eri.

  11. Perceptual narrowing during infancy: a comparison of language and faces.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Daphne; Werker, Janet F

    2014-02-01

    In this article, we begin with a summary of the evidence for perceptual narrowing for various aspects of language (e.g., vowel and consonant contrasts, tone languages, visual language, sign language) and of faces (e.g., own species, own race). We then consider possible reasons for the apparent differences in the timing of narrowing (e.g., apparently earlier for own race than for own species). Throughout we consider whether the evidence fits a model of maintenance/loss or is better characterized as enhancement/attunement to exposed categories. Finally, we consider evidence on the malleability of the timing and its implications for the role of endogenous factors versus learning in controlling when narrowing occurs. Overall, the comparison across domains revealed many similarities but also striking differences which lead to suggestions for future research. PMID:24519366

  12. CT demonstration of pharyngeal narrowing in adult obstructive sleep apnea

    SciTech Connect

    Bohlman, M.E.; Haponik, E.F.; Smith, P.L.; Allen, R.P.; Bleecker, E.R.; Goldman, S.M.

    1983-03-01

    Sleep apnea is a major cause of daytime hypersomnolence. Among the proposed etiologies, focal obstruction of the airways at the level of the pharynx has been suggested but not proven. Using computed tomography, the cross-sectional area of the airway can be readily assessed. Thirty-three adults with clinically proven sleep apnea and 12 normal adults underwent systematic computed tomography of the neck. Significant airway narrowing was demonstrated in all the patients with obstructive sleep apnea, whereas no such narrowing was seen in the controls. In 11, the narrowing was at a single level, whereas in 22 patients two or more levels were affected. This study has shown that a structurally abnormal airway may serve as an anatomic substrate for the development of sleep apnea. On the basis of this evidence, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty has been performed in two patients with relief of symptoms in one.

  13. Sharp monotonic resolution of discontinuities without clipping of narrow extrema

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonard, B. P.; Niknafs, H. S.

    1991-01-01

    A strategy is presented for accurately simulating highly convective flows containing discontinuities such as density fronts or shock waves, without distorting smooth profiles or clipping narrow local extrema. The convection algorithm is based on non-artificially-diffusive third-order upwinding in smooth regions, with automatic adaptive stencil expansion to (in principle, arbitrarily) higher order upwinding locally, in regions of rapidly changing gradients. This is highly cost-effective because the wider stencil is used only where needed - in isolated narrow regions. A recently developed universal limiter assures sharp monotonic resolution of discontinuities without introducing artificial diffusion or numerical compression. An adaptive discriminator is constructed to distinguish between spurious overshoots and physical peaks; this automatically relaxes the limiter near local turning points, thereby avoiding loss of resolution in narrow extrema. Examples are given for one-dimensional pure convection of scalar profiles at constant velocity.

  14. Pressure Fluctuation Characteristics of Narrow Gauge Train Running Through Tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masahiro; Sakuma, Yutaka

    Pressure fluctuations on the sides of narrow (1067 mm) gauge trains running in tunnels are measured for the first time to investigate the aerodynamic force acting on the trains. The present measurements are compared with earlier measurements obtained with the Shinkansen trains. The results are as follows: (1) The aerodynamic force, which stems from pressure fluctuations on the sides of cars, puts the energy into the vibration of the car body running through a tunnel. (2) While the pressure fluctuations appear only on one of the two sides of the trains running in double-track tunnels, the fluctuations in opposite phase on both sides in single-track tunnels. (3) The on-track test data of the narrow gauge trains show the same tendency as those of the Shinkansen trains, although it is suggested that the pressure fluctuations develop faster along the narrow gauge trains than the Shinkansen trains.

  15. Ultra-narrow linewidth measurement based on Voigt profile fitting.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mo; Meng, Zhou; Wang, Jianfei; Chen, Wei

    2015-03-01

    We study the method of Voigt profile fitting for ultra-narrow linewidth measurement. It filters out the effect of the spectrum broadening due to the 1/f frequency noise and extracts out the Lorentzian lineshape from the measured spectrum. The resolution is thus greatly promoted than the direct measurement from the self-heterodyne technique. We apply this method to an ultra-narrow-linewidth (~40 Hz by heterodyne beat technique) Brillouin/erbium fiber laser. The linewidth estimated from Voigt fitting method is indicated to be more accurate. In contrast, the linewidths estimated direct from the 3-dB and the 20-dB heterodyne-spectrum width are far over the true linewidth of the BEFL. The Voigt fitting method provides an efficient tool for ultra-narrow-linewidth measurement. And compared with heterodyne beat technique, it is applicable for all types of lasers. PMID:25836899

  16. On narrow-band representation of ocean waves: 1. Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfun, M. Aziz

    1986-06-01

    The description of linear random waves in the form of an amplitude-modulated carrier wave is known as narrow-band representation. Herewith, the theoretical basis of such a representation is examined in terms of integral properties of surface spectra and criteria governing the statistical and kinematic characteristics of the carrier wave. These considerations are then extended systematically to derive two narrow-band type representations for nonlinear waves. The nature of these representations and their statistical properties are discussed and compared with other models such as those proposed earlier by Tayfun (1980) and Huang et al. (1983).

  17. Search for narrow resonances lighter than Upsilon mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-03-01

    We report a search for narrow resonances, produced in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, that decay into muon pairs with invariant mass between 6.3 and 9.0 GeV/c{sup 2}. The data, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron collider, correspond to an integrated luminosity of 630 pb{sup -1}. We use the dimuon invariant mass distribution to set 90% upper credible limits of about 1% to the ratio of the production cross section times muonic branching fraction of possible narrow resonances to that of the {Upsilon}(1S) meson.

  18. Ultrabroadband absorber using a deep metallic grating with narrow slits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yan-Lin; Zhao, Yan

    2015-01-01

    We report an ultrabroadband absorber using a deep metallic grating with narrow slits in the infrared regime. In this absorber, the ultrabroadband electromagnetic wave has been perfectly transmitted through the vacuum-grating interface due to the plasmonic Brewster angle effect, and its energy can attenuate effectively through the slits because of the enhanced electric field inside the slits. In addition, simulation results show that this ultrabroadband absorber works over a narrow angle range which is a very important feature of directional thermal source.

  19. Investigation on Heat Transfer Characteristics of Water Through Narrow Annulus

    SciTech Connect

    Guangyao Lu; Jing Wang

    2006-07-01

    A study is carried out to investigate the forced convective heat transfer characteristics of water through narrow annulus. For most works undertaken before were mainly concerned with the heat transfer characteristics of heat removal systems, the experiments herein are conducted to detect the heat transfer characteristics of heated fluid, as well as cooled fluid, flowing through narrow annulus. In the experiments, directions of flow include horizontal, upstream and downstream. The Reynolds number range, based on the annular hydraulic diameter, of 10 to 30,000 is covered in the experiments. During the experiments, the transitions from laminar to turbulent convective heat transfer are carefully observed. It is found that fully turbulent convective heat transfer is achieved at a lower Reynolds number in narrow annulus than that in larger tubes. When the Reynolds number is lower than 150, the heat transfer is degraded attributed to the slow flow rate and axial heat conduction. The experimental results indicate that the heat transfer characteristics of narrow annular flow are different from that of lager, more conventionally sized pipe flow. A convective heat transfer correlation is developed and the comparisons are made with the correlations of other works. (authors)

  20. Note: Folded optical system for narrow forward looking probe

    SciTech Connect

    Hou, Hsuan-Chao; Hah, Dooyoung; Kim, Jeonghwan; Feldman, M.

    2014-02-15

    An optical system is described in which a laser beam makes three passes through a single graded index lens, forming a focus along the optic axis. It has important applications in endoscopic probes, where the forward looking characteristic permits the avoidance of obstacles and the narrow structure makes it minimally invasive.

  1. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE KITCHEN. NOTE THE NARROW DOOR OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE KITCHEN. NOTE THE NARROW DOOR OF THE FORMER COOLER (LEFT), SINGLE-LIGHT OVER THREE-PANEL DOOR TO THE SERVICE PORCH (CENTER), AND BUILT-IN SPICE RACK (RIGHT). VIEW FACING EAST. - Hickam Field, NCO Housing Type 1, 211 Tenth Street, Honolulu, Honolulu County, HI

  2. Young Children's Limited and Narrow Exposure to Informational Text

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yopp, Ruth Helen; Yopp, Hallie Kay

    2012-01-01

    Despite arguments for more fully including informational text in early childhood classrooms, research suggests that young children's exposure to the genre is quite limited. This article focuses on the informational books that children do encounter, specifically through read-alouds, and describes the narrow focus of those books. Informational…

  3. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 162.240, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF...

  4. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  5. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  6. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  7. 33 CFR 162.240 - Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Tongass Narrows, Alaska; navigation. 162.240 Section 162.240 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.240...

  8. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-01-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of…

  9. Relational Themes in Counseling Supervision: Broadening and Narrowing Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gazzola, Nicola; Theriault, Anne

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the experiences of broadening (i.e., thinking and acting creatively and being open to exploring new ways of being) and narrowing (i.e., the experience of perceiving one's choices as limited) in the supervisory process with the aim of identifying key relational themes from the perspective of supervisees. We interviewed 10…

  10. The electronic structure of heavy fermions: Narrow temperature independent bands

    SciTech Connect

    Arko, A.J.; Joyce, J.J.; Smith, J.L.; Andrews, A.B.

    1996-08-01

    The electronic structure of both Ce and U heavy fermions appears to consist of extremely narrow temperature independent bands. There is no evidence from photoemission for a collective phenomenon normally referred to as the Kondo resonance. In uranium compounds a small dispersion of the bands is easily measurable.

  11. Narrow grass hedge effects on nutrient transport following compost application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of stiff-stemmed grass hedges can be a valuable soil conservation measure. A study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge, planted on the contour along the hillslope, in reducing runoff nutrient transport from plots with a range of soil nutrient values. Composted ...

  12. Revisiting the Case for Narrow Reading with English Language Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hansen, Laurie E.; Collins, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated children's access to books, narrow independent reading volume, and growth in vocabulary knowledge and comprehension. Two hundred-twenty English language learners and native-English speaking children from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds were given measures of vocabulary and literacy in the fall and spring of fourth grade.…

  13. 9. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM DETAIL OF ONE OF TWO NARROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. INTERIOR LIVING ROOM DETAIL OF ONE OF TWO NARROW 4-LIGHT OVER 4-LIGHT, DOUBLE-HUNG, WOOD-FRAMED WINDOWS ON EITHER SIDE OF FRONT DOOR SHOWING EXPOSED COUNTERBALANCE CABLE. VIEW TO SOUTHWEST. - Bishop Creek Hydroelectric System, Plant 4, Worker Cottage, Bishop Creek, Bishop, Inyo County, CA

  14. A "Narrowing of Inquiry" in American Moral Psychology and Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Michael J.; Slife, Brent D.

    2013-01-01

    We explore the possibility that a priori philosophical commitments continue to result in a narrowing of inquiry in moral psychology and education where theistic worldviews are concerned. Drawing from the theories of Edward L. Thorndike and John Dewey, we examine naturalistic philosophical commitments that influenced the study of moral psychology…

  15. Career Attainment among Healthcare Executives: Is the Gender Gap Narrowing?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branin, Joan Julia

    2009-01-01

    Health care occupations are expected to be among the fastest growing professions in the next ten years. With such incredible growth expected in employment and wages, and with women's participation in the industry remaining strong, are women in the health care industry, particularly those in health care administration, experiencing a narrowing of…

  16. World Food Resources and Population: The Narrowing Margin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Lester R.

    1981-01-01

    This bulletin examines the narrowing margin between global food production and population growth. Between 1950 and 1971, world grain production nearly doubled and per capita production increased 31 percent. During the 1970s, gains in output barely kept pace with population growth, consumption per person declined in sub-Saharan Africa and parts of…

  17. Mechanical properties of Indonesian-made narrow dynamic compression plate.

    PubMed

    Dewo, P; van der Houwen, E B; Sharma, P K; Magetsari, R; Bor, T C; Vargas-Llona, L D; van Horn, J R; Busscher, H J; Verkerke, G J

    2012-09-01

    Osteosynthesis plates are clinically used to fixate and position a fractured bone. They should have the ability to withstand cyclic loads produced by muscle contractions and total body weight. The very high demand for osteosynthesis plates in developing countries in general and in Indonesia in particular necessitates the utilisation of local products. In this paper, we investigated the mechanical properties, i.e. proportional limit and fatigue strength of Indonesian-made Narrow Dynamic Compression Plates (Narrow DCP) as one of the most frequently used osteosynthesis plates, in comparison to the European AO standard plate, and its relationship to geometry, micro structural features and surface defects of the plates. All Indonesian-made plates appeared to be weaker than the standard Narrow DCP because they consistently failed at lower stresses. Surface defects did not play a major role in this, although the polishing of the Indonesian Narrow DCP was found to be poor. The standard plate showed indications of cold deformation from the production process in contrast to the Indonesian plates, which might be the first reason for the differences in strength. This is confirmed by hardness measurements. A second reason could be the use of an inferior version of stainless steel. The Indonesian plates showed lower mechanical behaviour compared to the AO-plates. These findings could initiate the development of improved Indonesian manufactured DCP-plates with properties comparable to commonly used plates, such as the standard European AO-plates.

  18. Narrow-Band WGM Optical Filters With Tunable FSRs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohageg, Makan; Matsko, Andrey; Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Maleki, Lute; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2007-01-01

    Optical resonators of the whispering-gallery-mode (WGM) type featuring DC-tunable free spectral ranges (FSRs) have been demonstrated. By making the FSR tunable, one makes it possible to adjust, during operation, the frequency of a microwave signal generated by an optoelectronic oscillator in which an WGM optical resonator is utilized as a narrow-band filter.

  19. Narrow-band photography of Jupiter and Saturn.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fountain, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    An IR-sensitive vidicon was used in the 1 to 2 mu region, with narrow-bandwidth filters, for Jupiter photographs taken in April, 1971, and Saturn photographs taken in December, 1970. The changes in limb darkening and surface details observed at different wavelengths are discussed. The 37 Jupiter photographs and the 38 Saturn photographs are included.

  20. Pulmonary surfactant will secure free airflow through a narrow tube.

    PubMed

    Liu, M Y; Wang, L M; Li, E; Enhorning, G

    1991-08-01

    Well functioning pulmonary surfactant is necessary to ensure alveolar stability. It is proposed that surfactant is also required to keep the finest cylindrical airways open, thereby securing an unrestricted flow of air to and from the alveoli. If the surfactant is inadequate in quality or quality there is a risk that liquid will accumulate in the most marrow section of the airway and form a blocking column. To study that possibility special glass capillaries were used. The glass capillaries were heated and extended to make a short section very narrow. In the lumen of that section a minute volume (1 microliter) of liquid was deposited, which formed a blocking column. When pressure was raised on one side of the column, it forced the liquid to move away from the narrow section. Pressure dropped to zero as air could pass, and if the liquid column consisted of calf lung surfactant extract (CLSE), pressure remained at zero because a new liquid column did not form. If, on the other hand, the liquid column consisted of saline solution it would repeatedly reform as soon as it had been pressed out of the capillary's narrow section. The same occurred if the CLSE suspension forming the liquid column was very dilute or contained inhibiting proteins. These observations did not require that the capillary consisted of the material glass; they were also noted when the narrow tube was outlined by epithelium.

  1. Dangers of placement of narrow bore nasogastric feeding tubes.

    PubMed Central

    Biggart, M.; McQuillan, P. J.; Choudhry, A. K.; Nickalls, R. W.

    1987-01-01

    Three complications of the use of narrow bore nasogastric feeding tubes are described. Clinical tests to determine correct placement are noted to be unreliable and the importance of radiological confirmation is stressed. A number of suggestions are made for safe use of these tubes. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:3111340

  2. INTERIOR VIEW OF THE SOUTH ROOM. DOOR TO THE NARROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF THE SOUTH ROOM. DOOR TO THE NARROW CORRIDOR IS ON THE LEFT, DOOR TO THE NORTH ROOM IS ON THE RIGHT. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    INTERIOR VIEW OF NARROW CORRIDOR. NOTE THE ENTRY STAIRWAY (STAIRS COVERED WITH EARTH) LEADING UP TO GROUND LEVEL ON THE LEFT. VIEW FACING WEST - U.S. Naval Base, Pearl Harbor, Ford Island 5-Inch Antiaircraft Battery, Battery Command Center, Ford Island, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  4. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1994-01-01

    We use a Green's function technique to calculate the position of deep defects in narrow gap semiconductors. We consider substitutional (including antisite), vacancy, and interstitial (self and foreign) deep defects. We also use perturbation theory to look at the effect of nonparabolic bands on shallow defect energies and find nonparabolicity can increase the binding by 10 percent or so. We consider mercury cadmium telluride (MCT), mercury zinc telluride (MZT), and mercury zinc selenide (MZS). For substitutional and interstitial defects we look at the situation with and without relaxation. For substitutional impurities in MCT, MZT, and MZS, we consider x (the concentration of Cd or Zn) in the range 0.1 less than x less than 0.3 and also consider appropriate x so E(sub g) = 0.1 eV for each of the three compounds. We consider several cation site s-like deep levels and anion site p-like levels. For E(sub g) = 0.1 eV, we also consider the effects of relaxation. Similar comments apply to the interstitial deep levels whereas no relaxation is considered for the ideal vacancy model. Relaxation effects can be greater for the interstitial than the substitutional cases. Specific results are given in figures and tables and comparison to experiment is made in a limited number of cases. We find, for example, that I, Se, S, Rn, and N are possible cation site, s-like deep levels in MCT and Zn and Mg are for anion site, p-like levels (both levels for substitutional cases). The corresponding cation and anion site levels for interstitial deep defects are (Au, Ag, Hg, Cd, Cu, Zn) and (N, Ar, O, F). For the substitutional cases we have some examples of relaxation moving the levels into the band gap, whereas for the interstitial case we have examples where relaxation moves it out of the band gap. Future work involves calculating the effects of charge state interaction and seeing the effect of relaxation on vacancy levels.

  5. A narrow band pattern-matching model of vowel perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, James M.; Houde, Robert A.

    2003-02-01

    The purpose of this paper is to propose and evaluate a new model of vowel perception which assumes that vowel identity is recognized by a template-matching process involving the comparison of narrow band input spectra with a set of smoothed spectral-shape templates that are learned through ordinary exposure to speech. In the present simulation of this process, the input spectra are computed over a sufficiently long window to resolve individual harmonics of voiced speech. Prior to template creation and pattern matching, the narrow band spectra are amplitude equalized by a spectrum-level normalization process, and the information-bearing spectral peaks are enhanced by a ``flooring'' procedure that zeroes out spectral values below a threshold function consisting of a center-weighted running average of spectral amplitudes. Templates for each vowel category are created simply by averaging the narrow band spectra of like vowels spoken by a panel of talkers. In the present implementation, separate templates are used for men, women, and children. The pattern matching is implemented with a simple city-block distance measure given by the sum of the channel-by-channel differences between the narrow band input spectrum (level-equalized and floored) and each vowel template. Spectral movement is taken into account by computing the distance measure at several points throughout the course of the vowel. The input spectrum is assigned to the vowel template that results in the smallest difference accumulated over the sequence of spectral slices. The model was evaluated using a large database consisting of 12 vowels in /hVd/ context spoken by 45 men, 48 women, and 46 children. The narrow band model classified vowels in this database with a degree of accuracy (91.4%) approaching that of human listeners.

  6. Light effects in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances in wall-coated cells

    SciTech Connect

    Breschi, E.; Schori, C.; Di Domenico, G.; Mileti, G.; Kazakov, G.; Litvinov, A.; Matisov, B.

    2010-12-15

    We report on light shift and broadening in the atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing of dark resonances prepared in alkali-metal vapors contained in wall-coated cells without buffer gas. The atomic-motion-induced Ramsey narrowing is due to the free motion of the polarized atomic spins in and out of the optical interaction region before spin relaxation. As a consequence of this effect, we observe a narrowing of the dark resonance linewidth as well as a reduction of the ground states' light shift when the volume of the interaction region decreases at constant optical intensity. The results can be intuitively interpreted as a dilution of the intensity effect similar to a pulsed interrogation due to the atomic motion. Finally the influence of this effect on the performance of compact atomic clocks is discussed.

  7. Nature of the narrow optical band in H*-aggregates: Dozy-chaos-exciton coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-01

    Dozy chaos emerges as a combined effect of the collective chaotic motion of electrons and nuclei, and their chaotic electromagnetic interactions in the transient state of molecules experiencing quantum transitions. Following earlier discussions of the well-known Brönsted relations for proton-transfer reactions; the temperature-dependent electron transfer in Langmuir-Blodgett films; the shape of the optical bands of polymethine dye monomers, their dimers, and J-aggregates, this paper reports one more application of the dozy-chaos theory of molecular quantum transitions. The qualitative and quantitative explanations for shape of a narrow and blue-shifted optical absorption band in H*-aggregates is given on the basis of the dozy-chaos theory by taking into account the dozy-chaos-exciton coupling effect. It is emphasized that in the H*-aggregate chromophore (dimer of cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanines) there is a competition between two Frenkel exciton transitions through the chaotic reorganization motion of nuclear environment. As a result, the highly organized quantum transition to the upper exciton state becomes an exciton-induced source of dozy chaos for the low organized transition to the lower exciton state. This manifests itself in appearing the narrow peak and broad wing in the optical spectrum pattern of H*-aggregates. A similar enhancement in the H*-effect caused by the strengthening of the exciton coupling in H*-dimers, which could be achieved by synthesizing tertiary and quarternary thiacarbocyanine monomers, is predicted.

  8. PHL 1092: A narrow-line quasar emerging from the darkness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallo, Luigi

    2013-10-01

    The radio quiet, narrow line quasar, PHL1092 exhibits the extreme behaviour associated with 1H0707 and IRAS13224, but at a high redshift (z=0.396) and with high luminosity (~10^45 erg/s). From a short, bright state observation of PHL1092 we discovered a super soft excess, possible relativistically broadened FeL and K emission, high radiative efficiency, and possible high velocity outflow. Follow up observations between 2008-10 caught the quasar in a deep minimum that could be attributed to disruption of the corona. We will monitor PHL1092 with Swift to catch the quasar emerging from its current low-flux state so that we can study the bright state of the AGN with a triggered 130ks XMM observation.

  9. 980 nm narrow linewidth Yb-doped phosphate fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Pingxue; Yao, Yifei; Hu, Haowei; Chi, Junjie; Yang, Chun; Zhao, Ziqiang; Zhang, Guangju

    2014-12-01

    A narrow-linewidth ytterbium (Yb)-doped phosphate fiber laser based on fiber Bragg grating (FBG) operating around 980 nm is reported. Two different kinds of cavity are applied to obtain the 980 nm narrow-linewidth output. One kind of the cavity consists of a 0.35 nm broadband lindwidth high-reflection FBG and the Yb-doped phosphate fiber end with 0° angle, which generates a maximum output power of 25 mW. The other kind of resonator is composed of a single mode Yb-doped phosphate fiber and a pair of FBGs. Over 10.7 mW stable continuous wave are obtained with two longitudinal modes at 980 nm. We have given a detailed analysis and discussion for the results.

  10. Domain wall pinning in ultra-narrow electromigrated break junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeve, Robert M.; Loescher, André; Mawass, Mohamad-Assaad; Hoffmann-Vogel, Regina; Kläui, Mathias

    2014-11-01

    The study of magnetic domain walls in constrained geometries is an important topic, yet when dealing with extreme nanoscale magnetic systems artefacts can often dominate the measurements and obscure the effects of intrinsic magnetic origin. In this work we study the evolution of domain wall depinning in electromigrated ferromagnetic junctions which are both initially fabricated and subsequently tailored in-situ in clean ultra-high vacuum conditions. Carefully designed Ni80Fe20 (Permalloy) notched half-ring structures are fabricated and investigated as a function of constriction width by tailoring the size of the contact using controlled in-situ electromigration. It is found that the domain wall pinning strength is increased on reducing the contact size in line with a reduction of the wall energy in narrower constrictions. Furthermore, the angular dependency and symmetry of the depinning field is measured to determine the full pinning potential for a domain wall in a system with a narrow constriction.

  11. Model of Layered Weld Formation Under Narrow Gap Pulse Welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krampit, A. G.

    2016-04-01

    The model parameters of narrow gap pulse welding can be divided into input, internal and output ones. The breadth of gap, that is, clearance breadth between upright edges is one of key parameters securing high quality of a weld joint. The paper presents theoretical outcomes for the model of layered weld formation under narrow gap pulse welding. Based on these studies is developed model of processes, which occur in the weld pool under pulse grove welding. It comprises the scheme of liquid metal motion in the weld pool, scheme of fusion with the side edge and in the bottom part, and the scheme of welding current impulse effect on the structure of a weld joint.

  12. NARROW ATOMIC FEATURES FROM RAPIDLY SPINNING NEUTRON STARS

    SciTech Connect

    Bauboeck, Michi; Psaltis, Dimitrios; Oezel, Feryal E-mail: dpsaltis@email.arizona.edu

    2013-04-01

    Neutron stars spinning at moderate rates ({approx}300-600 Hz) become oblate in shape and acquire a nonzero quadrupole moment. In this paper, we calculate the profiles of atomic features from such neutron stars using a ray-tracing algorithm in the Hartle-Thorne approximation. We show that line profiles acquire cores that are much narrower than the widths expected from pure Doppler effects for a large range of observer inclinations. As a result, the effects of both the oblateness and the quadrupole moments of neutron stars need to be taken into account when aiming to measure neutron-star radii from rotationally broadened lines. Moreover, the presence of these narrow cores substantially increases the likelihood of detecting atomic lines from rapidly spinning neutron stars.

  13. Period Effects, Cohort Effects, and the Narrowing Gender Wage Gap

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Colin; Pearlman, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Despite the abundance of sociological research on the gender wage gap, questions remain. In particular, the role of cohorts is under investigated. Using data from the Current Population Survey, we use Age-Period-Cohort analysis to uniquely estimate age, period, and cohort effects on the gender wage gap. The narrowing of the gender wage gap that occurred between 1975 and 2009 is largely due to cohort effects. Since the mid-1990s, the gender wage gap has continued to close absent of period effects. While gains in female wages contributed to declines in the gender wage gap for cohorts born before 1950, for later cohorts the narrowing of the gender wage gap is primarily a result of declines in male wages. PMID:24090861

  14. Noise measurement on thermal systems with narrow band

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, Stephen D.; Haefner, David P.; Doe, Joshua M.

    2016-05-01

    Thermal systems with a narrow spectral bandpass and mid-wave thermal imagers are useful for a variety of imaging applications. Additionally, the sensitivity for these classes of systems is increasing along with an increase in performance requirements when evaluated in a lab. Unfortunately, the uncertainty in the blackbody temperature along with the temporal instability of the blackbody could lead to uncontrolled laboratory environmental effects which could increase the measured noise. If the temporal uncertainty and accuracy of a particular blackbody is known, then confidence intervals could be adjusted for source accuracy and instability. Additionally, because thermal currents may be a large source of temporal noise in narrow band systems, a means to mitigate them is presented and results are discussed.

  15. Light source for narrow and broadband coherent Raman scattering microspectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Brinkmann, Maximilian; Dobner, Sven; Fallnich, Carsten

    2015-12-01

    We present a light source that is well adapted to both narrow- and broadband coherent Raman scattering (CRS) methods. Based on a single oscillator, the light source delivers synchronized broadband pulses via supercontinuum generation and narrowband, frequency-tunable pulses via four-wave mixing in a photonic crystal fiber. Seeding the four-wave mixing with a spectrally filtered part of the supercontinuum yields high-pulse energies up to 8 nJ and the possibility of scanning a bandwidth of 2000  cm(-1) in 25 ms. All pulses are emitted with a repetition frequency of 1 MHz, which ensures efficient generation of CRS signals while avoiding significant damage of the samples. Consequently, the light source combines the performance of individual narrow- and broadband CRS light sources in one setup, thus enabling hyperspectral imaging and rapid single-resonance imaging in parallel. PMID:26625022

  16. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    SciTech Connect

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2000-02-04

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  17. Narrow groove welding gas diffuser assembly and welding torch

    DOEpatents

    Rooney, Stephen J.

    2001-01-01

    A diffuser assembly is provided for narrow groove welding using an automatic gas tungsten arc welding torch. The diffuser assembly includes a manifold adapted for adjustable mounting on the welding torch which is received in a central opening in the manifold. Laterally extending manifold sections communicate with a shield gas inlet such that shield gas supplied to the inlet passes to gas passages of the manifold sections. First and second tapered diffusers are respectively connected to the manifold sections in fluid communication with the gas passages thereof. The diffusers extend downwardly along the torch electrode on opposite sides thereof so as to release shield gas along the length of the electrode and at the distal tip of the electrode. The diffusers are of a transverse width which is on the order of the thickness of the electrode so that the diffusers can, in use, be inserted into a narrow welding groove before and after the electrode in the direction of the weld operation.

  18. Analysis of ultra-narrow ferromagnetic domain walls

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, Catherine; Paul, David

    2012-01-10

    New materials with high magnetic anisotropy will have domains separated by ultra-narrow ferromagnetic walls with widths on the order of a few unit cells, approaching the limit where the elastic continuum approximation often used in micromagnetic simulations is accurate. The limits of this approximation are explored, and the static and dynamic interactions with intrinsic crystalline defects and external driving elds are modeled. The results developed here will be important when considering the stability of ultra-high-density storage media.

  19. 28. ROOM 211, VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. THE LONG NARROW ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. ROOM 211, VIEW TO THE SOUTHEAST. THE LONG NARROW SPACE HAS EXPOSED TRUSSWORK IN UNPAINTED WOOD AS DID ALL UPSTAIRS ROOMS IN THEIR ORIGINAL CONDITION. CLERESTORY WINDOWS ARE INTERSPERSED WITH VENTS ALONG BOTH LONG SIDES OF THE ROOM. WALLS HAVE WIDE WOOD PANELING THAT IS PAINTED, FLOORS ARE WOOD. DOORWAY IN SOUTHWEST WALL LEADS TO UNFINISHED ATTIC SPACE. - Presidio of San Francisco, Cavalry Stables, Cowles Street, between Lincoln Boulevard & McDowell Street, San Francisco, San Francisco County, CA

  20. 4. Overhead view showing the 1927 bridge (narrow bridgeleft side) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Overhead view showing the 1927 bridge (narrow bridge-left side) and 1959 bridge (right side) across Carquinez Strait. Town of Crockett is on south bank (bottom of image). C&H sugar factory is along the strait to the east (right) side of the 1959 bridge. The toll plaza is at the top of the image on the 1959 bridge side. - Carquinez Bridge, Spanning Carquinez Strait at Interstate 80, Vallejo, Solano County, CA

  1. Limits on neutrino oscillations in the Fermilab narrow band beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brucker, E.B.; Jacques, P.F.; Kalelkar, M.; Koller, E.L.; Plano, R.J.; Stamer, P.E.; Baker, N.J.; Connolly, P.L.; Kahn, S.A.; Murtagh, M.J.

    1986-01-01

    A search for neutrino oscillations was made using the Fermilab narrow-band neutrino beam and the 15 ft. bubble chamber. No positive signal for neutrino oscillations was observed. Limits were obtained for mixing angles and neutrino mass differences for nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub e/, nu/sub ..mu../ ..-->.. nu/sub tau/, nu/sub e/ ..-->.. nu/sub e/. 5 refs.

  2. A numerical study of natural convection in a narrow annulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, V.

    1991-12-01

    Various numerical models were used to predict the natural convection of a solidifying liquid metal in a narrow annulus. Previous work in this area does not consider the temperature variation that exists in the fluid and the resulting heat conduction in the solid mold material. The finite element fluid dynamics code FIDAP was used to solve these models. The results indicate that the natural convective effects are small.

  3. Generation of narrow peaks in spectroscopy of charged particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubbers, Dirk; Schmidt, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    In spectroscopy of charged particles, narrow peaks may appear in continuous spectra if magnetic transport of the particles is involved. These artefacts, which so far have escaped the attention of investigators, can develop whenever geometric detection efficiency is less than 100%. As such peaks may be misinterpreted as new physics, their generation is investigated, both analytically and experimentally, for various detector configurations, including those used in searches for the spontaneous decay of the vacuum in heavy-ion collisions.

  4. Theta brain rhythms index perceptual narrowing in infant speech perception.

    PubMed

    Bosseler, Alexis N; Taulu, Samu; Pihko, Elina; Mäkelä, Jyrki P; Imada, Toshiaki; Ahonen, Antti; Kuhl, Patricia K

    2013-01-01

    The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants' initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the world's languages narrows-native discrimination increases while non-native discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4-8 Hz), reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech stimuli in two dimensions, stimulus frequency (frequent vs. infrequent) and language (native vs. non-native speech syllables) and tested 6-month-old infants, 12-month-old infants, and adults. We hypothesized that 6-month-old infants would show increased relative theta power (RTP) for frequent syllables, regardless of their status as native or non-native syllables, reflecting young infants' attention and cognitive effort in response to highly frequent stimuli ("statistical learning"). In adults, we hypothesized increased RTP for non-native stimuli, regardless of their presentation frequency, reflecting increased cognitive effort for non-native phonetic categories. The 12-month-old infants were expected to show a pattern in transition, but one more similar to adults than to 6-month-old infants. The MEG brain rhythm results supported these hypotheses. We suggest that perceptual narrowing in speech perception is governed by an implicit learning process. This learning process involves an implicit shift in attention from frequent events (infants) to learned categories (adults). Theta brain oscillatory activity may provide an index of perceptual narrowing beyond speech, and would offer a test of whether the early speech learning process is governed by domain-general or domain-specific processes.

  5. The Structure of A Pacific Narrow Cold Frontal Rainband

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jorgensen, David P.; Pu, Zhaoxia; Persson, Ola; Tao, Wei-Kuo; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A NOAA P-3 instrumented aircraft observed an intense, fast-moving narrow cold frontal Farmhand as it approached the Pacific Northwest coast on 19 February 2001 during the Pacific Coastal Jets Experiment. Pseudo-dual-Doppler analyses performed on the airborne Doppler radar data while the frontal system was well offshore indicated that a narrow ribbon of very high radar reflectively convective cores characterized the Farmhand at low levels with echo tops to approximately 4-5 km. The NCFR exhibited gaps in its narrow ribbon of high reflectively, probably as a result of hydrodynamic instability all no its advancing cold pool leading edge. In contrast to some earlier studies of cold frontal rainbands, density current theory described well the motion of the overall front. The character of the updraft structure associated with the heavy rainfall at its leading edge varied across the gap region. The vertical shear of the cross-frontal low-level ambient flow exerted a strong influence on the updraft character, consistent with theoretical arguments developed for squall lines describing the balance of vorticity at the leading edge. In short regions south of the gaps the vertical wind shear was strongest with the updrafts and rain shafts more intense, narrower, and more erect or even downshear tilted. North of the gaps the wind shear weakened with less intense Dihedrals which tilted upshear with a broader band of rainfall. Simulations using a nonhydrostatic mesoscale nested grid model are used to investigate the gap regions, particularly the balance of cold pool induced to pre-frontal ambient shears at the leading edge. Observations confirm the model results that the updraft character depends on the balance of vorticity at the leading edge. Downshear-tilted updrafts imply that convection south of the gap regions would weaken with time relative to the frontal segments north of the gaps since inflow air would be affected by passage through the heavy rain region before ascent

  6. Photonic bandgap narrowing in conical hollow core Bragg fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Ozturk, Fahri Emre; Yildirim, Adem; Kanik, Mehmet; Bayindir, Mehmet

    2014-08-18

    We report the photonic bandgap engineering of Bragg fibers by controlling the thickness profile of the fiber during the thermal drawing. Conical hollow core Bragg fibers were produced by thermal drawing under a rapidly alternating load, which was applied by introducing steep changes to the fiber drawing speed. In conventional cylindrical Bragg fibers, light is guided by omnidirectional reflections from interior dielectric mirrors with a single quarter wave stack period. In conical fibers, the diameter reduction introduced a gradient of the quarter wave stack period along the length of the fiber. Therefore, the light guided within the fiber encountered slightly smaller dielectric layer thicknesses at each reflection, resulting in a progressive blueshift of the reflectance spectrum. As the reflectance spectrum shifts, longer wavelengths of the initial bandgap cease to be omnidirectionally reflected and exit through the cladding, which narrows the photonic bandgap. A narrow transmission bandwidth is particularly desirable in hollow waveguide mid-infrared sensing schemes, where broadband light is coupled to the fiber and the analyte vapor is introduced into the hollow core to measure infrared absorption. We carried out sensing simulations using the absorption spectrum of isopropyl alcohol vapor to demonstrate the importance of narrow bandgap fibers in chemical sensing applications.

  7. Characteristics of narrow bipolar pulses observed in Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azlinda Ahmad, Noor; Fernando, M.; Baharudin, Z. A.; Cooray, V.; Ahmad, H.; Abdul Malek, Z.

    2010-04-01

    Narrow bipolar pulses (NBPs) are considered as isolated intracloud events with higher peak amplitude and strong high frequency emission compared to the first return strokes and other intracloud discharges. From 182 NBPs recorded in Malaysia in the tropic, 75 were narrow negative bipolar pulses (NNBPs) while 107 were narrow positive bipolar pulses (NPBPs). The mean duration of NNBPs was 24.6±17.1 [mu]s, while 30.2±12.3 [mu]s was observed for NPBPs. The mean full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) was 2.2±0.7 and 2.4±1.4 [mu]s for NNBPs and NPBPs, respectively. The mean peak amplitude of NPBPs normalized to 100 km was 22.7 V/m, a factor of 1.3 higher than that of NNBPs which is 17.6 V/m. In contrast to the previous studies, it was observed that the electric field change was characterized by a bipolar pulse with a significant amount of fine structures separated by a few tens of nanoseconds intervals, embedded on it.

  8. Spin-exchange narrowing in a nuclear magnetic transverse oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korver, Anna; Thrasher, Daniel; Bulatowicz, Michael; Walker, Thad

    2015-05-01

    We demonstrate spin exchange narrowing in synchronously pumped Xe NMR. The Xe NMR is driven by spin exchange with Rb atoms whose polarization is square-wave modulated at the Xe NMR frequency. On resonance, the nuclei precess in phase with the Rb polarization. Off resonance, however, the spin-exchange fields from the Rb cause the Xe to develop a static orthogonal spin component. This induces broadening in the NMR line while also dramatically suppressing the phase shift between the precessing Rb and Xe polarizations. We can compensate for this effect by adding an oscillating magnetic field oriented along the optical pumping axis and 180 degrees out of phase with the Rb polarization. This narrows the NMR line width to approximately the T1 limit, and nearly restores the usual relationship between detuning and phase shift. These results suggest the possibility of using the alkali field with appropriate magnetic field feedback along the bias field direction to narrow the NMR linewidth below the usual T1 limit. Support by the NSF and Northrop Grumman Co.

  9. A universal gate set on a Trapped-Ion Optical Qubit using a narrow linewidth Diode laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glickman, Yinnon; Akerman, Nitzan; Kotler, Shlomi; Kesselman, Anna; Ozeri, Roee

    2011-05-01

    Optical qubit states are encoded in the 5S1/2 ground state and the meta-stable 4D5/2 level in a single trapped 88Sr+ ion, connected by a narrow optical quadruple transition. A 674nm diode laser is frequency stabilized and narrowed to a line-width below 80 Hz. Using this laser we demonstrate a universal quantum gate-set as well as other coherent operations on the ions' internal and external degrees of freedom. Rabi flopping, Ramsey spectroscopy and ground state cooling of the qubit are performed. Using a bi-chromatic beam, two ion-qubits are entangled with a Sorenson-Molmer entangling gate scheme. The advantages and disadvantages of using a diode laser to this end are discussed. In particular, the contribution of fast phase noise, typical to diode laser systems, to off-resonance qubit excitation and gate error is analyzed.

  10. Optogenetic excitation of central amygdala amplifies and narrows incentive motivation to pursue one reward above another.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Mike J F; Warlow, Shelley M; Berridge, Kent C

    2014-12-10

    Choosing one reward above another is important for achieving adaptive life goals. Yet hijacked into excessive intensity in disorders such as addiction, single-minded pursuit becomes maladaptive. Here, we report that optogenetic channelrhodopsin stimulation of neurons in central nucleus of amygdala (CeA), paired with earning a particular sucrose reward in rats, amplified and narrowed incentive motivation to that single reward target. Therefore, CeA rats chose and intensely pursued only the laser-paired sucrose reward while ignoring an equally good sucrose alternative. In contrast, reward-paired stimulation of basolateral amygdala did not hijack choice. In a separate measure of incentive motivation, CeA stimulation also increased the progressive ratio breakpoint or level of effort exerted to obtain sucrose reward. However, CeA stimulation by itself failed to support behavioral self-stimulation in the absence of any paired external food reward, suggesting that CeA photo-excitation specifically transformed the value of its external reward (rather than adding an internal reinforcement state). Nor did CeA stimulation by itself induce any aversive state that motivated escape. Finally, CeA stimulation also failed to enhance 'liking' reactions elicited by sucrose taste and did not simply increase the general motivation to eat. This pattern suggests that CeA photo-excitation specifically enhances and narrows incentive motivation to pursue an associated external reward at the expense of another comparable reward. PMID:25505310

  11. Theta brain rhythms index perceptual narrowing in infant speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Bosseler, Alexis N.; Taulu, Samu; Pihko, Elina; Mäkelä, Jyrki P.; Imada, Toshiaki; Ahonen, Antti; Kuhl, Patricia K.

    2013-01-01

    The development of speech perception shows a dramatic transition between infancy and adulthood. Between 6 and 12 months, infants' initial ability to discriminate all phonetic units across the world's languages narrows—native discrimination increases while non-native discrimination shows a steep decline. We used magnetoencephalography (MEG) to examine whether brain oscillations in the theta band (4–8 Hz), reflecting increases in attention and cognitive effort, would provide a neural measure of the perceptual narrowing phenomenon in speech. Using an oddball paradigm, we varied speech stimuli in two dimensions, stimulus frequency (frequent vs. infrequent) and language (native vs. non-native speech syllables) and tested 6-month-old infants, 12-month-old infants, and adults. We hypothesized that 6-month-old infants would show increased relative theta power (RTP) for frequent syllables, regardless of their status as native or non-native syllables, reflecting young infants' attention and cognitive effort in response to highly frequent stimuli (“statistical learning”). In adults, we hypothesized increased RTP for non-native stimuli, regardless of their presentation frequency, reflecting increased cognitive effort for non-native phonetic categories. The 12-month-old infants were expected to show a pattern in transition, but one more similar to adults than to 6-month-old infants. The MEG brain rhythm results supported these hypotheses. We suggest that perceptual narrowing in speech perception is governed by an implicit learning process. This learning process involves an implicit shift in attention from frequent events (infants) to learned categories (adults). Theta brain oscillatory activity may provide an index of perceptual narrowing beyond speech, and would offer a test of whether the early speech learning process is governed by domain-general or domain-specific processes. PMID:24130536

  12. Photoinduced phase transitions in narrow-gap Mott insulators: The case of VO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Zhuoran; Millis, Andrew J.

    2016-03-01

    We study the nonequilibrium dynamics of photoexcited electrons in the narrow-gap Mott insulator VO2. The initial stages of relaxation are treated using a quantum Boltzmann equation methodology, which reveals a rapid (˜femtosecond time scale) relaxation to a pseudothermal state characterized by a few parameters that vary slowly in time. The long-time limit is then studied by a Hartree-Fock methodology, which reveals the possibility of nonequilibrium excitation to a new metastable M1 metal phase that is qualitatively consistent with a recent experiment. The general physical picture of photoexcitation driving a correlated electron system to a new state that is not accessible in equilibrium may be applicable in similar materials.

  13. Cold Atomic Hydrogen, Narrow Self-Absorption, and the Age of Molecular Clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsmith, Paul F.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the history, and current work on HI and its importance in star formation. Through many observations of HI Narrow Self Absorption (HINSA) the conclusions are drawn and presented. Local molecular clouds have HI well-mixed with molecular constituents This HI is cold, quiescent, and must be well-shielded from the UV radiation field The density and fractional abundance (wrt H2) of the cold HI are close to steady state values The time required to convert these starless clouds from purely HI initial state to observed present composition is a few to ten million years This timescale is a lower limit - if dense clouds being swept up from lower density regions by shocks, the time to accumulate material to get A(sub v) is approximately 1 and provide required shielding may be comparable or longer

  14. Emergent dimensional reduction of the spin sector in a model for narrow-band manganites

    SciTech Connect

    Liang, Shuhua; Daghofer, Maria; Dong, Shuai; Sen, Cengiz; Dagotto, Elbio R

    2011-01-01

    The widely used double-exchange model for manganites is shown to support various striped phases at filling fractions 1/n (n = 3, 4, 5, . . .), in the previously unexplored regime of narrow bandwidth and small Jahn-Teller coupling. Working in two dimensions, our main result is that these stripes can be individually spin flipped without a physically relevant change in the energy, i.e., we find a large ground-state manifold with nearly degenerate energies. The two-dimensional spin system thus displays an unexpected dynamically generated dimensional reduction into decoupled one-dimensional stripes, even though the electronic states remain two dimensional. Relations of our results with recent literature addressing compass models in quantum computing are discussed.

  15. Molecular crowding causes narrowing of population heterogeneity and restricts internal dynamics in a protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondal, Samsuzzoha; Kallianpur, Mamata V.; Udgaonkar, Jayant B.; Krishnamoorthy, G.

    2016-03-01

    Macromolecular crowding is a distinguishing property of intracellular media. Knowledge on the structure and dynamics of a protein in a crowded environment is essential for a complete understanding of its function. Reduction in intermolecular space could cause structural and functional alterations. Here, we have studied a model protein barstar to see how polyethylene glycol (PEG)-induced crowding affects its various structural states (native, unfolded and molten-globule-like) with different extents of change in conformational heterogeneity. Intramolecular distances and distance distributions were determined by time-resolved Förster resonance energy transfer from Trp53 to several acceptor sites by analysis of fluorescence decay kinetics using the Maximum Entropy Method. We observed PEG-induced narrowing of population distributions along with shifting of populations towards more compact states. Structural compactness also resulted in the slowing down of internal dynamics of the protein as revealed by fluorescence anisotropy decay kinetics of the fluorophore IAEDANS attached at several sites.

  16. Phage and bacteria support mutual diversity in a narrowing staircase of coexistence

    PubMed Central

    Haerter, Jan O; Mitarai, Namiko; Sneppen, Kim

    2014-01-01

    The competitive exclusion principle states that phage diversity M should not exceed bacterial diversity N. By analyzing the steady-state solutions of multistrain equations, we find a new constraint: the diversity N of bacteria living on the same resources is constrained to be M or M+1 in terms of the diversity of their phage predators. We quantify how the parameter space of coexistence exponentially decreases with diversity. For diversity to grow, an open or evolving ecosystem needs to climb a narrowing ‘diversity staircase' by alternatingly adding new bacteria and phages. The unfolding coevolutionary arms race will typically favor high growth rate, but a phage that infects two bacterial strains differently can occasionally eliminate the fastest growing bacteria. This context-dependent fitness allows abrupt resetting of the ‘Red-Queen's race' and constrains the local diversity. PMID:24858781

  17. Narrow-band tunable alexandrite laser with passive Q switching

    SciTech Connect

    Tyryshkin, I S; Ivanov, N A; Khulugurov, V M

    1998-06-30

    An alexandrite laser with a self-injection of narrow-band radiation into its cavity was developed. A Fabry - Perot interferometer and a diffraction grating were used as dispersive components in an additional cavity. The cavity was switched by an LiF crystal with F{sub 3}{sup -} colour centres. The laser generated a single pulse of {approx} 180 ns duration and of 1.5 mJ energy, and with a spectrum 5 x 10{sup -3} cm{sup -1} wide. The laser emitted in the spectral range 720 - 780 nm. (lasers, active media)

  18. Taylor dispersion of colloidal particles in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sané, Jimaan; Padding, Johan T.; Louis, Ard A.

    2015-09-01

    We use a mesoscopic particle-based simulation technique to study the classic convection-diffusion problem of Taylor dispersion for colloidal discs in confined flow. When the disc diameter becomes non-negligible compared to the diameter of the pipe, there are important corrections to the original Taylor picture. For example, the colloids can flow more rapidly than the underlying fluid, and their Taylor dispersion coefficient is decreased. For narrow pipes, there are also further hydrodynamic wall effects. The long-time tails in the velocity autocorrelation functions are altered by the Poiseuille flow.

  19. Bayesian-Augmented Identification of Stars in a Narrow View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clouse, Daniel; Padgett, Curtis

    2004-01-01

    An algorithm for the identification of stars from a charge-coupled-device (CCD) image of a star field has been extended for use with narrower field-of-view images. Previously, the algorithm had been shown to be effective at a field of view of 8 degrees. This work augments the earlier algorithm using Bayesian decision theory. The new algorithm is shown to be capable of effective star identification down to a field of view of 2 degrees. The algorithm was developed for use in estimating the attitude of a spacecraft and could be used on Earth to help in the identification of stars and other celestial objects for astronomical observations.

  20. The Meteorology of Storms that Produce Narrow Bipolar Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy; McCaul, Bill; Fuchs, Brody; Cummer, Steve

    2013-01-01

    Narrow Bipolar Event's (NBE) are compact (< 2 km), powerful (> 10 kW in VHF), and impulsive (approx 10 micro s) electrical discharges in thunderstorms, also known as compact intracloud discharges (CIDs). Can be either positive or negative polarity and have distinctive broadband waveform signatures sometimes confused for +CGs in the past by NLDN and other networks. NBEs are related to lightning but are likely optically "dark". As revealed by VHF sensors (both satellite and ground): (1) The most powerful lightning-­-related VHF sources observed (2) Tend to occur at the beginning of intracloud discharges (3) Difficult to estimate altitude properly due to receiver saturation.

  1. Masas de agujeros negros en Narrow Line Seyfert 1

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, E.; Ferreiro, D.; Oio, G.; Vega, L.; Donoso, L.

    We describe two of the ways to estimate black hole masses in AGN, and then we estimate the black hole masses of 13 Narrow Line Seyfert 1 galaxies with the two methods: virial masses, using the correlation found by Greene & Ho (2005, ApJ, 630, 122); and the correlation found by Tremaine et al. (2002, ApJ, 574, 740). For this work we analyzed the optical spectroscopy data we obtained from CASLEO (San Juan). We compare the results obtained through both methods. FULL TEXT IN SPANISH

  2. Coupling Through Tortuous Path Narrow Slot Apertures into Complex Cavitivies

    SciTech Connect

    Jedlicka, Russell P.; Castillo, Steven P.; Warne, Larry K.

    1999-07-26

    A hybrid FEM/MoM model has been implemented to compute the coupling of fields into a cavity through narrow slot apertures having depth. The model utilizes the slot model of Warne and Chen [23]-[29] which takes into account the depth of the slot, wall losses, and inhomogeneous dielectrics in the slot region. The cavity interior is modeled with the mixed-order, covariant-projection hexahedral elements of Crowley [32]. Results are given showing the accuracy and generality of the method for modeling geometrically complex slot-cavity combinations.

  3. Radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Pavlov, N. V.; Zegrya, G. G.

    2012-01-15

    The mechanism of the radiative recombination of hot carriers in narrow-gap semiconductors is analyzed using the example of indium antimonide. It is shown that the CHCC Auger recombination process may lead to pronounced carrier heating at high excitation levels. The distribution functions and concentrations of hot carriers are determined. The radiative recombination rate of hot carriers and the radiation gain coefficient are calculated in terms of the Kane model. It is demonstrated that the radiative recombination of hot carriers will make a substantial contribution to the total radiative recombination rate at high carrier concentrations.

  4. Distribution of Narrow-Width Magnetic Anomalies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, J C

    1964-05-22

    Data for aeromagnetic profiles obtained in Antarctica during the 1963-64 austral summer were used together with earlier results to construct a map showing the areal distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies. Numerous anomalies are associated with known volcanic mountains in western Antarctica. A large area of few anomalies is probably a result of an extension of the thick metasedimentary section observed in the Ellsworth Mountains. Portions of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains have associated anomalies which are probably caused by late Cenozoic volcanic rocks.

  5. Collisional simulations of particles in a narrow planetary ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kolvoord, Robert A.; Burns, Joseph A.

    1992-01-01

    A model is used to investigate how particle-particle collisions might modify some consequences of satellite perturbations relevant to short-term features of narrow planetary rings. A Monte Carlo-like simulation ring-model particle velocity alteration allows the simulation of collisions while individual particles are tracked. Periodic features visible in Voyager images are reproduced in a 2D numerical model which incorporates the collisional simulation as well as the perturbations of adjacent satellites. Collisions are noted to wash out periodic features within one collisional relaxation time.

  6. Distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies in Antarctica

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.

    1964-01-01

    Data for aeromagnetic profiles obtained in Antarctica during the 1963-64 austral summer were used together with earlier results to construct a map showing the areal distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies. Numerous anomalies are associated with known volcanic mountains in western Antarctica. A large area of few anomalies is probably a result of an extension of the thick metasedimentary section observed in the Ellsworth Mountains. Portions of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains have associated anomalies which are probably caused by late Cenozoic volcanic rocks.

  7. Distribution of Narrow-Width Magnetic Anomalies in Antarctica.

    PubMed

    Behrendt, J C

    1964-05-22

    Data for aeromagnetic profiles obtained in Antarctica during the 1963-64 austral summer were used together with earlier results to construct a map showing the areal distribution of narrow-width magnetic anomalies. Numerous anomalies are associated with known volcanic mountains in western Antarctica. A large area of few anomalies is probably a result of an extension of the thick metasedimentary section observed in the Ellsworth Mountains. Portions of the Trans-Antarctic Mountains have associated anomalies which are probably caused by late Cenozoic volcanic rocks. PMID:17811603

  8. Fatigue failure of materials under narrow band random vibrations. I.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, T. C.; Hubbard, R. B.; Lanz, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    A novel approach for the study of fatigue failure of materials under the multifactor influence of narrow band random vibrations is developed. The approach involves the conduction of an experiment in conjunction with various statistical techniques. Three factors including two statistical properties of the excitation or response are considered and varied simultaneously. A minimum of 6 tests for 3 variables is possible for a fractional f actorial design. The four coefficients of the predicting equation can be independently estimated. A look at 3 predicting equations shows the predominant effect of the root mean square stress of the first order equation.

  9. The evolution of flight in bats: narrowing the field of plausible hypotheses.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Kristin L

    2008-06-01

    The evolution of flapping flight in bats from an arboreal gliding ancestor appears on the surface to be a relatively simple transition. However, bat flight is a highly complex functional system from a morphological, physiological, and aerodynamic perspective, and the transition from a gliding precursor may involve functional discontinuities that represent evolutionary hurdles. In this review, I suggest a framework for a comprehensive treatment of the evolution of complex functional systems that emphasizes a mechanistic understanding of the initial state, the final state, and the proposed transitional states. In this case, bats represent the final state and extant mammalian gliders are used as a model for the initial state. To explore possible transitional states, I propose a set of criteria for evaluating hypotheses about the evolution of flight in vertebrates and suggest methods by which we can advance our understanding of the transition from gliding to flapping flight. Although it is impossible ever to know with certainty the sequence of events landing to flapping flight, the field of possibilities can be narrowed to those that maintain the functional continuity of the wing and result in improved aerodynamic performance across this transition. The fundamental differences between gliding and flapping flight should not necessarily be seen as evidence that this transition could not occur; rather, these differences point out compelling aspects of the aerodynamics of animal wings that require further investigation. PMID:18605533

  10. Positional Asphyxia: Death Due to Unusual Head-Down Position in a Narrow Space.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Vinod Ashok; Ghodake, Dattatray G; Kharat, Rajesh D

    2016-06-01

    Death due to a head-down position with hyperflexion of the neck is a rare event. A person accidentally falling into a narrow space and remaining in an upside-down position with no timely recovery may experience positional or postural asphyxia. It is a critical condition arising out of particular body positions, leading to mechanical obstruction of respiration. The precipitating factors are intoxication due to alcohol, drugs, obesity, psychiatric illnesses, and injuries. A 30-year-old unmarried woman, weighing 82 kg and with a body mass index of 31.24, was found in a narrow space between the bed and the wall in a naked state and in a head-down position with hyperflexion of the neck. The distribution of lividity was consistent with the position of the body at the scene. Blood was oozing from the mouth and nostrils, and signs of asphyxia were present. The toxicological analyses of viscera, blood, and urine were negative for alcohol, drugs, and poisons. Glucose levels in the blood (86 mg/dL) as well as urine and vitreous humor levels (68 mg/dL) were within normal limits. On microscopic examination, there were no findings of coronary atherosclerosis, whereas the brain and lung were edematous. After meticulous examination, we ruled out sexual assault, autoerotic asphyxia, epilepsy, psychiatric illness, diabetes, toxicity, and coronary artery disease. Death was attributed to the accidental fall of the obese individual being stuck in a narrow space, resulting in positional asphyxia. It is imperative to recognize the precipitating or risk factors before labeling positional asphyxia as a cause of death.

  11. Analysis of Red Blood Cell Behavior in a Narrow Tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Haruki; Omori, Toshihiro; Imai, Yohsuke; Yamaguchi, Takami; Ishikawa, Takuji

    2012-11-01

    Red Blood Cell (RBC) is a main component of blood accounting for 40 percent in volume, and enclosed by a twodimensional hyper elastic membrane. RBCs strongly influence rheological properties and mass transport of blood. The deformation of RBCs in capillary and at narrowing is also important in considering mechano-transduction of RBCs and hemolysis, though it has not been clarified in detail. Thus, in this study, we investigated the behavior of a RBC flowing in a narrow tube. To carry out the fluid-structure interaction analysis, we coupled a boundary element method to analyze the velocity of the internal and external fluid with a finite element method to analyze the deformation of the membrane. The boundary element method has good calculation accuracy and its computational cost is low because three-dimensional flow filed can be calculated by a two-dimensional computational mesh. The background flow in a tube is pressure-driven Poiseuille flow. Additionally, to reduce the computational time, we implemented massive parallel computation by using GPUs. The results show that the deformation of a RBC is strongly affected by the Capillary number, which is the ratio of viscous force to the elastic force, radius of the tube, and the initial orientation.

  12. Robust Mosaicking of Uav Images with Narrow Overlaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J.; Kim, T.; Shin, D.; Kim, S. H.

    2016-06-01

    This paper considers fast and robust mosaicking of UAV images under a circumstance that each UAV images have very narrow overlaps in-between. Image transformation for image mosaicking consists of two estimations: relative transformations and global transformations. For estimating relative transformations between adjacent images, projective transformation is widely considered. For estimating global transformations, panoramic constraint is widely used. While perspective transformation is a general transformation model in 2D-2D transformation, this may not be optimal with weak stereo geometry such as images with narrow overlaps. While panoramic constraint works for reliable conversion of global transformation for panoramic image generation, this constraint is not applicable to UAV images in linear motions. For these reasons, a robust approach is investigated to generate a high quality mosaicked image from narrowly overlapped UAV images. For relative transformations, several transformation models were considered to ensure robust estimation of relative transformation relationship. Among them were perspective transformation, affine transformation, coplanar relative orientation, and relative orientation with reduced adjustment parameters. Performance evaluation for each transformation model was carried out. The experiment results showed that affine transformation and adjusted coplanar relative orientation were superior to others in terms of stability and accuracy. For global transformation, we set initial approximation by converting each relative transformation to a common transformation with respect to a reference image. In future work, we will investigate constrained relative orientation for enhancing geometric accuracy of image mosaicking and bundle adjustments of each relative transformation model for optimal global transformation.

  13. Narrow-multibeam Echosounders Designed for Shallow Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Takeya; Tanabe, Kouichi; Kannda, Hironobu

    The development of technology in electronics, communications and measurements with digital equipment have spawned a lot of new measuring techniques in the fields of researches and thus the conventional research techniques will be replaced by the new ones. Concerning the fields of seafloor topography survey, narrow-multibeam echosounders designed for shallow water have been used in Japan since 5 years ago. This equipment enabled us to obtain bathymetric information in large features at one time more precisely compared with the conventional equipment which obtains seafloor topography as a collection of depths data measured at numerous points. In addition, GPS enabled us to obtain real-time information of its position anywhere on the globe with great precision in three dimensions. Consequently more discoveries in the fields of marine science will be made from the information of the more detailed seafloor topography. This paper will describe some ways to improve the narrow multibeam echosounder system designed for shallow water (SEABAT9001S, Reson) which we, Kokusai Kogyo Co., Ltd., have been working on, and its future prospects.

  14. Electronic characterization of defects in narrow gap semiconductors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1993-01-01

    The study of point defects in semiconductors has a long and honorable history. In particular, the detailed understanding of shallow defects in common semiconductors traces back to the classic work of Kohn and Luttinger. However, the study of defects in narrow gap semiconductors represents a much less clear story. Here, both shallow defects (caused by long range potentials) and deep defects (from short range potentials) are far from being completely understood. In this study, all results are calculational and our focus is on the chemical trend of deep levels in narrow gap semiconductors. We study substitutional (including antisite), interstitial and ideal vacancy defects. For substitutional and interstitial impurities, the efects of relaxation are included. For materials like Hg(1-x)Cd(x)Te, we study how the deep levels vary with x, of particular interest is what substitutional and interstitial atoms yield energy levels in the gap i.e. actually produce deep ionized levels. Also, since the main technique utilized is Green's functions, we include some summary of that method.

  15. Linewidth narrowing for 31Phosphorus MRI of cell membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Sean; Frey, Merideth; Madri, Joseph; Michaud, Michael

    2011-03-01

    Most 31 P Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy studies of tissues try to avoid contamination by a relatively large, but broad, spectral feature attributed to cell membrane phospholipids. MRI using this broad 31 P membrane spectrum is not even attempted, since the spatial resolution and signal-to-noise would be poor, relative to conventional MRI using the narrow 1 H water spectrum. This long-standing barrier has been overcome by a novel pulse sequence, recently discovered in fundamental quantum computation research, which narrows the broad 31 P spectrum by ~ 1000 × . Applying time-dependent gradients in synch with a repeating pulse block enables a new route to high spatial resolution, 3D 31 P MRI of the soft solid components of cells and tissues. So far, intact and sectioned samples of ex vivo fixed mouse organs have been imaged, with (sub-mm)3 voxels. Extending the reach of MRI to broad spectra in natural and artificial tissues opens a new window into cells, enabling progress in biomedical research. W.J. Thoma et al., J. MR 61, 141 (1985); E.J. Murphy et al., MR Med 12, 282 (1989); R. McNamara et al., NMR Biomed 7, 237 (1994).

  16. Electrocardiographical case. Narrow complex tachycardia provoked by the Valsalva manoeuvre.

    PubMed

    Koh, C H; Foo, D; Ng, K S; Chong, C H

    2009-04-01

    A 19-year-old Chinese man presented with tachyarrhythmia during a human centrifuge session while performing a Valsalva manoeuvre at near normal (+1.4 Gz) centripetal forces. It was likely that the hydrostatic effects of sustained centrifugal forces, the distortion of the heart's shape, as well as swings in the autonomic dominance pre- and post-Valsalva manoeuvre, contributed to the tachyarrhythmia. The 12-lead ECG showed a narrow complex tachycardia with visible P-waves after the QRS complexes consistent with a long R-P' tachycardia. The intracardiac electrogram demonstrated a concentric retrograde atrial activation during narrow complex tachycardia. The V-A interval was 150 ms which was much longer than in typical atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, which is usually less than 70 ms. The A-H interval was short and the H-A interval was long, indicating that antegrade activation was over the fast pathway and retrograde activation was over the slow pathway. The diagnosis was atypical atrioventricular nodal reentry tachycardia, and radiofrequency ablation was successfully applied to the slow AV nodal pathway. PMID:19421691

  17. Narrow band imaging: clinical applications in oral and oropharyngeal cancer.

    PubMed

    Vu, A; Farah, C S

    2016-07-01

    Narrow Band Imaging (NBI) is an endoscopic optical imaging enhancement technology that improves the contrast of mucosal surface texture, and enhances visualisation of mucosal and submucosal vasculature. White light is filtered to emit two 30-nm narrow bands of blue (415 nm) and green light (540 nm) light simultaneously, the former corresponding to the main peak absorption spectrum of haemoglobin, and the latter allowing visualisation of blood vessels in the deeper mucosal and submucosal layers. NBI has been used to better assess oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD), identify oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and to define surgical margins of head and neck malignancies. NBI shows great potential in improving detection rates of OPMD, facilitating better assessment of oral and oropharyngeal SCC, and reducing the risk of recurrence for oral SCC. Although further research is required to better understand and define intrapapillary capillary loop (IPCL) patterns and to relate these with clinical, histopathological and molecular parameters especially for early mucosal changes, there is building evidence to recommend its use as the new gold standard for endoscopic assessment in head and neck oncology. PMID:26713751

  18. An evaluation of the narrowing gender gap in DUI arrests.

    PubMed

    Robertson, Angela A; Liew, Hui; Gardner, Sheena

    2011-07-01

    Although males account for the vast majority of those convicted of driving under the influence of alcohol and/or other drugs (DUI), female DUI convictions have increased over the past two decades. In this study, we examined the ratio of males-to-females who were court-mandated between the years 1992 and 2008 to attend the Mississippi Alcohol Safety Education Program (MASEP), a DUI intervention program in Mississippi. The data for this study came from MASEP records; the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS); the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR); the Treatment Episode Data Set (TEDS); the National Household Travel Survey (NHTS); and National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), an agency within the US Department of Transportation. Augmented Dickey-Fuller (ADF) tests were used to assess the nature (i.e., convergence, divergence, or stability) of this trend and to identify predictors. The results showed that, over the 17-year period, the gender gap in DUI convictions, self-reported history of prior arrest, official drug arrests, and substance abuse treatment admissions has narrowed considerably. Results from the autoregressive integrated moving average (ARIMA) models show that three factors account for increases in the proportion of women mandated to attend MASEP: self-reported arrest prior to the DUI conviction, female admissions to substance abuse treatment, and annual miles driven. Changes in both women's behavior and law enforcement practices have increased female exposure to DUI arrests and narrowed the gender gap in DUI convictions.

  19. Sub-kilohertz laser linewidth narrowing using polarization spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Torrance, Joshua S; Sparkes, Ben M; Turner, Lincoln D; Scholten, Robert E

    2016-05-30

    We identify several beneficial characteristics of polarization spectroscopy as an absolute atomic reference for frequency stabilization of lasers, and demonstrate sub-kilohertz laser spectral linewidth narrowing using polarization spectroscopy with high-bandwidth feedback. Polarization spectroscopy provides a highly dispersive velocity-selective absolute atomic reference based on frequency-dependent birefringence in an optically pumped atomic gas. The pumping process leads to dominance of the primary closed transition, suppressing closely-spaced subsidiary resonances which reduce the effective capture range for conventional atomic references. The locking signal is based on subtraction of two orthogonal polarization signals, reducing the effect of laser intensity noise to the shot noise limit. We measure noise-limited servo bandwidth comparable to that of a high-finesse optical cavity without the frequency limit or complexity imposed by optical modulation normally associated with high bandwidth laser frequency stabilization. We demonstrate narrowing to 600±100 Hz laser linewidth using the beatnote between two similarly locked external cavity diode lasers. PMID:27410068

  20. When alcohol narrows the field of focal attention.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Alistair J

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to measure the extent to which alcohol intoxication restricts the scope of attention in the visual field. A group of intoxicated (n = 31; mean BAC ≈ .08%) and placebo control (n = 31; mean BAC ≈ .00%) participants were required to correctly identify visual probes while performing two verbal categorization tasks: one designed to widen the scope of visual attention on to each stimulus word, the other to narrow attention on to the central letter of each word. Response times to surprise probes interpolated between categorization trials were measured and these catch trials could appear in any of the stimulus word letter positions. As predicted by alcohol myopia theory (AMT), which assumes that the drug narrows focal attention, intoxicated participants made slower responses than the sober controls to probes displayed in non-central letter positions, although right-field probe reaction times (RTs) were slower than those for left-field targets. This response asymmetry and the wider theoretical implications of these findings are discussed.

  1. Spin transport with dispersive traps: Narrowing of the Hanle curve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roundy, R. C.; Raikh, M. E.

    2014-12-01

    We study theoretically the spin transport in a device in which the active layer is an organic film with numerous deep and widely dispersed in energy in-gap levels serving as traps. A carrier, diffusing between a magnetized injector and detector, spends a considerable portion of time on the traps. This feature of transport does not affect the giant magnetoresistance, which is sensitive only to the mutual orientation of magnetizations of the injector and detector. By contrast, the presence of traps strongly affects the sensitivity of the spin transport to an external magnetic field perpendicular to the magnetizations of the electrodes (the Hanle effect). Namely, the Hanle curve narrows dramatically and develops a flat background. The origin of such a narrowing is that the spin precession takes place during the entire time of the carrier motion between the electrodes, while the spin relaxation takes place only during diffusive motion between the subsequent traps. If the resulting width of the Hanle curve is smaller than the measurement resolution, observation of the Hanle peak becomes impossible. This would explain why the Hanle effect is missing in experiments on organic spin valves, where the giant magnetoresistance is unambiguously detected.

  2. Channel narrowing and vegetation development following a great plains flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Lewis, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    Streams in the plains of eastern Colorado are prone to intense floods following summer thunderstorms. Here, and in other semiarid and arid regions, channel recovery after a flood may take several decades. As a result, flood history strongly influences spatial and temporal variability in bottomland vegetation. Interpretation of these patterns must be based on understanding the long-term response of bottomland morphology and vegetation to specific floods. A major flood in 1965 on Plum Creek, a perennial sandbed stream, removed most of the bottomland vegetatiqn and transformed the single-thread stream into a wider, braided channel. Channel narrowing began in 1973 and continues today. In 1991, we determined occurrences of 150 vascular plant species in 341 plots (0.5 m2) along a 7-km reach of Plum Creek near Louviers, Colorado. We related patterns of vegetation to elevation, litter cover, vegetative cover, sediment particle size, shade, and year of formation of the underlying surface (based on age of the excavated root flare of the oldest woody plants). Geomorphic investigation determined that Plum Creek fluvial surfaces sort into five groups by year of formation: terraces of fine sand formed before 1965; terraces of coarse sand deposited by the 1965 flood; stable bars formed by channel narrowing during periods of relatively high bed level (1973-1986); stable bars similarly formed during a recent period of low bed level (1987-1990); and the present channel bed (1991). Canonical correspondence analysis indicates a strong influence of elevation and litter cover, and lesser effects of vegetative cover, shade, and sediment particle size. However, the sum of all canonical eigenvalues explained by these factors is less than that explained by an analysis including only the dummy variables that define the five geomorphically determined age groups. The effect of age group is significant even when all five other environmental variables are specified as covariables. Therefore, the

  3. All-optical production of a lithium quantum gas using narrow-line laser cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Duarte, P. M.; Hart, R. A.; Hitchcock, J. M.; Corcovilos, T. A.; Yang, T.-L.; Reed, A.; Hulet, R. G.

    2011-12-15

    We have used the narrow 2S{sub 1/2}{yields}3P{sub 3/2} transition in the ultraviolet (uv) to laser cool and magneto-optically trap (MOT) {sup 6}Li atoms. Laser cooling of lithium is usually performed on the 2S{sub 1/2}{yields}2P{sub 3/2} (D2) transition, and temperatures of {approx}300 {mu}K are typically achieved. The linewidth of the uv transition is seven times narrower than the D2 line, resulting in lower laser cooling temperatures. We demonstrate that a MOT operating on the uv transition reaches temperatures as low as 59 {mu}K. Furthermore, we find that the light shift of the uv transition in an optical dipole trap at 1070 nm is small and blueshifted, facilitating efficient loading from the uv MOT. Evaporative cooling of a two spin-state mixture of {sup 6}Li in the optical trap produces a quantum degenerate Fermi gas with 3x10{sup 6} atoms in a total cycle time of only 11 s.

  4. Ion Trap with Narrow Aperture Detection Electrodes for Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Oleg Y.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2015-05-01

    The current paradigm in ion trap (cell) design for Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) is the ion detection with wide aperture detection electrodes. Specifically, excitation and detection electrodes are typically 90° wide and positioned radially at a similar distance from the ICR cell axis. Here, we demonstrate that ion detection with narrow aperture detection electrodes (NADEL) positioned radially inward of the cell's axis is feasible and advantageous for FT-ICR MS. We describe design details and performance characteristics of a 10 T FT-ICR MS equipped with a NADEL ICR cell having a pair of narrow aperture (flat) detection electrodes and a pair of standard 90° excitation electrodes. Despite a smaller surface area of the detection electrodes, the sensitivity of the NADEL ICR cell is not reduced attributable to improved excite field distribution, reduced capacitance of the detection electrodes, and their closer positioning to the orbits of excited ions. The performance characteristics of the NADEL ICR cell are comparable with the state-of-the-art FT-ICR MS implementations for small molecule, peptide, protein, and petroleomics analyses. In addition, the NADEL ICR cell's design improves the flexibility of ICR cells and facilitates implementation of advanced capabilities (e.g., quadrupolar ion detection for improved mainstream applications). It also creates an intriguing opportunity for addressing the major bottleneck in FTMS—increasing its throughput via simultaneous acquisition of multiple transients or via generation of periodic non-sinusoidal transient signals.

  5. Flow-radiation coupling for atmospheric entries using a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soucasse, Laurent; Scoggins, James B.; Rivière, Philippe; Magin, Thierry E.; Soufiani, Anouar

    2016-09-01

    In this study, a Hybrid Statistical Narrow Band (HSNB) model is implemented to make fast and accurate predictions of radiative transfer effects on hypersonic entry flows. The HSNB model combines a Statistical Narrow Band (SNB) model for optically thick molecular systems, a box model for optically thin molecular systems and continua, and a Line-By-Line (LBL) description of atomic radiation. Radiative transfer calculations are coupled to a 1D stagnation-line flow model under thermal and chemical nonequilibrium. Earth entry conditions corresponding to the FIRE 2 experiment, as well as Titan entry conditions corresponding to the Huygens probe, are considered in this work. Thermal nonequilibrium is described by a two temperature model, although non-Boltzmann distributions of electronic levels provided by a Quasi-Steady State model are also considered for radiative transfer. For all the studied configurations, radiative transfer effects on the flow, the plasma chemistry and the total heat flux at the wall are analyzed in detail. The HSNB model is shown to reproduce LBL results with an accuracy better than 5% and a speed up of the computational time around two orders of magnitude. Concerning molecular radiation, the HSNB model provides a significant improvement in accuracy compared to the Smeared-Rotational-Band model, especially for Titan entries dominated by optically thick CN radiation.

  6. The Suzaku Observation of NGC 3516: Complex Absorption and the Broad and Narrow Fe K Lines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Markowitz, Alex; Reeves, James N.; Miniutti, Giovanni; Serlemitsos, Peter; Kunieda, Hideyo; Taqoob, Tahir; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fukazawa, Yasushi; Mushotzky, Richard; Okajima, Takashi; Gallo, Luigi; Awaki, Hisamitsu; Griffiths, Richard E.

    2007-01-01

    We present results from a 150 ksec Suzaku observation of the Seyfert 1 NGC 3516 in October 2005. The source was in a relatively highly absorbed state. Our best-fit model is consistent with partial covering by a lowly-ionized absorber with a column density near 5x10(exp 22) cm(exp -2) and with a covering fraction 96-100 percent. Narrow K-shell absorption features due to He- and H-like Fe confirm the presence of a high-ionization absorbing component as well. A broad Fe K(alpha) diskline is required in all fits, even after the complex absorption is taken into account; an additional partial-covering component is an inadequate substitute for the continuum curvature associated with the broad line. The narrow Fe Ka line at 6.4 keV is resolved, yielding a velocity width commensurate with the optical Broad Line Region. The strength of the Compton reflection hump suggests a contribution mainly from the broad Fe line origin. We include in our model soft band emission lines from He- and H-like ions and radiative recombination lines, consistent with photo-ionization, though a small contribution from collisional ionization is possible.

  7. Nature of the narrow optical band in H*-aggregates: Dozy-chaos–exciton coupling

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, Vladimir V.

    2014-07-15

    Dozy chaos emerges as a combined effect of the collective chaotic motion of electrons and nuclei, and their chaotic electromagnetic interactions in the transient state of molecules experiencing quantum transitions. Following earlier discussions of the well-known Brönsted relations for proton-transfer reactions; the temperature-dependent electron transfer in Langmuir–Blodgett films; the shape of the optical bands of polymethine dye monomers, their dimers, and J-aggregates, this paper reports one more application of the dozy-chaos theory of molecular quantum transitions. The qualitative and quantitative explanations for shape of a narrow and blue-shifted optical absorption band in H{sup *}-aggregates is given on the basis of the dozy-chaos theory by taking into account the dozy-chaos–exciton coupling effect. It is emphasized that in the H{sup *}-aggregate chromophore (dimer of cyclic bis-thiacarbocyanines) there is a competition between two Frenkel exciton transitions through the chaotic reorganization motion of nuclear environment. As a result, the highly organized quantum transition to the upper exciton state becomes an exciton-induced source of dozy chaos for the low organized transition to the lower exciton state. This manifests itself in appearing the narrow peak and broad wing in the optical spectrum pattern of H{sup *}-aggregates. A similar enhancement in the H{sup *}-effect caused by the strengthening of the exciton coupling in H{sup *}-dimers, which could be achieved by synthesizing tertiary and quarternary thiacarbocyanine monomers, is predicted.

  8. 76 FR 60733 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-30

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY AGENCY... the Smith Point Bridge, 6.1, across Narrow Bay, between Smith Point and Fire Island, New York. The.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Smith Point Bridge, across Narrow Bay, mile 6.1, between Smith Point and...

  9. Two WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes, narrow leaf2 and narrow leaf3, control leaf width in rice.

    PubMed

    Ishiwata, Aiko; Ozawa, Misa; Nagasaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Makio; Noda, Yusaku; Yamaguchi, Takahiro; Nosaka, Misuzu; Shimizu-Sato, Sae; Nagasaki, Akie; Maekawa, Masahiko; Hirano, Hiro-Yuki; Sato, Yutaka

    2013-05-01

    Leaf shape is one of the key determinants of plant architecture. Leaf shape also affects the amount of sunlight captured and influences photosynthetic efficiency; thus, it is an important agronomic trait in crop plants. Understanding the molecular mechanisms governing leaf shape is a central issue of plant developmental biology and agrobiotechnology. Here, we characterized the narrow-leaf phenotype of FL90, a linkage tester line of rice (Oryza sativa). Light and scanning electron microscopic analyses of FL90 leaves revealed defects in the development of marginal regions and a reduction in the number of longitudinal veins. The narrow-leaf phenotype of FL90 shows a two-factor recessive inheritance and is caused by the loss of function of two WUSCHEL-related homeobox genes, NAL2 and NAL3 (NAL2/3), which are duplicate genes orthologous to maize NS1 and NS2 and to Arabidopsis PRS. The overexpression of NAL2/3 in transgenic rice plants results in wider leaves containing increased numbers of veins, suggesting that NAL2/3 expression regulates leaf width. Thus, NAL2/3 can be used to modulate leaf shape and improve agronomic yield in crop plants. PMID:23420902

  10. Forced transport of deformable containers through narrow constrictions.

    PubMed

    Kusters, Remy; van der Heijden, Thijs; Kaoui, Badr; Harting, Jens; Storm, Cornelis

    2014-09-01

    We study, numerically and analytically, the forced transport of deformable containers through a narrow constriction. Our central aim is to quantify the competition between the constriction geometry and the active forcing, regulating whether and at which speed a container may pass through the constriction and under what conditions it gets stuck. We focus, in particular, on the interrelation between the force that propels the container and the radius of the channel, as these are the external variables that may be directly controlled in both artificial and physiological settings. We present lattice Boltzmann simulations that elucidate in detail the various phases of translocation and present simplified analytical models that treat two limiting types of these membrane containers: deformational energy dominated by the bending or stretching contribution. In either case we find excellent agreement with the full simulations, and our results reveal that not only the radius but also the length of the constriction determines whether or not the container will pass.

  11. Ciliochoroidal melanomas treated with a narrow medical proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Brovkina, A.F.; Zarubei, G.D.

    1986-03-01

    We treated 63 patients with intraocular melanomas by means of a narrow medical proton beam. Tumors were irradiated with 2,500 rad at each of four to five sessions, with an interval of one to two days between sessions. The melanomas ranged in diameter from 8 to 20 mm and were from 3.0 to 13.7 mm in thickness. Patients were followed up for three months to seven years. In 11 cases, the tumor was fully resorbed. Complications included radiation cataract, postradiation glaucoma, radiation retinopathy, and exudative retinal detachment. In 12 cases, enucleation was performed because tumor growth persisted. Four patients died during follow-up period because of metastasis. The eye was preserved in 47 cases.

  12. Leo Szilard: Physics, Politics, and the Narrow Margin of Hope.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lanouette, William

    1998-04-01

    Leo Szilard (1898-1964) was a creative physicist and biologist. But concern about how scientific discoveries might affect humanity also led him to seek political solutions to enlarge the benefits and limit the damage caused by his work. This disposition to save the world came to Szilard by the age of 10, when he read The Tragedy of Man, a Hungarian epic poem in which humanity faces extinction yet continues to survive by maintaining a narrow margin of hope. With this hope Szilard brought about improbable scientific and political feats (such as the nuclear chain reaction and the Moscow-Washington Hotline). This talk focuses on Szilard's many attempts in 1945 to prevent the atomic bombing of Japan. William Lanouette, a writer and public policy analyst, is the author of Genius in the Shadows: A Biography of Leo Szilard, The Man Behind the Bomb. (University of Chicago Press, 1994)

  13. Narrow-field imaging of the lunar sodium exosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stern, S. Alan; Flynn, Brian C.

    1995-01-01

    We present the first results of a new technique for imaging the lunar Na atmosphere. The technique employs high resolution, a narrow bandpass, and specific observing geometry to suppress scattered light and image lunar atmospheric Na I emission down to approximately 50 km altitude. Analysis of four latitudinally dispersed images shows that the lunar Na atmosphere exhibits intersting latitudinal and radial dependencies. Application of a simple Maxwellian collisionless exosphere model indicates that: (1) at least two thermal populations are required to adequately fit the soldium's radial intensity behavior, and (2) the fractional abundances and temperatures of the two components vary systematically with latitude. We conclude that both cold (barometric) and hot (suprathermal) Na may coexist in the lunar atmosphere, either as distinct components or as elements of a continuum of populations ranging in temperature from the local surface temperature up to or exceeding escape energies.

  14. Narrow Field of View Zenith Radiometer (NFOV) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, C; Marshak, A; Hodges, G; Barnard, JC; Schmelzer, J

    2008-11-01

    The two-channel narrow field-of-view radiometer (NFOV2) is a ground-based radiometer that looks straight up and measures radiance directly above the instrument at wavelengths of 673 and 870 nm. The field-of-view of the instrument is 1.2 degrees, and the sampling time resolution is one second. Measurements of the NFOV2 have been used to retrieve optical properties for overhead clouds that range from patchy to overcast. With a one-second sampling rate of the NFOV2, faster than almost any other ARM Climate Research Facility (ACRF) instrument, we are able, for the first time, to capture changes in cloud optical properties at the natural time scale of cloud evolution.

  15. PCF based high power narrow line width pulsed fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Yan, P.; Xiao, Q.; Wang, Y.; Gong, M.

    2012-09-01

    Based on semiconductor diode seeded multi-stage cascaded fiber amplifiers, we have obtained 88-W average power of a 1063-nm laser with high repetition rate of up to 1.5 MHz and a constant 2-ns pulse duration. No stimulated Brillouin scattering pulse or optical damage occurred although the maximum pulse peak power has exceeded 112 kW. The output laser exhibits excellent beam quality (M2x = 1.24 and M2y = 1.18), associated with a spectral line width as narrow as 0.065 nm (FWHM). Additionally, we demonstrate high polarization extinction ratio of 18.4 dB and good pulse stabilities superior to 1.6 % (RMS).

  16. Single-Frequency Narrow Linewidth 2 Micron Fiber Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jiang, Shibin (Inventor); Spiegelberg, Christine (Inventor); Luo, Tao (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A compact single frequency, single-mode 2 .mu.m fiber laser with narrow linewidth, <100 kHz and preferably <100 kHz, is formed with a low phonon energy glass doped with triply ionized rare-earth thulium and/or holmium oxide and fiber gratings formed in sections of passive silica fiber and fused thereto. Formation of the gratings in passive silica fiber both facilitates splicing to other optical components and reduces noise thus improving linewidth. An increased doping concentration of 0.5 to 15 wt. % for thulium, holmium or mixtures thereof produces adequate gain, hence output power levels for fiber lengths less than 5 cm and preferably less than 3 cm to enable single-frequency operation.

  17. Prediction of narrow N* and {Lambda}* with hidden charm

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jiajun; Molina, R.; Oset, E.; Zou, B. S.

    2011-10-24

    The interaction between various charmed mesons and charmed baryons, such as D-bar{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar{Lambda}{sub c}, D-bar*{Sigma}{sub c}-D-bar*{Lambda}{sub c}, and related strangeness channels, are studied within the framework of the coupled channel unitary approach with the local hidden gauge formalism. Six narrow N* and {Lambda}* resonances are dynamically generated with mass above 4 GeV and width smaller than 100 MeV. These predicted new resonances definitely cannot be accommodated by quark models with three constituent quarks. We make estimates of production cross sections of these predicted resonances in p-barp collisions for PANDA at the forthcoming FAIR facility.

  18. Solder wetting kinetics in narrow V-grooves

    SciTech Connect

    Yost, F.G.; Rye, R.R.; Mann, J.A. Jr.

    1997-12-01

    Experiments are performed to observe capillary flow in grooves cut into copper surfaces. Flow kinetics of two liquids, 1-heptanol and eutectic Sn-Pb solder, are modeled with modified Washburn kinetics and compared to flow data. It is shown that both liquids flow parabolically in narrow V-grooves, and the data scale as predicted by the modified Washburn model. The early portions of the flow kinetics are characterized by curvature in the length vs time relationship which is not accounted for in the modified Washburn model. This effect is interpreted in terms of a dynamic contact angle. It is concluded that under conditions of rapid flow, solder spreading can be understood as a simple fluid flow process. Slower kinetics, e.g. solder droplet spreading on flat surfaces, may be affected by subsidiary chemical processes such as reaction.

  19. Motion tracking in narrow spaces: a structured light approach.

    PubMed

    Olesen, Oline Vinter; Paulsen, Rasmus R; Højgaar, Liselotte; Roed, Bjarne; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel tracking system for patient head motion inside 3D medical scanners. Currently, the system is targeted at the Siemens High Resolution Research Tomograph (HRRT) PET scanner. Partial face surfaces are reconstructed using a miniaturized structured light system. The reconstructed 3D point clouds are matched to a reference surface using a robust iterative closest point algorithm. A main challenge is the narrow geometry requiring a compact structured light system and an oblique angle of observation. The system is validated using a mannequin head mounted on a rotary stage. We compare the system to a standard optical motion tracker based on a rigid tracking tool. Our system achieves an angular RMSE of 0.11 degrees demonstrating its relevance for motion compensated 3D scan image reconstructions as well as its competitiveness against the standard optical system with an RMSE of 0.08 degrees. Finally, we demonstrate qualitative result on real face motion estimation.

  20. Role of Narrow Band Imaging in Management of Urothelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Altobelli, Emanuela; Zlatev, Dimitar V; Liao, Joseph C

    2015-08-01

    Urothelial carcinoma of the bladder and upper tract is primarily diagnosed by white light endoscopy, which has well-known limitations that contribute to the increased risk of tumor recurrence and progression. Narrow band imaging (NBI) is an optical imaging technology that facilitates detection of tumor vasculature and differentiation of benign urothelium from neoplastic tissue. For urothelial carcinoma, NBI may be utilized in a variety of clinical settings, including office cystoscopy for initial identification and surveillance, transurethral resection for pathological diagnosis, and ureteroscopic management of upper tract lesions. Early evidence suggests that NBI increases the detection of urothelial carcinoma in the bladder and upper tract, including flat high-grade lesions such as carcinoma-in-situ that are a diagnostic challenge under white light. NBI also appears to improve the quality of transurethral resection and thereby reduce the frequency of tumor recurrence.

  1. CdS colloidal nanocrystals with narrow green emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghamsari, Morteza Sasani; Sasani Ghamsari, Amir Hossein

    2016-04-01

    Cadmium sulfide (CdS) colloidal nanocrystals have been synthesized by a chemical reaction route. Polyvinyl alcohol was employed to modify the surface of CdS nanocrystals and improved their optical properties. The prepared nanoparticles were characterized using techniques such as x-ray powder diffraction, UV-VIS absorption, and photoluminescence spectroscopy. The prepared sample displays a strong and narrow green emission peak centered at 519 nm that has not been reported before and it is longer than the onset of absorption of ˜512 nm for bulk CdS. Several weak emission peaks appeared at wavelengths 490, 506, 521, and 543 nm, too. These two important characteristics of the prepared sample are due to the strong band-edge emission of CdS nanocrystals. The obtained results confirm that the prepared CdS nanocrystals have potential for opto-electronic applications.

  2. Precisely tunable, narrow-band pulsed dye laser

    SciTech Connect

    Bhatia, P.S.; Keto, J.W.

    1996-07-01

    A narrow-band, precisely tunable dye laser pumped by an injection-seeded YAG laser is described. The laser achieves an output of 100 mJ/pulse and 40{percent} efficiency when one uses Rhodamine 6G dyes. The output pulse is Gaussian both in time and spatial profile. The laser oscillator employs an intracavity {acute e}talon that is repetitively pressure scanned over one free spectral range while the grating successively steps to consecutive {acute e}talon modes. We pressure scanned the {acute e}talon under computer control using a bellows. Methods are described for calibrating the tuning elements for absolute precision. We demonstrated that the laser has an absolute precision of {plus_minus}0.4 pm over a 1.0-nm scan. This accuracy is achievable over the wavelength range of a dye. {copyright} {ital 1996 Optical Society of America.}

  3. Water transportation across narrow channel of nanometer dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Rongzheng; Fang, Haiping

    2010-06-01

    Since the discovery of the carbon nanotube and aquaporin, the study of the transportation of water across nanochannels has become one of the hot subjects. When the radius of a nanochannel is only about one nanometer or a little larger, water confined in those nanoscale channels usually exhibits dynamics different from those in bulk system, such as the wet-dry transition due to the confinement, concerted hydrogen-bond orientations and flipping, concerted motion of water molecules, and strong interactions with external charges. Those dynamics correlate with the unique behavior of the water transportation across the channels, such as the extra-high permeability, excellent on-off gating behavior with response to the external mechanical and electrical signals and noises, enhancement by structure outside the channel, directional transportation driven by charges close to a channel or electric field. In this article, we review some of the recent progress on the study of the water molecules inside those narrow nanochannels.

  4. Single-file diffusion of water inside narrow carbon nanorings.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Biswaroop; Maiti, Prabal K; Dasgupta, Chandan; Sood, A K

    2010-02-23

    We use atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the diffusion of water molecules confined inside narrow (6,6) carbon nanorings. The water molecules form two oppositely polarized chains. It is shown that the effective interaction between these two chains is repulsive in nature. The computed mean-squared displacement (MSD) clearly shows a scaling with time Deltatheta(2)(t) approximately t(1/2), which is consistent with single-file diffusion (SFD). The time up to which the water molecules undergo SFD is shown to be the lifetime of the water molecules inside these chains. Simulations of "uncharged" water molecules inside the nanoring show the formation of several water chains and yield SFD. These observations conclusively prove that the diffusion is Fickian when there is a single chain of water and SFD is observed only when two or more chains are present.

  5. Density Fluctuations of Hard-Sphere Fluids in Narrow Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nygârd, Kim; Sarman, Sten; Hyltegren, Kristin; Chodankar, Shirish; Perret, Edith; Buitenhuis, Johan; van der Veen, J. Friso; Kjellander, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Spatial confinement induces microscopic ordering of fluids, which in turn alters many of their dynamic and thermodynamic properties. However, the isothermal compressibility has hitherto been largely overlooked in the literature, despite its obvious connection to the underlying microscopic structure and density fluctuations in confined geometries. Here, we address this issue by probing density profiles and structure factors of hard-sphere fluids in various narrow slits, using x-ray scattering from colloid-filled nanofluidic containers and integral-equation-based statistical mechanics at the level of pair distributions for inhomogeneous fluids. Most importantly, we demonstrate that density fluctuations and isothermal compressibilities in confined fluids can be obtained experimentally from the long-wavelength limit of the structure factor, providing a formally exact and experimentally accessible connection between microscopic structure and macroscopic, thermodynamic properties. Our approach will thus, for example, allow direct experimental verification of theoretically predicted enhanced density fluctuations in liquids near solvophobic interfaces.

  6. Narrow Band Imaging: Technology Basis and Research and Development History.

    PubMed

    Gono, Kazuhiro

    2015-11-01

    The first launch of narrow band imaging (NBI) was in 2005. Since then, in most countries where gastrointestinal endoscopies are performed, NBI is the most commonly used optical digital method of performing image-enhanced endoscopy. Thanks to the outstanding efforts of many endoscopists, many clinical studies have been performed and clinical evidence has been gathered. In Japan, since 2010, NBI has been reimbursed under the Japanese national health insurance system. This is owing to the establishment of clinical evidence by physicians. However, even though endoscope systems with NBI function have been widely used outside of Japan, dissemination of knowledge on how to use NBI is insufficient. In this review paper, the technology basis of NBI and its research and development history are described. I hope this information will be helpful for updating physicians' knowledge of NBI.

  7. Evolution of the plasma bubble in a narrow gap.

    PubMed

    Chu, Hong-Yu; Lee, Hung-Ken

    2011-11-25

    We investigate the evolution of the plasma bubble in a narrow gap. According to the morphological changes, we further show that there are three phases during the evolution for spherical fluctuating, radial fingering, and dense branching plasma bubbles, which are similar to the radial fingering pattern in a Hele-Shaw cell. The dependences of the wavelength of the fingering boundary are experimentally discussed. The dense branching plasma bubble is found with a fractal dimension of D(f)=1.74. The reduced surface tension pressure from the local heatings due to the filamentary discharges is suspected of being responsible for the growth of the radial fingering and the dense branching plasma bubbles.

  8. FORMATION OF THE TERRESTRIAL PLANETS FROM A NARROW ANNULUS

    SciTech Connect

    Hansen, Brad M. S.

    2009-09-20

    We show that the assembly of the solar system terrestrial planets can be successfully modeled with all of the mass initially confined to a narrow annulus between 0.7 and 1.0 AU. With this configuration, analogs of Mercury and Mars often form from the collisional evolution of material diffusing out of the annulus under the scattering of the forming Earth and Venus analogs. The final systems also possess eccentricities and inclinations that match the observations, without recourse to dynamical friction from remnant small body populations. Finally, the characteristic assembly timescale for Earth analogs is rapid in this model and consistent with cosmochemical models based on the {sup 182}Hf-{sup 182}W isotopes. The agreement between this model and the observations suggests that terrestrial planet systems may also be formed in 'planet traps', as has been proposed recently for the cores of giant planets in our solar system and others.

  9. Characteristics of crystallization of complex plasmas in narrow channels

    SciTech Connect

    Klumov, B. A. Morfill, G. E.

    2008-11-15

    Molecular dynamics simulations are performed to analyze the dependence of the behavior of complex (dusty) plasmas in narrow three-dimensional channels on the confining potential. Dynamics of micrometer-sized particles is modeled by using Langevin thermostat and Yukawa (screened Coulomb) pair interaction potential. A detailed analysis shows that confinement strongly affects plasma crystallization characteristics and local ordering of dust grains. In particular, the formation of a new, quasi-crystalline phase induced by hard-wall confinement is revealed. Transitions between different lattice symmetries induced by changes in channel width are examined. Strong dependence of the transverse dust density profile on the shielding parameter (ratio between mean interparticle distance and screening length) can be used to manipulate the dust-grain flux in such a system.

  10. Flow regimes and heat transfer in vertical narrow annuli

    SciTech Connect

    Ulke, A.; Goldberg, I.

    1993-11-01

    In shell side boiling heat exchangers narrow crevices that are formed between the tubes and the tube support structure provide areas for local thermal-hydraulic conditions which differ significantly from bulk fluid conditions. Understanding of the processes of boiling and dryout in flow restricted crevices can help in designing of tube support geometries to minimize the likelihood of tube support plate and tube corrosion observed in commercial power plant steam generators. This paper describes a one dimensional thermal-hydraulic model of a vertical crevice between a tube and a support plate with cylindrical holes. The annulus formed by the support plate hole and an eccentrically located tube has been represented by vertical strips. The formation, growth and collapse of a steam bubble in each strip has been determined. Based on the bubble history, and flow regimes characterized by ``isolated`` bubbles, ``coalesced`` bubbles and liquid deficient regions have been defined.

  11. Friction-factor characteristics for narrow channels with honeycomb surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, T. W.; Morrison, G. L.; Childs, D. W.

    1992-01-01

    The experimental determination of friction-factors for the flow of air in a narrow channel lined with various honeycomb geometries has been carried out. Test results show that, generally, the friction-factor is nearly constant or slightly decreases as the Reynolds number increases, a characteristic common to turbulent flow in pipes. However, in some test geometries this trend is remarkably different. The friction factor dramatically drops and then rises as the Reynolds number increases. This phenomenon can be characterized as a 'friction-factor jump'. Further investigations of the acoustic spectrum and friction-factor measurements for a broad range of Reynolds numbers indicate that the 'friction-factor jump' phenomenon is accompanied by an onset of a normal mode resonance excited coherent flow fluctuation structure, which occurs at Reynolds number of the order of 10,000. The purpose of this paper is to explain the friction-factor-jump phenomenon and friction-factor characteristics.

  12. The Tacoma Narrows Bridge Collapse on Film and Video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, Don; Hook, Joseph; Doescher, Russell; Wolf, Steven

    2015-11-01

    This month marks the 75th anniversary of the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapse. During a gale on Nov. 7, 1940, the bridge exhibited remarkable oscillations before collapsing spectacularly (Figs. 1-5). Physicists over the years have spent a great deal of time and energy studying this event. By using open-source analysis tools and digitized footage of the disaster, physics students in both high school and college can continue in this tradition. Students can watch footage of "Galloping Gertie," ask scientific questions about the bridge's collapse, analyze data, and draw conclusions from that analysis. Students should be encouraged to pursue their own investigations, but the question that drove our inquiry was this: "When physics classes watch modern video showing the oscillations and the free fall of the bridge fragments, are these scenes sped up, slowed down, or at the correct speed compared to what was observed by the eyewitnesses on Nov. 7, 1940?"

  13. Narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor parameter variation.

    PubMed

    Guzzomi, A; Rondelli, V

    2013-10-01

    Despite a general consensus among farmers, manufacturers, and researchers that wheeled agricultural tractor design has changed over time, there is little published evidence. There is debate as to whether the standardized rollover protective structure (ROPS) energy and force requirements, based on a tractor reference mass and pertaining to studies conducted more than 40 years ago, are appropriate for modern tractors. This article investigated the physical parameters of 326 modern narrow-track tractors, measured according to OECD Code 6 over 16 years (1993 to 2008 inclusive): 252 (-77%) were fixed-chassis tractors and 74 (-23%) were articulated. To understand the significance of design changes, the data were analyzed with respect to time and as a function of tractor mass. Articulated and fixed-chassis data were treated separately. The time data allowed qualitative analysis, while the mass data allowed quantitative analysis. The parameters show some changes over time and clearly indicate differences between articulated and fixed-chassis types. The parameter changes, along with the differences between types, may have important safety ramifications for ROPS energy absorption requirements, and these aspects are discussed. Regression lines with R2 values were fitted to the mass-related data for fixed-chassis and articulated tractors to determine the suitability of fit. The mass relations also displayed differences between fixed-chassis and articulated tractors. Thus, the most significant recommendation from this study is that the standardized testing procedure for narrow-track wheeled agricultural tractor category should be split into two groups: fixed-chassis and articulated. PMID:24673034

  14. Narrow-line fiber-coupled modules for DPAL pumping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenning, Tobias; McCormick, Dan; Irvin, David; Stapleton, Dean; Guiney, Tina; Patterson, Steve

    2015-03-01

    Recent advances in high power diode laser technologies have enabled advanced research on diode pumped alkali metal vapor lasers (DPALs). Due to their low quantum defect, DPALs offer the promise of scalability to very high average power levels while maintaining excellent beam quality. Research is being conducted on a variety of gain media species, requiring different pump wavelengths: near 852nm for cesium, 780nm for rubidium, 766nm for potassium, and 670nm for lithium atoms. The biggest challenge in pumping these materials efficiently is the narrow gain media absorption band of approximately 0.01nm. Typical high power diode lasers achieve spectral widths around 3nm (FWHM) in the near infrared spectrum. Gratings may be used internal or external to the cavity to reduce the spectral width to 0.5nm to 1nm for high power diode laser modules. Recently, experimental results have shown narrower line widths ranging from picometers (pm) at very low power levels to sub-100 picometers for water cooled stacks around 1kW of output power. The focus of this work is a further reduction in the spectral line width of high power diode laser bars emitting at 766nm, with full applicability to other wavelengths of interest. One factor limiting the reduction of the spectral line width is the optical absorption induced thermal gradient inside the volume Bragg grating (VBG). Simulated profiles and demonstrated techniques to minimize thermal gradients will be presented. To enable the next stage of DPAL research, a new series of fiber coupled modules is being introduced featuring greater than 400W from a 600μm core fiber of 0.22NA. The modules achieve a spectral width of <<0.1nm and wavelength tunability of +/- 0.15nm.

  15. Keeping the Edges Sharp II: Honing Simulations of Narrow Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rimlinger, Thomas; Hamilton, Douglas; Hahn, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    It has long been believed that shepherd satellites are necessary to keep narrow rings confined. While a pair of nearby satellites brackets Saturn’s F ring and Uranus’ Epsilon ring, dozens of other ringlets observed around the outer three planets seem to be unattended. Hamilton et al. (this meeting) have argued analytically that eccentric or inclined rings can maintain their sharp edges for millions or even billions of years despite continually dissipating energy. Here, we present numerical integrations showing isolated eccentric ringlets that do not spread; our model includes only the gravity from an oblate planet, ring self-gravity, and viscosity. We use the symplectic integrator epi_int written by Hahn & Spitale (2013).For narrow rings, the weak perturbation forces that we study act on secular rather than orbital timescales. Therefore, we find that we can use an unusually long timestep, in which these weak forces are applied once every ~30 orbits, with good energy and angular momentum conservation. Long timesteps allow us to run simulations that might otherwise take hours or even days in a matter of minutes. We present comparisons between simulations with identical initial conditions but varying timesteps to show that our approach is appropriate for this class of problems. This technique of speeding up numerical integrations works for any symplectic integrator, requiring only that the forces be weak and that the timescale of interest be long. Problems well suited to this approach (those with only secular and drag forces) include tidally-damped exoplanets and dust grains subject to radiation pressure and Poynting-Robertson drag.

  16. Quantum interference by localized scattering waves of gapless helical modes in narrow strips of topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takagaki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    Quantum interference in scattering from a potential offset is investigated in narrow strips of two-dimensional systems described by the Bernevig-Hughes-Zhang Hamiltonian. Attention is focused on the situations where the transmission in the scattering region takes place around the Dirac point of topological insulators when the hybridization energy gap is eliminated by utilizing transverse interference. Apart from conventional periodic transmission modulation that takes place when the length of the potential offset region is varied, resonant disappearances of reflection occur for short potential offsets. The anomalous resonance appears not only for the four-band Hamiltonian but also for the two-band Hamiltonian, manifesting the generality of the phenomenon. Evanescent-like waves excited around the potential steps are indicated to be responsible for the anomalous behavior. The interference states can couple with each other and generic reduction in the amplitude of transmission modulation occurs upon coupling with the periodic modulation.

  17. Zero-bias anomalies in narrow tunnel junctions in the quantum Hall regime.

    PubMed

    Jiang, P; Chien, C-C; Yang, I; Kang, W; Baldwin, K W; Pfeiffer, L N; West, K W

    2010-12-10

    We report on the study of cleaved-edge-overgrown line junctions with a serendipitously created narrow opening in an otherwise thin, precise line barrier. Two sets of zero-bias anomalies are observed with an enhanced conductance for filling factors ν>1 and a strongly suppressed conductance for ν<1. A transition between the two behaviors is found near ν≈1. The zero-bias anomaly (ZBA) line shapes find explanation in Luttinger liquid models of tunneling between quantum Hall edge states. The ZBA for ν<1 occurs from strong backscattering induced by suppression of quasiparticle tunneling between the edge channels for the n=0 Landau levels. The ZBA for ν>1 arises from weak tunneling of quasiparticles between the n=1 edge channels.

  18. Bandgap narrowing of titanium oxide semiconductors by non-compensated anion-cation codoping for enhanced visible-light photoactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Wenguang; Qiu, Xiaofeng; Iancu, Violet; Chen, Xingqiu; Pan, Hui; Wang, Wei; Dimitrijevic, Nada; Rajh, Tijana; Meyer III, Harry M; Paranthaman, Mariappan Parans; Stocks, George Malcolm; Weitering, Hanno; Gu, Baohua; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2009-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is widely recognized as one of the most promising photocatalysts for solar energy utilization and environmental cleanup, but because of its wide bandgap, pure TiO2 can only absorbs ultraviolet light, which represents 4% of the solar spectrum1-6. Here we establish a conceptually novel approach, termed non-compensated n-p codoping, to narrow the bandgap of TiO2 and shift the optical response into the visible spectral range where a much larger fraction of the solar spectrum can be captured. The concept embodies two key ingredients: The electrostatic attraction within the n-p dopant pair enhances the thermodynamic and kinetic solubility in substitutional doping, and the non-compensated nature ensures the creation of broadened intermediate electronic states that effectively narrow the bandgap. The concept is demonstrated quantitatively within first-principles density functional theory. The experimental evidence for bandgap narrowing is obtained in the forms of direct measurements of the density of states by scanning tunneling spectroscopy, dramatically redshifted and increased optical absorbance, and enhanced photoactivity manifested by efficient hole-electron separation in the visible spectral region. These findings represent the first crucial steps toward development of a new class of titania-based photocatalysts with greatly enhanced efficiency of solar energy conversion facilitating environmentally friendly applications ofrenewable energy.

  19. Coherent Control of Population Transfer via Linear Chirp in Liquid Solution: The Role of Motional Narrowing.

    PubMed

    McRobbie, Porscha L; Geva, Eitan

    2016-05-19

    The conditions under which linear chirp can be used to control population transfer between the electronic states of a chromophore dissolved in liquid solution are investigated. To this end, we model the chromophore as a two-state system with shifted electronic potential energy surfaces and a fluctuating electronic transition frequency. The fluctuations are described as an exponentially correlated Gaussian stochastic process, which can be characterized by the average fluctuation amplitude, σ, and correlation time, τc. The time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved numerically for an ensemble of stochastic histories, at different values of σ and τc, and under a wide range of pulse intensities and linear chirp coefficients. In the limit τc → ∞, we find that control diminishes rapidly as soon as σ exceeds the bandwidth of the pulse. However, we also find that control can be regained by reducing τc. We attribute this trend to motional narrowing, whereby decreasing τc narrows down the effective bandwidth of the solvent-induced fluctuations. The results suggest that the choice of methanol as a solvent in the actual experimental demonstration of chirp control by Cerullo et al. [ Chem. Phys. Lett. 1996 , 262 , 362 - 368 ] may have contributed to its success, due to the particularly short τc (∼20 fs) that the rapid librations of this hydrogen bonded liquid give rise to. The results also give rise to the rather surprising prediction that coherent control in liquid solution can be strongly dependent on the choice of solvent and be improved upon by choosing solvents that correspond to lower values of στc.

  20. High-average-power narrow-line-width sum frequency generation 589 nm laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yanhua; Fan, Guobin; Ren, Huaijin; Zhang, Lei; Xu, Xiafei; Zhang, Wei; Wan, Min

    2015-10-01

    An 81 W average-power all-solid-state sodium beacon laser at 589 nm with a repetition rate of 250 Hz is introduced, which is based on a novel sum frequency generation idea between two high-energy, different line widths, different beam quality infrared lasers (a 1064 nm laser and a 1319 nm laser). The 1064 nm laser, which features an external modulated CW single frequency seed source and two stages of amplifiers, can provide average-power of 150 W, beam quality M2 of ~1.8 with ultra-narrow line width (< 100 kHz). The 1319 nm laser can deliver average-power of 100 W, beam quality M2 of ~3.0 with a narrow line width of ~0.3 GHz. By sum frequency mixing in a LBO slab crystal (3 mm x 12 mm x 50 mm), pulse energy of 325 mJ is achieved at 589 nm with a conversion efficiency of 32.5 %. Tuning the center wavelength of 1064 nm laser by a PZT PID controller, the target beam's central wavelength is accurately locked to 589.15910 nm with a line width of ~0.3 GHz, which is dominated mainly by the 1319 nm laser. The beam quality is measured to be M2 < 1.3. The pulse duration is measured to be 150 μs in full-width. To the best of our knowledge, this represents the highest average-power for all-solid-state sodium beacon laser ever reported.

  1. Whispering-Gallery-Mode Tunable Narrow-Band-Pass Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Iltchenko, Vladimir; Matsko, Andrey; Maleki, Lute

    2004-01-01

    An experimental tunable, narrow-band-pass electro-optical filter is based on a whispering-gallery resonator. This device is a prototype of tunable filters needed for the further development of reconfigurable networking wavelength-division multiplexers and communication systems that utilize radio-frequency (more specifically, microwave) subcarrier signals on optical carrier signals. The characteristics of whispering-gallery resonators that make them attractive for such applications include high tuning speed, compactness, wide tuning range, low power consumption, and compatibility with single-mode optical fibers. In addition, relative to Fabry-Perot resonators, these devices offer advantages of greater robustness and lower cost. As described in several prior NASA Tech Briefs articles, a whispering-gallery resonator is a spheroidal, disk-like, or toroidal body made of a highly transparent material. It is so named because it is designed to exploit whispering-gallery electromagnetic modes, which are waveguide modes that propagate circumferentially and are concentrated in a narrow toroidal region centered on the equatorial plane and located near the outermost edge. The experimental whispering-gallery tunable filter (see figure) is made from a disk of Z-cut LiNbO3 of 4.8-mm diameter and 0.17-mm thickness. The perimeter of the disk is rounded to a radius of curvature of 100 m. Metal coats on the flat faces of the disk serve as electrodes for exploiting the electro-optical effect in LiNbO3 for tuning. There is no metal coat on the rounded perimeter region, where the whispering-gallery modes propagate. Light is coupled from an input optical fiber into the whispering-gallery modes by means of a diamond prism. Another diamond prism is used to couple light from the whispering-gallery modes to an output optical fiber. This device is designed and operated to exploit transverse magnetic (TM) whispering- gallery modes, rather than transverse electric (TE) modes because the

  2. Associations between Narrow Angle and Adult Anthropometry: The Liwan Eye Study

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Yuzhen; He, Mingguang; Friedman, David S.; Khawaja, Anthony P.; Lee, Pak Sang; Nolan, Winifred P.; Yin, Qiuxia; Foster, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To assess the associations between narrow angle and adult anthropometry. Methods Chinese adults aged 50 years and older were recruited from a population-based survey in the Liwan District of Guangzhou, China. Narrow angle was defined as the posterior trabecular meshwork not visible under static gonioscopy in at least three quadrants (i.e. a circumference of at least 270°). Logistic regression models were used to examine the associations between narrow angle and anthropomorphic measures (height, weight and body mass index, BMI). Results Among the 912 participants, lower weight, shorter height, and lower BMI were significantly associated with narrower angle width (tests for trend: mean angle width in degrees vs weight p<0.001; vs height p<0.001; vs BMI p = 0.012). In univariate analyses, shorter height, lower weight and lower BMI were all significantly associated with greater odds of narrow angle. The crude association between height and narrow angle was largely attributable to a stronger association with age and sex. Lower BMI and weight remained significantly associated with narrow angle after adjustment for height, age, sex, axial ocular biometric measures and education. In analyses stratified by sex, the association between BMI and narrow angle was only observed in women. Conclusion Lower BMI and weight were associated with significantly greater odds of narrow angle after adjusting for age, education, axial ocular biometric measures and height. The odds of narrow angle increased 7% per 1 unit decrease in BMI. This association was most evident in women. PMID:24707840

  3. Narrow band imaging and bladder cancer: when and how.

    PubMed

    Naselli, Angelo; Puppo, Paolo

    2015-10-01

    Narrow band imaging (NBI) is an optical enhancement technology for endoscopy. NBI works filtering the standard white light in two bandwidths of illumination of 415 nm, blue, and 540 nm, green. As a result, capillaries on mucosal surface appear brown and veins in connective subepithelial layer cyan, enhancing the contrast among epithelial, subepithelial tissue and its vascularisation. Given that it is a filter, it is safe, does not need any kind of instillation and the vision modality can be switched from NBI to white light and vice versa without any limitations of time. NBI-assisted cystoscopy increases the detection rate of urothelial lesions and enhances visibility of tumour margins with respect to standard white light modality, although it does not need a particular learning curve. NBI exploration of the bladder should be avoided during active bleeding because the light absorption would be excessive impeding an optimal vision. Moreover, it should always be employed in combination with standard white light modality to avoid an excess of false-positive findings, particularly during or immediately after topic treatments. It can be used in office to anticipate bladder recurrences and in the operating theatre to perform a complete tumour resection. As a matter of fact, it is able to reduce the recurrence rate and ameliorate bladder cancer management by identifying high-grade cancerous tissue, especially Cis, undetected by the standard white light modality. PMID:26481715

  4. Sedimentation of an oblate ellipsoid in narrow tubes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xin; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Xiyun

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentation behaviors of an oblate ellipsoidal particle inside narrow [R/a∈(1.2,2.0)] infinitely long circular tubes are studied by the lattice Boltzmann method, where R and a are the radius of the tube and the length of the semimajor axis of the ellipsoid, respectively. The Archimedes numbers (Ar) up to 70 are considered. Four periodic and two steady sedimentation modes are identified. It is the first time that the anomalous mode has been found in a circular tube for an ellipsoidal particle. The phase diagram of the modes as a function of Ar and R/a is obtained. The anomalous mode is observed in the larger R/a and lower-Ar regime. Through comparisons between the anomalous and oscillatory modes, it is found that R/a plays a critical role for the anomalous mode. Some constrained cases with two steady modes are simulated. It is found that the particle settles faster in the unconstrained modes than in the corresponding constrained modes. This might inspire further study on why the particle adopts a specific mode under a certain circumstance. PMID:26764806

  5. Broadband Absorbing Exciton-Plasmon Metafluids with Narrow Transparency Windows.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jihua; Kramer, Nicolaas J; Schramke, Katelyn S; Wheeler, Lance M; Besteiro, Lucas V; Hogan, Christopher J; Govorov, Alexander O; Kortshagen, Uwe R

    2016-02-10

    Optical metafluids that consist of colloidal solutions of plasmonic and/or excitonic nanomaterials may play important roles as functional working fluids or as means for producing solid metamaterial coatings. The concept of a metafluid employed here is based on the picture that a single ballistic photon, propagating through the metafluid, interacts with a large collection of specifically designed optically active nanocrystals. We demonstrate water-based metafluids that act as broadband electromagnetic absorbers in a spectral range of 200-3300 nm and feature a tunable narrow (∼100 nm) transparency window in the visible-to-near-infrared region. To define this transparency window, we employ plasmonic gold nanorods. We utilize excitonic boron-doped silicon nanocrystals as opaque optical absorbers ("optical wall") in the UV and blue-green range of the spectrum. Water itself acts as an opaque "wall" in the near-infrared to infrared. We explore the limits of the concept of a "simple" metafluid by computationally testing and validating the effective medium approach based on the Beer-Lambert law. According to our simulations and experiments, particle aggregation and the associated decay of the window effect are one example of the failure of the simple metafluid concept due to strong interparticle interactions. PMID:26808215

  6. Buoyancy-induced turbulent mixing in a narrow tilted tank

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiras Y.; Caulfield, C. P.; Woods, Andrew W.

    2014-11-01

    We describe a series of experiments in which a constant buoyancy flux Bs of dyed salty water of density ρs is introduced at the top of a long narrow tank of square cross-section tilted at an angle θ from the vertical. The tank is initially filled with fresh clear water of density ρ0 <ρs , and we investigate the resulting buoyancy-driven high Reynolds number turbulent mixing at various tilt angles θ using a light-attenuation method. When θ >0° , the ensemble averaged reduced gravity develops a statically stable gradient normal to the walls of the tank, and this induces a counterflow. We model the evolution of the cross-tank and ensemble averaged reduced gravity < g ' ̲ >e as a diffusive process using Prandtl's mixing length theory, building on the model of van Sommeren et al. (JFM 701, 2012) who considered vertical tanks. We show that the counterflow acts to enhance the effective along-tank turbulent diffusivity, and from experiments, we find that the mixing length increases approximately linearly with θ, and that both the along-tank and cross-tank turbulent diffusivities are proportional to (∂ < g ' ̲ >e / ∂ z)1/2 .

  7. PAU, a fully depleted mosaic imager with narrow band filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, A.; Casas, R.; Castander, F. J.; Serrano, S.

    2014-03-01

    The PAU Survey studies the existence and properties of dark energy from the observations of redshift space distortions and weak lensing magnification from galaxy cross-correlations as main cosmological probes. The PAU Team is building an instrument, PAUCam, equipped with fully depleted CCD detectors, designed to be mounted at the prime focus of the 4.2 m diameter William Herschel Telescope (WHT) in La Palma. Simulations indicate that PAUCam at the WHT will be able to image about 2 square degrees per night in 40 narrow-band filters plus six wide-band filters to an AB magnitude depth of i ~ 22.5, providing low-resolution (R ~ 50) photometric spectra for around 30,000 galaxies, 5,000 stars and 1,000 quasars per square degree. Accurate photometric calibration of the PAU data is vital to achieve the survey science goals. This calibration is challenging due to the large and unusual filter set. We outline the data management pipelines being developed for the survey, both for nightly data reduction and co-addition of multiple epochs, with emphasis on the photometric calibration strategies. We also describe the main tests and results in the characterization of our Hamamatsu fully depleted detectors.

  8. Detonation propagation in narrow gaps with various configurations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monwar, M.; Yamamoto, Y.; Ishii, K.; Tsuboi, T.

    2007-08-01

    In general all detonation waves have cellular structure formed by the trajectory of the triple points. This paper aims to investigate experimentally the propagation of detonation in narrow gaps for hydrogen-oxygen-argon mixtures in terms of various gap heights and gap widths. The gap of total length 1500 mm was constructed by three pair of stainless plates, each of them was 500 mm in length, which were inserted in a detonation tube. The gap heights were varied from 1.2 mm to 3.0 mm while the gap widths were varied from 10 mm to 40 mm. Various argon dilution rates were tested in the present experiments to change the size of cellular structure. Attempts have been made by means of reaction front velocity, shock front velocity, and smoked foil to record variations of cellular structure inside the gaps. A combination probe composed of a pressure and an ion probe detected the arrival of the shock and the reaction front individually at one measurement point. Experimental results show that the number of the triple points contained in detonation front decreases with decrease in the gap heights and gap widths, which lead to larger cellular structures. For mixtures with low detonability, cell size is affected by a certain gap width although conversely cell size is almost independent of gap width. From the present result it was found that detonation propagation inside the gaps is strongly governed by the gap height and effects of gap width is dependent on detonability of mixtures.

  9. The narrow rings of Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.; Murray, C. D.; Sinclair, A. T.

    1980-01-01

    The origin of the newly discovered narrow ring systems around Jupiter, Saturn and Uranus is considered. It is pointed out that both the Uranian and Jovian ring systems have mean orbital radii of 1.8 planetary radii and lie within the Roche zones of their respective planets, and it is suggested that the Jovian ring is the product of the disintegration of a satellite that entered the Roche zone, and that large numbers of small particles are now in horseshoe orbits about the Lagrangian equilibrium points of the remnant chunks. Analysis of the path of a ring particle in a horseshoe orbit is shown to result in ring structures in agreement with those observed for the circular rings of Jupiter and the highly eccentric ring of Uranus. The stability of these ring systems is then considered, and it is suggested that the F ring of Saturn, which lies outside the Roche zone, represents primordial matter not yet accreted by small satellites just inside the Mimas first-order resonances.

  10. Effect of Regulatory Architecture on Broad versus Narrow Sense Heritability

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunpeng; Vik, Jon Olav; Omholt, Stig W.; Gjuvsland, Arne B.

    2013-01-01

    Additive genetic variance (VA) and total genetic variance (VG) are core concepts in biomedical, evolutionary and production-biology genetics. What determines the large variation in reported VA/VG ratios from line-cross experiments is not well understood. Here we report how the VA/VG ratio, and thus the ratio between narrow and broad sense heritability (h2/H2), varies as a function of the regulatory architecture underlying genotype-to-phenotype (GP) maps. We studied five dynamic models (of the cAMP pathway, the glycolysis, the circadian rhythms, the cell cycle, and heart cell dynamics). We assumed genetic variation to be reflected in model parameters and extracted phenotypes summarizing the system dynamics. Even when imposing purely linear genotype to parameter maps and no environmental variation, we observed quite low VA/VG ratios. In particular, systems with positive feedback and cyclic dynamics gave more non-monotone genotype-phenotype maps and much lower VA/VG ratios than those without. The results show that some regulatory architectures consistently maintain a transparent genotype-to-phenotype relationship, whereas other architectures generate more subtle patterns. Our approach can be used to elucidate these relationships across a whole range of biological systems in a systematic fashion. PMID:23671414

  11. Buoyancy Driven flows in Narrow-Gap, Spherical Annuli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thamire, Chandrasekhar

    1999-11-01

    Results from the analysis of buoyancy driven flows in narrow-gap, spherical annuli heated by the inner surface are presented. The effects of Grashof number Gr, Prandtl number Pr, and radial aspect ratio γ on convective motion and heat transfer are examined. Crescent-eddy flows obtained at low Gr are consistent with published results. Multicellular flows, indicative of thermal instability and ranging from steady bicellular to oscillating ten-cell, develop for Gr > Gr_c. As Gr increases further, secondary rolls of hydrodynamic origin develop inside the crescent-eddy roll. For Gr > Gr_r, the solution exhibits a reverse transition to steady unicellular flows for 0.15 < γ, and with hysteresis for moderate γs. Heat transfer results, presented in terms of local and global Nusselt numbers, demonstrate the effect of the flow structures on the heat transfer. For multicellular flows, high and low heat-flux regions develop side by side at the spherical surfaces, which are periodic or steady, depending on the nature of the flow. A correlation is presented for the global Nusselt number, Nu_g, which indicates that Nug depends strongly on Gr and weakly on Pr and γ.

  12. Sedimentation of an oblate ellipsoid in narrow tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xin; Huang, Haibo; Lu, Xiyun

    2015-12-01

    Sedimentation behaviors of an oblate ellipsoidal particle inside narrow [R /a ∈(1.2 ,2.0 )] infinitely long circular tubes are studied by the lattice Boltzmann method, where R and a are the radius of the tube and the length of the semimajor axis of the ellipsoid, respectively. The Archimedes numbers (Ar) up to 70 are considered. Four periodic and two steady sedimentation modes are identified. It is the first time that the anomalous mode has been found in a circular tube for an ellipsoidal particle. The phase diagram of the modes as a function of Ar and R /a is obtained. The anomalous mode is observed in the larger R /a and lower-Ar regime. Through comparisons between the anomalous and oscillatory modes, it is found that R/a plays a critical role for the anomalous mode. Some constrained cases with two steady modes are simulated. It is found that the particle settles faster in the unconstrained modes than in the corresponding constrained modes. This might inspire further study on why the particle adopts a specific mode under a certain circumstance.

  13. On narrow-band representation of ocean waves: 2. Simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayfun, M. Aziz

    1986-06-01

    In paper 1 (Tayfun, this issue) we derived two narrow-band type representations for nonlinear waves and obtained theoretical expressions for the key statistics of the corresponding surface elevations, namely, the variance, skewness, and kurtosis. The nature of these statistics and the underlying probability structure were examined qualitatively with particular emphasis on the effects of the spectrum bandwidth. In this paper we explore the reliability of these results quantitatively. Proceeding via the Monte Carlo approach and finite Fourier transform techniques, we generate extensive samples of surface time history with preassigned spectral and statistical properties. Each sample is synthesized from a systematic superposition of the first-order linear field and the second-order corrections, consisting of shortwave and long-wave modulations, respectively. This approach enables us to demonstrate explicitly the individual as well as combined effects of second-order nonlinearities on the probability distribution and statistics of the surface elevation. In the final analysis we find that the simulated results compare favorably with the theoretical predictions and confirm the validity of various qualitative arguments put forward in paper 1.

  14. The Meteorology of Storms that Produce Narrow Bipolar Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.; McCaul, Eugene W.; Cummer, Steven A.

    2013-01-01

    Narrow Bipolar Events (NBEs) are compact intracloud discharges that produce the most powerful lightning-related radio frequency signals that have been observed. However, their luminosity is below the threshold for detectability from current and past spaceborne optical sensors. NBEs have been loosely associated with convective intensity, but their occurrence tends to be highly localized in time and space within a thunderstorm, and there remain many questions about whether and to what extent they are significantly related to meteorological processes within thunderstorms. Using the North Alabama Lightning Mapping Array (NALMA), the National Lightning Detection Network, and available Doppler and polarimetric radar data, case studies will be presented for storm events that produced large numbers of NBEs (10s-100s) during their lifetimes. NBEs are documented via a method that identifies high peak power (>40-50 dBW) initial VHF sources within a specific altitude band in the upper levels of thunderstorms. The production of NBEs, including spatial and temporal variability, will be compared to the radar-inferred kinematic and microphysical structure and evolution of thunderstorms, as well as their NALMA- and NLDN-inferred electrical characteristics. The results should provide new insights into the relationships between NBEs and thunderstorm processes.

  15. Narrow-band ELF events observed from South Pole Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heavisides, J.; Weaver, C.; Lessard, M.; Weatherwax, A. T.

    2012-12-01

    Extremely Low Frequency (ELF) waves are typically in the range of 3 Hz - 3 kHz and can play a role in acceleration and pitch-angle scattering of energetic particles in the radiation belts. Observations of a not uncommon, but not well studied ELF phenomenon are presented with ground-based data from South Pole Station. The narrow-band waves last approximately one or two minutes maintaining bandwidth over the course of the event, begin around 100 Hz, decrease to about 70 Hz, and typically show a higher frequency harmonic. The waves have only been documented at four locations - Heacock, 1974 (Alaska); Sentman and Ehring, 1994 (California); Wang et al, 2005 and Wang et al, 2011 (Taiwan); and Kim et al, 2006 (South Pole). The waves observed at the South Pole are not detected when the Sun drops below a 10 degree elevation angle, which is not true for the other locations. We extend the study of Kim et al, 2006, and explore possible generation mechanisms including sunlit ionosphere and ion cyclotron wave modes, as well as correspondence with energetic particle precipitation.

  16. Source characteristics of Jovian narrow-band kilometric radio emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reiner, M. J.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; Kaiser, M. L.; Desch, M. D.; Manning, R.; Zarka, P.; Pedersen, B.-M.

    1993-07-01

    New observations of Jovian narrow-band kilometric (nKOM) radio emissions were made by the Unified Radio and Plasma Wave (URAP) experiment on the Ulysses spacecraft during the Ulysses-Jupiter encounter in early February 1992. These observations have demonstrated the unique capability of the URAP instrument for determining both the direction and polarization of nKOM radio sources. An important result is the discovery that nKOM radio emission originates from a number of distinct sources located at different Jovian longitudes and at the inner and outermost regions of the Io plasma torus. These sources have been tracked for several Jovian rotations, yielding their corotational lags, their spatial and temporal evolution, and their radiation characteristics at both low latitudes far from Jupiter and at high latitudes near the planet. Both right-hand and left-hand circularly polarized nKOM sources were observed. The polarizations observed for sources in the outermost regions of the torus seem to favor extraordinary mode emission.

  17. Propagation modeling results for narrow-beam undersea laser communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fletcher, Andrew S.; Hardy, Nicholas D.; Hamilton, Scott A.

    2016-03-01

    Communication links through ocean waters are challenging due to undersea propagation physics. Undersea optical communications at blue or green wavelengths can achieve high data rates (megabit- to gigabit-per-second class links) despite the challenging undersea medium. Absorption and scattering in ocean waters attenuate optical signals and distort the waveform through dense multipath. The exponential propagation loss and the temporal spread due to multipath limit the achievable link distance and data rate. In this paper, we describe the Monte Carlo modeling of the undersea scattering and absorption channel. We model photon signal attenuation levels, spatial photon distributions, time of arrival statistics, and angle of arrival statistics for a variety of lasercom scenarios through both clear and turbid water environments. Modeling results inform the design options for an undersea optical communication system, particularly illustrating the advantages of narrow-beam lasers compared to wide beam methods (e.g. LED sources). The modeled pupil plane and focal plane photon arrival distributions enable beam tracking techniques for robust pointing solutions, even in highly scattering harbor waters. Laser communication with collimated beams maximizes the photon transfer through the scattering medium and enables spatial and temporal filters to minimize waveform distortion and background interference.

  18. IP-based narrow-band videophone system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhengbing; Zhu, Dongmei; Xue, Liang; Zhu, Guangxi

    2005-02-01

    Architecture of an IP-based narrow-band videophone system is proposed in this paper for convenient videophone calls between any two computers even if being placed in two different LANs within network agents. The bandwidth need of each call is less than 256 kbps. The system consists of two kinds of entities: Videophone Terminals (VPT) and a Video Call Server (VCS). A VPT is actually a microcomputer program, composed of 4 primary parts, an audio codec, a video codec, a media deliverer/receiver and a call controller. The basic functions of the VCS include videophone number generation and management, access admission and address resolution. The VCS with a public IP address plays an important role in the system especially when a video call has to penetrate through network agents. Each VPT in the system gets its own external transport address from the VCS through registration process. A calling VPT would receive the external transport address of the called VPT from the VCS through address resolution. The proposed system works and is helpful to accelerate the realization of people's videophone dream over IP networks.

  19. Assembly auxiliary system for narrow cabins of spacecraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yi; Li, Shiqi; Wang, Junfeng

    2015-09-01

    Due to the narrow space and complex structure of spacecraft cabin, the existing asssembly systems can not well suit for the assembly process of cabin products. This paper aims to introduce an assembly auxiliary system for cabin products. A hierarchical-classification method is proposed to re-adjust the initial assembly relationship of cabin into a new hierarchical structure for efficient assembly planning. An improved ant colony algorithm based on three assembly principles is established for searching a optimizational assembly sequence of cabin parts. A mixed reality assembly environment is constructed with enhanced information to promote interaction efficiency of assembly training and guidance. Based on the machine vision technology, the inspection of left redundant objects and measurement of parts distance in inner cabin are efficiently performed. The proposed system has been applied to the assembly work of a spacecraft cabin with 107 parts, which includes cabin assembly planning, assembly training and assembly quality inspection. The application result indicates that the proposed system can be an effective assistant tool to cabin assembly works and provide an intuitive and real assembly experience for workers. This paper presents an assembly auxiliary system for spacecraft cabin products, which can provide technical support to the spacecraft cabin assembly industry.

  20. Indian power generation market: Narrowing the gap between supply & demand

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, R.

    1997-01-01

    It is estimated that per capita consumption of electricity in India is less than 350 kWh per year, an extremely low level by world standards. India accounts for 16% of the world`s population, but only 3% of world energy consumption. Massive investments, as much as US $10 billion over the next five years, are needed to narrow the gap between supply and demand. Power sector policy reforms dating back to 1991 have encouraged private investors, but the lndian bureaucracy itself still bubbles with protectionist leanings and corruption, resulting in delays and inefficiencies. Stakes in the Indian power sector are so high, however, that investor interest is still keen. Most predict better than double-digit growth in the Indian energy sector through 2000. Those who have been persistent in courting the India power sector will eventually reap the rewards. This paper describes some of the projects in the works at present and the companies and equipment manufacturers involved. 6 figs.

  1. Mass Outflow in the Narrow Line Region of Markarian 573

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Revalski, Mitchell; Crenshaw, D. Michael; Fischer, Travis C.; Kraemer, Steven B.; Schmitt, Henrique R.

    2016-01-01

    We present our progress toward determining the mass outflow rate in the narrow emission line region (NLR) of the Seyfert 2 galaxy Markarian 573. Mass outflows in Active Galactic Nuclei (AGN) drive gas away from the central supermassive black hole (SMBH) into the circumnuclear environment, and may play an important role in regulating the growth of the SMBH, and its coevolution with the host galaxy bulge. Recent work by Crenshaw et al. (2015, ApJ, 799, 83) found that the mass outflow rate in the NLR of NGC 4151 is too large for the outflowing mass to have originated only from the central region, indicating a significant amount of gas is picked up by the outflow as it travels away from the nucleus. Using archival spectra taken with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph (STIS), we are working to determine the mass outflow rates in a sample of 10 Seyfert galaxies to determine if correlations exist between their outflows and other properties including galaxy luminosity. To accomplish this, we will analyze the emission line spectra using photoionization models to determine the mass of the outflowing gas. Combining this information with previous kinematic modeling from Fischer et al. (2013, ApJS, 209, 1), we can determine the mass outflow rates and kinetic luminosities as a function of radius from the nucleus. These quantities will provide a direct comparison between observation and theoretical feedback models, allowing us to determine the significance of these outflows in regulating AGN feedback.

  2. The HST view of the innermost narrow line region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balmaverde, Barbara; Capetti, Alessandro; Moisio, Daria; Baldi, Ranieri D.; Marconi, Alessandro

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the properties of the innermost narrow line region in a sample of low-luminosity AGN. We select 33 LINERs (bona fide AGN) and Seyfert galaxies from the optical spectroscopic Palomar survey observed by HST/STIS. We find that in LINERs the [ N II ] and [ O I ] lines are broader than the [ S II ] line and that the [ N II ] /[ S II ] flux ratio increases when moving from ground-based to HST spectra. This effect is more pronounced considering the wings of the lines. Our interpretation is that, as a result of superior HST spatial resolution, we isolate a compact region of dense ionized gas in LINERs, located at a typical distance of ~3 pc and with a gas density of ~104-105 cm-3, which we identify with the outer portion of the intermediate line region (ILR). Instead, we do not observe these kinds of effects in Seyferts; this may be the result of a stronger dilution from the NLR emission, since the HST slit maps a larger region in these sources. Alternatively, we argue that the innermost, higher density component of the ILR is only present in Seyferts, while it is truncated at larger radii because of the presence of the circumnuclear torus. The ILR is only visible in its entirety in LINERs because the obscuring torus is not present in these sources.

  3. A LARGE APERTURE NARROW QUADROUPOLE FOR THE SNS ACCUMULATOR RING.

    SciTech Connect

    TSOUPAS,N.; BRODOWSKI,J.; MENG,W.; WEI,J.; LEE,Y.Y.; TUOZZOLO,J.

    2002-06-03

    The accumulator ring of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is designed to accept high-intensity H{sup -} beam of 1 GeV kinetic energy from the injecting LINAC, and to accumulate, in a time interval of 1 msec, 2 x 10{sup 14} protons in a single bunch of 700 nsec. In order to optimize the effective straight-section spaces for beam-injection, extraction and collimation, we have minimized the width of the large aperture quadrupoles which are located in the same straight sections of the accumulator ring with the injection and extraction systems. By minimizing the width of the quadrupoles to {+-}40.4 cm, the beam-injection and extraction angles are lowered to 8.75{sup o} and 16.8{sup o} respectively. Further optimization of the narrow quadrupole, minimizes the strength of the dodecapole multipole component of the quadrupole, thus reducing the width of the 12pole structure resonance and allowing a larger tune space for stability of the circulating beam. In this paper we present results derived from magnetic field calculations of 2D and 3D modeling, and discuss the method of optimizing the size of the quadrupole and minimizing its dodecapole multipole component.

  4. Inclined internal tide waves at a narrow Mexican Pacific shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filonov, Anatoliy

    2011-07-01

    The dynamics of a semidiurnal internal tidal wave at a narrow Mexican Pacific shelf is discussed using the data of temperature obtained by an anchored instrument and data of field surveys. The internal tide on the shelf is dominated by an inclined wave, which propagates upward and onshore along a continental slope. Despite its reflection from the bottom and from the surface of the ocean, they remain inclined and totally destroyed over the course of one wavelength. Due to wave reflection from the inclined bottom, the horizontal and vertical wave number increase threefold when the wave goes into shallow waters. The wave undergoes nonlinear transformation and overturns forming several homogeneous temperature layers up to 20 m thick. The most intense disturbances of water layers are observed near the bottom, where the slope angle approaches its critical value. Because of nonlinear effects, the wave carries cool deep water out to the shallow depth and causes coastal upwelling. Intense solar warming together with vertical mixing results in a rapid rise of temperature in the 130-m water column that was observed.

  5. The Use of Narrow Diameter Implants in the Molar Area

    PubMed Central

    Saad, M.; Assaf, A.; Gerges, E.

    2016-01-01

    Implant rehabilitations in the posterior jaw are influenced by many factors such as the condition of the remaining teeth, the force factors related to the patient, the quality of the bone, the maintenance of the hygiene, the limited bone height, the type and extent of edentulism, and the nature of the opposing arch. The gold standard is to place a regular diameter implant (>3.7 mm) or a wide one to replace every missing molar. Unfortunately, due to horizontal bone resorption, this option is not possible without lateral bone augmentation. In this situation, narrow diameter implant (NDI < 3.5 mm) could be the alternative to lateral bone augmentation procedures. This paper presents a clinical study where NDIs were used for the replacement of missing molars. They were followed up to 11 years. Special considerations were observed and many parameters were evaluated. NDI could be used to replace missing molar in case of moderate horizontal bone resorption if strict guidelines are respected. Yet, future controlled prospective clinical trials are required to admit their use as scientific evidence. PMID:27293436

  6. Flight Calibration of the LROC Narrow Angle Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humm, D. C.; Tschimmel, M.; Brylow, S. M.; Mahanti, P.; Tran, T. N.; Braden, S. E.; Wiseman, S.; Danton, J.; Eliason, E. M.; Robinson, M. S.

    2016-04-01

    Characterization and calibration are vital for instrument commanding and image interpretation in remote sensing. The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera Narrow Angle Camera (LROC NAC) takes 500 Mpixel greyscale images of lunar scenes at 0.5 meters/pixel. It uses two nominally identical line scan cameras for a larger crosstrack field of view. Stray light, spatial crosstalk, and nonlinearity were characterized using flight images of the Earth and the lunar limb. These are important for imaging shadowed craters, studying ˜1 meter size objects, and photometry respectively. Background, nonlinearity, and flatfield corrections have been implemented in the calibration pipeline. An eight-column pattern in the background is corrected. The detector is linear for DN = 600--2000 but a signal-dependent additive correction is required and applied for DN<600. A predictive model of detector temperature and dark level was developed to command dark level offset. This avoids images with a cutoff at DN=0 and minimizes quantization error in companding. Absolute radiometric calibration is derived from comparison of NAC images with ground-based images taken with the Robotic Lunar Observatory (ROLO) at much lower spatial resolution but with the same photometric angles.

  7. Measurement of Resonance Parameters of Orbitally Excited Narrow B^0 Mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, : T.

    2008-09-01

    The authors report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L = 1) narrow B{sup 0} mesons in decays to B{sup (*)+}{pi}{sup -} using 1.7 fb{sup -1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} state are measured to be m(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 5740.2{sub -1.8}{sup +1.7}(stat.){sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and {Lambda}(B*{sub 2}{sup 0}) = 22.7{sub -3.2}{sup +3.8}(stat.){sub -10.2}{sup +3.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sub 2}. The mass difference between the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} and B{sub 1}{sup 0} states is measured to be 14.9{sub -2.5}{sup +2.2}(stat.){sub -1.4}{sup +1.2}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, resulting in a B{sub 1}{sup 0} mass of 5725.3{sub -2.2}{sup +1.6}(stat.){sub -1.5}{sup +1.4}(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B*{sub 2}{sup 0} width.

  8. Measurement of resonance parameters of orbitally excited narrow B0 mesons.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; González, B Alvarez; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzurri, P; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burke, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Almenar, C Cuenca; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Derwent, P F; di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Genser, K; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; da Costa, J Guimaraes; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; Lecompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-S; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Luci, C; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Macqueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moggi, N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlok, J; Fernandez, P Movilla; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Griso, S Pagan; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Wynne, S M; Xie, S; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2009-03-13

    We report a measurement of resonance parameters of the orbitally excited (L=1) narrow B0 mesons in decays to B;{(*)+}pi;{-} using 1.7 fb;{-1} of data collected by the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. The mass and width of the B_{2};{*0} state are measured to be m(B_{2};{*0})=5740.2_{-1.8};{+1.7}(stat)-0.8+0.9(syst) MeV/c;{2} and Gamma(B_{2};{*0})=22.7_{-3.2};{+3.8}(stat)-10.2+3.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}. The mass difference between the B_{2};{*0} and B10 states is measured to be 14.9_{-2.5};{+2.2}(stat)-1.4+1.2(syst) MeV/c;{2}, resulting in a B10 mass of 5725.3_{-2.2};{+1.6}(stat)-1.5+1.4(syst) MeV/c;{2}. This is currently the most precise measurement of the masses of these states and the first measurement of the B_{2};{*0} width.

  9. Observation of a New Narrow Axial-Vector Meson a1(1420).

    PubMed

    Adolph, C; Akhunzyanov, R; Alexeev, M G; Alexeev, G D; Amoroso, A; Andrieux, V; Anosov, V; Austregesilo, A; Azevedo, C; Badełek, B; Balestra, F; Barth, J; Beck, R; Bedfer, Y; Bernhard, J; Bicker, K; Bielert, E R; Birsa, R; Bisplinghoff, J; Bodlak, M; Boer, M; Bordalo, P; Bradamante, F; Braun, C; Bressan, A; Büchele, M; Burtin, E; Chang, W-C; Chiosso, M; Choi, I; Chung, S U; Cicuttin, A; Crespo, M L; Curiel, Q; Dalla Torre, S; Dasgupta, S S; Dasgupta, S; Denisov, O Yu; Dhara, L; Donskov, S V; Doshita, N; Dünnweber, W; Duic, V; Dziewiecki, M; Efremov, A; Eversheim, P D; Eyrich, W; Faessler, M; Ferrero, A; Finger, M; Finger, M; Fischer, H; Franco, C; du Fresne von Hohenesche, N; Friedrich, J M; Frolov, V; Gautheron, F; Gavrichtchouk, O P; Gerassimov, S; Gnesi, I; Gorzellik, M; Grabmüller, S; Grasso, A; Grosse-Perdekamp, M; Grube, B; Grussenmeyer, T; Guskov, A; Haas, F; Hahne, D; von Harrach, D; Hashimoto, R; Heinsius, F H; Herrmann, F; Hinterberger, F; Horikawa, N; d'Hose, N; Hsieh, C-Yu; Huber, S; Ishimoto, S; Ivanov, A; Ivanshin, Yu; Iwata, T; Jahn, R; Jary, V; Jörg, P; Joosten, R; Kabuß, E; Ketzer, B; Khaustov, G V; Khokhlov, Yu A; Kisselev, Yu; Klein, F; Klimaszewski, K; Koivuniemi, J H; Kolosov, V N; Kondo, K; Königsmann, K; Konorov, I; Konstantinov, V F; Kotzinian, A M; Kouznetsov, O; Krämer, M; Kremser, P; Krinner, F; Kroumchtein, Z V; Kuchinski, N; Kunne, F; Kurek, K; Kurjata, R P; Lednev, A A; Lehmann, A; Levillain, M; Levorato, S; Lichtenstadt, J; Maggiora, A; Magnon, A; Makins, N; Makke, N; Mallot, G K; Marchand, C; Martin, A; Marzec, J; Matousek, J; Matsuda, H; Matsuda, T; Meshcheryakov, G; Meyer, W; Michigami, T; Mikhailov, Yu V; Miyachi, Y; Nagaytsev, A; Nagel, T; Nerling, F; Neyret, D; Nikolaenko, V I; Novy, J; Nowak, W-D; Nunes, A S; Olshevsky, A G; Orlov, I; Ostrick, M; Panzieri, D; Parsamyan, B; Paul, S; Peng, J-C; Pereira, F; Pesek, M; Peshekhonov, D V; Platchkov, S; Pochodzalla, J; Polyakov, V A; Pretz, J; Quaresma, M; Quintans, C; Ramos, S; Regali, C; Reicherz, G; Riedl, C; Rocco, E; Rossiyskaya, N S; Ryabchikov, D I; Rychter, A; Samoylenko, V D; Sandacz, A; Santos, C; Sarkar, S; Savin, I A; Sbrizzai, G; Schiavon, P; Schmeing, S; Schmidt, K; Schmieden, H; Schönning, K; Schopferer, S; Schlüter, T; Selyunin, A; Shevchenko, O Yu; Silva, L; Sinha, L; Sirtl, S; Slunecka, M; Sozzi, F; Srnka, A; Stolarski, M; Sulc, M; Suzuki, H; Szabelski, A; Szameitat, T; Sznajder, P; Takekawa, S; Ter Wolbeek, J; Tessaro, S; Tessarotto, F; Thibaud, F; Tskhay, V; Uhl, S; Veloso, J; Virius, M; Wallner, S; Weisrock, T; Wilfert, M; Zaremba, K; Zavertyaev, M; Zemlyanichkina, E; Ziembicki, M; Zink, A

    2015-08-21

    The COMPASS Collaboration at CERN has measured diffractive dissociation of 190  GeV/c pions into the π(-)π(-)π(+) final state using a stationary hydrogen target. A partial-wave analysis (PWA) was performed in bins of 3π mass and four-momentum transfer using the isobar model and the so far largest PWA model consisting of 88 waves. A narrow peak is observed in the f0(980)π channel with spin, parity and C-parity quantum numbers J(PC)=1(++). We present a resonance-model study of a subset of the spin-density matrix selecting 3π states with J(PC)=2(++) and 4(++) decaying into ρ(770)π and with J(PC)=1(++) decaying into f0(980)π. We identify a new a1 meson with mass (1414(-13)(+15))  MeV/c2 and width (153(-23)(+8))  MeV/c2. Within the final states investigated in our analysis, we observe the new a1(1420) decaying only into f0(980)π, suggesting its exotic nature. PMID:26340182

  10. Laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing in Sm2+-doped fluoride glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Masanori; Kushida, Takashi

    1994-02-01

    Fluorescence line-narrowing experiments have been made for the Sm2+ ion in fluoride glass at 77 K under cw dye-laser excitation at various energies within the inhomogeneously broadened 7F50-D0 and 7F50-D1 absorption lines. The energies of the three Stark levels of the 7F1 and 5D1 manifolds have been obtained as a function of the 5D70-F0 energy separation. From the analysis of this result, it has been found that the site-to-site variations of the energies of these Stark levels can be explained well only by taking into account the J-mixing effect. The low-energy levels of the 4f55d configuration lie in the vicinity of the 5DJ states in this material. However, no effect of the crystal-field mixing of the 4f55d states on the inhomogeneous distribution of the energies of the 7F1 and 5D1 states has been observed. The origin of the unusually intense 5D70-F0 transition in Sm2+ is also discussed.

  11. Having Their Lives Narrowed Down? The State of Black Women's College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winkle-Wagner, Rachelle

    2015-01-01

    Contradictory trends emerge relative to Black women's college success: They have doubled their enrollment rates in thirty years but their graduation rates remain behind those of White and Asian women. This integrative, interdisciplinary review of both student- and institutional-level factors explores the role of individual characteristics and…

  12. Can Technology Narrow the Black-White Achievement Gap?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beglau, Monica M.

    2005-01-01

    The author begins this article by relating the experiences of her fourth-grade students who had just completed an intensive four-week project that involved crafting arguments to convince their local school board to allow a field trip to the Missouri state capitol so they could explore their state's government in person and in depth. Just one year…

  13. Magneto-optical studies of magnetic and non-magnetic narrow-gap semiconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khodaparast, Giti

    2005-03-01

    In light of the growing interest in spin-related phenomena and devices, there is now renewed interest in the science and engineering of narrow gap semiconductors. Narrow gap semiconductors (NGS) offer many unique features such as small effective masses, high intrinsic mobilities, large effective g- factors, and large spin-orbit coupling effects. This talk will discuss our recent magneto-optical studies on InSb quantum wells (QWs) and InMnAs ferromagnetic heterostructures. In InSb QWs, we observe spin-resolved cyclotron resonance (CR) caused by the non- parabolicity in conduction band and electron spin resonance in symmetric and asymmetric confinement potentials. The asymmetric wells exhibit a strong deviation in behavior from the symmetric wells at low magnetic fields with far more spin splitting than expected from the bulk g-factor of InSb. In InMnAs/GaSb we observe light and heavy hole CR peaks which demonstrate the existence of delocalized p-like carriers. In addition, In order to increase our understanding of the dynamics of carriers and spins, we performed time resolved measurements such as time- resolved CR spectroscopy on undoped InSb QWs and time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect on InMnAs/GaSb. Our results are important for understanding the electronic and magnetic states in NGS. This work was performed in collaboration with M. B. Santos and R. E. Doezema at the Univ. of Oklahoma, J. Wang and J. Kono at Rice Univ., H. Munekata at Tokyo Institute of Technology, C. J. Stanton at the Univ. of Florida, and Y. H. Matsuda and N. Miura at the Univ. of Tokyo.

  14. Manipulation of electrical flicker-noise and line narrowing in free-running quantum cascade-lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamanishi, Masamichi; Hirohata, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Intrinsic linewidths of quantum-cascade lasers are found to be extremely narrow, ~100 Hz. However, the free running linewidths (usually ~1 MHz) of existing quantum-cascade lasers are governed by flicker frequency-noise that is identified to originate from electrical flicker-noise in the devices. Obviously, substantial suppression of the electrical flicker noise is required for substantial narrowing of free-running LWs. In this presentation, we show systematic experimental results of flicker voltage-noise power-spectral density obtained with mid-infrared quantum-cascade lasers of designed positioning of impurities in injectors. The measured noise-levels depending strongly on impurity position as well as device-temperature are evaluated with an ad hoc model based on fluctuating charge-dipoles induced by trapping and de-trapping at impurity states in their injectors. It is shown that quasi-delta doping of impurities leads to strong suppression of electrical flicker noise by minimization of the dipole-length at a certain temperature, for instance ~300 K and, in turn, is expected to narrow astonishingly the free-running line-width down below 10 kHz without assistances of any types of feedback schemes.

  15. The peculiar radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 galaxy 1H 0323+342

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Sahayanathan, S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Anjum, Ayesha; Pandey, S. B.

    2014-07-10

    We present a multiwavelength study of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLSy1) 1H 0323+342, detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Multiband light curves show many orphan X-ray and optical flares having no corresponding γ-ray counterparts. Such anomalous variability behavior can be due to different locations of the emission region from the central source. During a large flare, a γ-ray flux doubling timescale as small as ∼3 hr is noticed. We built spectral energy distributions (SEDs) during different activity states and modeled them using a one-zone leptonic model. The shape of the optical/UV component of the SEDs is dominated by accretion disk emission in all the activity states. In the X-ray band, significant thermal emission from the hot corona is inferred during quiescent and first flaring states; however, during subsequent flares, the nonthermal jet component dominates. The γ-ray emission in all the states can be well explained by inverse-Compton scattering of accretion disk photons reprocessed by the broad-line region. The source showed violent intra-night optical variability, coinciding with one of the high γ-ray activity states. An analysis of the overall X-ray spectrum fitted with an absorbed power-law plus relativistic reflection component hints at the presence of an Fe Kα line and returns a high black hole spin value of a = 0.96 ± 0.14. We argue that 1H 0323+342 possesses dual characteristics, akin to both flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and radio-quiet NLSy1 galaxies, though at a low jet power regime compared to powerful FSRQs.

  16. The Peculiar Radio-loud Narrow Line Seyfert 1 Galaxy 1H 0323+342

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Sahayanathan, S.; Parker, M. L.; Fabian, A. C.; Stalin, C. S.; Anjum, Ayesha; Pandey, S. B.

    2014-07-01

    We present a multiwavelength study of the radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy (NLSy1) 1H 0323+342, detected by the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope. Multiband light curves show many orphan X-ray and optical flares having no corresponding γ-ray counterparts. Such anomalous variability behavior can be due to different locations of the emission region from the central source. During a large flare, a γ-ray flux doubling timescale as small as ~3 hr is noticed. We built spectral energy distributions (SEDs) during different activity states and modeled them using a one-zone leptonic model. The shape of the optical/UV component of the SEDs is dominated by accretion disk emission in all the activity states. In the X-ray band, significant thermal emission from the hot corona is inferred during quiescent and first flaring states; however, during subsequent flares, the nonthermal jet component dominates. The γ-ray emission in all the states can be well explained by inverse-Compton scattering of accretion disk photons reprocessed by the broad-line region. The source showed violent intra-night optical variability, coinciding with one of the high γ-ray activity states. An analysis of the overall X-ray spectrum fitted with an absorbed power-law plus relativistic reflection component hints at the presence of an Fe Kα line and returns a high black hole spin value of a = 0.96 ± 0.14. We argue that 1H 0323+342 possesses dual characteristics, akin to both flat-spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) and radio-quiet NLSy1 galaxies, though at a low jet power regime compared to powerful FSRQs.

  17. Brownian needle in dire straits: Stochastic motion of a rod in very confined narrow domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holcman, D.; Schuss, Z.

    2012-01-01

    We study the mean turnaround time of a Brownian needle in a narrow planar strip. When the needle is only slightly shorter than the width of the strip, the computation becomes a nonstandard narrow escape problem. We develop a boundary layer method, based on a conformal mapping of cusplike narrow straits, to obtain an explicit asymptotic approximation to the mean turnaround time. Our result suggests that two-dimensional domains lying between parallel walls may play a significant role in DNA repair.

  18. Stabilization and dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bieri, Joanna A.

    The dynamics of edge flames in narrow channels is studied, first within the context of a reactive diffusive (or constant density) model and then in a variable density model which allows for the consideration of thermal expansion effects. Fuel and oxidizer, separated upstream by a thin plate of finite length, flow into a channel with a prescribed upstream velocity. At the end of the plate, the fuel and oxidizer mix and, when ignited, an edge flame is sustained at some distance from the tip of the plate. Typically, the flame, which is stabilized by heat conduction back to the cold plate, has a tribrachial structure. It consists of a leading edge, made up of lean and rich premixed segments, and an attached diffusion flame trailing behind. The flame can also have a hook-like shape, when one of the premixed branches is missing. This often happens for conditions away from stoichiometry and when the mass diffusivities of the fuel and oxidizer are unequal. Earlier work has determined the behavior of an edge flame in a mixing layer that develops downstream of a splitter plate with no boundaries in the lateral direction. This is relevant to the stabilization and liftoff of jet diffusion flames. The confined case has other possible applications, such as flames in mini-combustor systems, that have been recently tested experimentally. The objective in this work is to determine the effect that confinement has on the edge standoff distance, on the flame shape and on the flame stability. In particular, we examine the influence of channel width, wall temperature, and the effects of differential diffusion. We determine conditions under which the edge flame is stabilized near the tip of the splitter plate, is held near the tip but oscillates back and forth, or is blown-off. We consider a wide range of channel widths and boundary conditions at the walls.

  19. Detection of joint space narrowing in hand radiographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauffman, Joost A.; Slump, Cornelis H.; Bernelot Moens, Hein J.

    2006-03-01

    Radiographic assessment of joint space narrowing in hand radiographs is important for determining the progression of rheumatoid arthritis in an early stage. Clinical scoring methods are based on manual measurements that are time consuming and subjected to intra-reader and inter-reader variance. The goal is to design an automated method for measuring the joint space width with a higher sensitivity to change1 than manual methods. The large variability in joint shapes and textures, the possible presence of joint damage, and the interpretation of projection images make it difficult to detect joint margins accurately. We developed a method that uses a modified active shape model to scan for margins within a predetermined region of interest. Possible joint space margin locations are detected using a probability score based on the Mahalanobis distance. To prevent the detection of false edges, we use a dynamic programming approach. The shape model and the Mahalanobis scoring function are trained with a set of 50 hand radiographs, in which the margins have been outlined by an expert. We tested our method on a test set of 50 images. The method was evaluated by calculating the mean absolute difference with manual readings by a trained person. 90% of the joint margins are detected within 0.12 mm. We found that our joint margin detection method has a higher precision considering reproducibility than manual readings. For cases where the joint space has disappeared, the algorithm is unable to estimate the margins. In these cases it would be necessary to use a different method to quantify joint damage.

  20. Vascular contrast in narrow-band and white light imaging.

    PubMed

    Du Le, V N; Wang, Quanzeng; Gould, Taylor; Ramella-Roman, Jessica C; Pfefer, T Joshua

    2014-06-20

    Narrow-band imaging (NBI) is a spectrally selective reflectance imaging technique that is used clinically for enhancing visualization of superficial vasculature and has shown promise for applications such as early endoscopic detection of gastrointestinal neoplasia. We have studied the effect of vessel geometry and illumination wavelength on vascular contrast using idealized geometries in order to more quantitatively understand NBI and broadband or white light imaging of mucosal tissue. Simulations were performed using a three-dimensional, voxel-based Monte Carlo model incorporating discrete vessels. In all cases, either 415 or 540 nm illumination produced higher contrast than white light, yet white light did not always produce the lowest contrast. White light produced the lowest contrast for small vessels and intermediate contrast for large vessels (diameter≥100  μm) at deep regions (vessel depth≥200  μm). The results show that 415 nm illuminations provided superior contrast for smaller vessels at shallow depths while 540 nm provided superior contrast for larger vessels in deep regions. Besides 540 nm, our studies also indicate the potential of other wavelengths to achieve high contrast of large vessels at deep regions. Simulation results indicate the importance of three key mechanisms in determining spectral variations in contrast: intravascular hemoglobin (Hb) absorption in the vessel of interest, diffuse Hb absorption from collateral vasculature, and bulk tissue scattering. Measurements of NBI contrast in turbid phantoms incorporating 0.1-mm-diameter hemoglobin-filled capillary tubes indicated good agreement with modeling results. These results provide quantitative insights into light-tissue interactions and the effect of device and tissue properties on NBI performance.

  1. NARROW-K-BAND OBSERVATIONS OF THE GJ 1214 SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Colón, Knicole D.; Gaidos, Eric

    2013-10-10

    GJ 1214 is a nearby M dwarf star that hosts a transiting super-Earth-size planet, making this system an excellent target for atmospheric studies. Most studies find that the transmission spectrum of GJ 1214b is flat, which favors either a high mean molecular weight or cloudy/hazy hydrogen (H) rich atmosphere model. Photometry at short wavelengths (<0.7 μm) and in the K band can discriminate the most between these different atmosphere models for GJ 1214b, but current observations do not have sufficiently high precision. We present photometry of seven transits of GJ 1214b through a narrow K-band (2.141 μm) filter with the Wide Field Camera on the 3.8 m United Kingdom Infrared Telescope. Our photometric precision is typically 1.7 × 10{sup –3} (for a single transit), comparable with other ground-based observations of GJ 1214b. We measure a planet-star radius ratio of 0.1158 ± 0.0013, which, along with other studies, also supports a flat transmission spectrum for GJ 1214b. Since this does not exclude a scenario where GJ 1214b has an H-rich envelope with heavy elements that are sequestered below a cloud/haze layer, we compare K-band observations with models of H{sub 2} collision-induced absorption in an atmosphere for a range of temperatures. While we find no evidence for deviation from a flat spectrum (slope s = 0.0016 ± 0.0038), an H{sub 2}-dominated upper atmosphere (<60 mbar) cannot be excluded. More precise observations at <0.7 μm and in the K band, as well as a uniform analysis of all published data, would be useful for establishing more robust limits on atmosphere models for GJ 1214b.

  2. Comparison of the efficacy of narrow band ultraviolet B and narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical catalase-superoxide dismutase treatment in vitiligo patients.

    PubMed

    Yuksel, Esra Pancar; Aydin, Fatma; Senturk, Nilgun; Canturk, Tayyar; Turanli, Ahmet Yasar

    2009-01-01

    Accumulation of free radicals in the epidermis and the role of oxidative stress have been demonstrated in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. So, new treatment modalities that support antioxidant systems may be a choice for treatment. We sought to determine the clinical efficacy of narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical formulation including Cucumis melo superoxide dismutase and catalase (Vitix), over the narrow band ultraviolet B treatment alone. Thirty vitiligo patients (18 female, 12 male; mean age 34 +/- 13 years) were included in this study. 15 patients in Group 1 were treated only with narrow band ultraviolet B whereas 15 patients in Group 2 were treated with narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical Vitix for 6 months. Areas of 21 lesions from each group were measured by point counting methods at the beginning and at the end of the treatment. Efficacy of treatment was graded as perfect, good, moderate and poor according to healing percentages of measured areas and both groups were compared statistically. In Group 1 two moderate; in Group 2 one perfect, four moderate healings were observed at the end of the treatment. There was no statistically significant difference according to healing percentages between the two groups (p > 0.05). No adverse effect was reported in either group. The superiority of narrow band ultraviolet B plus topical Vitix treatment over narrow band ultraviolet B treatment could not be demonstrated statistically. There is a need for further studies involving large case series to clarify the results of our preliminary study. PMID:19467974

  3. Asymmetry Measurement in the Elastic Pion-Proton Scattering at 1.94 and 2.07 GeV/c

    SciTech Connect

    Alekseev, I. G.; Budkovsky, P. E.; Kanavets, V. P.; Koroleva, L. I.; Morozov, B. V.; Nesterov, V. M.; Ryltsov, V. V.; Sulimov, A. D.; Svirida, D. N.; Zhurkin, V. V.; Bazhanov, N. A.; Bunyatova, E. I.; Zolin, L. S.; Beloglazov, Yu. A.; Filimonov, E. A.; Kovalev, A. I.; Kruglov, S. P.; Novinsky, D. V.; Shchedrov, V. A.; Sumachev, V. V.

    2007-06-13

    Latest results by the ITEP-PNPI collaboration on the asymmetry in the {pi}+p elastic scattering are presented. The data were obtained for the first time in the region of backward angles with low cross section, where the predictions of the partial wave analyses are not reliable. The results at 1.94 GeV/c are in favor of the older KH80 analysis and show noticeable deviation from the latest FA06 solution by GWU group. At 2.07 GeV/c very low cross section did not allow to achieve good accuracy. Yet the data do not follow any of the PWA predictions and definitely disagree with SP06 analysis.

  4. Anomalous diameter dependence of thermal transport in ultra-narrow Si nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Karamitaheri, Hossein; Neophytou, Neophytos; Kosina, Hans

    2014-01-14

    We present atomistic valence force field calculations of thermal transport in Si nanowires of diameters from 12 nm down to 1 nm. We show that as the diameter is reduced, the phonon density-of-states and transmission function acquire a finite value at low frequency, in contrast to approaching zero as in the bulk material. It turns out that this effect results in what Ziman described as the “problem of long longitudinal waves” [J. M. Ziman, Electrons and Phonons: The Theory of Transport Phenomena in Solids (Clarendon, Oxford, 1962)], which states that the thermal conductivity of a material increases as its length is increased due to the vanishing scattering for long-wavelength phonons. We show that this thermal transport improvement also appears in nanowires as their diameter is decreased below D = 5 nm (not only as the length increases), originating from the increase in the density of the long wavevector modes. The observation is present under ballistic transport conditions, and further enhanced with the introduction of phonon-phonon scattering. Because of this, in such ultra-narrow nanowires, as the diameter is reduced, phonon transport is dominated more and more by lower energy phonons with longer mean-free paths. We show that ∼80% of the heat is carried by phonons with energies less than 5 meV, most with mean-free paths of several hundreds of nanometers.

  5. NGC 4051 and the Nature of Narrow-Line Seyfert I Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, B. M.; McHardy, I. M.; Wilkes, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    We report on the results of a three-year program of coordinated X-ray and optical monitoring of the narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxy NGC 4051. The principal results of this program are: (1) The H-beta emission line time lag and Doppler width yield a virial mass estimate of about 1.1 mission solar masses, at the extreme low end of AGN masses. A plausible adjustment for inclination effects increases this mass slightly to about 1.4 mission solar masses. (2) During the third year of this campaign, both the X-ray continuum and the He II 4686 line went into extremely low states, although the optical continuum and the H-beta broad line were both still present and variable. We suggest that the inner part of the accretion disk may have gone into an advection-dominated state, yielding little radiation from the hotter inner disk. (3) The He II 4686 line is almost five times as broad as H-beta, and it is strongly blueward asymmetric, as are the high-ionization UV lines recorded in archive spectra of NGC 4051. The data are consistent with the Balmer lines arising in a low-inclination disk-like configuration, and the high-ionization lines arising in an outflowing wind, of which we observe preferentially the near side.

  6. Static and dynamical properties of a hard-disk fluid confined to a narrow channel.

    PubMed

    Godfrey, M J; Moore, M A

    2014-03-01

    The thermodynamic properties of disks moving in a channel sufficiently narrow that they can collide only with their nearest neighbors can be solved exactly by determining the eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of an integral equation. Using it, we have determined the correlation length ξ of this system. We have developed an approximate solution which becomes exact in the high-density limit. It describes the system in terms of defects in the regular zigzag arrangement of disks found in the high-density limit. The correlation length is then effectively the spacing between the defects. The time scales for defect creation and annihilation are determined with the help of transition-state theory, as is the diffusion coefficient of the defects, and these results are found to be in good agreement with molecular dynamics simulations. On compressing the system with the Lubachevsky-Stillinger procedure, jammed states are obtained whose packing fractions ϕJ are a function of the compression rate γ. We find a quantitative explanation of this dependence by making use of the Kibble-Zurek hypothesis. We have also determined the point-to-set length scale ξPS for this system. At a packing fraction ϕ close to its largest value ϕmax, ξPS has a simple power law divergence, ξPS∼1/(1-ϕ/ϕmax), while ξ diverges much faster, ln(ξ)∼1/(1-ϕ/ϕmax). PMID:24730794

  7. Observation of a narrow structure in 1 H( γ , KS0 ) X via interference with φ -meson production

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Amaryan, M. J.; Gavalian, G.; Nepali, C.; Polyakov, M. V.; Azimov, Ya.; Briscoe, W. J.; Dodge, G. E.; Hyde, C. E.; Klein, F.; Kuznetsov, V.; et al

    2012-03-01

    We report observation of a narrow peak structure at ≈1.54 GeV with a Gaussian width σ = 6 MeV in the missing mass of KS in the reaction γ + p → pKSKL. The observed structure may be due to the interference between a strange (or antistrange) baryon resonance in the pKL system and the φ(KSKL) photoproduction leading to the same final state. The statistical significance of the observed excess of events estimated as the log-likelihood ratio of the resonant signal + background hypothesis and the φ-production-based background-only hypothesis corresponds to 5.3σ.

  8. Problems of simulating tornado-like heat transfer in turbulent flow past a dimpled relief on a narrow channel wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isaev, S. A.; Leontiev, A. I.

    2010-09-01

    This paper analyzes the state of the art of numerical and partly physical simulation of convective heat transfer in the vicinity of dimpled reliefs on one of the walls of narrow plane-parallel channels. We show that there is a mismatch and spread of the results of these investigations, their conclusions lack substantiation, and there are "white spots" in the problems under consideration and in the methods of their investigation. Several physical experiments have been analyzed, and the correlation between the calculated predictions and measurement data has been discussed. In conclusion, the thermohydraulic characteristics of various dimpled reliefs are compared, and the advantage of oval dimples over spherical ones is demonstrated.

  9. Substantial band-gap narrowing of α-Si 3N 4 induced by heavy Al doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, W.; Geng, W. T.

    2011-07-01

    Our first-principles study on the structural and electronic properties of Al-doped α-Si 3N 4 predict a significant band-gap narrowing, which makes this material a more efficient phosphor. Strong attraction of substitutional and interstitial Al atoms leads to the formation of stable (3+1) complexes that behave as isoelectronic traps. The near-mid-gap states of the interstitials reduce nearly half of the band-gap of α-Si 3N 4. Such a new nitride-based semiconductor could be a promising photocatalyst with high reactivity in solar irradiation or interior lighting in visible spectrum.

  10. Narrow band imaging and long slit spectroscopy of UGC 5101

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanga, R. M.; Mannucci, F.; Rodriguezespinosa, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    UGC 5101 (z = 0.04; D is approximately equal to 240 Mpc) is one of the so called Ultraluminous IRAS sources. Two important properties of the members of this group are their L(sub IR) is greater than or equal to 10(exp 12) solar luminosity, and their space density in the universe up to z is less than 0.1 is equal or even larger than the space density of the quasars. Further noteworthy features of the Ultraluminous IRAS sources are their being morphologically peculiar and the fact that they all seem to host active nuclei in their center. We have observed UGC 5101 in an effort to study the interplay between the gas ionized by the central active nucleus and that gas ionized by other processes which may hold important clues to the understanding of the entire picture of this object. In particular these other ionizing processes could well be massive stars formed recently after the galactic encounter and shocks possibly also related to the galaxy collision. The data that we discuss were obtained between Dec. 1989 and Jan. 1992 with the WHT 4.2 m telescope using the two-arm spectrograph ISIS. Several spectral frames were obtained at three different position angles: PA 84--along the tail of the galaxy; PA 32--along the dust lane; and PA 110. The blue spectra are centered on the H beta line, while the red spectra are centered on the H alpha line. In the configuration we used for the long slit spectra, the spectral scale was 0.74 A per pixel, and the spatial scale was .37 arcsec per pixel; we also observed the H alpha region with a spectral scale of .37 A per pixel, at position angle 84. The narrow band images were obtained at the auxiliary port of ISIS, with a scale of .2 arcsec per pixel, and were centered at the H alpha wavelength, and on the adjacent continuum. The H alpha images and the spectra support the following model. UGC 5101 hosts an active nucleus; the NLR extends up to about 1.5 kpc and shows a complex velocity field, superimposed on the rotation curve of the

  11. Linear and Nonlinear Optical Techniques to Characterize Narrow Gap Semiconductors:

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Stephen Warren

    Several methods have been developed and used to characterize the narrow gap semiconductors Hg(,1-x)Cd(,x)Te (HgCdTe) (0.20 < x < 0.32) and InSb both in the presence of CO(,2) laser radiation and in the dark. The results have allowed the determination of certain band parameters including the fundamental energy bandgap E(,g) which is directly related to x, the mole fraction of Cd. In the dark, characterization of several different samples of HgCdTe and InSb were carried out by analyzing the temperature dependence of the Hall coefficient and the magnetic field positions of the magnetophonon extrema from which their x-values were determined. The quality of the magnetophonon spectral is also shown to be related to the inhomogeneity (DELTA)x of the HgCdTe samples. One-photon magneto-absorption (OPMA) spectra have been obtained for x (TURN) 0.2 samples of p-HgCdTe thin films and n-HgCdTe bulk samples. Analysis of the OPMA transition energies allows the x-value to be determined to within (DBLTURN)(+OR-)0.001. A method is also discussed which can be used to estimate the sample inhomogeneity (DELTA)x. Nonlinear optical properties of semiconductors are not only scientifically interesting to study, but are also proving to be technologically important as various nonlinear optical devices are being developed. One of the most valuable nonlinear optical characterization method uses two-photon absorption (TPA). Two techniques using TPA processes were developed and used to measure the cut -off wavelength of several different samples of HgCdTe (x (TURN) 0.3) from which x-values were determined to within (DBLTURN)(+OR-)0.0005. Intensity and temperature dependent measurements on impurity and TPA processes have also been carried out and the results are compared with rate equations describing the photo-excited carrier dynamics. These results have yielded important information about the optical and material properties of HgCdTe such as the detection of impurity and trapping levels, TPA

  12. Narrow-band ultraviolet-B stimulates proliferation and migration of cultured melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ching-Shuang; Yu, Chia-Li; Wu, Chieh-Shan; Lan, Cheng-Che E; Yu, Hsin-Su

    2004-12-01

    Narrow-band ultraviolet-B (UVB) radiation is an effective treatment for vitiligo vulgaris. However, the mechanisms of narrow-band UVB in inducing repigmentation of vitiligo lesions are not thoroughly clarified. The purpose of our study was to investigate the effects of narrow-band UVB irradiation on melanocyte proliferation and migration in vitro. Our results showed that the cell counts as well as [3H]thymidine uptake of melanocytes were significantly enhanced by narrow-band UVB-irradiated keratinocyte supernatants. In these supernatants, a significant increase in basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) and in endothelin-1 (ET-1) release was observed. bFGF is a natural mitogen for melanocytes, whereas ET-1 can stimulate DNA synthesis in melanocytes. This stimulatory effect of melanocyte proliferation by supernatants derived from narrow-band UVB-irradiated keratinocytes was significantly reduced by a selective endothelin-B (ET-B) receptor antagonist (BQ788), suggesting an essential role of ET-1 on melanocyte proliferation. Our results of time-lapse microphotography revealed a stimulatory effect of narrow-band UVB irradiation on melanocyte migration. Focal adhesion kinase (FAK) plays a pivotal role in cell migration. Phosphorylated FAK (p125(FAK)) expression on melanocyte was enhanced by narrow-band UVB irradiation. In this study, narrow-band UVB irradiation stimulated a significant increase in matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) activity in melanocyte supernatants. Narrow-band UVB-irradiation-induced migration of melanocytes was significantly annihilated by the addition of p125(FAK) inhibitor (herbimycin-A) or MMP-2 inhibitor (GM6001). These results suggest that p125(FAK) and MMP-2 activity play important roles in narrow-band UVB-induced migration of melanocytes. Our results provide a theoretical basis for the effectiveness of narrow-band UVB irradiation in treating vitiligo.

  13. Magnetic Fields Sculpt Narrow Jets From Dying Star

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2006-03-01

    Molecules spewed outward from a dying star are confined into narrow jets by a tightly-wound magnetic field, according to astronomers who used the National Science Foundation's Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) radio telescope to study an old star about 8,500 light-years from Earth. Magnetic Field Around Jet Artist's Conception Shows Tightly-Wound Magnetic Field Confining Jet CREDIT: NRAO/AUI/NSF (Click on image for larger version) The star, called W43A, in the constellation Aquila, is in the process of forming a planetary nebula, a shell of brightly-glowing gas lit by the hot ember into which the star will collapse. In 2002, astronomers discovered that the aging star was ejecting twin jets of water molecules. That discovery was a breakthrough in understanding how many planetary nebulae are formed into elongated shapes. "The next question was, what is keeping this outpouring of material confined into narrow jets? Theoreticians suspected magnetic fields, and we now have found the first direct evidence that a magnetic field is confining such a jet," said Wouter Vlemmings, a Marie Curie Fellow working at the Jodrell Bank Observatory of the University of Manchester in England. "Magnetic fields previously have been detected in jets emitted by quasars and protostars, but the evidence was not conclusive that the magnetic fields were actually confining the jets. These new VLBA observations now make that direct connection for the very first time," Vlemmings added. By using the VLBA to study the alignment, or polarization, of radio waves emitted by water molecules in the jets, the scientists were able to determine the strength and orientation of the magnetic field surrounding the jets. "Our observations support recent theoretical models in which magnetically-confined jets produce the sometimes-complex shapes we see in planetary nebulae," said Philip Diamond, also of Jodrell Bank Observatory. During their "normal" lives, stars similar to our Sun are powered by the nuclear fusion

  14. 77 FR 66480 - Final Environmental Impact Statement, Narrows Project, Sanpete County, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Final Environmental Impact Statement, Narrows Project, Sanpete County, Utah AGENCY..., announce the availability of the final environmental impact statement on the Narrows Project, a non... Environmental Protection Agency publishes their Notice of Availability of Weekly Receipt of Environmental...

  15. Sample Size Planning for the Standardized Mean Difference: Accuracy in Parameter Estimation via Narrow Confidence Intervals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelley, Ken; Rausch, Joseph R.

    2006-01-01

    Methods for planning sample size (SS) for the standardized mean difference so that a narrow confidence interval (CI) can be obtained via the accuracy in parameter estimation (AIPE) approach are developed. One method plans SS so that the expected width of the CI is sufficiently narrow. A modification adjusts the SS so that the obtained CI is no…

  16. Brief Daily Exposures to Asian Females Reverses Perceptual Narrowing for Asian Faces in Caucasian Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anzures, Gizelle; Wheeler, Andrea; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Tanaka, James W.; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing in the visual, auditory, and multisensory domains has its developmental origins during infancy. The current study shows that experimentally induced experience can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing on infants' visual recognition memory of other-race faces. Caucasian 8- to 10-month-olds who could not discriminate…

  17. Burnout and distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boltenko, E. A.; Shpakovskii, A. A.

    2010-03-01

    Previous works on studying distribution of liquid between the flow core and wall films in narrow slot channels are briefly reviewed. Interrelation between mass transfer processes and burnout is shown. A procedure for calculating burnout on convex and concave heat-transfer surfaces in narrow slot channels is presented.

  18. 47 CFR 80.1159 - Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP). 80.1159... Narrow-band direct-printing (NB-DP). NB-DP is a form of telegraphy for the transmission and receipt of direct printing public correspondence. Ships must use NB-DP techniques only with authorized public...

  19. 78 FR 23845 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Narrow Bay, Smith Point, NY AGENCY... the Smith Point Bridge, mile 6.1, across Narrow Bay, between Smith Point and Fire Island, New York. The deviation is necessary to facilitate the Smith Point Triathlon. This deviation allows the...

  20. Narrowing the Gap in Outcomes: Early Years (0-5 Years)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Springate, Ian; Atkinson, Mary; Straw, Suzanne; Lamont, Emily; Grayson, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    This report was commissioned by the Local Government Association (LGA) to inform the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) and LGA work on "Narrowing the Gap." It focuses on early years' provision and presents findings from a review of the best evidence on narrowing the gap in outcomes across the five Every Child Matters (ECM) areas…

  1. kW-level narrow linewidth fiber amplifier seeded by a fiber Bragg grating based oscillator.

    PubMed

    Hao, Jinping; Zhao, Hong; Zhang, Dayong; Zhang, Liming; Zhang, Kun

    2015-05-20

    This paper demonstrates an all-fiber narrow linewidth amplifier with a seed based on narrow linewidth fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). The fiber amplifier achieves a narrow bandwidth output of 823 W, with an opto-optic efficiency of 84.5%. The pair of FBGs in the seed configuration helps to assure a narrow linewidth of the laser as 0.08 nm. In the laser profile, we introduce a cladding stripper with a sectional structure, which realizes high pump power leakage with high efficiency. The paper also discusses the impact of seed linewidth and fiber length on the SBS threshold in a narrow bandwidth laser. Based on this analysis, we discovered ways to inhibit SBS onset and scale power output. PMID:26192524

  2. Radiation mechanisms and physical properties of the γ-ray narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianping; Zhou, Bing

    2015-12-01

    We investigate the physical properties and radiation mechanisms of 11 states of five narrow-line Seyfert 1 (NLS1) galaxies detected by the Large Area Telescope on board Fermi through modeling the quasi-simultaneous multi-band observations. We obtain the best-fitting model parameters and their uncertainties for each state with the χ2-minimization procedure and discuss their implications on the characteristics of jet. Similar to blazars, their spectral energy distributions (SEDs) have a two-humped structure and their non-thermal emission can be modelled with the single-zone synchrotron + inverse Compton (IC) model. For all states, the GeV γ-rays may be contributed by the external Compton (EC) emission components. The observations of Fermi are mostly located at the declining stage of the EC humps. Text < 0.5 eV in all cases (Text is the characteristic temperature of external soft photons), suggesting that their radiation zones may be usually located outside of the broad line region (BLR) and the soft photons of Compton scattering mainly come from the dust torus. Compared with the bright Fermi blazars studied by Ghisellini et al. (2014, Nature, 515, 376), the Pjet (the power of the jets) of NLS1 galaxies detected by Fermi is similar to that of the flat spectrum radio quasars (FSRQs) but a little larger than that of the BL Lac objects (BL Lacs). However, a comparison of Pr (the powers of radiations) with the FSRQs and BL Lac objects shows that NLS1 galaxies' Pr has values comparable to BL Lac objects but lower than FSRQs in spite of having similar Pjet values and the same energy carrier (the cold protons) as the FSRQs. Observations indicate that γ-NLS1 galaxies might have lower η (efficiency of gravitational energy release) values than GeV blazars.

  3. Simulating Current-Voltage Relationships for a Narrow Ion Channel Using the Weighted Ensemble Method.

    PubMed

    Adelman, Joshua L; Grabe, Michael

    2015-04-14

    Ion channels are responsible for a myriad of fundamental biological processes via their role in controlling the flow of ions through water-filled membrane-spanning pores in response to environmental cues. Molecular simulation has played an important role in elucidating the mechanism of ion conduction, but connecting atomistically detailed structural models of the protein to electrophysiological measurements remains a broad challenge due to the computational cost of reaching the necessary time scales. Here, we introduce an enhanced sampling method for simulating the conduction properties of narrow ion channels using the Weighted ensemble (WE) sampling approach. We demonstrate the application of this method to calculate the current–voltage relationship as well as the nonequilibrium ion distribution at steady-state of a simple model ion channel. By direct comparisons with long brute force simulations, we show that the WE simulations rigorously reproduce the correct long-time scale kinetics of the system and are capable of determining these quantities using significantly less aggregate simulation time under conditions where permeation events are rare.

  4. Narrowing of the neutron sd- pf shell gap in 29Na

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A. M.; Wu, C. Y.; Becker, J. A.; Stoyer, M. A.; Pearson, C. J.; Hackman, G.; Schumaker, M. A.; Svensson, C. E.; Austin, R. A. E.; Ball, G. C.; Bandyopadhyay, D.; Barton, C. J.; Boston, A. J.; Boston, H. C.; Churchman, R.; Cline, D.; Colosimo, S. J.; Cross, D. S.; Demand, G.; Djongolov, M.; Drake, T. E.; Garrett, P. E.; Gray-Jones, C.; Green, K. L.; Grint, A. N.; Hayes, A. B.; Leach, K. G.; Kulp, W. D.; Lee, G.; Lloyd, S.; Maharaj, R.; Martin, J.-P.; Millar, B. A.; Mythili, S.; Nelson, L.; Nolan, P. J.; Oxley, D. C.; Padilla-Rodal, E.; Phillips, A. A.; Porter-Peden, M.; Rigby, S. V.; Sarazin, F.; Sumithrarachchi, C. S.; Triambak, S.; Walker, P. M.; Williams, S. J.; Wong, J.; Wood, J. L.

    2009-04-01

    The wave-function composition for the low-lying states in 29Na was explored by measuring their electromagnetic properties using the Coulomb-excitation technique. A beam of 29Na ions, postaccelerated to 70 MeV, bombarded a 110Pd target with a rate of up to 600 particles per second at the recently commissioned ISAC-II facility at TRIUMF. Six segmented HPGe clover detectors of the TIGRESS γ-ray spectrometer were used to detect deexcitation γ rays in coincidence with scattered or recoiling charged particles in the segmented silicon detector, BAMBINO. The reduced transition matrix element | <5/2 1 + | | E 2 | |3/2 gs + > | in 29Na was derived to be 0.237(21) e b from the measured γ-ray yields for both projectile and target. This first-time measured value is consistent with the most recent Monte Carlo shell-model calculation, indicating a significant admixture of both sd and pf components in the wave function, and also providing evidence for the narrowing of the neutron sd- pf shell gap from ∼ 6 MeV for stable nuclei to ∼ 3 MeV for 29Na.

  5. THE PHYSICAL CONDITIONS OF THE INTRINSIC N V NARROW ABSORPTION LINE SYSTEMS OF THREE QUASARS

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Jian; Charlton, Jane C.; Misawa, Toru; Eracleous, Michael; Ganguly, Rajib E-mail: misawatr@shinshu-u.ac.j

    2010-10-20

    We employ detailed photoionization models to infer the physical conditions of intrinsic narrow absorption line systems found in high-resolution spectra of three quasars at z = 2.6-3.0. We focus on a family of intrinsic absorbers characterized by N V lines that are strong relative to the Ly{alpha} lines. The inferred physical conditions are similar for the three intrinsic N V absorbers, with metallicities greater than 10 times the solar value (assuming a solar abundance pattern), and with high ionization parameters (log U {approx} 0). Thus, we conclude that the unusual strength of the N V lines results from a combination of partial coverage, a high ionization state, and high metallicity. We consider whether dilution of the absorption lines by flux from the broad emission line region can lead us to overestimate the metallicities and we find that this is an unlikely possibility. The high abundances that we infer are not surprising in the context of scenarios in which metal enrichment takes place very early on in massive galaxies. We estimate that the mass outflow rate in the absorbing gas (which is likely to have a filamentary structure) is less than a few M{sub sun} yr{sup -1} under the most optimistic assumptions, although it may be embedded in a much hotter, more massive outflow.

  6. Computational analysis of sedimentation of two particles in a narrow channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aidun, Cyrus K.; Ding, Ejiang

    1998-11-01

    The motion and interaction of two spherical bodies of diameter d in a narrow channel (width 4d) is simulated by Lattice-Boltzmann method at Reynolds numbers between 0 and 10. The initial positions of the particles are midway between the centerline of the channel and the side wall while one particle is 2d above the other. At low Reynolds numbers, the particles oscillate around the centerline of the channel while they approach each other, and eventually settle in contact. At higher Reynolds numbers, the trailing particle approaches the leading one; jointly, the particles enter into a damping oscillation without contacting each other. This motion has been described as drafting, kissing and tumbling (Hu, Joseph, and Crochet, Theoret. Comput. Fluid Dyn. 3 1992; Feng, Hu, and Joseph, J. Fluid Mech. 261 1994). In the phase space, constructed by the distances between each particle and the side wall, the attractor is a fixed point, representing a steady state. At even higher Reynolds number the dynamics changes into a stable limit cycle. The amplitude of the limit cycle increases as the Reynolds number increases in value. As Reynolds number increases further the motion becomes more complex. The trajectory in the phase space suggests the existence of a strange attractor. The dynamics of two particle sedimentation at this range of Reynolds number will be presented.

  7. Fluorescence line narrowing spectroscopy of Eu{sup 3+} in zinc-thallium-tellurite glass

    SciTech Connect

    Tuyen, V.P.; Hayakawa, T.; Nogami, M.; Duclere, J.R-.; Thomas, P.

    2010-11-15

    The environment of Eu{sup 3+} in zinc-thallium-tellurite glass of the molar composition 60TeO{sub 2}-30TlO{sub 0.5}-9.9ZnO-0.1Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} was investigated by laser-induced fluorescence line narrowing (FLN) techniques using Eu{sup 3+} as a local site probe. From the site selective luminescence spectra of Eu{sup 3+} at 7 K, the energies of the Stark components of the {sup 7}F{sub 1} and {sup 7}F{sub 2} states were recorded and then the crystal field parameters B{sub nm} were calculated assuming a C{sub 2v} site symmetry. The ratios B{sub 22}/B{sub 20} and B{sub 44}/B{sub 40} for each excitation energy within {sup 7}F{sub 0}-{sup 5}D{sub 0} transition were obtained and compared with the values calculated for Eu{sup 3+} in other types of glasses. -- Graphical abstract: Crystal fields parameters B{sub nm} of Eu{sup 3+} ions (strength, distribution) in novel TeO{sub 2}-TlO{sub 0.5}-ZnO glass system. Display Omitted

  8. Dynamics and stability of the Townsend discharge in nitrogen in narrow gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astrov, Yu. A.; Lodygin, A. N.; Portsel, L. M.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates the dynamics of the Townsend discharge in nitrogen in narrow gaps. To provide stability of discharge in a broad range of current, we apply a plane-parallel structure, one of the electrodes of which is made of a high-resistivity gallium arsenide. The results of experiments are analyzed in the framework of theory [Yu. P. Raizer et al., Tech. Phys. 51, 185 (2006), 10.1134/S1063784206020071], which considers the dynamics of discharge in short nitrogen-filled gaps of similar structures. According to the theory, a key parameter of discharge dynamics is time ϑ that defines the rate of discharge response to perturbations. In our work, time ϑ is experimentally found by analyzing the noise spectrum of the discharge glow in the stable and spatially uniform state of the structure. This characteristic time depends linearly on the discharge gap width, which corroborates conclusions based on the standard model of Townsend discharge. However, its values are substantially shorter compared to those predicted by theory. The relationship between ϑ and experimentally observed critical current density for the oscillatory instability, jcr, is applied to find the discharge negative differential resistance for a set of parameters of the discharge gap.

  9. Narrowing the Search After Gravitational-Wave Detections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-11-01

    Now that were able to detect gravitational waves, the next challenge is to spot electromagnetic signatures associated with gravitational-wave events. A team of scientists has proposed a new algorithm that might narrow the search.Artists illustrations of the stellar-merger model for short gamma-ray bursts. In the model, 1) two neutron stars inspiral, 2) they merge and produce a gamma-ray burst, 3) a small fraction of their mass is flung out and radiates as a kilonova, 4) a massive neutron star or black hole with a disk remains after the event. [NASA, ESA, and A. Feild (STScI)]Light from Neutron-Star MergersJust over a year ago, LIGO detected its first gravitational-wave signal: GW150914, produced when two black holes merged. While we didnt expect to see any sort of light-based signal from this merger, we could expect to see transient electromagnetic signatures in the case of a neutron starblack hole merger or a neutron starneutron star merger in the form of a kilonova or a short gamma-ray burst.While we havent yet detected any mergers involving neutron stars, LIGO has the sensitivity to make these detections in the local universe, and we hope to start seeing them soon! Finding the electromagnetic companions to gravitational-wave signals would be the best way to probe the evolution history of the universe and learn what happens when evolved stars collide. So how do we hunt them down?2D localization maps for LIGOs detection of GW150914 (black contours), as well as the footprints of follow-up observations (red for radio, green for optical/IR, blue for X-ray). [Abbott et al. 2016]Pinpointing a VolumeThe two LIGO detectors can already provide rough 2D localization of where the gravitational-wave signal came from, but the region predicted for GW150914 still covered 600 square degrees, which is a pretty hefty patch of sky! In light of this, the simplest follow-up strategy of tiling large survey observations of the entire predicted region is somewhat impractical and time

  10. Opposed-Flow Flame Spread in a Narrow Channel Apparatus over Thin PMMA Sheets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bornand, G. R.; Olson, Sandra L.; Miller, F. J.; Pepper, J. M.; Wichman, I. S.

    2013-01-01

    Flame spread tests have been conducted over polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) samples in San Diego State University's Narrow Channel Apparatus (SDSU NCA). The Narrow Channel Apparatus (NCA) has the ability to suppress buoyant flow in horizontally spreading flames, and is currently being investigated as a possible replacement or complement to NASA's current material flammability test standard for non-metallic solids, NASA-STD-(I)-6001B Test 1. The buoyant suppression achieved with a NCA allows for tests to be conducted in a simulated microgravity atmosphere-a characteristic that Test 1 lacks since flames present in Test 1 are buoyantly driven. The SDSU NCA allows for flame spread tests to be conducted with varying opposed flow oxidizer velocities, oxygen percent by volume, and total pressure. Also, since the test sample is placed symmetrically between two confining plates so that there is a gap above and below the sample, this gap can be adjusted. This gap height adjustment allows for a compromise between heat loss from the flame to the confining boundaries and buoyancy suppression achieved by those boundaries. This article explores the effect gap height has on the flame spread rate for 75 µm thick PMMA at 1 atm pressure and 21% oxygen concentration by volume in the SDSU NCA. Flame spread results from the SDSU NCA for thin cellulose fuels have previously been compared to results from tests in actual microgravity at various test conditions with the same sample materials and were found to be in good agreement. This article also presents results from the SDSU NCA for PMMA at 1 atm pressure, opposed oxidizer velocity ranging from 3 to 35 cm/s, oxygen concentration by volume at 21%, 30 %, and 50% and fuel thicknesses of 50 and 75 µm. These results are compared to results obtained in actual microgravity for PMMA obtained at the 4.5s drop tower of MGLAB in Gifu, Japan, and the 5.2s drop tower at NASA's Zero-Gravity Research Facility in Cleveland, OH. This comparison confirms

  11. High-Precision Narrow Angle Astrometry with a Space-Borne Interferometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milman, Mark H.; Murphy, Dave

    2008-01-01

    This paper develops an observing and processing scheme for narrow angle astrometry using a single baseline interferometer without the aid of "grid" stars to characterize the interferometer baseline vector in inertial space. The basic concept derives from the recognition that over a narrow field the set of fundamental unknown instrument parameters that arise because the interferometer baseline vector has large uncertainties (since there are no grid star measurements) is indistinguishable from a particular set of unobservable errors in the determination of star positions within the field. Reference stars within the narrow field of regard are used to circumvent the unobservable modes. Feasibility of the approach is demonstrated through analysis and example simulations.

  12. Spectrally narrowed lasing of a self-injection KrF excimer laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimada, Yasuhiro; Wani, Koichi; Miki, Tadaaki; Kawahara, Hidehito; Mimasu, Mutsumi; Ogata, Yoshiro

    1990-08-01

    Spectrally nantwed lasing of a KrF excimer laser has teen ahieved by a self-injection technique using abeam splitter for power extraction aixi intravity etalons for spectral-narrowing. The laser cavity is divithi into an amplifying branch aix! a spectralnarrowing branch. The spectral bandwidth was narrowed to <3pm FWHM with air-sed etalons placed in the spectral-narrowing branch. A laser propagation model was intrOdUced for describing the laser intensity traveling in the laser cavity. The calculated intensityincident onthe intracavityetalons wassmaller thanthat in theconventional Fabry-Perotcavity withplane-parallel mirrors.

  13. Narrowing of Doppler and hyperfine line shapes of Rb - D2 transition using a Vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bankim Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; De, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    We performed an experimental and theoretical study on saturation absorption spectroscopy on 87Rb and 85Rb atoms in D2 transition using a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam with higher orders. We observed narrow line shapes of the Doppler and hyperfine absorption profiles due to the introduction of the LG beam in comparison to the fundamental Gaussian beam. Narrowing of the line shape is dependent on the azimuthal mode index of the LG field. It is observed that the spatially dependent Rabi frequency plays a significant role behind these narrowing phenomenon.

  14. A technique for production of nanocrystalline cellulose with a narrow size distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Wen; Holbery, James D.; Li, Kaichang

    2009-02-01

    Nanocrystalline cellulose (NCC) was prepared by sulfuric acid hydrolysis of microcrystalline cellulose. A differential centrifugation technique was studied to obtain NCC whiskers with a narrow size distribution. It was shown that the volume of NCC in different fractions had an inverse relationship with relative centrifugal force (RCF). The length of NCC whiskers was also fractionized by differential RCF. The aspect ratio of NCC in different fractions had a relatively narrow range. This technique provides an easy way of producing NCC whiskers with a narrow size distribution.

  15. Electronic structure of narrow gap semiconductors: Understanding gap formation and thermoelectric properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Paul Melvin

    Electronic band structure calculations are invaluable theoretical tools to understand structural, transport, and optical properties of materials. We have used this tool in the search for new high performance thermoelectric materials, which are usually narrow-gap semiconductors. We have studied the electronic structures of these systems both to understand which properties of the band structure are most important for thermoelectric properties and the nature of the gap formation. Narrow-gap semiconductors lie between metals and wide-gap semiconductors, so understanding the nature of the gap formation is very important. The small band gaps in the systems we have studied generally arise from hybridization between different bands. We have used the local density approximation (LDA) and the generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within density functional theory (DFT). These have been implemented using the full-potential linearized augmented planewave (FLAPW) method within the WIEN97 package. This state-of-the-art method is among the most accurate methods for calculating the electronic structure of solids. We have studied four classes of compounds. These include the half-Heusler compounds, the ternary Zintl-phase compounds, the simple chalcogenides, and the complex chalcogenides. The ternary half-Heusler compounds, considered having a stuffed NaCl structure, show promising thermoelectric properties. The band gap formation is understood by starting with the semi-metallic binary NaCl compounds from which they are formed. Adding the transition (or noble) metal atom causes a strong p-d hybridization near the Fermi energy which opens up the band gap. This hybridization also leads to highly anisotropic effective masses at the conduction band minimum which are found in the best thermoelectric materials. Similar band gap formation is found in the ternary Zintl-phase compounds which are considered a stuffed Th3P4 structure. The band gaps in these ternary compounds are larger than

  16. Ethical reasons for narrowing the scope of biotech patents.

    PubMed

    Andreassen, Tom

    2015-11-01

    Patents on biotech products have a scope that goes well beyond what is covered by the most widely applied ethical justifications of intellectual property. Neither natural rights theory from Locke, nor public interest theory of IP rights justifies the wide scope of legal protection. The article takes human genes as an example, focusing on the component that is not invented but persists as unaltered gene information even in the synthetically produced complementary DNA, the cDNA. It is argued that patent on cDNA holds this information captive, or illegitimately appropriates it in limiting other researchers and inventors' opportunity to explore new functions and uses based on this non-invented information. A tighter connection between legal IP protection and the use description stated in the patent claim is suggested. By binding protection to the product's foreseeable functions and use, instead of the product itself and all future uses of it, legitimacy of biotech product patents is restored.

  17. Yet another new species from one of the best-studied neotropical areas: Plantago humboldtiana (Plantaginaceae), an extremely narrow endemic new species from a waterfall in southern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents and describes Plantago humboldtiana, an extremely narrow endemic rheophytic new species from a waterfall in Corupá, Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. The new species is unique in presenting a combination of type-G antrorse trichomes on scapes, pendulous inflorescences and 1-seeded pyxidia. Only one population is known to exist, despite intensive search efforts in nearby, similar environments. Its conservation status is assessed as critically endangered (CR) as the only known population is restricted to a dramatically small area, and is subject to extreme fluctuation due to occasional floods, and also to intense visitation by tourists, which can disturb its fragile habitat. We also present an updated identification key to the species of Plantago that occur in Santa Catarina. The recent description of three narrow endemic, threatened new species of Plantago in Santa Catarina, which is the Brazilian state with its flora best studied, highlights the need for more taxonomic research, especially in the neotropics. PMID:27231665

  18. Yet another new species from one of the best-studied neotropical areas: Plantago humboldtiana (Plantaginaceae), an extremely narrow endemic new species from a waterfall in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents and describes Plantago humboldtiana, an extremely narrow endemic rheophytic new species from a waterfall in Corupá, Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. The new species is unique in presenting a combination of type-G antrorse trichomes on scapes, pendulous inflorescences and 1-seeded pyxidia. Only one population is known to exist, despite intensive search efforts in nearby, similar environments. Its conservation status is assessed as critically endangered (CR) as the only known population is restricted to a dramatically small area, and is subject to extreme fluctuation due to occasional floods, and also to intense visitation by tourists, which can disturb its fragile habitat. We also present an updated identification key to the species of Plantago that occur in Santa Catarina. The recent description of three narrow endemic, threatened new species of Plantago in Santa Catarina, which is the Brazilian state with its flora best studied, highlights the need for more taxonomic research, especially in the neotropics. PMID:27231665

  19. Yet another new species from one of the best-studied neotropical areas: Plantago humboldtiana (Plantaginaceae), an extremely narrow endemic new species from a waterfall in southern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Hassemer, Gustavo; Rønsted, Nina

    2016-01-01

    This article presents and describes Plantago humboldtiana, an extremely narrow endemic rheophytic new species from a waterfall in Corupá, Santa Catarina state, southern Brazil. The new species is unique in presenting a combination of type-G antrorse trichomes on scapes, pendulous inflorescences and 1-seeded pyxidia. Only one population is known to exist, despite intensive search efforts in nearby, similar environments. Its conservation status is assessed as critically endangered (CR) as the only known population is restricted to a dramatically small area, and is subject to extreme fluctuation due to occasional floods, and also to intense visitation by tourists, which can disturb its fragile habitat. We also present an updated identification key to the species of Plantago that occur in Santa Catarina. The recent description of three narrow endemic, threatened new species of Plantago in Santa Catarina, which is the Brazilian state with its flora best studied, highlights the need for more taxonomic research, especially in the neotropics.

  20. Trimers in the resonant (2+1)-fermion problem on a narrow Feshbach resonance: Crossover from Efimovian to hydrogenoid spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Castin, Yvan; Tignone, Edoardo

    2011-12-15

    We study the quantum three-body free-space problem of two same-spin-state fermions of mass m interacting with a different particle of mass M, on an infinitely narrow Feshbach resonance with infinite s-wave scattering length. This problem is made interesting by the existence of a tunable parameter, the mass ratio {alpha}=m/M. By a combination of analytical and numerical techniques, we obtain a detailed picture of the spectrum of three-body bound states, within each sector of fixed total angular momentum l. For {alpha} increasing from 0, we find that the trimer states first appear at the l-dependent Efimovian threshold {alpha}{sub c}{sup (l)}, where the Efimov exponent s vanishes, and that the entire trimer spectrum (starting from the ground trimer state) is geometric for {alpha} tending to {alpha}{sub c}{sup (l)} from above, with a global energy scale that has a finite and nonzero limit. For further increasing values of {alpha}, the least bound trimer states still form a geometric spectrum, with an energy ratio exp(2{pi}/|s|) that becomes closer and closer to unity, but the most bound trimer states deviate more and more from that geometric spectrum and eventually form a hydrogenoid spectrum.

  1. Can optical diagnosis of small colon polyps be accurate? Comparing standard scope without narrow banding to high definition scope with narrow banding

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Etaati, Firoozeh; Rezaeean, Farahnaz; Nouraie, Mehdi; Paydar, Mansour; Namin, Hassan Hassanzadeh; Sanderson, Andrew; Begum, Rehana; Alkhalloufi, Kawtar; Brim, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the accuracy of using high definition (HD) scope with narrow band imaging (NBI) vs standard white light colonoscope without NBI (ST), to predict the histology of the colon polyps, particularly those < 1 cm. METHODS: A total of 147 African Americans patients who were referred to Howard University Hospital for screening or, diagnostic or follow up colonoscopy, during a 12-mo period in 2012 were prospectively recruited. Some patients had multiple polyps and total number of polyps was 179. Their colonoscopies were performed by 3 experienced endoscopists who determined the size and stated whether the polyps being removed were hyperplastic or adenomatous polyps using standard colonoscopes or high definition colonoscopes with NBI. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported by pathologists as part of routine care. RESULTS: Of participants in the study, 55 (37%) were male and median (interquartile range) of age was 56 (19-80). Demographic, clinical characteristics, past medical history of patients, and the data obtained by two instruments were not significantly different and two methods detected similar number of polyps. In ST scope 89% of polyps were < 1 cm vs 87% in HD scope (P = 0.7). The ST scope had a positive predictive value (PPV) and positive likelihood ratio (PLR) of 86% and 4.0 for adenoma compared to 74% and 2.6 for HD scope. There was a trend of higher sensitivity for HD scope (68%) compare to ST scope (53%) with almost the same specificity. The ST scope had a PPV and PLR of 38% and 1.8 for hyperplastic polyp (HPP) compared to 42% and 2.2 for HD scope. The sensitivity and specificity of two instruments for HPP diagnosis were similar. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that HD scope was more sensitive in diagnosis of adenoma than ST scope. Clinical diagnosis of HPP with either scope is less accurate compared to adenoma. Colonoscopy diagnosis is not yet fully matched with pathologic diagnosis of colon polyp. However with the advancement of both

  2. Can optical diagnosis of small colon polyps be accurate? Comparing standard scope without narrow banding to high definition scope with narrow banding

    PubMed Central

    Ashktorab, Hassan; Etaati, Firoozeh; Rezaeean, Farahnaz; Nouraie, Mehdi; Paydar, Mansour; Namin, Hassan Hassanzadeh; Sanderson, Andrew; Begum, Rehana; Alkhalloufi, Kawtar; Brim, Hassan; Laiyemo, Adeyinka O

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To study the accuracy of using high definition (HD) scope with narrow band imaging (NBI) vs standard white light colonoscope without NBI (ST), to predict the histology of the colon polyps, particularly those < 1 cm. METHODS: A total of 147 African Americans patients who were referred to Howard University Hospital for screening or, diagnostic or follow up colonoscopy, during a 12-mo period in 2012 were prospectively recruited. Some patients had multiple polyps and total number of polyps was 179. Their colonoscopies were performed by 3 experienced endoscopists who determined the size and stated whether the polyps being removed were hyperplastic or adenomatous polyps using standard colonoscopes or high definition colonoscopes with NBI. The histopathologic diagnosis was reported by pathologists as part of routine care. RESULTS: Of participants in the study, 55 (37%) were male and median (interquartile range) of age was 56 (19-80). Demographic, clinical characteristics, past medical history of patients, and the data obtained by two instruments were not significantly different and two methods detected similar number of polyps. In ST scope 89% of polyps were < 1 cm vs 87% in HD scope (P = 0.7). The ST scope had a positive predictive value (PPV) and positive likelihood ratio (PLR) of 86% and 4.0 for adenoma compared to 74% and 2.6 for HD scope. There was a trend of higher sensitivity for HD scope (68%) compare to ST scope (53%) with almost the same specificity. The ST scope had a PPV and PLR of 38% and 1.8 for hyperplastic polyp (HPP) compared to 42% and 2.2 for HD scope. The sensitivity and specificity of two instruments for HPP diagnosis were similar. CONCLUSION: Our results indicated that HD scope was more sensitive in diagnosis of adenoma than ST scope. Clinical diagnosis of HPP with either scope is less accurate compared to adenoma. Colonoscopy diagnosis is not yet fully matched with pathologic diagnosis of colon polyp. However with the advancement of both

  3. Further improvements in program to calculate electronic properties of narrow band gap materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, James D.

    1991-01-01

    Research into the properties of narrow band gap materials during the period 15 Jun. to 15 Dec. 1991 is discussed. Abstracts and bibliographies from papers presented during this period are reported. Graphs are provided.

  4. Ultrafast optical control of group delay of narrow-band terahertz waves

    PubMed Central

    Miyamaru, Fumiaki; Morita, Hiroki; Nishiyama, Yohei; Nishida, Tsubasa; Nakanishi, Toshihiro; Kitano, Masao; Takeda, Mitsuo W.

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate control over the group delay of narrow-band (quasi continuous wave) terahertz (THz) pulses with constant amplitude based on optical switching of a metasurface characteristic. The near-field coupling between resonant modes of a complementary split ring resonator pair and a rectangular slit show an electromagnetically induced transparency-like (EIT-like) spectral shape in the reflection spectrum of a metasurface. This coupling induces group delay of a narrow-band THz pulse around the resonant frequency of the EIT-like spectrum. By irradiating the metasurface with an optical excitation pulse, the metasurface becomes mirror-like and thus the incident narrow-band THz pulse is reflected without a delay. Remarkably, if we select the appropriate excitation power, only the group delay of the narrow-band THz pulse can be switched while the amplitude is maintained before and after optical excitation. PMID:24614514

  5. The Effect of Divided Attention on Emotion-Induced Memory Narrowing

    PubMed Central

    Steinmetz, Katherine R. Mickley; Waring, Jill D.; Kensinger, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Individuals are more likely to remember emotional than neutral information, but this benefit does not always extend to the surrounding background information. This memory narrowing is theorized to be linked to the availability of attentional resources at encoding. In contrast to the predictions of this theoretical account, altering participants’ attentional resources at encoding, by dividing attention, did not affect the emotion-induced memory narrowing. Attention was divided using three separate manipulations: a digit ordering task (Experiment 1), an arithmetic task (Experiment 2), and an auditory discrimination task (Experiment 3). Across all three experiments, divided attention decreased memory across-the-board but did not affect the degree of memory narrowing. These findings suggest that theories to explain memory narrowing must be expanded to include other potential mechanisms beyond limitations of attentional resources. PMID:24295041

  6. The effect of divided attention on emotion-induced memory narrowing.

    PubMed

    Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Waring, Jill D; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Individuals are more likely to remember emotional than neutral information, but this benefit does not always extend to the surrounding background information. This memory narrowing is theorised to be linked to the availability of attentional resources at encoding. In contrast to the predictions of this theoretical account, altering participants' attentional resources at encoding by dividing attention did not affect emotion-induced memory narrowing. Attention was divided using three separate manipulations: a digit ordering task (Experiment 1), an arithmetic task (Experiment 2) and an auditory discrimination task (Experiment 3). Across all three experiments, divided attention decreased memory across the board but did not affect the degree of memory narrowing. These findings suggest that theories to explain memory narrowing must be expanded to include other potential mechanisms beyond the limitations of attentional resources.

  7. 77 FR 72825 - Narrow Woven Ribbons With Woven Selvedge From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... International Trade Administration Narrow Woven Ribbons With Woven Selvedge From Taiwan: Final Results of Antidumping Duty Administrative Review; 2010-2011 AGENCY: Import Administration, International Trade... Administration, International Trade Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce, 14th Street and...

  8. Ultra-narrow bandpass filters for infrared applications with improved angle of incidence performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmlow, Thomas D.; Fredell, Markus; Chanda, Sheetal; Johnson, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Narrow band-pass optical interference filters are used for a variety of applications to improve signal quality in laser based systems. Applications include LIDAR, sensor processing and free space communications. A narrow band width optical filter allows for passage of the laser signal while rejecting ambient light. The more narrow the bandwidth, the better the signal to noise. However, the bandwidth of a design for a particular application is typically limited by a number of factors including spectral shift over the operational angles of incidence, thermal shift over the range of operating temperature and, in the case of laser communication, rejection of adjacent laser channels. The trade-off of these parameters can significantly impact system design and performance. This paper presents design and material approaches to maximize the performance of narrow bandpass filters in the infrared.

  9. The effect of divided attention on emotion-induced memory narrowing.

    PubMed

    Mickley Steinmetz, Katherine R; Waring, Jill D; Kensinger, Elizabeth A

    2014-01-01

    Individuals are more likely to remember emotional than neutral information, but this benefit does not always extend to the surrounding background information. This memory narrowing is theorised to be linked to the availability of attentional resources at encoding. In contrast to the predictions of this theoretical account, altering participants' attentional resources at encoding by dividing attention did not affect emotion-induced memory narrowing. Attention was divided using three separate manipulations: a digit ordering task (Experiment 1), an arithmetic task (Experiment 2) and an auditory discrimination task (Experiment 3). Across all three experiments, divided attention decreased memory across the board but did not affect the degree of memory narrowing. These findings suggest that theories to explain memory narrowing must be expanded to include other potential mechanisms beyond the limitations of attentional resources. PMID:24295041

  10. On the Links Among Face Processing, Language Processing, and Narrowing During Development

    PubMed Central

    Pascalis, Olivier; Loevenbruck, Hélène; Quinn, Paul C; Kandel, Sonia; Tanaka, James W; Lee, Kang

    2014-01-01

    From the beginning of life, face and language processing are crucial for establishing social communication. Studies on the development of systems for processing faces and language have yielded such similarities as perceptual narrowing across both domains. In this article, we review several functions of human communication, and then describe how the tools used to accomplish those functions are modified by perceptual narrowing. We conclude that narrowing is common to all forms of social communication. We argue that during evolution, social communication engaged different perceptual and cognitive systems—face, facial expression, gesture, vocalization, sound, and oral language—that emerged at different times. These systems are interactive and linked to some extent. In this framework, narrowing can be viewed as a way infants adapt to their native social group. PMID:25254069

  11. The relationship between narrow and wide bandwidth filter settings during an EMG scanning procedure.

    PubMed

    Cram, J R; Garber, A

    1986-06-01

    This study examined the correlation between EMG values measured with wide (25-1000 Hz) and narrow (100-200 Hz) band-width filters. An EMG diagnostic scan was conducted on 32 chronic pain patients admitted to an inpatient treatment unit. EMG readings were taken from a total of 44 sites (11 sites X 2 sides X 2 postures). Each EMG measure was passed in parallel through a narrow and wide band-pass filter and the stable readings were recorded. Correlated t tests and Pearson correlations were used to compare the data from the narrow and wide filter settings. The measures from the wide filter were significantly higher than the measures from the narrow filter. In addition, 61% of the correlations were greater than .90. The majority of the correlations below the median (.93) occurred in the neck region and the abdomen. The implications of the findings are discussed.

  12. Fluorescence line-narrowing spectrometry of polycyclic compounds on filter paper substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Vo-Dinh, T.; Suter, G.W.; Kallir, A.J.; Wild, U.P.

    1986-12-01

    The fluorescence line-narrowing (FLN) technique was used to characterize polynuclear aromatic compounds adsorbed on a simple and practical substrate consisting of a filter paper material. Narrow-based excitation was used to produce highly resolved fluorescence spectra of benzo(a)pyrene, chrysene, and pyrene on Whatman 4 paper substrate at 4 K. The detection of these compounds in a complex mixture was illustrated by the analysis of an unfractionated coal liquid sample.

  13. Association between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in eyes with narrow or open-angle

    PubMed Central

    Li, Song-Feng; Wu, Ge-Wei; Chen, Chang-Xi; Shen, Ling; Zhang, Zhi-Bao; Gao, Fei; Wang, Ning-Li

    2016-01-01

    AIM To investigate the relationship between choroidal thickness and anterior chamber segment in subjects with eyes with narrow or open-angle. METHODS The subfoveal choroidal thickness was measured with enhanced depth-imaging optical coherence tomography and anterior chamber parameters were measured with ultrasound biomicroscopy in one eye of 23 subjects with open-angle eyes and 38 subjects with narrow-angle eyes. The mean age was 59.52±7.04y for narrow-angle subjects and 60.76±7.23y for open-angle subjects (P=0.514). Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to assess the association between choroidal thickness and narrow-angle parameters. RESULTS There were no differences in subfoveal choroidal thickness between open- and narrow-angle subjects (P=0.231). Anterior chamber parameters, including central anterior chamber depth, trabecular iris angle, iris thickness 500 µm from the scleral spur (IT500), and ciliary body thickness at 1 mm and 2 mm from the scleral spur (CBT1, CBT2) showed significant differences between the two groups (P<0.05). Subfoveal choroidal thickness showed negative correlation (β=-0.496, P=0.016) only with anterior chamber depth in the open-angle group and with age (β=-0.442, P=0.003) and IT500 (β=-0.399, P=0.008) in the narrow-angle group. However, subfoveal choroidal thickness was not correlated with trabecular iris angle, anterior chamber depth, ciliary body thickness, or central corneal thickness in the narrow-angle group. CONCLUSION Choroidal thickness does not differ in the two groups and has not correlated with anterior chamber parameters in narrow-angle subjects, suggesting a lack of relationship between choroidal thickness and primary angle-closure glaucoma. PMID:27588269

  14. Collisional narrowing in the optically pumped CH3OH and CH3F lasers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1982-01-01

    The gain linewidth of the optically pumped CH3F laser is observed to narrow and rebroaden with the addition of He. In addition, the same effect is observed in the CH3OH laser with the addition of the polyatomic buffer gases SF6 and CS2. These results offer conclusive evidence of the Dicke narrowing phenomena in these inverted pure rotational transitions. The effect is observed using a high harmonic mixing technique in a Schottky barrier diode.

  15. Spectrally narrowed external-cavity high-power stack of laser diode arrays.

    PubMed

    Zhu, H; Ruset, I C; Hersman, F W

    2005-06-01

    We describe an effective external cavity for narrowing the spectral linewidth of a multiarray stack of laser diode arrays. For a commercially available 279-W free-running five-array laser diode array operating at 60 A, we narrow the spectral linewidth to 0.40 nm at FWHM with 115 W of cw power output. This technique leads to the possibility of higher-efficiency, lower-cost production of hyperpolarized noble gases for magnetic resonance imaging.

  16. Wide and Narrow CMEs and Their Source Explosions Observed at the Spring 2003 SOHO-Sun-Ulysses Quadrature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suess, Steven; Corti, G.; Poletto, G.; Sterling, A.; Moore, R.

    2006-01-01

    At the time of the spring 2003 Ulysses-SOHO-Sun quadrature, Ulysses was off the East limb of the Sun at 14.5 degrees north latitude and 4.91 AU. LASCO/C2 images show small transient events that originated from near the limb on May 25, 26 and 27 in the north-east quadrant, along with a large Coronal Mass Ejection (CME) that originated from an active region near disk center on May 26. Ulysses data bear clear signatures of the large CME, specifically including an enhanced abundance of highly ionized Fe. SOHO/UVCS spectra at 1.75 solar radii, near the radial direction to Ulysses, give no evidence of emission from high temperature lines, even for the large CME: instead, for the small events, occasional transient high emission in cool lines was observed, such as the CIII 977 Angstrom line usually absent at coronal levels. Each of these events lasted ca. 1 hour or less and never affected lines from ions forming above ca. 106K. Compact eruptions in Helium 304 Angstrom EIT images, related to the small UVCS transients, were observed at the limb of the Sun over the same period. At least one of these surge events produced a narrow CME observed in LASCO/C2. Most probably all these events are compact magnetic explosions (surges/jets, from around a small island of included polarity) which ejected cool material from lower levels. Ulysses data have been analyzed to find evidence of the cool, narrow CME events, but none or little was found. This puzzling scenario, where events seen by UVCS have no in situ counterparts and vice versa, can be partially explained once the region where the large CME originated is recognized as being at the center of the solar disk so that the CME material was actually much further from the Sun than the 1.7 Rsun height of the UVCS slit off the limb. Conversely, the narrow events may simply have missed Ulysses or been too brief for reliable signatures in composition and ionization state. A basic feature demonstrated by these observations is that large

  17. Crystal growth and characterization of the narrow-band-gap semiconductors OsPn₂ (Pn = P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Bugaris, Daniel E; Malliakas, Christos D; Shoemaker, Daniel P; Do, Dat T; Chung, Duck Young; Mahanti, Subhendra D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2014-09-15

    Using metal fluxes, crystals of the binary osmium dipnictides OsPn2 (Pn = P, As, Sb) have been grown for the first time. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirms that these compounds crystallize in the marcasite structure type with orthorhombic space group Pnnm. The structure is a three-dimensional framework of corner- and edge-sharing OsPn6 octahedra, as well as [Pn2(4-)] anions. Raman spectroscopy shows the presence of P-P single bonds, consistent with the presence of [Pn2(-4)] anions and formally Os(4+) cations. Optical-band-gap and high-temperature electrical resistivity measurements indicate that these materials are narrow-band-gap semiconductors. The experimentally determined Seebeck coefficients reveal that nominally undoped OsP2 and OsSb2 are n-type semiconductors, whereas OsAs2 is p-type. Electronic band structure using density functional theory calculations shows that these compounds are indirect narrow-band-gap semiconductors. The bonding p orbitals associated with the Pn2 dimer are below the Fermi energy, and the corresponding antibonding states are above, consistent with a Pn-Pn single bond. Thermopower calculations using Boltzmann transport theory and constant relaxation time approximation show that these materials are potentially good thermoelectrics, in agreement with experiment.

  18. Single-/dual-wavelength switchable and tunable compound-cavity erbium-doped fiber laser with super-narrow linewidth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Ting; Yan, Feng-ping; Liu, Shuo

    2016-03-01

    A single-/dual-wavelength switchable and tunable erbium-doped fiber laser (EDFL) with super-narrow linewidth has been proposed and experimentally demonstrated at room temperature. The fiber laser is based on a compound cavity simply composed of a ring main cavity and a two-ring subring cavity (TR-SC). Regardless of single- or dual-wavelength operation, the EDFL could always work well in single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) state at every oscillating wavelength. In dual-wavelength operation, the spacing could be tuned from 0 nm to 4.83 nm. In single-wavelength operation, the EDFL could lase at a fixed wavelength of 1 543.65 nm or another wavelength with a tunable range of 4.83 nm. The super-narrow linewidths of 550 Hz and 600 Hz for two wavelengths are obtained. The proposed EDFL has potential applications in microwave/terahertz-wave generation and high-precision distributed fiber optical sensing.

  19. Unusual narrowing of the ESR line width in ordered structures with linear chains of Ge/Si quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zinovieva, A. F.; Smagina, Zh. V.; Nenashev, A. V.; Kulik, L. V.; Dvurechenskii, A. V.

    2015-07-01

    Electron states in ordered Ge/Si heterostructures with linear chains of quantum dots (QDs) were studied by the electron spin resonance (ESR) method. A new ESR signal with principal g-factor values g zz = 1.9993 ± 0.0001, g xx = g yy = 1.9990 ± 0.0001 was detected. Unlike disordered QD structures, where ESR line broadening is usually observed (evidence of Dyakonov-Perel mechanism efficiency), the structures under study demonstrate the narrowing of ESR line when the external magnetic field deviates from the growth direction. The ESR line width is Δ H = 1.2 Oe for perpendicular magnetic field (along the growth direction) and Δ H = 0.8 Oe for in-plane magnetic field. The narrowing of ESR line can be explained by combination of two mechanisms. The first one is suppression of Dyakonov-Perel spin relaxation due to a settled direction of electron motion and finiteness of QD chains. The second one is cancelation of the wavefunction shrinking effect with decreasing the perpendicular component of the magnetic field.

  20. Iterative re-weighted approach to high-resolution optical coherence tomography with narrow-band sources.

    PubMed

    Mousavi, Mahta; Duan, Lian; Javidi, Tara; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2016-01-25

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive optical imaging modality capable of high resolution imaging of internal tissue structures. It is widely believed that the high axial resolution in OCT systems requires a wide-bandwidth light source. As a result, often the potential advantages of narrow-bandwidth sources (in terms of cost and/or imaging speed) are understood to come at the cost of significant reduction in imaging resolution. In this paper, we argue that this trade-off between resolution and speed is a shortcoming imposed by the-state-of-the-art A-scan reconstruction algorithm, Fast Fourier Transform, and can be circumvented through use of alternative processing methods. In particular, we investigate the shortcomings of the FFT as well as previously proposed alternatives and demonstrate the first application of an iterative regularized re-weighted l(2) norm method to improve the axial resolution of fast scan rate OCT systems in the narrow-bandwidth imaging conditions. We validate our claims via experimental results generated from a home-built OCT system used to image layered phantom and in vivo data. Our results rely on new, sophisticated signal processing algorithms to generate higher precision (i.e., higher resolution) OCT images at correspondingly fast scan rates. In other words, our work demonstrates the feasibility of simultaneously more reliable and more comfortable medical imaging systems for patients by reducing the overall scan time, without sacrificing image quality. PMID:26832556

  1. Crystal growth and characterization of the narrow-band-gap semiconductors OsPn₂ (Pn = P, As, Sb).

    PubMed

    Bugaris, Daniel E; Malliakas, Christos D; Shoemaker, Daniel P; Do, Dat T; Chung, Duck Young; Mahanti, Subhendra D; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G

    2014-09-15

    Using metal fluxes, crystals of the binary osmium dipnictides OsPn2 (Pn = P, As, Sb) have been grown for the first time. Single-crystal X-ray diffraction confirms that these compounds crystallize in the marcasite structure type with orthorhombic space group Pnnm. The structure is a three-dimensional framework of corner- and edge-sharing OsPn6 octahedra, as well as [Pn2(4-)] anions. Raman spectroscopy shows the presence of P-P single bonds, consistent with the presence of [Pn2(-4)] anions and formally Os(4+) cations. Optical-band-gap and high-temperature electrical resistivity measurements indicate that these materials are narrow-band-gap semiconductors. The experimentally determined Seebeck coefficients reveal that nominally undoped OsP2 and OsSb2 are n-type semiconductors, whereas OsAs2 is p-type. Electronic band structure using density functional theory calculations shows that these compounds are indirect narrow-band-gap semiconductors. The bonding p orbitals associated with the Pn2 dimer are below the Fermi energy, and the corresponding antibonding states are above, consistent with a Pn-Pn single bond. Thermopower calculations using Boltzmann transport theory and constant relaxation time approximation show that these materials are potentially good thermoelectrics, in agreement with experiment. PMID:25162930

  2. Attention Induced Gain Stabilization in Broad and Narrow-Spiking Cells in the Frontal Eye-Field of Macaque Monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Brandt, Christian; Dasilva, Miguel; Gotthardt, Sascha; Chicharro, Daniel; Panzeri, Stefano; Distler, Claudia

    2016-01-01

    Top-down attention increases coding abilities by altering firing rates and rate variability. In the frontal eye field (FEF), a key area enabling top-down attention, attention induced firing rate changes are profound, but its effect on different cell types is unknown. Moreover, FEF is the only cortical area investigated in which attention does not affect rate variability, as assessed by the Fano factor, suggesting that task engagement affects cortical state nonuniformly. We show that putative interneurons in FEF of Macaca mulatta show stronger attentional rate modulation than putative pyramidal cells. Partitioning rate variability reveals that both cell types reduce rate variability with attention, but more strongly so in narrow-spiking cells. The effects are captured by a model in which attention stabilizes neuronal excitability, thereby reducing the expansive nonlinearity that links firing rate and variance. These results show that the effect of attention on different cell classes and different coding properties are consistent across the cortical hierarchy, acting through increased and stabilized neuronal excitability. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Cortical processing is critically modulated by attention. A key feature of this influence is a modulation of “cortical state,” resulting in increased neuronal excitability and resilience of the network against perturbations, lower rate variability, and an increased signal-to-noise ratio. In the frontal eye field (FEF), an area assumed to control spatial attention in human and nonhuman primates, firing rate changes with attention occur, but rate variability, quantified by the Fano factor, appears to be unaffected by attention. Using recently developed analysis tools and models to quantify attention effects on narrow- and broad-spiking cell activity, we show that attention alters cortical state strongly in the FEF, demonstrating that its effect on the neuronal network is consistent across the cortical hierarchy. PMID

  3. 78 FR 43868 - Notice of Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the Whittier Narrows Dam...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-22

    ... Statement for the Whittier Narrows Dam Safety Modification Study Report AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) for the Whittier Narrows Dam Safety Modification Study (DSMS). Whittier Narrows Dam is located approximately 12 miles east of downtown Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, CA....

  4. 33 CFR 334.710 - The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to Santa Rosa Island, Headquarters Air Armament Center...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico... DEFENSE DANGER ZONE AND RESTRICTED AREA REGULATIONS § 334.710 The Narrows and Gulf of Mexico adjacent to... part 329, including the waters of The Narrows and the Gulf of Mexico easterly of the periphery of...

  5. 17 CFR 41.15 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 41.15 Section 41.15 Commodity and... Indexes § 41.15 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the securities of an...

  6. 17 CFR 41.15 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 41.15 Section 41.15 Commodity and... Indexes § 41.15 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the securities of an...

  7. 17 CFR 41.15 - Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. 41.15 Section 41.15 Commodity and... Indexes § 41.15 Exclusion from definition of narrow-based security index for indexes composed of debt securities. (a) An index is not a narrow-based security index if: (1)(i) Each of the securities of an...

  8. The Effects of Narrow Reading of Authentic Texts on Interest and Reading Ability in English as a Foreign Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cho, Kyung-Sook; Ahn, Kyoung-Ok; Krashen, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Narrow reading means reading in only one genre, one subject matter, or the work of one author. The case for narrow reading was first presented over twenty years ago (Krashen, 1981). Narrow reading, it was argued, has the advantage of providing the developing reader with a familiar context, that is, familiar background knowledge that helps make…

  9. Genetic structure, introgression, and a narrow hybrid zone between northern and California spotted owls (Strix occidentalis).

    PubMed

    Barrowclough, G F; Groth, J G; Mertz, L A; Gutiérrez, R J

    2005-04-01

    The northern spotted owl (Strix occidentalis caurina) is a threatened subspecies and the California spotted owl (Strix occidentalis occidentalis) is a subspecies of special concern in the western United States. Concern for their continued viability has arisen because of habitat loss caused by timber harvesting. The taxonomic status of the northern subspecies has been the subject of continuing controversy. We investigated the phylogeographical and population genetic structure of northern and California spotted owls with special reference to their region of contact. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) control region sequences confirmed the existence of two well-differentiated lineages connected by a narrow hybrid zone in a region of low population density in north central California. Maximum-likelihood estimates indicated bidirectional gene flow between the lineages but limited introgression outside the region of contact. The lengths of both the mtDNA hybrid zone and the reduced density patch were similar and slightly exceeded estimates of natal dispersal distances. This suggests that the two subspecies were in secondary contact in a hybrid zone trapped by a population density trough. Consequently, the zone of interaction is expected to be geographically stable. We discovered a third, rare clade of haplotypes, which we interpreted to be a result of incomplete lineage sorting; those haplotypes result in a paraphyletic northern spotted owl with respect to the California spotted owl. A congeneric species, the barred owl (Strix varia), occasionally hybridizes with spotted owls; our results indicated an upper bound for the frequency of barred owl mtDNA haplotypes in northern spotted owl populations of 3%. PMID:15773939

  10. Fermi monitoring of radio-loud narrow-line Seyfert 1 galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Paliya, Vaidehi S.; Stalin, C. S.; Ravikumar, C. D.

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed analysis of the γ-ray flux variability and spectral properties of the five radio-loud narrow line Seyfert 1 (RL-NLSy1) galaxies, detected by the Large Area Telescope on board the Fermi Gamma-Ray Space Telescope, namely 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, PMN J0948+0022, PKS 1502+036, and PKS 2004−447. The first three sources show significant flux variations, including the rapid variability of a few hours by 1H 0323+342. The average γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 shows deviation from a simple power-law (PL) behavior, whereas the PL model gives a better fit for the other three sources. The spectra of 1H 0323+342, SBS 0846+513, and PMN J0948+0022, which are in low, flaring, and moderately active states, respectively, show significant curvature. Such curvature in the γ-ray spectrum of 1H 0323+342 and PMN J0948+0022 could be due to the emission region located inside the broad line region (BLR) where the primary mechanism of the γ-ray emission is inverse-Compton (IC) scattering of BLR photons occurring in the Klein–Nishina regime. The γ-ray emission of SBS 0846+513 is explained by IC scattering of dusty torus photons, which puts the emission region outside the BLR and thus under the Thomson regime. Therefore, the observed curvature of SBS 0846+513 could be intrinsic to the particle energy distribution. The presence of curvature in the γ-ray spectrum and flux variability amplitudes of some of the RL-NLSy1 galaxies suggests that these sources could be akin to low/moderate jet power flat spectrum radio quasars.

  11. The narrow substrate specificity of human tyrosine aminotransferase--the enzyme deficient in tyrosinemia type II.

    PubMed

    Sivaraman, Sharada; Kirsch, Jack F

    2006-05-01

    Human tyrosine aminotransferase (hTATase) is the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the reversible transamination of tyrosine to p-hydrophenylpyruvate, an important step in tyrosine metabolism. hTATase deficiency is implicated in the rare metabolic disorder, tyrosinemia type II. This enzyme is a member of the poorly characterized Igamma subfamily of the family I aminotransferases. The full length and truncated forms of recombinant hTATase were expressed in Escherichia coli, and purified to homogeneity. The pH-dependent titration of wild-type reveals a spectrum characteristic of family I aminotransferases with an aldimine pK(a) of 7.22. I249A mutant hTATase exhibits an unusual spectrum with a similar aldimine pK(a) (6.85). hTATase has very narrow substrate specificity with the highest enzymatic activity for the Tyr/alpha-ketoglutarate substrate pair, which gives a steady state k(cat) value of 83 s(-1). In contrast there is no detectable transamination of aspartate or other cosubstrates. The present findings show that hTATase is the only known aminotransferase that discriminates significantly between Tyr and Phe: the k(cat)/K(m) value for Tyr is about four orders of magnitude greater than that for Phe. A comparison of substrate specificities of representative Ialpha and Igamma aminotransferases is described along with the physiological significance of the discrimination between Tyr and Phe by hTATase as applied to the understanding of the molecular basis of phenylketonuria.

  12. Hydrographic surveys of four narrows within the Namakan reservoir system, Voyageurs National Park, Minnesota, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Densmore, Brenda K.; Strauch, Kellan R.; Ziegeweid, Jeffrey R.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey performed multibeam echosounder hydrographic surveys of four narrows in the Namakan reservoir system in August 2011, in cooperation with the International Joint Commission and Environment Canada. The data-collection effort was completed to provide updated and detailed hydrographic data to Environment Canada for inclusion in a Hydrologic Engineering Centers River Analysis System hydraulic model. The Namakan reservoir system is composed of Namakan, Kabetogama, Sand Point, Crane, and Little Vermilion Lakes. Water elevations in the Namakan reservoir system are regulated according to rule curves, or guidelines for water-level management based on the time of year, established by the International Joint Commission. Water levels are monitored by established gages on Crane Lake and the outlet of Namakan Lake at Kettle Falls, but water elevations throughout the system may deviate from these measured values by as much as 0.3 meters, according to lake managers and residents. Deviations from expected water elevations may be caused by between-lake constrictions (narrows). According to the 2000 Rule Curve Assessment Workgroup, hydrologic models of the reservoir system are needed to better understand the system and to evaluate the recent changes made to rule curves in 2000. Hydrographic surveys were performed using a RESON SeaBat™7125 multibeam echosounder system. Surveys were completed at Namakan Narrows, Harrison Narrows, King Williams Narrows, and Little Vermilion Narrows. Hydrographic survey data were processed using Caris HIPSTM and SIPSTM software that interpolated a combined uncertainty and bathymetric estimator (CUBE) surface. Quality of the survey results was evaluated in relation to standards set by the International Hydrographic Organization (IHO) for describing the uncertainty of hydrographic surveys. More than 90 percent of the surveyed areas at the four narrows have resulting bed elevations that meet the IHO “Special Order” quality

  13. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat.

    PubMed

    Farrell, Brad J; Bulgakova, Margarita A; Sirota, Mikhail G; Prilutsky, Boris I; Beloozerova, Irina N

    2015-11-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar.

  14. Accurate stepping on a narrow path: mechanics, EMG, and motor cortex activity in the cat

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, Brad J.; Bulgakova, Margarita A.; Sirota, Mikhail G.; Prilutsky, Boris I.

    2015-01-01

    How do cats manage to walk so graciously on top of narrow fences or windowsills high above the ground while apparently exerting little effort? In this study we investigated cat full-body mechanics and the activity of limb muscles and motor cortex during walking along a narrow 5-cm path on the ground. We tested the hypotheses that during narrow walking 1) lateral stability would be lower because of the decreased base-of-support area and 2) the motor cortex activity would increase stride-related modulation because of imposed demands on lateral stability and paw placement accuracy. We measured medio-lateral and rostro-caudal dynamic stability derived from the extrapolated center of mass position with respect to the boundaries of the support area. We found that cats were statically stable in the frontal plane during both unconstrained and narrow-path walking. During narrow-path walking, cats walked slightly slower with more adducted limbs, produced smaller lateral forces by hindlimbs, and had elevated muscle activities. Of 174 neurons recorded in cortical layer V, 87% of forelimb-related neurons (from 114) and 90% of hindlimb-related neurons (from 60) had activities during narrow-path walking distinct from unconstrained walking: more often they had a higher mean discharge rate, lower depth of stride-related modulation, and/or longer period of activation during the stride. These activity changes appeared to contribute to control of accurate paw placement in the medio-lateral direction, the width of the stride, rather than to lateral stability control, as the stability demands on narrow-path and unconstrained walking were similar. PMID:26354314

  15. Narrow-linewidth Q-switched random distributed feedback fiber laser.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiangming; Ye, Jun; Xiao, Hu; Leng, Jinyong; Wu, Jian; Zhang, Hanwei; Zhou, Pu

    2016-08-22

    A narrow-linewidth Q-switched random fiber laser (RFL) based on a half-opened cavity, which is realized by narrow-linewidth fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a section of 3 km passive fiber, has been proposed and experimentally investigated. The narrow-linewidth lasing is generated by the spectral filtering of three FBGs with linewidth of 1.21 nm, 0.56 nm, and 0.12 nm, respectively. The Q switching of the distributed cavity is achieved by placing an acousto-optical modulator (AOM) between the FBG and the passive fiber. The maximal output powers of the narrow-linewidth RFLs with the three different FBGs are 0.54 W, 0.27 W, and 0.08 W, respectively. Furthermore, the repetition rates of the output pulses are 500 kHz, and the pulse durations are about 500 ns. The corresponding pulse energies are about 1.08 μJ, 0.54 μJ, and 0.16 μJ, accordingly. The linewidth of FBG can influence the output characteristics in full scale. The narrower the FBG, the higher the pump threshold; the lower the output power at the same pump level, the more serious the linewidth broadening; and thus the higher the proportion of the CW-ground exists in the output pulse trains. Thanks to the assistance of the band-pass filter (BPF), the proportion of the CW-ground of narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL under the relative high-pump-low-output condition can be reduced effectively. The experimental results indicate that it is challenging to demonstrate a narrow-linewidth Q-switched RFL with high quality output. But further power scaling and linewidth narrowing is possible in the case of operating parameters, optimization efforts, and a more powerful pump source. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of narrow-linewidth generation in a Q-switched RFL. PMID:27557200

  16. California hospital networks are narrower in Marketplace than in commercial plans, but access and quality are similar.

    PubMed

    Haeder, Simon F; Weimer, David L; Mukamel, Dana B

    2015-05-01

    Do insurance plans offered through the Marketplace implemented by the State of California under the Affordable Care Act restrict consumers' access to hospitals relative to plans offered on the commercial market? And are the hospitals included in Marketplace networks of lower quality compared to those included in the commercial plans? To answer these questions, we analyzed differences in hospital networks across similar plan types offered both in the Marketplace and commercially, by region and insurer. We found that the common belief that Marketplace plans have narrower networks than their commercial counterparts appears empirically valid. However, there does not appear to be a substantive difference in geographic access as measured by the percentage of people residing in at least one hospital market area. More surprisingly, depending on the measure of hospital quality employed, the Marketplace plans have networks with comparable or even higher average quality than the networks of their commercial counterparts.

  17. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β -CuGaO2

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-04-16

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. Inmore » conclusion, the optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment.« less

  18. First-principles study of direct and narrow band gap semiconducting β-CuGaO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Manh Cuong; Zhao, Xin; Wang, Cai-Zhuang; Ho, Kai-Ming

    2015-04-01

    Semiconducting oxides have attracted much attention due to their great stability in air or water and the abundance of oxygen. Recent success in synthesizing a metastable phase of CuGaO2 with direct narrow band gap opens up new applications of semiconducting oxides as absorber layer for photovoltaics. Using first-principles density functional theory calculations, we investigate the thermodynamic and mechanical stabilities as well as the structural and electronic properties of the β-CuGaO2 phase. Our calculations show that the β-CuGaO2 structure is dynamically and mechanically stable. The energy band gap is confirmed to be direct at the Γ point of Brillouin zone. The optical absorption occurs right at the band gap edge and the density of states near the valance band maximum is large, inducing an intense absorption of light as observed in experiment.

  19. Anisotropic particles align perpendicular to the flow direction in narrow microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Trebbin, Martin; Steinhauser, Dagmar; Perlich, Jan; Buffet, Adeline; Roth, Stephan V.; Zimmermann, Walter; Thiele, Julian; Förster, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    The flow orientation of anisotropic particles through narrow channels is of importance in many fields, ranging from the spinning and molding of fibers to the flow of cells and proteins through thin capillaries. It is commonly assumed that anisotropic particles align parallel to the flow direction. When flowing through narrowed channel sections, one expects the increased flow rate to improve the parallel alignment. Here, we show by microfocus synchrotron X-ray scattering and polarized optical microscopy that anisotropic colloidal particles align perpendicular to the flow direction after passing a narrow channel section. We find this to be a general behavior of anisotropic colloids, which is also observed for disk-like particles. This perpendicular particle alignment is stable, extending downstream throughout the remaining part of the channel. We show by microparticle image velocimetry that the particle reorientation in the expansion zone after a narrow channel section occurs in a region with considerable extensional flow. This extensional flow is promoted by shear thinning, a typical property of complex fluids. Our discovery has important consequences when considering the flow orientation of polymers, micelles, fibers, proteins, or cells through narrow channels, pipes, or capillary sections. An immediate consequence for the production of fibers is the necessity for realignment by extension in the flow direction. For fibrous proteins, reorientation and stable plug flow are likely mechanisms for protein coagulation. PMID:23569240

  20. The role of vegetation and bed-level fluctuations in the process of channel narrowing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Friedman, J.M.; Osterkamp, W.R.; Lewis, W.M.

    1996-01-01

    A catastrophic flood in 1965 on Plum Creek, a perennial sandbed stream in the western Great Plains, removed most of the bottomland vegetation and transformed the single-thalweg stream into a wider, braided channel. Following eight years of further widening associated with minor high flows, a process of channel narrowing began in 1973; narrowing continues today. The history of channel narrowing was reconstructed by counting the annual rings of 129 trees and shrubs along a 5-km reach of Plum Creek near Louviers, Colorado. Sixty-three of these plants were excavated in order to determine the age and elevation of the germination point. The reconstructed record of channel change was verified from historical aerial photographs, and then compared to sediment stratigraphy and records of discharge and bed elevation from a streamflow gaging station in the study reach. Channel narrowing at Plum Creek occurs in two ways. First, during periods of high flow, sand and fine gravel are delivered to the channel, temporarily raising the general bed-level. Subsequently, several years of uninterrupted low flows incise a narrower channel. Second, during years of low flow, vegetation becomes established on the subaerial part of the present channel bed. In both cases, surfaces stabilize as a result of vegetation growth and vertical accretion of sediment.

  1. Electronic structure descriptor for the discovery of narrow-band red-emitting phosphors

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Zhenbin; Chu, Iek -Heng; Zhou, Fei; Ong, Shyue Ping

    2016-05-09

    Narrow-band red-emitting phosphors are a critical component of phosphor-converted light-emitting diodes for highly efficient illumination-grade lighting. In this work, we report the discovery of a quantitative descriptor for narrow-band Eu2+-activated emission identified through a comparison of the electronic structures of known narrow-band and broad-band phosphors. We find that a narrow emission bandwidth is characterized by a large splitting of more than 0.1 eV between the two highest Eu2+ 4f7 bands. By incorporating this descriptor in a high-throughput first-principles screening of 2259 nitride compounds, we identify five promising new nitride hosts for Eu2+-activated red-emitting phosphors that are predicted to exhibit goodmore » chemical stability, thermal quenching resistance, and quantum efficiency, as well as narrow-band emission. Lastly, our findings provide important insights into the emission characteristics of rare-earth activators in phosphor hosts and a general strategy to the discovery of phosphors with a desired emission peak and bandwidth.« less

  2. Emergence of a Narrow H2O Maser Feature in NGC 1052

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameno, Seiji; Nakai, Naomasa; Sawada-Satoh, Satoko; Sato, Naoko; Haba, Arisa

    2005-02-01

    We report the emergence of a narrow H2O maser feature with an FWHM of 21 km s-1 in the LINER NGC 1052, which has been known to show only a broad (FWHM>100 km s-1) maser line profile with relatively bright continuum radio emission. The new narrow maser feature with a peak flux density of 47 mJy at VLSR=1787 km s-1 is redshifted by 328 km s-1 with respect to the systemic velocity. Broad features with peak velocities of 1510 and 1704 km s-1, more redward than ever observed before, are also detected. The profile of the new narrow feature possibly shows brightening by 16%+/-9% and narrowing by 30%+/-12% between 2003 May 30 and June 2. During the same time, the continuum flux density has increased by 21%. Synchronous variation of maser and continuum flux densities on a timescale of days resembles that in Mrk 348, which is also a broad megamaser source with a bright radio continuum. Continuum and maser brightening and narrowing indicate that an increase of the background seed photon and an increase of maser gain have occurred simultaneously. A jet component running behind a mixture of ionized regions and X-ray dissociation regions at a subrelativistic velocity can produce such short-time variation. Another explanation is an interaction between the jet and molecular clouds.

  3. Tunable solid state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Hammerling, R.; Budgor, A.B.; Pinto, A.

    1985-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a conference on solid state lasers. Topics considered at the conference included transition-metal-doped lasers, line-narrowed alexandrite lasers, NASA specification, meteorological lidars, laser materials spectroscopy, laser pumped single pass gain, vibronic laser materials growth, crystal growth methods, vibronic laser theory, cross-fertilization through interdisciplinary fields, and laser action of color centers in diamonds.

  4. 300-mW narrow-linewidth deep-ultraviolet light generation at 193 nm by frequency mixing between Yb-hybrid and Er-fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Igarashi, Hironori; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Kouji; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-04-20

    A narrow-linewidth, high average power deep-ultraviolet (DUV) coherent laser emitting at 193 nm is demonstrated by frequency mixing a Yb-hybrid laser with an Er-fiber laser. The Yb-hybrid laser consists of Yb-fiber lasers and an Yb:YAG amplifier. The average output power of the 193 nm laser is 310 mW at 6 kHz, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 51 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power and pulse energy ever reported for a narrow-linewidth 193 nm light generated by a combination of solid-state and fiber lasers with frequency mixing. We believe this laser will be beneficial for the application of interference lithography by seeding an injection-locking ArF eximer laser. PMID:25969096

  5. 300-mW narrow-linewidth deep-ultraviolet light generation at 193 nm by frequency mixing between Yb-hybrid and Er-fiber lasers.

    PubMed

    Xuan, Hongwen; Zhao, Zhigang; Igarashi, Hironori; Ito, Shinji; Kakizaki, Kouji; Kobayashi, Yohei

    2015-04-20

    A narrow-linewidth, high average power deep-ultraviolet (DUV) coherent laser emitting at 193 nm is demonstrated by frequency mixing a Yb-hybrid laser with an Er-fiber laser. The Yb-hybrid laser consists of Yb-fiber lasers and an Yb:YAG amplifier. The average output power of the 193 nm laser is 310 mW at 6 kHz, which corresponds to a pulse energy of 51 μJ. To the best of our knowledge, this is the highest average power and pulse energy ever reported for a narrow-linewidth 193 nm light generated by a combination of solid-state and fiber lasers with frequency mixing. We believe this laser will be beneficial for the application of interference lithography by seeding an injection-locking ArF eximer laser.

  6. Physical conditions in the narrow-line regions of M51 and NGC 4151

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Larry Daniel

    2004-04-01

    pc) from the nucleus, to examine the electron density, temperature, and ionization state of the NLR gas. To test the hypothesis of central source ionization, I generated detailed photoionization models for each NLR cloud using the photoionization code Cloudy. The emission-line fluxes for most of the NLR clouds can be reproduced reasonably well by simple photoionization models using a central power-law continuum source and supersolar nitrogen abundances. The optimized photoionization models reveal the presence of a nitrogen abundance gradient within the inner narrow-line region of M51. The nitrogen abundance appears to be larger closer to the nucleus (˜4.5 N⊙ ) and decreases with increasing radius, reaching ˜3 N⊙ for the outer clouds. I have also compared our observed line ratios with the MAPPINGS II shock models to determine if shocks play a significant role in the excitation of the NLR gas. Shock+precursor models provide a better fit than photoionization models to the observed fluxes of an NLR cloud ˜ 2.'' 5 south of the nucleus that is identified with the extra-nuclear cloud (XNC) detected in earlier studies. In our 3.6 cm data, this cloud is straddled by two radio knots and lies near the location where a weak radio jet, ˜ 2.'' 5 (102 pc) in extent, connects the near-nuclear radio emission with a diffuse (lobe) structure spanning ˜ 4'' (163 pc).

  7. Evidence for a narrow N{sup *}(1685) resonance in quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.; Polyakov, M. V.; Bellini, V.; Giusa, A.; Mammoliti, F.; Randieri, C.; Russo, G.; Sperduto, M. L.; Boiko, T.; Chebotaryov, S.; Dho, H.-S.; Kim, W.; Milman, E.; Ni, A.; Gervino, G.; Ghio, F.; Kim, A.; Perevalova, I. A.; Vall, A. N.; Sutera, C. M.

    2011-02-15

    The study of quasifree Compton scattering on the neutron in the energy range of E{sub {gamma}}=0.75-1.5 GeV is presented. The data reveal a narrow peak at W{approx}1.685 GeV. This result, being considered in conjunction with the recent evidence for a narrow structure at W{approx}1.68 GeV in {eta} photoproduction on the neutron, suggests the existence of a nucleon resonance with unusual properties: a mass M{approx}1.685 GeV, a narrow width {Gamma}{<=}30 MeV, and the much stronger photoexcitation on the neutron than on the proton.

  8. What narrow-linewidth semiconductor lasers can do for defense and security?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, M.; Ayotte, S.; Latrasse, C.; Aubé, M.; Poulin, M.; Painchaud, Y.; Gagnon, N.; Lafrance, G.

    2010-04-01

    Sensing systems for defense and security operate in evermore demanding environments, increasingly leaving the comfort zone of fiber laser technology. Efficient and rugged laser sources are required that maintain a high level performance under large temperature excursions and sizable vibrations. This paper first presents a sample of defense and security sensing applications requiring laser sources with a narrow emission spectrum. Laser specifications of interest for defense and security sensing applications are reviewed. The effect of the laser frequency noise in interferometric sensing systems is discussed and techniques implemented to reduce phase noise while maintaining the relative intensity noise performance of these sources are reviewed. Developments towards the size reduction of acoustically isolated narrow-linewidth semiconductor lasers are presented. The performance of a narrow-linewidth semiconductor laser subjected to vibrations is characterized. Simulation results of interferometric sensing systems are also presented, taking into account both the intensity and phase noise of the laser.

  9. Approximation of super-ions for single-file diffusion of multiple ions through narrow pores.

    PubMed

    Kharkyanen, Valery N; Yesylevskyy, Semen O; Berezetskaya, Natalia M

    2010-11-01

    The general theory of the single-file multiparticle diffusion in the narrow pores could be greatly simplified in the case of inverted bell-like shape of the single-particle energy profile, which is often observed in biological ion channels. There is a narrow and deep groove in the energy landscape of multiple interacting ions in such profiles, which corresponds to the pre-defined optimal conduction pathway in the configurational space. If such groove exists, the motion of multiple ions can be reduced to the motion of single quasiparticle, called the superion, which moves in one-dimensional effective potential. The concept of the superions dramatically reduces the computational complexity of the problem and provides very clear physical interpretation of conduction phenomena in the narrow pores.

  10. Using ultra narrow bandwidth to overcome traditional problems with distribution line carrier

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, P.C.; Hunt, L.R.

    1995-12-31

    It has long been common knowledge among communication engineers that wide bandwidth signals require more energy to overcome noise than do narrow band signals. This is why, during adverse conditions Morse code radio communications can get through when voice can`t. To achieve similar range: A television transmitter (6000 kHz bandwidth) requires 200,000 watts; A music broadcast transmitter (60 kHz bandwidth) requires 2000 watts; A voice only transmitter (3 kHz bandwidth) requires 100 watts. Carry this principle to extremes: An Ultra Narrow Bandwidth (UNB) transmitter (.00001 kHz bandwidth) requires .003 watts. This paper explores the advantages of using Ultra Narrow Bandwidth (UNB) in power line carrier systems. Using an Automatic Meter Reading System as an example, the authors explore how UNB allows (or sometimes requires) a change in system architecture, which creates further advantages.

  11. HIGH DEFINITION ENDOSCOPY AND "NARROW BAND IMAGING" IN THE DIAGNOSIS OF GASTROESOPHAGEAL REFLUX DISEASE

    PubMed Central

    ASSIRATI, Frederico Salvador; HASHIMOTO, Cláudio Lyoiti; DIB, Ricardo Anuar; FONTES, Luiz Henrique Souza; NAVARRO-RODRIGUEZ, Tomás

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The gastroesophageal reflux disease is a common condition in the western world but less than half of patients present endoscopic abnormalities, making a standard procedure unsuitable for diagnosis. High definition endoscopy coupled with narrow band imaging has shown potential for differentiation of lesions and possible biopsy, allowing early diagnosis and treatment. Methods This review describes the principles of biotic and their influence in obtaining images with better definition of the vessels in the mucosa, through the narrow band imaging. Selected papers using it in patients with reflux disease and Barrett's esophagus are analyzed in several ways, highlighting the findings and limitations. Conclusion The meaning of the narrow band imaging in the endoscopic diagnosis of reflux disease will be defined by large scale studies, with different categories of patients, including assessment of symptoms and response to treatment. PMID:24676302

  12. Performance of 1. 5. mu. m DFB lasers with a narrow stripe region

    SciTech Connect

    Kinoshita, J.; Ohtsuka, K.; Agatsuma, H.; Tanaka, A.; Matsuyama, T.; Makuta, A.; Kobayashi, H. )

    1991-06-01

    In this paper the excellent performance of DFB lasers which have a narrow region in the middle of the waveguiding stripe and AR-coated facet ends is presented. The narrow region is designed to act as a three-quarter wavelength phase shift. single longitudinal mode (SLM) capability is discussed both theoretically and experimentally. Calculated results predict that the shift region is effective in relaxing axial hole burning because of (1) a dip at the center of the axial field profile, and (2) a smaller optical confinement factor in the region. Experimentally, stable SLM operation up to more than 50 nW, a sidemode suppression ratio of more than 40 dB, and a 3 dB modulation bandwidth over 10 GHz are achieved. The performance of MQW-DFB lasers with a narrow region is also presented.

  13. Brief daily exposures to Asian females reverses perceptual narrowing for Asian faces in Caucasian infants

    PubMed Central

    Anzures, Gizelle; Wheeler, Andrea; Quinn, Paul C.; Pascalis, Olivier; Slater, Alan M.; Heron-Delaney, Michelle; Tanaka, James W.; Lee, Kang

    2012-01-01

    Perceptual narrowing in the visual, auditory, and multisensory domains has its developmental origins in infancy. The present study shows that experimentally induced experience can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing on infants’ visual recognition memory of other-race faces. Caucasian 8- to 10-month-olds who could not discriminate between novel and familiarized Asian faces at the beginning of testing were given brief daily experience with Asian female faces in the experimental condition and Caucasian female faces in the control condition. At the end of three weeks, only infants who received daily experience with Asian females showed above-chance recognition of novel Asian female and male faces. Further, infants in the experimental condition showed greater efficiency in learning novel Asian females compared to infants in the control condition. Thus, visual experience with a novel stimulus category can reverse the effects of perceptual narrowing in infancy via improved stimulus recognition and encoding. PMID:22625845

  14. Method for shaping and aiming narrow beams. [sonar mapping and target identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A sonar method and apparatus is discribed which utilizes a linear frequency chirp in a transmitter/receiver having a correlator to synthesize a narrow beamwidth pattern from otherwise broadbeam transducers when there is relative velocity between the transmitter/receiver and the target. The chirp is so produced in a generator in bandwidth, B, and time, T, as to produce a time bandwidth product, TB, that is increased for a narrower angle. A replica of the chirp produced in a generator is time delayed and Doppler shifted for use as a reference in the receiver for correlation of received chirps from targets. This reference is Doppler shifted to select targets preferentially, thereby to not only synthesize a narrow beam but also aim the beam in azimuth and elevation.

  15. Design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for nuclear resonance fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albert, F.; Anderson, S. G.; Gibson, D. J.; Marsh, R. A.; Wu, S. S.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.; Hartemann, F. V.

    2011-05-01

    The design of narrow-band Compton scattering sources for specific applications using nuclear resonance fluorescence (NRF) is presented. NRF lines are extremely narrow (ΔE/Ẽ10-6) and require spectrally narrow sources to be excited selectively and efficiently. This paper focuses on the theory of spectral broadening mechanisms involved during Compton scattering of laser photons from relativistic electron beams. It is shown that in addition to the electron beam emittance, energy spread, and the laser parameters, nonlinear processes during the laser-electron interaction can have a detrimental effect on the gamma-ray source bandwidth, including a newly identified weakly nonlinear phase shift accumulated over the effective interaction duration. Finally, a design taking these mechanisms into consideration is outlined.

  16. Ambulatory narrow excision for thin melanoma (< or = 2 mm): results of a prospective study.

    PubMed

    Bono, A; Bartoli, C; Clemente, C; Del Prato, I; Boracchi, P; Rossi, N; Cascinelli, N

    1997-07-01

    Although narrow surgical excision may be sufficient for thin melanoma, questions remain concerning how narrow the excision should be and how it should be related to tumour thickness. To address these issues, a group of 168 consecutive patients with primary invasive melanoma up to 2 mm thick underwent ambulatory surgery with excision margins of 1 cm. 40 (24%) of these patients had lesions thicker than 1 mm. In a median follow-up of 5 years, 11 patients relapsed and 3 developed second malignancies. The crude cumulative incidence of regional and distant metastases were, respectively, 5.6% and 1.5%. No local isolated recurrence was observed, indicating that ambulatory narrow excision is justified for melanoma up to 2 mm thick.

  17. Searching for Narrow Emission Lines in X-ray Spectra: Computation and Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Taeyoung; van Dyk, David A.; Siemiginowska, Aneta

    2008-12-01

    The detection and quantification of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra is a challenging statistical task. The Poisson nature of the photon counts leads to local random fluctuations in the observed spectrum that often result in excess emission in a narrow band of energy resembling a weak narrow line. From a formal statistical perspective, this leads to a (sometimes highly) multimodal likelihood. Many standard statistical procedures are based on (asymptotic) Gaussian approximations to the likelihood and simply cannot be used in such settings. Bayesian methods offer a more direct paradigm for accounting for such complicated likelihood functions, but even here multimodal likelihoods pose significant computational challenges. The new Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods developed in 2008 by van Dyk and Park, however, are able to fully explore the complex posterior distribution of the location of a narrow line, and thus provide valid statistical inference. Even with these computational tools, standard statistical quantities such as means and standard deviations cannot adequately summarize inference and standard testing procedures cannot be used to test for emission lines. In this paper, we use new efficient MCMC algorithms to fit the location of narrow emission lines, we develop new statistical strategies for summarizing highly multimodal distributions and quantifying valid statistical inference, and we extend the method of posterior predictive p-values proposed by Protassov and coworkers to test for the presence of narrow emission lines in X-ray spectra. We illustrate and validate our methods using simulation studies and apply them to the Chandra observations of the high-redshift quasar PG 1634+706.

  18. Keeping the Edges Sharp I: Honing the Theory of Narrow Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, Douglas P.; Rimlinger, Thomas; Hahn, Joseph M.

    2016-05-01

    Most of the rings that encircle Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune are very narrow structures with typical radial widths of just a few kilometers. Such extreme sharpness is surprising, as even slightly different orbital periods should allow ring particles to continually jostle one another in collisions that preserve angular momentum whileinexorably draining energy. Sharp edges should blur as rings spread in response to collisions and yet they do not. The generally accepted solution to this dilemma is to bracket each narrow ring with a pair of shepherding satellites that can pump energy back into the ring to replace that lost by collisions. But only a disappointing two of roughly twenty narrow rings actually have known attendant satellites. We present a compelling alternative in which the slight eccentricities and inclinations of narrow ringlets act as internal energy sources that can be tapped to prevent ring spreading. When unattended circular rings dissipate energy they must spread radially in order to preserve angular momentum. By contrast, eccentric or inclined rings have an extra degree of freedom that can be exploited to prevent radial spreading; energy is dissipated while keeping z-component of angular momentum, sqrt(a(1-e^2))cos(i), constant by simply decreasing the overall eccentricity (e) and/or inclination (i) of the entire ring. A real narrow ring moves inward as a unit, circularizes, and drops into the equatorial plane in a process that deters radial spreading for millions or billions of years. Using secular theory with dissipation (Zhang et al. 2013), we show that narrow rings are secular eigenstates in which ellipses are nested with pericenters almost, but not exactly aligned. The misalignment of pericenters is crucial in allowing energy dissipation to be shared evenly across the ring. We predict ring surface densities that are roughly constant across the ring's width, in contrast to profiles expected for shepherded rings. Rimlinger et al. (this meeting

  19. Multiple-spacecraft observation of a narrow transient plasma jet in the Earth's plasma sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, V. A.; Sauvaud, J.-A.; Popescu, D.; Kovrazhkin, R. A.; Liou, K.; Newell, P. T.; Brittnacher, M.; Parks, G.; Nakamura, R.; Mukai, T.; Reeves, G. D.

    2000-03-01

    We use observations from five magnetospheric spacecraft in a fortuitous constellation to show that narrow transient plasma flow jets of considerable length formed in the tail can intrude into the inner magnetosphere and provide considerable contribution to the total plasma transport. A specific auroral structure, the auroral streamer, accompanied the development of this narrow plasma jet. These observations support the ‘boiling’ plasma sheet model consisting of localized underpopulated plasma tubes (bubbles) moving Earthward at high speeds as a realistic way to resolve the ‘convection crisis’ and to close the global magnetospheric circulation pattern.

  20. Plasmonically-enhanced mid-infrared photoluminescence in a metal/narrow-gap semiconductor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Pengqi; Cai, Chunfeng; Zhang, Bingpo; Liu, Bozhi; Wu, Huizhen; Bi, Gang; Si, Jianxiao

    2016-05-01

    We report the enhancement of the mid-infrared (MIR) luminescence intensity in a nanoscale metal/semiconductor structure by the coupling of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) with excitons in a narrow-gap semiconductor. The SPPs are efficiently excited by the total internal reflection photons at a metal/semiconductor interface. The intense electric field induced by SPPs, in turn, greatly changes the radiative recombination rates of the excitons generated by the pumping laser and thus the MIR luminescence intensity. The finding avails the understanding of fundamental science of SPs in narrow-gap semiconductors and the development of novel MIR devices.

  1. Derivation of the center-wavelength shift of narrow-bandpass filters under temperature change.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung-Hwa; Hwangbo, Chang Kwon

    2004-11-15

    We derive a simple equation to predict the center-wavelength shift of a Fabry-Perot type narrow-bandpass filter by using the conventional characteristic matrix method and the elastic strain model as the temperature varies. We determine the thermal expansion coefficient of substrate from the zero-shift condition of the center wavelength of the filter. The calculated shifts are in a good agreement with the experimental ones, in which the narrow-bandpass filters are prepared by plasma ion-assisted deposition on four substrates with different thermal expansion coefficients.

  2. Optic for an endoscope/borescope having high resolution and narrow field of view

    DOEpatents

    Stone, Gary F.; Trebes, James E.

    2003-10-28

    An optic having optimized high spatial resolution, minimal nonlinear magnification distortion while at the same time having a limited chromatic focal shift or chromatic aberrations. The optic located at the distal end of an endoscopic inspection tool permits a high resolution, narrow field of view image for medical diagnostic applications, compared to conventional optics for endoscopic instruments which provide a wide field of view, low resolution image. The image coverage is over a narrow (<20 degrees) field of view with very low optical distortion (<5% pin cushion or barrel distortion. The optic is also optimized for best color correction as well as to aid medical diagnostics.

  3. A Practical Surgical Technique to Expose the Mental Nerve in Narrowing Genioplasty.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chenglong; Gui, Lai; Liu, Jianfeng

    2015-11-01

    In this article, the authors present a practical surgical technique using the anatomical character of the inferior alveolar nerve to fully expose the mental nerve (MN) in narrowing genioplasty. During the procedure, a rectangular mandibular outer cortex adjacent to the mental foramen is removed before the osteotomy. The objective is to avoid the injury of the MN from the reciprocating saw or bur and offer abundant space for the surgical operation. The technique has a minimal learning curve and will be useful to plastic surgeons to minimize unintentional cutting or pulling injury to the MN in narrowing genioplasty. PMID:26893979

  4. Narrow linewidth single-mode semiconductor laser development for coherent detection lidar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mansour, Kamjou; Ksendzov, Alexander; Menzies, Robert T.; Maker, Paul D.; Muller, Richard E.; Manfra, M. J.; Turner, George W.

    2003-01-01

    High power, tunable, single mode, narrow linewidth semiconductor lasers in the 2.05-(micro)m wavelength region are needed to develop semiconductor laser reference oscillators for optical remote sensing from Earth orbit. 2.05-I1/4m narrow linewidth monolithic distributed feedback (DFB) and distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) with the external grating ridge waveguide lasers fabricated from epitaxially grown InGaAs/InGaAsP/InP and in InGaAsSb/AlGaAsSb/GaSb heterostructures are reported.

  5. Narrow-band, slowly varying decimetric radiation from the dwarf M flare star YZ Canis Minoris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, K. R.; Willson, R. F.

    1986-01-01

    Observations of slowly varying radiation from the dwarf M star YZ Canis Minoris with a maximum flux density of 20 mJy and narrow-band frequency structure at frequencies near 1465 MHz are presented. Possible explanations for this radiation are examined. Thermal gyroresonant radiation would require impossibly large coronal loops and magnetic field strengths. The narrow-band structure cannot be explained by continuum emission processes such as thermal bremsstrahlung, thermal gyroresonant radiation, or nonthermal gyrosynchrotron radiation. Coherent burst mechanisms seem to be required.

  6. Filter-free nondispersive infrared sensing using narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, Takuya; De Zoysa, Menaka; Asano, Takashi; Noda, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally demonstrate filter-free nondispersive infrared (NDIR) sensing of organic solvents using single-peak narrow-bandwidth mid-infrared thermal emitters. Our emitters are based on multiple quantum wells (MQWs) and two-dimensional (2D) photonic crystal (PC) slabs, and show a single thermal emission peak with a quality factor of over 100 at the fingerprint wavelength (around 9 µm) of the target organic solvents. Using these narrow-bandwidth thermal emitters and commercial pyroelectric sensors without any optical bandpass filters, we successfully distinguish and determine the concentration of the target solvents among other solvents.

  7. Collisional narrowing by polyatomic buffer gases in an optically pumped CH3F laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawandy, N. M.; Koepf, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    The gain linewidth of an optically pumped CH3F molecular laser is observed with the addition of various polyatomic buffer gases. This is interpreted as collisional (Dicke) narrowing. The measurement is the first observation of collisional narrowing by polyatomic buffer gases. It is also the first observation of the effect in a laser oscillator. The effect was observed using a heterodyne mixing technique at the laser emission frequency of 604 GHz. Collision cross sections for SF6-CH3F and CS2-CH3F are obtained.

  8. Narrow-band imaging for the head and neck region and the upper gastrointestinal tract.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, Osamu; Ezoe, Yasumasa; Morita, Shuko; Horimatsu, Takahiro; Muto, Manabu

    2013-05-01

    Endoscopy is essential for the diagnosis and treatment of cancers derived from the gastrointestinal tract. However, a conventional white-light image has technical limitations in detecting small or superficial lesions. Narrow-band imaging, especially with magnification, allows visualization of microstructure patterns and microvascular patterns on the mucosal surface. These technical breakthroughs enable endoscopists to easily detect small pre-neoplastic and neoplastic lesions and to make a differential diagnosis of these lesions. Appropriate diagnosis with narrow-band imaging contributes to minimally invasive endoscopic resection.

  9. A narrow view of the broad iron line in MCG --6-30-15

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, A. J.; Lee, J. C.; Reynolds, C. S.; Fabian, A. C.; Gibson, R.; Canizares, C. R.

    2004-12-01

    We present the deepest Chandra High Energy Transmission Grating Spectrometer observation of the Seyfert 1 galaxy MCG --6-30-15 to date. Concentrating on the hard X-ray band we note the continued presence of the relativistically broadened iron Kα fluorescence line, and discuss the various narrow emission and absorption features in this band. In particular, we find narrow, weak H- and He-like iron absorption lines, but no evidence of K-shell absorption lines from less highly ionized iron, supporting the relativistic disk line interpretation of the broad iron line. This work is supported by NASA contract NAS8-01129.

  10. Impact of a narrow limiter SOL heat flux channel on the ITER first wall panel shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocan, M.; Pitts, R. A.; Arnoux, G.; Balboa, I.; de Vries, P. C.; Dejarnac, R.; Furno, I.; Goldston, R. J.; Gribov, Y.; Horacek, J.; Komm, M.; Labit, B.; LaBombard, B.; Lasnier, C. J.; Mitteau, R.; Nespoli, F.; Pace, D.; Panek, R.; Stangeby, P. C.; Terry, J. L.; Tsui, C.; Vondracek, P.

    2015-03-01

    The inboard limiters for ITER were initially designed on the assumption that the parallel heat flux density in the scrape-off layer (SOL) could be approximated by a single exponential with decay length λq. This assumption was found not to be adequate in 2012, when infra-red (IR) thermography measurements on the inner column during JET limiter discharges clearly revealed the presence of a narrow heat flux channel adjacent to the last closed flux surface. This near-SOL decay occurs with λq ∼ few mm, much shorter than the main SOL λq, and can raise the heat flux at the limiter apex a factor up to ∼4 above the value expected from a single, broader exponential. The original logarithmically shaped ITER inner wall first wall panels (FWPs) would be unsuited to handling the power loads produced by such a narrow feature. A multi-machine study involving the C-Mod, COMPASS, DIII-D and TCV tokamaks, employing inner wall IR measurements and/or inner wall reciprocating probes, was initiated to investigate the narrow limiter SOL heat flux channel. This paper describes the new results which have provided an experimental database for the narrow feature and presents an ITER inner wall FWP toroidal shape optimized for a double-exponential profile with λq = 4 (narrow feature) and 50 mm (main-SOL), the latter also derived from a separate multi-machine database constituted recently within the International Tokamak Physics Activity. It is shown that the new shape allows the power handling capability of the original shape design to be completely recovered for a wide variety of limiter start-up equilibria in the presence of a narrow feature, even taking assembly tolerances into account. It is, moreover, further shown that the new shape has the interesting property of both mitigating the impact of the narrow feature and resulting in only a very modest increase in heat load, compared to the current design, if the narrow feature is not eventually found on ITER.

  11. Recipient luminophoric mediums having narrow spectrum luminescent materials and related semiconductor light emitting devices and methods

    DOEpatents

    LeToquin, Ronan P; Tong, Tao; Glass, Robert C

    2014-12-30

    Light emitting devices include a light emitting diode ("LED") and a recipient luminophoric medium that is configured to down-convert at least some of the light emitted by the LED. In some embodiments, the recipient luminophoric medium includes a first broad-spectrum luminescent material and a narrow-spectrum luminescent material. The broad-spectrum luminescent material may down-convert radiation emitted by the LED to radiation having a peak wavelength in the red color range. The narrow-spectrum luminescent material may also down-convert radiation emitted by the LED into the cyan, green or red color range.

  12. Narrow-linewidth master-oscillator power amplifier based on a semiconductor tapered amplifier.

    PubMed

    Wilson, A C; Sharpe, J C; McKenzie, C R; Manson, P J; Warrington, D M

    1998-07-20

    The output of a grating-stabilized external-cavity diode laser was injected into a semiconductor tapered amplifier in a master-oscillator power amplifier configuration, producing as much as 500 mW of power with narrow linewidth. The additional linewidth that is due to the tapered amplifier is much smaller than the typical linewidth of grating-stabilized laser diodes. To demonstrate the usefulness of the narrow linewidth and high output power, we used the system to perform Doppler-free two-photon spectroscopy with rubidium. PMID:18285950

  13. Low lower crustal velocity across Ethiopia: Is the Main Ethiopian Rift a narrow rift in a hot craton?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keranen, K.M.; Klemperer, S.L.; Julia, J.; Lawrence, J. F.; Nyblade, A.A.

    2009-01-01

    [1] The Main Ethiopian Rift (MER) is a classic narrow rift that developed in hot, weak lithosphere, not in the initially cold, thick, and strong lithosphere that would be predicted by common models of rift mode formation. Our new 1-D seismic velocity profiles from Rayleigh wave/receiver function joint inversion across the MER and the Ethiopian Plateau indicate that hot lower crust and upper mantle are present throughout the broad region affected by Oligocene flood basalt volcanism, including both the present rift and the adjacent Ethiopian Plateau hundreds of kilometers from the rift valley. The region of hot lithosphere closely corresponds to the region of flood basalt volcanism, and we interpret that the volcanism and thermal perturbation were jointly caused by impingement of the Afar plume head. Across the affected region, Vs is 3.6-3.8 km/s in the lowermost crust and ???4.3 km/s in the uppermost mantle, both ??0.3 km/s lower than in the eastern and western branches of the East African Rift System to the south. We interpret the low Vs in the lower crust and upper mantle as indicative of hot lithosphere with partial melt. Our results lead to a hybrid rift mode, in which the brittle upper crust has developed as a narrow rift along the Neoproterozoic suture between East and West Gondwana, while at depth lithospheric deformation is distributed over the broad region (??400 km wide) thermally perturbed by the broad thermal upwelling associated with the Afar plume head. Development of both the East African Rift System to the south (in cold, strong lithosphere) and the MER to the north (in hot, weak lithosphere) as narrow rifts, despite their vastly different initial thermal states and depth-integrated lithospheric strength, indicates that common models of rift mode formation that focus only on temperature, thickness, and vertical strength profiles do not apply to these classic continental rifts. Instead, inherited structure and associated lithospheric weaknesses are

  14. The 'Embowire' Technique: Concept and Description of a Novel Embolization Technique for Narrow Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez-Benitez, Ruben Rusch, Oliver Heverhagen, Johannes Levent, Kara Hanno, Hoppe Geiser, Christa Kettenbach, Joachim

    2013-10-15

    We describe a new, useful embolization technique applied to occlude narrow vessel branches ({<=}1.5 mm (0.06 Double-Prime ) in diameter) by deployment of one hydrocoil, through a microcatheter, in a way similar to the way in which one might navigate through the vascular lumen with a guidewire.

  15. Extensive Reading, Narrow Reading and Second Language Learners: Implications for Libraries

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Sharon

    2011-01-01

    Extensive Reading is a resource heavy technique used in second language acquisition in which language learners read large amounts of texts for enjoyment, with the expectation that they will improve their vocabulary and fluency as a result of exposure to the written language. Narrow Reading is a similar technique in which the texts have a common…

  16. Mind the Gaps: How College Readiness Narrows Achievement Gaps in College Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ACT, Inc., 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report discusses factors that contribute to lower college success rates among underrepresented racial/ethnic minority students and students from lower-income families. The report also shows that "racial/ethnic and family income gaps in college success rates narrow substantially among students who are ready for college." Everyone needs to…

  17. A smile insensitive method for spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zining; Wang, Hongyan; Li, Yuandong; Lu, Qisheng; Hua, Weihong; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2011-10-01

    To eliminate the smile effect in spectral linewidth narrowing on high power laser diode arrays, we have introduced a plane reflective mirror into a common Littrow configuration external cavity to enhance the correlation among emitters. By this way, we obtained uniform spectral distribution among emitters of a 64-elements laser diode array with 35 GHz linewidth and 41 W output laser power.

  18. Student Interns' Socially Constructed Work Realities: Narrowing the Work Expectation-Reality Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnett, Kathy

    2012-01-01

    New employees, including college students, often experience expectation-reality gaps about work, making the assimilation process more difficult for all. This qualitative study explores the role of the internship in narrowing the work expectation-reality gap. This article addresses two research questions: (a) What do students learn about work…

  19. Social learning solves the problem of narrow-peaked search landscapes: experimental evidence in humans

    PubMed Central

    Acerbi, Alberto; Tennie, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    The extensive use of social learning is considered a major reason for the ecological success of humans. Theoretical considerations, models and experiments have explored the evolutionary basis of social learning, showing the conditions under which learning from others is more adaptive than individual learning. Here we present an extension of a previous experimental set-up, in which individuals go on simulated ‘hunts’ and their success depends on the features of a ‘virtual arrowhead’ they design. Individuals can modify their arrowhead either by individual trial and error or by copying others. We study how, in a multimodal adaptive landscape, the smoothness of the peaks influences learning. We compare narrow peaks, in which solutions close to optima do not provide useful feedback to individuals, to wide peaks, where smooth landscapes allow an effective hill-climbing individual learning strategy. We show that individual learning is more difficult in narrow-peaked landscapes, but that social learners perform almost equally well in both narrow- and wide-peaked search spaces. There was a weak trend for more copying in the narrow than wide condition, although as in previous experiments social information was generally underutilized. Our results highlight the importance of tasks’ design space when studying the adaptiveness of high-fidelity social learning. PMID:27703687

  20. Note: A cryogenic, ultra-high-vacuum, microwave filter which passes a narrow beam

    SciTech Connect

    Evetts, N. Dosanjh, P.; Hardy, W. N.; Zvyagintsev, V.

    2015-12-15

    We report on a device which filters microwave radiation prone to heating cryogenic experiments while at the same time allowing large apertures which will not disturb a propagating beam. A method for evaporating thin films onto the inner face of a narrow tube is also described.

  1. Narrow-Leaf Plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.) selection to increase freezing tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies in the northeastern USA have shown that the improved New Zealand cultivars of narrow leaf plantain (Plantago lanceolata L.), Tonic and Lancelot, do not have sufficient winter hardiness to persist under wintertime conditions typical of this region. However, an experimental line, PG700, develo...

  2. Congruence Effect in Semantic Categorization with Masked Primes with Narrow and Broad Categories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Wendy Maree; Kinoshita, Sachiko

    2008-01-01

    In semantic categorization, masked primes that are category-congruent with the target (e.g., "Planets: mars-VENUS") facilitate responses relative to category-incongruent primes (e.g., "tree-VENUS"). The present study investigated why this category congruence effect is more consistently found with narrow categories (e.g., "Numbers larger/smaller…

  3. Enhanced tunable narrow-band THz emission from laser-modulated electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Xiang, D.; Stupakov, G.; /SLAC

    2009-06-19

    We propose and analyze a scheme to generate enhanced narrow-band terahertz (THz) radiation through down-conversion of the frequency of optical lasers using laser-modulated electron beams. In the scheme the electron beam is first energy modulated by two lasers with wave numbers k{sub 1} and k2, respectively. After passing through a dispersion section, the energy modulation is converted to density modulation. Due to the nonlinear conversion process, the beam will have density modulation at wave number k = nk{sub 1} + mk{sub 2}, where n and m are positive or negative integers. By properly choosing the parameters for the lasers and dispersion section, one can generate density modulation at THz frequency in the beam using optical lasers. This density-modulated beam can be used to generate powerful narrow-band THz radiation. Since the THz radiation is in tight synchronization with the lasers, it should provide a high temporal resolution for the optical-pump THz-probe experiments. The central frequency of the THz radiation can be easily tuned by varying the wavelength of the two lasers and the energy chirp of the electron beam. The proposed scheme is in principle able to generate intense narrow-band THz radiation covering the whole THz range and offers a promising way towards the tunable intense narrow-band THz sources.

  4. Note: A cryogenic, ultra-high-vacuum, microwave filter which passes a narrow beam.

    PubMed

    Evetts, N; Dosanjh, P; Zvyagintsev, V; Hardy, W N

    2015-12-01

    We report on a device which filters microwave radiation prone to heating cryogenic experiments while at the same time allowing large apertures which will not disturb a propagating beam. A method for evaporating thin films onto the inner face of a narrow tube is also described. PMID:26724082

  5. The Narrowing of Curriculum and Pedagogy in the Age of Accountability: Urban Educators Speak Out

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crocco, Margaret S.; Costigan, Arthur T.

    2007-01-01

    Under the curricular and pedagogical impositions of scripted lessons and mandated curriculum, patterns associated nationwide with high-stakes testing, the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001, and the phenomenon known as the "narrowing of curriculum," new teachers in New York City (NYC) find their personal and professional identity thwarted,…

  6. 33 CFR 162.255 - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation. 162.255 Section 162.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  7. 33 CFR 162.255 - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation. 162.255 Section 162.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  8. 33 CFR 162.255 - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation. 162.255 Section 162.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  9. 33 CFR 162.255 - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation. 162.255 Section 162.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  10. 33 CFR 162.255 - Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Wrangell Narrows, Alaska; use, administration, and navigation. 162.255 Section 162.255 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION...

  11. NARROW-GAP POINT-TO-PLANE CORONA WITH HIGH VELOCITY FLOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The article discusses a mathematical model developed to describe a narrow- gap point- to- plane corona system used in the detoxification of chemical agents or their simulants, for which the degree of destruction depends on the strength of the electric field or electron energy. Na...

  12. Effect of Narrow Cut Oil Shale Distillates on HCCI Engine Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Eaton, Scott J; Bunting, Bruce G; Lewis Sr, Samuel Arthur; Fairbridge, Craig

    2009-01-01

    In this investigation, oil shale crude obtained from the Green River Formation in Colorado using Paraho Direct retorting was mildly hydrotreated and distilled to produce 7 narrow boiling point fuels of equal volumes. The resulting derived cetane numbers ranged between 38.3 and 43.9. Fuel chemistry and bulk properties strongly correlated with boiling point.

  13. Narrow grass hedge control of nutrient loads following variable manure application

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nutrient transport in runoff has been shown to be reduced by the placement of stiff-stemmed grass hedges on the contour along a hill slope. This study was conducted to measure the effectiveness of a narrow grass hedge in reducing runoff nutrient transport soon after manure application. Beef cattle m...

  14. Narrow coherence-induced peaks in Doppler-free spectra of thorium

    SciTech Connect

    Tissue, B.M. ); Fearey, B.L. )

    1994-04-01

    We report the observation of narrow peaks in Doppler-free spectra of thorium. The peaks are superimposed upon saturation-broadened line profiles in thorium atomic spectra by use of counterpropagating cw laser beams with resonance ionization mass spectrometry detection. At low laser powers the spectra show a conventional Lamb dip. As the laser power is increased, a narrow peak obscures the dip (for two of four transitions studied). The narrow peak is attributed to coherence effects at high laser powers. To confirm this assignment, we calculated the saturated absorption line shapes by using the theory of Haroche and Hartmann [Phys. Rev. A [bold 6], 1280 (1972)]. The spectral simulations reproduce the narrow peaks and show the same dependence with laser power and transition strength as do the data. There are some quantitative discrepancies, particularly in the overall saturation broadening, but given that there were no adjustable parameters in the calculations, the agreement between theory and experiment is considered quite good. The Einstein [ital A] coefficients used in the calculations were determined from an analysis of the laser-power dependence of the saturation broadening for each transition.

  15. Keeping the Bar Low: Why Russia's Nonresident Fathers Accept Narrow Fatherhood Ideals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Utrata, Jennifer

    2008-01-01

    Although most Russian nonresident fathers feel torn between old and new ideals of fatherhood, they end up accepting older, narrow ideals. Fathers reproduce the dominant gender discourse, which deems men irresponsible and infantile and diminishes the importance of fathers. On the basis of extensive fieldwork, including in-depth interviews (N = 21)…

  16. Broad and Narrow Personality Traits of Women's College Students in Relation to Early Departure from College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Sarah E.; Scepansky, James A.; Lounsbury, John W.; Gibson, Lucy W.

    2010-01-01

    Personality traits of coeducational students have been shown to correlate with early withdrawal intention from college (Lounsbury, Saudargas, & Gibson, 2004). The current study investigated the relationship between the Big Five personality traits as well as seven narrow personality traits in relation to withdrawal intention among 103 female…

  17. Simultaneous wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia: what is the mechanism?

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Mañero, Moisés; Bayrak, Fatih; Namdar, Mehdi; Casado-Arroyo, Rubén; Ricciardi, Danilo; Chierchia, Gian-Battista; Sarkozy, Andrea; de Asmundis, Carlo; Brugada, Pedro

    2013-05-01

    We present the case of a 50-year-old patient with several episodes of syncope and documented simultaneous wide and narrow QRS complex tachycardia. We then review this tacharrhythmia, focusing on electrophysiological findings and pathophysiology, diagnosis and treatment. PMID:23688775

  18. US: Supreme Court adopts narrow definition of "disability" under anti-discrimination law.

    PubMed

    Elliott, Richard

    2002-03-01

    In January 2002, the US Supreme Court issued the latest in a series of court judgments adopting a narrow interpretation of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). The unanimous decision is fundamentally flawed in several important respects. It does not bode well for people with disabilities seeking protection from discrimination in employment.

  19. Assessing the Utility of Compound Trait Estimates of Narrow Personality Traits.

    PubMed

    Credé, Marcus; Harms, Peter D; Blacksmith, Nikki; Wood, Dustin

    2016-01-01

    It has been argued that approximations of narrow traits can be made through linear combinations of broad traits such as the Big Five personality traits. Indeed, Hough and Ones ( 2001 ) used a qualitative analysis of scale content to arrive at a taxonomy of how Big Five traits might be combined to approximate various narrow traits. However, the utility of such compound trait approximations has yet to be established beyond specific cases such as integrity and customer service orientation. Using data from the Eugene-Springfield Community Sample (Goldberg, 2008 ), we explore the ability of linear composites of scores on Big Five traits to approximate scores on 127 narrow trait measures from 5 well-known non-Big-Five omnibus measures of personality. Our findings indicate that individuals' standing on more than 30 narrow traits can be well estimated from 3 different types of linear composites of scores on Big Five traits without a substantial sacrifice in criterion validity. We discuss theoretical accounts for why such relationships exist as well as the theoretical and practical implications of these findings for researchers and practitioners.

  20. 78 FR 29703 - Narrow Woven Ribbons With Woven Selvedge From Taiwan: Preliminary Results of Antidumping Duty...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-21

    ... Determination of Sales at Less than Fair Value: Narrow Woven Ribbons with Woven Selvedge from Taiwan, 75 FR... questionnaire. As a result, we have preliminarily assigned these companies a margin based on adverse facts... preliminary results, we have relied on facts available and, because the respondents did not act to the best...