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Sample records for nas atitudes desportivas

  1. NAS: The first year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Kutler, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are the capabilities of NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program and its application as an advanced supercomputing system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research. First, the paper describes the NAS computational system, called the NAS Processing System Network, and the advanced computational capabilities it offers as a consequence of carrying out the NAS pathfinder objective. Second, it presents examples of pioneering CFD research accomplished during NAS's first operational year. Examples are included which illustrate CFD applications for predicting fluid phenomena, complementing and supplementing experimentation, and aiding in design. Finally, pacing elements and future directions for CFD and NAS are discussed.

  2. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  3. New NAS journal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    In April 1984 the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) will begin publishing a new quarterly focusing on science policy. Written primarily for legislators, diplomats, corporate managers, security analysts, and other public policy analysts, the new journal will deal with such diverse topics as arms control, economic competition, social change, and health care.Original articles are expected to create a 120-page periodical that will discuss policy issues on a sophisticated but nonspecialist level, in a manner similar to that which Foreign Affairs uses to discuss U.S. foreign policy topics, according to NAS.

  4. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, David H.

    2009-11-15

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) are a suite of parallel computer performance benchmarks. They were originally developed at the NASA Ames Research Center in 1991 to assess high-end parallel supercomputers. Although they are no longer used as widely as they once were for comparing high-end system performance, they continue to be studied and analyzed a great deal in the high-performance computing community. The acronym 'NAS' originally stood for the Numerical Aeronautical Simulation Program at NASA Ames. The name of this organization was subsequently changed to the Numerical Aerospace Simulation Program, and more recently to the NASA Advanced Supercomputing Center, although the acronym remains 'NAS.' The developers of the original NPB suite were David H. Bailey, Eric Barszcz, John Barton, David Browning, Russell Carter, LeoDagum, Rod Fatoohi, Samuel Fineberg, Paul Frederickson, Thomas Lasinski, Rob Schreiber, Horst Simon, V. Venkatakrishnan and Sisira Weeratunga. The original NAS Parallel Benchmarks consisted of eight individual benchmark problems, each of which focused on some aspect of scientific computing. The principal focus was in computational aerophysics, although most of these benchmarks have much broader relevance, since in a much larger sense they are typical of many real-world scientific computing applications. The NPB suite grew out of the need for a more rational procedure to select new supercomputers for acquisition by NASA. The emergence of commercially available highly parallel computer systems in the late 1980s offered an attractive alternative to parallel vector supercomputers that had been the mainstay of high-end scientific computing. However, the introduction of highly parallel systems was accompanied by a regrettable level of hype, not only on the part of the commercial vendors but even, in some cases, by scientists using the systems. As a result, it was difficult to discern whether the new systems offered any fundamental performance advantage

  5. Update on NAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    With the approval of the governing bodies of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM), the first phase of a major reorganization of the National Research Council [Eos, March 16, p. 194] is well underway. As part of the reorganization—which consolidates seven existing assemblies and commissions into three commissions, two offices, and an independent board—the new Commission on Physical Sciences, Mathematics, and Resources will combine the activities of the former Assembly of Mathematical and Physical Sciences (AMPS) and the former Commission on Natural Resources (CNR).Herbert Friedman and Robert M. White, chairman of the assembly and of the commission, respectively, will cochair the new commission for 1 year. Charles K. Reed, executive director of the former assembly, is retiring but will serve as senior advisor to help establish the new commission and will serve as a member of the commission through June 1983. Raphael G. Kasper, executive secretary of the Environmental Studies Board, will be the commission's acting executive director.

  6. SMART NAS Test Bed Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palopo, Kee

    2016-01-01

    These slides presents an overview of SMART NAS Test Bed. The test bed is envisioned to be connected to operational systems and to allow a new concept and technology to be evaluated in its realistic environment. Its role as an accelerator of concepts and technologies development, its use-case-driven development approach, and its state are presented.

  7. The NAS kernel benchmark program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A collection of benchmark test kernels that measure supercomputer performance has been developed for the use of the NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation) program at the NASA Ames Research Center. This benchmark program is described in detail and the specific ground rules are given for running the program as a performance test.

  8. NAS Applications and Advanced Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Biswas, Rupak; VanDerWijngaart, Rob; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the applications most commonly run on the supercomputers at the Numerical Aerospace Simulation (NAS) facility. It analyzes the extent to which such applications are fundamentally oriented to vector computers, and whether or not they can be efficiently implemented on hierarchical memory machines, such as systems with cache memories and highly parallel, distributed memory systems.

  9. NASA's UAS NAS Access Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    The vision of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project is "A global transportation system which allows routine access for all classes of UAS." The goal of the UAS Integration in the NAS Project is to "contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS." This goal will be accomplished through a two-phased approach based on development of system-level integration of key concepts, technologies and/or procedures, and demonstrations of integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. Phase 1 will take place the first two years of the Project and Phase 2 will take place the following three years. The Phase 1 and 2 technical objectives are: Phase 1: Developing a gap analysis between current state of the art and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) UAS Concept of Operations . Validating the key technical areas identified by this Project . Conducting initial modeling, simulation, and flight testing activities . Completing Sub-project Phase 1 deliverables (spectrum requirements, comparative analysis of certification methodologies, etc.) and continue Phase 2 preparation (infrastructure, tools, etc.) Phase 2: Providing regulators with a methodology for developing airworthiness requirements for UAS, and data to support development of certifications standards and regulatory guidance . Providing systems-level, integrated testing of concepts and/or capabilities that address barriers to routine access to the NAS. Through simulation and flight testing, address issues including separation assurance, communications requirements, and human systems integration in operationally relevant environments. The UAS in the NAS Project will demonstrate solutions in specific technology areas, which will address operational/safety issues related to UAS access to the NAS. Since the resource allocation for

  10. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  11. The SMART-NAS Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquilina, Rudolph A.

    2015-01-01

    The SMART-NAS Testbed for Safe Trajectory Based Operations Project will deliver an evaluation capability, critical to the ATM community, allowing full NextGen and beyond-NextGen concepts to be assessed and developed. To meet this objective a strong focus will be placed on concept integration and validation to enable a gate-to-gate trajectory-based system capability that satisfies a full vision for NextGen. The SMART-NAS for Safe TBO Project consists of six sub-projects. Three of the sub-projects are focused on exploring and developing technologies, concepts and models for evolving and transforming air traffic management operations in the ATM+2 time horizon, while the remaining three sub-projects are focused on developing the tools and capabilities needed for testing these advanced concepts. Function Allocation, Networked Air Traffic Management and Trajectory Based Operations are developing concepts and models. SMART-NAS Test-bed, System Assurance Technologies and Real-time Safety Modeling are developing the tools and capabilities to test these concepts. Simulation and modeling capabilities will include the ability to assess multiple operational scenarios of the national airspace system, accept data feeds, allowing shadowing of actual operations in either real-time, fast-time and/or hybrid modes of operations in distributed environments, and enable integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies, and NAS architectures. An important focus within this project is to enable the development of a real-time, system-wide safety assurance system. The basis of such a system is a continuum of information acquisition, analysis, and assessment that enables awareness and corrective action to detect and mitigate potential threats to continuous system-wide safety at all levels. This process, which currently can only be done post operations, will be driven towards "real-time" assessments in the 2035 time frame.

  12. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  13. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  14. NAS Panel faults export controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  15. UAS-NAS Stakeholder Feedback Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Debra; Murphy, Jim; Grindle, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    The need to fly UAS in the NAS to perform missions of vital importance to national security and defense, emergency management, science, and to enable commercial applications has been continually increasing over the past few years. To address this need, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Integrated Aviation Systems Program (IASP) formulated and funded the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project (hereafter referred to as UAS-NAS Project) from 2011 to 2016. The UAS-NAS Project identified the following need statement: The UAS community needs routine access to the global airspace for all classes of UAS. The Project identified the following goal: To provide research findings to reduce technical barriers associated with integrating UAS into the NAS utilizing integrated system level tests in a relevant environment. This report provides a summary of the collaborations between the UAS-NAS Project and its primary stakeholders and how the Project applied and incorporated the feedback.

  16. Supercomputing 2002: NAS Demo Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hyperwall is a new concept in visual supercomputing, conceived and developed by the NAS Exploratory Computing Group. The hyperwall will allow simultaneous and coordinated visualization and interaction of an array of processes, such as a the computations of a parameter study or the parallel evolutions of a genetic algorithm population. Making over 65 million pixels available to the user, the hyperwall will enable and elicit qualitatively new ways of leveraging computers to accomplish science. It is currently still unclear whether we will be able to transport the hyperwall to SC02. The crucial display frame still has not been completed by the metal fabrication shop, although they promised an August delivery. Also, we are still working the fragile node issue, which may require transplantation of the compute nodes from the present 2U cases into 3U cases. This modification will increase the present 3-rack configuration to 5 racks.

  17. Greenhouse policy study from NAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The National Academy of Sciences will produce a study for the Environmental Protection Agency on policy responses to global warming. The report is due out before the end of 1990.Dan J. Evans, former U.S. Senator and former Governor of Washington, will chair a panel of the Commission on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, a body of the councils of the NAS, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. Evans is a registered civil engineer and previously chaired the Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council.The 13-person panel includes AGU members Stephen Schneider of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and Robert Frosch, Vice President of Research Laboratores at General Motors Corp., Jessica Mathews, Vice President of the World Resources Institute, and Sir Crispin Tickell, the United Kingdom's Ambassador to the United Nations.

  18. GaInNAs laser gain

    SciTech Connect

    CHOW,WENG W.; JONES,ERIC D.; MODINE,NORMAND A.; KURTZ,STEVEN R.; ALLERMAN,ANDREW A.

    2000-05-23

    The optical gain spectra for GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells are computed using a microscopic laser theory. From these spectra, the peak gain and carrier radiative decay rate as functions of carrier density are determined. These dependences allow the study of the lasing threshold current density of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

  19. Translational coupling of nasST expression in Azotobacter vinelandii prevents overexpression of the nasT gene.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Rensing, Christopher; Pierson, Leland S; Zhao, Hui; Kennedy, Christina

    2014-12-01

    The nasST operon encodes the transcriptional regulators of assimilatory nitrate reductase operons in phylogenetically diverse bacteria. NasT is a RNA-binding antiterminator and helps RNA polymerase read through the regulatory terminator sequences upstream of the structural genes. NasS senses nitrate and nitrite and regulates the activity of NasT through stoichiometric interaction. In this study, we analyzed the nasST sequence in Azotobacter vinelandii and revealed that the nasS and nasT genes overlap by 19 nucleotides. Our genetic analyses suggested that translational initiation of NasT was coupled with NasS translation, a regulatory mechanism that prevents overproduction of NasT. The significance of tight control of nasT expression was demonstrated in a nasT-overexpression strain, where expression of the assimilatory nitrate reductase operon was deregulated. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) User Services Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandori, John; Hamilton, Chris; Niggley, C. E.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing), its goals, and its mainframe computer assets. Also covered are its functions, including systems monitoring and technical support.

  1. UAS NAS IHITL Test Readiness Review (TRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Brignola, Michael P.; Rorie, Conrad; Santiago, Confesor; Guminsky, Mike; Cross, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Requesting release of IHITL test readiness review (TRR) charts to ensure UAS-NAS project primary stakeholders, the Federal Aviation Administration through the RTCA special committee -228 and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Sense and Avoid Science and Research Panel, are well informed on the IHITL test plan and expected outcomes as they relate to their needs to safely fly UAS in the NAS.

  2. Simultaneous Estimation of Hydrochlorothiazide, Hydralazine Hydrochloride, and Reserpine Using PCA, NAS, and NAS-PCA.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chetan; Badyal, Pragya Nand; Rawal, Ravindra K

    2015-01-01

    In this study, new and feasible UV-visible spectrophotometric and multivariate spectrophotometric methods were described for the simultaneous determination of hydrochlorothiazide (HCTZ), hydralazine hydrochloride (H.HCl), and reserpine (RES) in combined pharmaceutical tablets. Methanol was used as a solvent for analysis and the whole UV region was scanned from 200-400 nm. The resolution was obtained by using multivariate methods such as the net analyte signal method (NAS), principal component analysis (PCA), and net analyte signal-principal component analysis (NAS-PCA) applied to the UV spectra of the mixture. The results obtained from all of the three methods were compared. NAS-PCA showed a lot of resolved data as compared to NAS and PCA. Thus, the NAS-PCA technique is a combination of NAS and PCA methods which is advantageous to obtain the information from overlapping results.

  3. Antimycobacterial Activity and Mechanism of Action of NAS-91.

    PubMed

    Gratraud, Paul; Surolia, Namita; Besra, Gurdyal S; Surolia, Avadhesha; Kremer, Laurent

    2008-03-01

    The antimalarial agents NAS-91 and NAS-21 were found to express potent antimycobacterial activity, NAS-91 being more active than NAS-21. They partially inhibited mycolic acid biosynthesis and profoundly altered oleic acid production. The development of a cell-free assay for Delta 9-desaturase activity allowed direct demonstration of the inhibition of oleic acid biosynthesis by these compounds.

  4. Status and projections of the NAS program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Frank R.

    1986-01-01

    NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program has completed development of the initial operating configuration of the NAS Processing System Network (NPSN). This is the first milestone in the continuing and pathfinding effort to provide state-of-the-art supercomputing for aeronautics research and development. The NPSN, available to a nation-wide community of remote users, provides a uniform UNIX environment over a network of host computers ranging from the Cray-2 supercomputer to advanced scientific workstations. This system, coupled with a vendor-independent base of common user interface and network software, presents a new paradigm for supercomputing environments. Background leading to the NAS program, its programmatic goals and strategies, technical goals and objectives, and the development activities leading to the current NPSN configuration are presented. Program status, near-term plans, and plans for the next major milestone, the extended operating configuration, are also discussed.

  5. Security Controls Hurt Research, NAS Warns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report found no evidence that leaks of technical information from universities or other research centers have damaged national security. However, in areas where control is warranted, decisions should be based on criteria. These criteria and issues related to security control and technological transfer are…

  6. UAS Integration in the NAS Project - Project Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chuck

    2011-01-01

    The goal of the UAS integration in the NAS Project is to contribute capabili1es that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and opera1onal challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS.

  7. NAS Grid Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Frumkin, Michael; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We provide a paper-and-pencil specification of a benchmark suite for computational grids. It is based on the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB). NGB problems are presented as data flow graphs encapsulating an instance of a slightly modified NPB task in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. Like NPB, NGB specifies several different classes (problem sizes). In this report we describe classes S, W, and A, and provide verification values for each. The implementor has the freedom to choose any language, grid environment, security model, fault tolerance/error correction mechanism, etc., as long as the resulting implementation passes the verification test and reports the turnaround time of the benchmark.

  8. NAS Technical Summaries, March 1993 - February 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1993-94 operational year concluded with 448 high-speed processor projects and 95 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  9. Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A number of features make Java an attractive but a debatable choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) we have implemented NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would move Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  10. Carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well

    SciTech Connect

    Asami, T.; Nosho, H.; Tackeuchi, A.; Li, L. H.; Harmand, J. C.; Lu, S. L.

    2011-12-23

    We have investigated the carrier spin relaxation in GaInNAsSb/GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum well (QW) by time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) measurement. The sample consists of an 8-nm-thick GaIn{sub 0.36}N{sub 0.006}AsSb{sub 0.015} well, 5-nm-thick GaN{sub 0.01}AsSb{sub 0.11} intermediate barriers and 100-nm-thick GaAs barriers grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a GaAs(100) substrate. The spin relaxation time and recombination lifetime at 10 K are measured to be 228 ps and 151 ps, respectively. As a reference, we have also obtained a spin relaxation time of 125 ps and a recombination lifetime of 63 ps for GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QW. This result shows that crystal quality is slightly improved by adding Sb, although these short carrier lifetimes mainly originate from a nonradiative recombination. These spin relaxation times are longer than the 36 ps spin relaxation time of InGaAs/InP QWs and shorter than the 2 ns spin relaxation time of GaInNAs/GaAs QW.

  11. NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new problem size, called Class D, for the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), whose MPI source code implementation is being released as NPB 2.4. A brief rationale is given for how the new class is derived. We also describe the modifications made to the MPI (Message Passing Interface) implementation to allow the new class to be run on systems with 32-bit integers, and with moderate amounts of memory. Finally, we give the verification values for the new problem size.

  12. Remote access for NAS: Supercomputing in a university environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, G.; Olson, B.; Swisshelm, J.; Pryor, D.; Ziebarth, J.

    1986-01-01

    The experiment was designed to assist the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Project Office in the testing and evaluation of long haul communications for remote users. The objectives of this work were to: (1) use foreign workstations to remotely access the NAS system; (2) provide NAS with a link to a large university-based computing facility which can serve as a model for a regional node of the Long-Haul Communications Subsystem (LHCS); and (3) provide a tail circuit to the University of Colorado a Boulder thereby simulating the complete communications path from NAS through a regional node to an end-user.

  13. NAS Parallel Benchmarks, Multi-Zone Versions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    vanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Haopiang, Jin

    2003-01-01

    We describe an extension of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) suite that involves solving the application benchmarks LU, BT and SP on collections of loosely coupled discretization meshes. The solutions on the meshes are updated independently, but after each time step they exchange boundary value information. This strategy, which is common among structured-mesh production flow solver codes in use at NASA Ames and elsewhere, provides relatively easily exploitable coarse-grain parallelism between meshes. Since the individual application benchmarks also allow fine-grain parallelism themselves, this NPB extension, named NPB Multi-Zone (NPB-MZ), is a good candidate for testing hybrid and multi-level parallelization tools and strategies.

  14. The Need for Vendor Source Code at NAS. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Russell; Acheson, Steve; Blaylock, Bruce; Brock, David; Cardo, Nick; Ciotti, Bob; Poston, Alan; Wong, Parkson; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility has a long standing practice of maintaining buildable source code for installed hardware. There are two reasons for this: NAS's designated pathfinding role, and the need to maintain a smoothly running operational capacity given the widely diversified nature of the vendor installations. NAS has a need to maintain support capabilities when vendors are not able; diagnose and remedy hardware or software problems where applicable; and to support ongoing system software development activities whether or not the relevant vendors feel support is justified. This note provides an informal history of these activities at NAS, and brings together the general principles that drive the requirement that systems integrated into the NAS environment run binaries built from source code, onsite.

  15. [The NAS system: Nursing Activities Score in mobile technology].

    PubMed

    Catalan, Vanessa Menezes; Silveira, Denise Tolfo; Neutzling, Agnes Ludwig; Martinato, Luísa Helena Machado; Borges, Gilberto Cabral de Mello

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this study was to present the computerized structure that enables the use of the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) in mobile technology. It is a project for the development of technology production based on software engineering, founded on the theory of systems development life cycle. The NAS system was built in two modules: the search module, which is accessed using a personal computer (PC), and Data Collection module, which is accessed through a mobile device (Smartphone). The NAS system was constructed to allow other forms, in addition to the NAS tool, to be included in the future. Thus, it is understood that the development of the NAS will bring nurses closer to mobile technology and facilitate their accessibility to the data of the instrument relating to patients, thus assisting in decision-making and in staffing to provide nursing care.

  16. NO3-/NO2- assimilation in halophilic archaea: physiological analysis, nasA and nasD expressions.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Espinosa, Rosa María; Lledó, Belén; Marhuenda-Egea, Frutos C; Díaz, Susana; Bonete, María José

    2009-09-01

    The haloarchaeon Haloferax mediterranei is able to assimilate nitrate or nitrite using the assimilatory nitrate pathway. An assimilatory nitrate reductase (Nas) and an assimilatory nitrite reductase (NiR) catalyze the first and second reactions, respectively. The genes involved in this process are transcribed as two messengers, one polycistronic (nasABC; nasA encodes Nas) and one monocistronic (nasD; codes for NiR). Here we report the Hfx mediterranei growth as well as the Nas and NiR activities in presence of high nitrate, nitrite and salt concentrations, using different approaches such as physiological experiments and enzymatic activities assays. The nasA and nasD expression profiles are also analysed by real-time quantitative PCR. The results presented reveal that the assimilatory nitrate/nitrite pathway in Hfx mediterranei takes place even if the salt concentration is higher than those usually present in the environments where this microorganism inhabits. This haloarchaeon grows in presence of 2 M nitrate or 50 mM nitrite, which are the highest nitrate and nitrite concentrations described from a prokaryotic microorganism. Therefore, it could be attractive for bioremediation applications in sewage plants where high salt, nitrate and nitrite concentrations are detected in wastewaters and brines.

  17. UAS Integration in the NAS Project - FY 14 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Randall, Debra; Hackenberg, Davis

    2014-01-01

    This briefing gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS Projects progress and future directions.

  18. UAS Integration in the NAS FY15 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Randall, Debra; Hackenburg, Davis

    2015-01-01

    This presentation gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS progress and future directions.

  19. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks 2.1 Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saphir, William; Woo, Alex; Yarrow, Maurice

    1996-01-01

    We present performance results for version 2.1 of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the following architectures: IBM SP2/66 MHz; SGI Power Challenge Array/90 MHz; Cray Research T3D; and Intel Paragon. The NAS Parallel Benchmarks are a widely-recognized suite of benchmarks originally designed to compare the performance of highly parallel computers with that of traditional supercomputers.

  20. Natural attenuation software (NAS): Assessing remedial strategies and estimating timeframes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.

    2005-01-01

    Natural Attenuation Software (NAS) is a screening tool to estimate remediation timeframes for monitored natural attenuation (MNA) and to assist in decision-making on the level of source zone treatment in conjunction with MNA using site-specific remediation objectives. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include are advection, dispersion, sorption, non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution, and biodegradation of either petroleum hydrocarbons or chlorinated ethylenes. Newly-implemented enhancements to NAS designed to maximize the utility of NAS for site managers were observed. NAS has expanded source contaminant specification options to include chlorinated ethanes and chlorinated methanes, and to allow for the analysis of any other user-defined contaminants that may be subject to microbially-mediated transformations (heavy metals, radioisotopes, etc.). Included is the capability to model co-mingled plumes, with constituents from multiple contaminant categories. To enable comparison of remediation timeframe estimates between MNA and specific engineered remedial actions , NAS was modified to incorporate an estimation technique for timeframes associated with pump-and-treat remediation technology for comparison to MNA. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 8th International In Situ and On-Site Bioremediation Symposium (Baltimore, MD 6/6-9/2005).

  1. National Air Space (NAS) Data Exchange Environment Through 2060

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Aloke

    2015-01-01

    NASA's NextGen Concepts and Technology Development (CTD) Project focuses on capabilities to improve safety, capacity and efficiency of the National Air Space (NAS). In order to achieve those objectives, NASA sought industry-Government partnerships to research and identify solutions for traffic flow management, dynamic airspace configuration, separation assurance, super density operations, airport surface operations and similar forward-looking air-traffic modernization (ATM) concepts. Data exchanges over NAS being the key enabler for most of these ATM concepts, the Sub-Topic area 3 of the CTD project sought to identify technology candidates that can satisfy air-to-air and air/ground communications needs of the NAS in the year 2060 timeframe. Honeywell, under a two-year contract with NASA, is working on this communications technology research initiative. This report summarizes Honeywell's research conducted during the second year of the study task.

  2. UAS-NAS Flight Test Series 3: Test Environment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoang, Ty; Murphy, Jim; Otto, Neil

    2016-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability (SSI), Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communications (Comm), and Certification to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Detect and Avoid (DAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project is conducting a series of human-in-the-loop (HITL) and flight test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity, and

  3. Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunter, George; Boisvert, Benjamin

    2013-01-01

    This document is the final report for the project entitled "Upgrades to the Probabilistic NAS Platform Air Traffic Simulation Software." This report consists of 17 sections which document the results of the several subtasks of this effort. The Probabilistic NAS Platform (PNP) is an air operations simulation platform developed and maintained by the Saab Sensis Corporation. The improvements made to the PNP simulation include the following: an airborne distributed separation assurance capability, a required time of arrival assignment and conformance capability, and a tactical and strategic weather avoidance capability.

  4. High-speed GaInNAs laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Masahiko; Nakahara, Kouji; Fujisaki, S.; Tanaka, Shigehisa; Kudo, M.; Taniguchi, Tadashi; Terano, A.; Uchiyama, H.

    2004-05-01

    The explosive growth of Internet/intranet traffic has created a strong demand for cost-effective high-speed light-sources to be used in local access networks and data links. The frequency of relaxation oscillation (fr) is a major factor that restricts the high-speed operation of laser diodes. To achieve a high fr, the material of an active layer should have a large differential gain. By using GaInNAs, very deep quantum wells, especially in the conduction band can be formed. Deep quantum wells bring a large differential gain. In this paper, we show how GaInNAs lasers can be applied in this application

  5. Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark. Version 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Huiyu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Mavriplis, Catherine

    2004-01-01

    We present a complete specification of a new benchmark for measuring the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. It complements the existing NAS Parallel Benchmark suite. The benchmark involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem in a cubic domain, discretized on an adaptively refined, unstructured mesh.

  6. UAS in the NAS Flight Test Series 3 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.

    2015-01-01

    The UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting a series of flight tests to acheive the following objectives: 1.) Validate results previously collected during project simulations with live data 2.) Evaluate TCAS IISS interoperability 3.) Test fully integrated system in a relevant live test environment 4.) Inform final DAA and C2 MOPS 5.) Reduce risk for Flight Test Series 4.

  7. Applications Performance on NAS Intel Paragon XP/S - 15#

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Copper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division received an Intel Touchstone Sigma prototype model Paragon XP/S- 15 in February, 1993. The i860 XP microprocessor with an integrated floating point unit and operating in dual -instruction mode gives peak performance of 75 million floating point operations (NIFLOPS) per second for 64 bit floating point arithmetic. It is used in the Paragon XP/S-15 which has been installed at NAS, NASA Ames Research Center. The NAS Paragon has 208 nodes and its peak performance is 15.6 GFLOPS. Here, we will report on early experience using the Paragon XP/S- 15. We have tested its performance using both kernels and applications of interest to NAS. We have measured the performance of BLAS 1, 2 and 3 both assembly-coded and Fortran coded on NAS Paragon XP/S- 15. Furthermore, we have investigated the performance of a single node one-dimensional FFT, a distributed two-dimensional FFT and a distributed three-dimensional FFT Finally, we measured the performance of NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) on the Paragon and compare it with the performance obtained on other highly parallel machines, such as CM-5, CRAY T3D, IBM SP I, etc. In particular, we investigated the following issues, which can strongly affect the performance of the Paragon: a. Impact of the operating system: Intel currently uses as a default an operating system OSF/1 AD from the Open Software Foundation. The paging of Open Software Foundation (OSF) server at 22 MB to make more memory available for the application degrades the performance. We found that when the limit of 26 NIB per node out of 32 MB available is reached, the application is paged out of main memory using virtual memory. When the application starts paging, the performance is considerably reduced. We found that dynamic memory allocation can help applications performance under certain circumstances. b. Impact of data cache on the i860/XP: We measured the performance of the BLAS both assembly coded and Fortran

  8. Comparison of GaNAsSb and GaNAs as quantum-well barriers for GaInNAsSb optoelectronic devices operating at 1.3-1.55 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Yuen, Homan B.; Bank, Seth R.; Wistey, Mark A.; Harris, James S. Jr.; Moto, Akihiro

    2004-12-01

    GaNAsSb/GaAs quantum wells were grown by solid-source molecular-beam epitaxy utilizing a radio-frequency nitrogen plasma source. The GaNAsSb layers, originally the quantum well barrier materials for GaInNAs(Sb) devices, were studied for their general growth characteristics as well as their structural and optical properties, which give an indication of its quality as a quantum well barrier material. Reflection high-energy electron diffraction, high-resolution x-ray diffraction, secondary-ion mass spectroscopy, and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were used to study those properties. The growth parameters including arsenic overpressure and substrate temperature were changed systematically to determine the properties during deposition and to optimize these conditions. It was found that the addition of antimony to GaNAs did not improve the material as it did for GaInNAs. PL measurements indicated a decreasing optical quality with an increasing substrate temperature and no change with the arsenic overpressure. In addition, the addition of antimony had eliminated the lattice-strain compensation provided by the GaNAs barriers. Using GaNAs rather than GaNAsSb barriers in the GaInNAs(Sb) devices was found to be advantageous and has dramatically improved the performance of long-wavelength GaAs-based lasers.

  9. NAS Grid Benchmarks: A Tool for Grid Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We present an approach for benchmarking services provided by computational Grids. It is based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called NAS Grid Benchmark (NGB) in this paper. We present NGB as a data flow graph encapsulating an instance of an NPB code in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. These nodes may be mapped to the same or different Grid machines. Like NPB, NGB will specify several different classes (problem sizes). NGB also specifies the generic Grid services sufficient for running the bench-mark. The implementor has the freedom to choose any specific Grid environment. However, we describe a reference implementation in Java, and present some scenarios for using NGB.

  10. An improved NAS-RIF algorithm for image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Weizhe; Zou, Jianhua; Xu, Rong; Liu, Changhai; Li, Hengnian

    2016-10-01

    Space optical images are inevitably degraded by atmospheric turbulence, error of the optical system and motion. In order to get the true image, a novel nonnegativity and support constants recursive inverse filtering (NAS-RIF) algorithm is proposed to restore the degraded image. Firstly the image noise is weaken by Contourlet denoising algorithm. Secondly, the reliable object support region estimation is used to accelerate the algorithm convergence. We introduce the optimal threshold segmentation technology to improve the object support region. Finally, an object construction limit and the logarithm function are added to enhance algorithm stability. Experimental results demonstrate that, the proposed algorithm can increase the PSNR, and improve the quality of the restored images. The convergence speed of the proposed algorithm is faster than that of the original NAS-RIF algorithm.

  11. NASA UAS Integration into the NAS Project: Human Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS (Unmanned Aircraft System) Integration into the NAS project. The most recent simulation on DAA interoperability with Traffic Collision Avoidance System (TCAS) is discussed in the most detail. The relationship of the work to the larger UAS community and next steps are also detailed.

  12. Evaluating the Information Power Grid using the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaartm Rob F.; Frumkin, Michael A.

    2004-01-01

    The NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) are a collection of synthetic distributed applications designed to rate the performance and functionality of computational grids. We compare several implementations of the NGB to determine programmability and efficiency of NASA's Information Power Grid (IPG), whose services are mostly based on the Globus Toolkit. We report on the overheads involved in porting existing NGB reference implementations to the IPG. No changes were made to the component tasks of the NGB can still be improved.

  13. Performance and Scalability of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael A.; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Haoqiang; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several features make Java an attractive choice for scientific applications. In order to gauge the applicability of Java to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), we have implemented the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would position Java closer to Fortran in the competition for scientific applications.

  14. Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael A.; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Haoqiang; Yan, Jerry; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several features make Java an attractive choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), we have implemented the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would position Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  15. Autotasked Performance in the NAS Workload: A Statistical Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, R. L.; Stockdale, I. E.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    A statistical analysis of the workload performance of a production quality FORTRAN code for five different Cray Y-MP hardware and system software configurations is performed. The analysis was based on an experimental procedure that was designed to minimize correlations between the number of requested CPUs and the time of day the runs were initiated. Observed autotasking over heads were significantly larger for the set of jobs that requested the maximum number of CPUs. Speedups for UNICOS 6 releases show consistent wall clock speedups in the workload of around 2. which is quite good. The observed speed ups were very similar for the set of jobs that requested 8 CPUs and the set that requested 4 CPUs. The original NAS algorithm for determining charges to the user discourages autotasking in the workload. A new charging algorithm to be applied to jobs run in the NQS multitasking queues also discourages NAS users from using auto tasking. The new algorithm favors jobs requesting 8 CPUs over those that request less, although the jobs requesting 8 CPUs experienced significantly higher over head and presumably degraded system throughput. A charging algorithm is presented that has the following desirable characteristics when applied to the data: higher overhead jobs requesting 8 CPUs are penalized when compared to moderate overhead jobs requesting 4 CPUs, thereby providing a charging incentive to NAS users to use autotasking in a manner that provides them with significantly improved turnaround while also maintaining system throughput.

  16. Study of GaInNAs Epilayers Using Optical Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yutsung

    Photovoltaic devices that convert sun's energy into electricity have the potential to influence energy needs on a global scale. A major limitation of single junction solar cells is that only photons with energy slightly above the bandgap are absorbed efficiently. One of the methods is to split the energy of the incoming spectrum into multiple bands each of which is absorbed separately for more efficient collection. That is why multijunction solar cells formed from III-V compound semiconductors are the highest efficiency photovoltaic devices today. To achieve this goal, researchers stack a number of junctions made of different materials with the highest gap material at the top and the lowest at the bottom since each material is transparent to photons with energy smaller than its bandgap. Kurtz [1] predicted an improvement in the performance of multijunction solar cells if a fourth material with bandgap in the 1.0eV-1.05eV range is included between the GaAs (bandgap = 1.42 eV) and Ge (bandgap = 0.67 eV) in the solar cell. In order for this fourth material to be easily incorporated into the GaInP/ GaAs/Ge triple junction device, it must also be lattice matched to germanium. Since it is preferred to grow multijunction solar cells monolithically lattice matching is required making the options for the 1 eV material rather limited. The most promising material for the fourth junction is currently GaInNAs. This is the reason why this thesis concentrates on the study of this material. In this thesis, we have conducted PL, optical pumping, magneto-PL, reflectance and transmission spectroscopic studies of undoped and p-type doped GaInNAs epilayers. The objective of these studies is to investigate the following phenomena in our samples: (a) Localized excitons and free excitons at low temperatures in GaInNAs epilayers: The exciton localization at low temperatures in undoped GaInNAs epilayers results in the S-shape of the PL peaks versus temperature plot. On the other hand, the

  17. New therapeutic perspectives in HBV: when to stop NAs.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cameo, Cristina; Pons, Mònica; Esteban, Rafael

    2014-02-01

    The goal of chronic hepatitis B (CHB) treatment is to achieve seroclearance of HBsAg. Nucleos(t)ide analogues (NAs) are one of the first-line treatments for CHB. NAs produce a potent suppression of viral replication but are associated with a low rate of HBsAg seroclearance and a high risk of virological relapse after discontinuation. Because of these reasons, long-term treatment is needed. They are well-tolerated oral drugs, and it seems they do not produce important side-effects in long-term administration. The duration of NA treatment remains unclear, nevertheless, in some patients NAs can be stopped with a low rate of relapse. HBeAg-positive patients could discontinue NA therapy if they achieved HBeAg seroclearance and maintain undetectable HBV DNA. For HBeAg-negative patients, to stop NA treatment is not recommended. In addition to other factors, serum HBsAg titres during treatment have recently been proposed to guide NA-based therapy duration in selected patients. All patients could be stopped from taking treatment if they achieve HBsAg loss.

  18. Hybrid Network Architectures for the Next Generation NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madubata, Christian

    2003-01-01

    To meet the needs of the 21st Century NAS, an integrated, network-centric infrastructure is essential that is characterized by secure, high bandwidth, digital communication systems that support precision navigation capable of reducing position errors for all aircraft to within a few meters. This system will also require precision surveillance systems capable of accurately locating all aircraft, and automatically detecting any deviations from an approved path within seconds and be able to deliver high resolution weather forecasts - critical to create 4- dimensional (space and time) profiles for up to 6 hours for all atmospheric conditions affecting aviation, including wake vortices. The 21st Century NAS will be characterized by highly accurate digital data bases depicting terrain, obstacle, and airport information no matter what visibility conditions exist. This research task will be to perform a high-level requirements analysis of the applications, information and services required by the next generation National Airspace System. The investigation and analysis is expected to lead to the development and design of several national network-centric communications architectures that would be capable of supporting the Next Generation NAS.

  19. Graded band gap GaInNAs solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, F.; Perl, S.; Kamp, M.; Höfling, S.

    2015-06-08

    Dilute nitride GaInN(Sb)As with a band gap (E{sub g}) of 1.0 eV is a promising material for the integration in next generation multijunction solar cells. We have investigated the effect of a compositionally graded GaInNAs absorber layer on the spectral response of a GaInNAs sub cell. We produced band gap gradings (ΔE{sub g}) of up to 39 meV across a 1 μm thick GaInNAs layer. Thereby, the external quantum efficiency—compared to reference cells—was increased due to the improved extraction of photo-generated carriers from 34.0% to 36.7% for the wavelength range from 900 nm to 1150 nm. However, this device figure improvement is accompanied by a small decrease in the open circuit voltage of about 20 mV and the shift of the absorption edge to shorter wavelengths.

  20. High electron mobility in Ga(In)NAs films grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Okada, Yoshitaka; Inagaki, Makoto; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2012-11-26

    We report the highest mobility values above 2000 cm{sup 2}/Vs in Si doped GaNAs film grown by molecular beam epitaxy. To understand the feature of the origin which limits the electron mobility in GaNAs, temperature dependences of mobility were measured for high mobility GaNAs and referential low mobility GaInNAs. Temperature dependent mobility for high mobility GaNAs is similar to the GaAs case, while that for low mobility GaInNAs shows large decrease in lower temperature region. The electron mobility of high quality GaNAs can be explained by intrinsic limiting factor of random alloy scattering and extrinsic factor of ionized impurity scattering.

  1. Navigation in Grid Space with the NAS Grid Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Hood, Robert; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We present a navigational tool for computational grids. The navigational process is based on measuring the grid characteristics with the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB) and using the measurements to assign tasks of a grid application to the grid machines. The tool allows the user to explore the grid space and to navigate the execution at a grid application to minimize its turnaround time. We introduce the notion of gridscape as a user view of the grid and show how it can be me assured by NGB, Then we demonstrate how the gridscape can be used with two different schedulers to navigate a grid application through a rudimentary grid.

  2. NAS Requirements Checklist for Job Queuing/Scheduling Software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, James Patton

    1996-01-01

    The increasing reliability of parallel systems and clusters of computers has resulted in these systems becoming more attractive for true production workloads. Today, the primary obstacle to production use of clusters of computers is the lack of a functional and robust Job Management System for parallel applications. This document provides a checklist of NAS requirements for job queuing and scheduling in order to make most efficient use of parallel systems and clusters for parallel applications. Future requirements are also identified to assist software vendors with design planning.

  3. Nucleotide-dependent switch in proteasome assembly mediated by the Nas6 chaperone.

    PubMed

    Li, Frances; Tian, Geng; Langager, Deanna; Sokolova, Vladyslava; Finley, Daniel; Park, Soyeon

    2017-02-14

    The proteasome is assembled via the nine-subunit lid, nine-subunit base, and 28-subunit core particle (CP). Previous work has shown that the chaperones Rpn14, Nas6, Hsm3, and Nas2 each bind a specific ATPase subunit of the base and antagonize base-CP interaction. Here, we show that the Nas6 chaperone also obstructs base-lid association. Nas6 alternates between these two inhibitory modes according to the nucleotide state of the base. When ATP cannot be hydrolyzed, Nas6 interferes with base-lid, but not base-CP, association. In contrast, under conditions of ATP hydrolysis, Nas6 obstructs base-CP, but not base-lid, association. Modeling of Nas6 into cryoelectron microscopy structures of the proteasome suggests that Nas6 controls both base-lid affinity and base-CP affinity through steric hindrance; Nas6 clashes with the lid in the ATP-hydrolysis-blocked proteasome, but clashes instead with the CP in the ATP-hydrolysis-competent proteasome. Thus, Nas6 provides a dual mechanism to control assembly at both major interfaces of the proteasome.

  4. Parallelization of NAS Benchmarks for Shared Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry C.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting to new generations of high performance computing systems to parallelization tools and compilers. Due to the simplicity of programming shared-memory multiprocessors, compiler developers have provided various facilities to allow the users to exploit parallelism. Native compilers on SGI Origin2000 support multiprocessing directives to allow users to exploit loop-level parallelism in their programs. Additionally, supporting tools can accomplish this process automatically and present the results of parallelization to the users. We experimented with these compiler directives and supporting tools by parallelizing sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks. Results reported in this paper indicate that with minimal effort, the performance gain is comparable with the hand-parallelized, carefully optimized, message-passing implementations of the same benchmarks.

  5. Statistical Analysis of NAS Parallel Benchmarks and LINPACK Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meuer, Hans-Werner; Simon, Horst D.; Strohmeier, Erich; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In the last three years extensive performance data have been reported for parallel machines both based on the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, and on LINPACK. In this study we have used the reported benchmark results and performed a number of statistical experiments using factor, cluster, and regression analyses. In addition to the performance results of LINPACK and the eight NAS parallel benchmarks, we have also included peak performance of the machine, and the LINPACK n and n(sub 1/2) values. Some of the results and observations can be summarized as follows: 1) All benchmarks are strongly correlated with peak performance. 2) LINPACK and EP have each a unique signature. 3) The remaining NPB can grouped into three groups as follows: (CG and IS), (LU and SP), and (MG, FT, and BT). Hence three (or four with EP) benchmarks are sufficient to characterize the overall NPB performance. Our poster presentation will follow a standard poster format, and will present the data of our statistical analysis in detail.

  6. Data communication requirements for the advanced NAS network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levin, Eugene; Eaton, C. K.; Young, Bruce

    1986-01-01

    The goal of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program is to provide a powerful computational environment for advanced research and development in aeronautics and related disciplines. The present NAS system consists of a Cray 2 supercomputer connected by a data network to a large mass storage system, to sophisticated local graphics workstations, and by remote communications to researchers throughout the United States. The program plan is to continue acquiring the most powerful supercomputers as they become available. In the 1987/1988 time period it is anticipated that a computer with 4 times the processing speed of a Cray 2 will be obtained and by 1990 an additional supercomputer with 16 times the speed of the Cray 2. The implications of this 20-fold increase in processing power on the data communications requirements are described. The analysis was based on models of the projected workload and system architecture. The results are presented together with the estimates of their sensitivity to assumptions inherent in the models.

  7. Parallelization of NAS Benchmarks for Shared Memory Multiprocessors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry C.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This paper presents our experiences of parallelizing the sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks using compiler directives on SGI Origin2000 distributed shared memory (DSM) system. Porting existing applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Ideally, a user develops a sequential version of the application, leaving the task of porting to new generations of high performance computing systems to parallelization tools and compilers. Due to the simplicity of programming shared-memory multiprocessors, compiler developers have provided various facilities to allow the users to exploit parallelism. Native compilers on SGI Origin2000 support multiprocessing directives to allow users to exploit loop-level parallelism in their programs. Additionally, supporting tools can accomplish this process automatically and present the results of parallelization to the users. We experimented with these compiler directives and supporting tools by parallelizing sequential implementation of NAS benchmarks. Results reported in this paper indicate that with minimal effort, the performance gain is comparable with the hand-parallelized, carefully optimized, message-passing implementations of the same benchmarks.

  8. UAS-NAS Project Demo - Mini HITL Week 2 Stats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Fern, Lisa C.; Rorie, Robert C.; Shively, Robert; Jovic, Srboljub

    2016-01-01

    The UAS-NAS Project demo will showcase recent research efforts to ensure the interoperability between proposed UAS detect and avoid (DAA) human machine interface requirements (developed within RTCA SC-228) and existing collision avoidance displays. Attendees will be able to view the current state of the art of the DAA pilot traffic, alerting and guidance displays integrated with Traffic advisory and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) II in the UAS-NAS Project's research UAS ground control station (developed in partnership with the Air Force Research Laboratory). In addition, attendees will have the opportunity to interact with the research UAS ground control station and "fly" encounters, using the DAA and TCAS II displays to avoid simulated aircraft. The display of the advisories will be hosted on a laptop with an external 30" monitor, running the Vigilant Spirit system. DAA advisories will be generated by the JADEM software tool, connected to the system via the LVC Gateway. A repeater of the primary flight display will be shown on a 55" monitor mounted on a stand at the back of the booth to show the pilot interaction to the passersby.

  9. Concepts of Integration for UAS Operations in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges facing the integration of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is the lack of an onboard pilot that can comply with the legal requirement identified in the US Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) that pilots see and avoid other aircraft. UAS will be expected to demonstrate the means to perform the function of see and avoid while preserving the safety level of the airspace and the efficiency of the air traffic system. This paper introduces a Sense and Avoid (SAA) concept for integration of UAS into the NAS that is currently being developed by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and identifies areas that require additional experimental evaluation to further inform various elements of the concept. The concept design rests on interoperability principles that take into account both the Air Traffic Control (ATC) environment as well as existing systems such as the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System (TCAS). Specifically, the concept addresses the determination of well clear values that are large enough to avoid issuance of TCAS corrective Resolution Advisories, undue concern by pilots of proximate aircraft and issuance of controller traffic alerts. The concept also addresses appropriate declaration times for projected losses of well clear conditions and maneuvers to regain well clear separation.

  10. 1.15 Å resolution structure of the proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 PDZ domain

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, Chingakham R.; Lovell, Scott; Mehzabeen, Nurjahan; Chowdhury, Wasimul Q.; Geanes, Eric S.; Battaile, Kevin P.; Roelofs, Jeroen

    2014-03-25

    The proteasome-assembly chaperone Nas2 binds to the proteasome subunit Rpt5 using its PDZ domain. The structure of the Nas2 PDZ domain has been determined. The 26S proteasome is a 2.5 MDa protease dedicated to the degradation of ubiquitinated proteins in eukaryotes. The assembly of this complex containing 66 polypeptides is assisted by at least nine proteasome-specific chaperones. One of these, Nas2, binds to the proteasomal AAA-ATPase subunit Rpt5. The PDZ domain of Nas2 binds to the C-terminal tail of Rpt5; however, it does not require the C-terminus of Rpt5 for binding. Here, the 1.15 Å resolution structure of the PDZ domain of Nas2 is reported. This structure will provide a basis for further insights regarding the structure and function of Nas2 in proteasome assembly.

  11. In vivo inhibition of NAS preparation on H9N2 subtype AIV.

    PubMed

    Shang, Ruo-feng; Liang, Jian-ping; Na, Zhong-yuan; Yang, Hong-jun; Lu, Yu; Hua, Lan-ying; Guo, Wen-zhu; Cui, Ying; Wang, Ling

    2010-04-01

    NAS preparation, a kind of Chinese herbal medicine found by the Yunnan Eco-agricultural Research Institute, has potential antiviral activity. In this paper, the inhibiting effect of NAS preparation on H9N2 subtype Avian influenza virus (AIV) was investigated in vivo. Chickens infected with H9N2 virus were treated with NAS preparation for 4 days. The virus was then detected by hemoagglutination (HA) test and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that no H9N2 virus could be detected at the 7th day when the chickens were treated with 0.2 g/kg/d or 0.1 g/kg/d of NAS preparation. However the virus could be detected in other chickens without NAS preparation treatment. This result suggested that NAS preparation may be a potential drug candidate to control infection of H9N2 subtype AIV in chickens.

  12. A Comparison of Brunt Criteria, the Non Alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Activity Score (NAS) & a Proposed NAS-including fibrosis as Valid Diagnostic Scores for NASH

    PubMed Central

    Santiago-Rolón, Amarilys; Purcell, Dagmary; Rosado, Kathia; Toro, Doris H.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) can result in cirrhosis and end stage liver disease. It is of utmost importance to differentiate NASH from simple steatosis. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of NASH in Latino veterans with metabolic syndrome and compare histologic grading using Brunt Criteria, the NAFLD activity score (NAS), and a proposed NAS score including fibrosis. Methods Veterans with metabolic syndrome, hepatic steatosis and elevation of ALT/AST who underwent a liver biopsy from 2004-2010 were included in this study. Biopsies were evaluated by a single blinded Hepatopathologist. Steatosis, lobular inflammation, ballooning and fibrosis were graded per specimen. Each biopsy was evaluated using Brunt criteria, NAS and NAS plus fibrosis. Results Sixty patients were included in this study, 88.3% men with a mean age of 50.4 (± 12.8). 50.0% met criteria for NASH according to the Brunt system. When classifying biopsies using NAS, only 30.0% (18/60) had a score ≥5, while when adding fibrosis, the number of patients with a score ≥5 increased to 33 (55.0%). When evaluating the predictive ability of the two scoring systems, we found that NAS including fibrosis had a higher sensitivity than NAS (86.7% vs. 40.0%) and a lower specificity (76.7% vs. 80.0%). Conclusion In our population with metabolic syndrome and altered liver function tests, about 50-55% had steatohepatitis. There were significant differences between the scoring systems. When using NAS-plus-fibrosis more patients were recognized and the sensitivity increased. Further validation studies are required to evaluate this proposed NAS scoring System. PMID:26602577

  13. Control of nitrogen incorporation in Ga(In)NAs grown by metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derluyn, J.; Moerman, I.; Leys, M. R.; Patriarche, G.; Sek, G.; Kudrawiec, R.; Rudno-Rudziński, W.; Ryczko, K.; Misiewicz, J.

    2003-08-01

    We report on our studies of the nitrogen incorporation behavior in GaNAs bulk layers and GaInNAs quantum wells, grown by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. By high-resolution x-ray diffraction measurements on GaNAs, we observe that the nitrogen incorporation efficiency increases with increasing tertiary-butyl-arsine flow up to a certain threshold. Results on GaInNAs quantum wells (QWs) confirm this trend. Finally, we link the optical quality of these quantum wells to the abruptness of the QWs and the nitrogen content.

  14. An improved NAS-RIF algorithm for blind image restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ning; Jiang, Yanbin; Lou, Shuntian

    2007-01-01

    Image restoration is widely applied in many areas, but when operating on images with different scales for the representation of pixel intensity levels or low SNR, the traditional restoration algorithm lacks validity and induces noise amplification, ringing artifacts and poor convergent ability. In this paper, an improved NAS-RIF algorithm is proposed to overcome the shortcomings of the traditional algorithm. The improved algorithm proposes a new cost function which adds a space-adaptive regularization term and a disunity gain of the adaptive filter. In determining the support region, a pre-segmentation is used to form it close to the object in the image. Compared with the traditional algorithm, simulations show that the improved algorithm behaves better convergence, noise resistance and provides a better estimate of original image.

  15. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package: Automation Impacts of ROA's in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to analyze the impact of Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) operations on current and planned Air Traffic Control (ATC) automation systems in the En Route, Terminal, and Traffic Flow Management domains. The operational aspects of ROA flight, while similar, are not entirely identical to their manned counterparts and may not have been considered within the time-horizons of the automation tools. This analysis was performed to determine if flight characteristics of ROAs would be compatible with current and future NAS automation tools. Improvements to existing systems / processes are recommended that would give Air Traffic Controllers an indication that a particular aircraft is an ROA and modifications to IFR flight plan processing algorithms and / or designation of airspace where an ROA will be operating for long periods of time.

  16. Synthesis and biological evaluation of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues as potential inhibitors of the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme Rv0636.

    PubMed

    Bhowruth, Veemal; Brown, Alistair K; Besra, Gurdyal S

    2008-07-01

    The identification of potential new anti-tubercular chemotherapeutics is paramount due to the recent emergence of extensively drug-resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (XDR-TB). Libraries of NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues were synthesized and evaluated for their whole-cell activity against Mycobacterium bovis BCG. NAS-21 analogues 1 and 2 demonstrated enhanced whole-cell activity in comparison to the parental compound, and an M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing the dehydratase enzyme Rv0636 was resistant to these analogues. NAS-91 analogues with ortho-modifications gave enhanced whole-cell activity. However, extension with biphenyl modifications compromised the whole-cell activities of both NAS-21 and NAS-91 analogues. Interestingly, both libraries demonstrated in vitro activity against fatty acid synthase II (FAS-II) but not FAS-I in cell-free extracts. In in vitro assays of FAS-II inhibition, NAS-21 analogues 4 and 5 had IC(50) values of 28 and 19 mug ml(-1), respectively, for the control M. bovis strain, and the M. bovis BCG strain overexpressing Rv0636 showed a marked increase in resistance. In contrast, NAS-91 analogues demonstrated moderate in vitro activity, although increased resistance was again observed in FAS-II activity assays with the Rv0636-overexpressing strain. Fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) and mycolic acid methyl ester (MAME) analysis of M. bovis BCG and the Rv0636-overexpressing strain revealed that the effect of the drug was relieved in the overexpressing strain, further implicating and potentially identifying Rv0636 as the target for these known FabZ dehydratase inhibitors. This study has identified candidates for further development as drug therapeutics against the mycobacterial FAS-II dehydratase enzyme.

  17. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of... Analysis System (NAS).” Payments Under Fixed-Price Construction Contracts (JUL 2002) The clause entitled...) Failure either to meet schedules in Section Network Analysis System (NAS), or to process the Interim...

  18. Looking Backward: Parting Reflections on Higher Education Reform from NAS's Founding President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five years at the helm of the National Association of Scholars (NAS) have left the author with vivid memories: of knocks and bruises, peaks of exhilaration and, especially, unforgettable characters. But as for lessons learned, that's a very different story. In this article, the author shares some of the successes that happened in NAS for…

  19. The NAS EarlyBird Programme: Partnership with Parents in Early Intervention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Jane

    2001-01-01

    This article describes the development of an autism-specific three-month parent education program by Britain's National Autistic Society (NAS). The NAS EarlyBird Programme emphasizes partnerships with parents and uses weekly group training sessions and individualized home visits to teach parents about autism, social communication, and prevention…

  20. Looking Backward: Parting Reflections on Higher Education Reform from NAS's Founding President

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2012-01-01

    Twenty-five years at the helm of the National Association of Scholars (NAS) have left the author with vivid memories: of knocks and bruises, peaks of exhilaration and, especially, unforgettable characters. But as for lessons learned, that's a very different story. In this article, the author shares some of the successes that happened in NAS for…

  1. Genome-wide identification, classification and expression profiling of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) gene family in maize

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Nicotianamine (NA), a ubiquitous molecule in plants, is an important metal ion chelator and the main precursor for phytosiderophores biosynthesis. Considerable progress has been achieved in cloning and characterizing the functions of nicotianamine synthase (NAS) in plants including barley, Arabidopsis and rice. Maize is not only an important cereal crop, but also a model plant for genetics and evolutionary study. The genome sequencing of maize was completed, and many gene families were identified. Although three NAS genes have been characterized in maize, there is still no systematic identification of maize NAS family by genomic mining. Results In this study, nine NAS genes in maize were identified and their expression patterns in different organs including developing seeds were determined. According to the evolutionary relationship and tissue specific expression profiles of ZmNAS genes, they can be subgrouped into two classes. Moreover, the expression patterns of ZmNAS genes in response to fluctuating metal status were analysed. The class I ZmNAS genes were induced under Fe deficiency and were suppressed under Fe excessive conditions, while the expression pattern of class II genes were opposite to class I. The complementary expression patterns of class I and class II ZmNAS genes confirmed the classification of this family. Furthermore, the histochemical localization of ZmNAS1;1/1;2 and ZmNAS3 were determined using in situ hybridization. It was revealed that ZmNAS1;1/1;2, representing the class I genes, mainly expressed in cortex and stele of roots with sufficient Fe, and its expression can expanded in epidermis, as well as shoot apices under Fe deficient conditions. On the contrary, ZmNAS3, one of the class II genes, was accumulated in axillary meristems, leaf primordia and mesophyll cells. These results suggest that the two classes of ZmNAS genes may be regulated on transcriptional level when responds to various demands for iron uptake, translocation

  2. Natural Attenuation Software (NAS): A computer program for estimating remediation times of contaminated groundwater

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mendez, E.; Widdowson, M.; Brauner, S.; Chapelle, F.; Casey, C.; ,

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the development and application of a modeling system called Natural Attenuation Software (NAS). NAS was designed as a screening tool to estimate times of remediation (TORs), associated with monitored natural attenuation (MNA), to lower groundwater contaminant concentrations to regulatory limits. Natural attenuation processes that NAS models include advection, dispersion, sorption, biodegradation, and non-aqueous phase liquid (NAPL) dissolution. This paper discusses the three main interactive components of NAS: 1) estimation of the target source concentration required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits, 2) estimation of the time required for NAFL contaminants in the source area to attenuate to a predetermined target source concentration, and 3) estimation of the time required for a plume extent to contract to regulatory limits after source reduction. The model's capability is illustrated by results from a case study at a MNA site, where NAS time of remediation estimates compared well with observed monitoring data over multiple years.

  3. Production technology of an electrolyte for Na/S batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heimke, G.; Mayer, H.; Reckziegel, A.

    1982-05-01

    The trend to develop a cheap electrochemical electric battery and the development of the Na/S system are discussed. The main element in this type of battery is the beta Al2O3 solid electrolyte. Characteristics for this material of first importance are: specific surface, density of green and of sintered material, absence of cracks, gas permeability, resistance to flexion, purity, electrical conductivity, crystal structure and dimensions. Influence of production method on all these characteristics were investigated, e.g., method of compacting powder, tunnel kiln sintering versus static chamber furnace sintering, sintering inside a container or not, and type of kiln material when sintering in a container. In the stationary chamber furnace, beta alumina ceramics were produced with a density of 3.2 g/cm3, a mechanical strength higher than 160 MPa, and an electrical conductivity of about 0.125 Ohm-1cm-1 at 300 C. The best kiln material proved to be MgO and MgAl2O3.MgO ceramics.

  4. A Programming Model Performance Study Using the NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    DOE PAGES

    Shan, Hongzhang; Blagojević, Filip; Min, Seung-Jai; ...

    2010-01-01

    Harnessing the power of multicore platforms is challenging due to the additional levels of parallelism present. In this paper we use the NAS Parallel Benchmarks to study three programming models, MPI, OpenMP and PGAS to understand their performance and memory usage characteristics on current multicore architectures. To understand these characteristics we use the Integrated Performance Monitoring tool and other ways to measure communication versus computation time, as well as the fraction of the run time spent in OpenMP. The benchmarks are run on two different Cray XT5 systems and an Infiniband cluster. Our results show that in general the threemore » programming models exhibit very similar performance characteristics. In a few cases, OpenMP is significantly faster because it explicitly avoids communication. For these particular cases, we were able to re-write the UPC versions and achieve equal performance to OpenMP. Using OpenMP was also the most advantageous in terms of memory usage. Also we compare performance differences between the two Cray systems, which have quad-core and hex-core processors. We show that at scale the performance is almost always slower on the hex-core system because of increased contention for network resources.« less

  5. Performance Characteristics of the Multi-Zone NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Haoqiang; VanderWijngaart, Rob F.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new suite of computational benchmarks that models applications featuring multiple levels of parallelism. Such parallelism is often available in realistic flow computations on systems of grids, but had not previously been captured in bench-marks. The new suite, named NPB Multi-Zone, is extended from the NAS Parallel Benchmarks suite, and involves solving the application benchmarks LU, BT and SP on collections of loosely coupled discretization meshes. The solutions on the meshes are updated independently, but after each time step they exchange boundary value information. This strategy provides relatively easily exploitable coarse-grain parallelism between meshes. Three reference implementations are available: one serial, one hybrid using the Message Passing Interface (MPI) and OpenMP, and another hybrid using a shared memory multi-level programming model (SMP+OpenMP). We examine the effectiveness of hybrid parallelization paradigms in these implementations on three different parallel computers. We also use an empirical formula to investigate the performance characteristics of the multi-zone benchmarks.

  6. Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash

    1997-01-01

    Compilers supporting High Performance Form (HPF) features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR), Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS Parallel Benchmark results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition, we would also present NPB, (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu CAPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, and SGI Origin2000. We would also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  7. NAS Parallel Benchmark Results 11-96. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks have been developed at NASA Ames Research Center to study the performance of parallel supercomputers. The eight benchmark problems are specified in a "pencil and paper" fashion. In other words, the complete details of the problem to be solved are given in a technical document, and except for a few restrictions, benchmarkers are free to select the language constructs and implementation techniques best suited for a particular system. These results represent the best results that have been reported to us by the vendors for the specific 3 systems listed. In this report, we present new NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for the following systems: DEC Alpha Server 8400 5/440, Fujitsu VPP Series (VX, VPP300, and VPP700), HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, IBM RS/6000 SP P2SC node (120 MHz), NEC SX-4/32, SGI/CRAY T3E, SGI Origin200, and SGI Origin2000. We also report High Performance Fortran (HPF) based NPB results for IBM SP2 Wide Nodes, HP/Convex Exemplar SPP2000, and SGI/CRAY T3D. These results have been submitted by Applied Parallel Research (APR) and Portland Group Inc. (PGI). We also present sustained performance per dollar for Class B LU, SP and BT benchmarks.

  8. Update on the NAS-NRC Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Page, William F

    2006-12-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC) Twin Registry is one of the oldest, national population-based twin registries in the United States. It consists of 15,924 white male twin pairs born in the years 1917 to 1927 (inclusive), both of whom served in the armed forces, mostly during World War II. This article updates activity in this registry since the earlier 2002 article in Twin Research. The results of clinically based studies on dementia, Parkinson's disease, age-related macular degeneration, and primary osteoarthritis were published, as well as articles based on previously collected questionnaire data on chronic fatigue syndrome, functional limitations, and healthy aging. In addition, risk factor studies are being planned to merge clinical data with earlier collected risk factor data from questionnaires. Examination data from the subset of National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) twins resulted in a number of articles, including the relationship of endogenous sex hormones to coronary heart disease and morphological changes in aging brain structures. The NEO Five-Factor Personality Inventory (a paper-and-pencil self-administered questionnaire) has been fielded for the first time. A push to consolidate the various data holdings of the registry is being made.

  9. Investigation of Deep Levels in GaInNas

    SciTech Connect

    Abulfotuh, F.; Balcioglu, A.; Friedman, D.; Geisz, J.; Kurtz, S.

    1998-11-12

    This paper presents and discusses the first Deep-Level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) data obtained from measurements carried out on both Schottky barriers and homojunction devices of GaInNAs. The effect of N and In doping on the electrical properties of the GaNInAs devices, which results in structural defects and interface states, has been investigated. Moreover, the location and densities of deep levels related to the presence of N, In, and N+In are identified and correlated with the device performance. The data confirmed that the presence of N alone creates a high density of shallow hole traps related to the N atom and structural defects in the device. Doping by In, if present alone, also creates low-density deep traps (related to the In atom and structural defects) and extremely deep interface states. On the other hand, the co-presence of In and N eliminates both the interface states and levels related to structural defects. However, the device still has a high density of the shallow and deep traps that are responsible for the photocurrent loss in the GaNInAs device, together with the possible short diffusion length.

  10. [Study on the Application of NAS-Based Algorithm in the NIR Model Optimization].

    PubMed

    Geng, Ying; Xiang, Bing-ren; He, Lan

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, net analysis signal (NAS)-based concept was introduced to the analysis of multi-component Ginkgo biloba leaf extracts. NAS algorithm was utilized for the preprocessing of spectra, and NAS-based two-dimensional correlation analysis was used for the optimization of NIR model building. Simultaneous quantitative models for three flavonol aglycones: quercetin, keampferol and isorhamnetin were established respectively. The NAS vectors calculated using two algorithms introduced from Lorber and Goicoechea and Olivieri (HLA/GO) were applied in the development of calibration models, the reconstructed spectra were used as input of PLS modeling. For the first time, NAS-based two-dimensional correlation spectroscopy was used for wave number selection. The regions appeared in the main diagonal were selected as useful regions for model building. The results implied that two NAS-based preprocessing methods were successfully used for the analysis of quercetin, keampferol and isorhamnetin with a decrease of factor number and an improvement of model robustness. NAS-based algorithm was proven to be a useful tool for the preprocessing of spectra and for optimization of model calibration. The above research showed a practical application value for the NIRS in the analysis of complex multi-component petrochemical medicine with unknown interference.

  11. 78 FR 46497 - Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Oceana NAS, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... Tower at Oceana NAS (Apollo Soucek Field) now operating on a part time basis. This action enhances the... also updates the geographic coordinates of Oceana NAS (Apollo Soucek Field) and NALF Fentress. DATES... surface airspace at Oceana NAS (Apollo Soucek Field), VA, as the air traffic control tower...

  12. 78 FR 12951 - TRICARE; Elimination of the Non-Availability Statement (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-26

    ... (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency Inpatient Mental Health Care AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard beneficiary's claim to be paid. Currently, NAS are required for non-emergency inpatient mental health care for...

  13. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project Subcommittee Final

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Chuck; Griner, James H.; Hayhurst, Kelly J.; Shively, Robert J.; Consiglio, Maria; Muller, Eric; Murphy, James; Kim, Sam

    2012-01-01

    UAS Integration in the NAS Project overview with details from each of the subprojects. Subprojects include: Communications, Certification, Integrated Test and Evaluation, Human Systems Integration, and Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability.

  14. Psychometric assessment of the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System and the MOTHER NAS Scale.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Seashore, Carl; Johnson, Elisabeth; Horton, Evette; O'Grady, Kevin E; Andringa, Kim; Grossman, Matthew R; Whalen, Bonny; Holmes, Alison Volpe

    2016-08-01

    The present study examined the psychometric characteristics of the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (NASS; "Finnegan Scale") and the MOTHER NAS Scale (MNS). Secondary analysis of data from 131 neonates from the Maternal Opioid Treatment: Human Experimental Research (MOTHER) study, a randomized trial in opioid-dependent pregnant women administered buprenorphine or methadone. Both the NASS and MNS demonstrated poor psychometric properties, with internal consistency (Cronbach's αs) failing to exceed .62 at first administration, peak NAS score, and NAS treatment initiation. Findings support the need for development of a NAS measure based on sound psychometric principles. This study found that two frequently used measures of neonatal abstinence syndrome suffer inadequacies in regard to their basic measurement characteristics. (Am J Addict 2016;25:370-373). © 2016 American Academy of Addiction Psychiatry.

  15. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Texts of... “Network Analysis System (NAS).” Payments Under Fixed-Price Construction Contracts (APR 1984) The...

  16. Performance assessment of multijunction solar cells incorporating GaInNAsSb.

    PubMed

    Aho, Arto; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Guina, Mircea

    2014-02-05

    We have measured the characteristics of molecular beam epitaxy grown GaInNAsSb solar cells with different bandgaps using AM1.5G real sun illumination. Based on the solar cell diode characteristics and known parameters for state-of-the-art GaInP/GaAs and GaInP/GaAs/Ge cells, we have calculated the realistic potential efficiency increase for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb and GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb/Ge multijunction solar cells for different current matching conditions. The analyses reveal that realistic GaInNAsSb solar cell parameters, render possible an extraction efficiency of over 36% at 1-sun AM1.5D illumination. PACS: 88.40.hj; 88.40.jm; 88.40.jp; 81.15.Hi.

  17. Low temperature grown GaNAsSb: A promising material for photoconductive switch application

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Wicaksono, S.; Loke, W. K.; Li, D. S.; Saadsaoud, N.; Tripon-Canseliet, C.; Lampin, J. F.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2013-09-09

    We report a photoconductive switch using low temperature grown GaNAsSb as the active material. The GaNAsSb layer was grown at 200 °C by molecular beam epitaxy in conjunction with a radio frequency plasma-assisted nitrogen source and a valved antimony cracker source. The low temperature growth of the GaNAsSb layer increased the dark resistivity of the switch and shortened the carrier lifetime. The switch exhibited a dark resistivity of 10{sup 7} Ω cm, a photo-absorption of up to 2.1 μm, and a carrier lifetime of ∼1.3 ps. These results strongly support the suitability of low temperature grown GaNAsSb in the photoconductive switch application.

  18. Shadow Mode Assessment Using Realistic Technologies for the National Airspace (SMART NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal H.

    2014-01-01

    Develop a simulation and modeling capability that includes: (a) Assessment of multiple parallel universes, (b) Accepts data feeds, (c) Allows for live virtual constructive distribute environment, (d) Enables integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies and National Airspace System (NAS) architectures.

  19. QNAP 1263U Network Attached Storage (NAS)/ Storage Area Network (SAN) Device Users Guide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-11-01

    7 Fig. 8 Add a Policy button ...............................................................................8 Fig. 9 Read/ write access...store information and to reformat the NAS using other specifications. At the writing of this, the QNAP 1263U NAS is set up in a redundant array of...initiators are writing files. For this reason, only one computer should ever have write access to a LUN, which is viewed as a local hard drive by the

  20. All-GaInNAs ultrafast lasers: Material development for emitters and absorbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rutz, A.; Liverini, V.; Müller, E.; Schön, S.; Keller, U.

    2007-04-01

    Defect engineering is a key feature in material development for active and passive laser devices. Active devices such as surface emitting lasers require excellent material quality with low defect concentration and good strain management. In contrast, passive devices such as saturable absorbers benefit from nonradiative recombination via defect states. Different molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth conditions and annealing parameters were developed to optimize GaInNAs for both active and passive devices. We have demonstrated for the first time an all-GaInNAs modelocked vertical external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) at 1.3 μm. We combined a GaInNAs VECSEL with a GaInNAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirror (SESAM) in a laser cavity. The VECSEL was optically pumped by an 808 nm semiconductor diode laser. The intracavity GaInNAs SESAM self-starts stable modelocking and generates a pulse duration of 18.7 ps with a pulse repetition rate of 6.1 GHz at 57 mW of average output power at a center wavelength of 1308 nm. In this paper, we briefly review the modelocking result and then focus on the MBE growth and fabrication of both active and passive GaInNAs devices.

  1. The NAS Alert System: A look at the first eight years

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Pamela L.; Neilson, Matt; Huge, Dane H.

    2013-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey's Nonindigenous Aquatic Species (NAS) database program (http://nas.er.usgs.gov) tracks the distribution of introduced aquatic organisms across the United States. Awareness of, and timely response to, novel species introductions by those involved in nonindigenous aquatic species management and research requires a framework for rapid dissemination of occurrence data as it is incorporated into the NAS database. In May 2004, the NAS program developed an alert system to notify registered users of new introductions as part of a national early detection/rapid response system. This article summarizes information on system users and dispatched alerts from the system's inception through the end of 2011. The NAS alert system has registered over 1,700 users, with approximately 800 current subscribers. A total of 1,189 alerts had been transmitted through 2011. More alerts were sent for Florida (134 alerts) than for any other state. Fishes comprise the largest taxonomic group of alerts (440), with mollusks, plants, and crustaceans each containing over 100 alerts. Most alerts were for organisms that were intentionally released (414 alerts), with shipping, escape from captivity, and hitchhiking also representing major vectors. To explore the archive of sent alerts and to register, the search and signup page for the alert system can be found online at http://nas.er.usgs.gov/AlertSystem/default.aspx.

  2. Analysis of Band Offset in GaNAs/GaAs by X-Ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, Takeshi; Kondow, Masahiko; Kikawa, Takeshi; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto; Uomi, Kazuhisa

    1999-09-01

    We used X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) to measure the energy discontinuity in the valence band (ΔEv) of Ga1-xNxAs/AlAs (x=0, 0.014, 0.034) and estimated ΔEv of GaNAs/GaAs by using the Al2p energy level as a reference. The change in ΔEv for GaNAs/GaAs with an increasing nitrogen content was -(0.019±0.053) eV/%N. This suggests that the valence-band edge (Ev) in GaNAs decreases in proportion to the nitrogen content. Based on the decrease in the bandgap energy of GaNAs, we found that the energy discontinuity in the conduction band (ΔEc) of GaNAs/GaAs is -(0.175±0.053) eV/%N. This large effect of bandgap bowing on the conduction band indicates that an ideal carrier confinement in the well can be obtained by using GaInNAs as an active layer in long-wavelength laser diodes.

  3. Dilute-As AlNAs Alloy for Deep-Ultraviolet Emitter

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Borovac, Damir; Sun, Wei; Tansu, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The band structures of dilute-As AlNAs alloys with As composition ranging from 0% up to 12.5% are studied by using First-Principle Density Functional Theory (DFT) calculation. The energy band gap shows remarkable reduction from 6.19 eV to 3.87 eV with small amount of As content in the AlNAs alloy, which covers the deep ultraviolet (UV) spectral regime. A giant bowing parameter of 30.5 eV ± 0.5 eV for AlNAs alloy is obtained. In addition, our analysis shows that the crossover between crystal field split-off (CH) band and heavy hole (HH) bands occurs in the dilute-As AlNAs alloy with As-content of ~1.5%. This result implies the possibility of dominant transverse electric (TE)-polarized emission by using AlNAs alloy with dilute amount of As-content. Our findings indicate the potential of dilute-As AlNAs alloy as the new active region material for TE-polarized III-Nitride-based deep UV light emitters. PMID:26905060

  4. Reading: Students' Attitudes and Interests in Fourth, Fifth, and Sixth Grades in Official Portuguese Schools in the USA (A Leitura: Atitudes e Preferencias dos Educandos do 4th, 5th, e 6th Anos de Escolaridade nas Escolas Oficiais Portuguesas nos Estados Unidos da America).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castanho, Maria da Graca Borges

    A study investigated attitudes and preferences concerning reading among fourth-, fifth-, and sixth-grade students in Portuguese-language schools in the United States. Extrinsic factors influencing students (parents, teachers) were also analyzed. The research took place in 10 schools in 5 states. Data were obtained using questionnaires (students)…

  5. NAS Parallel Benchmark. Results 11-96: Performance Comparison of HPF and MPI Based NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subash; Bailey, David; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    High Performance Fortran (HPF), the high-level language for parallel Fortran programming, is based on Fortran 90. HALF was defined by an informal standards committee known as the High Performance Fortran Forum (HPFF) in 1993, and modeled on TMC's CM Fortran language. Several HPF features have since been incorporated into the draft ANSI/ISO Fortran 95, the next formal revision of the Fortran standard. HPF allows users to write a single parallel program that can execute on a serial machine, a shared-memory parallel machine, or a distributed-memory parallel machine. HPF eliminates the complex, error-prone task of explicitly specifying how, where, and when to pass messages between processors on distributed-memory machines, or when to synchronize processors on shared-memory machines. HPF is designed in a way that allows the programmer to code an application at a high level, and then selectively optimize portions of the code by dropping into message-passing or calling tuned library routines as 'extrinsics'. Compilers supporting High Performance Fortran features first appeared in late 1994 and early 1995 from Applied Parallel Research (APR) Digital Equipment Corporation, and The Portland Group (PGI). IBM introduced an HPF compiler for the IBM RS/6000 SP/2 in April of 1996. Over the past two years, these implementations have shown steady improvement in terms of both features and performance. The performance of various hardware/ programming model (HPF and MPI (message passing interface)) combinations will be compared, based on latest NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmark (NPB) results, thus providing a cross-machine and cross-model comparison. Specifically, HPF based NPB results will be compared with MPI based NPB results to provide perspective on performance currently obtainable using HPF versus MPI or versus hand-tuned implementations such as those supplied by the hardware vendors. In addition we would also present NPB (Version 1.0) performance results for

  6. Testing New Programming Paradigms with NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Schultz, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly, not only in hardware architectures but also with increasing complexity of real applications. Technologies have been developing to aim at scaling up to thousands of processors on both distributed and shared memory systems. Development of parallel programs on these computers is always a challenging task. Today, writing parallel programs with message passing (e.g. MPI) is the most popular way of achieving scalability and high performance. However, writing message passing programs is difficult and error prone. Recent years new effort has been made in defining new parallel programming paradigms. The best examples are: HPF (based on data parallelism) and OpenMP (based on shared memory parallelism). Both provide simple and clear extensions to sequential programs, thus greatly simplify the tedious tasks encountered in writing message passing programs. HPF is independent of memory hierarchy, however, due to the immaturity of compiler technology its performance is still questionable. Although use of parallel compiler directives is not new, OpenMP offers a portable solution in the shared-memory domain. Another important development involves the tremendous progress in the internet and its associated technology. Although still in its infancy, Java promisses portability in a heterogeneous environment and offers possibility to "compile once and run anywhere." In light of testing these new technologies, we implemented new parallel versions of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPBs) with HPF and OpenMP directives, and extended the work with Java and Java-threads. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of alternative programming paradigms. NPBs consist of five kernels and three simulated applications that mimic the computation and data movement of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. We started with the serial version included in NPB2.3. Optimization of memory and cache usage

  7. Testing New Programming Paradigms with NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Schultz, M.; Yan, J.

    2000-01-01

    Over the past decade, high performance computing has evolved rapidly, not only in hardware architectures but also with increasing complexity of real applications. Technologies have been developing to aim at scaling up to thousands of processors on both distributed and shared memory systems. Development of parallel programs on these computers is always a challenging task. Today, writing parallel programs with message passing (e.g. MPI) is the most popular way of achieving scalability and high performance. However, writing message passing programs is difficult and error prone. Recent years new effort has been made in defining new parallel programming paradigms. The best examples are: HPF (based on data parallelism) and OpenMP (based on shared memory parallelism). Both provide simple and clear extensions to sequential programs, thus greatly simplify the tedious tasks encountered in writing message passing programs. HPF is independent of memory hierarchy, however, due to the immaturity of compiler technology its performance is still questionable. Although use of parallel compiler directives is not new, OpenMP offers a portable solution in the shared-memory domain. Another important development involves the tremendous progress in the internet and its associated technology. Although still in its infancy, Java promisses portability in a heterogeneous environment and offers possibility to "compile once and run anywhere." In light of testing these new technologies, we implemented new parallel versions of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPBs) with HPF and OpenMP directives, and extended the work with Java and Java-threads. The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of alternative programming paradigms. NPBs consist of five kernels and three simulated applications that mimic the computation and data movement of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. We started with the serial version included in NPB2.3. Optimization of memory and cache usage

  8. [Methods in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS): results of a nationwide survey in Austria].

    PubMed

    Bauchinger, S; Sapetschnig, I; Danda, M; Sommer, C; Resch, B; Urlesberger, B; Raith, W

    2015-08-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs in neonates whose mothers have taken addictive drugs or were under substitution therapy during pregnancy. Incidence numbers of NAS are on the rise globally, even in Austria NAS is not rare anymore. The aim of our survey was to reveal the status quo of dealing with NAS in Austria. A questionnaire was sent to 20 neonatology departments all over Austria, items included questions on scoring, therapy, breast-feeding and follow-up procedures. The response rate was 95%, of which 94.7% had written guidelines concerning NAS. The median number of children being treated per year for NAS was 4. Finnegan scoring system is used in 100% of the responding departments. Morphine is being used most often, in opiate abuse (100%) as well as in multiple substance abuse (44.4%). The most frequent forms of morphine preparation are morphine and diluted tincture of opium. Frequency as well as dosage of medication vary broadly. 61.1% of the departments supported breast-feeding, regulations concerned participation in a substitution programme and general contraindications (HIV, HCV, HBV). Our results revealed that there is a big west-east gradient in patients being treated per year. NAS is not a rare entity anymore in Austria (up to 50 cases per year in Vienna). Our survey showed that most neonatology departments in Austria treat their patients following written guidelines. Although all of them base these guidelines on international recommendations there is no national consensus. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  9. The astacin metalloprotease moulting enzyme NAS-36 is required for normal cuticle ecdysis in free-living and parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Stepek, Gillian; McCormack, Gillian; Birnie, Andrew J; Page, Antony P

    2011-02-01

    Nematodes represent one of the most abundant and species-rich groups of animals on the planet, with parasitic species causing chronic, debilitating infections in both livestock and humans worldwide. The prevalence and success of the nematodes is a direct consequence of the exceptionally protective properties of their cuticle. The synthesis of this cuticle is a complex multi-step process, which is repeated 4 times from hatchling to adult and has been investigated in detail in the free-living nematode, Caenorhabditis elegans. This process is known as moulting and involves numerous enzymes in the synthesis and degradation of the collagenous matrix. The nas-36 and nas-37 genes in C. elegans encode functionally conserved enzymes of the astacin metalloprotease family which, when mutated, result in a phenotype associated with the late-stage moulting defects, namely the inability to remove the preceding cuticle. Extensive genome searches in the gastrointestinal nematode of sheep, Haemonchus contortus, and in the filarial nematode of humans, Brugia malayi, identified NAS-36 but not NAS-37 homologues. Significantly, the nas-36 gene from B. malayi could successfully complement the moult defects associated with C. elegans nas-36, nas-37 and nas-36/nas-37 double mutants, suggesting a conserved function for NAS-36 between these diverse nematode species. This conservation between species was further indicated when the recombinant enzymes demonstrated a similar range of inhibitable metalloprotease activities.

  10. Long-wavelength-range laser diode using GaInNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondow, Masahiko; Nakatsuka, Shin'ichi; Kitatani, Takeshi; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto O.

    1997-05-01

    We propose a novel material: GaInNAs. It can be formed on a GaAs substrate, and has a bandgap energy suitable for long- wavelength-range laser diodes. The band lineup is ideal for preventing electron overflow. Therefore, applying GaInNAs to long-wavelength-range laser diodes is expected to result in excellent high-temperature performance. We have succeeded in demonstrating continuous-wave operation of GaInNAs/GaAs single quantum well laser diodes at room temperature. The threshold current density was about 1.4 kA/cm2. The lasing wavelength was about 1.2 micrometers . We have measured some characteristic parameters of the GaInNAs laser diode under pulsed operation. A high characteristic temperature (T0) of 127 K and a small wavelength shift per ambient temperature change of 0.48 nm/ degree(s)C were obtained. The experimental results indicate the applicability of GaInNAs to long-wavelength-range laser diodes with excellent high- temperature performance.

  11. Six Years of Parallel Computing at NAS (1987 - 1993): What Have we Learned?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Horst D.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In the fall of 1987 the age of parallelism at NAS began with the installation of a 32K processor CM-2 from Thinking Machines. In 1987 this was described as an "experiment" in parallel processing. In the six years since, NAS acquired a series of parallel machines, and conducted an active research and development effort focused on the use of highly parallel machines for applications in the computational aerosciences. In this time period parallel processing for scientific applications evolved from a fringe research topic into the one of main activities at NAS. In this presentation I will review the history of parallel computing at NAS in the context of the major progress, which has been made in the field in general. I will attempt to summarize the lessons we have learned so far, and the contributions NAS has made to the state of the art. Based on these insights I will comment on the current state of parallel computing (including the HPCC effort) and try to predict some trends for the next six years.

  12. UAS in the NAS: Survey Responses by ATC, Manned Aircraft Pilots, and UAS Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; McAdaragh, Raymon; Ghatas, Rania W.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2013-01-01

    NASA currently is working with industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish future requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) flying in the National Airspace System (NAS). To work these issues NASA has established a multi-center UAS Integration in the NAS project. In order to establish Ground Control Station requirements for UAS, the perspective of each of the major players in NAS operations was desired. Three on-line surveys were administered that focused on Air Traffic Controllers (ATC), pilots of manned aircraft, and pilots of UAS. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with some survey respondents. The survey questions addressed UAS control, navigation, and communications from the perspective of small and large unmanned aircraft. Questions also addressed issues of UAS equipage, especially with regard to sense and avoid capabilities. From the ATC and military ATC perspective, of particular interest is how mixed-operations (manned/UAS) have worked in the past and the role of aircraft equipage. Knowledge gained from this information is expected to assist the NASA UAS in the NAS project in directing research foci thus assisting the FAA in the development of rules, regulations, and policies related to UAS in the NAS.

  13. UAS in the NAS: Survey Responses by ATC, Manned Aircraft Pilots, and UAS Pilots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Comstock, James R., Jr.; McAdaragh, Raymon; Ghatas, Rania W.; Burdette, Daniel W.; Trujillo, Anna C.

    2014-01-01

    NASA currently is working with industry and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to establish future requirements for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) flying in the National Airspace System (NAS). To work these issues NASA has established a multi-center "UAS Integration in the NAS" project. In order to establish Ground Control Station requirements for UAS, the perspective of each of the major players in NAS operations was desired. Three on-line surveys were administered that focused on Air Traffic Controllers (ATC), pilots of manned aircraft, and pilots of UAS. Follow-up telephone interviews were conducted with some survey respondents. The survey questions addressed UAS control, navigation, and communications from the perspective of small and large unmanned aircraft. Questions also addressed issues of UAS equipage, especially with regard to sense and avoid capabilities. From the civilian ATC and military ATC perspectives, of particular interest are how mixed operations (manned / UAS) have worked in the past and the role of aircraft equipage. Knowledge gained from this information is expected to assist the NASA UAS Integration in the NAS project in directing research foci thus assisting the FAA in the development of rules, regulations, and policies related to UAS in the NAS.

  14. Six Years of Parallel Computing at NAS (1987 - 1993): What Have we Learned?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Horst D.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    In the fall of 1987 the age of parallelism at NAS began with the installation of a 32K processor CM-2 from Thinking Machines. In 1987 this was described as an "experiment" in parallel processing. In the six years since, NAS acquired a series of parallel machines, and conducted an active research and development effort focused on the use of highly parallel machines for applications in the computational aerosciences. In this time period parallel processing for scientific applications evolved from a fringe research topic into the one of main activities at NAS. In this presentation I will review the history of parallel computing at NAS in the context of the major progress, which has been made in the field in general. I will attempt to summarize the lessons we have learned so far, and the contributions NAS has made to the state of the art. Based on these insights I will comment on the current state of parallel computing (including the HPCC effort) and try to predict some trends for the next six years.

  15. Active ear acupuncture points in neonates with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS).

    PubMed

    Raith, Wolfgang; Kutschera, Jörg; Müller, Wilhelm; Urlesberger, Berndt

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the presence of acupuncture ear points in neonates with Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS). NAS occurs in the first days of life in neonates whose mothers have a history of drug abuse, and may also occur in neonates whose mothers are currently following substitution therapy. The patients are neonates with NAS admitted over one year to the Division of Neonatology at the University Hospital Graz. The examination took place on the third day after delivery (mean value 70.3 hours) and was performed by a neuronal pen (PS 3 © Silberbauer, Vienna, Austria). An integrated sound and optical signal detected the active ear points that were then placed on an ear map. We investigated six neonates (four male, two female). All investigated neonates showed the presence of active ear acupuncture points. The psychovegetative rim was the most common organic area of the children, following by a few organic points. This corresponds with the results found in healthy neonates. In all neonates with NAS, we found the presence of psychic ear points. The identified psychic ear points are the frustration-point, R-point and the psychotropic area nasal from the incisura intertragica. In all neonates with NAS, active organic and psychic ear points were detectable in both ears. In the future, it could be possible to use active ear points for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes.

  16. The NAS perchlorate review: questions remain about the perchlorate RfD.

    PubMed

    Ginsberg, Gary; Rice, Deborah

    2005-09-01

    Human exposure to perchlorate is commonplace because it is a contaminant of drinking water, certain foods, and breast milk. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) conducted a perchlorate risk assessment in 2002 that yielded a reference dose (RfD) based on both the animal and human toxicology data. This assessment has been superceded by a recent National Academy of Science (NAS) review that derived a perchlorate RfD that is 20-fold greater (less stringent) than that derived by the U.S. EPA in 2002. The NAS-derived RfD was put on the U.S. EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database very quickly and with no further public review. In this commentary we raise concerns about the NAS approach to RfD development in three areas of toxicity assessment: the dose that the NAS described as a no observable adverse-effect level is actually associated with perchlorate-induced effects; consideration of uncertainties was insufficient; and the NAS considered the inhibition of iodine uptake to be a nonadverse effect. We conclude that risk assessors should carefully evaluate whether the IRIS RfD is the most appropriate value for assessing perchlorate risk.

  17. An Evaluation of the NaS Battery Storage Potential for Providing Regulation Service in California

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Ning; Weimar, Mark R.; Makarov, Yuri V.; Loutan, Clyde

    2011-03-23

    Sodium sulfur (NaS) batteries can provide energy storage, real-time dispatch, regulation, frequency response, and other essential services to the power grids. This study presents the technical characteristics, modeling approach, methodologies, and results for providing regulation services in the California Independent System Operator (CAISO) market. Two different scenarios were studied and compared: a scenario without intermittent renewable-energy resource penetration (base case) and a scenario with significant renewable-energy resource penetration (including wind) reaching 20% of CAISO’s energy supply. In addition, breakeven cost analyses were developed for four cases. Based on the results of the technical and cost analyses, the opportunities for the NaS battery providing the regulation services are discussed, design improvements for the battery’s physical characteristics are recommended, and modifications of the regulation signals sent to NaS batteries are proposed.

  18. GaNAsP: An intermediate band semiconductor grown by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Kuang, Y. J.; Yu, K. M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Kudrawiec, R.; Luce, A. V.; Ting, M.; Tu, C. W.

    2013-03-18

    Dilute nitride GaNAsP thin films were grown via a GaAsP metamorphic buffer on GaP(100) substrate with gas-source molecular beam epitaxy. The compositions of this III-V-V-V compound were determined by channeling Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy and nuclear reaction analysis. Photoreflectance shows two distinctive transitions from the valence band to the split conduction bands due to N incorporation. Photoluminescence and optical absorption show the fundamental bandgap of Ga(N)AsP is largely tailored by the small amount of N. The observed multiband characteristics and the bandgap tunability of GaNAsP are two merits that fit into the intermediate-band solar cell roadmap, and GaNAsP of high crystal quality provides a strong candidate for intermediate band solar cell materials.

  19. Examination of Frameworks for Safe Integration of Intelligent Small UAS into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper briefly examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine "classes" of platforms and operations. A framework for categorization of the "intelligence" level of the UAS is postulated for purposes of NAS integration. Finally, constraints on the intelligent systems are postulated to ensure their ease of integration into the NAS.

  20. Characterization of the Refractive Index of Strained GaInNAs Layers by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, Takeshi; Kondow, Masahiko; Shinoda, Kazunori; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    We have characterized the refractive index of strained GaInNAs layers. Using spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE), the variation in optical constants of GaInNAs layers, about 6 nm thick with a nitrogen content lower than 1%, can be clearly observed. Analysis of the SE data, including the strain effect in the layer, clarified that the refractive index of GaInNAs increases in proportion to the nitrogen content. While the trend for increase in refractive index with a decrease in the bandgap energy is the same as that observed in conventional III V alloy semiconductors, the rate of increase is found to be much larger than that in GaInAs. This result suggests a large density of states in the conduction band characteristics of this type of material system that includes nitrogen atoms.

  1. Improved performance in GaInNAs solar cells by hydrogen passivation

    SciTech Connect

    Fukuda, M.; Whiteside, V. R.; Keay, J. C.; Meleco, A.; Sellers, I. R.; Hossain, K.; Golding, T. D.; Leroux, M.; Al Khalfioui, M.

    2015-04-06

    The effect of UV-activated hydrogenation on the performance of GaInNAs solar cells is presented. A proof-of-principle investigation was performed on non-optimum GaInNAs cells, which allowed a clearer investigation of the role of passivation on the intrinsic nitrogen-related defects in these materials. Upon optimized hydrogenation of GaInNAs, a significant reduction in the presence of defect and impurity based luminescence is observed as compared to that of unpassivated reference material. This improvement in the optical properties is directly transferred to an improved performance in solar cell operation, with a more than two-fold improvement in the external quantum efficiency and short circuit current density upon hydrogenation. Temperature dependent photovoltaic measurements indicate a strong contribution of carrier localization and detrapping processes, with non-radiative processes dominating in the reference materials, and evidence for additional strong radiative losses in the hydrogenated solar cells.

  2. Test report for the Direct Access Radar/National Airspace System (DARC/NAS) bi-directional interface test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimeo, Robert V.; Mullany, T. C.; Tedford, A.; Grossman, L.

    1989-01-01

    The results of the DARC/NAS (HOST) bi-directional interface testing are described in this report. The DARC and NAS systems were physically connected by the General Purpose Output (GPO)/General Purpose Input (GPI) lines. Controller and supervisory messages were entered automatically by time from both the DARC and NAS systems. Both systems used common simulated radar data. Results were examined by analyzing recorded data to determine the transparency of the system.

  3. Heavy Metals Need Assistance: The Contribution of Nicotianamine to Metal Circulation Throughout the Plant and the Arabidopsis NAS Gene Family.

    PubMed

    Schuler, Mara; Bauer, Petra

    2011-01-01

    Understanding the regulated inter- and intra-cellular metal circulation is one of the challenges in the field of metal homeostasis. Inside organisms metal ions are bound to organic ligands to prevent their uncontrolled reactivity and to increase their solubility. Nicotianamine (NA) is one of the important ligands. This non-proteinogenic amino acid is synthesized by nicotianamine synthase (NAS). NA is involved in mobilization, uptake, transport, storage, and detoxification of metals. Much of the progress in understanding NA function has been achieved by studying mutants with altered nicotianamine levels. Mild and strong Arabidopsis mutants impaired in nicotianamine synthesis have been identified and characterized, namely nas4x-1 and nas4x-2. Arabidopsis thaliana has four NAS genes. In this review, we summarize the structure and evolution of the NAS genes in the Arabidopsis genome. We summarize previous results and present novel evidence that the four NAS genes have partially overlapping functions when plants are exposed to Fe deficiency and nickel supply. We compare the phenotypes of nas4x-1 and nas4x-2 and summarize the functions of NAS genes and NA as deduced from the studies of mutant phenotypes.

  4. TRICARE; elimination of the non-availability statement (NAS) requirement for non-emergency inpatient mental health care. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2013-02-26

    This final rule eliminates the requirement that states a NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard beneficiary's claim to be paid. Currently, NAS are required for non-emergency inpatient mental health care for TRICARE Standard beneficiaries who live within a military treatment facility catchment area. At this time, the number of NASs issued is negligible as most mental health admissions are emergency admissions. Requiring a NAS for a relatively few non-emergency inpatient mental health admissions is disproportionate to the cost of maintaining the systems necessary to process and coordinate the NAS.

  5. Compositional dependence of the band gap in Ga(NAsP) quantum well heterostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Jandieri, K. Ludewig, P.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Kunert, B.; Springer, P.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Koch, S. W.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2015-08-14

    We present experimental and theoretical studies of the composition dependence of the direct band gap energy in Ga(NAsP)/GaP quantum well heterostructures grown on either (001) GaP- or Si-substrates. The theoretical description takes into account the band anti-crossing model for the conduction band as well as the modification of the valence subband structure due to the strain resulting from the pseudomorphic epitaxial growth on the respective substrate. The composition dependence of the direct band gap of Ga(NAsP) is obtained for a wide range of nitrogen and phosphorus contents relevant for laser applications on Si-substrate.

  6. A thermo-mechanical stress prediction model for contemporary planar sodium sulfur (NaS) cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Keeyoung; Colker, Jeffrey P.; Cao, Yuzhe; Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Kim, Chang-Soo

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a comprehensive finite-element analysis (FEA) computational model to accurately predict the thermo-mechanical stresses at heterogeneous joints and components of large-size sodium sulfur (NaS) cells during thermal cycling. Quantification of the thermo-mechanical stress is important because the accumulation of stress during cell assembly and/or operation is one of the critical issues in developing practical planar NaS cells. The computational model is developed based on relevant experimental assembly and operation conditions to predict the detailed stress field of a state-of-the-art planar NaS cell. Prior to the freeze-and-thaw thermal cycle simulation, residual stresses generated from the actual high temperature cell assembly procedures are calculated and implemented into the subsequent model. The calculation results show that large stresses are developed on the outer surface of the insulating header and the solid electrolyte, where component fracture is frequently observed in the experimental cell fabrication process. The impacts of the coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of glass materials and the thicknesses of cell container on the stress accumulation are also evaluated to improve the cell manufacturing procedure and to guide the material choices for enhanced thermo-mechanical stability of large-size NaS cells.

  7. Comparison of Origin 2000 and Origin 3000 Using NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, Raymond D.

    2001-01-01

    This report describes results of benchmark tests on the Origin 3000 system currently being installed at the NASA Ames National Advanced Supercomputing facility. This machine will ultimately contain 1024 R14K processors. The first part of the system, installed in November, 2000 and named mendel, is an Origin 3000 with 128 R12K processors. For comparison purposes, the tests were also run on lomax, an Origin 2000 with R12K processors. The BT, LU, and SP application benchmarks in the NAS Parallel Benchmark Suite and the kernel benchmark FT were chosen to determine system performance and measure the impact of changes on the machine as it evolves. Having been written to measure performance on Computational Fluid Dynamics applications, these benchmarks are assumed appropriate to represent the NAS workload. Since the NAS runs both message passing (MPI) and shared-memory, compiler directive type codes, both MPI and OpenMP versions of the benchmarks were used. The MPI versions used were the latest official release of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, version 2.3. The OpenMP versiqns used were PBN3b2, a beta version that is in the process of being released. NPB 2.3 and PBN 3b2 are technically different benchmarks, and NPB results are not directly comparable to PBN results.

  8. Beyond the NAS Parallel Benchmarks: Measuring Dynamic Program Performance and Grid Computing Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob F.; Biswas, Rupak; Frumkin, Michael; Feng, Huiyu; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The contents include: 1) A brief history of NPB; 2) What is (not) being measured by NPB; 3) Irregular dynamic applications (UA Benchmark); and 4) Wide area distributed computing (NAS Grid Benchmarks-NGB). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  9. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hagir M; Balkan, Naci

    2014-01-13

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling.

  10. Room-temperature electron spin amplifier based on Ga(In)NAs alloys.

    PubMed

    Puttisong, Yuttapoom; Buyanova, Irina A; Ptak, Aaron J; Tu, Charles W; Geelhaar, Lutz; Riechert, Henning; Chen, Weimin M

    2013-02-06

    The first experimental demonstration of a spin amplifier at room temperature is presented. An efficient, defect-enabled spin amplifier based on a non-magnetic semiconductor, Ga(In)NAs, is proposed and demonstrated, with a large spin gain (up to 2700% at zero field) for conduction electrons and a high cut-off frequency of up to 1 GHz.

  11. Index-Guide GaInNAs Laser Diode for Optical Communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatsuka, Shin'ichi; Kondow, Masahiko; Kitatani, Takeshi; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto

    1998-03-01

    An AlGaAs/GaAs/GaInNAs single-quantum-well real-index-guide laser diode with a ridged waveguide structure was fabricated. A threshold current of 24 mA under room-temperature continuous-wave operation was attained with this structure. Obtained device parameters show that this device shows promise for application in optical communication system.

  12. Composition modulation in GaInNAs quantum wells: Comparison of experiment and theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herrera, M.; González, D.; Hopkinson, M.; Gutiérrez, M.; Navaretti, P.; Liu, H. Y.; García, R.

    2005-04-01

    Composition modulation observed in GaInNAs quantum wells imposes an important handicap to their potential application within optical components, particularly as the indium and nitrogen contents are increased to reach longer wavelengths. In this paper, we compare our experimental results of phase separation in GaInNAs quantum wells grown at different temperatures with recent theoretical models of spinodal decomposition from the literature. This comparison has shown that the regular solution approximation, which explains the higher composition modulation compared to GaInAs samples, provides a more appropriate explanation of GaInNAs decomposition than the usual delta lattice-parameter approximation. Transmission electron microscopy shows no composition modulation contrasts with the chemical sensitive 002 dark field reflection and a strong increase in the intensity of the strain contrasts observed with 220 bright field reflection as the growth temperature increases from 360to460°C. These observations can be explained by an uncoupling between N and In composition profiles forming separate In-rich and N-rich regions according to the regular solution approximation model. We therefore believe that the compositional fluctuations in GaInNAs are not only due to GaInAs decomposition, but that an uncoupled modulation of the III and V elements is also present.

  13. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Integrated Test and LVC Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Hoang, Ty

    2015-01-01

    Overview presentation of the Integrated Test and Evaluation sub-project of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS). The emphasis of the presentation is the Live, Virtual, and Constructive (LVC) system (a broadly used name for classifying modeling and simulation) infrastructure and use of external assets and connection.

  14. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project FY16 Annual Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Hackenberg, Davis

    2016-01-01

    This presentation gives insight into the research activities and efforts being executed in order to integrate unmanned aircraft systems into the national airspace system. This briefing is to inform others of the UAS-NAS FY16 progress and future directions.

  15. Consistency of TTO-NAS inorganic carbon data with modern measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanhua, Toste; Wallace, Douglas W. R.

    2005-07-01

    We compare alkalinity and total dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) measurements made during the Transient Tracers in the Ocean, North Atlantic Study (TTO-NAS) in 1981 with modern measurements from a TTO reoccupation cruise in 2004 (M60/5). We find that the TTO-NAS alkalinity values are 3.6 +/- 2.3 μmol kg-1 higher than modern alkalinity data tied to Certified Reference Materials. The TTO-NAS DIC values re-calculated from original alkalinity and discrete-pCO2 data using currently accepted constants are 3.8 μmol kg-1 higher than those reported in the revised TTO data set. This difference is reduced to 0.7 μmol kg-1 when our suggested correction to the TTO-NAS alkalinity is applied. These re-calculated DIC values are 2.4 μmol kg-1 too low relative to contemporaneous measurements made by the vacuum extraction/manometric Certified method. Application of this correction brings the TTO data into almost perfect agreement with modern measurements for slowly-ventilated deep water of the eastern Atlantic.

  16. (GaIn)(NAs) growth using di-tertiary-butyl-arsano-amine (DTBAA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterzer, E.; Ringler, B.; Nattermann, L.; Beyer, A.; von Hänisch, C.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.

    2017-06-01

    III/V semiconductors containing small amounts of Nitrogen (N) are very interesting for a variety of optoelectronic applications. Unfortunately, the conventionally used N precursor 1,1-dimethylhydrazine (UDMHy) has an extremely low N incorporation efficiency in GaAs when grown using metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Alloying Ga(NAs) with Indium (In) even leads to an exponential reduction of N incorporation. The huge amount of UDMHy in turn changes drastically the growth conditions. Furthermore, the application of this material is still hampered by the large carbon incorporation, most probably originating from the metal organic precursors. Hence, novel precursors for dilute nitride growth are needed. This paper will show (GaIn)(NAs) growth studies with the novel precursor di-tertiary-butyl-arsano-amine in combination with tri-ethyl-gallium and tri-methyl-indium. We show an extremely high N incorporation efficiency in the In containing (GaIn)(NAs). The (GaIn)(NAs) samples investigated in this study have been examined using high resolution X-Ray diffraction, room temperature photoluminescence and atomic force microscope measurements as well as secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  17. UAS-NAS Integrated Human in the Loop: Test Environment Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Otto, Neil; Jovic, Srba

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability (SSI), Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research was broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of the Test Infrastructure theme was to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the execution of integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project developed an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment incorporating live, virtual, and constructive elements capable of validating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project planned to conduct three integrated events: a Human-in-the-Loop simulation and two Flight Test series that integrated key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of

  18. Meeting of Experts on NASA's Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace Systems (NAS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Jean; Bauer, Jeff; Bixby, C.J.; Lauderdale, Todd; Shively, Jay; Griner, James; Hayhurst, Kelly

    2010-01-01

    Topics discussed include: Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) and UAS Integration in the NAS Project; UAS Integration into the NAS Project; Separation Assurance and Collision Avoidance; Pilot Aircraft Interface Objectives/Rationale; Communication; Certification; and Integrated Tests and Evaluations.

  19. 76 FR 57690 - TRICARE; Elimination of the Non-Availability Statement (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... (NAS) Requirement for Non-Emergency Inpatient Mental Health Care AGENCY: Office of the Secretary... states a NAS is needed for non-emergency inpatient mental health care in order for a TRICARE Standard... the MTF catchment area for non-emergency inpatient mental health care. Currently, the number of NASs...

  20. UAS in the NAS - Analysis Results and Recommendations for Integration of CNPC and ATC Communications Simulation Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This report addresses a deliverable to the UAS-in-the-NAS project for recommendations for integration of CNPC and ATC communications based on analysis results from modeled radio system and NAS-wide UA communication architecture simulations. For each recommendation, a brief explanation of the rationale for its consideration is provided with any supporting results obtained or observed in our simulation activity.

  1. Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome (NAS): Transitioning Methadone Treated Infants From An Inpatient to an Outpatient Setting

    PubMed Central

    Backes, Carl H.; Backes, Carl R.; Gardner, Debra; Nankervis, Craig A.; Giannone, Peter J.; Cordero, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Background Each year in the US approximately 50,000 neonates receive inpatient pharmacotherapy for the treatment of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). Objective To compare the safety and efficacy of a traditional inpatient only approach with a combined inpatient and outpatient methadone treatment program. Design/Methods Retrospective review (2007-9). Infants were born to mothers maintained on methadone or buprenorphine in an antenatal substance abuse program. All infants received methadone for NAS treatment as inpatient. Methadone weaning for the traditional group (75 pts) was inpatient while the combined group (46 pts) was outpatient. Results Infants in the traditional and combined groups were similar in demographics, obstetrical risk factors, birth weight, GA and the incidence of prematurity (34 & 31%). Hospital stay was shorter in the combined than in the traditional group (13 vs 25d; p < 0.01). Although the duration of treatment was longer for infants in the combined group (37 vs 21d, p<0.01), the cumulative methadone dose was similar (3.6 vs 3.1mg/kg, p 0.42). Follow-up: Information was available for 80% of infants in the traditional and 100% of infants in the combined group. All infants in the combined group were seen ≤ 72 hours from hospital discharge. Breast feeding was more common among infants in the combined group (24 vs. 8% p<0.05). Following discharge there were no differences between the two groups in hospital readmissions for NAS. Prematurity (<37w GA) was the only predictor for hospital readmission for NAS in both groups (p 0.02, OR 5). Average hospital cost for each infant in the combined group was $13,817 less than in the traditional group. Conclusions A combined inpatient and outpatient methadone treatment in the management of NAS decreases hospital stay and substantially reduces cost. Additional studies are needed to evaluate the potential long term benefits of the combined approach on infants and their families. PMID:21852772

  2. Defect study of molecular beam epitaxy grown undoped GaInNAsSb thin film using junction-capacitance spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Monirul Islam, Muhammad; Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2013-02-18

    Defects in undoped GaInNAsSb thin film (i-GaInNAsSb) were investigated by junction-capacitance technique using admittance and transient photocapacitance (TPC) spectroscopy. An electron trap D2 was identified at 0.34 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}) of i-GaInNAsSb using admittance spectroscopy. Optical transition of valance band (E{sub V}) electrons to a localized state OH1 (E{sub V} + 0.75 eV) was manifested in negative TPC signal. Combined activation energy of OH1 and D2 defect corresponds to the band-gap of i-GaInNAsSb, suggesting that OH1/D2 acts as an efficient recombination center. TPC signal at {approx}1.59 eV above E{sub V} was attributed to the nitrogen-induced localized state in GaInNAsSb.

  3. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William W.; Ingram, Carla D.; Ahlquist, Douglas Kurt; Chachad, Girish H.

    2016-01-01

    "Gate Turnaround" plays a key role in the National Air Space (NAS) gate-to-gate performance by receiving aircraft when they reach their destination airport, and delivering aircraft into the NAS upon departing from the gate and subsequent takeoff. The time spent at the gate in meeting the planned departure time is influenced by many factors and often with considerable uncertainties. Uncertainties such as weather, early or late arrivals, disembarking and boarding passengers, unloading/reloading cargo, aircraft logistics/maintenance services and ground handling, traffic in ramp and movement areas for taxi-in and taxi-out, and departure queue management for takeoff are likely encountered on the daily basis. The Integrated Gate Turnaround Management (IGTM) concept is leveraging relevant historical data to support optimization of the gate operations, which include arrival, at the gate, departure based on constraints (e.g., available gates at the arrival, ground crew and equipment for the gate turnaround, and over capacity demand upon departure), and collaborative decision-making. The IGTM concept provides effective information services and decision tools to the stakeholders, such as airline dispatchers, gate agents, airport operators, ramp controllers, and air traffic control (ATC) traffic managers and ground controllers to mitigate uncertainties arising from both nominal and off-nominal airport gate operations. IGTM will provide NAS stakeholders customized decision making tools through a User Interface (UI) by leveraging historical data (Big Data), net-enabled Air Traffic Management (ATM) live data, and analytics according to dependencies among NAS parameters for the stakeholders to manage and optimize the NAS performance in the gate turnaround domain. The application will give stakeholders predictable results based on the past and current NAS performance according to selected decision trees through the UI. The predictable results are generated based on analysis of the

  4. Ubiquity and diversity of heterotrophic bacterial nasA genes in diverse marine environments.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  5. Ubiquity and Diversity of Heterotrophic Bacterial nasA Genes in Diverse Marine Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuexia; Dang, Hongyue; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2015-01-01

    Nitrate uptake by heterotrophic bacteria plays an important role in marine N cycling. However, few studies have investigated the diversity of environmental nitrate assimilating bacteria (NAB). In this study, the diversity and biogeographical distribution of NAB in several global oceans and particularly in the western Pacific marginal seas were investigated using both cultivation and culture-independent molecular approaches. Phylogenetic analyses based on 16S rRNA and nasA (encoding the large subunit of the assimilatory nitrate reductase) gene sequences indicated that the cultivable NAB in South China Sea belonged to the α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and CFB (Cytophaga-Flavobacteria-Bacteroides) bacterial groups. In all the environmental samples of the present study, α-Proteobacteria, γ-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes were found to be the dominant nasA-harboring bacteria. Almost all of the α-Proteobacteria OTUs were classified into three Roseobacter-like groups (I to III). Clone library analysis revealed previously underestimated nasA diversity; e.g. the nasA gene sequences affiliated with β-Proteobacteria, ε-Proteobacteria and Lentisphaerae were observed in the field investigation for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The geographical and vertical distributions of seawater nasA-harboring bacteria indicated that NAB were highly diverse and ubiquitously distributed in the studied marginal seas and world oceans. Niche adaptation and separation and/or limited dispersal might mediate the NAB composition and community structure in different water bodies. In the shallow-water Kueishantao hydrothermal vent environment, chemolithoautotrophic sulfur-oxidizing bacteria were the primary NAB, indicating a unique nitrate-assimilating community in this extreme environment. In the coastal water of the East China Sea, the relative abundance of Alteromonas and Roseobacter-like nasA gene sequences responded closely to algal blooms, indicating that NAB may be

  6. First-principle natural band alignment of GaN / dilute-As GaNAs alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Chee-Keong Tansu, Nelson

    2015-01-15

    Density functional theory (DFT) calculations with the local density approximation (LDA) functional are employed to investigate the band alignment of dilute-As GaNAs alloys with respect to the GaN alloy. Conduction and valence band positions of dilute-As GaNAs alloy with respect to the GaN alloy on an absolute energy scale are determined from the combination of bulk and surface DFT calculations. The resulting GaN / GaNAs conduction to valence band offset ratio is found as approximately 5:95. Our theoretical finding is in good agreement with experimental observation, indicating the upward movements of valence band at low-As content dilute-As GaNAs are mainly responsible for the drastic reduction of the GaN energy band gap. In addition, type-I band alignment of GaN / GaNAs is suggested as a reasonable approach for future device implementation with dilute-As GaNAs quantum well, and possible type-II quantum well active region can be formed by using InGaN / dilute-As GaNAs heterostructure.

  7. NAS technical summaries. Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1992 - February 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1992-93 operational year concluded with 399 high-speed processor projects and 91 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  8. Atomic scale morphology of thin GaNAs films: Effects of nitrogen content and growth temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGee, W. M.; Bone, P. A.; Williams, R. S.; Jones, T. S.

    2005-10-01

    The surface morphology of 8nm GaNAs layers grown by molecular-beam epitaxy on GaAs(001) substrates has been studied as a function of nitrogen content and growth temperature using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Increasing the nitrogen content from 0%-3% leads to a pronounced increase in surface roughness, caused by the appearance of deep pits. Raising the growth temperature from 400-500°C produces the same effect. We propose that pit formation is symptomatic of phase segregation. STM images show that the GaNAs layers adopt an (n×3) surface reconstruction, suggesting that a disproportionately high concentration of N is present on the postgrowth surface compared with that incorporated into the layer during growth.

  9. Object-Oriented Implementation of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks using Charm++

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnan, Sanjeev; Bhandarkar, Milind; Kale, Laxmikant V.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes experiences with implementing the NAS Computational Fluid Dynamics benchmarks using a parallel object-oriented language, Charm++. Our main objective in implementing the NAS CFD kernel benchmarks was to develop a code that could be used to easily experiment with different domain decomposition strategies and dynamic load balancing. We also wished to leverage the object-orientation provided by the Charm++ parallel object-oriented language, to develop reusable abstractions that would simplify the process of developing parallel applications. We first describe the Charm++ parallel programming model and the parallel object array abstraction, then go into detail about each of the Scalar Pentadiagonal (SP) and Lower/Upper Triangular (LU) benchmarks, along with performance results. Finally we conclude with an evaluation of the methodology used.

  10. The temperature dependence of atomic incorporation characteristics in growing GaInNAs films

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Jingling; Gao, Fangliang; Wen, Lei; Zhou, Shizhong; Zhang, Shuguang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn; Li, Guoqiang E-mail: msgli@scut.edu.cn

    2015-02-07

    We have systematically studied the temperature dependence of incorporation characteristics of nitrogen (N) and indium (In) in growing GaInNAs films. With the implementation of Monte-Carlo simulation, the low N adsorption energy (−0.10 eV) is demonstrated. To understand the atomic incorporation mechanism, temperature dependence of interactions between Group-III and V elements are subsequently discussed. We find that the In incorporation behaviors rather than that of N are more sensitive to the T{sub g}, which can be experimentally verified by exploring the compositional modulation and structural changes of the GaInNAs films by means of high-resolution X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, scanning electron microscope, and secondary ion mass spectroscopy.

  11. Al-enhanced N incorporation in GaNAs alloys grown by chemical beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Wallace, Steven G.; Fafard, Simon; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2013-10-01

    The N incorporation is studied in AlGaNAs with low Al content grown by chemical beam epitaxy at low temperature using dimethylhydrazine as the N precursor. The incorporation efficiency is significantly enhanced by introducing a relatively low Al concentration. The relation between the N incorporation and N/(N+As) flow ratio for Al concentrations of 0-15% is presented. The highest N incorporation and the best AlGaNAs crystal quality are obtained between 400 °C and 440 °C, where the growth mode starts to change from 2D to 3D. The activation energies for N incorporation in both the 2D and 3D growth mode regions are extracted.

  12. Moth eye antireflection coated GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Arto; Tommila, Juha; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Niemi, Tapio; Guina, Mircea

    2014-09-01

    The performance of a GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell incorporating AlInP moth eye antireflection coating is reported and compared with the performance of a similar cell comprising TiO2/SiO2 antireflection coating. The moth eye coating exhibits an average reflectance of only 2% within the spectral range from 400 nm to 1600 nm. EQE measurements revealed absorption-related losses in the AlInP moth eye coating at wavelengths below 510 nm. Short wavelength absorption decreases the current generation in the top GaInP junction by 10%. Despite the absorption losses, the moth eye patterned GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs solar cell exhibited higher current generation under AM1.5G real sun illumination.

  13. Nitrogen incorporation effects on gain properties of GaInNAs lasers : experiment and theory.

    SciTech Connect

    Thranhardt, A.; Mawst, L. J.; Hader, J.; Schlichenmaier, C.; Tansu, N.; Yeh, J. -Y.; Belenky, G.; Chow, Weng Wah; Shterengas, L.; Moloney, Jerome V.; Koch, S. W.; Kuznetsova, I.

    2005-05-01

    Gain properties of GaInNAs lasers with different nitrogen concentrations in the quantum wells are investigated experimentally and theoretically. Whereas nitrogen incorporation induces appreciable modifications in the spectral extension and the carrier density dependence of the gain, it is found that the linewidth enhancement factor is reduced by inclusion of nitrogen, but basically unaffected by different nitrogen content due to the balancing between gain and index changes.

  14. Applications Performance Under MPL and MPI on NAS IBM SP2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    On July 5, 1994, an IBM Scalable POWER parallel System (IBM SP2) with 64 nodes, was installed at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility Each node of NAS IBM SP2 is a "wide node" consisting of a RISC 6000/590 workstation module with a clock of 66.5 MHz which can perform four floating point operations per clock with a peak performance of 266 Mflop/s. By the end of 1994, 64 nodes of IBM SP2 will be upgraded to 160 nodes with a peak performance of 42.5 Gflop/s. An overview of the IBM SP2 hardware is presented. The basic understanding of architectural details of RS 6000/590 will help application scientists the porting, optimizing, and tuning of codes from other machines such as the CRAY C90 and the Paragon to the NAS SP2. Optimization techniques such as quad-word loading, effective utilization of two floating point units, and data cache optimization of RS 6000/590 is illustrated, with examples giving performance gains at each optimization step. The conversion of codes using Intel's message passing library NX to codes using native Message Passing Library (MPL) and the Message Passing Interface (NMI) library available on the IBM SP2 is illustrated. In particular, we will present the performance of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) kernel from NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) under MPL and MPI. We have also optimized some of Fortran BLAS 2 and BLAS 3 routines, e.g., the optimized Fortran DAXPY runs at 175 Mflop/s and optimized Fortran DGEMM runs at 230 Mflop/s per node. The performance of the NPB (Class B) on the IBM SP2 is compared with the CRAY C90, Intel Paragon, TMC CM-5E, and the CRAY T3D.

  15. Large-scale structural analysis: The structural analyst, the CSM Testbed and the NAS System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knight, Norman F., Jr.; Mccleary, Susan L.; Macy, Steven C.; Aminpour, Mohammad A.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) activity is developing advanced structural analysis and computational methods that exploit high-performance computers. Methods are developed in the framework of the CSM testbed software system and applied to representative complex structural analysis problems from the aerospace industry. An overview of the CSM testbed methods development environment is presented and some numerical methods developed on a CRAY-2 are described. Selected application studies performed on the NAS CRAY-2 are also summarized.

  16. Functional Requirements Document for HALE UAS Operations in the NAS: Step 1. Version 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this Functional Requirements Document (FRD) is to compile the functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 Vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the national airspace system (NAS)" for Step 1. These functional requirements could support the development of a minimum set of policies, procedures and standards by the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and various standards organizations. It is envisioned that this comprehensive body of work will enable the FAA to establish and approve regulations to govern safe operation of UAS in the NAS on a routine or daily "file and fly" basis. The approach used to derive the functional requirements found within this FRD was to decompose the operational requirements and objectives identified within the Access 5 Concept of Operations (CONOPS) into the functions needed to routinely and safely operate a HALE UAS in the NAS. As a result, four major functional areas evolved to enable routine and safe UAS operations for an on-demand basis in the NAS. These four major functions are: Aviate, Navigate, Communicate, and Avoid Hazards. All of the functional requirements within this document can be directly traceable to one of these four major functions. Some functions, however, are traceable to several, or even all, of these four major functions. These cross-cutting functional requirements support the "Command / Control: function as well as the "Manage Contingencies" function. The requirements associated to these high-level functions and all of their supporting low-level functions are addressed in subsequent sections of this document.

  17. Carrier trapping and escape times in p-i-n GaInNAs MQW structures

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    We used a semi-classical model to describe carrier capture into and thermionic escape from GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum wells (MQWs) situated within the intrinsic region of a GaAs p-i-n junction. The results are used to explain photocurrent oscillations with applied bias observed in these structures, in terms of charge accumulation and resonance tunnelling. PMID:24417767

  18. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. The prototype radio will be used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current status of the design, development, and flight test planning for this prototype radio.

  19. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS): Addressing the Regulatory Issues for National Airspace System (NAS) Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-04-01

    Aviation Safety Unmanned Aircraft Program Office, AIR-160, Interim Operational Approval Guidance, 08-01, simply states and defines a UAS as a device that...Aviation Programs , Part A-Air Commerce, subpart iii- Safety , Chapter 447- Safety Regulation, § 44701. Promoting Safety directs the FAA Administrator to...aircraft operations in the NAS. UAS Certificate of Authorization On March 2008, the FAA’s Aviation Safety Unmanned Aircraft Program Office (UAPO

  20. 1180 nm GaInNAs quantum well based high power DBR laser diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viheriälä, Jukka; Aho, Antti T.; Virtanen, Heikki; Koskinen, Mervi; Dumitrescu, Michael; Guina, Mircea

    2017-02-01

    We report state-of-the-art results for 1180nm (narrow linewidth) laser diodes based on GaInNAs quantum wells and show results for ridge waveguide DBR laser diode including its reliability tests. Manuscript demonstrates 500 mW output power in continuous-wave operation at room temperature, wide single mode tuning region and narrow linewidth operation. Devices reached narrow linewidth operation (>250 kHz) across their operation band.

  1. NAS technical summaries: Numerical aerodynamic simulation program, March 1991 - February 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefiting other supercomputer centers in Government and industry. This report contains selected scientific results from the 1991-92 NAS Operational Year, March 4, 1991 to March 3, 1992, which is the fifth year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP. The Cray-2, the first generation supercomputer, has four processors, 256 megawords of central memory, and a total sustained speed of 250 million floating point operations per second. The Cray Y-MP, the second generation supercomputer, has eight processors and a total sustained speed of one billion floating point operations per second. Additional memory was installed this year, doubling capacity from 128 to 256 megawords of solid-state storage-device memory. Because of its higher performance, the Cray Y-MP delivered approximately 77 percent of the total number of supercomputer hours used during this year.

  2. Nursing activities score (NAS): a proposal for practical application in intensive care units.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Leilane Andrade; Padilha, Katia Grillo; Cardoso Sousa, Regina M

    2007-12-01

    For over 30 years in an attempt to demonstrate the cost-benefit ratio of the intensive care unit (ICU) a variety of tools have been developed to measure not only the severity of illness of the patient but also to capture the true cost of nursing workload. In this context, the nursing activities score (NAS) was developed as a result of modifications to the therapeutic interventions scoring system-28 (TISS-28). The NAS is a tool to measure nursing workload ICU and it has been shown to be twice as effective in measuring how nurses spend their time caring for critically ill patients than the TISS-28. This paper discuss the introduction of the NAS into everyday use in an intensive care unit in Brazil and highlights the challenges of standardisation of operational definitions, training requirements and accurate completion of the documentation when using such a tool. The rationale and steps undertaken to achieve this are outlined and the benefits of such a process are highlighted.

  3. Optimisation of optical properties of a long-wavelength GaInNAs quantum-well laser diode

    SciTech Connect

    Alias, M S; Maskuriy, F; Faiz, F; Mitani, S M; AL-Omari, A N

    2013-11-30

    We report optimisation of optical properties of a strained GaInNAs/GaAs quantum-well laser, by taking into account the many-body effect theory and the bowing parameter. The theoretical transition energies and the GaInNAs bowing parameter are fitted into the photoluminescence spectrum of the GaInNAs quantum well, obtained in the experiment. The theoretical results for the photoluminescence spectrum and laser characteristics (light, current and voltage) exhibits a high degree of agreement with the experimental results. (lasers)

  4. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project. NASA Contributions to the SARP WC Definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Debra K.; Consiglio, Maria Cristina; Santiago, Confesor

    2014-01-01

    To better inform sense and avoid research needs and to understand ongoing investigation of potential solutions that ultimately lead to the assisting the FAA with their Congressional mandate to fly UAS in the NAS.

  5. Effect of antimony on the deep-level traps in GaInNAsSb thin films

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Muhammad Monirul Miyashita, Naoya; Ahsan, Nazmul; Okada, Yoshitaka; Sakurai, Takeaki; Akimoto, Katsuhiro

    2014-09-15

    Admittance spectroscopy has been performed to investigate the effect of antimony (Sb) on GaInNAs material in relation to the deep-level defects in this material. Two electron traps, E1 and E2 at an energy level 0.12 and 0.41 eV below the conduction band (E{sub C}), respectively, were found in undoped GaInNAs. Bias-voltage dependent admittance confirmed that E1 is an interface-type defect being spatially localized at the GaInNAs/GaAs interface, while E2 is a bulk-type defect located around mid-gap of GaInNAs layer. Introduction of Sb improved the material quality which was evident from the reduction of both the interface and bulk-type defects.

  6. Operational Overview for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace (NAS) Project Flight Test Series 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valkov, Steffi

    2017-01-01

    This presentation is a high level overview of the flight testing that took place in 2015 for the UAS-NAS project. All topics in the presentation discussed at a high level and no technical details are provided.

  7. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project KDP-C Review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Sakahara, Robert; Hackenberg, Davis; Johnson, William

    2017-01-01

    The topics discussed are the UAS-NAS project life-cycle and ARMD thrust flow down, as well as the UAS environments and how we operate in those environments. NASA's Armstrong Flight Research Center at Edwards, CA, is leading a project designed to help integrate unmanned air vehicles into the world around us. The Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System project, or UAS in the NAS, will contribute capabilities designed to reduce technical barriers related to safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS. The project falls under the Integrated Systems Research Program office managed at NASA Headquarters by the agency's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate. NASA's four aeronautics research centers - Armstrong, Ames Research Center, Langley Research Center, and Glenn Research Center - are part of the technology development project. With the use and diversity of unmanned aircraft growing rapidly, new uses for these vehicles are constantly being considered. Unmanned aircraft promise new ways of increasing efficiency, reducing costs, enhancing safety and saving lives 460265main_ED10-0132-16_full.jpg Unmanned aircraft systems such as NASA's Global Hawks (above) and Predator B named Ikhana (below), along with numerous other unmanned aircraft systems large and small, are the prime focus of the UAS in the NAS effort to integrate them into the national airspace. Credits: NASA Photos 710580main_ED07-0243-37_full.jpg The UAS in the NAS project envisions performance-based routine access to all segments of the national airspace for all unmanned aircraft system classes, once all safety-related and technical barriers are overcome. The project will provide critical data to such key stakeholders and customers as the Federal Aviation Administration and RTCA Special Committee 203 (formerly the Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics) by conducting integrated, relevant system-level tests to adequately address

  8. 5'-coding sequence of the nasA gene of Azotobacter vinelandii is required for efficient expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Baomin; Wang, Yumei; Kennedy, Christina

    2014-10-01

    The operon nasACBH in Azotobacter vinelandii encodes nitrate and nitrite reductases that sequentially reduce nitrate to nitrite and to ammonium for nitrogen assimilation into organic molecules. Our previous analyses showed that nasACBH expression is subject to antitermination regulation that occurs upstream of the nasA gene in response to the availability of nitrate and nitrite. In this study, we continued expression analyses of the nasA gene and observed that the nasA 5'-coding sequence plays an important role in gene expression, as demonstrated by the fact that deletions caused over sixfold reduction in the expression of the lacZ reporter gene. Further analysis suggests that the nasA 5'-coding sequence promotes gene expression in a way that is not associated with weakened transcript folding around the translational initiation region or codon usage bias. The findings from this study imply that there exists potential to improve gene expression in A. vinelandii by optimizing 5'-coding sequences. © 2014 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Dilute Nitride Nanowire Lasers Based on a GaAs/GaNAs Core/Shell Structure.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shula; Jansson, Mattias; Stehr, Jan E; Huang, Yuqing; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Chen, Weimin M; Buyanova, Irina A

    2017-03-08

    Nanowire (NW) lasers operating in the near-infrared spectral range are of significant technological importance for applications in telecommunications, sensing, and medical diagnostics. So far, lasing within this spectral range has been achieved using GaAs/AlGaAs, GaAs/GaAsP, and InGaAs/GaAs core/shell NWs. Another promising III-V material, not yet explored in its lasing capacity, is the dilute nitride GaNAs. In this work, we demonstrate, for the first time, optically pumped lasing from the GaNAs shell of a single GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NW. The characteristic "S"-shaped pump power dependence of the lasing intensity, with the concomitant line width narrowing, is observed, which yields a threshold gain, gth, of 3300 cm(-1) and a spontaneous emission coupling factor, β, of 0.045. The dominant lasing peak is identified to arise from the HE21b cavity mode, as determined from its pronounced emission polarization along the NW axis combined with theoretical calculations of lasing threshold for guided modes inside the nanowire. Even without intentional passivation of the NW surface, the lasing emission can be sustained up to 150 K. This is facilitated by the improved surface quality due to nitrogen incorporation, which partly suppresses the surface-related nonradiative recombination centers via nitridation. Our work therefore represents the first step toward development of room-temperature infrared NW lasers based on dilute nitrides with extended tunability in the lasing wavelength.

  10. UAS Integration Into the NAS: An Examination of Baseline Compliance in the Current Airspace System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Kenny, Caitlin A.; Shively, Robert J.; Johnson, Walter

    2012-01-01

    As a result of the FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012, Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) are expected to be integrated into the National Airspace System (NAS) by 2015. Several human factors challenges need to be addressed before UAS can safely and routinely fly in the NAS with manned aircraft. Perhaps the most significant challenge is for the UAS to be non-disruptive to the air traffic management system. Another human factors challenge is how to provide UAS pilots with intuitive traffic information in order to support situation awareness (SA) of their airspace environment as well as a see-and-avoid capability comparable to manned aircraft so that a UAS pilot could safely maneuver the aircraft to maintain separation and collision avoidance if necessary. A simulation experiment was conducted to examine baseline compliance of UAS operations in the current airspace system. Researchers also examined the effects of introducing a Cockpit Situation Display (CSD) into a UAS Ground Control Station (GCS) on UAS pilot performance, workload and situation awareness while flying in a positively controlled sector. Pilots were tasked with conducting a highway patrol police mission with a Medium Altitude Long Endurance (MALE) UAS in L.A. Center airspace with two mission objectives: 1) to reroute the UAS when issued new instructions from their commander, and 2) to communicate with Air Traffic Control (ATC) to negotiate flight plan changes and respond to vectoring and altitude change instructions. Objective aircraft separation data, workload ratings, SA data, and subjective ratings regarding UAS operations in the NAS were collected. Results indicate that UAS pilots were able to comply appropriately with ATC instructions. In addition, the introduction of the CSD improved pilot SA and reduced workload associated with UAS and ATC interactions.

  11. The CAS-NAS forum for new leaders in space science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David H.

    The space science community is thoroughly international, with numerous nations now capable of launching scientific payloads into space either independently or in concert with others. As such, it is important for national space-science advisory groups to engage with like-minded groups in other spacefaring nations. The Space Studies Board of the US National Academy of Sciences' (NAS') National Research Council has provided scientific and technical advice to NASA for more than 50 years. Over this period, the Board has developed important multilateral and bilateral partnerships with space scientists around the world. The primary multilateral partner is COSPAR, for which the Board serves as the US national committee. The Board's primary bilateral relationship is with the European Science Foundation’s European Space Science Committee. Burgeoning Chinese space activities have resulted in several attempts in the past decade to open a dialogue between the Board and space scientists in China. On each occasion, the external political environment was not conducive to success. The most recent efforts to engage the Chinese space researchers began in 2011 and have proved particularly successful. Although NASA is currently prohibited from engaging in bilateral activities with China, the Board has established a fruitful dialogue with its counterpart in the Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). A joint NAS-CAS activity, the Forum for New Leaders in Space Science, has been established to provide opportunities for a highly select group of young space scientists from China and the United States to discuss their research activities in an intimate and collegial environment at meetings to be held in both nations. The presentation will describe the current state of US-China space relations, discuss the goals of the joint NAS-CAS undertaking and report on the activities at the May, 2014, Forum in Beijing and the planning for the November, 2014, Forum in Irvine, California.

  12. NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program) technical summaries, March 1989 - February 1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    Given here are selected scientific results from the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program's third year of operation. During this year, the scientific community was given access to a Cray-2 and a Cray Y-MP supercomputer. Topics covered include flow field analysis of fighter wing configurations, large-scale ocean modeling, the Space Shuttle flow field, advanced computational fluid dynamics (CFD) codes for rotary-wing airloads and performance prediction, turbulence modeling of separated flows, airloads and acoustics of rotorcraft, vortex-induced nonlinearities on submarines, and standing oblique detonation waves.

  13. Communication Improvement for the LU NAS Parallel Benchmark: A Model for Efficient Parallel Relaxation Schemes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The first release of the MPI version of the LU NAS Parallel Benchmark (NPB2.0) performed poorly compared to its companion NPB2.0 codes. The later LU release (NPB2.1 & 2.2) runs up to two and a half times faster, thanks to a revised point access scheme and related communications scheme. The new scheme sends substantially fewer messages. is cache "friendly", and has a better load balance. We detail the, observations and modifications that resulted in this efficiency improvement, and show that the poor behavior of the original code resulted from deriving a message passing scheme from an algorithm originally devised for a vector architecture.

  14. The OpenMP Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks and its Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, Michael; Yan, Jerry

    1999-01-01

    As the new ccNUMA architecture became popular in recent years, parallel programming with compiler directives on these machines has evolved to accommodate new needs. In this study, we examine the effectiveness of OpenMP directives for parallelizing the NAS Parallel Benchmarks. Implementation details will be discussed and performance will be compared with the MPI implementation. We have demonstrated that OpenMP can achieve very good results for parallelization on a shared memory system, but effective use of memory and cache is very important.

  15. GaAs/GaInNAs quantum well and superlattice solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Rimada, Julio C.; Hernández, Luis

    2012-02-01

    A theoretical study of GaAs/GaInNAs solar cells based on multiple-quantum well solar cells (MQWSCs) and superlattice solar cell (SLSC) configuration is presented. The conversion efficiency as a function of the quantum well width and depth is modeled for MQWSC, reaching high values. A study of the SLSC viability is also presented. The influence of the cluster width on the conversion efficiency is researched showing a better performance when width and the cluster number are increased. The SLSC conversion efficiency is compared with the maximum conversion efficiency obtained for the MQWSC showing that it is reached an amazing increment of 4%.

  16. A Framework for Safe Integration of Small UAS Into the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Logan, Michael J.; Bland, Geoffrey; Murray, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses a proposed framework for the safe integration of small unmanned aerial systems (sUAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The paper examines the potential uses of sUAS to build an understanding of the location and frequency of potential future flight operations based on the future applications of the sUAS systems. The paper then examines the types of systems that would be required to meet the application-level demand to determine classes of platforms and operations. Finally, a framework is proposed for both airworthiness and operations that attempts to balance safety with utility for these important systems.

  17. The study of exoplanets and protoplanetary discs in the Main astronomical observatory of NAS of Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuznyetsova, Yu. G.; Krushevska, V. N.; Zakhozhay, O. V.; Matsiaka, O. M.; Vidmachenko, A. P.; Shliakhetskaya, Ya. O.; Andreev, M. V.; Romaniuk, Ya. O.

    2016-10-01

    Long-term spectral and photometric observations of transit and nontransit exoplanet systems are carried out in MAO NAS of Ukraine. On the base of obtained data we study the influence of exoplanets on chromospherical activity of the host stars, model the light curves, calculate exoplanet system's parameters and search planets in eclipsing binary star's systems. In the field of protoplanetary disc researches it was developed a new algorithm for calculation of the energy distribution in spectra of systems containing a spherical central source and a surrounding protoplanetary disc.

  18. Photoluminescence and magnetophotoluminescence studies in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segura, J.; Garro, N.; Cantarero, A.; Miguel-Sánchez, J.; Guzmán, A.; Hierro, A.

    2007-04-01

    We investigate the effects of electron and hole localization in the emission of a GaInNAs/GaAs single quantum well at low temperatures. Photoluminescence measurements varying the excitation density and under magnetic fields up to 14 T have been carried out. The results indicate that electrons are strongly localized in these systems due to small fluctuations in the nitrogen content of the quaternary alloy. The low linear diamagnetic shift of the emission points out the weakness of the Coulomb correlation between electrons and holes and suggests an additional partial localization of the holes.

  19. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Integrated Test and Evaluation (IT&E) Flight Test 3. Revision E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marston, Michael

    2015-01-01

    The desire and ability to fly Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS) is of increasing urgency. The application of unmanned aircraft to perform national security, defense, scientific, and emergency management are driving the critical need for less restrictive access by UAS to the NAS. UAS represent a new capability that will provide a variety of services in the government (public) and commercial (civil) aviation sectors. The growth of this potential industry has not yet been realized due to the lack of a common understanding of what is required to safely operate UAS in the NAS. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS Project is conducting research in the areas of Separation Assurance/Sense and Avoid Interoperability, Human Systems Integration (HSI), and Communication to support reducing the barriers of UAS access to the NAS. This research is broken into two research themes namely, UAS Integration and Test Infrastructure. UAS Integration focuses on airspace integration procedures and performance standards to enable UAS integration in the air transportation system, covering Sense and Avoid (SAA) performance standards, command and control performance standards, and human systems integration. The focus of Test Infrastructure is to enable development and validation of airspace integration procedures and performance standards, including the integrated test and evaluation. In support of the integrated test and evaluation efforts, the Project will develop an adaptable, scalable, and schedulable relevant test environment capable of evaluating concepts and technologies for unmanned aircraft systems to safely operate in the NAS. To accomplish this task, the Project will conduct a series of Human-in-the-Loop and Flight Test activities that integrate key concepts, technologies and/or procedures in a relevant air traffic environment. Each of the integrated events will build on the technical achievements, fidelity and complexity of the previous tests and

  20. Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate Integrated Systems Research Program (ISRP) and UAS Integration in the NAS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolfe, Jean

    2010-01-01

    Program Goal: Conduct research at an integrated system-level on promising concepts and technologies and explore, assess, or demonstrate the benefits in a relevant environment.Criteria for selection of projects for Integrated Systems Research: a) Technology has attained enough maturity in the foundational research program that they merit more in-depth evaluation at an integrated system level in a relevant environment. b) Technologies which systems analysis indicates have the most potential for contributing to the simultaneous attainment of goals. c) Technologies identified through stakeholder input as having potential for simultaneous attainment of goals. d) Research not being done by other government agencies and appropriate for NASA to conduct. e) Budget augmentation. Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) Project Explore and assess new vehicle concepts and enabling technologies through system-level experimentation to simultaneously reduce fuel burn, noise, and emissions Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project Contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS Innovative Concepts for Green Aviation (ICGA) Project Spur innovation by offering research opportunities to the broader aeronautics community through peer-reviewed proposals, with a focus on making aviation more eco-friendly. Establish incentive prizes similar to the Centennial Challenges and sponsor innovation demonstrations of selected technologies that show promise of reducing aviation s impact on the environment

  1. InGaN/Dilute-As GaNAs Interface Quantum Well for Red Emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Borovac, Damir; Sun, Wei; Tansu, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The design of InGaN/dilute-As GaNAs interface quantum well (QW) leads to significant redshift in the transition wavelength with improvement in electron-hole wave function overlap and spontaneous emission rate as compared to that of the conventional In0.2Ga0.8N QW. By using self-consistent six-band k·p band formalism, the nitride active region consisting of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N and 10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW leads to 623.52 nm emission wavelength in the red spectral regime. The utilization of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N/10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW also leads to 8.5 times enhancement of spontaneous emission rate attributed by the improvement in electron-hole wavefunction overlap, as compared to that of conventional 30 Å In0.35Ga0.65N QW for red spectral regime. In addition, the transition wavelength of the interface QW is relatively unaffected by the thickness of the dilute-As GaNAs interface layer (beyond 10 Å). The analysis indicates the potential of using interface QW concept in nitride-based light-emitting diodes for long wavelength emission.

  2. InGaN/Dilute-As GaNAs Interface Quantum Well for Red Emitters

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Chee-Keong; Borovac, Damir; Sun, Wei; Tansu, Nelson

    2016-01-01

    The design of InGaN/dilute-As GaNAs interface quantum well (QW) leads to significant redshift in the transition wavelength with improvement in electron-hole wave function overlap and spontaneous emission rate as compared to that of the conventional In0.2Ga0.8N QW. By using self-consistent six-band k·p band formalism, the nitride active region consisting of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N and 10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW leads to 623.52 nm emission wavelength in the red spectral regime. The utilization of 30 Å In0.2Ga0.8N/10 Å GaN0.95As0.05 interface QW also leads to 8.5 times enhancement of spontaneous emission rate attributed by the improvement in electron-hole wavefunction overlap, as compared to that of conventional 30 Å In0.35Ga0.65N QW for red spectral regime. In addition, the transition wavelength of the interface QW is relatively unaffected by the thickness of the dilute-As GaNAs interface layer (beyond 10 Å). The analysis indicates the potential of using interface QW concept in nitride-based light-emitting diodes for long wavelength emission. PMID:26758552

  3. Web Prep: How to Prepare NAS Reports For Publication on the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Prithika; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Felchle, Gail; Brickell, Cristy

    1996-01-01

    This document contains specific advice and requirements for NASA Ames Code IN authors of NAS reports. Much of the information may be of interest to other authors writing for the Web. WebPrep has a graphic Table of Contents in the form of a WebToon, which simulates a discussion between a scientist and a Web publishing consultant. In the WebToon, Frequently Asked Questions about preparing reports for the Web are linked to relevant text in the body of this document. We also provide a text-only Table of Contents. The text for this document is divided into chapters: each chapter corresponds to one frame of the WebToons. The chapter topics are: converting text to HTML, converting 2D graphic images to gif, creating imagemaps and tables, converting movie and audio files to Web formats, supplying 3D interactive data, and (briefly) JAVA capabilities. The last chapter is specifically for NAS staff authors. The Glossary-Index lists web related words and links to topics covered in the main text.

  4. Web Prep: How to Prepare NAS Reports For Publication on the Web

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walatka, Pamela; Balakrishnan, Prithika; Clucas, Jean; McCabe, R. Kevin; Felchle, Gail; Brickell, Cristy

    1996-01-01

    This document contains specific advice and requirements for NASA Ames Code IN authors of NAS reports. Much of the information may be of interest to other authors writing for the Web. WebPrep has a graphic Table of Contents in the form of a WebToon, which simulates a discussion between a scientist and a Web publishing consultant. In the WebToon, Frequently Asked Questions about preparing reports for the Web are linked to relevant text in the body of this document. We also provide a text-only Table of Contents. The text for this document is divided into chapters: each chapter corresponds to one frame of the WebToons. The chapter topics are: converting text to HTML, converting 2D graphic images to gif, creating imagemaps and tables, converting movie and audio files to Web formats, supplying 3D interactive data, and (briefly) JAVA capabilities. The last chapter is specifically for NAS staff authors. The Glossary-Index lists web related words and links to topics covered in the main text.

  5. Growth optimization and optical properties of AlGaNAs alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Wallace, Steven G.; Fafard, Simon; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard

    2014-04-01

    The effect of Al on the surface morphology of chemical beam epitaxy grown AlGaNAs alloys is studied. Pits attributed to N clustering appearing on the dilute nitride surface become smaller, denser, and more uniformly distributed in the presence of Al. This reveals that the introduction of Al results in more homogenous N atoms spatial distribution. A growth temperature study reveals the formation of 3D structures at high temperature due to phase separation. The density of these structures decreases, while their diameter and height increase when the temperature is raised from 380 °C to 565 °C. At growth temperatures in the 380-420 °C range, the phase separation is suppressed and the growth mode is 2D. At 420 °C, the N incorporation is also maximized, making it the optimum temperature. The absorption coefficient and the bandgap of AlGaNAs alloys are extracted from transmittance measurement. A good agreement is obtained between the experimentally measured bandgap and the theoretical values calculated using the band anticrossing model. A bandgap as low as 1.22 eV was reached using Al and N concentrations of ˜15% and ˜3.4%, respectively.

  6. Growth optimization and optical properties of AlGaNAs alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kolhatkar, Gitanjali; Boucherif, Abderraouf; Aimez, Vincent; Arès, Richard; Valdivia, Christopher E.; Wallace, Steven G.; Fafard, Simon

    2014-04-28

    The effect of Al on the surface morphology of chemical beam epitaxy grown AlGaNAs alloys is studied. Pits attributed to N clustering appearing on the dilute nitride surface become smaller, denser, and more uniformly distributed in the presence of Al. This reveals that the introduction of Al results in more homogenous N atoms spatial distribution. A growth temperature study reveals the formation of 3D structures at high temperature due to phase separation. The density of these structures decreases, while their diameter and height increase when the temperature is raised from 380 °C to 565 °C. At growth temperatures in the 380–420 °C range, the phase separation is suppressed and the growth mode is 2D. At 420 °C, the N incorporation is also maximized, making it the optimum temperature. The absorption coefficient and the bandgap of AlGaNAs alloys are extracted from transmittance measurement. A good agreement is obtained between the experimentally measured bandgap and the theoretical values calculated using the band anticrossing model. A bandgap as low as 1.22 eV was reached using Al and N concentrations of ∼15% and ∼3.4%, respectively.

  7. First-principles study on structure stabilities of α-S and Na-S battery systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momida, Hiroyoshi; Oguchi, Tamio

    2014-03-01

    To understand microscopic mechanisms of charge and discharge reactions in Na-S batteries, there has been increasing needs to study fundamental atomic and electronic structures of elemental S as well as that of Na-S phases. The most stable form of S is known to be an orthorhombic α-S crystal at ambient temperature and pressure, and α-S consists of puckered S8 rings which crystallize in space group Fddd . In this study, the crystal structure of α-S is examined by using first-principles calculations with and without the van der Waals interaction corrections of Grimme's method, and results clearly show that the van der Waals interactions between the S8 rings have crucial roles on cohesion of α-S. We also study structure stabilities of Na2S, NaS, NaS2, and Na2S5 phases with reported crystal structures. Using calculated total energies of the crystal structure models, we estimate discharge voltages assuming discharge reactions from 2Na+ xS -->Na2Sx, and discharge reactions in Na/S battery systems are discussed by comparing with experimental results. This work was partially supported by Elements Strategy Initiative for Catalysts and Batteries (ESICB) of Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science, and Technology (MEXT), Japan.

  8. Comparison of 250 MHz R10K Origin 2000 and 400 MHz Origin 2000 Using NAS Parallel Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turney, Raymond D.; Thigpen, William W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This report describes results of benchmark tests on Steger, a 250 MHz Origin 2000 system with R10K processors, currently installed at the NASA Ames National Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) facility. For comparison purposes, the tests were also run on Lomax, a 400 MHz Origin 2000 with R12K processors. The BT, LU, and SP application benchmarks in the NAS Parallel Benchmark Suite and the kernel benchmark FT were chosen to measure system performance. Having been written to measure performance on Computational Fluid Dynamics applications, these benchmarks are assumed appropriate to represent the NAS workload. Since the NAS runs both message passing (MPI) and shared-memory, compiler directive type codes, both MPI and OpenMP versions of the benchmarks were used. The MPI versions used were the latest official release of the NAS Parallel Benchmarks, version 2.3. The OpenMP versions used were PBN3b2, a beta version that is in the process of being released. NPB 2.3 and PBN3b2 are technically different benchmarks, and NPB results are not directly comparable to PBN results.

  9. Serious Gaming for Test & Evaluation of Clean-Slate (Ab Initio) National Airspace System (NAS) Designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, B. Danette; Alexandrov, Natalia

    2016-01-01

    Incremental approaches to air transportation system development inherit current architectural constraints, which, in turn, place hard bounds on system capacity, efficiency of performance, and complexity. To enable airspace operations of the future, a clean-slate (ab initio) airspace design(s) must be considered. This ab initio National Airspace System (NAS) must be capable of accommodating increased traffic density, a broader diversity of aircraft, and on-demand mobility. System and subsystem designs should scale to accommodate the inevitable demand for airspace services that include large numbers of autonomous Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and a paradigm shift in general aviation (e.g., personal air vehicles) in addition to more traditional aerial vehicles such as commercial jetliners and weather balloons. The complex and adaptive nature of ab initio designs for the future NAS requires new approaches to validation, adding a significant physical experimentation component to analytical and simulation tools. In addition to software modeling and simulation, the ability to exercise system solutions in a flight environment will be an essential aspect of validation. The NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) Autonomy Incubator seeks to develop a flight simulation infrastructure for ab initio modeling and simulation that assumes no specific NAS architecture and models vehicle-to-vehicle behavior to examine interactions and emergent behaviors among hundreds of intelligent aerial agents exhibiting collaborative, cooperative, coordinative, selfish, and malicious behaviors. The air transportation system of the future will be a complex adaptive system (CAS) characterized by complex and sometimes unpredictable (or unpredicted) behaviors that result from temporal and spatial interactions among large numbers of participants. A CAS not only evolves with a changing environment and adapts to it, it is closely coupled to all systems that constitute the environment. Thus, the ecosystem that

  10. Utilizing Traveler Demand Modeling to Predict Future Commercial Flight Schedules in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Smith, Jeremy; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2006-01-01

    The current work incorporates the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) to predict the future demand for airline travel. TSAM is a multi-mode, national model that predicts the demand for all long distance travel at a county level based upon population and demographics. The model conducts a mode choice analysis to compute the demand for commercial airline travel based upon the traveler s purpose of the trip, value of time, cost and time of the trip,. The county demand for airline travel is then aggregated (or distributed) to the airport level, and the enplanement demand at commercial airports is modeled. With the growth in flight demand, and utilizing current airline flight schedules, the Fratar algorithm is used to develop future flight schedules in the NAS. The projected flights can then be flown through air transportation simulators to quantify the ability of the NAS to meet future demand. A major strength of the TSAM analysis is that scenario planning can be conducted to quantify capacity requirements at individual airports, based upon different future scenarios. Different demographic scenarios can be analyzed to model the demand sensitivity to them. Also, it is fairly well know, but not well modeled at the airport level, that the demand for travel is highly dependent on the cost of travel, or the fare yield of the airline industry. The FAA projects the fare yield (in constant year dollars) to keep decreasing into the future. The magnitude and/or direction of these projections can be suspect in light of the general lack of airline profits and the large rises in airline fuel cost. Also, changes in travel time and convenience have an influence on the demand for air travel, especially for business travel. Future planners cannot easily conduct sensitivity studies of future demand with the FAA TAF data, nor with the Boeing or Airbus projections. In TSAM many factors can be parameterized and various demand sensitivities can be predicted for future travel. These

  11. NAS Demand Predictions, Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) Compared with Other Forecasts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viken, Jeff; Dollyhigh, Samuel; Smith, Jeremy; Trani, Antonio; Baik, Hojong; Hinze, Nicholas; Ashiabor, Senanu

    2006-01-01

    The current work incorporates the Transportation Systems Analysis Model (TSAM) to predict the future demand for airline travel. TSAM is a multi-mode, national model that predicts the demand for all long distance travel at a county level based upon population and demographics. The model conducts a mode choice analysis to compute the demand for commercial airline travel based upon the traveler s purpose of the trip, value of time, cost and time of the trip,. The county demand for airline travel is then aggregated (or distributed) to the airport level, and the enplanement demand at commercial airports is modeled. With the growth in flight demand, and utilizing current airline flight schedules, the Fratar algorithm is used to develop future flight schedules in the NAS. The projected flights can then be flown through air transportation simulators to quantify the ability of the NAS to meet future demand. A major strength of the TSAM analysis is that scenario planning can be conducted to quantify capacity requirements at individual airports, based upon different future scenarios. Different demographic scenarios can be analyzed to model the demand sensitivity to them. Also, it is fairly well know, but not well modeled at the airport level, that the demand for travel is highly dependent on the cost of travel, or the fare yield of the airline industry. The FAA projects the fare yield (in constant year dollars) to keep decreasing into the future. The magnitude and/or direction of these projections can be suspect in light of the general lack of airline profits and the large rises in airline fuel cost. Also, changes in travel time and convenience have an influence on the demand for air travel, especially for business travel. Future planners cannot easily conduct sensitivity studies of future demand with the FAA TAF data, nor with the Boeing or Airbus projections. In TSAM many factors can be parameterized and various demand sensitivities can be predicted for future travel. These

  12. Benefits of a Unified LaSRS++ Simulation for NAS-Wide and High-Fidelity Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia; Madden, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The LaSRS++ high-fidelity vehicle simulation was extended in 2012 to support a NAS-wide simulation mode. Since the initial proof-of-concept, the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulation is maturing into a research-ready tool. A primary benefit of this new capability is the consolidation of the two modeling paradigms under a single framework to save cost, facilitate iterative concept testing between the two tools, and to promote communication and model sharing between user communities at Langley. Specific benefits of each type of modeling are discussed along with the expected benefits of the unified framework. Current capability details of the LaSRS++ NAS-wide simulations are provided, including the visualization tool, live data interface, trajectory generators, terminal routing for arrivals and departures, maneuvering, re-routing, navigation, winds, and turbulence. The plan for future development is also described.

  13. Efficient GaInNAs Gain Mirrors for Semiconductor Disk Lasers at 1.18 {mu}m and 1.22 {mu}m

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Puustinen, Janne; Leinonen, Tomi; Rautiainen, Jussi; Haerkoenen, Antti; Hakkarainen, Teemu; Guina, Mircea

    2010-11-10

    We report two GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor disk lasers emitting at the wavelengths of 1180 nm and 1220 nm. The lasers generated 5 W and 7 W output powers, respectively, at a mount temperature of 15 deg. C. Both the gain mirrors were grown by molecular beam epitaxy and consisted of a GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflector and an active region with 10 GaInNAs/GaNAs/GaAs QWs.

  14. Design of free-barrier InGaAs/GaNAs multiple quantum well solar cells with 1.2 eV energy gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanwachirakul, Warakorn; Miyashita, Naoya; Sodabanlu, Hassanet; Watanabe, Kentaroh; Sugiyama, Masakazu; Okada, Yoshitaka; Nakano, Yoshiaki

    2017-08-01

    InGaAs and GaNAs were selected as components of a multiple quantum well (MQW) with a free-barrier conduction band (FB-CB) in which the quantum confinement for electrons was eliminated. Since the calculation demonstrated that the energy gap of a strain-balanced FB-CB InGaAs/GaNAs MQW could be decreased to 1.2 eV with lattice matching to Ge, this structure was expected as a potential absorber of the middle cell of a three-junction solar cell based on the Ge bottom cell. Additionally, the InGaAs/GaNAs MQW could mitigate detrimental impacts of the short lifetime of GaNAs because of the preferential existence of holes in InGaAs, and it can realize more efficient carrier transport than bulk GaInNAs. The time-resolved photoluminescence (TRPL) results demonstrated that the InGaAs/GaNAs MQW cell provided a significantly longer lifetime than the GaInNAs thin-film cell. The open-circuit voltage of the InGaAs/GaNAs MQW cell was superior to that of the GaInNAs thin-film cell.

  15. Comparative analysis of cavity length-dependent temperature sensitivity of GaInNAs quantum dot lasers and quantum well lasers.

    PubMed

    Liu, C Y; Yoon, S F; Cao, Q; Tong, C Z; Sun, Z Z

    2006-11-28

    Self-assembled GaInNAs/GaAsN single-layer quantum dot (QD) lasers, grown using solid source molecular beam epitaxy, have been fabricated and characterized. A high output power of 40.76 mW/facet was obtained from a GaInNAs QD laser with dimensions of 50 × 700 µm(2) at 10 °C. Temperature-dependent measurements were carried out on the GaInNAs QD lasers of different cavity lengths. For comparison, temperature-dependent measurements were also performed on GaInNAs single quantum well (SQW) and triple QW (TQW) lasers. Unlike the relationship between cavity length and T(0) in GaInNAs SQW/TQW lasers, longer-cavity GaInNAs QD lasers (50 × 1700 µm(2)) showed a lower T(0) of 65.1 K, which is believed to be due to non-uniformity of the GaInNAs QD layer. Furthermore, compared to GaInNAs SQW lasers, a significant improvement in temperature sensitivity was observed in the TQW GaInNAs lasers. This is attributed to a reduction in the relative contribution of the Auger recombination current and suppression of heavy-hole leakage in the TQW laser structures.

  16. DAIDALUS Observations From UAS Integration in the NAS Project Flight Test 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, Michael J.; Tsakpinis, Dimitrios

    2016-01-01

    In order to validate the Unmanned Aerial System (UAS) Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) solution proposed by standards body RTCA Inc., the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) UAS Integration in the NAS project, alongside industry members General Atomics and Honeywell, conducted the fourth flight test in a series at Armstrong Flight Research Center in Edwards, California. Flight Test 4 (FT4) investigated problems of interoperability with the TCAS collision avoidance system with a DAA system as well as problems associated with sensor uncertainty. A series of scripted flight encounters between the NASA Ikhana UAS and various "intruder" aircraft were flown while alerting and guidance from the DAA algorithm were recorded to investigate the timeliness of the alerts and correctness of the guidance triggered by the DAA system. The results found that alerts were triggered in a timely manner in most instances. Cases where the alerting and guidance was incorrect were investigated further.

  17. 615 nm GaInNAs VECSEL with output power above 10 W.

    PubMed

    Kantola, Emmi; Leinonen, Tomi; Penttinen, Jussi-Pekka; Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Guina, Mircea

    2015-08-10

    A high-power optically-pumped vertical-external-cavity surface-emitting laser (VECSEL) generating 10.5 W of cw output power at 615 nm is reported. The gain mirror incorporated 10 GaInNAs quantum wells and was designed to have an emission peak in the 1230 nm range. The fundamental emission was frequency doubled to the red spectral range by using an intra-cavity nonlinear LBO crystal. The maximum optical-to-optical conversion efficiency was 17.5%. The VECSEL was also operated in pulsed mode by directly modulating the pump laser to produce light pulses with duration of ~1.5 µs. The maximum peak power for pulsed operation (pump limited) was 13.8 W. This corresponded to an optical-to-optical conversion efficiency of 20.4%.

  18. Security Risk Assessment Process for UAS in the NAS CNPC Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannicca, Dennis Christopher; Young, Daniel Paul; Suresh, Thadhani; Winter, Gilbert A.

    2013-01-01

    This informational paper discusses the risk assessment process conducted to analyze Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) architectures for integrating civil Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The assessment employs the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management framework to identify threats, vulnerabilities, and risks to these architectures and recommends corresponding mitigating security controls. This process builds upon earlier work performed by RTCA Special Committee (SC) 203 and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to roadmap the risk assessment methodology and to identify categories of information security risks that pose a significant impact to aeronautical communications systems. A description of the deviations from the typical process is described in regards to this aeronautical communications system. Due to the sensitive nature of the information, data resulting from the risk assessment pertaining to threats, vulnerabilities, and risks is beyond the scope of this paper

  19. Security Risk Assessment Process for UAS in the NAS CNPC Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Iannicca, Dennis C.; Young, Dennis P.; Thadani, Suresh K.; Winter, Gilbert A.

    2013-01-01

    This informational paper discusses the risk assessment process conducted to analyze Control and Non-Payload Communications (CNPC) architectures for integrating civil Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System (NAS). The assessment employs the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Risk Management framework to identify threats, vulnerabilities, and risks to these architectures and recommends corresponding mitigating security controls. This process builds upon earlier work performed by RTCA Special Committee (SC) 203 and the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) to roadmap the risk assessment methodology and to identify categories of information security risks that pose a significant impact to aeronautical communications systems. A description of the deviations from the typical process is described in regards to this aeronautical communications system. Due to the sensitive nature of the information, data resulting from the risk assessment pertaining to threats, vulnerabilities, and risks is beyond the scope of this paper.

  20. Parallelization of the NAS Conjugate Gradient Benchmark Using the Global Arrays Shared Memory Programming Model

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yeliang; Tipparaju, Vinod; Nieplocha, Jarek; Hariri, Salim

    2005-04-08

    The NAS Conjugate Gradient (CG) benchmark is an important scientific kernel used to evaluate machine performance and compare characteristics of different programming models. Global Arrays (GA) toolkit supports a shared memory programming paradigm— even on distributed memory systems— and offers the programmer control over the distribution and locality that are important for optimizing performance on scalable architectures. In this paper, we describe and compare two different parallelization strategies of the CG benchmark using GA and report performance results on a shared-memory system as well as on a cluster. Performance benefits of using shared memory for irregular/sparse computations have been demonstrated before in context of the CG benchmark using OpenMP. Similarly, the GA implementation outperforms the standard MPI implementation on shared memory system, in our case the SGI Altix. However, with GA these benefits are extended to distributed memory systems and demonstrated on a Linux cluster with Myrinet.

  1. The conjugate gradient NAS parallel benchmark on the IBM SP1

    SciTech Connect

    Trefethen, A.E.; Zhang, T.

    1994-12-31

    The NAS Parallel Benchmarks are a suite of eight benchmark problems developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. They are specified in such a way that the benchmarkers are free to choose the language and method of implementation to suit the system in which they are interested. In this presentation the authors will discuss the Conjugate Gradient benchmark and its implementation on the IBM SP1. The SP1 is a parallel system which is comprised of RS/6000 nodes connected by a high performance switch. They will compare the results of the SP1 implementation with those reported for other machines. At this time, such a comparison shows the SP1 to be very competitive.

  2. Temperature coefficients for GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, Arto; Isoaho, Riku; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Aho, Timo; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2015-09-28

    We report the temperature coefficients for MBE-grown GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAsSb multijunction solar cells and the corresponding single junction sub-cells. Temperature-dependent current-voltage measurements were carried out using a solar simulator equipped with a 1000 W Xenon lamp and a three-band AM1.5D simulator. The triple-junction cell exhibited an efficiency of 31% at AM1.5G illumination and an efficiency of 37–39% at 70x real sun concentration. The external quantum efficiency was also measured at different temperatures. The temperature coefficients up to 80°C, for the open circuit voltage, the short circuit current density, and the conversion efficiency were determined to be −7.5 mV/°C, 0.040 mA/cm{sup 2}/°C, and −0.09%/°C, respectively.

  3. Deep-level study of Ga(In)P(NAs) alloys grown on Si substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baranov, A. I.; Kleider, J. P.; Gudovskikh, A. S.; Darga, A.; Nikitina, E. V.; Egorov, A. Yu

    2016-08-01

    Defect properties of Ga(In)P(NAs) layers with different composition were studied by admittance spectroscopy. For nitrogen content layers the defect level with energy of 0.44-0.47 eV, which related to nitrogen incorporation into GaP, was observed. Its concentration is lower for GaPNAs layers compared to GaPN/InP due to better compensation by arsenic than by indium in lattice of GaP. Other defect level with energy of 0.30 eV was detected in GaPAs and GaPN/InP layers. Likely, the both observed defects in GaPAs and GaPN/InP have the same nature.

  4. Direct visualization of the N impurity state in dilute GaNAs using scanning tunneling microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Nobuyuki; Jo, Masafumi; Mano, Takaaki; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Noda, Takeshi; Fujita, Daisuke

    2015-10-28

    The interaction between nitrogen (N) impurity states in III-V compounds plays a key role in controlling optoelectronic properties of the host materials. Here, we use scanning tunneling microscopy to characterize the spatial distribution and electronic properties of N impurity states in dilute GaNAs. We demonstrated that the N impurity states can be directly visualized by taking empty state current images using the multipass scanning method. The N impurity states broadened over several nanometers and exhibited a highly anisotropic distribution with a bowtie-like shape on the GaAs(110) surface, which can be explained by anisotropic propagation of strain along the zigzag chains of Ga and As atoms in the {110} plane. Our experimental findings provide strong insights into a possible role of N impurity states in modifying properties of the host materials.

  5. Development of computer program NAS3D using Vector processing for geometric nonlinear analysis of structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mangalgiri, P. D.; Prabhakaran, R.

    1986-01-01

    An algorithm for vectorized computation of stiffness matrices of an 8 noded isoparametric hexahedron element for geometric nonlinear analysis was developed. This was used in conjunction with the earlier 2-D program GAMNAS to develop the new program NAS3D for geometric nonlinear analysis. A conventional, modified Newton-Raphson process is used for the nonlinear analysis. New schemes for the computation of stiffness and strain energy release rates is presented. The organization the program is explained and some results on four sample problems are given. The study of CPU times showed that savings by a factor of 11 to 13 were achieved when vectorized computation was used for the stiffness instead of the conventional scalar one. Finally, the scheme of inputting data is explained.

  6. Photolytic Destruction Technology demonstration, NAS North Island, Site 9. Final contract report, October 1997--February 1998

    SciTech Connect

    1998-08-01

    The Photolytic Destruction Technology was chosen for demonstration, as part of the Navy Environmental Leadership Program (NELP), at Naval Air Station (NAS) North Island`s Site 9 soil vapor extraction (SVE) system. The demonstration was conducted, under contract N47408-97-C-0215 through Naval Facilities Engineering Service Center`s Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) program, to Process Technologies Incorporated (PTI), beginning October 7, 1997 and ending February 12, 1998, for 128 days. The literature search, demonstration oversight, and evaluation were funded by the Pollution Abatement Ashore Program managed by Naval Facilities Engineering Command and sponsored by the Environmental Protection, Safety and Occupational Health Division (N45) of the Chief of Naval Operations. The system was installed to treat a slip stream containing volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the operating SVE system already installed at the site. The goal of this demonstration was to obtain the necessary cost and performance data, including the lessons learned, on the system comprising of a concentrator, condenser, and photolytic destruction unit (PDU), for comparison with other treatment technologies. The system was demonstrated on air stream contaminated with halogenated and non-halogenated VOCs such as l,2- dichloroethene, trichloroethene, tetrachloroethene, toluene, and octane. The test results indicated that the system was effective in removing VOCs in thc SVE off-gas to below the maximum allowable emissions of 25 parts per million by volume. The average total DRE achieved for VOCs was 95.44% whereas the PDU alone demonstrated an overall DRE of 97%. The estimated unit cost to treat SVE off-gas at NAS North Island`s Site 9, for a 3,000 standard cubic feet per minute PTI system, is $3.77 per pound of VOC treated.

  7. Communications for UAS Integration in the NAS Phase 2 Satellite Communications and Terrestrial Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, Jim; Kerczewski, Bob

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide for the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System, the command and control communications link connecting the ground-based pilot with the unmanned aircraft must be highly reliable and robust, with national and international standards to enable interoperability and certification. Both line-of-sight (LOS) links using terrestrial-based communications and beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) links using satellite communications, supported by national and international standards, are required for integrated UAS operations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has undertaken an extensive technology development and test program in order to provide the required technical data needed to enable C2 standards development. NASAs UAS Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS), or UAS in the NAS Project, included as a major element the Command and Control Communications (C2) Subproject, based at NASAs Glenn Research Center. The successful first phase of the C2 Subproject, completed during 2012-2016, focused primarily on line-of-sight communications. Accomplishments included air-ground channel propagation characterization and modeling; CNPC prototype radio development; CNPC radio flight testing; satellite communications spectrum study and interference analysis; and development of C2 LOS communications standards development. The second phase of the C2 Subproject will focus primarily on beyond-line-of-sight communications, although a follow-on activity for terrestrial LOS communications, known as Terrestrial Extension, is also included. In addition to the terrestrial element, Phase 2 also includes technology development and testing activities for Ka-Band BLOS C2 Satellite Communications; Ku-Band BLOS C2 Satellite Communications; Ku-Band Interference and Propagation; and C-Band Satellite Communications. This paper will provide brief overviews of the C2 Subproject and its Phase I accomplishments

  8. Communications for UAS Integration in the NAS Phase 2 - Satellite Communications and Terrestrial Extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.; Kerczewski, Robert J.

    2017-01-01

    In order to provide for the safe integration of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) into the National Airspace System, the command and control communications link connecting the ground-based pilot with the unmanned aircraft must be highly reliable and robust, with national and international standards to enable interoperability and certification. Both line-of-sight (LOS) links using terrestrial-based communications and beyond-line-of-sight (BLOS) links using satellite communications, supported by national and international standards, are required for integrated UAS operations. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has undertaken an extensive technology development and test program in order to provide the required technical data needed to enable C2 standards development. NASAs UAS Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS), or UAS in the NAS Project, included as a major element the Command and Control Communications (C2) Subproject, based at NASAs Glenn Research Center. The successful first phase of the C2 Subproject, completed during 2012-2016, focused primarily on line-of-sight communications. Accomplishments included air-ground channel propagation characterization and modeling; CNPC prototype radio development; CNPC radio flight testing; satellite communications spectrum study and interference analysis; and development of C2 LOS communications standards development. The second phase of the C2 Subproject will focus primarily on beyond-line-of-sight communications, although a follow-on activity for terrestrial LOS communications, known as Terrestrial Extension, is also included. In addition to the terrestrial element, Phase 2 also includes technology development and testing activities for Ka-Band BLOS C2 Satellite Communications; Ku-Band BLOS C2 Satellite Communications; Ku-Band Interference and Propagation; and C-Band Satellite Communications. This paper will provide brief overviews of the C2 Subproject and its Phase I accomplishments

  9. Seismic reflection exploration of geothermal reservoir at Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alay G., Gebregiorgis

    The Primary objective of this study is to increase geologic and tectonic understanding of the geothermal resources at the Naval Air Station (NAS) Fallon, Nevada. The seismic reflection method is employed to study faults, fractures and other tectonic structures in the subsurface in order to identify geothermal drill targets. The efficiency of geothermal systems is strongly dependent on water circulation. Discrete faults may be permeable and provide pathways for water flow depending on the fracture density. It is therefore desirable to detect and map faults and fracture zones and characterize their physical properties when evaluating a geothermal prospect. The seismic data for this project were provided by the NAS environmental research program in Ridgecrest, CA. However, the data collection information was not available so the work includes determining the line geometry and mapping shot points to field files in order to process the data. ProMAX 2D(TM) is the software used to determine the geometry and to process the data. Data processing includes eliminating noise, datum and refraction statics, trace muting, bandpass filter, automatic gain control, amplitude recovery, CMP sorting, velocity analysis and NMO correction, stacking and migration. The results of this study indicate the presence of thick basin fill including Tertiary and Quaternary sediments underlain by Tertiary basalts which are interpreted to be capping rocks for the geothermal reservoirs. This seismic reflection study also reveals the presence of strongly fractured pre-Tertiary basement complex with their top at about 1500m on the north and west and about 900 m on the eastern and southern part of the study area.

  10. 78 FR 21084 - Proposed Amendment of Class D and E Airspace, and Establishment of Class E Airspace; Oceana NAS, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-09

    ... Traffic Control Tower at Oceana NAS (Apollo Soucek Field) operating on a part time basis. This action...-0038; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-2, at the beginning of your comments. You may also submit and review...; Airspace Docket No. 13-AEA-2) and be submitted in triplicate to the Docket Management System (see...

  11. EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (Volume 1) (Interagency Science Discussion Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is releasing the draft report, EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (Volume 1), that was distributed to Federal agencies and White House Offices for comment during the Science Discussion step of the EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

  1. OMVPE-grown GaInNAs lasers and SOAs operating at 1.3 μm region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katsuyama, Tsukuru; Yamada, Takashi; Hashimoto, Jun-ichi; Murata, Michio; Koyama, Kenji; Ito, Masashi; Iguchi, Yasushiro; Takagishi, Shigenori; Ishida, Akira

    2005-01-01

    Progress of information technology in recent years has led to a rapid expansion in data communication capacity and there has been a strong demand for constructing cost-effective and high-performance optical communication systems. Photonic integrated circuit (photonic IC) technology has offered solutions for these requirements by eliminating the individual packaging and optical connections between devices. This approach is expected not only to reduce the cost, size, and power consumption but also to realize new functions that can never be possible with conventional discrete devices. For the practical use of photonic ICs, it is desirable that they can be used under uncooled conditions and are highly productive. However, it seems difficult for conventional InP-based devices to satisfy these requirements because their temperature characteristics are insufficient due to a weak electron confinement in the active region. In addition, at present, InP substrates used for production are mainly 2 or 3 inches in diameter and it is difficult to enlarge the wafer size with maintaining the quality and mechanical strength. GaInNAs, which has been developed recently as an alternative semiconductor material in the long-wavelength region, seems to be the best candidate to satisfy these requirements. It covers bandgaps corresponding to the wavelength from 1.3 μm to 1.6 μm with lattic-matched to GaAs, which leads to the following advantages. First low-cost and large-scale integrations can be realized with high productivity due to the usage of large GaAs substrates of up to 6 inches in diameter and well-established Ga-As-based process technology. Second as well known in GaInNAs lasers, much stronger electron confinement in the active layer can be realized. Therefore GaInNAs-based devices are expected to have larger gain and better temperature characteristics comparing with conventional InP-based devices. In addition, the low Auger recombination rate and large effective mass of

  2. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Flight Test 3 Data Analysis of JADEM-Autoresolver Detect and Avoid System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gong, Chester; Wu, Minghong G.; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    The Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System project, or UAS Integration in the NAS, aims to reduce technical barriers related to safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS. The UAS Integration in the NAS Project conducted a flight test activity, referred to as Flight Test 3 (FT3), involving several Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) research prototype systems between June 15, 2015 and August 12, 2015 at the Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC). This report documents the flight testing and analysis results for the NASA Ames-developed JADEM-Autoresolver DAA system, referred to as 'Autoresolver' herein. Four flight test days (June 17, 18, 22, and July 22) were dedicated to Autoresolver testing. The objectives of this test were as follows: 1. Validate CPA prediction accuracy and detect-and-avoid (DAA, formerly known as self-separation) alerting logic in realistic flight conditions. 2. Validate DAA trajectory model including maneuvers. 3. Evaluate TCAS/DAA interoperability. 4. Inform final Minimum Operating Performance Standards (MOPS). Flight test scenarios were designed to collect data to directly address the objectives 1-3. Objective 4, inform final MOPS, was a general objective applicable to the UAS in the NAS project as a whole, of which flight test is a subset. This report presents analysis results completed in support of the UAS in the NAS project FT3 data review conducted on October 20, 2015. Due to time constraints and, to a lesser extent, TCAS data collection issues, objective 3 was not evaluated in this analysis.

  3. MPI, HPF or OpenMP: A Study with the NAS Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Hao-Qiang; Frumkin, Michael; Hribar, Michelle; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Porting applications to new high performance parallel and distributed platforms is a challenging task. Writing parallel code by hand is time consuming and costly, but the task can be simplified by high level languages and would even better be automated by parallelizing tools and compilers. The definition of HPF (High Performance Fortran, based on data parallel model) and OpenMP (based on shared memory parallel model) standards has offered great opportunity in this respect. Both provide simple and clear interfaces to language like FORTRAN and simplify many tedious tasks encountered in writing message passing programs. In our study we implemented the parallel versions of the NAS Benchmarks with HPF and OpenMP directives. Comparison of their performance with the MPI implementation and pros and cons of different approaches will be discussed along with experience of using computer-aided tools to help parallelize these benchmarks. Based on the study,potentials of applying some of the techniques to realistic aerospace applications will be presented

  4. Photoluminescence study of Be acceptors in GaInNAs epilayers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Y.; Barman, B.; Scrace, T.; Petrou, A.; Fukuda, M.; Sellers, I. R.; Leroux, M.; Khalfioui, M. A.

    2014-03-01

    We have studied the photoluminescence (PL) spectra from MBE grown GaInNAs epilayers doped p-type with Beryllium acceptors. The measurements were carried out in the 5 K - 70 K temperature range and in magnetic fields (B) up to 7 tesla. The PL spectra contain two features at T = 5 K: The exciton at 1093 meV and a second broader feature at 1058 meV. The intensity of this feature decreases with increasing temperature and disappears completely by 70K while the excitonic feature persists. The emission at 1058meV is identified as the conduction band to Beryllium acceptor transition. If we take into account the binding energy of the exciton [3] we get a value of 23 meV for the Beryllium acceptor binding energy. The acceptor related transition was studied as a function of magnetic field; the energy of this transition has a linear dependence on B with a slope of 055 meV/T. Research supported by Amethyst Research In. through the State of Oklahoma, ONAP program.

  5. UAS Integration into the NAS: Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Delegation of Separation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn; Kenny, Caitlin Ailis

    2012-01-01

    FAA Modernization and Reform Act of 2012 mandates UAS integration in the NAS by 2015. Operators must be able to safely maneuver UAS to maintain separation and collision avoidance. Delegated Separation is defined as the transfer of responsibility for maintaining separation between aircraft or vehicles from the air navigation service provider to the relevant flight operator, and will likely begin in sparsely trafficked areas before moving to more heavily populated airspace. As UAS operate primarily in areas with lower traffic density and perform maneuvers routinely that are currently managed through special handling, they have the advantage of becoming an early adopter of delegated separation. This experiment will examine if UAS are capable of performing delegated separation in 5 nm horizontal and 1000 ft vertical distances under two delegation conditions. In Extended Delegation, ATC are in charge of identifying problems and delegating to pilot identification and implementation of the solution and monitoring. In Full Delegation, the pilots are responsible for all tasks related to separation assurance: identification of problems and solutions, implementation and monitoring.

  6. MPI, HPF or OpenMP: A Study with the NAS Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, H.; Frumkin, M.; Hribar, M.; Waheed, A.; Yan, J.; Saini, Subhash (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Porting applications to new high performance parallel and distributed platforms is a challenging task. Writing parallel code by hand is time consuming and costly, but this task can be simplified by high level languages and would even better be automated by parallelizing tools and compilers. The definition of HPF (High Performance Fortran, based on data parallel model) and OpenMP (based on shared memory parallel model) standards has offered great opportunity in this respect. Both provide simple and clear interfaces to language like FORTRAN and simplify many tedious tasks encountered in writing message passing programs. In our study, we implemented the parallel versions of the NAS Benchmarks with HPF and OpenMP directives. Comparison of their performance with the MPI implementation and pros and cons of different approaches will be discussed along with experience of using computer-aided tools to help parallelize these benchmarks. Based on the study, potentials of applying some of the techniques to realistic aerospace applications will be presented.

  7. 1-eV GaInNAs solar cells for ultrahigh-frequency multijunction devices

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, D.J.; Geisz, J.F.; Kurtz, S.R.; Olson, J.M.

    1998-09-01

    The authors demonstrate working prototypes of a GaInNAs-based solar cell lattice-matched to GaAs with photoresponse down to 1 eV. This device is intended for use as the third junction of future-generation ultrahigh-efficiency three- and four-junction devices. Under the AM1.5 direct spectrum with all the light higher in energy than the GaAs band gap filtered out, the prototypes have open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.35 to 0.44 V, short-circuit currents of 1.8 mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factors from 61--66%. The short-circuit currents are of principal concern: the internal quantum efficiencies rise only to about 0.2. The authors discuss the short diffusion lengths which are the reason for this low photocurrent. As a partial workaround for the poor diffusion lengths, they demonstrate a depletion-width-enhanced variation of one of the prototype devices that grades off decreased voltage for increased photocurrent, with a short-circuit current of 6.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and an open-circuit voltage of 0.29 V.

  8. Air Traffic Controller Performance and Acceptability of Multiple UAS in a Simulated NAS Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vu, Kim-Phuong L.; Strybel, Thomas; Chiappe, Dan; Morales, Greg; Battiste, Vernol; Shively, Robert Jay

    2014-01-01

    Previously, we showed that air traffic controllers (ATCos) rated UAS pilot verbal response latencies as acceptable when a 1.5 s delay was added to the UAS pilot responses, but a 5 s delay was rated as mostly unacceptable. In the present study we determined whether a 1.5 s added delay in the UAS pilots' verbal communications would affect ATCos interactions with UAS and other conventional aircraft when the number and speed of the UAS were manipulated. Eight radar-certified ATCos participated in this simulation. The ATCos managed a medium altitude sector containing arrival aircraft, en route aircraft, and one to four UAS. The UAS were conducting a surveillance mission and flew at either a "slow" or "fast" speed. We measured both UAS and conventional pilots' verbal communication latencies, and obtained ATCos' acceptability ratings for these latencies. Although the UAS pilot response latencies were longer than those of conventional pilots, the ATCos rated UAS pilot verbal communication latencies to be as acceptable as those of conventional pilots. Because the overall traffic load within the sector was held constant, ATCos only performed slightly worse when multiple UAS were in their sector compared to when only one UAS was in the sector. Implications of these findings for UAS integration in the NAS are discussed.

  9. Enhancement of photocurrent in GaInNAs solar cells using Ag/Cu double-layer back reflector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aho, Timo; Aho, Arto; Tukiainen, Antti; Polojärvi, Ville; Salminen, Turkka; Raappana, Marianna; Guina, Mircea

    2016-12-01

    The effect of a Ag/Cu-based double-layer back reflector on current generation in GaInNAs single-junction solar cell is reported. Compared to Ti/Au reflector, the use of Ag/Cu led to a 28% enhancement of short-circuit current density, attaining a value of ˜14 mA/cm2 at AM1.5D (1000 W/m2) under a GaAs filter. The enhanced current generation is in line with requirements for current-matching in GaInP/GaAs/GaInNAs triple-junction solar cells. The Ag/Cu reflectors also had a low contact resistivity of the order of 10-6 Ω.cm2 and none of the samples exhibited notable peeling of metals in the adhesion tests. Moreover, no discernible diffusion of the metals into the semiconductor was observed after thermal annealing at 200 °C.

  10. Photoconductivity and photoluminescence under bias in GaInNAs/GaAs MQW p-i-n structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Hagir M.; Royall, Ben; Mazzucato, Simone; Balkan, Naci

    2012-09-01

    The low temperature photoluminescence under bias (PLb) and the photoconductivity (PC) of a p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well sample have been investigated. Under optical excitation with photons of energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, PC and PLb results show a number of step-like increases when the sample is reverse biased. The nature of these steps, which depends upon the temperature, exciting wavelength and intensity and the number of quantum wells (QWs) in the device, is explained in terms of thermionic emission and negative charge accumulation due to the low confinement of holes in GaInNAs QWs. At high temperature, thermal escape from the wells becomes much more dominant and the steps smear out.

  11. Photoconductivity and photoluminescence under bias in GaInNAs/GaAs MQW p-i-n structures.

    PubMed

    Khalil, Hagir M; Royall, Ben; Mazzucato, Simone; Balkan, Naci

    2012-09-28

    The low temperature photoluminescence under bias (PLb) and the photoconductivity (PC) of a p-i-n GaInNAs/GaAs multiple quantum well sample have been investigated. Under optical excitation with photons of energy greater than the GaAs bandgap, PC and PLb results show a number of step-like increases when the sample is reverse biased. The nature of these steps, which depends upon the temperature, exciting wavelength and intensity and the number of quantum wells (QWs) in the device, is explained in terms of thermionic emission and negative charge accumulation due to the low confinement of holes in GaInNAs QWs. At high temperature, thermal escape from the wells becomes much more dominant and the steps smear out.

  12. Multivariate control charts based on net analyte signal (NAS) and Raman spectroscopy for quality control of carbamazepine.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Werickson Fortunato de Carvalho; Poppi, Ronei Jesus

    2011-10-31

    Raman spectroscopy and control charts based on the net analyte signal (NAS) were applied to polymorphic characterization of carbamazepine. Carbamazepine presents four polymorphic forms: I-IV (dihydrate). X-ray powder diffraction was used as a reference technique. The control charts were built generating three charts: the NAS chart that corresponds to the analyte of interest (form III in this case), the interference chart that corresponds to the contribution of other compounds in the sample and the residual chart that corresponds to nonsystematic variations. For each chart, statistical limits were developed using samples within the quality specifications. It was possible to identify the different polymorphic forms of carbamazepine present in pharmaceutical formulations. Thus, an alternative method for the quality monitoring of the carbamazepine polymorphic forms after the crystallization process is presented.

  13. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project - Gen-4 and Gen-5 Radio Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. This prototype radio is being used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current plans for the prototype radio development.

  14. Nitrogen-concentration control in GaNAs/AlGaAs quantum wells using nitrogen δ-doping technique

    SciTech Connect

    Mano, Takaaki; Jo, Masafumi; Kuroda, Takashi; Noda, Takeshi; Sugimoto, Yoshimasa; Sakuma, Yoshiki; Elborg, Martin; Sakoda, Kazuaki

    2014-05-15

    GaNAs/Al{sub 0.35}Ga{sub 0.65}As multiple quantum wells (MQWs) with nitrogen δ-doping were fabricated on GaAs (100) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. High controllability of nitrogen-concentrations in the MQWs was achieved by tuning nitrogen δ-doping time. The maximum nitrogen concentration in the MQWs was 2.8%. The MQWs exhibit intense, narrow photoluminescence emission.

  15. NASA's UAS Integration into the NAS: A Report on the Human Systems Integration Phase 1 Simulation Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, R. Conrad; Shively, R. Jay

    2014-01-01

    In 2011 the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) began a five-year Project to address the technical barriers related to routine access of Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) in the National Airspace System (NAS). Planned in two phases, the goal of the first phase was to lay the foundations for the Project by identifying those barriers and key issues to be addressed to achieve integration. Phase 1 activities were completed two years into the five-year Project. The purpose of this paper is to review activities within the Human Systems Integration (HSI) subproject in Phase 1 toward its two objectives: 1) develop GCS guidelines for routine UAS access to the NAS, and 2) develop a prototype display suite within an existing Ground Control Station (GCS). The first objective directly addresses a critical barrier for UAS integration into the NAS - a lack of GCS design standards or requirements. First, the paper describes the initial development of a prototype GCS display suite and supporting simulation software capabilities. Then, three simulation experiments utilizing this simulation architecture are summarized. The first experiment sought to determine a baseline performance of UAS pilots operating in civil airspace under current instrument flight rules for manned aircraft. The second experiment examined the effect of currently employed UAS contingency procedures on Air Traffic Control (ATC) participants. The third experiment compared three GCS command and control interfaces on UAS pilot response times in compliance with ATC clearances. The authors discuss how the results of these and future simulation and flight-testing activities contribute to the development of GCS guidelines to support the safe integration of UAS into the NAS. Finally, the planned activities for Phase 2, including an integrated human-in-the-loop simulation and two flight tests are briefly described.

  16. Performance of BLAS 3, FFTs and NAS Parallel Benchmarks on Cray T3D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Simon, Horst D.; Cooper, D. M. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Recently, a Cray T3D Emulator has been made available on the Cray Y-MP and C90 computers. The Pittsburgh Supercomputer Center has acquired a CRAY T3D system and many other centers like Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) will have it by the end of 1994. The Cray T3D system is the firstphase system in Cray Research, Inc.'s (CRI) three-phase massively parallel processing (MPP) program. This system features a heterogeneous architecture that closely couples DEC's ALPHA microprocessors and CRI's parallel-vector technology, i.e. the Cray Y-MP and Cray C90. The Cray T3D Emulator will give prospective users a valuable experience in developing high performance applications on the MPP system. This emulator runs programs written in CRI's MPP Fortran programming model (data sharing and work sharing) or Parallel Virtual Machine (PVM) programming model. It will help the users to study data layout, data locality, and data reference patterns thereby providing feedback which will enable one to write more efficient parallel codes. An overview of the Cray T3D hardware, software, and three of its available programming models is presented.The Cray Fortran Programming Model comprising (a) Data Sharing, (b) Worksharing and (c) Message Passing, will be discussed with examples. We have also implemented distributed BLAS 3 (matrix-matrix multiplication) in data parallel model (using only CSHIFT); worksharing model using block distribution and collapsed distribution; and message passing model using PVM. We have also implemented 2D and 3D FFTs for radix-2 using PVM. The performance of NAS Parallel 'Benchmarks (NPB) on CRAY T3D will be compared with other highly parallel systems such as CM-5, Paragon, C90 etc.

  17. Heritability of usual alcohol intoxication and hangover in male twins: the NAS-NRC Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Wu, Sheng-Hui; Guo, Qin; Viken, Richard J; Reed, Terry; Dai, Jun

    2014-08-01

    Alcohol consumption is influenced by heritable factors. The genetic influence on usual high-density drinking, including alcohol intoxication and hangover, is unknown. We aim to estimate the heritability of usual high-density drinking. A total of 13,511 male twins in this cross-sectional study were included from the National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council (NAS-NRC) Twin Registry. Data on the frequency of alcohol intoxication and alcohol hangover over the past year, that is, usual high-density drinking (phenotypes), were collected through a self-administered questionnaire when twins were middle-aged in 1972. Structural equation modeling was used to estimate the variance components of phenotypes. The mean of the frequency of usual high-density drinking in the entire twin population was 0.16 times per month for intoxication and 0.18 times per month for hangover. The heritability of usual alcohol intoxication was 50.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 46.2 to 55.0) before and 49.9% (95% CI 45.3 to 54.2) after the body mass index (BMI) adjustment. The heritability of usual hangover was 55.4% (95% CI 51.2 to 58.6) before and 54.8% (95% CI 50.6 to 58.8) after adjustment for BMI. Unshared environmental factors between co-twins explained the remaining variance in alcohol intoxication and in hangover. Both genetic and unshared environmental factors have important influences on usual alcohol intoxication and hangover. These findings are important in understanding the occurrence of and developing interventions for usual high-density drinking. Copyright © 2014 by the Research Society on Alcoholism.

  18. Suppression of non-radiative surface recombination by N incorporation in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shula L.; Chen, Weimin M.; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Buyanova, Irina A.

    2015-01-01

    III-V semiconductor nanowires (NWs) such as GaAs NWs form an interesting artificial materials system promising for applications in advanced optoelectronic and photonic devices, thanks to the advantages offered by the 1D architecture and the possibility to combine it with the main-stream silicon technology. Alloying of GaAs with nitrogen can further enhance performance and extend device functionality via band-structure and lattice engineering. However, due to a large surface-to-volume ratio, III-V NWs suffer from severe non-radiative carrier recombination at/near NWs surfaces that significantly degrades optical quality. Here we show that increasing nitrogen composition in novel GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NWs can strongly suppress the detrimental surface recombination. This conclusion is based on our experimental finding that lifetimes of photo-generated free excitons and free carriers increase with increasing N composition, as revealed from our time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) studies. This is accompanied by a sizable enhancement in the PL intensity of the GaAs/GaNAs core/shell NWs at room temperature. The observed N-induced suppression of the surface recombination is concluded to be a result of an N-induced modification of the surface states that are responsible for the nonradiative recombination. Our results, therefore, demonstrate the great potential of incorporating GaNAs in III-V NWs to achieve efficient nano-scale light emitters. PMID:26100755

  19. Progress in GaInNAs/GaAs long-wavelength vertical-cavity surface-emitting lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Michael C.; Kondow, Masahiko; Kitatani, Takeshi; Nakahara, Kouji; Tamura, K.; Yazawa, Yoshiaki; Okai, Makoto O.; Inoue, Hiroaki; Uomi, Kazuhisa

    1998-04-01

    GaInNAs is a novel laser diode active layer material which holds great promise for low-cost optical fiber transmission applications requiring emission wavelengths near 1.3 micrometers . GaInNAs permits the realization of a long-wavelength vertical-cavity laser grown directly on a GaAs substrate. Continuous-wave room-temperature photo-pumped laser oscillation has been demonstrated in vertical cavity laser designs employing single or multiple GaInNAs quantum wells, with lasing wavelengths as long as 1.256 micrometers . Electrically-injected devices have achieved pulsed operation at room temperature and above, with a minimum threshold current density of 3.1 kA/cm2, slope efficiency above 0.04 W/A, and output power above 5 mW for 45 micrometers -diameter devices. Threshold current has exhibited minimal dependence on temperature from 20 degrees C to 60 degrees C, and laser oscillation is observed for temperatures as high as 95 degrees C.

  20. Strain relaxation induced surface morphology of heterogeneous GaInNAs layers grown on GaAs substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelczuk, Ł.; Jóźwiak, G.; Moczała, M.; Dłużewski, P.; Dąbrowska-Szata, M.; Gotszalk, T. P.

    2017-07-01

    The partially-relaxed heterogeneous GaInNAs layers grown on GaAs substrate by atmospheric pressure vapor phase epitaxy (AP-MOVPE) were investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The planar-view TEM image shows a regular 2D network of misfit dislocations oriented in two orthogonal <1 1 0> crystallographic directions at the (0 0 1) layer interface. Moreover, the cross-sectional view TEM image reveals InAs-rich and V-shaped precipitates in the near surface region of the GaInNAs epitaxial layer. The resultant undulating surface morphology, known as a cross-hatch pattern, is formed as observed by AFM. The numerical analysis of the AFM image of the GaInNAs layer surface with the well-defined cross-hatch morphology enabled us to determine a lower bound of actual density of misfit dislocations. However, a close correspondence between the asymmetric distribution of interfacial misfit dislocations and undulating surface morphology is observed.

  1. Composition Dependence of Thermal Annealing Effect on 1.3 μm GaInNAs/GaAs Quantum Well Lasers Grown by Chemical Beam Epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Shigeki; Miyamoto, Tomoyuki; Kageyama, Takeo; Ikenaga, Yoshihiko; Arai, Masakazu; Koyama, Fumio; Iga, Kenichi

    2001-11-01

    The thermal annealing process is effective to improve the optical quality of GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs). However, a blue shift of the emission peak wavelength occurs during the annealing and it is strongly related to the annealing condition and the composition of GaInNAs/GaAs QWs. In this study, we investigated the dependences of both the annealing condition and the composition on the lasing characteristics of 1.3 μm GaInNAs/GaAs QW lasers.

  2. Evaluation of the binding of four anti-tumor Casiopeínas® to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Correia, Isabel; Borovic, Sladjana; Cavaco, Isabel; Matos, Cristina P; Roy, Somnath; Santos, Hugo M; Fernandes, Luz; Capelo, José L; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena; Pessoa, João Costa

    2017-10-01

    The metal complexes designated by Casiopeínas® are mixed-ligand Cu(II)-compounds some of them having promising antineoplastic properties. We report studies of binding of Cu(glycinato)(4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) (Cas-II-Gly (1)), Cu(acetylacetonato)(4,7-dimethyl-1,10-phenanthroline) (Cas-III-Ea (2)), Cu(glycinato)(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) (Cas-IV-Gly (3)) and Cu(acetylacetonato)(4,4'-dimethyl-2,2'-bipyridine) (Cas-III-ia (4)) to human serum albumin (HSA) by circular dichroism (CD), Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) and fluorescence spectroscopy. The results indicate that HSA may bind up to three molecules of the tested Casiopeínas. This is confirmed by inductively coupled plasma - atomic absorption spectroscopy measurements of samples of HSA-Casiopeínas after passing by adequate size-exclusion columns. The binding of Cas-II-Gly to HSA was also confirmed by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric experiments. In the physiological range of concentrations the Casiopeínas form 1:1 adducts with HSA, with conditional binding constants of ca. 1×10(9) (1), 4×10(7) (2), 1×10(6) (3) and 2×10(5) (4), values determined from the CD spectra measured, and the fluorescence emission spectra indicates that the binding takes place close to the Trp214 residue. Overall, the data confirm that these Casiopeínas may bind to HSA and may be transported in blood serum by this protein; this might allow some selective tumor targeting, particularly in the case of Cas-II-Gly. In this work we also discuss aspects associated to the reliability of the frequently used methodologies to determine binding constants based on the measurement of fluorescence emission spectra of solutions containing low concentrations of proteins such as HSA and BSA, by titrations with solutions of metal complexes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguides grown by radio frequency nitrogen plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, K. H.; Yoon, S. F.; Loke, W. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Xu, Z.; Ng, T. K.; Lew, K. L.; Saadsaoud, N.; Zegaoui, M.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2008-03-17

    We demonstrate a 1.55 {mu}m GaAs/GaNAsSb/GaAs optical waveguide grown by molecular beam epitaxy as an alternative to the AlGaAs/GaAs system. The 0.4-{mu}m-thick GaNAsSb guiding layer contains {approx}3.5% of N and 9% of Sb, resulting in optical band gap of 0.88 eV. The refractive index of the GaNAsSb layer was measured from 800 to 1700 nm. The GaNAsSb layer has a refractive index value of 3.42 at 1.55 {mu}m wavelength. The propagation loss measured using the Fabry-Perot resonance method was found to be affected by nitrogen-related defect absorption.

  4. Física e Arte nas Estações do Ano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pessôa Queiroz, Glória; da Conceição Barbosa Lima, Maria; Navarro Vasconcellos das Mercês, Maria

    2004-12-01

    The paper deals with the subject of the Four Seasons, exploring elements of Science and the Art in order to motivate students or public of museums of science and technology to understand it from their current cultural experiences and of old times. Physics joins to Astronomy to explain the phenomenon, while the use of Music and Painting make possible the immersion in the subject in way to many trips to the imagination capable to awake emotions.A proposal didactic is presented and justified for some consensus of the research in the area of teaching-learning of science, since that related to the persistent alternative conceptions concerning the causes of the changes observed at the different times of the year until the qualitative modelling of phenomena that appeals three-dimensional pedagogical models. Such proposal was developed in the activity named " Hiper interesting Talk: The Four Seasons, Science and Art" in the first Sunday of August/2003 in the Museum of Astronomy, MAST. O artigo trata do tema das Estações do Ano, explorando elementos da Ciência e da Arte como forma de motivar estudantes ou público de museus de ciência e tecnologia a compreendê-lo a partir de vivências culturais atuais e de outras épocas. A Física se junta à Astronomia para explicar o fenômeno, enquanto a Música e a Pintura possibilitam a imersão no tema em meio a muitas viagens à imaginação capazes de despertar emoções.Uma proposta didática é apresentada e justificada por consensos das muitas pesquisas na área de ensino-aprendizagem de ciências, desde os que se referem às persistentes concepções alternativas acerca das causas das mudanças observadas nas diferentes épocas do ano até à modelagem qualitativa de fenômenos que recorre a modelos pedagógicos tridimensionais. Tal proposta foi desenvolvida na atividade "Bate papo Hiperinteressante: As Quatro Estações, Ciência e Arte" realizada no primeiro domingo do mês de agosto de 2003 no Museu de Astronomia.

  5. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package: Data Modeling and Sharing Perspective for Development of a Common Operating Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This report documents analyses that were performed in support of Task #3 of Work Package #3 (WP3), ROA Impact on the NAS. The purpose of the overall work package was to determine if there are any serious issues that would prevent or prohibit ROA's flying in the NAS on a routine basis, and if so, what actions should be taken to address them. The purpose of Task #3 was to look at this problem from the perspective of data modeling and sharing.

  6. Minimum Capacity of NaS Battery according to Capacity of PV System in a Microgrid under 30 min Power Balancing Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shimakage, Toyonari; Sone, Akihito; Sumita, Jiro; Kato, Takeyoshi; Suzuoki, Yasuo

    On constructing a microgrid, it is essential to design capacity of photovoltaic power generation (PV) systems and storage batteries in accordance with a control target. In this study, we constructed a simulation model of energy control system in the microgrid used in the demonstration project. By using this model, we investigated the minimum capacity of NaS battery for different PV system capacities for keeping the target power imbalance within ±3% over 30 min. The main results are as follows. The microgrid involving 330-kW PV systems (corresponding to the actual system) needs a NaS battery capacity of at least approximately ±20kW, and PV systems with a capacity up to about 890kW can be integrated in the microgrid with a NaS battery capacity of ±500kW (corresponding to the actual system). We estimated the minimum capacity of NaS battery for different PV system capacities and clarified that the output behavior of the NaS battery and PAFC when supply and demand power imbalance over 30 min. exceeds the ±3% limit. We suggested the improved control model and showed that it is effective in decreasing the minimum capacity of NaS battery, although it has negative effects on the reduction of short-period power flow fluctuation at the grid-connection point.

  7. Incorporating the social dimension into hydrogeochemical investigations for rural development: the Bir Al-Nas approach for socio-hydrogeology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Re, Viviana

    2015-11-01

    A replicable multidisciplinary approach is presented for science-based groundwater management practices: Bir Al-Nas (Bottom-up IntegRated Approach for sustainabLe grouNdwater mAnagement in rural areaS). This approach provides a practical example of the concept of "socio-hydrogeology", a way of incorporating the social dimension into hydrogeological investigations, as reinforced by the translation of the Arabic bir al-nas: "the people's well". To achieve this, hydrogeologists act as "social hydrologists" during their monitoring activities, which often bring them into contact with local communities and end users (and polluters) of water. Not only can they retrieve reliable information about traditional know-how and local issues, but they can also change the public perception of science/scientists to create the basis for mutual collaboration and understanding in view of implementing improved integrated groundwater management. The final outcomes are expected to be an increased awareness of communities at the local level and a clear understanding of their water issues and needs from the very early stages of the investigation. Although the importance of using such methods in groundwater analysis and management is widely recognized, hydrogeological investigations are currently dominated by sectorial approaches that are easier to implement but less sustainable. The pressure of population growth, the shift towards more water-dependent economies, climate change and its impact on water availability will require scientists to use a more integrated approach, such as Bir Al-Nas, when dealing with increasing water pollution and water-scarcity issues.

  8. The CSM testbed software system: A development environment for structural analysis methods on the NAS CRAY-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillian, Ronnie E.; Lotts, Christine G.

    1988-01-01

    The Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Activity at Langley Research Center is developing methods for structural analysis on modern computers. To facilitate that research effort, an applications development environment has been constructed to insulate the researcher from the many computer operating systems of a widely distributed computer network. The CSM Testbed development system was ported to the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulator (NAS) Cray-2, at the Ames Research Center, to provide a high end computational capability. This paper describes the implementation experiences, the resulting capability, and the future directions for the Testbed on supercomputers.

  9. Beyond lithium-ion batteries: A computational study on Na-S and Na-O batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masedi, M. C.; Ngoepe, P. E.; Sithole, H. M.

    2017-02-01

    The first principle pseudopotential calculations based on the Perdew-Burke-Ernzerhof (PBE) form of generalized gradient approximation (GGA) within density functional theory (DFT) has been utilized to investigate the stabilities of insoluble discharge products of oxygen and sulphur in the Na-O and Na-S batteries. Their structural, mechanical and electronic properties were determined. The lattice parameters were well reproduced and agree with the available experimental data. The heats of formation predict that all structures are generally stable and Na2S has the lowest value. The elastic constants suggest that all the structures are mechanically stable which in good agreement with the calculated phonon dispersions.

  10. UAS in the NAS Project: Large-Scale Communication Architecture Simulations with NASA GRC Gen5 Radio Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubat, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    This report provides a description and performance characterization of the large-scale, Relay architecture, UAS communications simulation capability developed for the NASA GRC, UAS in the NAS Project. The system uses a validated model of the GRC Gen5 CNPC, Flight-Test Radio model. Contained in the report is a description of the simulation system and its model components, recent changes made to the system to improve performance, descriptions and objectives of sample simulations used for test and verification, and a sampling and observations of results and performance data.

  11. Electron-irradiation enhanced photoluminescence from GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells subject to thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelescu, E.-M.; Gheorghiu, A.; Dumitrescu, M.; Tukiainen, A.; Jouhti, T.; Hakkarainen, T.; Kudrawiec, R.; Andrzejewski, J.; Misiewicz, J.; Tkachenko, N.; Dhaka, V.D.S.; Lemmetyinen, H.; Pessa, M.

    2004-12-20

    Electron irradiation of a 1.3-{mu}m-GaInNAs/GaAs multi-quantum-well heterostructure, grown by molecular beam epitaxy and subsequently rapid-thermal annealed, is found to induce much stronger photoluminescence than what is observed for an identical as-grown sample upon annealing. Annealing of the irradiated sample also causes a small additional spectral blueshift and reduces alloy potential energy fluctuations at the conduction band minimum. These irradiation-related phenomena are accompanied by small but discernable changes in x-ray diffraction features upon annealing, which indicate compositional and/or structural changes in the quantum wells.

  12. UAS Integration into the NAS: Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations in Support of SC-228 MOPS Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2015-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of the work the Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project has done on detect and avoid (DAA) displays while working on the UAS Integration into the NAS project. Much of the work has been used to support the ongoing development of minimum operational performance standards (MOPS) for UAS by RTCA Special Committee 228. The design and results of three different human-in-the-loop simulations are discussed, with particular emphasis on the role of the UAS pilot in the Self Separation Timeline.

  13. Time-resolved photoluminescence studies of annealed 1.3-μm GaInNAsSb quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (PL) was applied to study the dynamics of carrier recombination in GaInNAsSb quantum wells (QWs) emitting near 1.3 μm and annealed at various temperatures. It was observed that the annealing temperature has a strong influence on the PL decay time, and hence, it influences the optical quality of GaInNAsSb QWs. At low temperatures, the PL decay time exhibits energy dependence (i.e., the decay times change for different energies of emitted photons), which can be explained by the presence of localized states. This energy dependence of PL decay times was fitted by a phenomenological formula, and the average value of E0, which describes the energy distribution of localized states, was extracted from this fit and found to be smallest (E0 = 6 meV) for the QW annealed at 700°C. In addition, the value of PL decay time at the peak energy was compared for all samples. The longest PL decay time (600 ps) was observed for the sample annealed at 700°C. It means that based on the PL dynamics, the optimal annealing temperature for this QW is approximately 700°C. PMID:24533740

  14. Simulation and optimization of current and lattice matching double-junction GaNAsP/Si solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nacer, S.; Aissat, A.

    2016-01-01

    This paper deals with theoretical investigation of the performance of current and lattice matched GaNxAsyP1-x-y/Si double-junction solar cells. The nitrogen and arsenic concentrations ensuring lattice matching to Si are determined. The band gap of GaNAsP is calculated using the band anti-crossing model. Calculations were performed under 1-sun AM1.5 using the one diode ideal model. Impact of minor carrier lifetime and surface recombination in the top sub-cell on the cell performances is analyzed. Optimum compositions of the top sub-cell have been identified (x = 4.5%, y = 11.5% and Eg = 1.68 eV). The simulation results predict, for the optimized GaNAsP/Si double-junction solar cell, a short circuit current Jsc = 20 mA/cm2, an open circuit voltage Voc = 1.95 V, and a conversion efficiency η = 37.5%.

  15. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry).

    PubMed

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-06-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16,000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI.

  16. The effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of sodium sulfur (NaS) cells: Planar vs. tubular

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Goun; Park, Yoon-Cheol; Lee, Younki; Cho, Namung; Kim, Chang-Soo; Jung, Keeyoung

    2016-09-01

    Two sodium sulfur (NaS) cells, one with a planar design and the other with a tubular design, were subject to discharge-charge cycles in order to investigate the effect of cathode felt geometries on electrochemical characteristics of NaS cells. Their discharge-charge behaviors over 200 cycles were evaluated at the operation temperature of 350 °C with the current densities of 100 mA cm-2 for discharge and 80 mA cm-2 for charge. The results showed that the deviation from theoretical open circuit voltage changes of a planar cell was smaller than those of a tubular cell resulting in potential specific power loss reduction during operation. In order to understand the effect, a three dimensional statistically representative matrix for a cathode felt has been generated using experimentally measured data. It turns out that the area specific fiber number density in the outer side area of a tubular cathode felt is smaller than that of a planar felt resulting in occurrence of larger voltage drops via retarded convection of cathode melts during cell operation.

  17. Cohort Profile: The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry)

    PubMed Central

    Gatz, Margaret; Harris, Jennifer R; Kaprio, Jaakko; McGue, Matt; Smith, Nicholas L; Snieder, Harold; Spiro, Avron; Butler, David A

    2015-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council Twin Registry (NAS-NRC Twin Registry) is a comprehensive registry of White male twin pairs born in the USA between 1917 and 1927, both of the twins having served in the military. The purpose was medical research and ultimately improved clinical care. The cohort was assembled in the early 1960s with identification of approximately 16 000 twin pairs, review of service records, a brief mailed questionnaire assessing zygosity, and a health survey largely comparable to questionnaires used at that time with Scandinavian twin registries. Subsequent large-scale data collection occurred in 1974, 1985 and 1998, repeating the health survey and including information on education, employment history and earnings. Self-reported data have been supplemented with mortality, disability and medical data through record linkage. Potential collaborators should access the study website [http://www.iom.edu/Activities/Veterans/TwinsStudy.aspx] or e-mail the Medical Follow-up Agency at [Twins@nas.edu]. Questionnaire data are being prepared for future archiving with the National Archive of Computerized Data on Aging (NACDA) at the Inter-University Consortium for Political and Social Research (ICPSR), University of Michigan, MI. PMID:25183748

  18. The role of N-H complexes in the control of localized center recombination in hydrogenated GaInNAs (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiteside, Vincent R.; Fukuda, Miwa; Estes, Nicholas J.; Wang, Bin; Brown, Collin R.; Hossain, Khalid; Golding, Terry D.; Leroux, Mathieu; Al Khalfioui, Mohamed; Tischler, Joseph G.; Ellis, Chase T.; Glaser, Evan R.; Sellers, Ian R.

    2017-04-01

    A significant improvement in the quality of dilute nitrides has recently led to the ability to reveal depletion widths in excess of 1 μm at 1 eV [1]. The real viability of dilute nitrides for PV has been recently demonstrated with the reporting of a record efficiency of 43.5% from a 4J MJSC including GaInNAs(Sb) [2]. Despite the progress made, these materials remain poorly understood and work continues to improve their lifetime and reproducibility. We have investigated the possibility of improving the functionality of GaInNAs using hydrogenation to selectively passivate mid-gap defects, while preserving the substitutional nitrogen. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements of the intrinsic region of a GaInNAs p-i-n solar cell show a classic "s-shape" associated with localization prior to hydrogenation. No sign of this "s-shape" is evident after hydrogenation, despite the retention of substitutional nitrogen as evidenced by the band absorption of 1 eV. The absence of an "s-shape" at low-temperature in hydrogenated GaInNAs is rather curious since, even in high quality nitrides this behavior is due to the emission of isoelectronic centers created via N-As substitution [3]. The potential origins of this behavior will be discussed. The promise of this process for GaInNAs solar cells was demonstrated by a three-fold improvement in the performance of a hydrogenated device with respect to an as-grown reference [4]. [1] "Wide-depletion width GaInNAs solar cells by thermal annealing," I. R. Sellers, W-S. Tan, K. Smith, S. Hooper, S. Day and M. Kauer, Applied Physics Letters 99, 151111 (2011) [2] "43.5% efficient lattice matched solar cells," M. Wiemer, V. Sabnis, and H. Yuen, Proc. SPIE 8108, 810804 (2011) [3]"Probing the nature of carrier localization in GaInNAs, epilayers using optical methods," T. Ysai, B. Barman, T. Scarce, G. Lindberg, M. Fukuda, V. R. Whiteside, J. C. Keay, M. B. Johnson, I. R. Sellers, M. Al Khalfioui, M. Leroux, B. A. Weinstein and A

  19. Remotely Operated Aircraft (ROA) Impact on the National Airspace System (NAS) Work Package, 2005: Composite Report on FAA Flight Plan and Operational Evaluation Plan. Version 7.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this document is to present the findings that resulted from a high-level analysis and evaluation of the following documents: (1) The OEP (Operational Evolution Plan) Version 7 -- a 10-year plan for operational improvements to increase capacity and efficiency in U.S. air travel and transport and other use of domestic airspace. The OEP is the FAA commitment to operational improvements. It is outcome driven, with clear lines of accountability within FAA organizations. The OEP concentrates on operational solutions and integrates safety, certification, procedures, staffing, equipment, avionics and research; (2) The Draft Flight Plan 2006 through 2010 -- a multi-year strategic effort, setting a course for the FAA through 2001, to provide the safest and most efficient air transportation system in the world; (3) The NAS System Architecture Version 5 -- a blueprint for modernizing the NAS and improving NAS services and capabilities through the year 2015; and (4) The NAS-SR-1000 System Requirements Specification (NASSRS) -- a compilation of requirements which describe the operational capabilities for the NAS. The analysis is particularly focused on examining the documents for relevance to existing and/or planned future UAV operations. The evaluation specifically focuses on potential factors that could materially affect the development of a commercial ROA industry, such as: (1) Design limitations of the CNS/ATM system, (2) Human limitations, The information presented was taken from program specifications or program office lead personnel.

  20. Three of four GlnR binding sites are essential for GlnR-mediated activation of transcription of the Amycolatopsis mediterranei nas operon.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wang, Jing-Zhi; Shao, Zhi-Hui; Yuan, Hua; Lu, Yin-Hua; Jiang, Wei-Hong; Zhao, Guo-Ping; Wang, Jin

    2013-06-01

    In Amycolatopsis mediterranei U32, genes responsible for nitrate assimilation formed one operon, nasACKBDEF, whose transcription is induced by the addition of nitrate. Here, we characterized GlnR as a direct transcriptional activator for the nas operon. The GlnR-protected DNA sequences in the promoter region of the nas operon were characterized by DNase I footprinting assay, the previously deduced Streptomyces coelicolor double 22-bp GlnR binding consensus sequences comprising a1, b1, a2, and b2 sites were identified, and the sites were then mutated individually to test their roles in both the binding of GlnR in vitro and the GlnR-mediated transcriptional activation in vivo. The results clearly showed that only three GlnR binding sites (a1, b1, and b2 sites) were required by GlnR for its specific binding to the nas promoter region and efficient activation of the transcription of the nas operon in U32, while the a2 site seemed unnecessary.

  1. Effects of insertion of strain-engineering Ga(In)NAs layers on optical properties of InAs/GaAs quantum dots for high-efficiency solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelescu, Emil-Mihai; Polojärvi, Ville; Schramm, Andreas; Tukiainen, Antti; Aho, Arto; Zhang, Wenxin; Puustinen, Janne; Salmi, Joel; Guina, Mircea

    2016-02-01

    We report study on stacked InAs/GaNAs quantum dots heterostructures with dilute nitride GaInNAs strain mediating layers embedded in GaAs p-i-n solar cell structure. The insertion of GaInNAs strain mediating layers in the vicinity of the strain compensated InAs/GaNAs quantum dots heterostructures enhances their surface density, improves and significantly red shifts their light emission. Embedding a stack of the strain-mediated InAs/GaInNAs/GaNAs quantum dots in the i region of a GaAs p-i-n solar cell leads also to a red shift of the absorption edge of the solar cells and improves the solar cell photogenerated currents at longer wavelengths beyond 1200 nm.

  2. GaNAsSb/GaAs waveguide photodetector with response up to 1.6 μm grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loke, W. K.; Yoon, S. F.; Xu, Z.; Tan, K. H.; Ng, T. K.; Sim, Y. K.; Wicaksono, S.; Saadsaoud, N.; Decoster, D.; Chazelas, J.

    2008-08-01

    We present a GaNAsSb/GaAs p-i-n waveguide photodetector operating in the 1.0-1.6 μm wavelength range with enhanced photoresponsivity compared to a top-illuminated photodetector fabricated using the same material system. The device consists of a strained GaNAsSb layer, with N and Sb contents of 3.5% and 18%, respectively, sandwiched between GaAs:Si (n-type) and GaAs:C (p-type) layers. X-ray reciprocal space map of the GaNAsSb layer before device fabrication showed that the film relaxation is ˜1%. At 1.55 μm, photoresponsivities of 0.25 and 0.29 A/W for devices with 6.5 and 10 μm ridge width, respectively, was demonstrated.

  3. Growth of high N containing GaNAs/GaP/BGaAsP multi quantum well structures on Si (0 0 1) substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, P.; Diederich, M.; Jandieri, K.; Stolz, W.

    2017-06-01

    GaNAs/GaP/BGaAsP-multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWH) were deposited pseudomorphically strained on exactly oriented (0 0 1) Si-substrate plus thin GaP buffer by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The compressive strain of the GaNAs QW material enabled N fractions as high as 16.8%. Structural analyses show that the structures exhibit high crystalline quality for moderate strain values of 0.6% to 2.2%. Room temperature PL was obtained from samples with up to 11% N with an emission wavelength of up to 1130 nm. At low temperatures (15 K) even layers with 15% N showed photoluminescence from the GaNAs QW expanding the emission wavelength range to 1300 nm.

  4. Transmission electron microscopy study of GaInNAs(Sb) thin films grown by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, R.; Huang, J. Y.; Miyashita, N.; Matsubara, K.; Okada, Y.; Ponce, F. A.

    2011-11-01

    The quaternary GaInNAs is a promising material system for use in next generation multijunction photovoltaic devices. We have investigated the effect of introducing antimony on the growth by using transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray (EDX) spectroscopy. Two-dimensional growth was observed in GaInNAs films with striation features associated with compositional fluctuation and nanometer scale elemental segregation on the growth front. On the contrary, GaInNAsSb films exhibit uniform contrast throughout. EDX profile indicates uniform compositional distribution, as antimony atoms suppress the surface mobilites of adatoms resulting in a lower probability to generate the favored bonds, such as Ga-N and In-As.

  5. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project: KDP-A for Phase 2 Minimum Operational Performance Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grindle, Laurie; Hackenberg, Davis L.

    2016-01-01

    UAS Integration in the NAS Project has: a) Developed Technical Challenges that are crucial to UAS integration, aligned with NASA's Strategic Plan and Thrusts, and support FAA standards development. b) Demonstrated rigorous project management processes through the execution of previous phases. c) Defined Partnership Plans. d) Established path to KDP-C. Request approval of Technical Challenges, execution of partnerships and plans, and execution of near-term FY17 activities. There is an increasing need to fly UAS in the NAS to perform missions of vital importance to National Security and Defense, Emergency Management, and Science. There is also an emerging need to enable commercial applications such as cargo transport (e.g. FedEx). Unencumbered NAS Access for Civil/Commercial UAS. Provide research findings, utilizing simulation and flight tests, to support the development and validation of DAA and C2 technologies necessary for integrating Unmanned Aircraft Systems into the National Airspace System.

  6. Incorporation model of N into GaInNAs alloys grown by radio-frequency plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Aho, A.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Tukiainen, A.; Puustinen, J.; Guina, M.

    2014-12-07

    We present a Maxwell-Boltzmann electron energy distribution based model for the incorporation rate of nitrogen into GaInNAs grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a radio frequency plasma source. Nitrogen concentration is predicted as a function of radio-frequency system primary resistance, N flow, and RF power, and group III growth rate. The semi-empirical model is shown to be repeatable with a maximum error of 6%. The model was validated for two different MBE systems by growing GaInNAs on GaAs(100) with variable nitrogen composition of 0%–6%.

  7. Selective intermixing of Ga(In)NAs/GaAs quantum well structures using SiO2 encapsulation and rapid thermal annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yinqiang; Li, Lianhe; Pan, Zhong; Lin, Yaowang; Wang, Qiming

    2001-10-01

    The quantum well intermixing of Ga(In)NAs/GaAs simple quantum well (SQW) using SiO2 encapsulation and rapid thermal annealing has been studied. Obvious enhanced intermixing of GaInNAs/GaAs SQW was observed due to the localized SiO2 capping layer and RTA at temperature between 650° and 900&°. The selective intermixing strongly depends on N composition and In composition. An obvious selective intermixing had been found in the samples with small N composition and/or high In composition.

  8. Carrier dynamics in Ga(NAsP)/Si multi-quantum well heterostructures with varying well thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shakfa, M. K.; Woscholski, R.; Gies, S.; Wegele, T.; Wiemer, M.; Ludewig, P.; Jandieri, K.; Baranovskii, S. D.; Stolz, W.; Volz, K.; Heimbrodt, W.; Koch, M.

    2016-05-01

    Time-resolved photoluminescence (TR-PL) measurements have been performed in Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP) multi-quantum well heterostructures (MQWHs) with different well thicknesses. The studied structures have been pseudomorphically grown on Si substrates by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) with an N content of about 7%. Experimental results reveal a shortening in the PL decay time with increasing QW thickness, meanwhile, accompanied by a decrease in the PL intensity. We attribute this behavior to an increasing non-radiative recombination rate for broader QWs which arises from an increasing number of defects in the QW material. The emission-energy distribution of the PL decay time is studied at various temperatures. The PL decay time strongly depends on the emission energy at low temperatures and becomes emission-energy-independent close to room temperature. This is discussed in terms of the carrier localization in the studied structures.

  9. 1.22 {mu}m GaInNAs Saturable Absorber Mirrors with Tailored Recovery Time

    SciTech Connect

    Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea; Korpijaervi, Ville-Markus; Tukiainen, Antti; Kivistoe, Samuli; Pessa, Markus; Marcinkevicius, Saulius

    2010-11-10

    The effect of in-situ N-ion irradiation on the recombination dynamics of GaInNAs/GaAs semiconductor saturable absorber mirrors has been studied. The samples were fabricated by molecular beam epitaxy using a radio frequency plasma source for nitrogen incorporation in the absorber layers as well as for the irradiation. The recombination dynamics of irradiated samples were studied by pump-probe measurements. The recombination time of the absorbers could be reduced by increasing the irradiation time. The effect of the reduced recombination time on the pulse dynamics of a mode-locked laser setup was studied with a Bi-doped fibre laser. The pulse quality was found to improve with increased irradiation time and reduced recombination time, demonstrating the potential of the in-situ irradiation method for device applications.

  10. Study of nitrogen incorporation into GaInNAs: The role of growth temperature in molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Korpijaervi, V.-M.; Aho, A.; Tukiainen, A.; Laakso, A.; Guina, M.; Laukkanen, P.; Tuominen, M.

    2012-07-15

    GaInNAs has an important impact on developing GaAs-based optoelectronics and multijunction solar cells, but the complex nature of the nitrogen incorporation into GaInAs is still not fully understood. By combining x-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, reflection high-energy electron diffraction, and photoelectron spectroscopy measurements, we show that nitrogen incorporation is enhanced with increasing growth temperature in the range of 300-450 Degree-Sign C. We study the growth front and show that the surface reconstruction is (1 Multiplication-Sign 3) regardless of growth temperature in this range. The enhanced nitrogen incorporation can be modeled as a thermally activated process with activation energy of about 0.1 eV.

  11. The NAS-NRC Twin Registry of WWII military veteran twins. National Academy of Sciences-National Research Council.

    PubMed

    Page, William F

    2002-10-01

    The NAS-NRC Twin Registry is one of the oldest, national population based-twin registries in the United States. It consists of 15,924 white male twin pairs born in the years 1917-1927 (inclusive) both of whom served in the armed forces. The registry, which has been in operation more than 30 years, has collected data from a variety of sources. Records-based, computerized data have come largely from the Department of Veterans Affairs, and there have been three major epidemiologic questionnaires, undertaken roughly every 15 years. Classic twin studies on a variety of medical conditions were the early focus of the registry, which now has a strong focus on chronic disease epidemiology. Work on a DNA specimen bank has been proceeding slowly, but is now a top priority, due to the increasing force of mortality in this twin cohort.

  12. Reactive Microcontact Printing of DNA Probes on (DMA-NAS-MAPS) Copolymer-Coated Substrates for Efficient Hybridization Platforms.

    PubMed

    Castagna, Rossella; Bertucci, Alessandro; Prasetyanto, Eko Adi; Monticelli, Marco; Conca, Dario Valter; Massetti, Matteo; Sharma, Parikshit Pratim; Damin, Francesco; Chiari, Marcella; De Cola, Luisa; Bertacco, Riccardo

    2016-04-05

    High-performing hybridization platforms fabricated by reactive microcontact printing of DNA probes are presented. Multishaped PDMS molds are used to covalently bind oligonucleotides over a functional copolymer (DMA-NAS-MAPS) surface. Printed structures with minimum width of about 1.5 μm, spaced by 10 μm, are demonstrated, with edge corrugation lower than 300 nm. The quantification of the immobilized surface probes via fluorescence imaging gives a remarkable concentration of 3.3 × 10(3) oligonucleotides/μm(2), almost totally active when used as probes in DNA-DNA hybridization assays. Indeed, fluorescence and atomic force microscopy show a 95% efficiency in target binding and uniform DNA hybridization over printed areas.

  13. LNTgate: How scientific misconduct by the U.S. NAS led to governments adopting LNT for cancer risk assessment.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2016-07-01

    This paper provides a detailed rebuttal to the letter of Beyea (2016) which offered a series of alternative interpretations to those offered in my article in Environmental Research (Calabrese, 2015a) concerning the role of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) I Committee Genetics Panel in the adoption of the linear dose response model for cancer risk assessment. Significant newly uncovered evidence is presented which supports and extends the findings of Calabrese (2015a), reaffirming the conclusion that the Genetics Panel should be evaluated for scientific misconduct for deliberate misrepresentation of the research record in order to enhance an ideological agenda. This critique documents numerous factual errors along with extensive and deliberate filtering of information in the Beyea letter (2016) that leads to consistently incorrect conclusions and an invalid general perspective.

  14. Self-catalyzed core-shell GaAs/GaNAs nanowires grown on patterned Si (111) by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    La, Rui; Liu, Ren; Yao, Weichuan; Chen, Renjie; Jansson, Mattias; Pan, Janet L.; Buyanova, Irina A.; Xiang, Jie; Dayeh, Shadi A.; Tu, Charles W.

    2017-08-01

    We report structural studies on the epitaxial growth of GaAs/GaNAs core-shell nanowires (NWs) on patterned Si (111) substrates by self-catalyzed selective area growth using Gas-Source Molecular Beam Epitaxy. Epitaxial growth conditions were obtained using a combination of dry and time-sensitive wet etching of the SiO2 growth mask and native SiO2 layer, respectively. We found that higher growth temperatures resulted in a higher yield for the epitaxial growth of patterned self-catalyzed GaAs NWs on Si with an optimal temperature of 690 °C. The GaNAs shell growth at 500 °C was found to be conformal and maintained an epitaxial and dislocation-free interface with both the Si substrate and the GaAs nanowire. The micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) measurement at 6 K revealed two bands peaking at 1.45 and 1.17 eV, which could be emission from the GaAs core and GaNAs shell. Transmission electron microscopy showed the zincblende crystal structure of GaAs and GaAs/GaNAs core-shell NWs with minimal twinning near the base of the GaAs nanowires and at the tips of the GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires. This study illustrates the feasibility of the epitaxial growth of patterned GaAs with dilute nitride shells on Si substrates, which would have potential for Si-friendly intermediate band solar cells and telecom emitters.

  15. Effects of rapid thermal annealing conditions on GaInNAs band gap blueshift and photoluminescence intensity

    SciTech Connect

    Liverini, V.; Rutz, A.; Keller, U.; Schoen, S.

    2006-06-01

    We have studied the effects of various conditions of rapid thermal annealing (RTA) on 10 nm GaInNAs/GaAs single quantum wells (SQWs) with fixed indium concentration and increasing nitrogen content to obtain photoluminescence (PL) in the telecom wavelength regime of 1.3 and 1.5 {mu}m. Specifically, we analyzed the results of annealing for a fixed short time but at different temperatures and for longer times at a fixed temperature. In all experiments, InGaAs SQWs with the same In concentration were used as references. For both RTA conditions, the well-known blueshift of the band gap energy and the PL intensity improvement show trends that reveal that these are unrelated effects. At high RTA temperatures the PL efficiency reaches a maximum and then drops independently of N content. On the contrary, the blueshift experiences a rapid increase up to 700 deg. C (strong blueshift regime) and it saturates above this temperature (weak blueshift regime). Both these blueshift regimes are related to the nitrogen content in the SQWs but in different ways. In the strong blueshift regime, we could obtain activation energy for the blueshift process in the range of 1.25 eV, which increases with N content. Analysis with high-resolution x-ray diffraction (HRXRD) shows that the blueshift experienced in this regime is not due to a stoichiometric change in the QW. In the weak blueshift regime, the blueshift, which is only partly due to In outdiffusion, saturates more slowly the higher the N content. Annealing at the same temperature (600 deg. C) for a longer time shows that the blueshift saturates earlier than the PL intensity and that samples with higher nitrogen experience a larger blueshift. Only a small In outdiffusion for annealing at high temperatures (>650 deg. C) and long duration was observed. However, this modest stoichiometric change does not explain the large blueshift experienced by the GaInNAs SQWs. We conclude that the mechanism responsible for the drastic blueshift after

  16. A performance study of the time-varying cache behavior: a study on APEX, Mantevo, NAS, and PARSEC

    DOE PAGES

    Siddique, Nafiul A.; Grubel, Patricia A.; Badawy, Abdel-Hameed A.; ...

    2017-09-20

    Cache has long been used to minimize the latency of main memory accesses by storing frequently used data near the processor. Processor performance depends on the underlying cache performance. Therefore, significant research has been done to identify the most crucial metrics of cache performance. Although the majority of research focuses on measuring cache hit rates and data movement as the primary cache performance metrics, cache utilization is significantly important. We investigate the application’s locality using cache utilization metrics. In addition, we present cache utilization and traditional cache performance metrics as the program progresses providing detailed insights into the dynamic applicationmore » behavior on parallel applications from four benchmark suites running on multiple cores. We explore cache utilization for APEX, Mantevo, NAS, and PARSEC, mostly scientific benchmark suites. Our results indicate that 40% of the data bytes in a cache line are accessed at least once before line eviction. Also, on average a byte is accessed two times before the cache line is evicted for these applications. Moreover, we present runtime cache utilization, as well as, conventional performance metrics that illustrate a holistic understanding of cache behavior. To facilitate this research, we build a memory simulator incorporated into the Structural Simulation Toolkit (Rodrigues et al. in SIGMETRICS Perform Eval Rev 38(4):37–42, 2011). Finally, our results suggest that variable cache line size can result in better performance and can also conserve power.« less

  17. The solution of linear systems of equations with a structural analysis code on the NAS CRAY-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poole, Eugene L.; Overman, Andrea L.

    1988-01-01

    Two methods for solving linear systems of equations on the NAS Cray-2 are described. One is a direct method; the other is an iterative method. Both methods exploit the architecture of the Cray-2, particularly the vectorization, and are aimed at structural analysis applications. To demonstrate and evaluate the methods, they were installed in a finite element structural analysis code denoted the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed. A description of the techniques used to integrate the two solvers into the Testbed is given. Storage schemes, memory requirements, operation counts, and reformatting procedures are discussed. Finally, results from the new methods are compared with results from the initial Testbed sparse Choleski equation solver for three structural analysis problems. The new direct solvers described achieve the highest computational rates of the methods compared. The new iterative methods are not able to achieve as high computation rates as the vectorized direct solvers but are best for well conditioned problems which require fewer iterations to converge to the solution.

  18. An approach to high efficiencies using GaAs/GaInNAs multiple quantum well and superlattice solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Courel, Maykel; Rimada, Julio C.; Hernández, Luis

    2012-09-01

    A new type of photovoltaic device where GaAs/GaInNAs multiple quantum wells (MQW) or superlattice (SL) are inserted in the i-region of a GaAs p-i-n solar cell (SC) is presented. The results suggest the device can reach record efficiencies for single-junction solar cells. A theoretical model is developed to study the performance of this device. The conversion efficiency as a function of wells width and depth is modeled for MQW solar cells. It is shown that the MQW solar cells reach high conversion efficiency values. A study of the SL solar cell viability is also presented. The conditions for resonant tunneling are established by the matrix transfer method for a superlattice with variable quantum wells width. The effective density of states and the absorption coefficient for SL structure are calculated in order to determinate the J-V characteristic. The influence of superlattice length on the conversion efficiency is researched, showing a better performance when width and cluster numbers are increased. The SL solar cell conversion efficiency is compared with the maximum conversion efficiency obtained for the MQW solar cell and shows an efficiency enhancement.

  19. Origin of radiative recombination and manifestations of localization effects in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, S. L.; Filippov, S.; Chen, W. M.; Buyanova, I. A.; Ishikawa, Fumitaro

    2014-12-22

    Radiative carrier recombination processes in GaAs/GaNAs core/shell nanowires grown by molecular beam epitaxy on a Si substrate are systematically investigated by employing micro-photoluminescence (μ-PL) and μ-PL excitation (μ-PLE) measurements complemented by time-resolved PL spectroscopy. At low temperatures, alloy disorder is found to cause localization of photo-excited carriers leading to predominance of optical transitions from localized excitons (LE). Some of the local fluctuations in N composition are suggested to lead to strongly localized three-dimensional confining potential equivalent to that for quantum dots, based on the observation of sharp and discrete PL lines within the LE contour. The localization effects are found to have minor influence on PL spectra at room temperature due to thermal activation of the localized excitons to extended states. Under these conditions, photo-excited carrier lifetime is found to be governed by non-radiative recombination via surface states which is somewhat suppressed upon N incorporation.

  20. Optical transitions in GaNAs quantum wells with variable nitrogen content embedded in AlGaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Elborg, M.; Noda, T.; Mano, T.; Sakuma, Y.

    2016-06-15

    We investigate the optical transitions of GaN{sub x}As{sub 1−x} quantum wells (QWs) embedded in wider band gap AlGaAs. A combination of absorption and emission spectroscopic techniques is employed to systematically investigate the properties of GaNAs QWs with N concentrations ranging from 0 – 3%. From measurement of the photocurrent spectra, we find that besides QW ground state and first excited transition, distinct increases in photocurrent generation are observed. Their origin can be explained by N-induced modifications in the density of states at higher energies above the QW ground state. Photoluminescence experiments reveal that peak position dependence with temperature changes with N concentration. The characteristic S-shaped dependence for low N concentrations of 0.5% changes with increasing N concentration where the low temperature red-shift of the S-shape gradually disappears. This change indicates a gradual transition from impurity picture, where localized N induced energy states are present, to alloying picture, where an impurity-band is formed. In the highest-N sample, photoluminescence emission shows remarkable temperature stability. This phenomenon is explained by the interplay of N-induced energy states and QW confined states.

  1. Thermo-responsive shell cross-linked PMMA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-NAS) micelles for drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Chang, Cong; Wei, Hua; Wu, De-Qun; Yang, Bin; Chen, Ni; Cheng, Si-Xue; Zhang, Xian-Zheng; Zhuo, Ren-Xi

    2011-11-28

    Thermo-responsive amphiphilic poly(methyl methacrylate)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-N-acryloxysuccinimide) (PMMA-b-P(NIPAAm-co-NAS)) block copolymer was synthesized by successive RAFT polymerizations. The uncross-linked micelles were facilely prepared by directly dissolving the block copolymer in an aqueous medium, and the shell cross-linked (SCL) micelles were further fabricated by the addition of ethylenediamine as a di-functional cross-linker into the micellar solution. Optical absorption measurements showed that the LCST of uncross-linked and cross-linked micelles was 31.0°C and 40.8°C, respectively. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showed that both uncross-linked and cross-linked micelles exhibited well-defined spherical shape in aqueous phase at room temperature, while the SCL micelles were able to retain the spherical shape with relatively smaller dimension even at 40°C due to the cross-linked structure. In vitro drug release study demonstrated a slower and more sustained drug release behavior from the SCL micelles at high temperature as compared with the release profile of uncross-linked micelles, indicating the great potential of SCL micelles developed herein as novel smart carriers for controlled drug release.

  2. Ultramicroporous Carbon through an Activation-Free Approach for Li-S and Na-S Batteries in Carbonate-Based Electrolyte.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lei; Lu, Yue; Zhang, Tianwen; Huang, Tao; Zhu, Yongchun; Qian, Yitai

    2017-04-26

    We report an activation-free approach for fabricating ultramicroporous carbon as an accommodation of sulfur molecules for Li-S and Na-S batteries applications in carbonate-based electrolyte. Because of the high specific surface area of 967 m(2) g(-1), as well as 51.8% of the pore volume is contributed by ultramicropore with pore size less than 0.7 nm, sulfur cathode exhibits superior electrochemical behavior in carbonate-based electrolyte with a capacity of 507.9 mA h g(-1) after 500 cycles at 2 C in Li-S batteries and 392 mA h g(-1) after 200 cycles at 1 C in Na-S batteries, respectively.

  3. Nonlinear dynamics of non-equilibrium holes in p-type modulation-doped GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Nonlinear charge transport parallel to the layers of p-modulation-doped GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs) is studied both theoretically and experimentally. Experimental results show that at low temperature, T = 13 K, the presence of an applied electric field of about 6 kV/cm leads to the heating of the high mobility holes in the GaInNAs QWs, and their real-space transfer (RST) into the low-mobility GaAs barriers. This results in a negative differential mobility and self-generated oscillatory instabilities in the RST regime. We developed an analytical model based upon the coupled nonlinear dynamics of the real-space hole transfer and of the interface potential barrier controlled by space-charge in the doped GaAs layer. Our simulation results predict dc bias-dependent self-generated current oscillations with frequencies in the high microwave range. PMID:21711766

  4. Weather Requirements and Procedures for Step 1: High Altitude Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Flight Operations in the National Air Space (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This cover sheet is for version 2 of the weather requirements document along with Appendix A. The purpose of the requirements document was to identify and to list the weather functional requirements needed to achieve the Access 5 vision of "operating High Altitude, Long Endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) routinely, safely, and reliably in the National Airspace System (NAS) for Step 1." A discussion of the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) references and related policies, procedures, and standards is provided as basis for the recommendations supported within this document. Additional procedures and reference documentation related to weather functional requirements is also provided for background. The functional requirements and related information are to be proposed to the FAA and various standards organizations for consideration and approval. The appendix was designed to show that sources of flight weather information are readily available to UAS pilots conducting missions in the NAS. All weather information for this presentation was obtained from the public internet.

  5. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project: Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations in Support of SC-228 Minimum Operational Performance Standards Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa Carolynn

    2017-01-01

    The primary activity for the UAS-NAS Human Systems Integration (HSI) sub-project in Phase 1 was support of RTCA Special Committee 228 Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS). We provide data on the effect of various Detect and Avoid (DAA) display features with respect to pilot performance of the remain well clear function in order to determine the minimum requirements for DAA displays.

  6. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project, UAS Control and Non-Payload Communication System Phase-1 Flight Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, James H.

    2014-01-01

    NASA's UAS Integration in the NAS project, has partnered with Rockwell Collins to develop a concept Control and Non-Payload Communication (CNPC) system prototype radio, operating on recently allocated UAS frequency spectrum bands. This prototype radio is being used to validate initial proposed performance requirements for UAS control communications. This presentation will give an overview of the current status of the prototype radio development, and results from phase 1 flight tests conducted during 2013.

  7. MOVPE growth studies of Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP) multi quantum well heterostructures (MQWH) for the monolithic integration of laser structures on (001) Si-substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ludewig, P.; Reinhard, S.; Jandieri, K.; Wegele, T.; Beyer, A.; Tapfer, L.; Volz, K.; Stolz, W.

    2016-03-01

    High-quality, pseudomorphically strained Ga(NAsP)/(BGa)(AsP)-multiple quantum well heterostructures (MQWH) have been deposited on exactly oriented (001) Si-substrate by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE) in a wide temperature range between 525 °C and 700 °C. The individual atomic incorporation efficiencies, growth rates as well as nanoscale material properties have been clarified by applying detailed high-resolution X-ray diffraction (HR-XRD), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and high-angle annular dark field (HAADF) scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) studies. An almost constant N-incorporation efficiency is obtained for a wide growth temperature range from 550 °C up to 650 °C. The P-incorporation is steadily increasing with increasing growth temperature reaching values at high temperatures in excess of the applied gas phase ratio. While the lower interface from the binary GaP- to the quaternary Ga(NAsP)-material system is very sharp, the upper interface is significantly rougher with a roughness scale of ±0.43 nm in quantum well thickness variation at a growth temperature of 525 °C. This roughness scale increases steadily with increasing growth temperature. No indication of any phase separation effects is detected in the Ga(NAsP)-material system even at the highest growth temperature of 700 °C. The obtained experimental results are briefly discussed with respect to the anticipated metastable character of the novel dilute-nitride Ga(NAsP)-material system grown lattice-matched to (001) Si-substrate.

  8. Photographic Observations of Major Planets and Their Moons During 1961-1990 at the MAO NAS of Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizhakevych, O. M.; Andruk, V. M.; Pakuliak, L. K.

    We present the results of photographic observations' processing of Saturn's moons, Uranus, Neptune and their moons on the basis of MAO NAS of Ukraine photographic observational archive. The analysis of the results is given. Observations were obtained using 4 telescopes: Double Long-Focus Astrograph (DLFA, D/F = 400/5500), Zeiss Double Astrograph (DAZ, D/F= 400/3000), Reflector Zeiss-600 (D/F= 600/7500), Wideangle Astrograph, (DWA, D/F= 400/2000). Observations were carried out during 1961 - 1990 (http://gua.db.ukrvo. org). Digitizing of plates has been done by EPSON EXPRESSION 10000XL (EE) flatbed scanner in 16-bit gray color range with resolution 1200dpi.(Andruk et al.: 2005, 2012; Golovnja et al.: 2010;. Protsyuk et al. 2014a, 2014b). The reduction of plates was made using the software developed in MAO NASU in the enhanced LINUX-MIDAS software kit. (Andruk V. et al.: 2016a, 2016b). Tycho2 was used as a reference system. The internal accuracy of the reduction for the first three instruments is ±0.08 - ±0.13 arcsec for both coordinates. For the wide angle astrograph DWA, RMS errors appeared 2 - 2.5 times higher. The total amount of processed plates with images of Saturn's moons is 209 (511 frames), 33 plates contain the images of Uranus and U1,U2,U3,U4 moons, 29 plates have images of Neptune and N1 moon (Yizhakevych et al., 2015, 2016, 2017; Protsyuk et al., 2015). The online comparison of calculated positions of objects with IMCCE ephemeris data was made (http://lnfm1.sai.msu.ru/neb/nss/nssephmf.htm).

  9. Accelerations experienced during low-G flight of Black Brant VC (NAS 21.015) on 4 October 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kissel, R.

    1975-01-01

    This investigation was to determine whether a Black Brant VC (BBVC) sounding rocket equipped with the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) rate control system (RCS) would produce g-levels which are satisfactory for space processing. Accelerations measured by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) low-g accelerometer system (LGAS) were compared with accelerations calculated from measured payload RCS gyro data during a low-g flight of BBVC NAS 21.015 at White Sands Missile Range, N.M., on October 4, 1974. Accelerations of up to 0.0002 g existed at the LGAS accelerometers from 70 through 420 sec (5.8 min), with the exception of a spike at 101 sec of 0.0004 g which occurred when the RCS was activated the second time. Accelerations of 0.0001 g existed from 140 through 400 sec (4.3 min). Accelerations of 0.0002 g along the roll axis up to 150 sec and of 0.0015 g in the lateral plane at about 135 sec are being investigated by GSFC. They may be associated with leaking thruster valves or a leak in one of the heat pipe experiments. The vehicle rate buildup each time after the RCS nulls out are also being investigated by GSFC. This rate caused most of the 0.0001 g acceleration experienced after 150 sec into the flight. Aerodynamic drag produced no significant accelerations after about 80 sec. The principal conclusion was that the BBVC with the GSFC RCS produces g-levels satisfactory for space processing.

  10. Molecular beam epitaxy of GaNAs alloys with high As content for potential photoanode applications in hydrogen production

    SciTech Connect

    Novikov, S. V.; Staddon, C. R.; Foxon, C. T.; Yu, K. M.; Broesler, R.; Hawkridge, M.; Liliental-Weber, Z.; Walukiewicz, W.; Denlinger, J.; Demchenko, I.

    2009-10-06

    The authors have succeeded in growing GaN1?xAsx alloys over a large composition range (0 < x < 0.8) by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. The enhanced incorporation of As was achieved by growing the films with high As{sub 2} flux at low (as low as 100 C) growth temperatures, which is much below the normal GaN growth temperature range. Using x-ray and transmission electron microscopy, they found that the GaNAs alloys with high As content x > 0.17 are amorphous. Optical absorption measurements together with x-ray absorption and emission spectroscopy results reveal a continuous gradual decrease in band gap from -3.4 to < 1 eV with increasing As content. The energy gap reaches its minimum of -0.8 eV at x - 0.8. The composition dependence of the band gap of the crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys follows the prediction of the band anticrossing model (BAC). However, our measured band gap of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} with 0.3 < x < 0.8 are larger than that predicted by BAC. The results seem to indicate that for this composition range the amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys have short-range ordering that resembles random crystalline GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} alloys. They have demonstrated the possibility of the growth of amorphous GaN{sub 1?x}As{sub x} layers with variable As content on glass substrates

  11. The NAS parallel benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David (Editor); Barton, John (Editor); Lasinski, Thomas (Editor); Simon, Horst (Editor)

    1993-01-01

    A new set of benchmarks was developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers. These benchmarks consist of a set of kernels, the 'Parallel Kernels,' and a simulated application benchmark. Together they mimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large scale computational fluid dynamics (CFD) applications. The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their 'pencil and paper' specification - all details of these benchmarks are specified only algorithmically. In this way many of the difficulties associated with conventional benchmarking approaches on highly parallel systems are avoided.

  12. National Airspace System (NAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-12-01

    Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval Dev Est - Development Estimate DoD - Department of Defense DSN - Defense Switched Network Econ...Complete .. , IOT &E Start •• Complete -· Full Rate Production Contr. .. c- FOT&E Start , ... VOICE (VCSS) Program Review •:a. AUTOMATION (DAAS...JUN 1999 DEC 1999 OCT 1999 IOT &E Start JUL 2000 JUL 2000 JAN 2001 JUL 2000 Complete OCT 2003 OCT 2003 OCT 2004 OCT 2004 Full Rate Production Contract

  13. NAS agar is more suitable than McKay agar for primary culture of Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) fastidious bacteria, S. intermedius in particular.

    PubMed

    Raclavsky, Vladislav; Novotny, Radko; Stary, Lubomir; Navratilova, Lucie; Zatloukal, Jaromir; Jakubec, Petr; Zapalka, Martin; Kopriva, Frantisek; Kolek, Vitezslav

    2017-01-01

    Streptococcus milleri group (SMG) is a group of three streptococcal species (S. anginosus, intermedius and constellatus) that act as opportunist pathogens, among others in cystic fibrosis. Due to their fastidious character, they are both difficult to cultivate and to differentiate from less pathogenic streptococcal species, therefore being most probably underdiagnosed. Semi-selective McKay agar and NAS agar were developed to facilitate SMG recovery from clinical samples; however, direct comparison of recovery rates has not been published yet. We tested the performance of both media on 123 patient samples and demonstrated general superiority of NAS agar for SMG recovery during primary cultivation convincingly. This observation was also confirmed by quantitative drop tests during subculture. Despite the undisputed overall superiority of NAS agar over McKay agar, a smaller fraction of strains grew better on McKay agar. Inter-strain differences were the most probable explanation. Therefore, when economic conditions are not limiting and maximum recovery rate is desirable, both plates are advised to be used in parallel for primary cultivation of clinical samples.

  14. Designing of 1 eV GaNAs/GaInAs superlattice subcell in current-matched four-junction solar cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haixiao, Wang; Xinhe, Zheng; Xingyuan, Gan; Naiming, Wang; Hui, Yang

    2016-01-01

    A reasonably-thick GaNAs/GaInAs superlattice could be an option as a roughly 1 eV subcell to achieve high-efficiency multi-junction solar cells on a lattice-matched Ge substrate. A detailed consideration of a high-efficiency design for a GaInP/GaAs/1 eV/Ge device is presented. Calculations have been done for this structure to obtain the confined energies of the electrons and holes by utilizing the Kronig-Penney model, as well as the absorption coefficient and thereby the external quantum efficiency. The effect of well layers, GaNAs or GaInAs, on the absorption and photocurrent density under the AM 1.5 condition is discussed in order to realize a requirement of current matching in the four-junction solar cells. The management of these considerations implies the feasibility of the GaNAs/GaInAs superlattice subcell design to improve the overall conversion efficiency of lattice matched GaInP/GaAs/1 eV/Ge cells. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 61274134) and the International Cooperation Program of Suzhou, China (No. SH201215).

  15. Verification of Self-Report of Zygosity Determined via DNA Testing in a Subset of the NAS-NRC Twin Registry 40 Years Later

    PubMed Central

    Reed, T.; Plassman, B.L.; Tanner, C.M.; Dick, D. M.; Rinehart, S.A.; Nichols, W.C.

    2005-01-01

    The National Academy of Sciences – National Research Council (NAS-NRC) twin panel, created nearly 50 years ago, had twin zygosity determined primarily via a similarity questionnaire that has been estimated to correctly classify at least 95% of twins. In the course of a study on the genetics of healthy aging in the NAS-NRC twins DNA was collected for genome-wide scanning and zygosity confirmation was examined in 343 participating pairs. The sample was supplemented from two other studies using NAS-NRC twins where one or both co-twins were suspected to have Alzheimer disease or another dementia, or Parkinson’s disease. Overall there were 578 twin-pairs with DNA analyzed. 96.8% (519/536) had confirmation of zygosity assignment via questionnaire. Among 42 pairs whose questionnaire responses were inconclusive for assigning zygosity, 50% were found to be monozygous and 50% were dizygous. There was some evidence for greater misclassification of presumed DZ pairs in the healthy aging study where participation favored pairs who were similar in having a favorable health history and willingness to volunteer without any element of perceived risk for a specific disease influencing participation. PMID:16176721

  16. Development and manufacturing of panoramic Stokes polarimeter using the polarization films in the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidmachenko, A. P.; Ivanov, Yu. S.; Syniavskyi, I. I.; Sergeev, A. V.

    2015-08-01

    In the Main Astronomical Observatory of NAS of Ukraine is proposed and implemented the concept of the imaging Stokes polarimeter [1-5]. This device allows carrying out measurements of the four Stokes vector components at the same time, in a wide field, and without any restrictions on the relative aperture of the optical system. Its scheme is developed so that only by turning wheel with replaceable elements, photopolarimeter could be transformed into a low resolution spectropolarimeter. The device has four film's polarizers with positional angles 0°, 45°, 90°, 135°. The device uses a system of special deflecting prisms in each channel. These prisms were achromatizing in the spectral range of 420-850 nm [2], the distortion of the polarimeter optical system is less than 0.65%. In manufacturing version of spectropolarimeter provided for the possibility of using working on passing the diffraction grating with a frequency up to 100 lines/mm. Has begun the laboratory testing of instrument. References. 1. Sinyavskii I.I., Ivanov Yu. S., Vidmachenko Anatoliy P., Karpov N.V. Panoramic Stokes-polarimeter // Ecological bulettin of research centers of the Black Sea Economic Cooperation. - 2013. - V. 3, No 4. - P. 123-127. 2. Sinyavskii I. I., Ivanov Yu. S., Vil'machenko A. P. Concept of the construction, of the optical setup of a panoramic Stokes polarimeter for small telescopes // Journal of Optical Technology. - 2013. - V. 80, Issue 9. - P. 545-548. 3. Vidmachenko A. P., Ivanov Yu. S., Morozhenko A. V., Nevodovsky E. P., Syniavskyi I. I., Sosonkin M. G. Spectropolarimeter of ground-based accompanying for the space experiment "Planetary Monitoring" // Kosmichna Nauka i Tekhnologiya. - 2007. - V. 13, No. 1, p. 63 - 70. 4. Yatskiv Ya. S., Vidmachenko A. P., Morozhenko A. V., Sosonkin M. G., Ivanov Yu. S., Syniavskyi I. I. Spectropolarimetric device for overatmospheric investigations of Solar System bodies // Kosmichna Nauka i Tekhnologiya. - 2008. - V. 14, No. 2. - P. 56

  17. On Ensino de Astronomia nas Cidades de Ribeirão Pires e Rio Grande da Serra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faria, R. Z.; Voelzke, M. R.

    2007-08-01

    Apesar da astronomia ser um dos temas indicados pelos Parâmetros Curriculares Nacionais, observa-se que poucas mudanças ocorreram desde a implementação do mesmo em sala de aula. A presente pesquisa diz respeito sobre como os tópicos de astronomia estão sendo abordados pelos professores no ensino médio. Optou-se por aplicar um questionário com os professores que ministram a disciplina de física. Os mesmos trabalham em escolas estaduais situadas nas cidades de Ribeirão Pires e Rio Grande da Serra, ambas subordinadas a Diretoria de Ensino de Mauá, no Estado de São Paulo. O questionário foi aplicado durante o 2° semestre de 2006. Até o momento os resultados são preliminares. Dos 82,0% dos professores que responderam ao questionário no município de Rio Grande da Serra, 66,7% não aplicaram nenhum tópico de astronomia, 77,8% não utilizaram qualquer tipo de programa computacional, 66,7% não utilizaram laboratório, que 77,8% nunca levaram os alunos a museus e ou planetários e que 66,7% não indicaram qualquer tipo de revista ou livro sobre astronomia aos seus alunos. No município de Ribeirão Pires, 53,3% dos professores responderam ao questionário, destes 75,0% não aplicaram nenhum tópico de astronomia, 93,8% não utilizaram qualquer tipo de programa computacional, 75,0% não utilizaram laboratório, 81,3% nunca levaram os alunos a museus e ou planetário e 56,3% não indicaram qualquer tipo de revista ou livro sobre astronomia ao seus alunos. Apesar da maioria dos professores reconhecerem que o conteúdo de astronomia influi na formação do jovem, os mesmos não incluem o tema em seus planejamentos escolares.

  18. NOD promoter-controlled AtIRT1 expression functions synergistically with NAS and FERRITIN genes to increase iron in rice grains.

    PubMed

    Boonyaves, Kulaporn; Gruissem, Wilhelm; Bhullar, Navreet K

    2016-02-01

    Rice is a staple food for over half of the world's population, but it contains only low amounts of bioavailable micronutrients for human nutrition. Consequently, micronutrient deficiency is a widespread health problem among people who depend primarily on rice as their staple food. Iron deficiency anemia is one of the most serious forms of malnutrition. Biofortification of rice grains for increased iron content is an effective strategy to reduce iron deficiency. Unlike other grass species, rice takes up iron as Fe(II) via the IRON REGULATED TRANSPORTER (IRT) in addition to Fe(III)-phytosiderophore chelates. We expressed Arabidopsis IRT1 (AtIRT1) under control of the Medicago sativa EARLY NODULIN 12B promoter in our previously developed high-iron NFP rice lines expressing NICOTIANAMINE SYNTHASE (AtNAS1) and FERRITIN. Transgenic rice lines expressing AtIRT1 alone had significant increases in iron and combined with NAS and FERRITIN increased iron to 9.6 µg/g DW in the polished grains that is 2.2-fold higher as compared to NFP lines. The grains of AtIRT1 lines also accumulated more copper and zinc but not manganese. Our results demonstrate that the concerted expression of AtIRT1, AtNAS1 and PvFERRITIN synergistically increases iron in both polished and unpolished rice grains. AtIRT1 is therefore a valuable transporter for iron biofortification programs when used in combination with other genes encoding iron transporters and/or storage proteins.

  19. The mitochondrial apoptotic pathway is induced by Cu(II) antineoplastic compounds (Casiopeínas(®)) in SK-N-SH neuroblastoma cells after short exposure times.

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, Juan Carlos; Gutiérrez, Anllely Grizett; Vázquez-Aguirre, Adriana; Toledano-Magaña, Yanis; Alonso-Sáenz, Ana Luisa; Gómez-Vidales, Virginia; Flores-Alamo, Marcos; Mejía, Carmen; Ruiz-Azuara, Lena

    2017-02-01

    The family of Copper(II) coordination compounds Casiopeínas(®) (Cas) has shown antiproliferative activity in several tumour lines by oxidative cellular damage and mitochondrial dysfunction that lead to cell death through apoptotic pathways. The goal of this work is looking for the functional mechanism of CasIIgly, CasIIIia and CasIIIEa in neuroblastoma metastatic cell line SK-N-SH, a paediatric extra-cranial tumour which is refractory to several anti-carcinogenic agents. All Cas have shown higher antiproliferative activity than cisplatin (IC50 = 123 μM) with IC50 values of 18, 22 and 63 µM for CasIIgly, CasIIIEa and CasIIIia, respectively. At low concentrations and early times (4 h), these compounds cause a disruption of the mitochondrial transmembrane potential (Δψm). Concomitantly, an important depletion of intracellular glutathione and an increase of reactive oxygen species (ROS) hydrogen peroxide and radical superoxide were observed. On the other side, the lower cytotoxic effect of Casiopeínas on cultures of human peripheral blood lymphocytes (IC50CasIIgly  = 1720 µM, IC50 CasIIIEa  = 3860 µM and IC50 CasIIIia  = 4700 µM) show the selectivity of these compounds over the tumour cells compared with the non-transformed cells. Chemically, glutathione (GSH) interacts with Casiopeínas(®) through the coordination of sulphur atom to the metal centre, process which facilitates the electron transfer to get Cu(I), GSSG and the posterior production of ROS. Additionally, the molecular structure of CasIIIia as nitrate is reported. These results have shown that the anticarcinogenic activity of Casiopeínas(®) on neuroblastoma SK-N-SH is through mitochondrial apoptosis due to the enhanced pro-oxidant environment promoted by the presence of the coordination copper compounds.

  20. High gain 1.3-μm GaInNAs SOA with fast gain dynamics and enhanced temperature stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitsios, D.; Giannoulis, G.; Iliadis, N.; Korpijärvi, V.-M.; Viheriälä, J.; Laakso, A.; Dris, S.; Spyropoulou, M.; Avramopoulos, H.; Kanellos, G. T.; Pleros, N.; Guina, M.

    2014-03-01

    Semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) are a well-established solution of optical access networks. They could prove an enabling technology for DataCom by offering extended range of active optical functionalities. However, in such costand energy-critical applications, high-integration densities increase the operational temperatures and require powerhungry external cooling. Taking a step further towards improving the cost and energy effectiveness of active optical components, we report on the development of a GaInNAs/GaAs (dilute nitride) SOA operating at 1.3μm that exhibits a gain value of 28 dB and combined with excellent temperature stability owing to the large conduction band offset between GaInNAs quantum well and GaAs barrier. Moreover, the characterization results reveal almost no gain variation around the 1320 nm region for a temperature range from 20° to 50° C. The gain recovery time attained values as short as 100 ps, allowing implementation of various signal processing functionalities at 10 Gb/s. The combined parameters are very attractive for application in photonic integrated circuits requiring uncooled operation and thus minimizing power consumption. Moreover, as a result of the insensitivity to heating issues, a higher number of active elements can be integrated on chip-scale circuitry, allowing for higher integration densities and more complex optical on-chip functions. Such component could prove essential for next generation DataCom networks.

  1. Optical properties of multi-stacked InGaAs/GaNAs quantum dot solar cell fabricated on GaAs (311)B substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Shoji, Yasushi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-15

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) comprised of 10 stacked pairs of strain-compensated InGaAs/GaNAs QD structure have been fabricated by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A homogeneous and high-density QD array structure with improved in-plane ordering and total density of {approx}10{sup 12} cm{sup -2} has been achieved on GaAs (311)B grown at 460 Degree-Sign C after stacking. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of InGaAs/GaNAs QDSC increases in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. The short-circuit current density measured for QDSC is 17.2 mA/cm{sup 2} compared to 14.8 mA/cm{sup 2} of GaAs reference cell. Further, an increase in EQE due to photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature though it is still small at around 0.1%.

  2. Optical properties of multi-stacked InGaAs/GaNAs quantum dot solar cell fabricated on GaAs (311)B substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoji, Yasushi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Okada, Yoshitaka

    2012-09-01

    Quantum dot solar cells (QDSCs) comprised of 10 stacked pairs of strain-compensated InGaAs/GaNAs QD structure have been fabricated by atomic hydrogen-assisted molecular beam epitaxy. A homogeneous and high-density QD array structure with improved in-plane ordering and total density of ˜1012 cm-2 has been achieved on GaAs (311)B grown at 460 °C after stacking. The external quantum efficiency (EQE) of InGaAs/GaNAs QDSC increases in the longer wavelength range due to additive contribution from QD layers inserted in the intrinsic region. The short-circuit current density measured for QDSC is 17.2 mA/cm2 compared to 14.8 mA/cm2 of GaAs reference cell. Further, an increase in EQE due to photocurrent production by 2-step photon absorption has been observed at room temperature though it is still small at around 0.1%.

  3. p- to n-type conductivity transition in 1.0 eV GaInNAs solar cells controlled by the V/III ratio

    SciTech Connect

    Langer, Fabian Perl, Svenja; Kamp, Martin; Höfling, Sven

    2015-02-09

    In this work, we report a p- to n-type conductivity transition of GaInNAs (1.0 eV bandgap) layers in p-i-n dilute nitride solar cells continuously controlled by the V/III ratio during growth. Near the transition region, we were able to produce GaInNAs layers with very low effective electrically active doping concentrations resulting in wide depleted areas. We obtained internal quantum efficiencies (IQEs) up to 85% at 0.2 eV above the bandgap. However, the high IQE comes along with an increased dark current density resulting in a decreased open circuit voltage of about 0.2 V. This indicates the formation of non-radiant defect centers related to the p-type to n-type transition. Rapid-thermal annealing of the solar cells on the one hand helps to anneal some of these defects but on the other hand increases the effective doping concentrations.

  4. Characterization of temperature dependent operation of a GaInNAs-based RCEPD designed for 1.3 μm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarcan, F.; Nordin, M. S.; Kuruoğlu, F.; Erol, A.; Vickers, A. J.

    2017-02-01

    We report the characteristics of the temperature dependent operation of a GaInNAs-based resonant-cavity-enhanced photodetector (RCEPD), designed to be operated at the dispersion minimum optical communication window of 1.3 μm. A Transfer-Matrix Method (TMM) was used to design the structure of the device. The absorption layer of the photodetector is comprised of nine 7 nm-thick Ga0.733In0.267N0.025As0.975 (Sb)/GaN0.035As0.965 quantum wells, and 15 and 10 pairs of GaAs/AlAs distributed Bragg reflectors (DBRs) grown as the bottom and top mirrors, to form the cavity of the device. All electrical and optical measurements were carried out over a temperature range from 10 to 40 °C in order to investigate the characteristic of the device. The quantum efficiency is determined to be in the range of 16% (at 10 °C) and 31% (at 40 °C). An excellent wavelength selectivity is observed which changed from 3.7 nm (at 10 °C) to 5.4 nm (at 40 °C). The dark current of the device is measured as 11 nA at 10 °C and 19 nA at 40 °C without bias. The photocurrent at -0.5 V is measured to be 1.5 mA at 25 °C. The high dark current of the device is attributed to weak confinement of the electrons in GaInNAs QW surrounded by the strain-compensator GaNAs barrier layers. The temperature dependent cavity wavelength was analytically calculated and compared with that of experimental results. The temperature dependent linear shifts of the resonance wavelength (dλ / dT) is calculated as 0.077 nm/°C, which is in good agreement with the experimental result, 0.080 nm/°C. Our results reveal that the characteristics of a RCEPD, such as quantum efficiency, FWHM etc., are quite sensitive to temperature changes due to the temperature dependence of the refractive index of the DBRs.

  5. Effect of hyperfine-induced spin mixing on the defect-enabled spin blockade and spin filtering in GaNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puttisong, Y.; Wang, X. J.; Buyanova, I. A.; Chen, W. M.

    2013-03-01

    The effect of hyperfine interaction (HFI) on the recently discovered room-temperature defect-enabled spin-filtering effect in GaNAs alloys is investigated both experimentally and theoretically based on a spin Hamiltonian analysis. We provide direct experimental evidence that the HFI between the electron and nuclear spin of the central Ga atom of the spin-filtering defect, namely, the Gai interstitials, causes strong mixing of the electron spin states of the defect, thereby degrading the efficiency of the spin-filtering effect. We also show that the HFI-induced spin mixing can be suppressed by an application of a longitudinal magnetic field such that the electronic Zeeman interaction overcomes the HFI, leading to well-defined electron spin states beneficial to the spin-filtering effect. The results provide a guideline for further optimization of the defect-engineered spin-filtering effect.

  6. Correlation of the nanostructure with optoelectronic properties during rapid thermal annealing of Ga(NAsP) quantum wells grown on Si(001) substrates

    SciTech Connect

    Wegele, Tatjana; Beyer, Andreas; Gies, Sebastian; Zimprich, Martin; Heimbrodt, Wolfram; Stolz, Wolfgang; Volz, Kerstin

    2016-01-14

    Ga(NAsP) quantum wells grown pseudomorphically on Si substrate are promising candidates for optically active light sources in future optoelectronically integrated circuits on Si substrates. As the material is typically grown at low temperatures, it has to be thermally annealed after growth to remove defects and optimize optoelectronic properties. Here we show by quantitative transmission electron microscopy that two different kinds of structural development are associated with the annealing. First of all, the quantum well homogeneity improves with increasing annealing temperature. For annealing temperatures above 925 °C the composition becomes less homogeneous again. Second, voids form in the quantum well for annealing temperatures above 850 °C. Their density and size increase continuously with increasing annealing temperature. These results are correlated to the optical properties of the samples, where we find from temperature-dependent photoluminescence measurements two scales of disorder, which show the same temperature dependence as the structural properties.

  7. High-power temperature-stable GaInNAs distributed Bragg reflector laser emitting at 1180  nm.

    PubMed

    Korpijärvi, Ville-Markus; Viheriälä, Jukka; Koskinen, Mervi; Aho, Antti T; Guina, Mircea

    2016-02-15

    We report a single-mode 1180 nm distributed Bragg reflector (DBR) laser diode with a high output power of 340 mW. For the fabrication, we employed novel nanoimprint lithography that ensures cost-effective, large-area, conformal patterning and does not require regrowth. The output characteristics exhibited outstanding temperature insensitivity with a power drop of only 30% for an increase of the mount temperature from 20°C to 80°C. The high temperature stability was achieved by using GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells (QWs), which exhibit improved carrier confinement compared to standard InGaAs/GaAs QWs. The corresponding characteristic temperatures were T0=110  K and T1=160  K. Moreover, we used a large detuning between the peak wavelength of the material gain at room temperature and the lasing wavelength determined by the DBR. In addition to good temperature characteristics, GaInNAs/GaAs QWs exhibit relatively low lattice strain with direct impact on improving the lifetime of laser diodes at this challenging wavelength range. The single-mode laser emission could be tuned by changing the mount temperature (0.1 nm/°C) or the drive current (0.5 pm/mA). The laser showed no degradation in a room-temperature lifetime test at 900 mA drive current. These compact and efficient 1180 nm laser diodes are instrumental for the development of compact frequency-doubled yellow-orange lasers, which have important applications in medicine and spectroscopy.

  8. Nitrogen incorporation rate, optimal growth temperature, and AsH 3-flow rate in GaInNAs growth by gas-source MBE using N-radicals as an N-source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitatani, T.; Kondow, M.; Nakahara, K.; Larson, M. C.; Yazawa, Y.; Okai, M.; Uomi, K.

    1999-05-01

    We have investigated the conditions for growing GaInNAs by gas-source MBE using N-radicals as an N-source. The optimal growth temperature of GaInNAs with good surface morphology and PL characteristics was clarified: at higher growth temperature, the surface morphology degraded. On the other hand, PL intensity became weak at temperatures lower than the optimal one. This trend is similar to that in GaInAs grown by MBE. AsH 3-flow rate mainly affected crystal quality of GaInNAs rather than incorporation of nitrogen atoms. It was also confirmed experimentally that the N-radicals produced by RF-discharge are incorporated in the epitaxial layer like dopant atoms, indicating that their sticking coefficient is about one. This result is unlike that for the MOCVD growth using dimethylhydrazine as an N-source. These results are crucial to further improve the crystal quality of GaInNAs.

  9. Hydroxylamine assimilation by Rhodobacter capsulatus E1F1. requirement of the hcp gene (hybrid cluster protein) located in the nitrate assimilation nas gene region for hydroxylamine reduction.

    PubMed

    Cabello, Purificación; Pino, Carmen; Olmo-Mira, M Francisca; Castillo, Francisco; Roldán, M Dolores; Moreno-Vivián, Conrado

    2004-10-29

    Rhodobacter capsulatus E1F1 grows phototrophically with nitrate as nitrogen source. Using primers designed for conserved motifs in bacterial assimilatory nitrate reductases, a 450-bp DNA was amplified by PCR and used for the screening of a genomic library. A cosmid carrying an insert with four SalI fragments of 2.8, 4.1, 4.5, and 5.8 kb was isolated, and DNA sequencing revealed that it contains a nitrate assimilation (nas) gene region, including the hcp gene coding for a hybrid cluster protein (HCP). Expression of hcp is probably regulated by a nitrite-sensitive repressor encoded by the adjacent nsrR gene. A His(6)-HCP was overproduced in Escherichia coli and purified. HCP contained about 6 iron and 4 labile sulfide atoms per molecule, in agreement with the presence of both [2Fe-2S] and [4Fe-2S-2O] clusters, and showed hydroxylamine reductase activity, forming ammonia in vitro with methyl viologen as reductant. The apparent K(m) values for NH(2)OH and methyl viologen were 1 mM and 7 microM, respectively, at the pH and temperature optima (9.3 and 40 degrees C). The activity was oxygen-sensitive and was inhibited by sulfide and iron reagents. R. capsulatus E1F1 grew phototrophically, but not heterotrophically, with 1 mM NH(2)OH as nitrogen source, and up to 10 mM NH(2)OH was taken up by anaerobic resting cells. Ammonium was transiently accumulated in the media, and its assimilation was prevented by L-methionine-D,L-sulfoximine, a glutamine synthetase inhibitor. In addition, hydroxylamine- or nitrite-grown cells showed the higher hydroxylamine reductase activities. However, R. capsulatus B10S, a strain lacking the whole hcp-nas region, did not grow with 1 mM NH(2)OH. Also, E. coli cells overproducing HCP tolerate hydroxyl-amine better during anaerobic growth. These results suggest that HCP is involved in assimilation of NH(2)OH, a toxic product that could be formed during nitrate assimilation, probably in the nitrite reduction step.

  10. Nitrogen incorporation into GaInNAs lattice-matched to GaAs: The effects of growth temperature and thermal annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Pavelescu, E.-M.; Wagner, J.; Komsa, H.-P.; Rantala, T.T.; Dumitrescu, M.; Pessa, M.

    2005-10-15

    We have studied the effects of growth temperature and subsequent thermal annealing on nitrogen incorporation into lattice-matched dilute Ga{sub 0.942}In{sub 0.058}NAs-on-GaAs epilayers, which were grown by the molecular-beam epitaxy method. The samples were studied experimentally by means of x-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy and theoretically by calculations within the density-functional theory. Over the entire range of growth temperatures applied (410-470 deg. C), nitrogen appeared to be mainly located on substitutional sites in 'short-range-order clusters' as N-Ga{sub 4} and, to a lesser extent, as N-Ga{sub 3}In. There were also indications of the presence of nitrogen dimers NN, as suggested by Raman spectroscopy, in qualitative agreement with the calculations. An increase in growth temperature reduced the amount of substitutional nitrogen and decreased the number of N-Ga{sub 4} clusters relative to N-Ga{sub 3}In. Postgrowth thermal annealing promoted the formation of In-N bonds and caused a blueshift in the optical band gap, which increased as the growth temperature was lowered.

  11. Pratt and Whitney/Boeing Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts: Final Report for NASA Contract NAS3-97144, Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, Douglas; Bock, Larry A.; Bielak, Gerald W.; Dougherty, R. P.; Premo, John W.; Scharpf, Dan F.; Yu, Jia

    2014-01-01

    Major airports in the world's air transportation systems face a serious problem in providing greater capacity to meet the ever increasing demands of air travel. This problem could be relieved if airports are allowed to increase their operating time, now restricted by curfews and by relaxing present limits on takeoffs and landings. The key operational issue in extending the present curfews is noise. In response to these increasing restrictive noise regulations, NASA has launched a program to validate through engine testing, noise reduction concepts and technologies that have evolved from the Advanced Subsonic Technologies (AST) Noise Reduction Program. The goal of this AST program was to develop and validate technology that reduces engine noise and improves nacelle suppression effectiveness relative to 1992 technology. Contract NAS3-97144 titled "Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts" (EVNRC) was awarded to P&W on August 12, 1997 to conduct full scale noise reduction tests in two Phases on a PW4098 engine. The following Section 1.2 provides a brief description of the overall program. The remainder of this report provides a detailed documentation of Phase I of the program.

  12. Vertical Distribution of Bacterial Communities in the Indian Ocean as Revealed by Analyses of 16S rRNA and nasA Genes.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Xuexia; Jiao, Nianzhi

    2016-09-01

    Bacteria play an important role in the marine biogeochemical cycles. However, research on the bacterial community structure of the Indian Ocean is scarce, particularly within the vertical dimension. In this study, we investigated the bacterial diversity of the pelagic, mesopelagic and bathypelagic zones of the southwestern Indian Ocean (50.46°E, 37.71°S). The clone libraries constructed by 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that most phylotypes retrieved from the Indian Ocean were highly divergent from those retrieved from other oceans. Vertical differences were observed based on the analysis of natural bacterial community populations derived from the 16S rRNA gene sequences. Based on the analysis of the nasA gene sequences from GenBank database, a pair of general primers was developed and used to amplify the bacterial nitrate-assimilating populations. Environmental factors play an important role in mediating the bacterial communities in the Indian Ocean revealed by canonical correlation analysis.

  13. DNA microarray-based solid-phase PCR on copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) silicon coated slides: An example of relevant clinical application.

    PubMed

    Damin, Francesco; Galbiati, Silvia; Ferrari, Maurizio; Chiari, Marcella

    2016-04-15

    In a previous study we developed a highly sensitive DNA microarray for the detection of common KRAS oncogenic mutations, which has been proven to be highly specific in assigning the correct genotype without any enrichment strategy even in the presence of minority mutated alleles. However, in this approach, the need of a spotter for the deposition of the purified PCR products on the substrates and the purification step of the conventional PCR are serious drawbacks. To overcome these limitations we have introduced the solid-phase polymerase chain reaction (SP-PCR) to form the array of PCR products starting from the oligonucleotide primers. This work was possible thanks to the great thermal stability of the copoly (DMA-NAS-MAPS) coating which withstands PCR thermal cycling temperatures. As an example of the application of this platform we performed the analysis of six common mutations in the codon 12 of KRAS gene (G12A, G12C, G12D, G12R, G12S, and G12V). In conclusion solid-phase PCR, combined with dual-color hybridization, allows mutation analysis in a shorter time span and is more suitable for automation.

  14. UAS in the NAS Air Traffic Controller Acceptability Study-1: The Effects of Horizontal Miss Distances on Simulated UAS and Manned Aircraft Encounters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghatas, Rania W.; Comstock, James R., Jr.; Consiglio, Maria C.; Chamberlain, James P.; Hoffler, Keith D.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined air traffic controller acceptability ratings based on the effects of differing horizontal miss distances (HMDs) for encounters between UAS and manned aircraft. In a simulation of the Dallas/Fort Worth (DFW) East-side airspace, the CAS-1 experiment at NASA Langley Research Center enlisted fourteen recently retired DFW air traffic controllers to rate well-clear volumes based on differing HMDs that ranged from 0.5 NM to 3.0 NM. The controllers were tasked with rating these HMDs from "too small" to "too excessive" on a defined, 1-5, scale and whether these distances caused any disruptions to the controller and/or to the surrounding traffic flow. Results of the study indicated a clear favoring towards a particular HMD range. Controller workload was also measured. Data from this experiment and subsequent experiments will play a crucial role in the FAA's establishment of rules, regulations, and procedures to safely and efficiently integrate UAS into the NAS.

  15. Binding S0.6 Se0.4 in 1D Carbon Nanofiber with CS Bonding for High-Performance Flexible Li-S Batteries and Na-S Batteries.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yu; Zeng, Linchao; Hu, Shuhe; Jiang, Yu; Yuan, Beibei; Yu, Yan

    2017-03-29

    A one-step synthesis procedure is developed to prepare flexible S0.6 Se0.4 @carbon nanofibers (CNFs) electrode by coheating S0.6 Se0.4 powder with electrospun polyacrylonitrile nanofiber papers at 600 °C. The obtained S0.6 Se0.4 @CNFs film can be used as cathode material for high-performance Li-S batteries and room temperature (RT) Na-S batteries directly. The superior lithium/sodium storage performance derives from its rational structure design, such as the chemical bonding between Se and S, the chemical bonding between S0.6 Se0.4 and CNFs matrix, and the 3D CNFs network. This easy one-step synthesis procedure provides a feasible route to prepare electrode materials for high-performance Li-S and RT Na-S batteries.

  16. Effects of the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist NAS-181 on extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA in the frontal cortex and ventral hippocampus of awake rats: a microdialysis study.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiao Jing; Wang, Fu-Hua; Stenfors, Carina; Ogren, Sven Ove; Kehr, Jan

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the 5-HT(1B) receptor antagonist NAS-181 ((R)-(+)-2-(3-morpholinomethyl-2H-chromen-8-yl) oxymethyl-morpholine methanesulfonate) on cholinergic, glutamatergic and GABA-ergic neurotransmission in the rat brain in vivo. Extracellular levels of acetylcholine, glutamate and GABA were monitored by microdialysis in the frontal cortex (FC) and ventral hippocampus (VHipp) in separate groups of freely moving rats. NAS-181 (1, 5 or 10 mg/kg, s.c.) caused a dose-dependent increase in ACh levels, reaching the maximal values of 500% (FC) and 230% (VHipp) of controls at 80 min post-injection. On the contrary, NAS-181 injected at doses of 10 or 20 mg/kg s.c. had no effect on basal extracellular levels of Glu and GABA in these areas. The present data suggest that ACh neurotransmission in the FC and VHipp, the brain structures strongly implicated in cognitive function, is under tonic inhibitory control of 5-HT(1B) heteroreceptors localized at the cholinergic terminals in these areas.

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the non-ATPase subunit Nas6 in complex with the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the 26S proteasome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Yoshihiro; Umehara, Takashi; Tanaka, Akiko; Horikoshi, Masami; Padmanabhan, Balasundaram; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2007-03-01

    The complex of the non-ATPase subunit Nas6 with the C-terminal domain of the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the 26S proteasome from S. cerevisiae was co-expressed in E. coli and purified to homogeneity. The crystals obtained from the protein complex diffracted to a resolution of 2.2 Å. The non-ATPase subunit Nas6, which is the human orthologue of gankyrin, was co-expressed with the C-terminal domain of the ATPase subunit Rpt3 of the yeast 26S proteasome in Escherichia coli, purified to near-homogeneity and crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The protein crystallized in space group P2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 60.38, b = 100.22, c = 72.20 Å, β = 94.70° and with three Nas6–Rpt3C molecules per asymmetric unit. The crystal diffracted to beyond 2.2 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation.

  18. Estudo exaustivo e sistemático de erros nas provas da olimpíada brasileira de astronomia - resultados preliminares

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliveira, F. S.; Canalle, J. B. G.; Villas da Rocha, J. F.

    2003-08-01

    A Olimpíada Brasileira de Astronomia (OBA) contou, em sua quinta edição, com a participação de mais de 60 mil alunos dos ensinos fundamental e médio de praticamente todo o território nacional. Uma das formas de controle que a sua coordenação nacional possui sobre a correção, levada a cabo pelos professores que as aplicaram, é a do envio, por parte destes professores, das 10 melhores provas de cada um dos três níveis nos quais a Olimpíada é realizada. Assim, e dado ao caráter discursivo das provas da Olimpíada, a sua coordenação nacional dispõe de um vasto acervo sobre as concepções, certas ou erradas, dos alunos que dela participaram. Este conjunto de dados jamais fora explorado até o presente trabalho que pretende ser, neste sentido, inaugural. Nas provas dos níveis I e II da V OBA, que abrangem todo o conjunto do ensino fundamental, uma das questões versava sobre a noção que os alunos tinham sobre como os habitantes da Terra situam-se sobre sua superfície. Fizemos um estudo sistemático das respostas a esta questão. Primeiramente, todas as modalidades de erros foram levantadas; em seguida, realizamos uma distribuição por idade tanto do índice de acerto como da ocorrência e da distribuição de cada erro. Como resultado, obtivemos que, em ambos os níveis: 1) as concepções errôneas não se apresentam distribuídas aleatoriamente; 2) há uma concentração no tipo de erro apresentado; 3) há uma tendência de progressivo acerto com relação à idade quando os dados são considerados em termos nacionais; 4) esta tendência nacional é fraca ou mesmo não é verificada em alguns dos estados com maior patamar de acerto.

  19. Abundâncias de oxigênio e enxofre nas estrelas de tipo solar da vizinhança solar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Requeijo, F.; Porto de Mello, G. F.

    2003-08-01

    Alguns resultados sugerem que o Sol seja 58% mais abundante em oxigênio que o meio interestelar local. Esta anomalia parece estender-se para o carbono e o criptônio. Entre as possíveis explicações deste fenômeno estão: uma supernova de tipo II que tenha enriquecido a nebulosa protosolar, tornando-a superabundante em oxigênio; um episódio de infall de material pobre em metais sobre o disco Galático, diluindo o meio interestelar local ou uma migração dinâmica do Sol de uma órbita mais interna da Galáxia para sua posição atual. A escolha entre estes cenários exige o conhecimento preciso da abundância solar em relação às anãs G da vizinhança. Neste contexto, o oxigênio e enxofre, são elementos-chave por serem ambos produzidos pelas supernovas de tipo II, devendo portanto possuir o mesmo padrão de abundância. Este projeto visa esclarecer qual a posição do Sol na distribuição local de abundâncias de enxofre e oxigênio para uma amostra de estrelas de tipo solar com idades e metalicidades bem conhecidas. Para tal, analisamos espectros de alta resolução e alta relação sinal-ruído nas regiões espectrais de ll 6300, 7774 (O) e l8695 (S). Para o enxofre encontramos que o Sol parece ser uma estrela típica dentre as da vizinhança, e que este elemento não mostra a sobreabundância para baixas metalicidades, já bem estabelecida para o oxigênio. Discutimos as abundâncias do enxofre no contexto da Evolução Química da Galáxia. Apresentamos resultados preliminares muito precisos para a linha proibida do oxigênio l6300 e comparamos estes com os obtidos para o tripleto em l7774. Quantificamos os efeitos não-ETL presentes no tripleto em função dos parâmetros atmosféricos estelares.

  20. A estabilidade dos PAHS em função da energia da radiação interestelar nas faixas UV e raios-X

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinotti, R.; Costa, R. K.; Boechat-Roberty, H. M.; Lago, A.; Souza, G. B.

    2003-08-01

    A nebulosa CRL 618, uma proto-nebulosa planetária cuja nuvem molecular espessa envolve uma estrela B0, contém uma grande quantidade de C2H2 e CH4. Estas moléculas são consideradas os tijolos da criação de grandes moléculas carbonadas como os Hidrocarbonetos Policíclicos Aromáticos (PAHs). Esta nebulosa, por estar exposta a intensos campos de UV e Raios-X, é uma região de fotodissociação molecular que propicia a formação de novas moléculas, confirmada pela presença de C4H2 e C6H6 (Benzeno), que é a unidade básica dos PAHs. Atribui-se a esta família de moléculas orgânicas duas propriedades fundamentais, a resistência para sobreviver ao campo de radiação UV interestelar e a geração das bandas de emissão não identificadas (UIR) observadas no infravermelho. No entanto, alguns autores questionam a resistência dos PAHs ao campo de radiação UV interestelar. Empregando a técnica de Espectrometria de Massas por Tempo de Vôo, no modo de coincidência fotoelétron-fotoíon, estudamos a ionização e fragmentação das seguintes moléculas: Benzeno, Benzeno deuterado, Naftaleno, Antraceno e Fenantreno. Utilizamos uma fonte de Hélio monocromática em 21,21 eV (584,5 Å) e a radiação Síncroton do Laboratório Nacional de Luz Síncroton (LNLS) em diferentes energias nas proximidades da borda do C 1s ( 290 eV). Comprovamos a estabilidade dos PAHs sob ação de UV (21,21 eV), onde eles apresentam um baixo nível de fotodissociação, produzindo fragmentos ionizados com rendimento total na ordem de 5 por cento em relação ao íon molecular pai. Entretanto, em altas energias, na faixa de Raios-X, a quebra destas moléculas torna-se mais intensa, com a produção de muitos fragmentos. Como uma das rotas de fragmentação do Naftaleno é [(C10H8) = > (C6H6+) + (C4H2) + (e-)], e como temos as evidências observacionais da existência do C4H2 e C6H6 na nebulosa CRL 618, sugerimos que este ambiente também possui o Naftaleno.

  1. Physicochemical properties of the modeled structure of astacin metalloprotease moulting enzyme NAS-36 and mapping the druggable allosteric space of Heamonchus contortus, Brugia malayi and Ceanorhabditis elegans via molecular dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Om Prakash; Agrawal, Sonali; Kumar, M Suresh

    2013-12-01

    Nematodes represent the second largest phylum in the animal kingdom. It is the most abundant species (500,000) in the planet. It causes chronic, debilitating infections worldwide such as ascariasis, trichuriasis, hookworm, enterobiasis, strongyloidiasis, filariasis and trichinosis, among others. Molecular modeling tools can play an important role in the identification and structural investigation of molecular targets that can act as a vital candidate against filariasis. In this study, sequence analysis of NAS-36 from H. contortus (Heamonchus contortus), B. malayi (Brugia malayi) and C. elegans (Ceanorhabditis elegans) has been performed, in order to identify the conserved residues. Tertiary structure was developed for an insight into the molecular structure of the enzyme. Molecular Dynamics Simulation (MDS) studies have been carried out to analyze the stability and the physical properties of the proposed enzyme models in the H. contortus, B. malayi and C. elegans. Moreover, the drug binding sites have been mapped for inhibiting the function of NAS-36 enzyme. The molecular identity of this protease could eventually demonstrate how ex-sheathment is regulated, as well as provide a potential target of anthelmintics for the prevention of nematode infections.

  2. Cancer risk assessment foundation unraveling: new historical evidence reveals that the US National Academy of Sciences (US NAS), Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation (BEAR) Committee Genetics Panel falsified the research record to promote acceptance of the LNT.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2015-04-01

    The NAS Genetics Panel (1956) recommended a switch from a threshold to a linear dose response for radiation risk assessment. To support this recommendation, geneticists on the panel provided individual estimates of the number of children in subsequent generations (one to ten) that would be adversely affected due to transgenerational reproductive cell mutations. It was hoped that there would be close agreement among the individual risk estimates. However, extremely large ranges of variability and uncertainty characterized the wildly divergent expert estimates. The panel members believed that sharing these estimates with the scientific community and general public would strongly undercut their linearity recommendation, as it would have only highlighted their own substantial uncertainties. Essentially, their technical report in the journal Science omitted and misrepresented key adverse reproductive findings in an effort to ensure support for their linearity recommendation. These omissions and misrepresentations not only belie the notion of an impartial and independent appraisal by the NAS Panel, but also amount to falsification and fabrication of the research record at the highest possible level, leading ultimately to the adoption of LNT by governments worldwide. Based on previously unexamined correspondence among panel members and Genetics Panel meeting transcripts, this paper provides the first documentation of these historical developments.

  3. The Genetics Panel of the NAS BEAR I Committee (1956): epistolary evidence suggests self-interest may have prompted an exaggeration of radiation risks that led to the adoption of the LNT cancer risk assessment model.

    PubMed

    Calabrese, Edward J

    2014-09-01

    This paper extends a series of historical papers which demonstrated that the linear-no-threshold (LNT) model for cancer risk assessment was founded on ideological-based scientific deceptions by key radiation genetics leaders. Based on an assessment of recently uncovered personal correspondence, it is shown that some members of the United States (US) National Academy of Sciences (NAS) Biological Effects of Atomic Radiation I (BEAR I) Genetics Panel were motivated by self-interest to exaggerate risks to promote their science and personal/professional agenda. Such activities have profound implications for public policy and may have had a significant impact on the adoption of the LNT model for cancer risk assessment.

  4. An In-Port Feeding System for Shipboard Personnel. Volume 3. A personnel, Equipment, and Facility Evaluation of the Enlisted Dining Facilities at NAS North Island and NAVSTA San Diego.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-05-01

    highly acceptable and nutritious meals at a quality level that was equal to or better than that presently being served to shipboard personnel while in...27. Peas 42.60 5.68 5 44.00 22.17 5 28. Potatoes 74.04 25.87 23 59.89 24.75 18 11 .3 ty ,p Table 1 (contd) "o EDF NAS North Island EDF NAVSTA San...32.25 14.41 454. Greens, Mixed 48.36 18.15 11 44.33 15.91 6 55. Peas 54.00 29.94 7 42.75 19.72 4 56. Potatoes 72.41 22.48 32 55.78 16.57 1857. Rice

  5. Electric Machines with Non-Radially Mounted Rectangular Permanent Magnets / Elektriskās Mašīnas Ar Prizmatiskiem Neradiāli Novietotiem Pastāvīgajiem Magnētiem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levin, N.; Pugachev, V.; Dirba, J.; Lavrinovicha, L.

    2013-04-01

    The authors analyze the advantages and disadvantages of brushless synchronous electric machines with radially and non-radially mounted rectangular permanent magnets. The results show that the proposed nonradial mounting of permanent magnets considered in the paper, in several cases (e.g. multi-pole brushless generators with tooth windings of the armature) allows achievement of the following advantages: better technology of manufacturing the electric machine owing to simple packing of the stator winding in the stator open slots, which also increases the copper slot fillfactor; reduction in the mass-and-size of permanent magnets at least twice; significantly lower cost of the electric machine; and, finally, its greater specific power. Darbā tiek analizētas priekšrocības un trūkumi sinhronām bezkontaktu mašīnām ar radiāli un neradiāli novietotiem prizmatiskiem pastāvīgajiem magnētiem. Parādīts, ka vairākos gadījumos, piemēram, daudzpolu bezkontaktu sinhronajos ģeneratoros ar zobu tinumiem, neradiāls pastāvīgo magnētu izvietojums nodrošina vairākas priekšrocības: uzlabojas mašīnas izgatavošanas tehnoloģija, jo statora atvērtajās rievās vieglāk novietot tinumus un iespējams sasniegt augstāku rievas aizpildījuma koeficientu; samazinās pastāvīgo magnētu masa un izmaksas; palielinās mašīnas īpatnēja jauda.

  6. Prospective randomised comparative study of the effect of buprenorphine, methadone and heroin on the course of pregnancy, birthweight of newborns, early postpartum adaptation and course of the neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in women followed up in the outpatient department.

    PubMed

    Binder, Tomás; Vavrinková, Blanka

    2008-02-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of substitution therapy in heroin addicted pregnant women on the course of pregnancy, perinatal outcomes and course of the neonatal abstinence syndrome. A five-year randomised prospective comparative study The study was carried out in the period of 2002-2007. The group of patients included 147 i.v. heroin-addicted pregnant women. All of them were outpatients of our Perinatal Care Unit. Their daily dose of heroin was approximately lg. Later, 30 women were disqualified from the study for breaking the randomised criteria engagement. The substitution therapy in women who agreed to undergo it, started during the I. trimester of pregnancy. Finally, 47 heroin, 32 methadone and 38 buprenorphine addicted women were enrolled in the study. Birthweight of newborns was compared with the national birthweight tables. Severity and duration of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) were evaluated by Finnegan s score scale. None of the women delivered before the end of 34th gestational week. We did not encounter any perinatal death or developmental defect. The lowest birthweight, the highest number of newborns with IUGR and the most numerous placental changes were found in the group of heroin-addicted women. The differences compared to the two groups receiving substitution therapy were statistically significant (p < 0.05). The severity and course of NAS were the most severe (p < 0.001) in newborns of women from the methadone group. Comparison of the groups of outpatients is in many ways questionable because of the restricted possibility of the patients' control. The lifestyle of addicted women has the same impact as the drug use alone. This is probably the main reason for differences in some of the monitored parameters between individual groups. Based on our results we can state that substitution therapy provides pregnant women with the possibility of social stabilization and adequate prenatal care. substitution therapy decreases the

  7. Response to Questions on Presentation to NAS

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, W R

    2011-03-17

    Response to questions on the presentation 'Overview to Chamber and Power Plant Designs for IFE' made at the 1/29-31 meeting of the National Academies Committee on the Prospects for Inertial Confinement Fusion Energy Systems.

  8. NAS Forums Focus on National Science Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A series of public meetings designed to focus on complex and persistent problems of national importance involving science has been launched. Topics such as drugs, energy, and natural disasters are included. (DF)

  9. NAS Report Reveals Dangers From SST

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Jo Ann V.

    1973-01-01

    Reported are some harmful effects of supersonic travel on humans and other living organisms. Slight decreases in ozone concentration as a result of emissions from the SST aircrafts reduce absorption of ultraviolet radiation. Effects of this may include skin cancer, distort balance of activity in cells and have a deleterious effect on insects and…

  10. Input to NAS Plasma 2010 panel

    SciTech Connect

    Molvik, A W

    2006-01-30

    A number of areas of plasma physics have had outstanding success over the last decade. The author comments on progress in understanding and manipulating particle beams, a variety of non-neutral plasmas. Some of the key manipulations were made possible by immersing a particle beam in neutral plasma in order to greatly reduce space-charge forces on the beam.

  11. Multiband GaNAsP Quaternary Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, K.M.; Walukiewicz, W.; Ager III, J.W.; Bour, D.; Farshchi,R.; Dubon, O.D.; Li, S.X.; Sharp, I.D.; Haller, E.E.

    2005-12-08

    We have synthesized GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-y}P{sub y} alloys (x {approx} 0.3-1% and y = 0-0.4) using nitrogen N ion implantation into GaAsP epilayers followed by pulsed laser melting and rapid thermal annealing techniques. As predicted by the band anticrossing model, the incorporation of N splits the conduction band (E{sub M}) of the GaAs{sub 1-y}P{sub y} substrate, and strong optical transitions from the valence band to the lower (E{sub -}) and upper (E{sub +}) conduction subbands are observed. The relative strengths of the E{sub -} and E{sub +} transition change as the localized N level E{sub N} emerges from the conduction band forming narrow intermediate band for y > 0.3. The results show that GaN{sub x}As{sub 1-x-y}P{sub y} alloys with y > 0.3 is a three band semiconductor alloy with potential applications for high-efficiency intermediate band solar cells.

  12. Ecological risk assessment framework -- the NAS perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Barnthouse, L.W.

    1993-06-01

    A Workshop on Ecological Risk Assessment was held on February 26--March 1, 1991, at Airlie House, Warrenton, Virginia. In addition to presentation and discussion of the case study papers, the workshop included breakout sessions to discuss conceptual and technical aspects of ecological risk assessment. A general consensus emerged that an ecological version of the 1983 framework is desirable and feasible. The committee concluded that the 1983 human health framework could be expanded to accomodate both human health and ecological risk assessment. For general applicability to ecological assessments, the 1983 scheme requires augmentation to address some of the interfaces between science and management, primarily because of the need to focus on appropriate questions relevant to applicable environmental law and policy under different circumstances. Specifically, the scheme needs modification to address (1) the influence of legal and regulatory considerations on the initial stages of ecological risk assessment and (2) the importance of characterizing ecological risks in terms that are intelligible to risk managers. The committee`s opinion is that these augmentations are as important for human health risk assessment as they are for ecological risk assessment. This paper briefly describes the framework recommended by the Committee and compares it to EPA`s recently-published Framework for Ecological Risk Assessment.

  13. NAS Report Reveals Dangers From SST

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fowler, Jo Ann V.

    1973-01-01

    Reported are some harmful effects of supersonic travel on humans and other living organisms. Slight decreases in ozone concentration as a result of emissions from the SST aircrafts reduce absorption of ultraviolet radiation. Effects of this may include skin cancer, distort balance of activity in cells and have a deleterious effect on insects and…

  14. The NAS Perchlorate Review: Adverse Effects?

    SciTech Connect

    Johnston, Richard B.; Corley, Richard; Cowan, Linda; Utiger, Robert D.

    2005-11-01

    To the editor: Drs. Ginsberg and Rice argue that the reference dose for perchlorate of 0.0007 mg/kg per day recommended by the National Academies’ Committee to Assess the Health Implications of Perchlorate Ingestion is not adequately protective. As members of the committee, we disagree. Ginsberg and Rice base their conclusion on three points. The first involves the designation of the point of departure as a NOEL (no-observed-effect level) versus a LOAEL (lowest-observed-adverse- effect level). The committee chose as its point of departure a dose of perchlorate (0.007 mg/kg per day) that when given for 14 days to 7 normal subjects did not cause a significant decrease in the group mean thyroid iodide uptake (Greer et al. 2002). Accordingly, the committee considered it a NOEL. Ginsberg and Rice focus on the fact that only 7 subjects were given that dose, and they 1seem to say that attention should be paid only to the results in those subjects in whom there was a 1fall in thyroid iodide uptake, and that the results in those in whom there was no fall or an increase should be ignored. They consider the dose to be a LOAEL because of the fall in uptake in those few subjects. It is important to note that a statistically significant decrease of, for example, 5% or even 10%, would not be biologically important and, more important, would not be sustained. For example, in another study (Braverman et al. 2004), administration of 0.04 mg/kg per day to normal subjects for 6 months had no effect on thyroid iodide uptake when measured at 3 and 6 months, and no effect on serum thyroid hormone or thyrotropin concentrations measured monthly (inspection of Figure 5A in the paper by Greer et al. suggests that this dose would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake by about 25% if measured at 2 weeks). The second issue involves database uncertainty. In clinical studies, perchlorate has been administered prospectively to 68 normal subjects for 2 weeks to 6 months. In one study (Brabant et al. 1992), a dose of 9.2 mg/kg per day for 4 weeks had no effect on thyroid function. In occupational studies, doses as high as 0.5 mg/kg per day were not associated with adverse effects on thyroid function in workers. In epidemiologic studies, there were no abnormalities in growth or thyroid function in children exposed life-long to 100 to 120 mg of perchlorate per liter of drinking water, or in pregnant women and newborn infants similarly exposed. Given the choice of a non-adverse effect (inhibition of iodide uptake by the thyroid) as the point of departure and the multiple studies in which doses of perchlorate much larger than 0.007 mg/kg per day had no effect on any aspect of thyroid function, the committee did not apply a database uncertainty factor. Finally, Ginsberg and Rice argue that inhibition of thyroid iodide uptake is adverse. That conclusion assumes that any acute inhibition would be sustained, so that thyroid hormone production would fall. That is not the case. There is remarkable compensation for even substantial reductions in thyroid iodide uptake – and thyroid hormone production. As noted above, subjects given 0.04 mg/kg per day for 6 months and 9.2 mg/kg per day for 4 weeks-doses that certainly would inhibit thyroid iodide uptake for a few weeks-had no fall in serum thyroid hormone or rise in serum thyrotropin concentrations (the hallmark of even minor systemic thyroid deficiency). Short-term inhibition of thyroid iodide uptake is not an adverse effect; it has no adverse consequences, because there is rapid compensation mediated by several independent processes. One is upregulation of the thyroid sodium-iodide transport system, as a result of intrathyroidal iodide deficiency. The second, should there be even a very small fall in thyroid hormone production, is an increase in thyrotropin secretion, resulting in overall stimulation of the thyroid gland.

  15. Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment (NAS Final ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    On December 18, 2008, the National Academy of Sciences' National Research Council released a final report, requested and sponsored by the EPA, entitled Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: The Task Ahead. Risk assessment has become a dominant public policy tool for making choices, based on limited resources, to protect public health and the environment. It has been instrumental to the mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as well as other federal agencies in evaluating public health concerns, informing regulatory and technological decisions, prioritizing research needs and funding, and in developing approaches for cost-benefit analysis. People are exposed to a variety of chemicals throughout their daily lives. To protect public health, regulators use risk assessments to examine the effects of chemical exposures. This book provides guidance for assessing the risk of phthalates, chemicals found in many consumer products that have been shown to affect the development of the male reproductive system of laboratory animals. Because people are exposed to multiple phthalates and other chemicals that affect male reproductive development, a cumulative risk assessment should be conducted that evaluates the combined effects of exposure to all these chemicals. The book suggests an approach for cumulative risk assessment that can serve as a model for evaluating the health risks of other types of chemicals.

  16. A Report on the Atitudes and Behaviors of Sauk Valley Community College Students Regarding Alcohol, Sex, and Exercise.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferranto, Michael D.

    A stratified random sample of 538 students at Sauk Valley Community College in Illinois were surveyed in class about their attitudes and behaviors regarding alcohol, sex, and exercise. Study findings included the following: (1) one-half of the respondents indicated that they never read the student newspaper, and 22% that they rarely read it; (2)…

  17. Strategic Plans for the Future of Solar Physics: a community discussion of the NASA Sun-Earth Connection Program Roadmap and the NAS Decadal Survey of Astronomy and Astrophysics (Solar Astronomy section)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrijver, K.; Knoelker, M.

    1999-05-01

    optimal representation for solar physics in the Decadal Survey. The Roadmap Committee and the Decadal Survey's solar panel encourage the whole solar physics community to contact them prior to the meeting. The list of the committee/panel members and their e-mail addresses, as well as related information, can be accessed via their websites at http://www.lmsal.com/sec/ and http://www.nas.edu/bpa/projects/astrosurvey/solar/ , respectively.

  18. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in theterrestrial high l atitudes : relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  19. Spaceborne microwave remote sensing of seasonal freeze-thaw processes in theterrestrial high l atitudes : relationships with land-atmosphere CO2 exchange

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDonald, Kyle C.; Kimball, John S.; Zhao, Maosheng; Njoku, Eni; Zimmermann, Reiner; Running, Steven W.

    2004-01-01

    Landscape transitions between seasonally frozen and thawed conditions occur each year over roughly 50 million square kilometers of Earth's Northern Hemisphere. These relatively abrupt transitions represent the closest analog to a biospheric and hydrologic on/off switch existing in nature, affecting surface meteorological conditions, ecological trace gas dynamics, energy exchange and hydrologic activity profoundly. We utilize time series satellite-borne microwave remote sensing measurements from the Special Sensor Microwave Imager (SSM/I) to examine spatial and temporal variability in seasonal freeze/thaw cycles for the pan-Arctic basin and Alaska. Regional measurements of spring thaw timing are derived using daily brightness temperature measurements from the 19 GHz, horizontally polarized channel, separately for overpasses with 6 AM and 6 PM equatorial crossing times. Spatial and temporal patterns in regional freeze/thaw dynamics show distinct differences between North America and Eurasia, and boreal forest and Arctic tundra biomes. Annual anomalies in the timing of thawing in spring also correspond closely to seasonal atmospheric CO2 concentration anomalies derived from NOAA CMDL arctic and subarctic monitoring stations. Classification differences between AM and PM overpass data average approximately 5 days for the region, though both appear to be effective surrogates for monitoring annual growing seasons at high latitudes.

  20. NAS Automation Equipment Operating Cost Estimates, FY 1978-1984,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    AIRWAY FACILITIES cost $78,947,000 (70%), AIR TRAFFIC software support was $30,027,000 (27%) and other labor was $3,244,000 (3%). Support of the Enroute...andRepair . 4-9 4.7 Support Engineering................4-10 4.8 Automatic Data Interchange System, Service’B . .... 4-10 4.9 Field Software ...Maintenance .. .. .. ..... ...... 4-10 4.10 AT Training....................4-10 4.11 Operational Software S4pport........................4-11 ’ 4.12 NAFEC

  1. Science Policy: Former NAS Official Reviews World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas F.

    1982-01-01

    Issues discussed with Thomas F. Malone (former Foreign Secretary-National Academy of Sciences) include: scientists role in dealing with such global problems as nuclear war and needs in developing countries; scientific relations with China/Soviet Union; scientific enterprise/human rights; science/technology role in foreign policy; and political…

  2. NAS Associate Works on Environmental Implications of Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Manomita Patra joined the EPA's, Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division at the Las Vegas, NV location in June 2007. Her research project parallels her previous interests in the genotoxicity of mercury in plants. She is working with Dr. Kim Rogers and Tammy Jones-Lep...

  3. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: NOVOCS EVALUATION AT NAS NORTH ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a SITE Technology Capsule. The MACTEC, Inc. (MACTEC), NoVOCs(TM) in-well volatile organic compounds (VOC) stripping technology is an in-situ groundwater remediation technology designed for the cleanup of groundwater contaminated with VOCs. The NoVOCs(TM) technology was ev...

  4. NAS Associate Works on Environmental Implications of Nanoparticles

    EPA Science Inventory

    Dr. Manomita Patra joined the EPA's, Human Exposure and Atmospheric Sciences Division at the Las Vegas, NV location in June 2007. Her research project parallels her previous interests in the genotoxicity of mercury in plants. She is working with Dr. Kim Rogers and Tammy Jones-Lep...

  5. Response to NAS Request for Information on Chamber Repetition Rate

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Wayne R.

    2011-08-19

    This purpose of this report is to “Provide further information on the issues of repetition rates and chamber clearing issues for dry wall and liquid wall chamber concepts for IFE; namely what are the issues, possible solutions and needed R&D?”

  6. SITE TECHNOLOGY CAPSULE: NOVOCS EVALUATION AT NAS NORTH ISLAND

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a SITE Technology Capsule. The MACTEC, Inc. (MACTEC), NoVOCs(TM) in-well volatile organic compounds (VOC) stripping technology is an in-situ groundwater remediation technology designed for the cleanup of groundwater contaminated with VOCs. The NoVOCs(TM) technology was ev...

  7. Flight Test Overview for UAS Integration in the NAS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Hayes, Peggy S.; Kim, Sam K.; Bridges, Wayne; Marston, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration is conducting a series of flight tests intended to support the reduction of barriers that prevent unmanned aircraft from flying without the required waivers from the Federal Aviation Administration. The most recent testing supported two separate test configurations. The first investigated the timing of Detect and Avoid (DAA) alerting thresholds using a radar-equipped unmanned vehicle and multiple live intruders flown at varying encounter geometries. The second configuration included a surrogate unmanned vehicle (flown from a ground control station, with a safety pilot on board) flying a mission in a virtual air traffic control airspace sector using research pilot displays and DAA advisories to maintain separation from live and virtual aircraft. The test was conducted over a seven-week span in the summer of 2015. The data from over 100 encounter sorties will be used to inform the RTCA Phase 1 Detect and Avoid and Command and Control Minimum Operating Performance Standards (MOPS) intended to be completed by the summer of 2016. Follow-on flight-testing is planned for the spring of 2016 to capture remaining encounters and support validation of the MOPS.

  8. Feasibility study for a secondary Na/S battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abraham, K. M.; Schiff, R.; Brummer, S. B.

    1979-01-01

    The feasibility of a moderate temperature Na battery was studied. This battery is to operate at a temperature in the range of 100-150 C. Two kinds of cathode were investigated: (1) a soluble S cathode consisting of a solution of Na2Sn in an organic solvent and (2) an insoluble S cathode consisting of a transition metal dichalcogenide in contact with a Na(+)ion conducting electrolyte. Four amide solvents, dimethyl acetamide, diethyl acetamide, N-methyl acetamide and acetamide, were investigated as possible solvents for the soluble S cathode. Results of stability and electrochemical studies using these solvents are presented. The dialkyl substituted amides were found to be superior. Although the alcohol 1,3-cyclohexanediol was found to be stable in the presence of Na2Sn at 130 C, its Na2Sn solutions did not appear to have suitable electrochemical properties.

  9. Comparison of leading parallel NAS file systems on commodity hardware

    SciTech Connect

    Hedges, R; Fitzgerald, K; Gary, M; Stearman, D M

    2010-11-08

    High performance computing has experienced tremendous gains in system performance over the past 20 years. Unfortunately other system capabilities, such as file I/O, have not grown commensurately. In this activity, we present the results of our tests of two leading file systems (GPFS and Lustre) on the same physical hardware. This hardware is the standard commodity storage solution in use at LLNL and, while much smaller in size, is intended to enable us to learn about differences between the two systems in terms of performance, ease of use and resilience. This work represents the first hardware consistent study of the two leading file systems that the authors are aware of.

  10. Job Management Requirements for NAS Parallel Systems and Clusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saphir, William; Tanner, Leigh Ann; Traversat, Bernard

    1995-01-01

    A job management system is a critical component of a production supercomputing environment, permitting oversubscribed resources to be shared fairly and efficiently. Job management systems that were originally designed for traditional vector supercomputers are not appropriate for the distributed-memory parallel supercomputers that are becoming increasingly important in the high performance computing industry. Newer job management systems offer new functionality but do not solve fundamental problems. We address some of the main issues in resource allocation and job scheduling we have encountered on two parallel computers - a 160-node IBM SP2 and a cluster of 20 high performance workstations located at the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility. We describe the requirements for resource allocation and job management that are necessary to provide a production supercomputing environment on these machines, prioritizing according to difficulty and importance, and advocating a return to fundamental issues.

  11. Science Policy: Former NAS Official Reviews World Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malone, Thomas F.

    1982-01-01

    Issues discussed with Thomas F. Malone (former Foreign Secretary-National Academy of Sciences) include: scientists role in dealing with such global problems as nuclear war and needs in developing countries; scientific relations with China/Soviet Union; scientific enterprise/human rights; science/technology role in foreign policy; and political…

  12. Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment (NAS Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On December 18, 2008, the National Academy of Sciences' National Research Council released a final report, requested and sponsored by the EPA, entitled Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: The Task Ahead.

    Risk assessment has become a dominant public policy ...

  13. Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment (NAS Final Report)

    EPA Science Inventory

    On December 18, 2008, the National Academy of Sciences' National Research Council released a final report, requested and sponsored by the EPA, entitled Phthalates and Cumulative Risk Assessment: The Task Ahead.

    Risk assessment has become a dominant public policy ...

  14. UAS in the NAS Flight Test Series 4 Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim

    2016-01-01

    Flight Test Series 4 (FT4) provides the researchers with an opportunity to expand on the data collected during the first flight tests. Following Flight Test Series 3, additional scripted encounters with different aircraft performance and sensors will be conducted. FT4 is presently planned for Spring of 2016 to ensure collection of data to support the validation of the final RTCA Phase 1 DAA (Detect and Avoid) Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS). There are three research objectives associated with this goal: Evaluate the performance of the DAA system against cooperative and non-cooperative aircraft encounters Evaluate UAS (Unmanned Aircraft Systems) pilot performance in response to DAA maneuver guidance and alerting with live intruder encounters Evaluate TCAS/DAA (Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance System/Detect and Avoid) interoperability. This flight test series will focus on only the Scripted Encounters configuration, supporting the collection of data to validate the interoperability of DAA and collision avoidance algorithms.

  15. BEHAVIOR OF INSTRUMENTED PRESTRESSED CONCRETE PAVEMENT AT NAS LEMOORE, CALIFORNIA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Longitudinal and transverse post-tensioning loads and the distribution of these forces along the lengths of tendons were defined by calibrated links...or couplers installed in the tendons . Strains induced in the concrete by stressing and existing for several months after stressing were measured by...the measurement of pressures under the load. There was apparently a substantial amount of friction between longitudinal tendons and their ducts as

  16. Confessionalidade Nas Instituicoes Metodista de Ensino (Methodist Confessioanlism).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boaventura, Elias

    2000-01-01

    States that the topic of confessionalism has generated a prolonged debate between Brazilian Methodists through the general council of Methodist teaching institutions. Suggests that Methodist academic institutions have no obligation to evangelize but should work in the struggle toward education which is characterized by the search for meaning in…

  17. NAS report gives advice on federal science policy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    For 50 years, the United States poured money into basic research and subsequently reaped the rewards of that science. But in a major new report, the leaders of the government's science operation are calling for an overhaul of that system.The report “may be one of the most important things we've ever done,” outgoing National Academy of Sciences President Frank Press said during a recent congressional hearing. Produced by a joint committee of the National Academy of Sciences, the National Academy of Engineering, and the Institute of Medicine, it is entitled “Science, Technology and the Federal Government: National Goals for a New Era.”

  18. UAS Integration in the NAS Project and Future Autonomy Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles W.

    2014-01-01

    This presentation highlights NASA use of unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) and related technologies for civil purposes. This briefing will give more insight into the UAS projects progress and future goals.

  19. National Airspace System (NAS) Software Life Cycle Management Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-03-01

    located at both FAA Headquarters and the Technical Center in Atlantic City. The following personnel were interviewed: Chuck Bolling AAT-14 Ralph Caprio ...34, July 1987, DRAFT [DOT/FAA-10] FAA-CDRL-240-001B, "Software Requirements Specification", DI -E-X107 (DOT/FAA-il] No author given, "Configuration

  20. Transforming the NAS: The Next Generation Air Traffic Control System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erzberger, Heinz

    2004-01-01

    The next-generation air traffic control system must be designed to safely and efficiently accommodate the large growth of traffic expected in the near future. It should be sufficiently scalable to contend with the factor of 2 or more increase in demand expected by the year 2020. Analysis has shown that the current method of controlling air traffic cannot be scaled up to provide such levels of capacity. Therefore, to achieve a large increase in capacity while also giving pilots increased freedom to optimize their flight trajectories requires a fundamental change in the way air traffic is controlled. The key to achieving a factor of 2 or more increase in airspace capacity is to automate separation monitoring and control and to use an air-ground data link to send trajectories and clearances directly between ground-based and airborne systems. In addition to increasing capacity and offering greater flexibility in the selection of trajectories, this approach also has the potential to increase safety by reducing controller and pilot errors that occur in routine monitoring and voice communication tasks.

  1. Facilitation and inhibition of male rat ejaculatory behaviour by the respective 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptor agonists 8-OH-DPAT and anpirtoline, as evidenced by use of the corresponding new and selective receptor antagonists NAD-299 and NAS-181

    PubMed Central

    Hillegaart, Viveka; Ahlenius, Sven

    1998-01-01

    Ejaculatory problems and anorgasmia are well-known side-effects of the SSRI antidepressants, and a pharmacologically induced increase in serotonergic neurotransmission inhibits ejaculatory behaviour in the rat. In the present study the role of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors in the mediation of male rat ejaculatory behaviour was examined by use of selective agonists and antagonists acting at these 5-HT receptor subtypes.The 5-HT1A receptor agonist 8-OH-DPAT (0.25–4.00 μmol kg−1 s.c.) produced an expected facilitation of the male rat ejaculatory behaviour, and this effect was fully antagonized by pretreatment with the new selective 5-HT1A receptor antagonist (R)-3-N,N-dicyclobutylamino-8-fluoro-3,4-dihydro-2H-1-benzopyran-5-carboxamide hydrogen (2R,3R) tartrate monohydrate (NAD-299) (1.0 μmol kg−1 s.c.). NAD-299 by itself (0.75–3.00 μmol kg−1 s.c.) did not affect the male rat ejaculatory behaviour.The 5-HT1B receptor agonist anpirtoline (0.25–4.00 μmol kg−1 s.c.) produced a dose-dependent inhibition of the male rat ejaculatory behaviour, and this effect was fully antagonized by pretreatment with the 5-HT1B receptor antagonist isamoltane (16 μmol kg−1 s.c.) as well as by the new and selective antagonist (R)-(+)-2-(3-morpholinomethyl-2H-chromene-8-yl)oxymethylmorpholino methansulphonate (NAS-181) (16 μmol kg−1 s.c.). Isamoltane (1.0–16.0 μmol kg−1 s.c.) and NAD-181 (1.0–16.0 μmol kg−1 s.c.) had no, or weakly facilitatory effects on the male rat ejaculatory behaviour. The non-selective 5-HT1 receptor antagonist (−)-pindolol (8 μmol kg−1 s.c.), did not antagonize the inhibition produced by anpirtoline.The present results demonstrate opposite effects, facilitation and inhibition, of male rat ejaculatory behaviour by stimulation of 5-HT1A and 5-HT1B receptors, respectively, suggesting that the SSRI-induced inhibition of male ejaculatory dysfunction is due to 5-HT1B receptor stimulation. PMID:9886765

  2. Stigma and Attitudes towards Psychiatric Patients in Portuguese Medical Students.

    PubMed

    Telles-Correia, Diogo; Gama Marques, João; Gramaça, João; Sampaio, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: Este estudo pretende avaliar o impacto da educação psiquiátrica nas atitudes em alunos de medicina face aos doentes mentais. Material e Métodos: Foi conduzido um inquérito em corte transversal na maior faculdade de medicina portuguesa. Os alunos preencheram um questionário que incluía informação sociodemográfica, antecedentes pessoais e familiares de doença psiquiátrica, bem como a Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale. Resultados: Em 2 178 estudantes, 398 responderam ao inquérito, representando 18,2% daquela faculdade de medicina. Houve uma significativa melhoria em todas as dimensões avaliadas pela Community Attitudes towards the Mentally Ill scale, ao longo dos anos do curso de medicina. Os valores mais elevados verificaram-se na subescala Restritividade (38,01), e os valores mais baixos na sub-escala Autoritarismo (36,13). A melhor diferença verificou-se para a sub-escala Autoritarismo (5º ano - 1º ano = 2,03), e a pior diferença verificou-se para a sub-escala Benevolência (5º ano - 1º ano = 0,39). Os melhores resultados foram encontrados no final do 3º ano. Discussão: Os resultados poderão dever-se ao módulo de luta contra o estigma, incluído na disciplina de 'Introdução à Saúde Mental'. Esse efeito positivo ter-se-á perdido no 4º e 5º anos, com uma degradação das atitudes.Conclusão: Este estudo salienta a import'ncia dos módulos de luta contra o estigma na melhoria das atitudes dos estudantes de medicina perante a saúde mental. Este tipo de acções pedagógicas preventivas com intuito anti-estigma, devem ser na melhor preparação possível de gerações Médicas futuras.

  3. Development of Educational Resources to Include the Teaching of Astronomy in the First Years of the Basic Education. (Spanish Title: Desarrollo de Recursos Pedagógicos Para Incluir la Enseñanza de la Astronomía en los Primeros Años de la Educación Básica.) Desenvolvimento de Recursos Pedagógicos Para Inserir o Ensino de Astronomia nas Séries Iniciais do Ensino Fundamental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva Morett, Samara; de Oliveira Souza, Marcelo

    2010-07-01

    ía y la vida cotidiana de los estudiantes. La inclusión de la astronomía en la escuela primaria es una manera de demostrar a los estudiantes cómo este campo está presente de forma activa en su vida cotidiana. Las clases que participan en el proyecto participaron en un estudio con el objetivo de proporcionar información a los conocimientos previos que tenían sobre los temas de la astronomía que se examinaron durante el proyecto. Con los experimentos realizados, y la ayuda de las nuevas tecnologías, conceptos astronómicos fueron presentados a los estudiantes de 4to y 5to año de la educación básica de una escuela municipal de Campos dos Goytacazes (RJ). Después de las presentaciones nuevos datos fueran colectados y se han llevado a cabo con el fin de verificar el nivel de aprendizaje alcanzado y se observó que el método utilizado fue una herramienta importante para ayudar al proceso de enseñanza y aprendizaje. El proyecto logró resultados satisfactorios. Neste trabalho será apresentado o desenvolvimento de recursos pedagógicos para a apresentação de conceitos de astronomia nas séries iniciais do ensino fundamental. Este material é composto por apresentações realizadas com o uso de novos recursos tecnológicos, pela fabricação de experimentos e a discussão de curiosidades relativas a esta área de conhecimento. Os experimentos foram construídos com material de baixo custo com o objetivo de permitir que os alunos envolvidos pudessem refazê-los em outras ocasiões. O material apresentado busca enfatizar a relação entre a astronomia e o cotidiano dos alunos. A inclusão da astronomia no ensino fundamental e uma forma de demonstrar aoestudante como esta área está presente de forma ativa em seu cotidiano. As turmas envolvidas no projeto participaram de uma pesquisa com o objetivo de obter dados relativos ao conhecimento prévio que possuíam sobre os tópicos de astronomia que foram considerados no decorrer do projeto. Com os experimentos

  4. Integrating the NAS Milestones and handheld technology to improve residency training and assessment.

    PubMed

    Cooney, Carisa M; Redett, Richard J; Dorafshar, Amir H; Zarrabi, Bahar; Lifchez, Scott D

    2014-01-01

    To incorporate the use of an intuitive and robust assessment tool in conjunction with the Next Accreditation System Milestones to maximize opportunities for trainee performance feedback and continuous trainee assessment, with the long-term goal of increasing the rate of performance improvement and mastery of knowledge and surgical skills. Pilot study. Johns Hopkins Medicine, Baltimore, MD. Primary, tertiary, and quaternary clinical care; institutional environment. Experimental group: two randomly selected postgraduate year-1 integrated training program residents per year for 2 consecutive years from the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. traditionally trained residents from the integrated training program in the Department of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. Study duration: 7 years (until residents complete residency training). This assessment strategy would create large amounts of informative data on trainees, which can be cross-referenced to determine trainee progress. Assessment data would be collected continuously from all faculty surgeons. Comparisons of faculty and resident self-assessments would facilitate resident evaluations. Ease of use of the data collection structure would improve faculty evaluation compliance and timely resident case report completion. Improving the efficiency and efficacy of competency documentation is critical. Using portable technologies is an intuitive way to improve the trainee assessment process. We anticipate that this 2-pronged approach to trainee assessments would quickly provide large amounts of informative data to better assess trainee progress and inform Milestone assessments in a manner that facilitates immediate feedback. Assessments of faculty and resident satisfaction would help us further refine the assessment process as needed. If successful, this format could easily be implemented by other training programs. Innovations in Surgical Education: Milestones. © 2013 Published by Association of Program Directors in Surgery on behalf of Association of Program Directors in Surgery.

  5. UAS Integration in the NAS Project Overview: RTCA SC-228 Plenary DAA Working Group 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Debra K.

    2014-01-01

    The presentation is intended to allow the public to know and understand NASA's plans for integrated test to allow them the opportunity to provide feedback and suggestions. The integrated testing will support verification and validation of the RTCA SC-228 UAS minimum operation performance standard requirements.

  6. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Percent Pneumatic Tube System 10 Incinerators (medical waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers (dish, cage, glass, etc.) 5 Sterilizing equipment 5 Water distilling equipment 5 Prefab temperature rooms (cold, constant temperature) 5 Entire...

  7. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers (dish, cage, glass, etc.) 5 Sterilizing equipment 5 Water distilling equipment 5 Prefab temperature...

  8. Lemoore NAS, California. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-11-01

    reported occurrences of thunderstorm, tornado , and waterspout. Rain and/or drizzle - All liquid precipitatiou, falling to the ground, not freezing...OL.A Pei VIuo olf of110. 00 . Foam "I*0 oM 45 PA L CLIMA rOL06Y 3RANCH 2FT, SURFACE WINDS -ATHFR SEVICL/Mac PERCENTAGE FREQUENCY OF WIND DIRECTION AND

  9. Design of Unstructured Adaptive (UA) NAS Parallel Benchmark Featuring Irregular, Dynamic Memory Accesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Hui-Yu; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    We describe the design of a new method for the measurement of the performance of modern computer systems when solving scientific problems featuring irregular, dynamic memory accesses. The method involves the solution of a stylized heat transfer problem on an unstructured, adaptive grid. A Spectral Element Method (SEM) with an adaptive, nonconforming mesh is selected to discretize the transport equation. The relatively high order of the SEM lowers the fraction of wall clock time spent on inter-processor communication, which eases the load balancing task and allows us to concentrate on the memory accesses. The benchmark is designed to be three-dimensional. Parallelization and load balance issues of a reference implementation will be described in detail in future reports.

  10. Automated Generation of Message-Passing Programs: An Evaluation of CAPTools using NAS Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hribar, Michelle R.; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry C.; Bailey, David (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    Scientists at NASA Ames Research Center have been developing computational aeroscience applications on highly parallel architectures over the past ten years. During the same time period, a steady transition of hardware and system software also occurred, forcing us to expand great efforts into migrating and receding our applications. As applications and machine architectures continue to become increasingly complex, the cost and time required for this process will become prohibitive. Various attempts to exploit software tools to assist and automate the parallelization process have not produced favorable results. In this paper, we evaluate an interactive parallelization tool, CAPTools, for parallelizing serial versions of the NAB Parallel Benchmarks. Finally, we compare the performance of the resulting CAPTools generated code to the hand-coded benchmarks on the Origin 2000 and IBM SP2. Based on these results, a discussion on the feasibility of automated parallelization of aerospace applications is presented along with suggestions for future work.

  11. 5th ESA Workshop on Joint Interim Approaches to NAS Recommendations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA and its federal partners, Fish and Wildlife Service and National Marine Fisheries Service, held a two-day meeting that provided a forum for stakeholder suggestions for refining some of the interim scientific methods

  12. A Family of Well-Clear Boundary Models for the Integration of UAS in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony; Chamberlain, James; Consiglio, Maria; Upchurch, Jason

    2014-01-01

    The FAA-sponsored Sense and Avoid Workshop for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) defines the concept of sense and avoid for remote pilots as "the capability of a UAS to remain well clear from and avoid collisions with other airborne traffic." Hence, a rigorous definition of well clear is fundamental to any separation assurance concept for the integration of UAS into civil airspace. This paper presents a family of well-clear boundary models based on the TCAS II Resolution Advisory logic. For these models, algorithms that predict well-clear violations along aircraft current trajectories are provided. These algorithms are analogous to conflict detection algorithms but instead of predicting loss of separation, they predict whether well-clear violations will occur during a given lookahead time interval. Analytical techniques are used to study the properties and relationships satisfied by the models.

  13. Analysis of Well-Clear Boundary Models for the Integration of UAS in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Upchurch, Jason M.; Munoz, Cesar A.; Narkawicz, Anthony J.; Chamberlain, James P.; Consiglio, Maria C.

    2014-01-01

    The FAA-sponsored Sense and Avoid Workshop for Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) defnes the concept of sense and avoid for remote pilots as "the capability of a UAS to remain well clear from and avoid collisions with other airborne traffic." Hence, a rigorous definition of well clear is fundamental to any separation assurance concept for the integration of UAS into civil airspace. This paper presents a family of well-clear boundary models based on the TCAS II Resolution Advisory logic. Analytical techniques are used to study the properties and relationships satisfied by the models. Some of these properties are numerically quantifed using statistical methods.

  14. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers (dish, cage, glass, etc.) 5 Sterilizing equipment 5 Water distilling equipment 5 Prefab temperature rooms (cold, constant temperature) 5 Entire air-conditioning system (Specified under 600 Sections) 5 Entire...

  15. Support of Activities of the NAS in Relation to the Radiation Effects Research Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Douple, Evan B.

    2006-05-31

    The National Academies (NA) provides support for the activities related to the long-term follow up of the health of the survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki being conducted by the Radiation Effects Research Foundation (RERF) laboratories in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. The NA serves as scientific and administrative liaison between the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and RERF, and performs tasks in the areas of scientific oversight, information/public interface, fiscal oversight, and personnel management. The project includes recruitment and support of approximately 10 NA employees who work at RERF in Japan. Specific activities are performed consistent with the cooperative agreement’s Statement of Work between DOE and NA and consistent with an Annual Work Plan developed by DOE and NA.

  16. National Airspace System: Air Traffic Control and Airspace Management Operational Concept NAS-SR-132

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-12-01

    provides continuous prerecorded weather advisories over selected VORs and includes Severe Weather Forecast Alerts (AWW), Significant Meteorological...Automated Terminal Information Service AWOS Automated Weather Observation Station AWP Aviation Weather Processor AWW Severe Weather Forecast Alerts

  17. 76 FR 1511 - Amendment of Class D Airspace; Fort Worth NAS JRB (Carswell Field), TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... navigation aids, at the request of the U.S. Navy, that are listed in the description. This action does not...) Class D airspace, Fort Worth, TX, and the navigation aids, to coincide with the FAAs...

  18. Large UAS Operations in the NAS - The NASA 2007 Western States Fire Missions (WSFM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoni, Gregory P.; Howell, Kathleen M.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: Demonstrate capabilities of UAS to overfly and collect sensor data on wildfires throughout Western US. Demonstrate long-endurance mission capabilities (20+ hours). Image multiple fires (greater than 4 fires per mission), to showcase extendable mission configuration and ability to either linger over key fires or station over disparate regional fires. Deliver real-time imagery to (within 10-minutes of acquisition).

  19. Semiannual Report, Contract Number NAS1-18605, April 1, thru September 30, 1991

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-01

    Mathematical Sciences, Clemson University. Control Theory for Multivariable Systems. Joel H . Ferziger - Ph.D., Nuclear Engineering , University of... numerical examples which demonstrate the efficiency of the method are given in a forthcoming ICASE report. H . T. Banks and Fumio Kojima Work is...regularization parameter is briefly discussed, and numerical ex- amples are given which demonstrate the applicability of the method both for problems with noise

  20. NAS (HOST/ARTS IIIA) to VME Modem Interface ATC Interface Hardware Manual

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-10-01

    h3,1,1,0,11; [0,C,1,O,O,O] -> [^h3,1,1,0,11; (0,C,1,0,0,0j -> ( Ah3 ,ll,0,l; [1,C,1,0,0,O] -> [h2,1,1,0,11; [0,C,1,O,0,0I - > t~h6,1,1,O,11; [1,C,1...gen) 100 IC,C,0, 1, 1,1i3,01 -> [’hO +nThl,0,1,01;hold [C,C,O,1, 1, Ah3 ,O] -> [’hO +n,Abl ,O,1,O;hold ,jIIconst n=1 ’ -:hczAlE ([C,C,1,1, 1,Th3,0J...bCAh2,00,0];status @const n = 1; @repeat "h3 { ICC,1IjAh3,1] -> [’hC +n,Ah2,0,0,0I;increment [C,C,0, 1,1, Ah3 , 11 -> ["hC + n, h2,0,0,O1;hold fC,C,0, 1,1 , Ah3

  1. Preliminary C3 Loading Analysis for Future High-Altitude Unmanned Aircraft in the NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ho, Yan-Shek; Gheorghisor, Izabela; Box, Frank

    2006-01-01

    This document provides a preliminary assessment and summary of the command, control, and communications (C(sup 3)) loading requirements of a generic future high-altitude, long-endurance unmanned aircraft (UA) operating at in the National Airspace System. Two principal types of C(sup 3) traffic are considered in our analysis: communications links providing air traffic services (ATS) to the UA and its human pilot, and the command and control data links enabling the pilot to operate the UA remotely. we have quantified the loading requirements of both types of traffic for two different assumed levels of UA autonomy. Our results indicate that the potential use of UA-borne relays for the ATS links, and the degree of autonomy exercised by the UA during the departure and arrival phases of its flight, will be among the key drivers of C(sup 3) loading and bandwidth requirements.

  2. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...) Retainage: (1) The contracting officer may retain funds: (i) Where performance under the contract has been... restricted to, the following: (i) Unsatisfactory progress as determined by the contracting officer; (ii... in this subparagraph shall be construed as limiting the contracting officer's right to withhold...

  3. National Airspace System: Air-Ground Communications Operational Concept NAS-SR-1361

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-01-01

    Communications Switching System (ICSS). In addition to the ICSS, AFSS personnel have direct voice interface with VOR equipment to provide emergency voice...FSDPS supports the AFSS work station which is combined in various configurations to support the different AFSS operational positions. Direct voice ... interface in the form of emergency messages are transmitted over the VOR in the same manner as the facility voice identification. NASSRS Requirement

  4. Adak NAS, Alaska. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-24

    operated by the U. S. Ser- vices aoi some foreig;n stations .silim, similar reporting prscticei. UiJesu otlherwise noted the Co ~luwilof suianries are...34 TRNSITERVEoRE .iF Oct 3.94 Longviev hAl Weather Sot available NA N/ N/A statin (Jo~Unit hAP & Navy) 2. 2 2/31/13 Ad~k(Joint’Unit) AF & Not available N/A I/A N/A...641214.15 2.18 cO 4 18.1 7.2 17. 9 .1.4421 FES 5 . 18.1 5.4 17.2 1 .5 19.1 17.4 L. 4 2.1 .1 76.Z IIG2 4 .7 _9.57) 1.97 MAN 5 5.5 19.5 13.3 1I.3 12. 9

  5. BOREAS TE-9 In Situ Diurnal Gas Exchange of NAS Boreal Forest Stands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Curd, Shelaine (Editor); Margolis, Hank; Coyea, Marie; Dang, Qinglai

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS TE-9 team collected several data sets related to chemical and photosynthetic properties of leaves in boreal forest tree species. The purpose of the BOREAS TE-09 study was threefold: 1) to provide in situ gas exchange data that will be used to validate models of photosynthetic responses to light, temperature, and carbon dioxide (CO2); 2) to compare the photosynthetic responses of different tree crown levels (upper and lower); and 3) to characterize the diurnal water potential curves for these sites to get an indication of the extent to which soil moisture supply to leaves might be limiting photosynthesis. The gas exchange data of the BOREAS NSA were collected to characterize diurnal gas exchange and water potential of two canopy levels of five boreal canopy cover types: young jack pine, old jack pine, old aspen, lowland old black spruce, and upland black spruce. These data were collected between 27-May-1994 and 17-Sep-1994. The data are provided in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  6. Evaluation of the Terminal Precision Scheduling and Spacing System for Near-Term NAS Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thipphavong, Jane; Martin, Lynne Hazel; Swenson, Harry N.; Lin, Paul; Nguyen, Jimmy

    2012-01-01

    NASA has developed a capability for terminal area precision scheduling and spacing (TAPSS) to provide higher capacity and more efficiently manage arrivals during peak demand periods. This advanced technology is NASA's vision for the NextGen terminal metering capability. A set of human-in-the-loop experiments was conducted to evaluate the performance of the TAPSS system for near-term implementation. The experiments evaluated the TAPSS system under the current terminal routing infrastructure to validate operational feasibility. A second goal of the study was to measure the benefit of the Center and TRACON advisory tools to help prioritize the requirements for controller radar display enhancements. Simulation results indicate that using the TAPSS system provides benefits under current operations, supporting a 10% increase in airport throughput. Enhancements to Center decision support tools had limited impact on improving the efficiency of terminal operations, but did provide more fuel-efficient advisories to achieve scheduling conformance within 20 seconds. The TRACON controller decision support tools were found to provide the most benefit, by improving the precision in schedule conformance to within 20 seconds, reducing the number of arrivals having lateral path deviations by 50% and lowering subjective controller workload. Overall, the TAPSS system was found to successfully develop an achievable terminal arrival metering plan that was sustainable under heavy traffic demand levels and reduce the complexity of terminal operations when coupled with the use of the terminal controller advisory tools.

  7. A Validation Study of Merging and Spacing Techniques in a NAS-Wide Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glaab, Patricia C.

    2011-01-01

    In November 2010, Intelligent Automation, Inc. (IAI) delivered an M&S software tool to that allows system level studies of the complex terminal airspace with the ACES simulation. The software was evaluated against current day arrivals in the Atlanta TRACON using Atlanta's Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport (KATL) arrival schedules. Results of this validation effort are presented describing data sets, traffic flow assumptions and techniques, and arrival rate comparisons between reported landings at Atlanta versus simulated arrivals using the same traffic sets in ACES equipped with M&S. Initial results showed the simulated system capacity to be significantly below arrival capacity seen at KATL. Data was gathered for Atlanta using commercial airport and flight tracking websites (like FlightAware.com), and analyzed to insure compatible techniques were used for result reporting and comparison. TFM operators for Atlanta were consulted for tuning final simulation parameters and for guidance in flow management techniques during high volume operations. Using these modified parameters and incorporating TFM guidance for efficiencies in flowing aircraft, arrival capacity for KATL was matched for the simulation. Following this validation effort, a sensitivity study was conducted to measure the impact of variations in system parameters on the Atlanta airport arrival capacity.

  8. Consumers and Workers Opinions of A Proposed Cash Food System: NAS Alameda

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    of the food preparation, food variety, the general dining decor, and the crowded conditions. 1Ü Unclassified SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF THIS PAGE...Toward the Current System 6 Cl. Interview Data: Reasons for Not Attending More Often 6 C2. Interview Data: General Opinions of the Navy Food...Alternative Rations Systems survey which asked respondents about their general attitudes toward various ration systems. Specificslly, it allowed

  9. Operational Overview for UAS Integration in the NAS Project Flight Test Series 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valkov, Steffi B.; Sternberg, Daniel; Marston, Michael

    2017-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration Unmanned Aircraft Systems Integration in the National Airspace System Project has conducted a series of flight tests intended to support the reduction of barriers that prevent unmanned aircraft from flying without the required waivers from the Federal Aviation Administration. The 2015 Flight Test Series 3, supported two separate test configurations. The first configuration investigated the timing of Detect and Avoid alerting thresholds using a radar equipped unmanned vehicle and multiple live intruders flown at varying encounter geometries. The second configuration included a surrogate unmanned vehicle (flown from a ground control station, with a safety pilot on board) flying a mission in a virtual air traffic control airspace sector using research pilot displays and Detect and Avoid advisories to maintain separation from live and virtual aircraft. The test was conducted over an eight-week span within the R-2508 Special Use Airspace. Over 200 encounters were flown for the first configuration, and although the second configuration was cancelled after three data collection flights, Flight Test 3 proved to be invaluable for the purposes of planning, managing, and execution of this type of integrated flight test.

  10. NASA UAS Integration into the NAS Project Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Air Force - NASA Bi-Annual Research Council Meeting, slides will be presented on phase 1 Detect and Avoid (DAA) display evaluations. A series of iterative human-in-the-loops (HITL) experiments were conducted with different display configurations to objectively measure pilot performance on maintaining well clear. To date, four simulations and two mini-HITLs have been conducted. Data from these experiments have been incorporated into a revised alerting structure and included in the RTCA SC 228 Phase 1 Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) proposal. Plans for phase 2 are briefly discussed.

  11. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Percent Pneumatic Tube System 10 Incinerators (medical waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers (dish, cage, glass, etc.) 5 Sterilizing equipment 5 Water distilling equipment 5 Prefab temperature rooms (cold, constant temperature) 5 Entire air...

  12. 48 CFR 852.236-82 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Percent Pneumatic Tube System 10 Incinerators (medical waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers (dish, cage, glass, etc.) 5 Sterilizing equipment 5 Water distilling equipment 5 Prefab temperature rooms (cold, constant temperature) 5 Entire air...

  13. Semiannual Report for Contract NAS1-19480 (Institute for Computer Applications in Science and Engineering)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-01

    concentrated on the second item. We have integrated our prototype parallel graphics library (PGL) into a Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code which is...following codes: a single grid version of ISAAC, TLNS3D a multi- block code, and DSMC a Monte Carlo code. We have analyzed the codes to understand...second the Ginzburg -Landau equations of superconductivity, and the third the Navier-Stokes equations for incompressible, viscous flows. 54 Speziale

  14. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (NAS) REVIEW OF THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF PERCHLORATE INGESTION (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the interest of resolving scientific questions, the EPA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - members of a broader Interagency Working Group on Perchlorate led by the Office of Science and Technology Polic...

  15. Forecasting the Demand of the F414-GE-400 Engine at NAS Lemoore

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    10 a. Fan Module...that allows the fan and compressor modules to spin independently. The Super Hornet is capable of going above the speed of sound, requiring Variable...Industry Daily, 2008) a. Fan Module The Fan Module is a three-stage axial flow design. It provides 20% of the air to the compressor module and 80% of

  16. NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES (NAS) REVIEW OF THE HEALTH IMPLICATIONS OF PERCHLORATE INGESTION (2005)

    EPA Science Inventory

    In the interest of resolving scientific questions, the EPA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration - members of a broader Interagency Working Group on Perchlorate led by the Office of Science and Technology Polic...

  17. UAS Integration into the NAS: HSI Full Mission Simulation Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shively, Jay; Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the Full Mission Sim was to examine the effects of different command and control interfaces on UAS pilots' ability to respond to ATC commands and traffic advisories. Results suggest that higher levels of automation (i.e., waypoint-to-waypoint control interfaces) lead to longer initial response times and longer edit times. The findings demonstrate the importance of providing pilots with interfaces that facilitate their ability to get back "in the loop."

  18. Brunswick NAS, Maine. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-02

    800 Imo 1A(.S.T.) (KNITS) 1 . 3 4 -6 7.- 10 1I -16 17 -2: 1 2127 -v 2-3 3 4.-40 41-.4y1 48-3 • 1 $ 11 % WIND N 2,6...75.2 75.2 75.2 75.2 75.3 75.6 z 2000 19.4 7 aS 7 71 9I. 77ol, 1 7? *.! 1.2-a 11..78 71., ? 1 . 7912 7.&. 1 800 19. 71# 1 75.1 76. 77. 77:2 ?7.3 77.4 17.6...92.9 93o5 93.7 .9307 93o l300 19. 76o s0 82. 65.1 65. 67.6 90.2 90o7 92.6 9141 9143 95.3 95.8 96.0 96.1 ( ’ 19.6. gloo 820 5. 1 87.8 90o 90.6 92.9

  19. Reliability Engineering Analysis - Small-Scale Heat Recovery Incinerator Installations (NS Mayport and NAS, Jacksonville).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-09-01

    NOTES 19 KEY WORDS (ContIinueR on reverse* side it necessary And identify by block. ruoober) Reliability prediction ; Heat recovery; Incineration...Testing requirements 20 ASTRAn (Cn l.... ,.. . old. It n ... nd id.n-fy by b1..4 -.. 1) ThsrPort addresses the reliability prediction conducted on hetwo...23 7.0 RELIABILITY PREDICTION ........................................... 29 7.1 NS Mayport

  20. Materials reliability. Technical activities, 1992. (NAS-NRC Assessment Panel, 13-14 May 1993)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHenry, H. I.; Fortunko, C. M.

    The Materials Reliability Division conducts materials research to improve the quality, reliability, and safety of industrial products and the nation's infrastructure. The authors' research fosters the use of advanced materials in commercial products by improving confidence in their service performance. The authors do this by developing measurement technology for: process control which improves the quality, consistency and producibility of materials; nondestructive evaluation (NDE) which assures the quality of finished materials and products; fitness-for-purpose standards which relate material quality to reliability and safety; and materials evaluation for severe applications, particularly for service at cryogenic temperatures. Early in FY92, the authors reorganized the Division to build a stronger group structure. The report summarizes the Division programs, and it is organized according to the three groups: materials characterization; process sensing and modeling; and structural materials.

  1. An Integrated Gate Turnaround Management Concept Leveraging Big Data/Analytics for NAS Performance Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, William; Chachad, Girish; Hochstetler, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Gate Turnaround Management (IGTM) concept was developed to improve the gate turnaround performance at the airport by leveraging relevant historical data to support optimization of airport gate operations, which include: taxi to the gate, gate services, push back, taxi to the runway, and takeoff, based on available resources, constraints, and uncertainties. By analyzing events of gate operations, primary performance dependent attributes of these events were identified for the historical data analysis such that performance models can be developed based on uncertainties to support descriptive, predictive, and prescriptive functions. A system architecture was developed to examine system requirements in support of such a concept. An IGTM prototype was developed to demonstrate the concept using a distributed network and collaborative decision tools for stakeholders to meet on time pushback performance under uncertainties.

  2. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: DAA-TCAS Interoperability "mini" HITL Primary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Conrad; Fern, Lisa; Shively, Jay; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    At the May 2015 SC-228 meeting, requirements for TCAS II interoperability became elevated in priority. A TCAS interoperability workgroup was formed to identify and address key issues/questions. The TCAS workgroup came up with an initial list of questions and a plan to address those questions. As part of that plan, NASA proposed to run a mini HITL to address display, alerting and guidance issues. A TCAS Interoperability Workshop was held to determine potential display/alerting/guidance issues that could be explored in future NASA mini HITLS. Consensus on main functionality of DAA guidance when TCAS II RA occurs. Prioritized list of independent variables for experimental design. Set of use cases to stress TCAS Interoperability.

  3. NAS battery demonstration at American Electric Power:a study for the DOE energy storage program.

    SciTech Connect

    Newmiller, Jeff; Norris, Benjamin L. (Norris Energy Consulting Company, Martinez, CA); Peek, Georgianne Huff

    2006-03-01

    The first U.S. demonstration of the NGK sodium/sulfur battery technology was launched in August 2002 when a prototype system was installed at a commercial office building in Gahanna, Ohio. American Electric Power served as the host utility that provided the office space and technical support throughout the project. The system was used to both reduce demand peaks (peak-shaving operation) and to mitigate grid power disturbances (power quality operation) at the demonstration site. This report documents the results of the demonstration, provides an economic analysis of a commercial sodium/sulfur battery energy storage system at a typical site, and describes a side-by-side demonstration of the capabilities of the sodium/sulfur battery system, a lead-acid battery system, and a flywheel-based energy storage system in a power quality application.

  4. Estudo de não gaussianidade nas anisotropias da RCF medidas Wmap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrade, A. P. A.; Wuensche, C. A.; Ribeiro, A. L. B.

    2003-08-01

    A investigação do campo de flutuações da Radiação Cósmica de Fundo (RCF) pode oferecer um importante teste para os modelos cosmológicos que descrevem a origem e a evolução das flutuações primordiais. De um lado, apresenta-se o modelo inflacionário que prevê um espectro de flutuações adiabáticas distribuídas segundo uma gaussiana e, de outro, os modelos de defeitos topológicos (dentre outros) que descrevem um mecanismo para a geração de flutuações de isocurvatura que obedecem a uma distribuição não gaussiana. Este trabalho tem como objetivo caracterizar traços do modelo não gaussiano de campo misto (entre flutuações adiabáticas e de isocurvatura) nos mapas do Wilkinson Microwave Anisotropy Probe (WMAP). Simulações das anisotropias da RCF no contexto de mistura indicam traços marcantes na distribuição das flutuações de temperatura, mesmo quando consideradas pequenas contribuições do campo de isocurvatura (da ordem de 0.001). O efeito da mistura entre os campos resulta na transferência de potência de flutuações em escalas angulares intermediárias para flutuações em pequenas escalas angulares. Este efeito pode ser caracterizado pela relação entre as amplitudes dos primeiros picos acústicos no espectro de potência da RCF. Neste trabalho, investigamos a contribuição do campo de isocurvatura, no contexto de mistura, sobre as observações recentes da RCF realizadas pelo WMAP. As previsões do modelo de campo misto, uma vez confrontadas com as observações em pequenas escalas angulares, podem ajudar a revelar a natureza das flutuações primordiais.

  5. UAS Integration in the NAS Project Test Site Kick-off Meeting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kopardekar, Parimal; Witzberger, Kevin; Hackenberg, Davis L.; Murphy, Jim

    2015-01-01

    This briefing was presented during the Test Site Kick Off Meeting to discuss the contract awards for Task 1 and Task 2. This briefing covered a high level overview for contract deliverables, Task 1 - UAS Traffic Management and Task 2, Live Virtual Constructive Distributed Environment.

  6. Environmental Assessment: Disposal and Reuse of NAS Dallas Family Housing in Duncanville, Texas

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    Carya illinoensis ), cedar elm (Ulmus crassifolia), willows (Salix spp.), Eastern cottonwood (Populus deltoides), and American elm {Ulmus americand). A...protection as a result of the proposed action. The proposed action would be a positive impact to the City’s parklands. No impact on cultural resources...Utilities 3-9 3.3.9 Transportation 3-10 Vll 3.3.10 Education 3.3.11 Government 3.3.12 Police and Fire Protection 3.3.13 Recreation 3.4 Cultural

  7. Atsugi Nas Japan. Limited Surface Observations Climatic Summary (LISOCS). Part A, C-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-02-01

    i, -. %,6-2621 Ii ISSALF:TAC/)D 130 F0I11A 41 (4MA R 63APRtdition may be Lsect , -td SE(I IRITY CIASSIICR TIo N 071 ThiS PAGEAll other enitions are...reporting hours (LST)- 0000-0200 1200-1400 0300-0500 1500-1700 0600-0800 1800-2000 0900-1100 2100-2300 Note that the first and last hour groups may or may ...tULd UVUL tor_r out 6. 1ransmissometer (AN/ GMO -lo) 71. 7. Cloud heiqht recorder (RO-121) _ 8. Dage weather vision (AN/GMQ-19(v) 3 Apr 81 900’ West of

  8. Patuxent River NAS, Maryland. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-05-14

    products. ENVRDIIXMALISMCUREVISED UNIFORM SUMMARY APPLICATIN cam( OF SURFACE WEATHER OBSERVATIONS HOURLY OBSERVATIONS liour ly observations are defined ...FETACSUFC WID A,. EATH4ER SE4VICE/PI*C PERCENTAGEFREQUENCY, OF WINDSRAC ID DiRECTION AND SPME (FROM HOURLY OMSERYATION) maim utfmMAO ALL WEAT ER 0 851...WINDS A.- !EATHER SCIRVICE/MAC "MMbI4AWE FREQUENCY OF Wile D1REcniON AND SPME Co (FROM HOURLY ONIRVATIONS) !?4’,𔃾U PATUXECNT RI VER #481 MO 73-60 (IIALL

  9. The Washington Alphabet Circa 1895-1905: NAS, USGS, SI, WAS, CC, GWMA, WMI, CIW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yochelson, E. L.

    2002-05-01

    Pursuit of science as part of the Federal responsibility to the American public was vigorously defended by John Wesley Powell in the 1880s, but received serious financial setback during the next decade. The following decade saw the gradual laying of foundations for the present-day non-academic component of "big science" through the development of a series of Federal and private organizations, some which were ephemeral. A key person in this alphabet soup has the initials CDW (Charles Doolittle Walcott). His influence will be discussed and if time permits, BM, NACA and NRC will be used to demonstrate methodology.

  10. Fire toxicology from the National Academy of Sciences (NAS) point of view

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, D. L.

    1978-01-01

    At the request of NASA the Subcommittee on Fire Toxicology undertook the tasks of evaluating the state-of-knowledge in fire toxicology and recommending guidelines for establishing standard approaches for testing the toxicity of polymeric materials in fires. The recommended guidelines on methodology for evaluation of toxicity of pyrolysis and combustion products are presented. Flow charts reflecting the organizations responsible for the evaluation tasks are presented to show organizational changes which took place between 1977 and 1978. Also listed are the names, phone numbers and companies in attendance at the meeting.

  11. Environmental Assessment for EOD Stand-Up at NAS Fort Worth JRB

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    Wolters could be impacted, since the potential range would effectively cut off large portions of areas currently being used for land navigation ...that only persons outside buildings would experience peak sound levels above 130 dBP. Persons located indoors would experience much lower peak sound...130 dBP, and persons located indoors would experience much lower levels of peak sound.  Loud Sound Levels (> 130 dBP) – The area expected to be

  12. UAS Integration in the NAS Project: Part Task 6 V & V Simulation: Primary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorie, Conrad; Fern, Lisa; Shively, Jay; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    This is a presentation of the preliminary results on final V and V (Verification and Validation) activity of [RTCA (Radio Technical Commission for Aeronautics)] SC (Special Committee)-228 DAA (Detect and Avoid) HMI (Human-Machine Interface) requirements for display alerting and guidance.

  13. A Glossary of Terms, Definitions, Acronyms, and Abbreviations Related to the National Airspace System (NAS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-01

    the part of the target being tracked. 13. track maneuver status/ TMS -- To aid the setting of the tracking modes, a track maneuver status ( TMS ) will be...crosstold from an adjacent center. ( TMS set to CROSSTELL in receiving center only.) 14. track merit -- A dash in the automatic tracking function that...Mean Sea Level (ICAO) AMSS Aeronautical Mobile Satellite Service AM-T Assistant Manager-Training AMTI Airborne Moving Target Indicator AM- TM

  14. Implementation of BT, SP, LU, and FT of NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, Matthew; Frumkin, Michael; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A number of Java features make it an attractive but a debatable choice for High Performance Computing. We have implemented benchmarks working on single structured grid BT,SP,LU and FT in Java. The performance and scalability of the Java code shows that a significant improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation are necessary for Java to compete with Fortran in HPC applications.

  15. UAS Integration into the NAS: iHTL: DAA Display Evaluation Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2014-01-01

    The integrated human-in-the-loop (iHITL) simulation examined the effect of four different Detect-and-Avoid (DAA) display concepts on unmanned aircraft system (UAS) pilots' ability to maintain safe separation. The displays varied in the type and amount of guidance they provided to pilots. The study's background and methodology are discussed, followed by a presentation of the preliminary 'measured response' data (i.e., pilots' end-to-end response time in reacting to traffic alerts on their DAA display). Results indicate that display type had moderate to no affect on pilot measured response times.

  16. Polymers: Technical activities, 1991. NAS-NRC Assessment Panel, February 13-14, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, L.E.; Fanconi, B.M.

    1991-10-01

    All of the Division's programs are described in the report, organized according to these six Groups. These Groups have made a number of significant accomplishments during the last year. Some of these are summarized below: A computer simulation was performed to model resin flow in liquid molding of the front end structure of a Ford Escort; A NIST/industry consortium has evolved for the purpose of developing in-line measurement technology based on optical and fluorescence methods; A combined light scattering photometer/rheometer has been constructed to examine phase separation behavior of polymer blends and solutions under the influence of a simple shear field; A unique new tool has been developed to study the physics involved in the adhesion between a polymer and a solid surface like glass; The distribution of polarization in poly(vinylidene fluoride) poled by corona discharge rather than by contacting electrodes indicated positive charge injection near the surface; Proton spin diffusion results indicated domain sizes in poly(butylmethacrylate)/hydroxy modified polystyrene blends with minimum dimensions in the 6-10 nm range and stoichiometries of the order of 75/25; Novel, siloxane-containing difunctional and multifunctional vinyl monomers were prepared; The apparent 'shift' in polymer blend phase separation temperature, Tc, under shear flow has been interpreted with the mode-coupling theory for mean-field polymer blend systems; The radial flow behavior was successfully predicted from measurements in unidirectional flow; An exposure technique that rapidly determines whether or not a polymer is biodegradable has been developed; Instrumentation has been set up and calibrated to measure the dielectric constant of thin polymer films at high electric fields; A viscoelastic model of stresses in porcelain-metal strips has been developed.

  17. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Adjusting, Correcting, and Testing System System Percent Pneumatic tube system 10 Incinerators (medical waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers...

  18. 48 CFR 852.236-83 - Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (including NAS).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Adjusting, Correcting, and Testing System System Percent Pneumatic tube system 10 Incinerators (medical waste and trash) 5 Sewage treatment plant equipment 5 Water treatment plant equipment 5 Washers...

  19. The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The 247-foot span solar-powered aircraft, resting on its ground maneuvering dolly, was on display for a visit of NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe and other NASA officials on January 31, 2002. The unique solar-electric flying wing reached an altitude of 96,863 feet during an almost 17-hour flight near Hawaii on August 13, 2001, a world record for sustained horizontal flight by a non-rocket powered aircraft. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) which can serve as 'atmospheric satellites,' performing Earth science missions or functioning as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere.

  20. Considerations in the Integration of Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATSHVO) in the National Airspace System (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lohr, Gary W.; Williams, Dan; Abbott, Terence; Baxley, Brian; Greco, Adam; Ridgway, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Small Aircraft Transportation System Higher Volume Operations (SATS HVO) concept holds the promise for increased efficiency and throughput at many of the nations under-used airports. This concept allows for concurrent operations at uncontrolled airports that under today s procedures are restricted to one arrival or one departure operation at a time, when current-day IFR separation standards are applied. To allow for concurrent operations, SATS HVO proposes several fundamental changes to today's system. These changes include: creation of dedicated airspace, development of new procedures and communications (phraseologies), and assignment of roles and responsibilities for pilots and controllers, among others. These changes would affect operations on the airborne side (pilot) as well as the groundside (controller and air traffic flow process). The focus of this paper is to discuss some of the issues and potential problems that have been considered in the development of the SATS HVO concept, in particular from the ground side perspective. Reasonable solutions to the issues raised here have been proposed by the SATS HVO team, and are discussed in this paper.

  1. NAS Experiences of Porting CM Fortran Codes to HPF on IBM SP2 and SGI Power Challenge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash

    1995-01-01

    Current Connection Machine (CM) Fortran codes developed for the CM-2 and the CM-5 represent an important class of parallel applications. Several users have employed CM Fortran codes in production mode on the CM-2 and the CM-5 for the last five to six years, constituting a heavy investment in terms of cost and time. With Thinking Machines Corporation's decision to withdraw from the hardware business and with the decommissioning of many CM-2 and CM-5 machines, the best way to protect the substantial investment in CM Fortran codes is to port the codes to High Performance Fortran (HPF) on highly parallel systems. HPF is very similar to CM Fortran and thus represents a natural transition. Conversion issues involved in porting CM Fortran codes on the CM-5 to HPF are presented. In particular, the differences between data distribution directives and the CM Fortran Utility Routines Library, as well as the equivalent functionality in the HPF Library are discussed. Several CM Fortran codes (Cannon algorithm for matrix-matrix multiplication, Linear solver Ax=b, 1-D convolution for 2-D datasets, Laplace's Equation solver, and Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) codes have been ported to Subset HPF on the IBM SP2 and the SGI Power Challenge. Speedup ratios versus number of processors for the Linear solver and DSMC code are presented.

  2. Non-equilibrium GaNAs Alloys with Band Gap Ranging from 0.8-3.4 eV

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    600 °C. The same active N flux with the total N beam equivalent pressure ( BEP ) ~1.5 10-5 Torr and the same deposition time (2hr) were used for the... BEP ~1.5x10-7 and ~7.5x10-6 Torr, respectively. A mono- tonic increase in the As incorporation in the film is ob- served as the growth temperature is

  3. UAS Integration into the NAS: Detect and Avoid Display Evaluations in Support of SC-228 MOPS Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa; Rorie, Conrad; Shively, Jay

    2016-01-01

    At the May 2015 SC-228 meeting, requirements for TCAS II interoperability became elevated in priority. A TCAS interoperability work group was formed to identify and address key issuesquestions. The TCAS work group came up with an initial list of questions and a plan to address those questions. As part of that plan, NASA proposed to run a mini HITL to address display, alerting and guidance issues. A TCAS Interoperability Workshop was held to determine potential displayalertingguidance issues that could be explored in future NASA mini HITLS. Consensus on main functionality of DAA guidance when TCAS II RA occurs. Prioritized list of independent variables for experimental design. Set of use cases to stress TCAS Interoperability.

  4. Excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum in GaInNAs/GaAs quantum well structures.

    PubMed

    Erol, Ayse; Akalin, Elif; Sarcan, Fahrettin; Donmez, Omer; Akyuz, Sevim; Arikan, Cetin M; Puustinen, Janne; Guina, Mircea

    2012-11-28

    The excitation energy-dependent nature of Raman scattering spectrum, vibration, electronic or both, has been studied using different excitation sources on as-grown and annealed n- and p-type modulation-doped Ga1 - xInxNyAs1 - y/GaAs quantum well structures. The samples were grown by molecular beam technique with different N concentrations (y = 0%, 0.9%, 1.2%, 1.7%) at the same In concentration of 32%. Micro-Raman measurements have been carried out using 532 and 758 nm lines of diode lasers, and the 1064 nm line of the Nd-YAG laser has been used for Fourier transform-Raman scattering measurements. Raman scattering measurements with different excitation sources have revealed that the excitation energy is the decisive mechanism on the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum. When the excitation energy is close to the electronic band gap energy of any constituent semiconductor materials in the sample, electronic transition dominates the spectrum, leading to a very broad peak. In the condition that the excitation energy is much higher than the band gap energy, only vibrational modes contribute to the Raman scattering spectrum of the samples. Line shapes of the Raman scattering spectrum with the 785 and 1064 nm lines of lasers have been observed to be very broad peaks, whose absolute peak energy values are in good agreement with the ones obtained from photoluminescence measurements. On the other hand, Raman scattering spectrum with the 532 nm line has exhibited only vibrational modes. As a complementary tool of Raman scattering measurements with the excitation source of 532 nm, which shows weak vibrational transitions, attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy has been also carried out. The results exhibited that the nature of the Raman scattering spectrum is strongly excitation energy-dependent, and with suitable excitation energy, electronic and/or vibrational transitions can be investigated.

  5. A Comparison of Automatic Parallelization Tools/Compilers on the SGI Origin 2000 Using the NAS Benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saini, Subhash; Frumkin, Michael; Hribar, Michelle; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Waheed, Abdul; Yan, Jerry

    1998-01-01

    Porting applications to new high performance parallel and distributed computing platforms is a challenging task. Since writing parallel code by hand is extremely time consuming and costly, porting codes would ideally be automated by using some parallelization tools and compilers. In this paper, we compare the performance of the hand written NAB Parallel Benchmarks against three parallel versions generated with the help of tools and compilers: 1) CAPTools: an interactive computer aided parallelization too] that generates message passing code, 2) the Portland Group's HPF compiler and 3) using compiler directives with the native FORTAN77 compiler on the SGI Origin2000.

  6. Advanced Transformer Demonstration And Validation Project Summary Report Based On Experiences At Nas, North Island, San Diego. California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    MAXIMIUI• 0 P 8. ALL LIGHTS ARE LED"’ TORMAD TEM"ERATUE TO RESET 9. DIGITAL METER IS LE[in EMORY IETER WILL AUTOMATICALLY MAD PHASE WiTH HIGHEST...in place. 4.4 Building 379 The Building 379 installation consisted of removing three existing 167 kVA PCB-filled, single phase , polemount transformers...that were connected in a three phase bank and replacing them with a single 300 kVA Square D Company VPI dry-type transformer. This task also involved

  7. Advanced Transformer Demonstration and Validation Project Summary Report Based on Experiences at NAS, North Island, San Diego, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    three existing 167 kVA PCB-filled, single phase , polemount transformers that were connected in a three phase bank and replacing them with a single 300...A-18 3.11.1 Insulated Phase Barriers .......................... A-lB 3.11.2 Undercoating ...................................... A-18 3.11.3 Warning...2.1 mezan Na, ý n al S I.and a r, 7nSt *u~e f’-^S. ANSI- C57 12.00 General Requirements for Liquid Immersed Distribution Power and Regulating

  8. 75 FR 33615 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments (EPA...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-14

    .... and ending at 4 p.m., Eastern Daylight Time. If you would like to make a presentation at the listening session, you should register by July 2, 2010, indicate that you wish to make oral comments at the session, and indicate the length of your presentation. When you register, please indicate if you will need...

  9. Materials Data on K5NaS4(ClO6)2 (SG:128) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-03-28

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  10. Materials Data on K2NaS2ClO6 (SG:85) by Materials Project

    SciTech Connect

    Kristin Persson

    2016-04-22

    Computed materials data using density functional theory calculations. These calculations determine the electronic structure of bulk materials by solving approximations to the Schrodinger equation. For more information, see https://materialsproject.org/docs/calculations

  11. The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The Helios Prototype flying wing stretches almost the full length of the 300-foot-long hangar at NASA's Dryden flight Research Center, Edwards, California. The 247-foot span solar-powered aircraft, resting on its ground maneuvering dolly, was on display for a visit of NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe and other NASA officials on January 31, 2002. The unique solar-electric flying wing reached an altitude of 96,863 feet during an almost 17-hour flight near Hawaii on August 13, 2001, a world record for sustained horizontal flight by a non-rocket powered aircraft. Developed by AeroVironment, Inc., under NASA's Environmental Research Aircraft and Sensor Technology (ERAST) project, the Helios Prototype is the forerunner of a planned fleet of slow-flying, long duration, high-altitude uninhabited aerial vehicles (UAV) which can serve as 'atmospheric satellites,' performing Earth science missions or functioning as telecommunications relay platforms in the stratosphere.

  12. Test Report for the Direct Access Radar/National Airspace System (DARC/NAS) Bi-Directional Interface Test

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Report m. Robert V. DiMeo, et al. DOT/FAA/CT-TN89/ II 9. Performing Organisation Name and Addrtess 10. Work Unit No. (TRAIS) U.S. Department of...procedures in summary form, the test enviroment , and test administration, data collection, and analyses. - Results - Presents significant findings based...cases that did not pass, whi wre attributed to S4 timng problems. As stated earlier in the Test Enviroent section we expected that a small percntage of

  13. 75 FR 28610 - Draft EPA's Reanalysis of Key Issues Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... report. In addition, it includes new analyses on potential human effects that may result from exposure to... under EPA's Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) program, and thus, the new IRIS process announced... Advisory Board (SAB), a body established under the Federal Advisory Committee Act, for independent...

  14. Photographic observations of major planets and their moons in MAO NAS of Ukraine during 1961-1990

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yizhakevych, O.; Andruk, V.; Pakuliak, L.; Lukianchuk, V.

    2017-06-01

    We present the results of digitizing and processing of archival observations to obtain the astrometric positions and stellar magnitudes of major planets and their satellites. The work has been done within the framework of the national project "Ukrainian Virtual Observatory" on the basis of photographic observations carried out in MAO NASU. The processing of digital images and the astrometric reduction of data was made in the software package created and developed in MAO for the reduction astrometric negatives. The catalogue includes data of Saturn's moons (S2-S9), obtained using 4 telescopes in 1961-1990. The stellar catalogue TYCHO2 was used as the reference. The internal positional accuracy is ˜ 0.09 - ˜ 0.25 arcsec.The same procedure is now applying for the processing of photographic observations of Neptune, Uranus, and their moons, obtained in MAO during the same period.

  15. Tinian Island Nas, Mariana Islands. Revised Uniform Summary of Surface Weather Observations (RUSSWO). Parts A-F.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1973-05-25

    6,7 S i , L!V i ENE 7181 - 30 4 0. sEw .. L . 84 . - t _ _______-18 26 9 _F -- - -g-....ESE._ ._ _ . SSEE_ _ 6 S SSW WSW WNW NNW _ ! ______ ______ _CFE...7 . 10 11 16 17. 21 22 . 27 28 3 34-40 41 84 4 55 TO6 WINO DIR. 41. -5 MEAN SPEED NN7 NE list 9 ,,4 - ~ F~ EN’ ___1 _33 6.7 3.31 I ~ ___ 14,4 8.2 ESE...8217 9 (,o g6 96,7 96.7 ).7 ).7 96,7 >ooo � 7 .7 992 997 997 9977 99 7 99 ? 997. 997 99. 997.7 99o 99.7 99.7 9927 0 900 : 7 7, 1 . 7oo . 20l O . O

  16. Association between filial responsibility when caring for parents and the caregivers overload.

    PubMed

    Aires, Marinês; Mocellin, Duane; Fengler, Fernanda Laís; Rosset, Idiane; Santos, Naiana Oliveira Dos; Machado, Diani de Oliveira; Day, Carolina Baltar; Paskulin, Lisiane Manganelli Girardi

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the association between filial responsibility and the overload of the children when caring for their older parents. Cross-sectional study with 100 caregiver children of older adults. Filial liability was assessed by the attitudes of the responsible child (scale of expectation and filial duty) and by care behaviors (assistance in activities of daily living, emotional and financial support, and keeping company). The overload was assessed by the Caregiver Burden Inventory. To assess the associations, the correlation coefficients of Pearson and Spearman, Kruskal-Wallis Test, and Mann-Whitney were employed. Variables that presented p-value<0.20 in the bivariate analysis were inserted in a multivariate linear regression model. The factors associated with overload were: formal employment (p=0.002), feelings regarding family life (p<0.001), financial support (p=0.027), and assistance with Activities of Daily Living (ADLs) (p<0.001). Children who were more involved with the ADLs and provided financial support showed higher levels of overload. Analisar a associação entre a responsabilidade filial e a sobrecarga dos filhos cuidadores de pessoas idosas. Estudo transversal com 100 filhos cuidadores de pessoas idosas. A responsabilidade filial foi avaliada pelas atitudes de responsabilidade filial (escala de expectativa e dever filial) e pelos comportamentos de cuidar (auxílio nas atividades de vida diária, apoio emocional, financeiro e companhia). A sobrecarga foi avaliada pelo Inventário de Sobrecarga do Cuidador. Para avaliar as associações utilizaram-se os coeficientes de correlação de Pearson e Spearman, Teste de Kruskal-Wallis e Mann-whitney. Variáveis que apresentaram valor de p<0,20 na análise bivariada foram inseridas em um modelo multivariado de regressão linear. Os fatores associados com a sobrecarga foram: emprego formal (p=0,002), sentimentos na vida familiar (p<0,001), apoio financeiro (p=0,027) e ajuda nas Atividades da Vida Diária (AVDs

  17. UAS-NAS Live Virtual Constructive Distributed Environment (LVC): LVC Gateway, Gateway Toolbox, Gateway Data Logger (GDL), SaaProc Software Design Description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jovic, Srboljub

    2015-01-01

    This document provides the software design description for the two core software components, the LVC Gateway, the LVC Gateway Toolbox, and two participants, the LVC Gateway Data Logger and the SAA Processor (SaaProc).

  18. Very high dose electron irradiation effects on photoluminescence from GaInNAs/GaAs quantum wells grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavelescu, E.-M.; Bălţăţeanu, N.; Spânulescu, S. I.; Arola, E.

    2017-02-01

    The effects of 7 MeV electron irradiation at very high doses of 2 ×1017 and 1.5 ×1018electrons /cm2 and subsequent rapid thermal annealing on photoluminescence from a strain-compensated GaInAsN/GaAsN/GaAs quantum well structure are investigated. A large additional blueshift of photoluminescence has been observed from the lower-dose irradiated sample as compared to the non-irradiated one when annealed after the irradiation. This additional blueshift will become considerably reduced by an ageing effect, which occurs already at room temperature. The mechanism causing the additional blueshift of photoluminescence and its reduction is qualitatively assigned to metastable complex defects promoted by electron irradiation in the nitrogen containing layers. No such additional blueshift of photoluminescence under the thermal treatment has been observed in the higher-dose irradiated sample.

  19. An estimate of the enroute noise of an advanced turboprop airplane NASA-TM-87302 E-3020 NAS 1.15:87302 HC A02/MF A01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dittmar, J. H.

    1986-01-01

    The enroute noise of an Advanced Turboprop powered aircraft was estimated. The measured noise levels were roughly equivalent in annoyance to the noise 15.24 m from an automobile traveling at 80 km/h. It is felt that these levels would not illicit noise complaints from urban areas during the day but might be a slight annoyance in rural areas or in urban areas at night. Although it is not felt that the enroute noise is a major problem, it is indicated that a reduction in the enroute noise could improve the acceptability of advance turboprop airplanes.

  20. Evaluations of HRI (Heat Recovery Incinerators) at NS (Naval Station) Mayport and NAS (Naval Air Station) Jacksonville, Florida-Lessons Learned Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-07-01

    primary chamber is lined with 2 in. of insulating mineral wool and 4 in. of castable refractory with a service temperature of 2500*F. 5.5.5.4...material. The refractory should be air cooled by circulating combustion air between it and the outer shell. A minimum of 2-in.-high density mineral wool or...passes through the roof. The 50-ft-high and 6-ft-4-in.-O.D. stack is constructed of steel and lined with 4 in. of refractory and 2 in. of mineral

  1. Pratt & Whitney/Boeing Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts Final Report for NASA Contract NAS3-97144, Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bock, Larry A.; Hauser, Joseph E.; Mathews, Douglas C.; Topol, David A.; Bielak, Gerald W.; Lan, Justin H.; Premo, John W.

    2014-01-01

    This report presents results of the work completed in Phase 2 of the Engine Validation of Noise Reduction Concepts (EVNRC) contract. The purpose of the program is to validate, through engine testing, advanced noise reduction concepts aimed at reducing engine noise up to 6 EPNdB and improving nacelle suppression by 50 percent relative to 1992 technology. Phase 1 of the program is completed and is summarized in NASA/CR-2014-218088.

  2. Fisica a escala de Planck usando o principio de incerteza generalizado: efeitos nas flutuações primordiais e buracos negros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horvath, J. E.; Custódio, P. S.

    2003-08-01

    Em escalas proximas à escala de Planck todas as teorias perturbativas de cordas produzem essenciamente a mesma relação de conmutação entre as coordenadas e impulsos (a chamada "álgebra deformada"), permitindo assim estudar a física resultante independentemente dos detalhes da teoria de cordas que seja considerada correta. Este resultado completamente geral, que inclui as interações gravitacionais junto com o resto dos campos pode ser considerada uma versão generalizada (GUP) do Princípio de Incerteza de Heisenberg. Aplicamos neste trabalho essas relações de conmutação para dois sistemas físicos bem definidos: buracos negros de massas próximas à massa de Planck, e flutuações quânticas em pequenas escalas antes do universo sofrer inflação. Obtemos dois resultados concretos dos efeitos do GUP : o primeiro é que o GUP impede a evaporação completa de buracos negros microscópicos na extensão do formalismo semiclássico, deixando assim remanescentes de pequena massa que já foram postulados como candidatos a matéria escura. O segundo resultado é o 'smoothing' das flutuações primordiais em pequenas escalas que levariam à produção de buracos negros primordiais após a inflação, impedindo assim a produção abundante destes últimos e predizendo abundancias atuais bem menores do que os limites disponíveis. Concluimos que, analogamente a utilização do Princípio de Incerteza de Heisenberg para estudar e determinar propriedades fundamentais das interações sem gravitação, o GUP e uma ferramenta poderosa para estudar uma ampla variedade de sistemas trans-Planckianos e predizer seu comportamento dispensando cálculos mais detalhados proprios da teoria quântica da gravitação.

  3. Teaching of Astronomy at Teresa Martin College. (Breton Title: Ensino de Astronomia Nas Faculdades Teresa Martin.) Enseñanza de la Astronomia en la Facultad Teresa Martin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azevedo Sobreira, Paulo Henrique

    2005-12-01

    Courses with exclusive Astronomy contents did not exist at (FATEMA) Teresa Martin College's program until the end of 2002. In 2001, a series of educational experiments started in courses and classes of Astronomy at Mathematics and Geography departments. This actions culminated with the insertion of Teaching of Astronomy as a study theme in the course of Independent Studies for Mathematics professors in 2005. Até o final de 2002 inexistiam na grade curricular das Faculdades Integradas Teresa Martin (FATEMA) cadeiras com conteúdos exclusivos de Astronomia. A partir do ano de 2001 iniciou-se uma série de experiências educacionais através de modelos de cursos e de aulas de Astronomia nos Departamentos de Matemática e de Geografia, o que culminou com a inserção do Ensino de Astronomia como temática da disciplina de Estudos Independentes para o curso de Licenciatura em Matemática, em 2005. Hasta el final de 2002 no había en el currículo dela Facultad TeresaMartín (FATEMA) en San Pablo - SP, Brasil, disciplinas con contenidos exclusivos de Astronomía. A partir del año 2001 comenzó una secuencia de experimentos educacionales de carrera y de clases de Astronomía en los Departamentos de Matemática y Geografía, culminando en la implantación de clases de Enseñanza dela Astronomíaenla Licenciaturaen Matemática, en el año de 2003, y de la cátedra de extensión en Cosmografía parala Licenciaturaen Geografía.

  4. Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project: Advanced Collision Avoidance System for UAS (ACAS Xu) Interoperability White Paper Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fern, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The Phase 1 DAA Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) provided requirements for two classes of DAA equipment: equipment Class 1 contains the basic DAA equipment required to assist a pilot in remaining well clear, while equipment Class 2 integrates the Traffic Alert and Collision Avoidance (TCAS) II system. Thus, the Class 1 system provides RWC functionality only, while the Class 2 system is intended to provide both RWC and Collision Avoidance (CA) functionality, in compliance with the Minimum Aviation System Performance (MASPS) for the Interoperability of Airborne Collision Avoidance Systems. The FAAs TCAS Program Office is currently developing Airborne Collision Avoidance System X (ACAS X) to support the objectives of the Federal Aviation Administrations (FAA) Next Generation Air Transportation System Program (NextGen). ACAS X has a suite of variants with a common underlying design that are intended to be optimized for their intended airframes and operations. ACAS Xu being is designed for UAS and allows for new surveillance technologies and tailored logic for platforms with different performance characteristics. In addition to Collision Avoidance (CA) alerting and guidance, ACAS Xu is being tuned to provide RWC alerting and guidance in compliance with the SC 228 DAA MOPS. With a single logic performing both RWC and CA functions, ACAS Xu will provide industry with an integrated DAA solution that addresses many of the interoperability shortcomings of Phase I systems. While the MOPS for ACAS Xu will specify an integrated DAA system, it will need to show compliance with the RWC alerting thresholds and alerting requirements defined in the DAA Phase 2 MOPS. Further, some functional components of the ACAS Xu system such as the remote pilots displayed guidance might be mostly references to the corresponding requirements in the DAA MOPS. To provide a seamless, integrated, RWC-CA system to assist the pilot in remaining well clear and avoiding collisions, several issues need to be addressed within the Phase 2 SC-228 DAA efforts. Interoperability of the RWC and CA alerting and guidance, and ensuring pilot comprehension, compliance and performance, will be a primary research area.

  5. Review of the NAS/NRC report: {open_quotes}Groundwater at Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?{close_quotes}. Special report No. 1

    SciTech Connect

    Archambeau, C.B.

    1992-12-01

    There are three basic and serious problems that produce disagreement with the conclusions and recommendations of the Academy report entitled {open_quotes}Groundwater at Yucca Mountain: How high can it rise?{close_quotes}. These are: First, the report ignores a considerable body of critical data relating to the ages and nature of hydrothermal alterations at the site; second, many of the strong conclusions expressed in the report are not reasonably supported by the evidence presented and, in some cases, are inconsistent with data and results available to the committee but which are not cited or used by them; and finally, there are statements describing field relationships and data that are not consistent with the facts or are made in such a way as to be misleading.

  6. System Engineering and Integration Contract for Implementation of the National Airspace System Plan. Volume 2. Section 5.0 NAS Plan Project Findings.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-01

    kits for DVOR , 112 VOT, and 75 Doppler VOR conversion kits. Status UThe VORTAC, VOR, and VOR/DME replacement program is approaching satisfactory...monitoring of additional airport .q. facilities and equipment such as DVOR , ARSR-3, navigation, and communications facilities associated with FSS (by 1988...DHSA Designated Major System Acquisition DOC Department of Defense 1. DOD Department of Defense DUAT Direct User Access Terminal DVOR Doppler Very

  7. A genetic analysis of the Epworth Sleepiness Scale in 1560 World War II male veteran twins in the NAS-NRC Twin Registry.

    PubMed

    Carmelli, D; Bliwise, D L; Swan, G E; Reed, T

    2001-03-01

    Responses to the eight-item Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) obtained from 1560 World War II male veteran twin pairs [818 monozygotic (MZ), 742 dizygotic (DZ)] were analysed to determine the extent to which genetic influences are involved in self-reported daytime sleepiness in the elderly. Average ESS score (+/- SD) in this sample was 7.1 +/- 3.9, range 0--24. More than half of the twins (65%--67%) reported a moderate to high chance of falling asleep while lying down to rest; fewer than 3% admitted that this would occur while sitting and talking to someone or while stopped in traffic. Daytime sleepiness was not associated with age but was significantly and positively associated with obesity. The intraclass twin correlation on ESS scores was 0.39 in MZ pairs and 0.21 in DZ pairs (both P < 0.001). Structural equation modeling of the observed variance-covariance matrices for MZ and DZ twins estimated the heritability of ESS to be 38% (95% confidence interval 33%--44%). Environmental influences not shared by twin brothers accounted for the remaining variance in daytime sleepiness. A reasonable interpretation of the heritability of ESS in this healthy cohort of elderly male twins is a genetic susceptibility for disordered breathing during sleep.

  8. [SAIMI Study--Health and Health Care Access by Immigrants from the Indian Subcontinent in Lisbon: What Recommendations for Equitable and Culturally Adequate Health Care?].

    PubMed

    Matos, Inês Campos; Alarcão, Violeta; Lopes, Elisa; Oiko, Carla; Carreira, Mário

    2015-01-01

    Introdução: O crescimento da população imigrante em Portugal tem sido consistente nas últimas décadas. Apesar disto, a informação sobre a saúde das populações imigrantes é escassa. Esta investigação utiliza dados recolhidos junto da população oriunda do subcontinente indiano a residir no distrito de Lisboa para produzir recomendações para a prestação de serviços de saúde culturalmente adaptados.Material e Métodos: Estudo transversal junto da comunidade imigrante do subcontinente indiano (Bangladesh, Ãçndia e Paquistão) a residir em Lisboa, selecionada com base numa técnica de amostragem bola de neve e recorrendo a inquiridores com acesso privilegiado à população-alvo. O questionário inquiriu sobre a saúde, o acesso aos cuidados de saúde, estilos de vida e atitudes perante a morte. Foi feita uma análise descritiva dos dados e uma comparação entre as três nacionalidades padronizada para a idade.Resultados: Foram administrados questionários a 1011 indivíduos com uma taxa de adesão de 97%. A maioria dos participantes eram adultos do sexo masculino. Os imigrantes indianos relataram mais frequentemente barreiras na utilização dos serviços de saúde e tinham uma maior frequência de doenças crónicas. Os imigrantes paquistaneses tinham piores indicadores de estilos de vida.Discussão: A população imigrante do subcontinente indiano tende a relatar mais dificuldades linguísticas no acesso aos cuidados de saúde quando comparada com outras populações imigrantes. Com base em recomendações da Organização Mundial da saúde, foi possível adaptar este conhecimento para produzir recomendações adaptadas ao contexto português.Conclusão: Existem diversos aspetos na gestão dos serviços de saúde em Portugal que podem ser melhor adaptados à população imigrante do subcontinente indiano.

  9. Nursing supervision for care comprehensiveness.

    PubMed

    Chaves, Lucieli Dias Pedreschi; Mininel, Vivian Aline; Silva, Jaqueline Alcântara Marcelino da; Alves, Larissa Roberta; Silva, Maria Ferreira da; Camelo, Silvia Helena Henriques

    2017-01-01

    To reflect on nursing supervision as a management tool for care comprehensiveness by nurses, considering its potential and limits in the current scenario. A reflective study based on discourse about nursing supervision, presenting theoretical and practical concepts and approaches. Limits on the exercise of supervision are related to the organization of healthcare services based on the functional and clinical model of care, in addition to possible gaps in the nurse training process and work overload. Regarding the potential, researchers emphasize that supervision is a tool for coordinating care and management actions, which may favor care comprehensiveness, and stimulate positive attitudes toward cooperation and contribution within teams, co-responsibility, and educational development at work. Nursing supervision may help enhance care comprehensiveness by implying continuous reflection on including the dynamics of the healthcare work process and user needs in care networks. refletir a supervisão de enfermagem como instrumento gerencial do enfermeiro para integralidade do cuidado, considerando suas potencialidades e limitações no cenário atual. estudo reflexivo baseado na formulação discursiva sobre a supervisão de enfermagem, apresentando conceitos e enfoques teóricos e/ou práticos. limitações no exercício da supervisão estão relacionadas à organização dos serviços de saúde embasada no modelo funcional e clínico de atenção, assim como possíveis lacunas no processo de formação do enfermeiro e sobrecarga de trabalho. Quanto às potencialidades, destaca-se a supervisão como instrumento de articulação de ações assistenciais e gerenciais, que pode favorecer integralidade da atenção, estimular atitudes de cooperação e colaboração em equipe, além da corresponsabilização e promoção da educação no trabalho. supervisão de enfermagem pode contribuir para fortalecimento da integralidade do cuidado, pressupondo reflexão cont

  10. Relationships between cooperation and goal orientation among male professional and semi-professional team athletes.

    PubMed

    Lameiras, João; Almeida, Pedro L; Garcia-Mas, Alexandre

    2014-12-01

    In team sports, athletes' goals may focus on the task (enhancing performance, developing better skills, etc.) or on ego (being better than the others, achieving superiority, etc.). This study investigated the relationships between athletes' goal orientation and their tendency to cooperate with teammates and coaches. 158 professional men (M age = 24.1 yr., SD = 4.6) who played on various sport teams participated in this study. Goal orientation was measured with the Portuguese version of the Task and Ego Orientation in Sport Questionnaire, and cooperation was measured with the Questionário de Cooperação Desportiva. Cooperation was positively correlated with task orientation, and negatively correlated with ego orientation. Overall, the findings support that in sports, directing the players' focus on task may promote prosocial behavior.

  11. A Comparative Analysis of Drug Use and Its Relationship to Certain Attitudes, Values, and Cognitive Knowledge on Drugs Between Eighth and Eleventh Grade Students in the Coronado Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brayer, Herbert O.; And Others

    The purpose of this study was to measure the nature and extent of the drug abuse involvement, knowledge, and atitudes of eighth and eleventh grade students in the Coronado Unified School District, Coronado, California. Included is a detailed comparison and evaluation of drug utilization rates; the determination of certain value orientations; and…

  12. EFL Writers' Attitudes and Perceptions toward F-Portfolio Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Selami

    2014-01-01

    Atitudes toward and perceptions of using Facebook as a portfolio-keeping tool in teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) writing. In general, existing research reveals primarily positive effects of Facebook on educational activities, and research on portfolio keeping in EFL writing shows both benefits and problem areas. Thus, the current…

  13. EFL Writers' Attitudes and Perceptions toward F-Portfolio Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aydin, Selami

    2014-01-01

    Atitudes toward and perceptions of using Facebook as a portfolio-keeping tool in teaching English as a foreign language (EFL) writing. In general, existing research reveals primarily positive effects of Facebook on educational activities, and research on portfolio keeping in EFL writing shows both benefits and problem areas. Thus, the current…

  14. Field Study for Remote Sensing: An instructor's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wake, W. H. (Editor); Hull, G. A. (Editor)

    1981-01-01

    The need for and value of field work (surface truthing) in the verification of image identification from high atitude infrared and multispectral space sensor images are discussed in this handbook which presents guidelines for developing instructional and research procedures in remote sensing of the environment.

  15. Ground Software Maintenance Facility (GSMF) user's manual. Appendices NASA-CR-178806 NAS 1.26:178806 Rept-41849-G159-026-App HC A05/MF A01

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquila, V.; Derrig, D.; Griffith, G.

    1986-01-01

    Procedures are presented that allow the user to assemble tasks, link, compile, backup the system, generate/establish/print display pages, cancel tasks in memory, and to TET an assembly task without having to enter the commands every time. A list of acronyms is provided. Software identification, payload checkout unit operating system services, data base generation, and MITRA operating procedures are also discussed.

  16. [Guía latinoamericana para el diagnóstico y tratamiento de alergia a las proteínas de la leche de vaca (GL-APLV)].

    PubMed

    Montijo-Barrios, Ericka; López-Ugalde, Martha Verónica; Ramírez-Mayans, Jaime; Anaya-Flórez, María Salomé; Arredondo-García, José Luis; Azevedo-Tenorio, Isaac; Bacarreza-Nogales, Dante; Bautista-Silva, Miriam G; Cáceres-Cano, Pablo Andrés; Cáceres-Mendoza, César Augusto; Cadena-León, José Francisco; Cadranel, Samy; Carbajal-Rodríguez, Luis; Castillo-de-León, Yolanda A; Cázares-Méndez, Josefina Monserrat; Cervantes-Bustamante, Roberto; Colindres-C, Ediltrudys; Cossío-Ochoa, Enna Alicia; Chanis-Águila, Ricardo; Chávez-Barrera, José Antonio; Escobar-Castro, Héctor; Fernández-Aragón, Marlon; Fernández-Carrocera, Luis Alberto; Flores, Alejandro; Flores-Calderón, Judith; Galaz-Pantoja, Manuel Enrique; García-Dávila, Marycruz; Heller-Rouassant, Solange; Hernández-Bautista, Víctor Manuel; Higuera-Benítez, Jorge; Huerta-Hernández, Rosa Elena; Huerta-López, José G; Jovel-Banegas, Luis Enrique; Larrosa-Haro, Alfredo; Leal-Quevedo, Francisco Javier; León-Ramírez, Carlos; Limón-Rojas, Ana Elena; Lozano-Sáenz, José Santos; Mariño-Forero, Álvaro Eduardo; Márquez-Aguirre, Martha Patricia; Maruy-Saito, Aldo; Méndez-Nieto, Carlos Mario; Menéndez-Sandoval, José Fernando; Merlos-Fernández, Ivonne Guadalupe; Michel-Aceves, Reynaldo de Jesús; Michel-Penichet, Fernando; Munguía-Venegas, Pedro; Murillo-Márquez, Pedro; Navarro-A, Dianora C; Noronha-Spolidoro, José Vicente; Núñez-Barrera, Isela; Ordaz-Ortiz, Carlos Reyes; Ortega-Martell, José Antonio; Ortiz-López-de-Wyss, Ana Caroliona; Ovando-Fonseca, Jesús Elías; Oyervides-García, Carlos Iván; Palacios-Rosales, Jorge; Pinzón-Navarro, Adriana Beatriz; Quevedo-B, Rafael; Quito-Riera, Bolívar; Ramírez-Ortiz, Flor de María; Rivera-Medina, Juan; Romero-Trujillo, Jorge O; Sabra, Aderbal; Sáez-de-Ocariz-Gutiérrez, María Del Mar; Sánchez-Ortega, Analissa; Sánchez-Pérez, Maira Patricia; Sarmiento-Quintero, Fernando; Serrano-Sierra, Alejandro; Suárez-Cortina, Lucrecia; Tormo-Carnicé, Ramón; Toro-Monjaraz, Erick; Urquidi-Rivera, Martha Eugenia; Vásconez, Fabián; Vera, Fernando; Worona-Dibner, Liliana Beatriz; Zablah-Córdova, Roberto; Zamora-Dávila, Eduardo; Zárate-Mondragón, Flora

    2014-08-01

    Cow's milk allergy (CMA) is an immune-based disease that has become an increasing problem. The diagnosis and management of CMA varies from one clinical setting to another and represents a challenge in pediatric practice. In addition, because nonallergic food reactions can be confused with CMA symptoms, there is an overdiagnosis of the disease. In response to these situations, pediatric specialties from recognized institutions throughout Latin America decided to develop a clinical guideline for diagnosis and management of cow's milk allergy. These guidelines include definitions, epidemiology, pathophysiology overview, clinical and evidencebased recommendations for the diagnosis and treatment of CMA. They also include prevention and prognosis sections and identify gaps in the current knowledge to be addressed through future research.

  17. A Pos-Graduacao Nas Ciencias Humanas e o Paradigma da Medicina: A Era da Especializacao. (Post-Graduation in the Human Sciences and the Paradigm of Medicine: The Era of Specialization.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Celio Juvenal

    2000-01-01

    Reflects on the current tendency in Brazilian higher education for greater and greater specialization, particularly in human sciences and in medicine. Calls for less specialization and a more historic and general preparation, especially in teacher education. (BT)

  18. A Pos-Graduacao Nas Ciencias Humanas e o Paradigma da Medicina: A Era da Especializacao. (Post-Graduation in the Human Sciences and the Paradigm of Medicine: The Era of Specialization.)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Costa, Celio Juvenal

    2000-01-01

    Reflects on the current tendency in Brazilian higher education for greater and greater specialization, particularly in human sciences and in medicine. Calls for less specialization and a more historic and general preparation, especially in teacher education. (BT)

  19. Heroin and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... serious problems for your baby, like premature birth, NAS, birth defects and stillbirth. If you’re pregnant ... pounds, 8 ounces. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (also called NAS). NAS happens when a baby is exposed to ...

  20. How Does Heroin Use Affect Pregnant Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... during pregnancy can result in neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS occurs when heroin passes through the placenta to ... weight gain, tremors, diarrhea, vomiting, and possibly death. NAS requires hospitalization and treatment with medication (often morphine) ...

  1. Neonatal abstinence syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    NAS; Neonatal abstinence symptoms ... may contribute to the severity of a baby's NAS symptoms. ... symptoms of withdrawal. Even after medical treatment for NAS is over and babies leave the hospital, they ...

  2. Three nicotianamine synthase genes isolated from maize are differentially regulated by iron nutritional status.

    PubMed

    Mizuno, Daichi; Higuchi, Kyoko; Sakamoto, Tatsuya; Nakanishi, Hiromi; Mori, Satoshi; Nishizawa, Naoko K

    2003-08-01

    Nicotianamine synthase (NAS) is an enzyme that is critical for the biosynthesis of the mugineic acid family of phytosiderophores in graminaceous plants, and for the homeostasis of metal ions in nongraminaceous plants. We isolated one genomic NAS clone, ZmNAS3, and two cDNA NAS clones, ZmNAS1 and ZmNAS2, from maize (Zea mays cv Alice). In agreement with the increased secretion of phytosiderophores with Fe deficiency, ZmNAS1 and ZmNAS2 were positively expressed only in Fe-deficient roots. In contrast, ZmNAS3 was expressed under Fe-sufficient conditions, and was negatively regulated by Fe deficiency. This is the first report describing down-regulation of NAS gene expression in response to Fe deficiency in plants, shedding light on the role of nicotianamine in graminaceous plants, other than as a precursor in phytosiderophore production. ZmNAS1-green fluorescent protein (sGFP) and ZmNAS2-sGFP were localized at spots in the cytoplasm of onion (Allium cepa) epidermal cells, whereas ZmNAS3-sGFP was distributed throughout the cytoplasm of these cells. ZmNAS1 and ZmNAS3 showed NAS activity in vitro, whereas ZmNAS2 showed none. Due to its duplicated structure, ZmNAS2 was much larger (65.8 kD) than ZmNAS1, ZmNAS3, and previously characterized NAS proteins (30-38 kD) from other plant species. We reveal that maize has two types of NAS proteins based on their expression pattern and subcellular localization.

  3. Cloning and characterization of the nicotianamine synthase gene in Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa.

    PubMed

    Huang, B L; Cheng, C; Zhang, G Y; Su, J J; Zhi, Y; Xu, S S; Cai, D T; Zhang, X K; Huang, B Q

    2015-12-22

    Nicotianamine (NA) is a ubiquitous metabolite in plants that bind heavy metals, is crucial for metal homeostasis, and is also an important metal chelator that facilitates long-distance metal transport and sequestration. NA synthesis is catalyzed by the enzyme nicotianamine synthase (NAS). Eruca vesicaria subsp sativa is highly tolerant to Ni, Pb, and Zn. In this study, a gene encoding EvNAS was cloned and characterized in E. vesicaria subsp sativa. The full-length EvNAS cDNA sequence contained a 111-bp 5'-untranslated region (UTR), a 155-bp 3'-UTR, and a 966-bp open reading frame encoding 322-amino acid residues. The EvNAS genomic sequence contained no introns, which is similar to previously reported NAS genes. The deduced translation of EvNAS contained a well-conserved NAS domain (1-279 amino acids) and an LIKI-CGEAEG box identical to some Brassica NAS and to the LIRL-box in most plant NAS, which is essential for DNA binding. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that EvNAS was most closely related to Brassica rapa NAS3 within the Cruciferae, followed by Thlaspi NAS1, Camelina NAS3, and Arabidopsis NAS3. A reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction indicated that EvNAS expression was greatest in the leaves, followed by the flower buds and hypocotyls. EvNAS was moderately expressed in the roots.

  4. 76 FR 44579 - Notice of Availability of Environmental Assessment for Strike Fighter Realignment at Naval Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ... realignment of strike fighter assets at Naval Air Station (NAS) Lemoore. Dates and Addresses: Written comments... to NAS Lemoore, and transitioning five NAS Lemoore based FA-18 Hornet squadrons to Super Hornets. The proposed action, when combined with a reduction in the size of NAS Lemoore's existing training...

  5. Systematic training model for teaching, development and training of instructors in inguinal hernia treatment using the Lichtenstein technique. Hernia campaign 2014 & 2015.

    PubMed

    Lazzarini-Mendes, Carlos José; Pacheco, Adhemar Monteiro; Destro, Bárbara Bozzoli; Tamaro, Caroline; Nogueira, Fábio Antonio Del Picchia DE Araújo; Chen, David; Reinpold, Wolfgang; Bruscagin, Vitor; Roll, Sergio; Silva, Rodrigo Altenfelder

    2016-01-01

    to evaluate the method of training and continuing education of 18 surgeons in 2014, and 28 surgeons in 2015, in the Holy Homes of Ribeirao Preto, Araraquara, Franca and San Carlos of São Paulo, in the performance of Lichtenstein inguinal herniorrhaphy, tutored by the Faculty of Medical Sciences of the São Paulo Holy Home and the organization HERNIA HELP - "Hernia Repair for the Underserved". the training was tutored and systematized through an active methodology of teaching and learning, aiming to offer competence, skills and attitudes, measured by a previously validated Qualification Form, qualifying leaders in trainees' improvement. in 2014 the outcomes were: the difficulty of the case, direction, incision, dissection, mesh preparation, mesh cutting, mesh setting, closing, instruments, respect to tissues, flow, time and motion, and performance, all presented change in the general rating (p=0.000002); there was greater confidence in the execution of the procedure in 80% of trainees, considered "very valuable" in 93.3% of the interventions. In 2015, 28 surgeons were trained by ten surgeons previously qualified in 2014. The nerve identification rate, a relevant time the Lichtenstein technique, was 95.5% for the Iliohypogastric, 98.5% for the ilioinguinal and 89.4% for the genital branch of the genitofemoral nerve. the applied teaching method is possible, reproducible, reliable and valid. The joint efforts offer enormous opportunity of directed education, reaching underserved populations, revealing the great teacher-student social responsibility. avaliar resultados do método de treinamento e educação continuada de 18 cirurgiões, em 2014, e 28 cirurgiões, em 2015, nas Santas Casas de Ribeirão Preto, Araraquara, Franca e São Carlos do Estado de São Paulo, na realização da Herniorrafia Inguinal à Lichtenstein, tutorados pela Faculdade de Ciências Médicas da Santa Casa de São Paulo e pela organização HERNIA HELP - "Hernia Repair for the Underserved

  6. [Alcohol consumption in the schooled youth: an old question revisited].

    PubMed

    Marques, Marilia; Viveiro, Carolina; Passadouro, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Introdução: É principalmente na adolescência que os jovens procuram novas experiências. O consumo de álcool surge neste contexto como uma atitude banalizada e, por vezes, até incitada socialmente, já que o acesso a bebidas alcoólicas é facilitado. Associa-se a comportamentos de risco, com consequências sérias do ponto de vista de saúde pública. O nosso objectivo é caracterizar os padrões de consumo de álcool numa amostra de adolescentes residentes no distrito de Leiria. Material e Métodos: Estudo transversal, descritivo, através de um questionário anónimo aplicado em alunos do distrito de Leiria. Resultados: A amostra final foi de 405 indivíduos, 56% do sexo feminino, com idade média de 16,5 ± 1 anos (15 - 18 anos). A maioria (48%) frequentava o 10º ano, 15,4% reprovaram pelo menos uma vez. Noventa por cento dos inquiridos afirmaram ter experimentado bebidas alcoólicas pelo menos uma vez. O primeiro contacto com o álcool ocorreu preferencialmente com amigos (63%), na maioria dos casos por curiosidade (47%). Os resultados apontaram para maiores índices de consumo de cerveja e maior insucesso escolar no género masculino, comparativamente ao género feminino, que apresentava um maior consumo de bebidas brancas. Em ambos os sexos verificou-se uma tendência para o binge drinking. A maioria dos inquiridos (60%) consumia 2 a 3 copos por ocasião mas cerca de 30% dos rapazes afirmaram consumir mais de quatro copos por ocasião (7% até ficarem embriagados), tendência que não se verificou nas raparigas. A maioria dos consumos efectuou-se nos bares e discotecas (60%). Constatou-se que 41% dos inquiridos saíam à noite, e 70% ingeriam bebidas alcoólicas; 66% começaram a sair à noite entre os 13 e os 15 anos de idade e 9% já tinham experimentado drogas pelo menos uma vez. Os jovens estão mal informados quanto ao consumo do álcool: 20% achavam que as bebidas alcoólicas podem matar a sede, 34% acreditavam que abrem o apetite, 15

  7. Artificial sweeteners induce glucose intolerance by altering the gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Suez, Jotham; Korem, Tal; Zeevi, David; Zilberman-Schapira, Gili; Thaiss, Christoph A; Maza, Ori; Israeli, David; Zmora, Niv; Gilad, Shlomit; Weinberger, Adina; Kuperman, Yael; Harmelin, Alon; Kolodkin-Gal, Ilana; Shapiro, Hagit; Halpern, Zamir; Segal, Eran; Elinav, Eran

    2014-10-09

    Non-caloric artificial sweeteners (NAS) are among the most widely used food additives worldwide, regularly consumed by lean and obese individuals alike. NAS consumption is considered safe and beneficial owing to their low caloric content, yet supporting scientific data remain sparse and controversial. Here we demonstrate that consumption of commonly used NAS formulations drives the development of glucose intolerance through induction of compositional and functional alterations to the intestinal microbiota. These NAS-mediated deleterious metabolic effects are abrogated by antibiotic treatment, and are fully transferrable to germ-free mice upon faecal transplantation of microbiota configurations from NAS-consuming mice, or of microbiota anaerobically incubated in the presence of NAS. We identify NAS-altered microbial metabolic pathways that are linked to host susceptibility to metabolic disease, and demonstrate similar NAS-induced dysbiosis and glucose intolerance in healthy human subjects. Collectively, our results link NAS consumption, dysbiosis and metabolic abnormalities, thereby calling for a reassessment of massive NAS usage.

  8. Women Soldiers in Korea: Troop Viewpoints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    27. Recreation/Education Services6-Satisfaction Score Analisis 121 29. Women-in Co--mba Attitude Sore Anaysis 123 28. then i Comy Atitude ,Scii Anaysis...The technical supplement also contains a series of analyses of score differences. The scores were simple suns of the number of ,times a person agreed or...QUESTIONNAIRE INVITATION TO PARTICIPATE TO: Persons Selected for This Survey 1. You have been selected from among all the soldiers in Eighth U.S

  9. Limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of naphthenic acids in oil sands process water.

    PubMed

    Lu, Weibing; Ewanchuk, Andrea; Perez-Estrada, Leonidas; Sego, Dave; Ulrich, Ania

    2013-01-01

    Fluorescence spectrophotometry has been proposed as a quick screening technique for the measurement of naphthenic acids (NAs). To evaluate the feasibility of this application, the fluorescence emission spectra of NAs extracted from three oil sands process water sources were compared with that of commercial NAs. The NAs resulting from the bitumen extraction process cannot be differentiated because of the similarity of the fluorescence spectra. Separation of the fluorescent species in NAs using high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detector proved unsuccessful. The acidic fraction of NAs is fluorescent but the basic fraction of NAs is not fluorescent, implying that aromatic acids in NAs give rise to the fluorescent signals. The concentrations of NAs in oil sands process water were measured by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), fluorescence spectrophotometry and ultra high performance liquid chromatography-time of flight/mass spectrometry (UPLC-TOF/MS). Commercial Merichem and Kodak NAs are the best standards to use when measuring NAs concentration with FTIR and fluorescence spectrophotometry. In addition, the NAs concentrations measured by fluorescence spectrophotometry are about 30 times higher than those measured by FTIR and UPLC-TOF/MS. The findings in this study underscore the limitation of fluorescence spectrophotometry in the measurement of NAs.

  10. 41 CFR 102-3.40 - What types of committees or groups are not covered by the Act and this part?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Sciences (NAS) or the National Academy of Public Administration (NAPA). Any committee created by NAS or NAPA in accordance with section 15 of the Act, except as otherwise covered by subpart E of this...

  11. Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla Aircraft Industry, England (center right) at the NAS Facility Cray 2 computer with Ron Deiss, NAS Deputy Manager (L) and Vic Peterson, Ames Deputy Director (R).

  12. Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Ames Director William 'Bill' Ballhaus (center left) joins visitor Sir Jeffrey Pope from Royla Aircraft Industry, England (center right) at the NAS Facility Cray 2 computer with Ron Deiss, NAS Deputy Manager (L) and Vic Peterson, Ames Deputy Director (R).

  13. NASA Altix 512P SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Davin

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of NASA Advances Supercomputing (NAS). The topics include: 1) About NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS); 2) System Configuration; 3) Our Experience with the Altix; and 4) Future Plans.

  14. Kids Born to Opioid-Addicted Moms Seem to Fare Poorly in School

    MedlinePlus

    ... academic results in children with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) -- when a fetus is exposed to drugs in ... In the United States, it's estimated that an NAS infant is born every 25 minutes, the study ...

  15. 75 FR 57848 - Revocation of Class E Airspace, Brunswick, ME; and Establishment of Class E Airspace, Wiscasset, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-23

    ...: Final rule. SUMMARY: This action removes Class E Airspace at Brunswick NAS, Brunswick, ME, as the..., Code of Federal Regulations (14 CFR) part 71 removes the Class E airspace at Brunswick NAS,...

  16. Job satisfaction, intent to stay, and recommended job improvements: the palliative nursing assistant speaks.

    PubMed

    Head, Barbara A; Washington, Karla T; Myers, John

    2013-11-01

    There are few studies specifically focused on the job satisfaction of hospice and palliative nursing assistants (NAs). The goal of this study was to ascertain factors contributing to NAs' job satisfaction and intent to remain with their current employer, garner suggestions for improving NA jobs, and inform hospice and palliative care providers concerned about retaining qualified, satisfied NAs. A nonexperimental, cross-sectional survey design was used to collect data from a broad sample of NAs employed in hospice and palliative care settings between December 2010 and May 2011. This study found hospice and palliative NAs to be satisfied and committed to their jobs, which most viewed as long-term careers. However, organizations committed to recruitment and retention of committed and satisfied NAs would do well to ensure high-quality NA supervision, include NAs as valued team members, encourage positive work relationships, work to reduce problems identified by NAs as interfering with their work, and continue efforts to increase NA compensation.

  17. Street Drugs and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... other brain problems. Neonatal abstinence syndrome (also called NAS). This is a group of health conditions that ... if his mother uses addictive drugs during pregnancy. NAS can happen when a baby is exposed to ...

  18. Medical Costs Soar for U.S. Babies Born Addicted to Opioids

    MedlinePlus

    ... steep rise in so-called neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS), the researchers said. Most often, newborns suffer the ... that the number of U.S. infants born with NAS tripled between 1999 and 2013 -- at least across ...

  19. Birth Defects: What They Are and How They Happen

    MedlinePlus

    ... your baby Marfan syndrome Microcephaly Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) Neural tube defects Neurofibromatosis Organic acid metabolism disorders ... your baby Marfan syndrome Microcephaly Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) Neural tube defects Neurofibromatosis Organic acid metabolism disorders ...

  20. Management of neonatal abstinence syndrome in the newborn nursery.

    PubMed

    Artigas, Valarie

    2014-12-01

    Maternal drug use and neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) are being seen across the United States. NAS occurs with withdrawal disturbances in response to the cessation of the pregnancy exposure. The clinical presentation of a newborn with NAS can include gastrointestinal, neurologic, vasomotor and respiratory symptoms. Assessment of newborns with NAS can often present as a challenge to maternal-child nurses. Treatment can include supportive care as well as pharmacologic therapies.

  1. O Passado como Nacao: Imagens do Imperio nas Falas Reacionarias dos Anos 30 e 40 do Seculo XX: Uma Pequena Arqueologia do Debate Publico e Privado (The Past as Nation: Images of the Empire in the Reactionary Words of the 30s and 40s in the 20th Century: A Small Archaeology of the Public Debate versus the Private One).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Marcos Cezar

    1998-01-01

    Suggests an archaeology of the public debate versus the private one in Brazil through analysis of the reactionary speech of a religious leader, Dom Jose Mauricio da Rocha, which produced innumerable representations of the Brazilian Empire. (PA)

  2. O Passado como Nacao: Imagens do Imperio nas Falas Reacionarias dos Anos 30 e 40 do Seculo XX: Uma Pequena Arqueologia do Debate Publico e Privado (The Past as Nation: Images of the Empire in the Reactionary Words of the 30s and 40s in the 20th Century: A Small Archaeology of the Public Debate versus the Private One).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de Freitas, Marcos Cezar

    1998-01-01

    Suggests an archaeology of the public debate versus the private one in Brazil through analysis of the reactionary speech of a religious leader, Dom Jose Mauricio da Rocha, which produced innumerable representations of the Brazilian Empire. (PA)

  3. Pluralizing the Monoculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    The National Association of Scholars (NAS) is now entering its twentieth year. The organization has grown over ten-fold since their national launch. When NAS made its debut, today's extensive infrastructure for higher education reform did not yet exist. In this article, the author discusses the contributions of NAS to the academe. The author also…

  4. Intrinsic Job Satisfaction, Overall Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave the Job among Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Frederic H.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Bercovitz, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined predictors of intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants (NAs). Design and Methods: The study focused on NAs who worked 30 or more hours per week in a nursing home. Data on 2,146 NAs meeting this criterion came from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, the…

  5. Predicting Treatment for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome in Infants Born to Women Maintained on Opioid Agonist Medication

    PubMed Central

    Kaltenbach, Karol; Holbrook, Amber; Coyle, Mara G.; Heil, Sarah H.; Salisbury, Amy; Stine, Susan; Martin, Peter; Jones, Hendrée

    2014-01-01

    Aim To identify factors that predict the expression of neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) in infants exposed to methadone or buprenorphine in utero. Design and Setting Multi-site randomized clinical trial in which infants were observed for a minimum of 10 days following birth, and assessed for NAS symptoms by trained raters. Participants n = 131 infants born to opioid dependent mothers, 129 of which were available for NAS assessment. Measurements Generalized linear modeling was performed using maternal and infant characteristics to predict: peak NAS score prior to treatment, whether an infant required NAS treatment, length of NAS treatment, and total dose of morphine required for treatment of NAS symptoms. Findings 53% of the sample (68 infants) required treatment for NAS. Lower maternal weight at delivery, later estimated gestational age (EGA), maternal use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), vaginal delivery, and higher infant birth weight predicted higher peak NAS scores. Higher infant birth weight and greater maternal nicotine use at delivery predicted receipt of NAS treatment for infants. Maternal use of SSRIs, higher nicotine use, and fewer days of study medication received also predicted total dose of medication required to treat NAS symptoms. No variables predicted length of treatment for NAS. Conclusions Maternal weight at delivery, estimated gestational age, infant birth weight, delivery type, maternal nicotine use, and days of maternal study medication received, and the use of psychotropic medications in pregnancy may play a role in the expression of neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in infants exposed to either methadone or buprenorphine. PMID:23106926

  6. 76 FR 6784 - Science Advisory Board Staff Office; Notification of Two Public Teleconferences of the Science...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-08

    ... Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments, External Review Draft. DATES: The SAB Dioxin... Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments, External Review Draft. The SAB will comply with the provisions of... Related to Dioxin Toxicity and Response to NAS Comments, External Review Draft (May 2010)...

  7. 75 FR 57828 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Renewed Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-22

    ... of Renewed Approval of Information Collection: NAS Data Release Request AGENCY: Federal Aviation... evaluate the validity of the user's request for National Airspace (NAS) data from FAA systems and equipment... Number: 2120-0668. Title: NAS Data Release Request. Form Numbers: FAA Form 1200-5. Type of...

  8. 75 FR 8485 - Revocation of Class D and E Airspace; Brunswick, ME

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... and E Airspace at Brunswick NAS Airport, Brunswick, ME, as the airport has closed and the associated... Brunswick NAS Airport in Brunswick, ME has closed in compliance with the 2005 Base Realignment and Closure... NAS Airport, Brunswick, ME. This rule will become effective on the date specified in the DATES...

  9. 48 CFR 832.111 - Contract clauses for non-commercial purchases.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... entitled “Network Analysis System (NAS),” the contracting officer must insert the clause at 852.236-82, Payments under fixed-price construction contracts (without NAS). When the solicitation or contract includes... solicitation or contract contains a section entitled “Network Analysis System (NAS),” the contracting...

  10. 76 FR 4743 - Agency Information Collection Activities: Requests for Comments; Clearance of Renewed Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... of Renewed Approval of Information Collection(s): NAS Data Release Request AGENCY: Federal Aviation... of the user's request for National Airspace (NAS) data from FAA systems and equipment. DATES: Written...-0668. Title: NAS Data Release Request. Form Numbers: FAA Form 1200-5. Type of Review: Renewal of...

  11. Intrinsic Job Satisfaction, Overall Satisfaction, and Intention to Leave the Job among Nursing Assistants in Nursing Homes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decker, Frederic H.; Harris-Kojetin, Lauren D.; Bercovitz, Anita

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: We examined predictors of intrinsic job satisfaction, overall satisfaction, and intention to leave the job among nursing assistants (NAs). Design and Methods: The study focused on NAs who worked 30 or more hours per week in a nursing home. Data on 2,146 NAs meeting this criterion came from the 2004 National Nursing Assistant Survey, the…

  12. Pluralizing the Monoculture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balch, Stephen H.

    2007-01-01

    The National Association of Scholars (NAS) is now entering its twentieth year. The organization has grown over ten-fold since their national launch. When NAS made its debut, today's extensive infrastructure for higher education reform did not yet exist. In this article, the author discusses the contributions of NAS to the academe. The author also…

  13. Nicotianamine synthase gene family as central components in heavy metal and phytohormone response in maize.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mei-Liang; Qi, Lei-Peng; Pang, Jun-Feng; Zhang, Qian; Lei, Zhi; Tang, Yi-Xiong; Zhu, Xue-Mei; Shao, Ji-Rong; Wu, Yan-Min

    2013-06-01

    Nicotianamine (NA) is an important divalent metal chelator and the main precursor of phytosiderophores. NA is synthesized from S-adenosylmethionine in a process catalyzed by nicotianamine synthase (NAS). In this study, a set of structural and phylogenetic analyses have been applied to identify the maize NAS genes based on the maize genome sequence release. Ten maize NAS genes have been mapped; seven of them have not been reported to date. Phylogenetic analysis and expression pattern from microarray data led to their classification into two different orthologous groups. C-terminal fusion of ZmNAS3 with GFP was found in the cytoplasm of Arabidopsis leaf protoplast. Expression analysis by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction revealed ZmNAS genes are responsive to heavy metal ions (Ni, Fe, Cu, Mn, Zn, and Cd), and all 10 ZmNAS genes were only observed in the root tissue except of ZmNAS6. The promoter of ZmNAS genes was analyzed for the presence of different cis-element response to all kinds of phytohormones and environment stresses. We found that the ZmNAS gene expression of maize seedlings was regulated by jasmonic acid, abscisic acid, and salicylic acid. Microarray data demonstrated that the ZmNAS genes show differential, organ-specific expression patterns in the maize developmental steps. The integrated comparative analysis can improve our current view of ZmNAS genes and facilitate the functional characterization of individual members.

  14. Neonatal abstinence syndrome: Historical perspective, current focus, future directions.

    PubMed

    Jones, Hendrée E; Fielder, Andrea

    2015-11-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) occurs following prenatal opioid exposure. It is characterized by signs and symptoms indicating central nervous system hyperirritability and autonomic nervous system, gastrointestinal tract, and respiratory system dysfunction. This article: (1) briefly reviews NAS history, including initial identification, assessment, and treatment efforts; (2) summarizes the current status of and current issues surrounding recent NAS assessment and treatment, and (3) details future directions in NAS conceptualization, measurement, and treatment. Mortality rate estimates in neonates treated for NAS exceeded 33%, and surpassed 90% for un-treated infants during the late-1800s until the mid-1900s. The focus of both assessment and treatment over the past 50years is predominantly due to two forces. First, methadone pharmacotherapy for "heroin addiction" led to women in methadone maintenance programs who were, or became pregnant. The second was defining NAS and developing a measure of neonatal withdrawal, the Neonatal Abstinence Scoring System (NASS). Various NAS treatment protocols were based on the NASS as well as other NAS measures. Future research must focus on psychometrically sound screening and assessment measures of neonatal opioid withdrawal for premature, term and older infants, measuring and treating possible withdrawal from non-opioids, particularly benzodiazepines, integrated non-pharmacological treatment of NAS, weight-based versus symptom-based treatment of NAS, and second-line treatment for NAS. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Maternal vagal tone change in response to methadone is associated with neonatal abstinence syndrome severity in exposed neonates.

    PubMed

    Jansson, Lauren M; Dipietro, Janet A; Elko, Andrea; Velez, Martha

    2007-09-01

    Though methadone pharmacotherapy is the treatment of choice for opiate-dependence during pregnancy in the USA, most methadone-exposed neonates develop neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS). NAS expression is widely variable among methadone-exposed neonates and only a subset requires pharmacotherapy. This study explores the potential predictors of NAS severity, including aspects of maternal substance use and methadone maintenance histories, concomitant exposure to other licit substances, and individual differences in intrinsic maternal or infant factors that may affect the infant's vulnerability to NAS expression. Fifty methadone-maintained pregnant women attending a comprehensive substance abuse treatment facility, received electrocardiogram monitoring at 36 weeks of gestation at the times of trough and peak maternal methadone levels. Vagal tone, an estimate of the magnitude of an individual's respiratory sinus arrhythmia and an indicator of autonomic control, was derived. NAS expression was unrelated to maternal substance abuse history, methadone maintenance history, or psychotropic medication exposure. Male infants displayed more profound NAS symptoms and received more pharmacotherapy to treat NAS (all p < 0.05). NAS expression was related to maternal vagal reactivity; both suppression and activation of maternal vagal tone in response to methadone administration were positively and significantly associated with NAS symptomatology (F (2,44) = 4.15, p < 0.05) and treatment (F (2,44) = 3.39, p < 0.05). Infants of vagal non-responder mothers showed substantially lower NAS expression. NAS severity is associated with maternal vagal tone change in response to methadone administration.

  16. Digestion of Nucleic Acids Starts in the Stomach.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Yanfang; Dong, Ping; An, Ran; Xue, Changhu; Ge, Yinlin; Wei, Liangzhou; Liang, Xingguo

    2015-07-14

    The ingestion of nucleic acids (NAs) as a nutritional supplement or in genetically modified food has attracted the attention of researchers in recent years. Discussions over the fate of NAs led us to study their digestion in the stomach. Interestingly, we found that NAs are digested efficiently by human gastric juice. By performing digests with commercial, recombinant and mutant pepsin, a protein-specific enzyme, we learned that the digestion of NAs could be attributed to pepsin rather than to the acidity of the stomach. Further study showed that pepsin cleaved NAs in a moderately site-specific manner to yield 3'-phosphorylated fragments and the active site to digest NAs is probably the same as that used to digest protein. Our results rectify the misunderstandings that the digestion of NAs in the gastric tract begins in the intestine and that pepsin can only digest protein, shedding new light on NA metabolism and pepsin enzymology.

  17. Review of the assessment and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure is an increasing problem. Variability in assessment and treatment of NAS has been attributed to the lack of high-quality evidence to guide management of exposed neonates. This systematic review examines available evidence for NAS assessment tools, nonpharmacologic interventions, and pharmacologic management of opioid-exposed infants. There is limited data on the inter-observer reliability of NAS assessment tools due to lack of a standardized approach. In addition, most scales were developed prior to the prevalent use of prescribed prenatal concomitant medications, which can complicate NAS assessment. Nonpharmacologic interventions, particularly breastfeeding, may decrease NAS severity. Opioid medications such as morphine or methadone are recommended as first-line therapy, with phenobarbital or clonidine as second-line adjunctive therapy. Further research is needed to determine best practices for assessment, nonpharmacologic intervention, and pharmacologic management of infants with NAS in order to improve outcomes. PMID:25199822

  18. Intraprofessional Excellence in Nursing: Collaborative Strategies for Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Teague, Amanda H; Jnah, Amy J; Newberry, Desi

    2015-01-01

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) is a growing public health concern, one that costs the health care system $190-$720 million each year. Recently, state-level perinatal quality collaborative groups have disseminated NAS action plans: customizable frameworks aimed to assist health care systems in identifying, evaluating, treating, and coordinating discharge services for neonates with NAS. Hospital-based neonatal nursing quality improvement teams, including neonatal nurse practitioners (NNPs), neonatal clinical nurse specialists (CNSs), and clinical neonatal nurses, by virtue of their collective academic, administrative, and practical years of experience, are ideally positioned to develop, implement, and evaluate NAS care bundles. The article's purpose is to discuss key elements of an NAS care bundle using the framework of the Perinatal Quality Collaborative of North Carolina NAS action plan as an exemplar. Discussion of evidence-based and nursing-driven metrics will be followed by a discussion of the emerging concept of an inpatient-to-outpatient transitional care NAS management model.

  19. Review of the assessment and management of neonatal abstinence syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bagley, Sarah Mary; Wachman, Elisha M; Holland, Erica; Brogly, Susan B

    2014-09-09

    Neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS) secondary to in-utero opioid exposure is an increasing problem. Variability in assessment and treatment of NAS has been attributed to the lack of high-quality evidence to guide management of exposed neonates. This systematic review examines available evidence for NAS assessment tools, nonpharmacologic interventions, and pharmacologic management of opioid-exposed infants. There is limited data on the inter-observer reliability of NAS assessment tools due to lack of a standardized approach. In addition, most scales were developed prior to the prevalent use of prescribed prenatal concomitant medications, which can complicate NAS assessment. Nonpharmacologic interventions, particularly breastfeeding, may decrease NAS severity. Opioid medications such as morphine or methadone are recommended as first-line therapy, with phenobarbital or clonidine as second-line adjunctive therapy. Further research is needed to determine best practices for assessment, nonpharmacologic intervention, and pharmacologic management of infants with NAS in order to improve outcomes.

  20. CdSe quantum dot sensitized solar cell based hierarchical branched ZnO nanoarrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Deng, Jianping

    2015-05-01

    The hierarchical branched ZnO nanoarrays (NAs) photoanode was prepared by a two-step hydrothermal method. Vertically aligned long ZnO NWs were first synthesized using as the backbone of hierarchical branched ZnO NAs structure and high quality ZnO NAs branches were grown on the surface of backbone ZnO NAs. The structured films enhance the optical path length through the light scatting effect of branched ZnO NAs and prove the larger internal surface area in NAs film to increase quantum dots (QDs) sensitizer loadings, so the light absorption has an optimization. Compared with the cell based conventional 1D ZnO NAs, the efficiency of the new cells has a great improvement due to the increase of the short circuit current density.