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Sample records for nas pregas vestibulares

  1. Vestibular recruitment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tsemakhov, S. G.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibular recruitment is defined through the analysis of several references. It is concluded that vestibular recruitment is an objective phenomenon which manifests itself during the affection of the vestibular receptor and thus serves as a diagnostic tool during affection of the vestibular system.

  2. [Vestibular paroxismia].

    PubMed

    Likhachev, S A; Mar'enko, I P; Antonenko, A I

    2013-01-01

    The objective of the present publication was to demonstrate a clinical case of peripheral vestibular paroxismia verified in a woman with the help of the MRI technique. Vestibular paroxismia is a relatively rare disease manifested in such characteristic signs and symptoms as sudden and short-lived episodes of dizziness, unstable gait, and the concomitant vegetative disorders accompanied as a rule by tympanophonia, impairment of hearing, and falls. In typical cases, the duration of such episodes varies from several minutes to a few days. A case of vestibular paroxismia associated with the lesion in the peripheral section of the vestibular system is described; it was caused by compression of the nerve by a blood vessel as shown by means of magnetic resonance imaging of cranial nerves.

  3. Vestibular function outcomes after vestibular neurectomy in Meniere disease: can vestibular neurectomy provide complete vestibular deafferentation?

    PubMed

    Leveque, M; Seidermann, L; Tran, H; Langagne, T; Ulmer, E; Chays, A

    2010-06-01

    Vestibular neurectomy is considered the reference treatment of incapacitating vertigo accompanying Meniere disease, with an efficiency rate of 85-95% in most literature reports. The aim of this study is to evaluate if vestibular neurectomy can provide a complete vestibular deafferentation by investigating complete vestibular function after surgery. Prospective study. Twenty-four patients suffering from incapacitated Meniere vertigo crisis beneficiated from a vestibular neurectomy by retrosigmoid approach. The average time between surgery and vestibular evaluation was 1 year. We performed (i) kinetic test, (ii) caloric test and (iii) vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) at 30, 60 and 100Hz under videonystagmography recording, (iv) vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), (v) video head impulsed test (VHIT) for each semicircular canals and (vi) an evaluation of visual vertical and horizontal subjective (VVS and HVS). On clinical evaluation, all the patients except one had never experienced any recurrence of vertigo crisis after surgery. The 24 patients would definitely undergo the surgery again. On vestibular evaluation, on the operated side, all patients showed a total areflexia at caloric test; 23 patients had no VEMP response; 23 patients had abolished canals response to VHIT. All the patients had VVS and HVS deviated towards the operated side; 23 patients had a high velocity VIN from 30 to 60Hz. This study proves that vestibular neurectomy can provide a complete vestibular deafferentation. We discuss this vestibular evaluation protocol and the main difficulties encounter during surgery, which could lead to partial nerve section and partial relief, and explain residual vestibular function after vestibular neurectomy. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Vestibular compensation studies]. [Vestibular Compensation and Morphological Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perachio, Adrian A. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    The following topics are reported: neurophysiological studies on MVN neurons during vestibular compensation; effects of spinal cord lesions on VNC neurons during compensation; a closed-loop vestibular compensation model for horizontally canal-related MVN neurons; spatiotemporal convergence in VNC neurons; contributions of irregularly firing vestibular afferents to linear and angular VOR's; application to flight studies; metabolic measures in vestibular neurons; immediate early gene expression following vestibular stimulation; morphological studies on primary afferents, central vestibular pathways, vestibular efferent projection to the vestibular end organs, and three-dimensional morphometry and imaging.

  5. Review of book vestibular crises

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blagoveshchenskaya, N. S.

    1980-01-01

    The etiology, pathogenesis, clinical practice, treatment and rehabilitation of patients with vestibular crises is discussed. Classifications for vestibular disorders are given. Information on the frequency of vestibular crises is given.

  6. Dyscalculia and vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Smith, P F

    2012-10-01

    A few studies in humans suggest that changes in stimulation of the balance organs of the inner ear (the 'vestibular system') can disrupt numerical cognition, resulting in 'dyscalculia', the inability to manipulate numbers. Many studies have also demonstrated that patients with vestibular dysfunction exhibit deficits in spatial memory. It is suggested that there may be a connection between spatial memory deficits resulting from vestibular dysfunction and the occurrence of dyscalculia, given the evidence that numerosity is coupled to the processing of spatial information (e.g., the 'spatial numerical association of response codes ('SNARC') effect'). The evidence supporting this hypothesis is summarised and potential experiments to test it are proposed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Modulation of Memory by Vestibular Lesions and Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Paul F.; Geddes, Lisa H.; Baek, Jean-Ha; Darlington, Cynthia L.; Zheng, Yiwen

    2010-01-01

    For decades it has been speculated that there is a close association between the vestibular system and spatial memories constructed by areas of the brain such as the hippocampus. While many animal studies have been conducted which support this relationship, only in the last 10 years have detailed quantitative studies been carried out in patients with vestibular disorders. The majority of these studies suggest that complete bilateral vestibular loss results in spatial memory deficits that are not simply due to vestibular reflex dysfunction, while the effects of unilateral vestibular damage are more complex and subtle. Very recently, reports have emerged that sub-threshold, noisy galvanic vestibular stimulation can enhance memory in humans, although this has not been investigated for spatial memory as yet. These studies add to the increasing evidence that suggests a connection between vestibular sensory information and memory in humans. PMID:21173897

  8. Vestibular Function Measurement Devices

    PubMed Central

    Miles, Richard D.; Zapala, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular function laboratories utilize a multitude of diagnostic instruments to evaluate a dizzy patient. Caloric irrigators, oculomotor stimuli, and rotational chairs produce a stimulus whose accuracy is required for the patient response to be accurate. Careful attention to everything from cleanliness of equipment to threshold adjustments determine on a daily basis if patient data are going to be correct and useful. Instrumentation specifications that change with time such as speed and temperature must periodically be checked using calibrated instruments. PMID:27516710

  9. NAS: The first year

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.; Kutler, Paul

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are the capabilities of NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program and its application as an advanced supercomputing system for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) research. First, the paper describes the NAS computational system, called the NAS Processing System Network, and the advanced computational capabilities it offers as a consequence of carrying out the NAS pathfinder objective. Second, it presents examples of pioneering CFD research accomplished during NAS's first operational year. Examples are included which illustrate CFD applications for predicting fluid phenomena, complementing and supplementing experimentation, and aiding in design. Finally, pacing elements and future directions for CFD and NAS are discussed.

  10. Vestibular pathways involved in cognition

    PubMed Central

    Hitier, Martin; Besnard, Stephane; Smith, Paul F.

    2014-01-01

    Recent discoveries have emphasized the role of the vestibular system in cognitive processes such as memory, spatial navigation and bodily self-consciousness. A precise understanding of the vestibular pathways involved is essential to understand the consequences of vestibular diseases for cognition, as well as develop therapeutic strategies to facilitate recovery. The knowledge of the “vestibular cortical projection areas”, defined as the cortical areas activated by vestibular stimulation, has dramatically increased over the last several years from both anatomical and functional points of view. Four major pathways have been hypothesized to transmit vestibular information to the vestibular cortex: (1) the vestibulo-thalamo-cortical pathway, which probably transmits spatial information about the environment via the parietal, entorhinal and perirhinal cortices to the hippocampus and is associated with spatial representation and self-versus object motion distinctions; (2) the pathway from the dorsal tegmental nucleus via the lateral mammillary nucleus, the anterodorsal nucleus of the thalamus to the entorhinal cortex, which transmits information for estimations of head direction; (3) the pathway via the nucleus reticularis pontis oralis, the supramammillary nucleus and the medial septum to the hippocampus, which transmits information supporting hippocampal theta rhythm and memory; and (4) a possible pathway via the cerebellum, and the ventral lateral nucleus of the thalamus (perhaps to the parietal cortex), which transmits information for spatial learning. Finally a new pathway is hypothesized via the basal ganglia, potentially involved in spatial learning and spatial memory. From these pathways, progressively emerges the anatomical network of vestibular cognition. PMID:25100954

  11. Vestibular blueprint in early vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Straka, Hans; Baker, Robert

    2013-11-19

    Central vestibular neurons form identifiable subgroups within the boundaries of classically outlined octavolateral nuclei in primitive vertebrates that are distinct from those processing lateral line, electrosensory, and auditory signals. Each vestibular subgroup exhibits a particular morpho-physiological property that receives origin-specific sensory inputs from semicircular canal and otolith organs. Behaviorally characterized phenotypes send discrete axonal projections to extraocular, spinal, and cerebellar targets including other ipsi- and contralateral vestibular nuclei. The anatomical locations of vestibuloocular and vestibulospinal neurons correlate with genetically defined hindbrain compartments that are well conserved throughout vertebrate evolution though some variability exists in fossil and extant vertebrate species. The different vestibular subgroups exhibit a robust sensorimotor signal processing complemented with a high degree of vestibular and visual adaptive plasticity.

  12. Visuo-Vestibular Interactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Session TA3 includes short reports covering: (1) Vestibulo-Oculomotor Interaction in Long-Term Microgravity; (2) Effects of Weightlessness on the Spatial Orientation of Visually Induced Eye Movements; (3) Adaptive Modification of the Three-Dimensional Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex during Prolonged Microgravity; (4) The Dynamic Change of Brain Potential Related to Selective Attention to Visual Signals from Left and Right Visual Fields; (5) Locomotor Errors Caused by Vestibular Suppression; and (6) A Novel, Image-Based Technique for Three-Dimensional Eye Measurement.

  13. Vestibular rehabilitation outcomes in the elderly with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Bayat, Arash; Pourbakht, Akram; Saki, Nader; Zainun, Zuraida; Nikakhlagh, Soheila; Mirmomeni, Golshan

    2012-11-01

    Chronic vestibular dysfunction is a frustrating problem in the elderly and can have a tremendous impact on their life, but only a few studies are available. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an important therapeutic option for the neuro-otologist in treating patients with significant balance deficits. The purpose of this study was to assess the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction. A total of 33 patients older than 60 years with chronic vestibular dysfunction were studied. Clinical and objective vestibular tests including videonystagmography (VNG) and dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) were carried out at their first visit, 2 weeks, and 8 weeks post-VRT. The VRT exercises were performed according to Cawthorne and Cooksey protocols. Oculomotor assessments were within normal limits in all patients. Nineteen patients (57.57%) showed abnormal canal paralysis on caloric testing which at follow-up sessions; CP values were decreased remarkably after VRT exercises. We found a significant improvement between pre-VRT and post-VRT total DHI scores (P < 0.001). This improvement was most prominent in functional subscore. Our study demonstrated that VRT is an effective therapeutic method for elderly patients with chronic vestibular dysfunction.

  14. Vestibular reflexes of otolith origin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Victor J.

    1988-01-01

    The vestibular system and its role in the maintenance of posture and in motion sickness is investigated using cats as experimental subjects. The assumption is that better understanding of the physiology of vestibular pathways is not only of intrinsic value, but will help to explain and eventually alleviate the disturbances caused by vestibular malfunction, or by exposure to an unusual environment such as space. The first project deals with the influence on the spinal cord of stimulation of the vestibular labyrinth, particularly the otoliths. A second was concerned with the properties and neural basis of the tonic neck reflex. These two projects are related, because vestibulospinal and tonic neck reflexes interact in the maintenance of normal posture. The third project began with an interest in mechanisms of motion sickness, and eventually shifted to a study of central control of respiratory muscles involved in vomiting.

  15. Vestibular Deficits Following Youth Concussion

    PubMed Central

    Corwin, Daniel J.; Wiebe, Douglas J.; Zonfrillo, Mark R.; Grady, Matthew F.; Robinson, Roni L.; Goodman, Arlene M.; Master, Christina L.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To characterize the prevalence and recovery of pediatric patients with concussion who manifest clinical vestibular deficits, and to describe the correlation of these deficits with neurocognitive function, based on computerized neurocognitive testing, in a sample of pediatric patients with concussion. Methods This was a retrospective cohort study of patients age 5–18 years old with concussion referred to a tertiary pediatric hospital-affiliated sports medicine clinic from 7/1/2010–12/31/2011. A random sample of all eligible patient visits was obtained, and all related visits for those patients were reviewed. Results 247 patients were chosen from 3740 eligible visits for detailed review and abstraction. 81% showed a vestibular abnormality on initial clinical exam. Those patients with vestibular signs on initial exam took a significantly longer time to return to school (median 59 days vs. 6 days, p=0.001) or to be fully cleared (median 106 days vs. 29 days, p=0.001). They additionally scored more poorly on initial computerized neurocognitive testing, and took longer for neurocognitive deficits to recover. Those patients with three or more prior concussions had a higher prevalence of vestibular deficits and took longer for those deficits to resolve. Conclusion Vestibular deficits in children and adolescents with a history of concussion are highly prevalent. These deficits appear to be associated with extended recovery times and poorer performance on neurocognitive testing. Further studies evaluating the effectiveness of vestibular therapy on improving such deficits are warranted. PMID:25748568

  16. Morphological studies of the vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergstroem, B.

    1973-01-01

    The anatomy of the intratemporal part of the vestibular nerve in man, and the possible age related degenerative changes in the nerve were studied. The form and structure of the vestibular ganglion was studied with the light microscope. A numerical analysis of the vestibular nerve, and caliber spectra of the myelinated fibers in the vestibular nerve branches were studied in individuals of varying ages. It was found that the peripheral endings of the vestibular nerve form a complicated pattern inside the vestibular sensory epithelia. A detailed description of the sensory cells and their surface organelles is included.

  17. Aging of vestibular function evaluated using correlational vestibular autorotation test

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2014-01-01

    Background Imbalance from degeneration of vestibular end organs is a common problem in the elderly. However, the decline of vestibular function with aging was revealed in few vestibular function tests such as vestibular autorotation test (VAT). In the current VAT, there are drawbacks of poor test–retest reliability, slippage of the sensor at high-speed rotations, and limited data about the effect of aging. We developed a correlational-VAT (cVAT) system that included a small, light sensor (less than 20 g) with wireless data transmission technique to evaluate the aging of vestibular function. Material and methods We enrolled 53 healthy participants aged between 25 and 75 years and divided them into five age groups. The test conditions were vertical and horizontal head autorotations of frequencies from 0 to 3 Hz with closed eyes or open eyes. The cross-correlation coefficient (CCC) between eye velocity and head velocity was obtained for the head autorotations between 1 Hz and 3 Hz. The mean of the CCCs was used to represent the vestibular function. Results Age was significantly and negatively correlated with the mean CCC for all test conditions, including horizontal or vertical autorotations with open eyes or closed eyes (P<0.05). The mean CCC with open eyes declined significantly at 55–65 years old and the mean CCC with closed eyes declined significantly at 65–75 years old. Conclusion Vestibular function evaluated using mean CCC revealed a decline with age, and the function of visual-vestibulo-ocular reflex declined 10 years earlier than the function of vestibulo-ocular reflex. PMID:25214774

  18. [Inferior vestibular neuritis: diagnosis using VEMP].

    PubMed

    Walther, L E; Repik, I

    2012-02-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) are a new method to establish the functional status of the otolith organs. The sacculocollic reflex of the cervical VEMP to air conduction (AC) reflects predominantly saccular function due to saccular afferents to the inferior vestibular nerve. We describe a case of inferior vestibular neuritis as a rare differential diagnosis of vestibular neuritis. Clinical signs were a normal caloric response, unilaterally absent AC cVEMPs and bilaterally preserved ocular VEMPs (AC oVEMPs).

  19. Compensation Following Bilateral Vestibular Damage

    PubMed Central

    McCall, Andrew A.; Yates, Bill J.

    2011-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular inputs affects far fewer patients than unilateral inner ear damage, and thus has been understudied. In both animal subjects and human patients, bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH) produces a variety of clinical problems, including impaired balance control, inability to maintain stable blood pressure during postural changes, difficulty in visual targeting of images, and disturbances in spatial memory and navigational performance. Experiments in animals have shown that non-labyrinthine inputs to the vestibular nuclei are rapidly amplified following the onset of BVH, which may explain the recovery of postural stability and orthostatic tolerance that occurs within 10 days. However, the loss of the vestibulo-ocular reflex and degraded spatial cognition appear to be permanent in animals with BVH. Current concepts of the compensatory mechanisms in humans with BVH are largely inferential, as there is a lack of data from patients early in the disease process. Translation of animal studies of compensation for BVH into therapeutic strategies and subsequent application in the clinic is the most likely route to improve treatment. In addition to physical therapy, two types of prosthetic devices have been proposed to treat individuals with bilateral loss of vestibular inputs: those that provide tactile stimulation to indicate body position in space, and those that deliver electrical stimuli to branches of the vestibular nerve in accordance with head movements. The relative efficacy of these two treatment paradigms, and whether they can be combined to facilitate recovery, is yet to be ascertained. PMID:22207864

  20. Procedures for restoring vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Walther, Leif Erik

    2005-01-01

    This paper will discuss therapeutic possibilities for disorders of the vestibular organs and the neurons involved, which confront ENT clinicians in everyday practice. Treatment of such disorders can be tackled either symptomatically or causally. The possible strategies for restoring the body's vestibular sense, visual function and co-ordination include medication, as well as physical and surgical procedures. Prophylactic or preventive measures are possible in some disorders which involve vertigo (bilateral vestibulopathy, kinetosis, height vertigo, vestibular disorders when diving (Tables 1 (Tab. 1) and 2 (Tab. 2)). Glucocorticoid and training therapy encourage the compensation of unilateral vestibular loss. In the case of a bilateral vestibular loss, it is important to treat the underlying disease (e.g. Cogan's disease). Although balance training does improve the patient's sense of balance, it will not restore it completely. In the case of Meniere's disease, there are a number of medications available to either treat bouts or to act as a prophylactic (e.g. dimenhydrinate or betahistine). In addition, there are non-ablative (sacculotomy) as well as ablative surgical procedures (e.g. labyrinthectomy, neurectomy of the vestibular nerve). In everyday practice, it has become common to proceed with low risk therapies initially. The physical treatment of mild postural vertigo can be carried out quickly and easily in outpatients (repositioning or liberatory maneuvers). In very rare cases it may be necessary to carry out a semicircular canal occlusion. Isolated disturbances of the otolith function or an involvement of the otolith can be found in roughly 50% of labyrinth disturbances. A specific surgical procedure to selectively block the otolith organs is currently being studied. When an external perilymph fistula involving loss of perilymph is suspected, an exploratory tympanotomy involving also the round and oval window niches must be carried out. A traumatic rupture of

  1. Vestibular migraine: who is the patient?

    PubMed

    Colombo, Bruno; Teggi, Roberto

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular migraine has been classified as a specific entity in which vestibular symptomatology is defined as part of the migrainous disorder. New and appropriate diagnostic criteria have been proposed by the Barany and International Headache Societies. The diagnosis of vestibular migraine mainly depends on the patient history. The NIVE project is a prospectic multicentric study on vestibular migraine. The aim of this project is to evaluate demographics, epidemiology, clinical manifestations of migraine and vertigo in a large cohort of Caucasian patients affected by vestibular migraine.

  2. Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential in patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis: abnormal VEMP and its recovery.

    PubMed

    Ochi, Kentaro; Ohashi, Toru; Watanabe, Shoji

    2003-02-01

    The incidence of inferior vestibular nerve disorders in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular neuritis and the recovery of these disorders were evaluated by monitoring the vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Eight patients ranged from 21 to 73 years that suffered from unilateral vestibular neuritis underwent VEMP and caloric testing. Abnormal VEMP was observed in two of the eight patients with unilateral vestibular neuritis. Two patients were diagnosed as having an inferior vestibular nerve disorder. One of these patients showed recovery of the inferior vestibular nerve function as assessed by the VEMP. Disorders of the inferior vestibular nerve function and their recovery was confirmed by our current results. The time course of recoveries of the superior and inferior vestibular nerve systems were similar in the two patients.

  3. Towards a neuromorphic vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Corradi, Federico; Zambrano, Davide; Raglianti, Marco; Passetti, Giovanni; Laschi, Cecilia; Indiveri, Giacomo

    2014-10-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the sense of balance and spatial orientation in mammals. It is a sensory system that detects both rotational and translational motion of the head, via its semicircular canals and otoliths respectively. In this work, we propose a real-time hardware model of an artificial vestibular system, implemented using a custom neuromorphic Very Large Scale Integration (VLSI) multi-neuron chip interfaced to a commercial Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The artificial vestibular system is realized with spiking neurons that reproduce the responses of biological hair cells present in the real semicircular canals and otholitic organs. We demonstrate the real-time performance of the hybrid analog-digital system and characterize its response properties, presenting measurements of a successful encoding of angular velocities as well as linear accelerations. As an application, we realized a novel implementation of a recurrent integrator network capable of keeping track of the current angular position. The experimental results provided validate the hardware implementation via comparisons with a detailed computational neuroscience model. In addition to being an ideal tool for developing bio-inspired robotic technologies, this work provides a basis for developing a complete low-power neuromorphic vestibular system which integrates the hardware model of the neural signal processing pathway described with custom bio-mimetic gyroscopic sensors, exploiting neuromorphic principles in both mechanical and electronic aspects.

  4. HASHIMOTO THYROIDITIS AND VESTIBULAR DYSFUNCTION.

    PubMed

    Chiarella, Giuseppe; Russo, Diego; Monzani, Fabio; Petrolo, Claudio; Fattori, Bruno; Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Cassandro, Ettore; Costante, Giuseppe

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this review was to analyze the existing literature concerning the relationship between Hashimoto thyroiditis (HT) and vestibular dysfunction. We used electronic databases (PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library) to search and collect all published articles about the association between HT and vestibular disorders. Several observational and retrospective studies have postulated a relationship between thyroid autoimmunity and vestibular disorders. In most cases, an appropriate control group was lacking, and the impact of thyroid functional status could not precisely be established. In recent years, two well-designed prospective studies have provided convincing evidence that the association is not random. One article reported that patients with Ménière disease (MD) had a significantly higher prevalence of positive anti-thyroid autoantibody as compared to healthy controls. Moreover, more than half of MD patients had either positive anti-thyroid or non-organ-specific autoantibody titers, compared to less than 30% of both patients with unilateral vestibular paresis without cochlear involvement and healthy controls. Another study found that patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV) had significantly higher serum thyroid-stimulating hormone and antithyroid autoantibody levels than healthy controls. Additionally, almost one-fifth of euthyroid patients with HT had signs of BPPV. The published results indicate that patients with MD or BPPV are potential candidates to also develop HT. Thus, in HT patients, the presence of even slight symptoms or signs potentially related to vestibular lesions should be carefully investigated. AITD = autoimmune thyroid disease; BPPV = benign paroxysmal positional vertigo; EH = endolymphatic hydrops; HT = Hashimoto thyroiditis; L-T 4 = L-thyroxine; MD = Ménière disease; PS = Pendred syndrome; Tg = thyroglobulin; TPO = thyroid peroxidase; TSH = thyroid-stimulating hormone.

  5. Vestibular Findings in Military Band Musicians

    PubMed Central

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Gueber, Crislaine; Silva, Thanara Pruner da; Liberalesso, Paulo Breno Noronha; Gonçalves, Claudia Giglio de Oliveira; Faryniuk, João Henrique; Marques, Jair Mendes; Jurkiewicz, Ari Leon

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Exposure to music is the subject of many studies because it is related to an individual's professional and social activities. Objectives Evaluate the vestibular behavior in military band musicians. Methods A retrospective cross-sectional study was performed. Nineteen musicians with ages ranging from 21 to 46 years were evaluated (average = 33.7 years and standard deviation = 7.2 years). They underwent anamnesis and vestibular and otolaryngologic evaluation through vectoelectronystagmography. Results The most evident otoneurologic symptoms in the anamnesis were tinnitus (84.2%), hearing difficulties (47.3%), dizziness (36.8%), headache (26.3%), intolerance to intense sounds (21.0%), and earache (15.7%). Seven musicians (37.0%) showed vestibular abnormality, which occurred in the caloric test. The abnormality was more prevalent in the peripheral vestibular system, and there was a predominance of irritative peripheral vestibular disorders. Conclusion The alteration in vestibular exam occurred in the caloric test (37.0%). There were changes in the prevalence of peripheral vestibular system with a predominance of irritative vestibular dysfunction. Dizziness was the most significant symptom for the vestibular test in correlation with neurotologic symptoms. The present study made it possible to verify the importance of the labyrinthine test, which demonstrates that this population should be better studied because the systematic exposure to high sound pressure levels may cause major vestibular alterations. PMID:25992076

  6. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. XII, Habituation of vestibular responses : an overview.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1974-03-01

    Vestibular and visual mechanisms are critical sensing systems in spatial orientation and in spatial disorientation. In aviation or space environments in particular, the role of the vestibular system is central to the problems of spatial disorientatio...

  7. Vestibular effects of cochlear implantation.

    PubMed

    Buchman, Craig A; Joy, Jennifer; Hodges, Annelle; Telischi, Fred F; Balkany, Thomas J

    2004-10-01

    Cochlear implantation (CI) carries with it the potential risk for vestibular system insult or stimulation with resultant dysfunction. As candidate profiles continue to evolve and with the recent development of bilateral CI, understanding the significance of this risk takes on an increasing importance. Between 1997 to 2001, a prospective observational study was carried out in a tertiary care medical center to assess the effects of unilateral CI on the vestibular system. Assessment was performed using the dizziness handicap inventory (DHI), vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) testing using both alternate bithermal caloric irrigations (ENG) and rotational chair-generated sinusoidal harmonic accelerations (SHA), and computerized dynamic platform posturography (CDP) at preoperative, 1-month, 4-month, 1-year and 2-year postimplantation visits. CI was carried out without respect to the preoperative vestibular function test results. Specifically, 86 patients were entered into the study after informed consent. For the group as a whole, pair wise comparisons revealed few significant differences between preoperative and postoperative values for VOR testing (ENG and SHA) at any of the follow-up intervals. Likewise, DHI testing was also unchanged except for significant reductions (improvements) in the emotional subcategory scores at both the 4-month and 1-year intervals. CDP results demonstrated substantial improvements in postural sway in the vestibular conditions (5 and 6) as well as composite scores with the device "off" and "on" at the 1-month, 4-month, 1-year, and 2-year intervals. Device activation appeared to improve postural stability in some conditions. Excluding those patients with preoperative areflexic or hyporeflexic responses in the implanted ear (total [warm + cool] caloric response or=21 deg/s maximum slow phase velocity) in total caloric response were observed for 8 (29%) patients at the 4-month interval. These persisted

  8. Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, V. L.; Ballhaus, W. F., Jr.; Bailey, F. R.

    1983-01-01

    The history of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Program, which is designed to provide a leading-edge capability to computational aerodynamicists, is traced back to its origin in 1975. Factors motivating its development and examples of solutions to successively refined forms of the governing equations are presented. The NAS Processing System Network and each of its eight subsystems are described in terms of function and initial performance goals. A proposed usage allocation policy is discussed and some initial problems being readied for solution on the NAS system are identified.

  9. Interaction of somatoform and vestibular disorders

    PubMed Central

    Best, C; Eckhardt‐Henn, A; Diener, G; Bense, S; Breuer, P; Dieterich, M

    2006-01-01

    Background The high coincidence of organic vestibular and somatoform vertigo syndromes has appeared to support pathogenic models showing a strong linkage between them. It was hypothesised that a persisting vestibular dysfunction causes the development of anxiety disorders. Objective To determine the relation between vestibular deficits and somatoform vertigo disorders in an interdisciplinary prospective study. Methods Participants were divided into eight diagnostic groups: healthy volunteers (n = 26) and patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV, n = 11), vestibular neuritis (n = 11), Menière's disease (n = 7), vestibular migraine (n = 15), anxiety (n = 23), depression (n = 12), or somatoform disorders (n = 22). Neuro‐otological diagnostic procedures included electro‐oculography with rotatory and caloric testing, orthoptic examination with measurements of subjective visual vertical (SVV) and ocular torsion, and a neurological examination. Psychosomatic diagnostic procedures comprised interviews and psychometric instruments. Results Patients with BPPV (35.3%) and with vestibular neuritis (52.2%) had pathological test values on caloric irrigation (p<0.001). Otolith dysfunction with pathological tilts of SVV and ocular torsion was found only in patients with vestibular neuritis (p<0.001). Patients with Menière's disease, vestibular migraine, and psychiatric disorders showed normal parameters for vestibular testing but pathological values for psychometric measures. There was no correlation between pathological neurological and pathological psychometric parameters. Conclusions High anxiety scores are not a result of vestibular deficits or dysfunction. Patients with Menière's disease and vestibular migraine but not vestibular deficits showed the highest psychiatric comorbidity. Thus the course of vertigo syndromes and the possibility of a pre‐existing psychopathological personality should be considered pathogenic

  10. Vestibular signals in the parasolitary nucleus.

    PubMed

    Barmack, N H; Yakhnitsa, V

    2000-06-01

    Vestibular primary afferents project to secondary vestibular neurons located in the vestibular complex. Vestibular primary afferents also project to the uvula-nodulus of the cerebellum where they terminate on granule cells. In this report we describe the physiological properties of neurons in a "new" vestibular nucleus, the parasolitary nucleus (Psol). This nucleus consists of 2,300 GABAergic neurons that project onto the ipsilateral inferior olive (beta-nucleus and dorsomedial cell column) as well as the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis. These olivary neurons are the exclusive source of vestibularly modulated climbing fiber inputs to the cerebellum. We recorded the activity of Psol neurons during natural vestibular stimulation in anesthetized rabbits. The rabbits were placed in a three-axis rate table at the center of a large sphere, permitting vestibular and optokinetic stimulation. We recorded from 74 neurons in the Psol and from 23 neurons in the regions bordering Psol. The activity of 72/74 Psol neurons and 4/23 non-Psol neurons was modulated by vestibular stimulation in either the pitch or roll planes but not the horizontal plane. Psol neurons responded in phase with ipsilateral side-down head position or velocity during sinusoidal stimulation. Approximately 80% of the recorded Psol neurons responded to static roll-tilt. The optimal response planes of evoked vestibular responses were inferred from measurement of null planes. Optimal response planes usually were aligned with the anatomical orientation of one of the two ipsilateral vertical semicircular canals. The frequency dependence of null plane measurements indicated a convergence of vestibular information from otoliths and semicircular canals. None of the recorded neurons evinced optokinetic sensitivity. These results are consistent with the view that Psol neurons provide the vestibular signals to the inferior olive that eventually reached the cerebellum in the form of modulated climbing fiber

  11. A vestibular phenotype for Waardenburg syndrome?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Allen, K.; Gianna, C.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate vestibular abnormalities in subjects with Waardenburg syndrome. STUDY DESIGN: Retrospective record review. SETTING: Tertiary referral neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Twenty-two adult white subjects with clinical diagnosis of Waardenburg syndrome (10 type I and 12 type II). INTERVENTIONS: Evaluation for Waardenburg phenotype, history of vestibular and auditory symptoms, tests of vestibular and auditory function. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Results of phenotyping, results of vestibular and auditory symptom review (history), results of vestibular and auditory function testing. RESULTS: Seventeen subjects were women, and 5 were men. Their ages ranged from 21 to 58 years (mean, 38 years). Sixteen of the 22 subjects sought treatment for vertigo, dizziness, or imbalance. For subjects with vestibular symptoms, the results of vestibuloocular tests (calorics, vestibular autorotation, and/or pseudorandom rotation) were abnormal in 77%, and the results of vestibulospinal function tests (computerized dynamic posturography, EquiTest) were abnormal in 57%, but there were no specific patterns of abnormality. Six had objective sensorineural hearing loss. Thirteen had an elevated summating/action potential (>0.40) on electrocochleography. All subjects except those with severe hearing loss (n = 3) had normal auditory brainstem response results. CONCLUSION: Patients with Waardenburg syndrome may experience primarily vestibular symptoms without hearing loss. Electrocochleography and vestibular function tests appear to be the most sensitive measures of otologic abnormalities in such patients.

  12. NATIONAL ALCOHOL SURVEY (NAS)

    EPA Science Inventory

    National Alcohol Survey (NAS) is designed to assess the trends in drinking practices and problems in the national population, including attitudes, norms, treatment and experiences and adverse consequences. It also studies the effects of public policy on drinking practices (i.e., ...

  13. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    The following research work is reported: (1) vestibular-visual interactions; (2) flight management and crew system interactions; (3) peripheral cue utilization in simulation technology; (4) control of signs and symptoms of motion sickness; (5) auditory cue utilization in flight simulators, and (6) vestibular function: Animal experiments.

  14. The NAS parallel benchmarks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barszcz, E.; Barton, J. T.; Carter, R. L.; Lasinski, T. A.; Browning, D. S.; Dagum, L.; Fatoohi, R. A.; Frederickson, P. O.; Schreiber, R. S.

    1991-01-01

    A new set of benchmarks has been developed for the performance evaluation of highly parallel supercomputers in the framework of the NASA Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program. These consist of five 'parallel kernel' benchmarks and three 'simulated application' benchmarks. Together they mimic the computation and data movement characteristics of large-scale computational fluid dynamics applications. The principal distinguishing feature of these benchmarks is their 'pencil and paper' specification-all details of these benchmarks are specified only algorithmically. In this way many of the difficulties associated with conventional benchmarking approaches on highly parallel systems are avoided.

  15. Visual and vestibular components of motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Eyeson-Annan, M; Peterken, C; Brown, B; Atchison, D

    1996-10-01

    The relative importance of visual and vestibular information in the etiology of motion sickness (MS) is not well understood, but these factors can be manipulated by inducing Coriolis and pseudo-Coriolis effects in experimental subjects. We hypothesized that visual and vestibular information are equivalent in producing MS. The experiments reported here aim, in part, to examine the relative influence of Coriolis and pseudo-Coriolis effects in inducing MS. We induced MS symptoms by combinations of whole body rotation and tilt, and environment rotation and tilt, in 22 volunteer subjects. Subjects participated in all of the experiments with at least 2 d between each experiment to dissipate after-effects. We recorded MS signs and symptoms when only visual stimulation was applied, when only vestibular stimulation was applied, and when both visual and vestibular stimulation were applied under specific conditions of whole body and environmental tilt. Visual stimuli produced more symptoms of MS than vestibular stimuli when only visual or vestibular stimuli were used (ANOVA F = 7.94, df = 1, 21 p = 0.01), but there was no significant difference in MS production when combined visual and vestibular stimulation were used to produce the Coriolis effect or pseudo-Coriolis effect (ANOVA: F = 0.40, df = 1, 21 p = 0.53). This was further confirmed by examination of the order in which the symptoms occurred and the lack of a correlation between previous experience and visually induced MS. Visual information is more important than vestibular input in causing MS when these stimuli are presented in isolation. In conditions where both visual and vestibular information are present, cross-coupling appears to occur between the pseudo-Coriolis effect and the Coriolis effect, as these two conditions are not significantly different in producing MS symptoms.

  16. Progress Toward Development of a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis for Treatment of Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    FRIDMAN, GENE Y.; DELLA SANTINA, CHARLES C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews vestibular pathology and the requirements and progress made in the design and construction of a vestibular prosthesis. Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation is disabling. When vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications or other insults to the labyrinth, the resulting loss of sensory input disrupts vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VORs) and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body. Affected individuals suffer poor vision during head movement, postural instability, chronic disequilibrium, and cognitive distraction. Although most individuals with residual sensation compensate for their loss over time, others fail to do so and have no adequate treatment options. A vestibular prosthesis analogous to cochlear implants but designed to modulate vestibular nerve activity during head movement should improve quality of life for these chronically dizzy individuals. We describe the impact of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, the current status of multichannel vestibular sensory replacement prosthesis development, and challenges to successfully realizing this approach in clinical practice. In bilaterally vestibular-deficient rodents and rhesus monkeys, the Johns Hopkins multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) partially restores the three-dimensional (3D) VOR for head rotations about any axis. Attempts at prosthetic vestibular stimulation of humans have not yet included the 3D eye movement assays necessary to accurately evaluate VOR alignment, but these initial forays have revealed responses that are otherwise comparable to observations in animals. Current efforts now focus on refining electrode design and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve cochlear function, optimizing stimulus protocols to improve dynamic range and reduce excitation–inhibition asymmetry, and adapting laboratory MVP prototypes into devices

  17. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1983-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  18. Habilitation of auditory and vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Snapp, Hillary A; Schubert, Michael C

    2012-04-01

    Although unilateral hearing loss is often the initial sign of vestibular schwannoma (VS), the pathogenesis of the associated structures within the cerebellopontine angle can result in vestibular, facial, or vascular symptoms. Removal of a VS causes deficits in hearing, balance, and gaze stability. The resulting hearing loss eliminates the benefits of binaural listening that provide localization, loudness summation, and listening-in-noise ability. Reduced balance and gaze stability increase fall risk. This review discusses modern treatment options for auditory and vestibular rehabilitation including contralateral routing of signals (CROS), bilateral CROS, bone-anchored implants, tinnitus management, gaze and gait stability exercises. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Vestibular-induced vomiting after vestibulocerebellar lesions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, A. D.; Wilson, V. J.

    1982-01-01

    Vestibular stimulation, by sinusoidal electrical polarization of the labyrinths of decerebrate cats which can produce vomiting and related activity which resembles motion sickness was examined. The symptoms include panting, salivation, swallowing, and retching as well as vomiting. These symptoms can be produced in cats with lesions of the posterior cerebellar vermis. It is suggested that a transcerebellar pathway from the vestibular apparatus through the nodulus and uvula to the vomiting center is not essential for vestibular induced vomiting and the occurrence of many symptoms of motion.

  20. Normal and abnormal human vestibular ocular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Black, F. O.

    1986-01-01

    The major motivation of this research is to understand the role the vestibular system plays in sensorimotor interactions which result in spatial disorientation and motion sickness. A second goal was to explore the range of abnormality as it is reflected in quantitative measures of vestibular reflex responses. The results of a study of vestibular reflex measurements in normal subjects and preliminary results in abnormal subjects are presented in this report. Statistical methods were used to define the range of normal responses, and determine age related changes in function.

  1. The Association Between Vestibular Physical Examination, Vertigo Questionnaires, and the Electronystagmography in Patients With Vestibular Symptoms.

    PubMed

    Gofrit, Shany G; Mayler, Yulia; Eliashar, Ron; Bdolah-Abram, Tali; Ilan, Ophir; Gross, Menachem

    2017-04-01

    Dizziness makes up a diagnostic and treatment challenge. The diagnostic accuracy of the medical history and vestibular physical examination in cases of vestibular symptoms is not clear. The aim of this study is to determine the association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and electronystagmography (ENG) test in patients with vestibular symptoms. This is a prospective study of 135 adults with vestibular symptoms. The subjects underwent targeted physical examination and filled vestibular questionnaires, including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), before ENG testing. The results of the physical examination and questionnaires were compared with the final ENG findings. Of patients who had normal ENG results, 32.1% (17/52) showed abnormal physical examination, and 48.8% (40/82) of the patient who had normal physical examination showed abnormal ENG results ( P = .46). Among patients with severe disability by DHI, 46.4% (13/28) had an abnormal ENG, and 42.9% (12/28) had a normal ENG ( P = .39). This study did not demonstrate association between vestibular physical examination, vestibular questionnaires, and ENG results. Although history (augmented by questionnaires) and physical examination are the initial steps in the evaluation of vertigo, the current study suggests that they should be complemented by objective testing for evaluation of inner ear origin of vertigo.

  2. Vestibular Restoration and Adaptation in Vestibular Neuritis and Ramsay Hunt Syndrome With Vertigo.

    PubMed

    Martin-Sanz, Eduardo; Rueda, Almudena; Esteban-Sanchez, Jonathan; Yanes, Joaquin; Rey-Martinez, Jorge; Sanz-Fernandez, Ricardo

    2017-08-01

    To evaluate vestibular restoration and the evolution of the compensatory saccades in acute severe inflammatory vestibular nerve paralysis, including vestibular neuritis and Ramsay Hunt syndrome with vertigo. Prospective. Tertiary referral center. Vestibular neuritis (n = 18) and Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients with vertigo (n = 13) were enrolled. After treatment with oral corticosteroids, patients were followed up for 6 months. Functional recovery of the facial nerve was scored according to the House-Brackman grading system. Caloric and video head impulse tests were performed in every patient at the time of enrolment. Subsequently, successive video head impulse test (vHIT) exploration was performed at the 1, 3, and 6-month follow-up. Eighteen patients with vestibular neuritis and 13 with Ramsay Hunt syndrome and associated vertigo were included. Vestibular function was significantly worse in patients with Ramsay Hunt syndrome than in those with vestibular neuritis. Similar compensatory saccades velocity and latency values were observed in both groups, in both the caloric and initial vHIT tests. Successive vHIT results showed a significantly higher vestibulo-ocular reflex gain recovery in vestibular neuritis patients than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. A significantly faster reduction in the latency, velocity, and organization of the compensatory saccades was observed in neuritis than in Ramsay Hunt syndrome patients. In addition to the recovery of the vestibulo-ocular reflex, the reduction of latency, velocity and the organization of compensatory saccades play a role in vestibular compensation.

  3. Vestibular development in marsupials and monotremes

    PubMed Central

    Ashwell, Ken W S; Shulruf, Boaz

    2014-01-01

    The young of marsupials and monotremes are all born in an immature state, followed by prolonged nurturing by maternal lactation in either a pouch or nest. Nevertheless, the level of locomotor ability required for newborn marsupials and monotremes to reach the safety of the pouch or nest varies considerably: some are transferred to the pouch or nest in an egg (monotremes); others are transferred passively by gravity (e.g. dasyurid marsupials); some have only a horizontal wriggle to make (e.g. peramelid and didelphid marsupials); and others must climb vertically for a long distance to reach the maternal pouch (e.g. diprotodontid marsupials). In the present study, archived sections of the inner ear and hindbrain held in the Bolk, Hill and Hubrecht collections at the Museum für Naturkunde, Berlin, were used to test the relationship between structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus and the locomotor challenges that face the young of these different mammalian groups. A system for staging different levels of structural maturity of the vestibular apparatus was applied to the embryos, pouch young and hatchlings, and correlated with somatic size as indicated by greatest body length. Dasyurids are born at the most immature state, with the vestibular apparatus at little more than the otocyst stage. Peramelids are born with the vestibular apparatus at a more mature state (fully developed semicircular ducts and a ductus reuniens forming between the cochlear duct and saccule, but no semicircular canals). Diprotodontids and monotremes are born with the vestibular apparatus at the most mature state for the non-eutherians (semicircular canals formed, maculae present, but vestibular nuclei in the brainstem not yet differentiated). Monotremes and marsupials reach the later stages of vestibular apparatus development at mean body lengths that lie within the range of those found for laboratory rodents (mouse and rat) reaching the same vestibular stage. PMID:24298911

  4. Vestibular-visual interactions in flight simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.

    1977-01-01

    All 139 research papers published under this ten-year program are listed. Experimental work was carried out at the Ames Research Center involving man's sensitivity to rotational acceleration, and psychophysical functioning of the semicircular canals; vestibular-visual interactions and effects of other sensory systems were studied in flight simulator environments. Experiments also dealt with the neurophysiological vestibular functions of animals, and flight management investigations of man-vehicle interactions.

  5. Outcome analysis of individualized vestibular rehabilitation protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Angel, C. R.; Pesznecker, S. C.; Gianna, C.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the outcome of vestibular rehabilitation protocols in subjects with peripheral vestibular disorders compared with normal and abnormal control subjects. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective study using repeated measure, matched control design. Subjects were solicited consecutively according to these criteria: vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) sensory organization tests (SOTs) 5 and 6 and underwent rehabilitation; vestibular disorder subjects who had abnormal results of SOTs 5 and 6 and did not undergo rehabilitation; and normal subjects (normal SOTs). SETTING: Tertiary neurotology clinic. SUBJECTS: Men and women over age 18 with chronic vestibular disorders and chief complaints of unsteadiness, imbalance, and/or motion intolerance, and normal subjects. INTERVENTIONS: Pre- and post-rehabilitation assessment included CDP, vestibular disability, and activities of daily living questionnaires. Individualized rehabilitation plans were designed and implemented to address the subject's specific complaints and functional deficits. Supervised sessions were held at weekly intervals, and self-administered programs were devised for daily home use. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: CDP composite and SOT scores, number of falls on CDP, and self-assessment questionnaire results. RESULTS: Subjects who underwent rehabilitation (Group A) showed statistically significant improvements in SOTs, overall composite score, and reduction in falls compared with abnormal (Group B) control groups. Group A's performances after rehabilitation were not significantly different from those of normal subjects (Group C) in SOTs 3 through 6, and close to normal on SOTs 1 and 2. Subjects in Group A also reported statistically significant symptomatic improvement. CONCLUSIONS: Outcome measures of vestibular protocol physical therapy confirmed objective and subjective improvement in subjects with chronic peripheral vestibular disorders. These

  6. [Effectiveness of Self-efficacy Promoting Vestibular Rehabilitation Program for Patients with Vestibular Hypofunction].

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun Jung; Choi-Kwon, Smi

    2016-10-01

    In this study an examination was done of the effect of self-efficacy promoting vestibular rehabilitation (S-VR) on dizziness, exercise selfefficacy, adherence to vestibular rehabilitation (VR), subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness in patients with vestibular hypofunction. This was a randomized controlled study. Data were collected 3 times at baseline, 4 and 8 weeks after beginning the intervention. Outcome measures were level of dizziness, exercise self-efficacy, and level of adherence to VR. Subjective and objective vestibular function, vestibular compensation and the recurrence of dizziness were also obtained. Data were analyzed using Windows SPSS 21.0 program. After 4 weeks of S-VR, there was no difference between the groups for dizziness, subjective and objective vestibular functions. However, exercise self-efficacy and adherence to VR were higher in the experimental group than in the control group. After 8 weeks of S-VR, dizziness (p=.018) exercise self-efficacy (p<.001), adherence to VR (p<.001), total-dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) (p=.012), vision analysis ratio (p=.046) in the experimental group differ significantly from that of the control group. The number of patients with recurring dizziness were higher in the control group than in the experimental group (p<.001). The results indicate that continuous 8 weeks of S-VR is effective in reducing dizziness, and improving exercise self-efficacy, subjective vestibular function and adherence to VR. Objective vestibular function and vestibular compensation were also improved in the experimental group at the end of 8 weeks of S-VR.

  7. Vestibular function assessment using the NIH Toolbox

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Michael C.; Whitney, Susan L.; Roberts, Dale; Redfern, Mark S.; Musolino, Mark C.; Roche, Jennica L.; Steed, Daniel P.; Corbin, Bree; Lin, Chia-Cheng; Marchetti, Greg F.; Beaumont, Jennifer; Carey, John P.; Shepard, Neil P.; Jacobson, Gary P.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Hoffman, Howard J.; Furman, Gabriel; Slotkin, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Objective: Development of an easy to administer, low-cost test of vestibular function. Methods: Members of the NIH Toolbox Sensory Domain Vestibular, Vision, and Motor subdomain teams collaborated to identify 2 tests: 1) Dynamic Visual Acuity (DVA), and 2) the Balance Accelerometry Measure (BAM). Extensive work was completed to identify and develop appropriate software and hardware. More than 300 subjects between the ages of 3 and 85 years, with and without vestibular dysfunction, were recruited and tested. Currently accepted gold standard measures of static visual acuity, vestibular function, dynamic visual acuity, and balance were performed to determine validity. Repeat testing was performed to examine reliability. Results: The DVA and BAM tests are affordable and appropriate for use for individuals 3 through 85 years of age. The DVA had fair to good reliability (0.41–0.94) and sensitivity and specificity (50%–73%), depending on age and optotype chosen. The BAM test was moderately correlated with center of pressure (r = 0.42–0.48) and dynamic posturography (r = −0.48), depending on age and test condition. Both tests differentiated those with and without vestibular impairment and the young from the old. Each test was reliable. Conclusion: The newly created DVA test provides a valid measure of visual acuity with the head still and moving quickly. The novel BAM is a valid measure of balance. Both tests are sensitive to age-related changes and are able to screen for impairment of the vestibular system. PMID:23479540

  8. Vestibular ontogeny: Measuring the influence of the dynamic environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Timothy A.; Devries, Sherri M.; Dubois, Linda M.; Nelson, Rick C.

    1993-01-01

    In comparison to other special senses, we are only meagerly informed about the development of vestibular function and the mechanisms that may operate to control or influence the course of vestibular ontogeny. Perhaps one contributing factor to this disparity is the difficulty of evaluating vestibular sense organs directly and noninvasively. The present report describes a recently developed direct noninvasive vestibular function test that can be used to address many basic questions about the developing vestibular system. More particularly, the test can be used to examine the effects of the dynamic environment (e.g. gravitational field and vibration) on vestibular ontogeny.

  9. Top-down approach to vestibular compensation: translational lessons from vestibular rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Balaban, Carey D.; Hoffer, Michael E.; Gottshall, Kim R.

    2012-01-01

    This review examines vestibular compensation and vestibular rehabilitation from a unified translational research perspective. Laboratory studies illustrate neurobiological principles of vestibular compensation at the molecular, cellular and systems levels in animal models that inform vestibular rehabilitation practice. However, basic research has been hampered by an emphasis on ‘naturalistic’ recovery, with time after insult and drug interventions as primary dependent variables. The vestibular rehabilitation literature, on the other hand, provides information on how the degree of compensation can be shaped by specific activity regimens. The milestones of the early spontaneous static compensation mark the re-establishment of static gaze stability, which provides a common coordinate frame for the brain to interpret residual vestibular information in the context of visual, somatosensory and visceral signals that convey gravitoinertial information. Stabilization of the head orientation and the eye orientation (suppression of spontaneous nystagmus) appear to be necessary by not sufficient conditions for successful rehabilitation, and define a baseline for initiating retraining. The lessons from vestibular rehabilitation in animal models offer the possibility of shaping the recovery trajectory to identify molecular and genetic factors that can improve vestibular compensation. PMID:22981400

  10. Neurotology symptoms at referral to vestibular evaluation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Dizziness-vertigo is common in adults, but clinical providers may rarely diagnose vestibular impairment and referral could be delayed. To assess neurotology symptoms (including triggers) reported by patients with peripheral vestibular disease, during the year just before their referral to vestibular evaluation. Methods 282 patients with peripheral vestibular disease and 282 control subjects accepted to participate. They had no middle ear, retinal, neurological, psychiatric, autoimmune or autonomic disorders. They reported their symptoms by a standardized questionnaire along with their anxiety/depression symptoms. Results Patients were referred after months or years from the onset of their symptoms, 24% of them reported frequent falls with a long clinical evolution; 10% of them reported no vertigo but instability related to specific triggers; 86% patients and 12% control subjects reported instability when moving the head rapidly and 79% patients and 6% control subjects reported instability when changing posture. Seven out of the 9 symptoms explored by the questionnaire allowed the correct classification of circa 95% of the participants (Discriminant function analysis, p < 0.001). High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms showed a mild correlation with the total score of symptoms (multiple R2 =0.18, p < 0.001). Conclusions Late referral to vestibular evaluation may underlie a history of frequent falls; some patients may not report vertigo, but instability related to specific triggers, which could be useful to prompt vestibular evaluation. High blood pressure, dyslipidemia and anxiety/depression symptoms may have a mild influence on the report of symptoms of vestibular disease in both, patients and control subjects. PMID:24279682

  11. Computational Approaches to Vestibular Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Muriel D.; Wade, Charles E. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The Biocomputation Center at NASA Ames Research Center is dedicated to a union between computational, experimental and theoretical approaches to the study of neuroscience and of life sciences in general. The current emphasis is on computer reconstruction and visualization of vestibular macular architecture in three-dimensions (3-D), and on mathematical modeling and computer simulation of neural activity in the functioning system. Our methods are being used to interpret the influence of spaceflight on mammalian vestibular maculas in a model system, that of the adult Sprague-Dawley rat. More than twenty 3-D reconstructions of type I and type II hair cells and their afferents have been completed by digitization of contours traced from serial sections photographed in a transmission electron microscope. This labor-intensive method has now been replace d by a semiautomated method developed in the Biocomputation Center in which conventional photography is eliminated. All viewing, storage and manipulation of original data is done using Silicon Graphics workstations. Recent improvements to the software include a new mesh generation method for connecting contours. This method will permit the investigator to describe any surface, regardless of complexity, including highly branched structures such as are routinely found in neurons. This same mesh can be used for 3-D, finite volume simulation of synapse activation and voltage spread on neuronal surfaces visualized via the reconstruction process. These simulations help the investigator interpret the relationship between neuroarchitecture and physiology, and are of assistance in determining which experiments will best test theoretical interpretations. Data are also used to develop abstract, 3-D models that dynamically display neuronal activity ongoing in the system. Finally, the same data can be used to visualize the neural tissue in a virtual environment. Our exhibit will depict capabilities of our computational approaches and

  12. Quality of life of individuals submitted to vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Patatas, Olívia Helena Gomes; Ganança, Cristina Freitas; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2009-01-01

    Balance disorders affect social, family and professional activities. Vestibular rehabilitation can reduce the impact of these disorders on the quality of life of individuals with vertigo. to study the influence of vestibular rehabilitation on the quality of life of individuals, correlating it with gender, age, results from computerized vectoelectronystagmography and vertigo. Retrospective. Twenty-two individuals were submitted to customized vestibular rehabilitation and the Brazilian Dizziness Handicap Inventory - DHI before and after vestibular rehabilitation. Results from this questionnaire were correlated with gender, age, vestibular assessment and the presence of vertigo. all the DHI scores reduced significantly after vestibular rehabilitation. There were no differences among genders; adults and elderly patients; irritative peripheral vestibular syndromes; deficiency syndromes and normal exams; the presence or absence of vertigo. all the individuals had improvements in their quality of life after customized vestibular rehabilitation.

  13. Vestibular Rehabilitation for Peripheral Vestibular Hypofunction: An Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline

    PubMed Central

    Herdman, Susan J.; Whitney, Susan L.; Cass, Stephen P.; Clendaniel, Richard A.; Fife, Terry D.; Furman, Joseph M.; Getchius, Thomas S. D.; Goebel, Joel A.; Shepard, Neil T.; Woodhouse, Sheelah N.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Uncompensated vestibular hypofunction results in postural instability, visual blurring with head movement, and subjective complaints of dizziness and/or imbalance. We sought to answer the question, “Is vestibular exercise effective at enhancing recovery of function in people with peripheral (unilateral or bilateral) vestibular hypofunction?” Methods: A systematic review of the literature was performed in 5 databases published after 1985 and 5 additional sources for relevant publications were searched. Article types included meta-analyses, systematic reviews, randomized controlled trials, cohort studies, case control series, and case series for human subjects, published in English. One hundred thirty-five articles were identified as relevant to this clinical practice guideline. Results/Discussion: Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of benefit over harm, clinicians should offer vestibular rehabilitation to persons with unilateral and bilateral vestibular hypofunction with impairments and functional limitations related to the vestibular deficit. Based on strong evidence and a preponderance of harm over benefit, clinicians should not include voluntary saccadic or smooth-pursuit eye movements in isolation (ie, without head movement) as specific exercises for gaze stability. Based on moderate evidence, clinicians may offer specific exercise techniques to target identified impairments or functional limitations. Based on moderate evidence and in consideration of patient preference, clinicians may provide supervised vestibular rehabilitation. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence, clinicians may prescribe a minimum of 3 times per day for the performance of gaze stability exercises as 1 component of a home exercise program. Based on expert opinion extrapolated from the evidence (range of supervised visits: 2-38 weeks, mean = 10 weeks), clinicians may consider providing adequate supervised vestibular rehabilitation sessions for the

  14. Auditory and Vestibular Issues Related to Human Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danielson, Richard W.; Wood, Scott J.

    2009-01-01

    Human spaceflight provides unique opportunities to study human vestibular and auditory systems. This session will discuss 1) vestibular adaptive processes reflected by pronounced perceptual and motor coordination problems during, and after, space missions; 2) vestibular diagnostic and rehabilitative techniques (used to promote recovery after living in altered gravity environments) that may be relevant to treatment of vestibular disorders on earth; and 3) unique acoustical challenges to hearing loss prevention and crew performance during spaceflight missions.

  15. Visual Dependency and Dizziness after Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Cousins, Sian; Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Kaski, Diego; Palla, Antonella; Seemungal, Barry M.; Golding, John F.; Staab, Jeffrey P.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Symptomatic recovery after acute vestibular neuritis (VN) is variable, with around 50% of patients reporting long term vestibular symptoms; hence, it is essential to identify factors related to poor clinical outcome. Here we investigated whether excessive reliance on visual input for spatial orientation (visual dependence) was associated with long term vestibular symptoms following acute VN. Twenty-eight patients with VN and 25 normal control subjects were included. Patients were enrolled at least 6 months after acute illness. Recovery status was not a criterion for study entry, allowing recruitment of patients with a full range of persistent symptoms. We measured visual dependence with a laptop-based Rod-and-Disk Test and severity of symptoms with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI). The third of patients showing the worst clinical outcomes (mean DHI score 36–80) had significantly greater visual dependence than normal subjects (6.35° error vs. 3.39° respectively, p = 0.03). Asymptomatic patients and those with minor residual symptoms did not differ from controls. Visual dependence was associated with high levels of persistent vestibular symptoms after acute VN. Over-reliance on visual information for spatial orientation is one characteristic of poorly recovered vestibular neuritis patients. The finding may be clinically useful given that visual dependence may be modified through rehabilitation desensitization techniques. PMID:25233234

  16. Expression of vesicular glutamate transporters in peripheral vestibular structures and vestibular nuclear complex of rat.

    PubMed

    Zhang, F X; Pang, Y W; Zhang, M M; Zhang, T; Dong, Y L; Lai, C H; Shum, D K Y; Chan, Y S; Li, J L; Li, Y Q

    2011-01-26

    Glutamate transmission from vestibular end organs to central vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) plays important role in transferring sensory information about head position and movements. Three isoforms of vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUTs) have been considered so far the most specific markers for glutamatergic neurons/cells. In this study, VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 were immunohistochemically localized to axon terminals in VNC and somata of vestibular primary afferents in association with their central and peripheral axon endings, and VGLUT1 and VGLUT3 were co-localized to hair cells of otolith maculae and cristae ampullaris. VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 defined three subsets of Scarpa's neurons (vestibular ganglionic neurons): those co-expressing VGLUT1 and VGLUT2 or expressing only VGLUT2, and those expressing neither. In addition, many neurons located in all vestibular subnuclei were observed to contain hybridized signals for VGLUT2 mRNA and a few VNC neurons, mostly scattered in medial vestibular nucleus (MVe), displayed VGLUT1 mRNA labelling. Following unilateral ganglionectomy, asymmetries of VGLUT1-immunoreactivity (ir) and VGLUT2-ir occurred between two VNCs, indicating that the VNC terminals containing VGLUT1 and/or VGLUT2 are partly of peripheral origin. The present data indicate that the constituent cells/neurons along the vestibular pathway selectively apply VGLUT isoforms to transport glutamate into synaptic vesicles for glutamate transmission. © 2011 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Neural Correlates of Sensory Substitution in Vestibular Pathways Following Complete Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Sadeghi, Soroush G.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2012-01-01

    Sensory substitution is the term typically used in reference to sensory prosthetic devices designed to replace input from one defective modality with input from another modality. Such devices allow an alternative encoding of sensory information that is no longer directly provided by the defective modality in a purposeful and goal-directed manner. The behavioral recovery that follows complete vestibular loss is impressive and has long been thought to take advantage of a natural form of sensory substitution in which head motion information is no longer provided by vestibular inputs, but instead by extra-vestibular inputs such as proprioceptive and motor efference copy signals. Here we examined the neuronal correlates of this behavioral recovery after complete vestibular loss in alert behaving monkeys (Macaca mulata). We show for the first time that extra-vestibular inputs substitute for the vestibular inputs to stabilize gaze at the level of single neurons in the VOR premotor circuitry. The summed weighting of neck proprioceptive and efference copy information was sufficient to explain simultaneously observed behavioral improvements in gaze stability. Furthermore, by altering correspondence between intended and actual head movement we revealed a four-fold increase in the weight of neck motor efference copy signals consistent with the enhanced behavioral recovery observed when head movements are voluntary versus unexpected. Thus, taken together our results provide direct evidence that the substitution by extra-vestibular inputs in vestibular pathways provides a neural correlate for the improvements in gaze stability that are observed following the total loss of vestibular inputs. PMID:23077054

  18. A systems concept of the vestibular organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayne, R.

    1974-01-01

    A comprehensive model of vestibular organ function is presented. The model is based on an analogy with the inertial guidance systems used in navigation. Three distinct operations are investigated: angular motion sensing, linear motion sensing, and computation. These operations correspond to the semicircular canals, the otoliths, and central processing respectively. It is especially important for both an inertial guidance system and the vestibular organs to distinguish between attitude with respect to the vertical on the one hand, and linear velocity and displacement on the other. The model is applied to various experimental situations and found to be corroborated by them.

  19. Vestibular convergence patterns in vestibular nuclei neurons of alert primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2002-01-01

    Sensory signal convergence is a fundamental and important aspect of brain function. Such convergence may often involve complex multidimensional interactions as those proposed for the processing of otolith and semicircular canal (SCC) information for the detection of translational head movements and the effective discrimination from physically congruent gravity signals. In the present study, we have examined the responses of primate rostral vestibular nuclei (VN) neurons that do not exhibit any eye movement-related activity using 0.5-Hz translational and three-dimensional (3D) rotational motion. Three distinct neural populations were identified. Approximately one-fourth of the cells exclusively encoded rotational movements (canal-only neurons) and were unresponsive to translation. The canal-only central neurons encoded head rotation in SCC coordinates, exhibited little orthogonal canal convergence, and were characterized with significantly higher sensitivities to rotation as compared to primary SCC afferents. Another fourth of the neurons modulated their firing rates during translation (otolith-only cells). During rotations, these neurons only responded when the axis of rotation was earth-horizontal and the head was changing orientation relative to gravity. The remaining one-half of VN neurons were sensitive to both rotations and translations (otolith + canal neurons). Unlike primary otolith afferents, however, central neurons often exhibited significant spatiotemporal (noncosine) tuning properties and a wide variety of response dynamics to translation. To characterize the pattern of SCC inputs to otolith + canal neurons, their rotational maximum sensitivity vectors were computed using exclusively responses during earth-vertical axis rotations (EVA). Maximum sensitivity vectors were distributed throughout the 3D space, suggesting strong convergence from multiple SCCs. These neurons were also tested with earth-horizontal axis rotations (EHA), which would activate

  20. Effects of sleep loss on vestibular response during simple and complex vestibular stimulation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1986-07-01

    Few data are available concerning the effects of sleep loss on vestibular responses although those responses are significant products of motion in aviation environments. This study assessed periodically throughout approx. 55 hrs. of sleep loss the oc...

  1. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. VIII, "Coriolis" vestibular stimulation and the influence of different visual surrounds.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1967-08-01

    Disorientation caused by 'Coriolis' vestibular reactions has been cited frequently as a significant factor in flying safety. In addition, personnel who maintain rotating radar towers may also be adversely affected by 'Coriolis' problems. In the study...

  2. Adaptation to vestibular disorientation. X, Modification of vestibular nystagmus and "vertigo" by means of visual stimulation.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1968-10-01

    A conflict among sensory signals frequently underlies problems of disorientation, vertigo, and motion sickness. In this study, visual information in conflict with vestibular signals was presented to groups of subjects by illuminating the test room fo...

  3. Physiological principles of vestibular function on earth and in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minor, L. B.

    1998-01-01

    Physiological mechanisms underlying vestibular function have important implications for our ability to understand, predict, and modify balance processes during and after spaceflight. The microgravity environment of space provides many unique opportunities for studying the effects of changes in gravitoinertial force on structure and function of the vestibular system. Investigations of basic vestibular physiology and of changes in reflexes occurring as a consequence of exposure to microgravity have important implications for diagnosis and treatment of vestibular disorders in human beings. This report reviews physiological principles underlying control of vestibular processes on earth and in space. Information is presented from a functional perspective with emphasis on signals arising from labyrinthine receptors. Changes induced by microgravity in linear acceleration detected by the vestibulo-ocular reflexes. Alterations of the functional requirements for postural control in space are described. Areas of direct correlation between studies of vestibular reflexes in microgravity and vestibular disorders in human beings are discussed.

  4. Interaction between Vestibular Compensation Mechanisms and Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: 10 Recommendations for Optimal Functional Recovery

    PubMed Central

    Lacour, Michel; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    This review questions the relationships between the plastic events responsible for the recovery of vestibular function after a unilateral vestibular loss (vestibular compensation), which has been well described in animal models in the last decades, and the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) therapy elaborated on a more empirical basis for vestibular loss patients. The main objective is not to propose a catalog of results but to provide clinicians with an understandable view on when and how to perform VR therapy, and why VR may benefit from basic knowledge and may influence the recovery process. With this perspective, 10 major recommendations are proposed as ways to identify an optimal functional recovery. Among them are the crucial role of active and early VR therapy, coincidental with a post-lesion sensitive period for neuronal network remodeling, the instructive role that VR therapy may play in this functional reorganization, the need for progression in the VR therapy protocol, which is based mainly on adaptation processes, the necessity to take into account the sensorimotor, cognitive, and emotional profile of the patient to propose individual or “à la carte” VR therapies, and the importance of motivational and ecologic contexts. More than 10 general principles are very likely, but these principles seem crucial for the fast recovery of vestibular loss patients to ensure good quality of life. PMID:25610424

  5. Vesibulotoxicity and Management of Vestibular Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, John P.

    2005-01-01

    The toxicity of certain aminoglycoside antibiotics for vestibular hair cells has been used to special advantage in the treatment of Meniere's disease. Intratympanic (middle ear) injections of these drugs are being increasingly used to control vertigo in this disorder when it has not responded to medical therapy. The mechanisms by which these drugs…

  6. Retinoic acid deficiency impairs the vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Romand, Raymond; Krezel, Wojciech; Beraneck, Mathieu; Cammas, Laura; Fraulob, Valérie; Messaddeq, Nadia; Kessler, Pascal; Hashino, Eri; Dollé, Pascal

    2013-03-27

    The retinaldehyde dehydrogenase 3 (Raldh3) gene encodes a major retinoic acid synthesizing enzyme and is highly expressed in the inner ear during embryogenesis. We found that mice deficient in Raldh3 bear severe impairment in vestibular functions. These mutant mice exhibited spontaneous circling/tilted behaviors and performed poorly in several vestibular-motor function tests. In addition, video-oculography revealed a complete loss of the maculo-ocular reflex and a significant reduction in the horizontal angular vestibulo-ocular reflex, indicating that detection of both linear acceleration and angular rotation were compromised in the mutants. Consistent with these behavioral and functional deficiencies, morphological anomalies, characterized by a smaller vestibular organ with thinner semicircular canals and a significant reduction in the number of otoconia in the saccule and the utricle, were consistently observed in the Raldh3 mutants. The loss of otoconia in the mutants may be attributed, at least in part, to significantly reduced expression of Otop1, which encodes a protein known to be involved in calcium regulation in the otolithic organs. Our data thus reveal a previously unrecognized role of Raldh3 in structural and functional development of the vestibular end organs.

  7. Peripheral vestibular pathology in Mondini dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Serdar; Hızlı, Ömer; Kaya, Fatıma Kübra; Monsanto, Rafael DaCosta; Paparella, Michael M; Cureoglu, Sebahattin

    2017-01-01

    In this study, our objective was to histopathologically analyze the peripheral vestibular system in patients with Mondini dysplasia. Comparative human temporal bone study. We assessed the sensory epithelium of the human vestibular system with a focus on the number of type I and type II hair cells, as well as the total number of hair cells. We compared those numbers in our Mondini dysplasia group versus our control group. The loss of type I and type II hair cells in the cristae of the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, as well as in the saccular and utricular macula, was significantly higher in our Mondini dysplasia group than in our control group. The total number of hair cells significantly decreased in the cristae of the superior, lateral, and posterior semicircular canals, as well as in the saccular and utricular macula, in our Mondini dysplasia group. Loss of vestibular hair cells can lead to vestibular dysfunction in patients with Mondini dysplasia. NA Laryngoscope, 127:206-209, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  8. Vestibular stimulation leads to distinct hemodynamic patterning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that responses of a particular sympathetic nerve to vestibular stimulation depend on the type of tissue the nerve innervates as well as its anatomic location. In the present study, we sought to determine whether such precise patterning of vestibulosympathetic reflexes could lead to specific hemodynamic alterations in response to vestibular afferent activation. We simultaneously measured changes in systemic blood pressure and blood flow (with the use of Doppler flowmetry) to the hindlimb (femoral artery), forelimb (brachial artery), and kidney (renal artery) in chloralose-urethane-anesthetized, baroreceptor-denervated cats. Electrical vestibular stimulation led to depressor responses, 8 +/- 2 mmHg (mean +/- SE) in magnitude, that were accompanied by decreases in femoral vasoconstriction (23 +/- 4% decrease in vascular resistance or 36 +/- 7% increase in vascular conductance) and increases in brachial vascular tone (resistance increase of 10 +/- 6% and conductance decrease of 11 +/- 4%). Relatively small changes (<5%) in renal vascular tone were observed. In contrast, electrical stimulation of muscle and cutaneous afferents produced pressor responses (20 +/- 6 mmHg) that were accompanied by vasoconstriction in all three beds. These data suggest that vestibular inputs lead to a complex pattern of cardiovascular changes that is distinct from that which occurs in response to activation of other types of somatic afferents.

  9. Immunological Influences on the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warchol, Mark E.

    2003-01-01

    The goals of this project were to examine the influence of immune signaling molecules on the survival and replacement of sensory hair cells in the vestibular organs. We have made considerable progress toward that goal, particularly in the characterization of mechanisms that underlie hair cell death.

  10. Postural Compensation for Unilateral Vestibular Loss

    PubMed Central

    Peterka, Robert J.; Statler, Kennyn D.; Wrisley, Diane M.; Horak, Fay B.

    2011-01-01

    Postural control of upright stance was investigated in well-compensated, unilateral vestibular loss (UVL) subjects compared to age-matched control subjects. The goal was to determine how sensory weighting for postural control in UVL subjects differed from control subjects, and how sensory weighting related to UVL subjects’ functional compensation, as assessed by standardized balance and dizziness questionnaires. Postural control mechanisms were identified using a model-based interpretation of medial–lateral center-of-mass body-sway evoked by support-surface rotational stimuli during eyes-closed stance. The surface-tilt stimuli consisted of continuous pseudorandom rotations presented at four different amplitudes. Parameters of a feedback control model were obtained that accounted for each subject’s sway response to the surface-tilt stimuli. Sensory weighting factors quantified the relative contributions to stance control of vestibular sensory information, signaling body-sway relative to earth-vertical, and proprioceptive information, signaling body-sway relative to the surface. Results showed that UVL subjects made significantly greater use of proprioceptive, and therefore less use of vestibular, orientation information on all tests. There was relatively little overlap in the distributions of sensory weights measured in UVL and control subjects, although UVL subjects varied widely in the amount they could use their remaining vestibular function. Increased reliance on proprioceptive information by UVL subjects was associated with their balance being more disturbed by the surface-tilt perturbations than control subjects, thus indicating a deficiency of balance control even in well-compensated UVL subjects. Furthermore, there was some tendency for UVL subjects who were less able to utilize remaining vestibular information to also indicate worse functional compensation on questionnaires. PMID:21922014

  11. Vestibular function in families with inherited autosomal dominant hearing loss

    PubMed Central

    Street, Valerie A.; Kallman, Jeremy C.; Strombom, Paul D.; Bramhall, Naomi F.; Phillips, James O.

    2008-01-01

    The inner ear contains the developmentally related cochlea and peripheral vestibular labyrinth. Given the similar physiology between these two organs, hearing loss and vestibular dysfunction may be expected to occur simultaneously in individuals segregating mutations in inner ear genes. Twenty-two different genes have been discovered that when mutated lead to non-syndromic autosomal dominant hearing loss. A review of the literature indicates that families segregating mutations in 13 of these 22 genes have undergone formal clinical vestibular testing. Formal assessment revealed vestibular dysfunction in families with mutations in ten of these 13 genes. Remarkably, only families with mutations in the COCH and MYO7A genes self-report considerable vestibular challenges. Families segregating mutations in the other eight genes do not self-report significant balance problems and appear to compensate well in everyday life for vestibular deficits discovered during formal clinical vestibular assessment. An example of a family (referred to as the HL1 family) with progressive hearing loss and clinically-detected vestibular hypofunction that does not report vestibular symptoms is described in this review. Notably, one member of the HL1 family with clinically-detected vestibular hypofunction reached the summit of Mount Kilimanjaro. PMID:18776598

  12. Exhibition of Stochastic Resonance in Vestibular Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan-Garza, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Oman, C. M.; Mulavara, A. P.

    2016-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transitions. Post flight sensorimotor changes include spatial disorientation, along with postural and gait instability that may degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. A sensorimotor countermeasure that mitigates these effects would improve crewmember safety and decrease risk. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor perception through the phenomenon of stochastic resonance (SR), when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is enhanced by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. This study aims to advance the development of SVS as a potential countermeasure by 1) demonstrating the exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular perception, a vital component of sensorimotor function, 2) investigating the repeatability of SR exhibition, and 3) determining the relative contribution of the semicircular canals (SCC) and otolith (OTO) organs to vestibular perceptual SR. A constant current stimulator was used to deliver bilateral bipolar SVS via electrodes placed on each of the mastoid processes, as previously done. Vestibular perceptual motion recognition thresholds were measured using a 6-degree of freedom MOOG platform and a 150 trial 3-down/1-up staircase procedure. In the first test session, we measured vestibular perceptual thresholds in upright roll-tilt at 0.2 Hz (SCC+OTO) with SVS ranging from 0-700 µA. In a second test session a week later, we re-measured roll-tilt thresholds with 0, optimal (from test session 1), and 1500 µA SVS levels. A subset of these subjects, plus naive subjects, participated in two additional test sessions in which we measured thresholds in supine roll-rotation at 0.2 Hz (SCC) and upright y-translation at 1 Hz

  13. The NAS kernel benchmark program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, D. H.; Barton, J. T.

    1985-01-01

    A collection of benchmark test kernels that measure supercomputer performance has been developed for the use of the NAS (Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation) program at the NASA Ames Research Center. This benchmark program is described in detail and the specific ground rules are given for running the program as a performance test.

  14. NAS Applications and Advanced Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, David H.; Biswas, Rupak; VanDerWijngaart, Rob; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    This paper examines the applications most commonly run on the supercomputers at the Numerical Aerospace Simulation (NAS) facility. It analyzes the extent to which such applications are fundamentally oriented to vector computers, and whether or not they can be efficiently implemented on hierarchical memory machines, such as systems with cache memories and highly parallel, distributed memory systems.

  15. SMART NAS Test Bed Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palopo, Kee

    2016-01-01

    These slides presents an overview of SMART NAS Test Bed. The test bed is envisioned to be connected to operational systems and to allow a new concept and technology to be evaluated in its realistic environment. Its role as an accelerator of concepts and technologies development, its use-case-driven development approach, and its state are presented.

  16. Choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity in the human vestibular end-organs.

    PubMed

    Ishiyama, A; Lopez, I; Wackym, P A

    1994-10-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) is believed to play a major role in the efferent vestibular system in several animal models, however no information regarding the role of ACh in the human efferent vestibular system has been published. Post-embedding immunohistochemistry in a hydrophilic resin was used to investigate the choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChATi) and acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry in human vestibular end-organs. ChATi and AChE activity was found in numerous bouton-type terminals at the basal area of the vestibular hair cells. These terminals were found to contact type II vestibular hair cells and the afferent chalices surrounding type I hair cells. This study provides the first evidence that the human efferent vestibular axons and terminals are cholinergic.

  17. Recovery of vestibular function following hair cell destruction by streptomycin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Nelson, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    Can the vestibular periphery of warm-blooded vertebrates recover functionally from severe sensory hair cell loss? Recent findings in birds suggest a mechanism for recovery but in fact no direct functional evidence has been reported. We produced vestibular hair cell lesions using the ototoxic agent streptomycin sulfate (600 mg/kg/day, 8 days, chicks, Gallus domesticus). Compound action potentials of the vestibular nerve were used as a direct measure of peripheral vestibular function. Vestibular thresholds, neural activation latencies and amplitudes were documented. Eight days of drug treatment elevated thresholds significantly (P < 0.001) and eliminated all but remnants of vestibular activity. Virtually complete physiological recovery occurred in all animals studied over a period of 70 days following treatment. Thresholds recovered within two weeks of drug treatment whereas the return of response morphologies including activation latencies and amplitudes required an additional 6-8 weeks.

  18. Vestibular system: the many facets of a multimodal sense.

    PubMed

    Angelaki, Dora E; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2008-01-01

    Elegant sensory structures in the inner ear have evolved to measure head motion. These vestibular receptors consist of highly conserved semicircular canals and otolith organs. Unlike other senses, vestibular information in the central nervous system becomes immediately multisensory and multimodal. There is no overt, readily recognizable conscious sensation from these organs, yet vestibular signals contribute to a surprising range of brain functions, from the most automatic reflexes to spatial perception and motor coordination. Critical to these diverse, multimodal functions are multiple computationally intriguing levels of processing. For example, the need for multisensory integration necessitates vestibular representations in multiple reference frames. Proprioceptive-vestibular interactions, coupled with corollary discharge of a motor plan, allow the brain to distinguish actively generated from passive head movements. Finally, nonlinear interactions between otolith and canal signals allow the vestibular system to function as an inertial sensor and contribute critically to both navigation and spatial orientation.

  19. A novel v- silicone vestibular stent: preventing vestibular stenosis and preserving nasal valves.

    PubMed

    Bassam, Wameedh Al; Bhargava, Deepa; Al-Abri, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a novel style of placing nasal stents. Patients undergoing surgical procedures in the region of nasal vestibule and nasal valves are at risk of developing vestibular stenosis and lifelong problems with the external and internal nasal valves; sequels of the repair. The objective of the report is to demonstrate a simple and successful method of an inverted V- Stent placement to prevent potential complication of vestibular stenosis and nasal valve compromise later in life. Following a fall on a sharp edge of a metallic bed, a sixteen month old child with a deep lacerated nasal wound extending from the collumellar base toward the tip of the nose underwent surgical exploration and repair of the nasal vestibule and nasal cavity. A soft silicone stent fashioned as inverted V was placed bilaterally. The child made a remarkable recovery with no evidence of vestibular stenosis or nasal valve abnormalities. In patients with nasal trauma involving the nasal vestibule and internal and external nasal valves stent placement avoids sequels, adhesions, contractures, synechia vestibular stenosis and fibrosis involving these anatomical structures. The advantages of the described V- stents over the traditional readymade ridged nasal stents, tubing's and composite aural grafts are: a) technical simplicity of use, b) safety, c) less morbidity, d) more comfortable, and e) economical. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a stent for prevention of vestibular stenosis and preserving nasal valves.

  20. A Novel V- Silicone Vestibular Stent: Preventing Vestibular Stenosis and Preserving Nasal Valves

    PubMed Central

    Bassam, Wameedh AL; Bhargava, Deepa; Al-Abri, Rashid

    2012-01-01

    This report presents a novel style of placing nasal stents. Patients undergoing surgical procedures in the region of nasal vestibule and nasal valves are at risk of developing vestibular stenosis and lifelong problems with the external and internal nasal valves; sequels of the repair. The objective of the report is to demonstrate a simple and successful method of an inverted V- Stent placement to prevent potential complication of vestibular stenosis and nasal valve compromise later in life. Following a fall on a sharp edge of a metallic bed, a sixteen month old child with a deep lacerated nasal wound extending from the collumellar base toward the tip of the nose underwent surgical exploration and repair of the nasal vestibule and nasal cavity. A soft silicone stent fashioned as inverted V was placed bilaterally. The child made a remarkable recovery with no evidence of vestibular stenosis or nasal valve abnormalities. In patients with nasal trauma involving the nasal vestibule and internal and external nasal valves stent placement avoids sequels, adhesions, contractures, synechia vestibular stenosis and fibrosis involving these anatomical structures. The advantages of the described V- stents over the traditional readymade ridged nasal stents, tubing’s and composite aural grafts are: a) technical simplicity of use, b) safety, c) less morbidity, d) more comfortable, and e) economical. To our knowledge, this is the first report of such a stent for prevention of vestibular stenosis and preserving nasal valves. PMID:22359729

  1. Characteristics of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in children with enlarged vestibular aqueduct.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangwei; Gopen, Quinton

    2011-01-01

    To explore the characteristics of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in children with enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) and to determine the diagnostic value of VEMP testing for this particular inner ear structural anomaly. Retrospective cohort study in a pediatric tertiary care facility. A total of 25 pediatric cases (37 ears) of EVA were identified with complete records, including otologic evaluation, CT scan of the temporal bone, and audiologic assessment. Results of audiometry, tympanometry, and VEMP testing were analyzed. Hearing loss was found in 97% (36/37) of the ears with EVA. Airbone gaps (conductive components) were found in all hearing losses with normal middle ear pressure and mobility. Abnormally low threshold VEMP responses were found in 92% (34/37) of the ears with EVA. VEMP responses were absent unilaterally in three EVA patients who had vestibular complaints. No clear correlation was found between the size of EVA and the audiologic findings. The presence of airbone gaps in children with EVA was found without apparent middle ear pathology. Characteristics of VEMP in EVA were lower thresholds and higher amplitudes despite of the presence of airbone gaps. The abnormally low threshold VEMP responses suggested a "third" window effect in the pathologic condition of EVA. Unilateral absence of VEMP may implicate peripheral vestibular impairment. The findings from our study are helpful in clinical evaluation of young children who usually give limited and ambiguous input regarding their hearing and vestibular problems.

  2. Hearing outcome after concurrent endolymphatic shunt and vestibular nerve section.

    PubMed

    Moody-Antonio, Stephanie; House, John W

    2003-05-01

    To determine if endolymphatic shunt surgery concurrent with vestibular nerve section improves hearing outcome compared with vestibular nerve section alone. Retrospective observational study with cross-sectional survey. Tertiary otologic private practice. Thirty-five patients who underwent vestibular nerve section and endolymphatic shunt surgery and 17 patients who had vestibular nerve section alone between 1985 and 2000. Chart review and correspondence for audiogram results and survey. Hearing at last follow-up. Hearing Handicap Inventory, Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, and SF-36. Eight patients in the vestibular nerve section and 15 in the vestibular nerve section and endolymphatic shunt surgery group had an audiogram at more than 16 months after surgery available for review. In the vestibular nerve section group, three patients had same hearing whereas five were worse. In the vestibular nerve section and endolymphatic shunt surgery group, 2 patients showed improvement, 2 were the same, and 11 were worse. There was no significant difference in the change from preoperative pure tone average or Word Discrimination Score to postoperative levels between the surgical groups. Eighteen patients had serviceable hearing preoperatively. Five of 8 in the vestibular nerve section and 4 of 10 in the vestibular nerve section and endolymphatic shunt surgery groups maintained serviceable hearing postoperatively. Of the 52 patients, 33 responded to the survey (63%). There were no significant differences between the groups for Dizziness Handicap Inventory, Hearing Handicap Inventory, Tinnitus Handicap Inventory, or SF-36, suggesting that patient-oriented outcomes are the same in both groups. Concurrent endolymphatic shunt surgery and vestibular nerve section does not improve hearing or tinnitus outcome over vestibular nerve section alone.

  3. Experiment M131. Human vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graybiel, A.; Miller, E. F., II; Homick, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The lower susceptibility to vestibular stimulation aloft, compared with that on ground under experimental conditions, is attributed to a precondition, namely, either there is no need to adapt, or, as exemplified by the Skylab 3 pilot, adaptation to weightlessness is achieved. Findings in some of the astronauts emphasize the distinction between two categories of vestibular side effects: immediate reflex phenomena (illusions, sensations of turning, etc.), and delayed epiphenomena that include the constellation of symptoms and syndromes comprising motion sickness. The drug combinations 1-scopolamine and d-amphetamine and promethazine hydrochloride and ephedrine sulfate are effective in prevention and treatment of motion sickness. It is concluded that prevention of motion sickness in any stressful motion environment involves selection, adaptation, and the use of drugs.

  4. Vestibular activation of sympathetic nerve activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, C. A.; Carter, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The vestibulosympathetic reflex refers to sympathetic nerve activation by the vestibular system. Animal studies indicate that the vestibular system assists in blood pressure regulation during orthostasis. Although human studies clearly demonstrate activation of muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) during engagement of the otolith organs, the role of the vestibulosympathetic reflex in maintaining blood pressure during orthostasis is not well-established. Examination of the vestibulosympathetic reflex with other cardiovascular reflexes indicates that it is a powerful and independent reflex. Ageing, which is associated with an increased risk for orthostatic hypotension, attenuates the vestibulosympathetic reflex. The attenuated reflex is associated with a reduction in arterial pressure. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that the vestibulosympathetic reflex assists in blood pressure regulation in humans, but future studies examining this reflex in other orthostatically intolerant populations are necessary to address this hypothesis.

  5. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, B.; Randle, R. J.; Stewart, J. D.

    1975-01-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present paper studies a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 sec of rotating. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 sec under two conditions: while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  6. Vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex in man.

    PubMed

    Clark, B R; Randle, R J; Stewart, J D

    1975-11-01

    Stimulation of the vestibular system by angular acceleration produces widespread sensory and motor effects. The present study was designed to study a motor effect which has not been reported in the literature, i.e., the influence of rotary acceleration of the body on ocular accommodation. The accommodation of 10 young men was recorded before and after a high-level deceleration to zero velocity following 30 s of rotation. Accommodation was recorded continuously on an infrared optometer for 110 s under two conditions; while the subjects observed a target set at the far point, and while they viewed the same target through a 0.3-mm pinhole. Stimulation by high-level rotary deceleration produced positive accommodation or a pseudomyopia under both conditions, but the positive accommodation was substantially greater and lasted much longer during fixation through the pinhole. It is hypothesized that this increase in accommodation is a result of a vestibular-ocular accommodation reflex.

  7. The vestibular system of the owl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Money, K. E.; Correia, M. J.

    1973-01-01

    Five owls were given vestibular examinations, and two of them were sacrificed to provide serial histological sections of the temporal bones. The owls exhibited a curious variability in the postrotatory head nystagmus following abrupt deceleration; sometimes a brisk nystagnus with direction opposite to that appropriate to the stimulus would occur promptly after deceleration. It was found also that owls can exhibit a remarkable head stability during angular movement of the body about any axis passing through the skull. The vestibular apparatus in the owl is larger than in man, and a prominent crista neglecta is present. The tectorial membrane, the cupula, and the otolithic membranes of the utricle, saccule, and lagena are all attached to surfaces in addition to the surfaces hearing hair cells. These attachments are very substantial in the utricular otolithic membrane and in the cupula.

  8. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  9. The History and Evolution of Surgery on the Vestibular Labyrinth.

    PubMed

    Naples, James G; Eisen, Marc D

    2016-11-01

    The history of surgery on the vestibular labyrinth is rich but sparsely documented in the literature. The story begins over a century ago with the labyrinthectomy in an era that consisted exclusively of ablative surgery for infection or vertigo. Improved understanding of vestibular physiology and pathology produced an era of selective ablation and hearing preservation that includes semicircular canal occlusion for benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. An era of restoration began with a discovery of superior semicircular canal dehiscence and its repair. The final era of vestibular replacement is upon us as the possibility of successful prosthetic vestibular implantation becomes reality. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2016.

  10. Vestibular involvement in adults with HIV/AIDS.

    PubMed

    Heinze, Barbara M; Vinck, Bart M; Hofmeyr, Louis M; Swanepoel, De Wet

    2014-04-01

    HIV/AIDS is responsible for widespread clinical manifestations involving the head, and neck. The prevalence and nature of vestibular involvement is still largely unknown. This study, aimed to describe and compare the occurrence and nature of vestibular involvement among a group of, adults infected with HIV compared to a control group. It also aimed to compare the vestibular function, of symptomatic and asymptomatic HIV positive adults who receive antiretroviral (ARV) therapies to, subjects not receiving ARV. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 53 adults (29 male, 24 female, aged 23-49 years, mean=38.5, SD=4.4) infected with HIV, compared to a control group of 38 HIV negative adults (18, male, 20 female, aged 20-49 years, mean=36.9, SD=8.2). A structured interview probed the subjective, perception of vestibular symptoms. Medical records were reviewed for CD4+ cell counts and the use of, ARV medication. An otologic assessment and a comprehensive vestibular assessment (bedside, assessments, vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, ocular motor and positional tests and bithermal, caloric irrigation) were conducted. Vestibular involvement occurred in 79.2% of subjects with HIV in all categories of disease, progression, compared to 18.4% in those without HIV. Vestibular involvement increased from 18.9% in CDC category 1 to 30.2% in category 2. Vestibular involvement was 30.1% in category 3. There were, vestibular involvement in 35.9% of symptomatic HIV positive subjects, and 41.5% in asymptomatic, HIV positive subjects. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of vestibular involvement, in subjects receiving ARV therapies compared to those not receiving ARV therapies (p=.914; chi-square, test). The odds ratio indicates that individuals with HIV have a 16.61 times higher risk of developing, vestibular involvement during their lifetime of living with the disease and that it may occur despite, being asymptomatic. Vestibular involvement was significantly more

  11. Clinical application of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP).

    PubMed

    Murofushi, Toshihisa

    2016-08-01

    The author reviewed clinical aspects of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). Now two types of VEMPs are available. The first one is cervical VEMP, which is recorded in the sternocleidomastoid muscle and predominantly reflects sacculo-collic reflex. The other is ocular VEMP, which is usually recorded below the lower eye lid and predominantly reflects utriculo-ocular reflex. VEMPs play important roles not only for assessment of common vestibular diseases but also for establishment of new clinical entities. Clinical application in Meniere's disease, vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, vestibular migraine, idiopathic otolithic vertigo, and central vertigo/dizziness was reviewed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Evidence for vestibular dysfunction in orthostatic hypotension.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Mitsuhiro; Sakaida, Yuzuru; Tanaka, Kunihiko; Mizuta, Keisuke; Ito, Yatsuji

    2012-03-01

    There is little definitive evidence of the clinical significance of the vestibular-cardiovascular reflex in humans, despite the fact that the vestibular system is known to contribute to cardiovascular control in animals. The present study involved 248 dizzy patients (127 male patients and 121 female patients) aged 65 years and younger. We classified all participants into three groups based on their vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) responses; absent VEMP, asymmetry VEMP and normal VEMP. To investigate the effect of the otolith disorder, which was estimated by the VEMP, on the orthostatic blood pressure responses, the subjects' systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP) and heart rate were monitored during the orthostatic test after they actively stood up. The male patients in the absent VEMP group had a significant drop in their DBP at 1 min after active standing up (P < 0.05) without any change in their SBP. Conversely, male patients in the asymmetry VEMP and normal VEMP groups showed a significant increase in the SBP at 1 min after active standing up (P < 0.05). Female patients in the absent VEMP group did not show any significant drop in their blood pressure after standing up (P > 0.05). In the entire group of participants, a total of 19.6% of the patients in the absent VEMP group fulfilled the criteria for orthostatic hypotension (OH), which was significantly > the 8.6% of patients in the normal VEMP group and the 7.2% in the asymmetry VEMP group (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that vestibular disorders due to the dysfunction of otolith organs provoke OH.

  13. Advances in Oculomotor and Vestibular Physiology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-11-24

    and nucleus reticularis tegmenti pontis in serving as an input to the flocculus and in mediating visual-vestibular interactions. Karten showed direct...demonstrated that the region in an around the Interstitial Nucleus of Cajal is important for the generation of torsional or rolling eye movements. 3...demonstrated that activity related to full field motion reaches the flocculus of mammals over mossy fiber Lnpits that arise from cells in nucleus

  14. Disequilibrium After Traumatic Brain Injury: Vestibular Mechanisms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    of otolith signal processing, including the integration of head acceleration26 and the disambiguation of linear ac- celeration signals related to tilt ...Foveal versus full-field visual stabilization strategies for translational and rotational head movements. J. Neurosci. 23: 1104–1108. 14. Walker, M.F., M...in the vestibular reflexes that compensate for linear movements of the head and body during standing and walking. The experimental protocol has two

  15. NASA's UAS NAS Access Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    The vision of the Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project is "A global transportation system which allows routine access for all classes of UAS." The goal of the UAS Integration in the NAS Project is to "contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS." This goal will be accomplished through a two-phased approach based on development of system-level integration of key concepts, technologies and/or procedures, and demonstrations of integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. Phase 1 will take place the first two years of the Project and Phase 2 will take place the following three years. The Phase 1 and 2 technical objectives are: Phase 1: Developing a gap analysis between current state of the art and the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen) UAS Concept of Operations . Validating the key technical areas identified by this Project . Conducting initial modeling, simulation, and flight testing activities . Completing Sub-project Phase 1 deliverables (spectrum requirements, comparative analysis of certification methodologies, etc.) and continue Phase 2 preparation (infrastructure, tools, etc.) Phase 2: Providing regulators with a methodology for developing airworthiness requirements for UAS, and data to support development of certifications standards and regulatory guidance . Providing systems-level, integrated testing of concepts and/or capabilities that address barriers to routine access to the NAS. Through simulation and flight testing, address issues including separation assurance, communications requirements, and human systems integration in operationally relevant environments. The UAS in the NAS Project will demonstrate solutions in specific technology areas, which will address operational/safety issues related to UAS access to the NAS. Since the resource allocation for

  16. Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas: A Critical Review

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, Erin S., E-mail: murphye3@ccf.or; Suh, John H.

    2011-03-15

    Vestibular schwannomas are slow-growing tumors of the myelin-forming cells that cover cranial nerve VIII. The treatment options for patients with vestibular schwannoma include active observation, surgical management, and radiotherapy. However, the optimal treatment choice remains controversial. We have reviewed the available data and summarized the radiotherapeutic options, including single-session stereotactic radiosurgery, fractionated conventional radiotherapy, fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy, and proton beam therapy. The comparisons of the various radiotherapy modalities have been based on single-institution experiences, which have shown excellent tumor control rates of 91-100%. Both stereotactic radiosurgery and fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy have successfully improved cranial nerve V and VII preservation tomore » >95%. The mixed data regarding the ideal hearing preservation therapy, inherent biases in patient selection, and differences in outcome analysis have made the comparison across radiotherapeutic modalities difficult. Early experience using proton therapy for vestibular schwannoma treatment demonstrated local control rates of 84-100% but disappointing hearing preservation rates of 33-42%. Efforts to improve radiotherapy delivery will focus on refined dosimetry with the goal of reducing the dose to the critical structures. As future randomized trials are unlikely, we suggest regimented pre- and post-treatment assessments, including validated evaluations of cranial nerves V, VII, and VIII, and quality of life assessments with long-term prospective follow-up. The results from such trials will enhance the understanding of therapy outcomes and improve our ability to inform patients.« less

  17. New NAS Parallel Benchmarks Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarrow, Maurice; Saphir, William; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Woo, Alex; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    NPB2 (NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks 2) is an implementation, based on Fortran and the MPI (message passing interface) message passing standard, of the original NAS Parallel Benchmark specifications. NPB2 programs are run with little or no tuning, in contrast to NPB vendor implementations, which are highly optimized for specific architectures. NPB2 results complement, rather than replace, NPB results. Because they have not been optimized by vendors, NPB2 implementations approximate the performance a typical user can expect for a portable parallel program on distributed memory parallel computers. Together these results provide an insightful comparison of the real-world performance of high-performance computers. New NPB2 features: New implementation (CG), new workstation class problem sizes, new serial sample versions, more performance statistics.

  18. Integration of vestibular and head movement signals in the vestibular nuclei during whole-body rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Single-unit recordings were obtained from 107 horizontal semicircular canal-related central vestibular neurons in three alert squirrel monkeys during passive sinusoidal whole-body rotation (WBR) while the head was free to move in the yaw plane (2.3 Hz, 20 degrees /s). Most of the units were identified as secondary vestibular neurons by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral vestibular nerve (61/80 tested). Both non-eye-movement (n = 52) and eye-movement-related (n = 55) units were studied. Unit responses recorded when the head was free to move were compared with responses recorded when the head was restrained from moving. WBR in the absence of a visual target evoked a compensatory vestibulocollic reflex (VCR) that effectively reduced the head velocity in space by an average of 33 +/- 14%. In 73 units, the compensatory head movements were sufficiently large to permit the effect of the VCR on vestibular signal processing to be assessed quantitatively. The VCR affected the rotational responses of different vestibular neurons in different ways. Approximately one-half of the units (34/73, 47%) had responses that decreased as head velocity decreased. However, the responses of many other units (24/73) showed little change. These cells had signals that were better correlated with trunk velocity than with head velocity. The remaining units had responses that were significantly larger (15/73, 21%) when the VCR produced a decrease in head velocity. Eye-movement-related units tended to have rotational responses that were correlated with head velocity. On the other hand, non-eye-movement units tended to have rotational responses that were better correlated with trunk velocity. We conclude that sensory vestibular signals are transformed from head-in-space coordinates to trunk-in-space coordinates on many secondary vestibular neurons in the vestibular nuclei by the addition of inputs related to head rotation on the trunk. This coordinate transformation is presumably important

  19. Asymmetric vestibular stimulation reveals persistent disruption of motion perception in unilateral vestibular lesions.

    PubMed

    Panichi, R; Faralli, M; Bruni, R; Kiriakarely, A; Occhigrossi, C; Ferraresi, A; Bronstein, A M; Pettorossi, V E

    2017-11-01

    Self-motion perception was studied in patients with unilateral vestibular lesions (UVL) due to acute vestibular neuritis at 1 wk and 4, 8, and 12 mo after the acute episode. We assessed vestibularly mediated self-motion perception by measuring the error in reproducing the position of a remembered visual target at the end of four cycles of asymmetric whole-body rotation. The oscillatory stimulus consists of a slow (0.09 Hz) and a fast (0.38 Hz) half cycle. A large error was present in UVL patients when the slow half cycle was delivered toward the lesion side, but minimal toward the healthy side. This asymmetry diminished over time, but it remained abnormally large at 12 mo. In contrast, vestibulo-ocular reflex responses showed a large direction-dependent error only initially, then they normalized. Normalization also occurred for conventional reflex vestibular measures (caloric tests, subjective visual vertical, and head shaking nystagmus) and for perceptual function during symmetric rotation. Vestibular-related handicap, measured with the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) at 12 mo correlated with self-motion perception asymmetry but not with abnormalities in vestibulo-ocular function. We conclude that 1 ) a persistent self-motion perceptual bias is revealed by asymmetric rotation in UVLs despite vestibulo-ocular function becoming symmetric over time, 2 ) this dissociation is caused by differential perceptual-reflex adaptation to high- and low-frequency rotations when these are combined as with our asymmetric stimulus, 3 ) the findings imply differential central compensation for vestibuloperceptual and vestibulo-ocular reflex functions, and 4 ) self-motion perception disruption may mediate long-term vestibular-related handicap in UVL patients. NEW & NOTEWORTHY A novel vestibular stimulus, combining asymmetric slow and fast sinusoidal half cycles, revealed persistent vestibuloperceptual dysfunction in unilateral vestibular lesion (UVL) patients. The compensation of

  20. International survey of vestibular rehabilitation therapists by the Barany Society Ad Hoc Committee on Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Gottshall, Kim R; Graziano, Mariella; Malmstrom, Eva-Maj; Sharpe, Margaret H

    2009-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how occupational and physical therapists learn about vestibular rehabilitation therapy, their educational backgrounds, referral patterns, and their ideas about entry-level and advanced continuing education in vestibular rehabilitation therapy. The Barany Society Ad Hoc Committee for Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy invited therapists around the world to complete an E-mail survey. Participants were either known to committee members or other Barany Society members, known to other participants, identified from their self-listings on the Internet, or volunteered after reading notices published in publications read by therapists. Responses were received from 133 therapists in 19 countries. They had a range of educational backgrounds, practice settings, and referral patterns. Few respondents had had any training about vestibular rehabilitation during their professional entry-level education. Most respondents learned about vestibular rehabilitation from continuing education courses, interactions with their colleagues, and reading. All of them endorsed the concept of developing standards and educating therapists about vestibular anatomy and physiology, vestibular diagnostic testing, vestibular disorders and current intervention strategies. Therefore, the Committee recommends the development of international standards for education and practice in vestibular rehabilitation therapy.

  1. The SMART-NAS Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aquilina, Rudolph A.

    2015-01-01

    The SMART-NAS Testbed for Safe Trajectory Based Operations Project will deliver an evaluation capability, critical to the ATM community, allowing full NextGen and beyond-NextGen concepts to be assessed and developed. To meet this objective a strong focus will be placed on concept integration and validation to enable a gate-to-gate trajectory-based system capability that satisfies a full vision for NextGen. The SMART-NAS for Safe TBO Project consists of six sub-projects. Three of the sub-projects are focused on exploring and developing technologies, concepts and models for evolving and transforming air traffic management operations in the ATM+2 time horizon, while the remaining three sub-projects are focused on developing the tools and capabilities needed for testing these advanced concepts. Function Allocation, Networked Air Traffic Management and Trajectory Based Operations are developing concepts and models. SMART-NAS Test-bed, System Assurance Technologies and Real-time Safety Modeling are developing the tools and capabilities to test these concepts. Simulation and modeling capabilities will include the ability to assess multiple operational scenarios of the national airspace system, accept data feeds, allowing shadowing of actual operations in either real-time, fast-time and/or hybrid modes of operations in distributed environments, and enable integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies, and NAS architectures. An important focus within this project is to enable the development of a real-time, system-wide safety assurance system. The basis of such a system is a continuum of information acquisition, analysis, and assessment that enables awareness and corrective action to detect and mitigate potential threats to continuous system-wide safety at all levels. This process, which currently can only be done post operations, will be driven towards "real-time" assessments in the 2035 time frame.

  2. Differential central projections of vestibular afferents in pigeons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. D.; Fang, Q.

    1996-01-01

    The question of whether a differential distribution of vestibular afferent information to central nuclear neurons is present in pigeons was studied using neural tracer compounds. Discrete tracing of afferent fibers innervating the individual semicircular canal and otolith organs was produced by sectioning individual branches of the vestibular nerve that innervate the different receptor organs and applying crystals of horseradish peroxidase, or a horseradish peroxidase/cholera toxin mixture, or a biocytin compound for neuronal uptake and transport. Afferent fibers and their terminal distributions within the brainstem and cerebellum were visualized subsequently. Discrete areas in the pigeon central nervous system that receive primary vestibular input include the superior, dorsal lateral, ventral lateral, medial, descending, and tangential vestibular nuclei; the A and B groups; the intermediate, medial, and lateral cerebellar nuclei; and the nodulus, the uvula, and the paraflocculus. Generally, the vertical canal afferents projected heavily to medial regions in the superior and descending vestibular nuclei as well as the A group. Vertical canal projections to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei were observed but were less prominent. Horizontal canal projections to the superior and descending vestibular nuclei were much more centrally located than those of the vertical canals. A more substantial projection to the medial and lateral vestibular nuclei was seen with horizontal canal afferents compared to vertical canal fibers. Afferents innervating the utricle and saccule terminated generally in the lateral regions of all vestibular nuclei in areas that were separate from the projections of the semicircular canals. In addition, utricular fibers projected to regions in the vestibular nuclei that overlapped with the horizontal semicircular canal terminal fields, whereas saccular afferents projected to regions that received vertical canal fiber terminations. Lagenar

  3. Otolith-Canal Convergence in Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David

    1996-01-01

    During manned spaceflight, acute vestibular disturbances often occur, leading to physical duress and a loss of performance. Vestibular adaptation to the weightless environment follows within two to three days yet the mechanisms responsible for the disturbance and subsequent adaptation are still unknown In order to understand vestibular system function in space and normal earth conditions the basic physiological mechanisms of vestibular information co coding must be determined. Information processing regarding head movement and head position with respect to gravity takes place in the vestibular nuclei neurons that receive signals From the semicircular canals and otolith organs in the vestibular labyrinth. These neurons must synthesize the information into a coded output signal that provides for the head and eye movement reflexes as well as the conscious perception of the body in three-dimensional space The current investigation will for the first time. determine how the vestibular nuclei neurons quantitatively synthesize afferent information from the different linear and angular acceleration receptors in the vestibular labyrinths into an integrated output signal. During the second year of funding, progress on the current project has been focused on the anatomical orientation of semicircular canals and the spatial orientation of the innervating afferent responses. This information is necessary in order to understand how vestibular nuclei neurons process the incoming afferent spatial signals particularly with the convergent otolith afferent signals that are also spatially distributed Since information from the vestibular nuclei is presented to different brain regions associated with differing reflexive and sensory functions it is important to understand the computational mechanisms used by vestibular neurons to produce the appropriate output signal.

  4. Effect of meprobamate on the vestibulosensory and vestibular somatic reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khinchikashvili, N. V.

    1980-01-01

    The influence of meprobamate on the vestibular illusion of counter-rotation, movement coordination and vertical writing was investigated by a double blind trial method and placebo. The results confirm the possibility of the meprobamate application for prophylaxis and correction of vestibular disturbances.

  5. Vestibular influences on autonomic cardiovascular control in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biaggioni, I.; Costa, F.; Kaufmann, H.; Robertson, D. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    There is substantial evidence that anatomical connections exist between vestibular and autonomic nuclei. Animal studies have shown functional interactions between the vestibular and autonomic systems. The nature of these interactions, however, is complex and has not been fully defined. Vestibular stimulation has been consistently found to reduce blood pressure in animals. Given the potential interaction between vestibular and autonomic pathways this finding could be explained by a reduction in sympathetic activity. However, rather than sympathetic inhibition, vestibular stimulation has consistently been shown to increase sympathetic outflow in cardiac and splanchnic vascular beds in most experimental models. Several clinical observations suggest that a link between vestibular and autonomic systems may also exist in humans. However, direct evidence for vestibular/autonomic interactions in humans is sparse. Motion sickness has been found to induce forearm vasodilation and reduce baroreflex gain, and head down neck flexion induces transient forearm and calf vasoconstriction. On the other hand, studies using optokinetic stimulation have found either very small, variable, or inconsistent changes in heart rate and blood pressure, despite substantial symptoms of motion sickness. Furthermore, caloric stimulation severe enough to produce nystagmus, dizziness, and nausea had no effect on sympathetic nerve activity measured directly with microneurography. No effect was observed on heart rate, blood pressure, or plasma norepinephrine. Several factors may explain the apparent discordance of these results, but more research is needed before we can define the potential importance of vestibular input to cardiovascular regulation and orthostatic tolerance in humans.

  6. Sensory processing in the vestibular nuclei during active head movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gdowski, G. T.; Boyle, R.; McCrea, R. A.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    2000-01-01

    Many secondary vestibular neurons are sensitive to head on trunk rotation during reflex-induced and voluntary head movements. During passive whole body rotation the interaction of head on trunk signals related to the vestibulo-collic reflex with vestibular signals increases the rotational gain of many secondary vestibular neurons, including many that project to the spinal cord. In some units, the sensitivity to head on trunk and vestibular input is matched and the resulting interaction produces an output that is related to the trunk velocity in space. In other units the head on trunk inputs are stronger and the resulting interaction produces an output that is larger during the reflex. During voluntary head movements, inputs related to head on trunk movement combine destructively with vestibular signals, and often cancel the sensory reafferent consequences of self-generated movements. Cancellation of sensory vestibular signals was observed in all of the antidromically identified secondary vestibulospinal units, even though many of these units were not significantly affected by reflexive head on trunk movements. The results imply that the inputs to vestibular neurons related to head on trunk rotation during reflexive and voluntary movements arise from different sources. We suggest that the relative strength of reflexive head on trunk input to different vestibular neurons might reflect the different functional roles they have in controlling the posture of the neck and body.

  7. Vestibular receptors contribute to cortical auditory evoked potentials.

    PubMed

    Todd, Neil P M; Paillard, Aurore C; Kluk, Karolina; Whittle, Elizabeth; Colebatch, James G

    2014-03-01

    Acoustic sensitivity of the vestibular apparatus is well-established, but the contribution of vestibular receptors to the late auditory evoked potentials of cortical origin is unknown. Evoked potentials from 500 Hz tone pips were recorded using 70 channel EEG at several intensities below and above the vestibular acoustic threshold, as determined by vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). In healthy subjects both auditory mid- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials (AEPs), consisting of Na, Pa, N1 and P2 waves, were observed in the sub-threshold conditions. However, in passing through the vestibular threshold, systematic changes were observed in the morphology of the potentials and in the intensity dependence of their amplitude and latency. These changes were absent in a patient without functioning vestibular receptors. In particular, for the healthy subjects there was a fronto-central negativity, which appeared at about 42 ms, referred to as an N42, prior to the AEP N1. Source analysis of both the N42 and N1 indicated involvement of cingulate cortex, as well as bilateral superior temporal cortex. Our findings are best explained by vestibular receptors contributing to what were hitherto considered as purely auditory evoked potentials and in addition tentatively identify a new component that appears to be primarily of vestibular origin. Copyright © 2013 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Internal Models, Vestibular Cognition, and Mental Imagery: Conceptual Considerations.

    PubMed

    Mast, Fred W; Ellis, Andrew W

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular cognition has recently gained attention. Despite numerous experimental and clinical demonstrations, it is not yet clear what vestibular cognition really is. For future research in vestibular cognition, adopting a computational approach will make it easier to explore the underlying mechanisms. Indeed, most modeling approaches in vestibular science include a top-down or a priori component. We review recent Bayesian optimal observer models, and discuss in detail the conceptual value of prior assumptions, likelihood and posterior estimates for research in vestibular cognition. We then consider forward models in vestibular processing, which are required in order to distinguish between sensory input that is induced by active self-motion, and sensory input that is due to passive self-motion. We suggest that forward models are used not only in the service of estimating sensory states but they can also be drawn upon in an offline mode (e.g., spatial perspective transformations), in which interaction with sensory input is not desired. A computational approach to vestibular cognition will help to discover connections across studies, and it will provide a more coherent framework for investigating vestibular cognition.

  9. Vestibular morphology in the German Waltzing guinea pig.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Sachie; Hultcrantz, Malou; Jin, Zhe; Ulfendahl, Mats; Suzuki, Mamoru

    2010-04-01

    The German waltzing guinea pig is a special strain of animal with a recessively inherited inner ear defect, resulting in deafness and a severe vestibular dysfunction. The hearing loss in the cochlea of the German strain is a result of a collapse of the Reissner membrane and the absence of scala media. The vestibular organ has not yet been described. German waltzing guinea pigs (homozygote and heterozygote) of different ages ranging from embryologic age 25 days to adulthood were investigated. The living animals were tested with four different vestibular tests, and the fetuses were controlled according to breeding. The morphology of the vestibular parts (ampulla, saccule, and utricle) was observed by using the light and transmission electron microscopy. Collapse of the membranous labyrinth was found already at embryologic age 50 days and progressed over time. Vestibular dysfunction was noted already from birth. Vestibular atelectasis has been shown to have the same morphology as the reported vestibular dysfunction in the German waltzing guinea pig. Owing to this similarity, this animal can be a good model for vestibular research.

  10. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields.

  11. Acute Unilateral Vestibular Failure Does Not Cause Spatial Hemineglect

    PubMed Central

    Conrad, Julian; Habs, Maximilian; Brandt, Thomas; Dieterich, Marianne

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Visuo-spatial neglect and vestibular disorders have common clinical findings and involve the same cortical areas. We questioned (1) whether visuo-spatial hemineglect is not only a disorder of spatial attention but may also reflect a disorder of higher cortical vestibular function and (2) whether a vestibular tone imbalance due to an acute peripheral dysfunction can also cause symptoms of neglect or extinction. Therefore, patients with an acute unilateral peripheral vestibular failure (VF) were tested for symptoms of hemineglect. Methods Twenty-eight patients with acute VF were assessed for signs of vestibular deficits and spatial neglect using clinical measures and various common standardized paper-pencil tests. Neglect severity was evaluated further with the Center of Cancellation method. Pathological neglect test scores were correlated with the degree of vestibular dysfunction determined by the subjective visual vertical and caloric testing. Results Three patients showed isolated pathological scores in one or the other neglect test, either ipsilesionally or contralesionally to the VF. None of the patients fulfilled the diagnostic criteria of spatial hemineglect or extinction. Conclusions A vestibular tone imbalance due to unilateral failure of the vestibular endorgan does not cause spatial hemineglect, but evidence indicates it causes mild attentional deficits in both visual hemifields. PMID:26247469

  12. Increased independence and decreased vertigo after vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Helen S; Kimball, Kay T

    2003-01-01

    We sought to determine the effectiveness in decreasing some symptoms, such as vertigo, and increasing performance of daily life skills after vestibular rehabilitation. Patients who had chronic vertigo due to peripheral vestibular impairments were seen at a tertiary care center. They were referred for vestibular rehabilitation and were assessed on vertigo intensity and frequency with the use of the Vertigo Symptom Scale, the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire, the Vestibular Disorders Activities of Daily Living Scale, and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory. They were then randomly assigned to 1 of 3 home program treatment groups. Vertigo decreased and independence in activities of daily living improved significantly. Improvement was not affected by age, gender, or history of vertigo. For many patients a simple home program of vestibular habituation head movement exercises is related to reduction in symptoms and increasing independence in activities of daily living.

  13. Regeneration of hair cells in the mammalian vestibular system.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenyan; You, Dan; Chen, Yan; Chai, Renjie; Li, Huawei

    2016-06-01

    Hair cells regenerate throughout the lifetime of non-mammalian vertebrates, allowing these animals to recover from hearing and balance deficits. Such regeneration does not occur efficiently in humans and other mammals. Thus, balance deficits become permanent and is a common sensory disorder all over the world. Since Forge and Warchol discovered the limited spontaneous regeneration of vestibular hair cells after gentamicininduced damage in mature mammals, significant efforts have been exerted to trace the origin of the limited vestibular regeneration in mammals after hair cell loss. Moreover, recently many strategies have been developed to promote the hair cell regeneration and subsequent functional recovery of the vestibular system, including manipulating the Wnt, Notch and Atoh1. This article provides an overview of the recent advances in hair cell regeneration in mammalian vestibular epithelia. Furthermore, this review highlights the current limitations of hair cell regeneration and provides the possible solutions to regenerate functional hair cells and to partially restore vestibular function.

  14. Development and regeneration of vestibular hair cells in mammals.

    PubMed

    Burns, Joseph C; Stone, Jennifer S

    2017-05-01

    Vestibular sensation is essential for gaze stabilization, balance, and perception of gravity. The vestibular receptors in mammals, Type I and Type II hair cells, are located in five small organs in the inner ear. Damage to hair cells and their innervating neurons can cause crippling symptoms such as vertigo, visual field oscillation, and imbalance. In adult rodents, some Type II hair cells are regenerated and become re-innervated after damage, presenting opportunities for restoring vestibular function after hair cell damage. This article reviews features of vestibular sensory cells in mammals, including their basic properties, how they develop, and how they are replaced after damage. We discuss molecules that control vestibular hair cell regeneration and highlight areas in which our understanding of development and regeneration needs to be deepened. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Evaluation of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kofman, I. S.; Warren, E.; DeSoto, R.; Moroney, G.; Chastain, J.; De Dios, Y. E.; Gadd, N.; Taylor, L.; Peters, B. T.; Allen, E.; hide

    2017-01-01

    Microgravity exposure results in an adaptive central reinterpretation of information from multiple sensory sources to produce a sensorimotor state appropriate for motor actions in this unique environment, but this new adaptive state is no longer appropriate for the 1-g gravitational environment on Earth. During these gravitational transitions, astronauts experience deficits in both perceptual and motor functions including impaired postural control, disruption in spatial orientation, impaired control of locomotion that include alterations in muscle activation variability, modified lower limb kinematics, alterations in head-trunk coordination as well as reduced dynamic visual acuity. Post-flight changes in postural and locomotor control might have adverse consequences if a rapid egress was required following a long-duration mission, where support personnel may not be available to aid crewmembers. The act of emergency egress includes, but is not limited to standing, walking, climbing a ladder, jumping down, monitoring displays, actuating discrete controls, operating auxiliary equipment, and communicating with Mission Control and recovery teams while maintaining spatial orientation, mobility and postural stability in order to escape safely. The average time to recover impaired postural control and functional mobility to preflight levels of performance has been shown to be approximately two weeks after long-duration spaceflight. The postflight alterations are due in part to central reinterpretation of vestibular information caused by exposure to microgravity. In this study we will use a commonly used technique of transcutaneous electrical stimulation applied across the vestibular end organs (galvanic vestibular stimulation, GVS) to disrupt vestibular function as a simulation of post-flight disturbances. The goal of this project is an engineering human-in-the-loop evaluation of a device that can degrade performance of functional tasks (e.g. to maintain upright balance

  16. Oculo-vestibular recoupling using galvanic vestibular stimulation to mitigate simulator sickness.

    PubMed

    Cevette, Michael J; Stepanek, Jan; Cocco, Daniela; Galea, Anna M; Pradhan, Gaurav N; Wagner, Linsey S; Oakley, Sarah R; Smith, Benn E; Zapala, David A; Brookler, Kenneth H

    2012-06-01

    Despite improvement in the computational capabilities of visual displays in flight simulators, intersensory visual-vestibular conflict remains the leading cause of simulator sickness (SS). By using galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS), the vestibular system can be synchronized with a moving visual field in order to lessen the mismatch of sensory inputs thought to result in SS. A multisite electrode array was used to deliver combinations of GVS in 21 normal subjects. Optimal electrode combinations were identified and used to establish GVS dose-response predictions for the perception of roll, pitch, and yaw. Based on these data, an algorithm was then implemented in flight simulator hardware in order to synchronize visual and GVS-induced vestibular sensations (oculo-vestibular-recoupled or OVR simulation). Subjects were then randomly exposed to flight simulation either with or without OVR simulation. A self-report SS checklist was administered to all subjects after each session. An overall SS score was calculated for each category of symptoms for both groups. The analysis of GVS stimulation data yielded six unique combinations of electrode positions inducing motion perceptions in the three rotational axes. This provided the algorithm used for OVR simulation. The overall SS scores for gastrointestinal, central, and peripheral categories were 17%, 22.4%, and 20% for the Control group and 6.3%, 20%, and 8% for the OVR group, respectively. When virtual head signals produced by GVS are synchronized to the speed and direction of a moving visual field, manifestations of induced SS in a cockpit flight simulator are significantly reduced.

  17. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and health-related quality of life in patients with vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Viciana, David; Lopez-Escamez, Jose A

    2010-08-01

    To evaluate the usefulness of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in subjects with vestibular neuritis (VN) and to determine the impact of the disease in health-related quality of life (HRQoL). Case series. Tertiary referral center. Fifty patients with VN (episode of sudden onset of prolonged vertigo [>24 h] associated with peripheral vestibular hypofunction, imbalance in absence of hearing loss, or other neurologic symptoms). VEMPs were measured in 41 patients by using an air-conducted 500 Hz tone burst. HRQoL was evaluated in all cases by the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short Form Health Survey (SF-36) and Dizziness Handicap Inventory Short Form (DHI-S) instruments, after the acute episode was resolved. Latencies P1 or N1 peaks, corrected amplitude or the absence of response, for VEMPs; scores obtained in SF-36 and DHI-S instruments. VEMPs showed abnormal results in 21 (51%) of 41 cases, with an increase in ipsilateral latencies for P1 and N1 peaks being the most common finding. Three patients (7%) had ipsilateral abnormal VEMP response with normal caloric response, indicating isolated involvement of inferior vestibular nerve. The total score obtained for the DHI-S was 14.76 +/- 11.07 (range, 0-34/40), suggesting a variable impact among patients with VN. For the SF-36, scores in men with VN were worse than their age-matched controls for all dimensions, except for mental health. However, women only showed lower scores for general health and social function. Abnormal VEMP responses demonstrate the involvement of the inferior vestibular nerve in half of the patients with VN. Moreover, VN has a moderate impact in HRQoL, and it is perceived more disabling by men than women.

  18. The role of the vestibular system in manual target localization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barry, Susan R.; Mueller, S. Alyssa

    1995-01-01

    Astronauts experience perceptual and sensory-motor disturbances during spaceflight and immediately after return to the 1-g environment of Earth. During spaceflight, sensory information from the eyes, limbs and vestibular organs is reinterpreted by the central nervous system so that astronauts can produce appropriate body movements in microgravity. Alterations in sensory-motor function may affect eye-head-hand coordination and, thus, the crewmember's ability to manually locate objects in extrapersonal space. Previous reports have demonstrated that crewmembers have difficulty in estimating joint and limb position and in pointing to memorized target positions on orbit and immediately postflight. One set of internal cues that may assist in the manual localization of objects is information from the vestibular system. This system contributes to our sense of the body's position in space by providing information on head position and movement and the orientation of the body with respect to gravity. Research on the vestibular system has concentrated on its role in oculo-motor control. Little is known about the role that vestibular information plays in manual motor control, such as reaching and pointing movements. Since central interpretation of vestibular information is altered in microgravity, it is important to determine its role in this process. This summer, we determined the importance of vestibular information in a subject's ability to point accurately toward a target in extrapersonal space. Subjects were passively rotated across the earth-vertical axis and then asked to point back to a previously-seen target. In the first paradigm, the subjects used both visual and vestibular cues for the pointing response, while, in the second paradigm, subjects used only vestibular information. Subjects were able to point with 85 percent accuracy to a target using vestibular information alone. We infer from this result that vestibular input plays a role in the spatial programming of

  19. Task-dependent vestibular feedback responses in reaching.

    PubMed

    Keyser, Johannes; Medendorp, W Pieter; Selen, Luc P J

    2017-07-01

    When reaching for an earth-fixed object during self-rotation, the motor system should appropriately integrate vestibular signals and sensory predictions to compensate for the intervening motion and its induced inertial forces. While it is well established that this integration occurs rapidly, it is unknown whether vestibular feedback is specifically processed dependent on the behavioral goal. Here, we studied whether vestibular signals evoke fixed responses with the aim to preserve the hand trajectory in space or are processed more flexibly, correcting trajectories only in task-relevant spatial dimensions. We used galvanic vestibular stimulation to perturb reaching movements toward a narrow or a wide target. Results show that the same vestibular stimulation led to smaller trajectory corrections to the wide than the narrow target. We interpret this reduced compensation as a task-dependent modulation of vestibular feedback responses, tuned to minimally intervene with the task-irrelevant dimension of the reach. These task-dependent vestibular feedback corrections are in accordance with a central prediction of optimal feedback control theory and mirror the sophistication seen in feedback responses to mechanical and visual perturbations of the upper limb. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Correcting limb movements for external perturbations is a hallmark of flexible sensorimotor behavior. While visual and mechanical perturbations are corrected in a task-dependent manner, it is unclear whether a vestibular perturbation, naturally arising when the body moves, is selectively processed in reach control. We show, using galvanic vestibular stimulation, that reach corrections to vestibular perturbations are task dependent, consistent with a prediction of optimal feedback control theory. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  20. Current evidence of peripheral vestibular symptoms secondary to otitis media.

    PubMed

    Monsanto, Rafael da Costa; Kasemodel, Ana Luiza Papi; Tomaz, Andreza; Paparella, Michael M; Penido, Norma de Oliveira

    2018-05-06

    The association between otitis media and vestibular symptoms has been hypothesized in the past. Thus, in this study, we aimed to critically analyze (based in a systematic review of the literature) whether patients who have otitis media are at greater risk of developing vestibular impairment or not. We performed a systematic review of the literature and identified potentially relevant articles reporting vestibular symptoms and results of vestibular function tests in patients with otitis media through searches of the PubMED, Web of Science, Scopus, and Google Scholar databases. The quality of the final set of records was assessed using the "Newcaste-Ottawa Scale". Of the 2334 records searched, 43 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria, and those included 2250 patients. The records comprised 20 longitudinal studies, 21 cross-sectional studies, and 2 case reports. Regarding the type of otitis media studied, 25 examined vestibular impairment in otitis media with effusion, 6 acute otitis media, and 12 chronic otitis media. Results of anamnesis, clinical exams, and several vestibular function tests are reported and critically discussed. Most studies evaluating the association between otitis media and vestibular symptoms have potential methodological flaws. Clinical evidence suggests that patients with otitis media have increased chances for having vestibular symptoms, delayed acquisition of developmental milestones, and abnormalities in several vestibular function tests as compared with controls. Future studies with rigorous methodology aiming to assess the clinical significance (and prognostic factors) of the association between otitis media and vestibular impairment are warranted. Key message Several studies demonstrated long-term sequelae secondary to otitis media. However, the evidence supporting those assumptions are based in low-quality evidence. Thus, better structured studies are warranted to better understand the clinical relevance of such association.

  1. Vestibular vertigo is associated with abnormal sleep duration.

    PubMed

    Albathi, Monirah; Agrawal, Yuri

    2017-01-01

    Several small studies in animals and humans have suggested a relationship between vestibular function and sleep. In this study, we evaluate the association between vestibular vertigo and sleep duration in a large, representative sample of US adults. We used data from the National Health Interview Survey, which administered a Balance Supplement in 2008 in a sample of 20,950 adult respondents. We evaluated the cross-sectional association between vestibular vertigo (based on a well-validated definition) and sleep duration (defined as short <6 hours, normal 6-8 hours, and long >8 hours). We performed multiple and multinomial logistic regression analyses to estimate the odds ratio and relative risk ratio (RRR) of impaired sleep duration compared to normal sleep duration associated with vestibular vertigo. Analyses were adjusted for demographic, lifestyle and health behavior characteristics as well as relevant comorbid conditions. Thirty percent of individuals with vestibular vertigo reported abnormal sleep duration (15.5% short duration and 14.8% long duration). In adjusted analyses, individuals with vestibular vertigo had a 1.75 (95% CI 1.45-2.11) RRR of having short sleep duration compared to individuals without vestibular vertigo, and a 1.55 (95% CI 1.26-1.91) RRR of having long sleep duration compared to individuals without vestibular vertigo. This study presents epidemiologic evidence to support the association between vestibular function and sleep duration. Individuals with vestibular vertigo had a higher RRR for abnormally short or long sleep duration. Further work is needed to evaluate the causal direction(s) of this association.

  2. Electric Current Transmission Through Tissues of the Vestibular Labyrinth of a Patient: Perfection of the Vestibular Implant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demkin, V. P.; Shchetinin, P. P.; Melnichuk, S. V.; Kingma, H.; Van de Berg, R.; Pleshkov, M. O.; Starkov, D. N.

    2018-03-01

    An electric model of current transmission through tissues of the vestibular labyrinth of a patient is suggested. To stimulate directly the vestibular nerve in surgical operation, terminations of the electrodes are implanted through the bone tissue of the labyrinth into the perilymph in the vicinity of the vestibular nerve. The biological tissue of the vestibular labyrinth surrounding the electrodes and having heterogeneous composition possesses conductive and dielectric properties. Thus, when a current pulse from the vestibular implant is applied to one of the electrodes, conductive disturbance currents may arise between the electrodes and the vestibular nerves that can significantly deteriorate the direct signal quality. To study such signals and to compensate for the conductive disturbance currents, an equivalent electric circuit with actual electric impedance properties of tissues of the vestibular system is suggested, and the time parameters of the conductive disturbance current transmission are calculated. It is demonstrated that these parameters can reach large values. The suggested electric model and the results of calculations can be used for perfection of the vestibular implant.

  3. Disability rank in vestibular older adults.

    PubMed

    Aratani, Mayra Cristina; Perracini, Monica Rodrigues; Caovilla, Heloísa Helena; Gazzola, Juliana Maria; Ganança, Mauricio Malavasi; Ganança, Fernando Freitas

    2011-01-01

    To analyze the hierarchical structure of activities of daily living (ADL) among vestibular older adults, according to its power to discriminate disability. An exploratory cross-sectional study was conducted comprising 235 elderly, aged 65 years and older, with chronic vestibular dysfunction. Functional capacity was assessed through the Brazilian version of OARS Multidimensional Functional Assessment Questionnaire which consists of 15 activities of daily living (ADL). The sample was classified in each ADL according to the difficulty level in performing the activity. A multiple correlation analysis technique and discriminant analysis was used to analyze the hierarchical structure of ADL. The sample consisted of 75.3% women, with an average age of 73.55±5.94 years. The ADL and their respective discrimination measurements were: getting into and out of bed (0.293); eating (0.129); combing hair (0.150); walking on flat surfaces (0.270); having a bath/shower (0.512); getting dressed (0.325); getting to the toilet in time (0.107); climbing stairs (0.338); taking medicines on time (0.035); walking close to home (0.529); shopping (0.503); preparing meals (0.398); cutting toenails (0.242); getting off buses (0.452); and cleaning the house (0.408). The tasks that reflect a higher demand upon the vestibular system were the most impaired, in the following order: walking close to home, having a bath/shower, shopping, getting off buses, cleaning the house, preparing meals, climbing stairs, getting dressed, getting into and out of bed, walking on flat surfaces, cutting toenails, combing hair, eating, getting to the toilet in time, taking medicines on time. © 2010 Japan Geriatrics Society.

  4. Vestibular Dysfunction after Subconcussive Head Impact

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lei; Kawata, Keisuke; Tierney, Ryan; Jeka, John J.

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Current thinking views mild head impact (i.e., subconcussion) as an underrecognized phenomenon that has the ability to cause significant current and future detrimental neurological effects. Repeated mild impacts to the head, however, often display no observable behavioral deficits based on standard clinical tests, which may lack sensitivity. The current study investigates the effects of subconcussive impacts from soccer heading with innovative measures of vestibular function and walking stability in a pre- 0–2 h, post- 24 h post-heading repeated measures design. The heading group (n = 10) executed 10 headers with soccer balls projected at a velocity of 25 mph (11.2 m/sec) over 10 min. Subjects were evaluated 24 h before, immediately after, and 24 h after soccer heading with: the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS); a walking stability task with visual feedback of trunk movement; and galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) while standing with eyes closed on foam. A control group (n = 10) followed the same protocol with no heading. The results showed significant decrease in trunk angle, leg angle gain, and center of mass gain relative to GVS for the heading group compared with controls. Medial-lateral trunk orientation displacement and velocity during treadmill walking increased immediately after mild head impact for the heading group compared with controls. Controls showed an improvement in mBESS scores over time, indicating a learning effect, which was not observed with the heading group. These results suggest that mild head impact leads to a transient dysfunction in vestibular processing, which deters walking stability during task performance. PMID:26885560

  5. Vestibular Dysfunction after Subconcussive Head Impact.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Sungjae; Ma, Lei; Kawata, Keisuke; Tierney, Ryan; Jeka, John J

    2017-01-01

    Current thinking views mild head impact (i.e., subconcussion) as an underrecognized phenomenon that has the ability to cause significant current and future detrimental neurological effects. Repeated mild impacts to the head, however, often display no observable behavioral deficits based on standard clinical tests, which may lack sensitivity. The current study investigates the effects of subconcussive impacts from soccer heading with innovative measures of vestibular function and walking stability in a pre- 0-2 h, post- 24 h post-heading repeated measures design. The heading group (n = 10) executed 10 headers with soccer balls projected at a velocity of 25 mph (11.2 m/sec) over 10 min. Subjects were evaluated 24 h before, immediately after, and 24 h after soccer heading with: the modified Balance Error Scoring System (mBESS); a walking stability task with visual feedback of trunk movement; and galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) while standing with eyes closed on foam. A control group (n = 10) followed the same protocol with no heading. The results showed significant decrease in trunk angle, leg angle gain, and center of mass gain relative to GVS for the heading group compared with controls. Medial-lateral trunk orientation displacement and velocity during treadmill walking increased immediately after mild head impact for the heading group compared with controls. Controls showed an improvement in mBESS scores over time, indicating a learning effect, which was not observed with the heading group. These results suggest that mild head impact leads to a transient dysfunction in vestibular processing, which deters walking stability during task performance.

  6. The NAS Computational Aerosciences Archive

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miceli, Kristina D.; Globus, Al; Lasinski, T. A. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    In order to further the state-of-the-art in computational aerosciences (CAS) technology, researchers must be able to gather and understand existing work in the field. One aspect of this information gathering is studying published work available in scientific journals and conference proceedings. However, current scientific publications are very limited in the type and amount of information that they can disseminate. Information is typically restricted to text, a few images, and a bibliography list. Additional information that might be useful to the researcher, such as additional visual results, referenced papers, and datasets, are not available. New forms of electronic publication, such as the World Wide Web (WWW), limit publication size only by available disk space and data transmission bandwidth, both of which are improving rapidly. The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Systems Division at NASA Ames Research Center is in the process of creating an archive of CAS information on the WWW. This archive will be based on the large amount of information produced by researchers associated with the NAS facility. The archive will contain technical summaries and reports of research performed on NAS supercomputers, visual results (images, animations, visualization system scripts), datasets, and any other supporting meta-information. This information will be available via the WWW through the NAS homepage, located at http://www.nas.nasa.gov/, fully indexed for searching. The main components of the archive are technical summaries and reports, visual results, and datasets. Technical summaries are gathered every year by researchers who have been allotted resources on NAS supercomputers. These summaries, together with supporting visual results and references, are browsable by interested researchers. Referenced papers made available by researchers can be accessed through hypertext links. Technical reports are in-depth accounts of tools and applications research projects

  7. NAS Panel faults export controls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katzoff, Judith A.

    A study prepared by a top-level panel says that current export controls on militarily sensitive U.S. technology may be “overcorrecting” previous weaknesses in that system, resulting in “a complex and confusing control system” that makes it more difficult for U.S. businesses to compete in international markets. Moreover, this control system has “an increasingly corrosive effect” on U.S. relations with allies. The panel recommended that the United States concentrate more effort on bringing about uniformity in the export control policies of countries belonging to the Coordinating Committee on Multilateral Export Controls (CoCom), i.e., most of the member nations in NATO (the North Atlantic Treaty Organization) and Japan.The 21-member panel was appointed by the Committee on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy (COSEPUP), a joint unit of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), the National Academy of Engineering (NAE), and the Institute of Medicine (IOM). The panel, composed of administrators, researchers, and former government officials, was chaired by AGU member Lew Allen, Jr., director of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (Pasadena, Calif.) and former chief of staff of the U.S. Air Force. Their report was supported by NAS funds, by a number of private organizations (including AGU), by the U.S. Departments of Commerce, Defense, Energy, and State, by the National Science Foundation, and by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration.

  8. Model-based Vestibular Afferent Stimulation: Modular Workflow for Analyzing Stimulation Scenarios in Patient Specific and Statistical Vestibular Anatomy.

    PubMed

    Handler, Michael; Schier, Peter P; Fritscher, Karl D; Raudaschl, Patrik; Johnson Chacko, Lejo; Glueckert, Rudolf; Saba, Rami; Schubert, Rainer; Baumgarten, Daniel; Baumgartner, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Our sense of balance and spatial orientation strongly depends on the correct functionality of our vestibular system. Vestibular dysfunction can lead to blurred vision and impaired balance and spatial orientation, causing a significant decrease in quality of life. Recent studies have shown that vestibular implants offer a possible treatment for patients with vestibular dysfunction. The close proximity of the vestibular nerve bundles, the facial nerve and the cochlear nerve poses a major challenge to targeted stimulation of the vestibular system. Modeling the electrical stimulation of the vestibular system allows for an efficient analysis of stimulation scenarios previous to time and cost intensive in vivo experiments. Current models are based on animal data or CAD models of human anatomy. In this work, a (semi-)automatic modular workflow is presented for the stepwise transformation of segmented vestibular anatomy data of human vestibular specimens to an electrical model and subsequently analyzed. The steps of this workflow include (i) the transformation of labeled datasets to a tetrahedra mesh, (ii) nerve fiber anisotropy and fiber computation as a basis for neuron models, (iii) inclusion of arbitrary electrode designs, (iv) simulation of quasistationary potential distributions, and (v) analysis of stimulus waveforms on the stimulation outcome. Results obtained by the workflow based on human datasets and the average shape of a statistical model revealed a high qualitative agreement and a quantitatively comparable range compared to data from literature, respectively. Based on our workflow, a detailed analysis of intra- and extra-labyrinthine electrode configurations with various stimulation waveforms and electrode designs can be performed on patient specific anatomy, making this framework a valuable tool for current optimization questions concerning vestibular implants in humans.

  9. Altered vestibular function in fetal and newborn rats gestated in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ronca, A. E.; Alberts, J. R.

    1997-01-01

    Researchers evaluated vestibular development and function in rat pups flown during gestation on the NASA-NIH R1 and R2 missions. Fetal and postnatal vestibular function were examined. Altered vestibular-mediated responses in the experimental fetal pups are attributed to either direct effect of gravity on the vestibular system or indirect effects of microgravity transduced through the mother. The postnatal tests confirmed the hypothesis that the vestibular system continually adapts and responds to tonic stimulation.

  10. Vestibular thalamus: Two distinct graviceptive pathways.

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Conrad, Julian; Stephan, Thomas; Kirsch, Valerie; Vogt, Thomas; Wilting, Janine; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-01-12

    To determine whether there are distinct thalamic regions statistically associated with either contraversive or ipsiversive disturbance of verticality perception measured by subjective visual vertical (SVV). We used modern statistical lesion behavior mapping on a sample of 37 stroke patients with isolated thalamic lesions to clarify which thalamic regions are involved in graviceptive otolith processing and whether there are distinct regions associated with contraversive or ipsiversive SVV deviation. We found 2 distinct systems of graviceptive processing within the thalamus. Contraversive tilt of SVV was associated with lesions to the nuclei dorsomedialis, intralamellaris, centrales thalami, posterior thalami, ventrooralis internus, ventrointermedii, ventrocaudales and superior parts of the nuclei parafascicularis thalami. The regions associated with ipsiversive tilt of SVV were located in more inferior regions, involving structures such as the nuclei endymalis thalami, inferior parts of the nuclei parafascicularis thalami, and also small parts of the junction zone of the nuclei ruber tegmenti and brachium conjunctivum. Our data indicate that there are 2 anatomically distinct graviceptive signal processing mechanisms within the vestibular network in humans that lead, when damaged, to a vestibular tone imbalance either to the contraversive or to the ipsiversive side. © 2015 American Academy of Neurology.

  11. Recent surgical options for vestibular vertigo

    PubMed Central

    Volkenstein, Stefan; Dazert, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    Vertigo is not a well-defined disease but a symptom that can occur in heterogeneous entities diagnosed and treated mainly by otolaryngologists, neurologists, internal medicine, and primary care physicians. Most vertigo syndromes have a good prognosis and management is predominantly conservative, whereas the need for surgical therapy is rare, but for a subset of patients often the only remaining option. In this paper, we describe and discuss different surgical therapy options for hydropic inner ear diseases, Menière’s disease, dehiscence syndromes, perilymph fistulas, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. At the end, we shortly introduce the most recent developments in regard to vestibular implants. Surgical therapy is still indicated for vestibular disease in selected patients nowadays when conservative options did not reduce symptoms and patients are still suffering. Success depends on the correct diagnosis and choosing among different procedures the ones going along with an adequate patient selection. With regard to the invasiveness and the possible risks due to surgery, in depth individual counseling is absolutely necessary. Ablative and destructive surgical procedures usually achieve a successful vertigo control, but are associated with a high risk for hearing loss. Therefore, residual hearing has to be included in the decision making process for surgical therapy. PMID:29279721

  12. Galvanic vestibular stimulation speeds visual memory recall.

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, David; Nicholls, Sophie; Pattenden, Charlotte; Kilduff, Patrick; Milberg, William

    2008-08-01

    The experiments of Alessandro Volta were amongst the first to indicate that visuo-spatial function can be altered by stimulating the vestibular nerves with galvanic current. Until recently, the beneficial effects of the procedure were masked by the high levels of electrical current applied, which induced nystagmus-related gaze deviation and spatial disorientation. However, several neuropsychological studies have shown that much weaker, imperceptible currents that do not elicit unpleasant side-effects can help overcome visual loss after stroke. Here, we show that visual processing in neurologically healthy individuals can also benefit from galvanic vestibular stimulation. Participants first learnt the names of eight unfamiliar faces and then after a short delay, answered questions from memory about how pairs of these faces differed. Mean correct reaction times were significantly shorter when sub-sensory, noise-enhanced anodal stimulation was administered to the left mastoid, compared to when no stimulation was administered at all. This advantage occurred with no loss in response accuracy, and raises the possibility that the procedure may constitute a more general form of cognitive enhancement.

  13. Clinical applications of correlational vestibular autorotation test.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Te-Ming; Chang, Yu-Min; Kuo, Terry B J; Lee, Gho-She

    2015-06-01

    The correlational vestibular autorotation test (VAT) system has the advantages of good test-retest reliability and calibrations of absolute degrees of eye movement are unnecessary when acquiring a cross correlation coefficient (CCC). The approach is able to efficiently detect peripheral vestibulopathies. A VAT has some drawbacks including poor test-retest reliability and slippage of sensor. This study aimed to develop a correlational VAT system and to evaluate the reliability and applicability of this system. Twenty healthy participants and 10 vertiginous patients were enrolled. Vertical and horizontal autorotations from 0 to 3 Hz with either closed or open eyes were performed. A small sensor and a wireless transmission technique were used to acquire the electro-ocular graph and head velocity signals. The two signals were analyzed using CCCs to assess the functioning of the vestibular ocular reflex (VOR). The results showed a significantly greater CCC for open-eye versus closed-eye of head autorotations. The CCCs also increased significantly with head rotational frequencies. Moreover, the CCCs significantly correlated with the VOR gains at autorotation frequencies ≥1.0 Hz. The test-retest reliability was good (intraclass correlation coefficients ≥0.85). The vertiginous participants had significantly lower individual CCCs and overall average CCC than age- and-gender matched controls.

  14. Modelling the vestibular head tilt response.

    PubMed

    Heibert, D; Lithgow, B

    2005-03-01

    This paper attempts to verify the existence of potentially diagnostically significant periodic signals thought to exist in recordings of neural activity originating from the vestibular nerve, following a single tilt of the head. It then attempts to find the physiological basis of this signal, in particular focusing on the mechanical response of the vestibular system. Simple mechanical models of the semi circular canals having angular velocities applied to them were looked at. A simple single canal model was simulated using CFX software. Finally, a simple model of all three canals with elastic duct walls and a moving cupula was constructed. Pressure waves within the canals were simulated using water hammer or pressure transient theory. In particular, it was investigated whether pressure waves within the utricle following a square pulse angular velocity applied to the canal(s) may be responsible for quasi-periodic oscillatory signals. The simulations showed that there are no pressure waves resonating within the canals following a square pulse angular velocity applied to the canal(s). The results show that the oscillatory signals are most likely not mechanical in origin. It was concluded that further investigation is required.

  15. Treatment of peripheral vestibular dysfunction using photobiomodulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Min Young; Hyun, Jai-Hwan; Suh, Myung-Whan; Ahn, Jin-Chul; Chung, Phil-Sang; Jung, Jae Yun; Rhee, Chung Ku

    2017-08-01

    Gentamicin, which is still used in modern medicine, is a known vestibular toxic agent, and various degrees of balance problems have been observed after exposure to this pharmacologic agent. Photobiomodulation is a candidate therapy for vertigo due to its ability to reach deep inner ear organs such as the cochlea. Previous reports have suggested that photobiomodulation can improve hearing and cochlea function. However, few studies have examined the effect of photobiomodulation on balance dysfunction. We used a rat model to mimic human vestibulopathy resulting from gentamicin treatment and evaluated the effect of photobiomodulation on vestibular toxicity. Slow harmonic acceleration (SHA) rotating platform testing was used for functional evaluation and both qualitative and quantitative epifluorescence analyses of cupula histopathology were performed. Animals were divided into gentamicin only and gentamicin plus laser treatment groups. Laser treatment was applied to one ear, and function and histopathology were evaluated in both ears. Decreased function was observed in both ears after gentamicin treatment, demonstrated by low gain and no SHA asymmetry. Laser treatment minimized the damage resulting from gentamicin treatment as shown by SHA asymmetry and recovered gain in the treated ear. Histology results reflected the functional results, showing increased hair cell density and epifluorescence intensity in laser-treated cupulae.

  16. Responses evoked by a vestibular implant providing chronic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Lara A; Haburcakova, Csilla; Gong, Wangsong; Lee, Daniel J; Wall, Conrad; Merfeld, Daniel M; Lewis, Richard F

    2012-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss experience dehabilitating visual, perceptual, and postural difficulties, and an implantable vestibular prosthesis that could improve these symptoms would be of great benefit to these patients. In previous work, we have shown that a one-dimensional, unilateral canal prosthesis can improve the vestibulooccular reflex (VOR) in canal-plugged squirrel monkeys. In addition to the VOR, the potential effects of a vestibular prosthesis on more complex, highly integrative behaviors, such as the perception of head orientation and posture have remained unclear. We tested a one-dimensional, unilateral prosthesis in a rhesus monkey with bilateral vestibular loss and found that chronic electrical stimulation partially restored the compensatory VOR and also that percepts of head orientation relative to gravity were improved. However, the one-dimensional prosthetic stimulation had no clear effect on postural stability during quiet stance, but sway evoked by head-turns was modestly reduced. These results suggest that not only can the implementation of a vestibular prosthesis provide partial restitution of VOR but may also improve perception and posture in the presence of bilateral vestibular hypofunction (BVH). In this review, we provide an overview of our previous and current work directed towards the eventual clinical implementation of an implantable vestibular prosthesis.

  17. The clinical manifestations of vestibular migraine: A review.

    PubMed

    O'Connell Ferster, Ashley P; Priesol, Adrian J; Isildak, Huseyin

    2017-06-01

    To provide an overview of vestibular migraines presentation, pathology, and diagnosis, as well as an update on current diagnostic criteria. A review of the most recent literature on vestibular migraines was performed. Vestibular migraine is a process with significant impact on the quality of life for those afflicted with the disease, with attacks of spontaneous or positional vertigo and migraine symptoms lasting several minutes to 72h. Inner ear disease can co-exist with migraine and the vestibular symptoms occurring with vestibular migraine can mimic inner ear disorders providing a challenge for clinicians in establishing diagnosis. Recent diagnostic criteria for vestibular migraine proposed by a joint committee of the Bárány Society and the International Headache Society provide an important standard for clinical diagnosis and research endeavor. Vestibular migraine is a challenging disease process to both diagnose and treat. Proper diagnosis and treatment requires a thorough understanding of the current literature. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of vestibular functions in children with vertigo attacks

    PubMed Central

    Uneri, A; Turkdogan, D

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To examine vestibular system functions in children with episodic vertigo attacks. Methods: Thirty four children (20 males) aged 4–18 years with paroxysmal dizziness and/or vertigo attacks were evaluated. A medical history for vestibular symptoms and migraine was taken. Vestibular and auditory functions were assessed. Results: Chronic headache attacks consistent with migraine were reported in 12 children and motion sickness was reported in 30. Family history in first degree relatives was positive for migraine in 29 children and for episodic vertigo in 22. Electronystagmography and videonystagmography showed two types of nystagmus: spontaneous vestibular nystagmus (41%) and benign paroxysmal positional nystagmus (BPPN) (59%). The first type of nystagmus was assessed as a sign of vestibulopathy and the patients with BPPN were diagnosed as having benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV). Audiometric examination in four cases revealed bilateral sensory neural hearing loss in low frequencies. Pure tone averages in 30 cases were within normal ranges; however low frequencies in 28 of them were approximately 10 dB lower than high frequencies. Unilateral caloric responses diminished in eight children. Conclusions: Peripheral vestibular problems in childhood present in a wide spectrum, which varies from a short episode of dizziness to a typical vestibular attack with fluctuating sensory neural hearing loss or episodes of BPPV. A considerable number of these vestibular problems might be related to the migraine syndrome. PMID:12765917

  19. Adaptive plasticity in vestibular influences on cardiovascular control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, B. J.; Holmes, M. J.; Jian, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Data collected in both human subjects and animal models indicate that the vestibular system influences the control of blood pressure. In animals, peripheral vestibular lesions diminish the capacity to rapidly and accurately make cardiovascular adjustments to changes in posture. Thus, one role of vestibulo-cardiovascular influences is to elicit changes in blood distribution in the body so that stable blood pressure is maintained during movement. However, deficits in correcting blood pressure following vestibular lesions diminish over time, and are less severe when non-labyrinthine sensory cues regarding body position in space are provided. These observations show that pathways that mediate vestibulo-sympathetic reflexes can be subject to plastic changes. This review considers the adaptive plasticity in cardiovascular responses elicited by the central vestibular system. Recent data indicate that the posterior cerebellar vermis may play an important role in adaptation of these responses, such that ablation of the posterior vermis impairs recovery of orthostatic tolerance following subsequent vestibular lesions. Furthermore, recent experiments suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs to the central vestibular system may be important in controlling blood pressure during movement, particularly following vestibular dysfunction. A number of sensory inputs appear to be integrated to produce cardiovascular adjustments during changes in posture. Although loss of any one of these inputs does not induce lability in blood pressure, it is likely that maximal blood pressure stability is achieved by the integration of a variety of sensory cues signaling body position in space.

  20. Immediate postoperative nystagmus and vestibular symptoms after stapes surgery.

    PubMed

    Hirvonen, Timo P; Aalto, Heikki

    2013-08-01

    Vestibular disturbance is frequent, but mild even immediately after stapes surgery. Vestibular symptoms improved or disappeared quickly, and they did not correlate with nystagmus. Outpatient stapes surgery performed under local anaesthesia is a feasible approach. Vestibular symptoms are common and may prevent outpatient surgery. The time course of vestibular disturbance is unclear, and we aimed to evaluate it immediately after the operation in the recovery room. Twenty patients with otosclerosis undergoing stapedotomy were prospectively included in the study. Postoperative symptoms were collected and nystagmus was recorded with video-oculography (VOG) on average 29 min after the surgery. None of the patients had spontaneous nystagmus with gaze fixation. Nine patients (45%) had slow spontaneous horizontal nystagmus (mean slow phase velocity of 1.1°/s) in the primary position without gaze fixation. In seven of these, the nystagmus obeyed Alexander's law. Nine patients (45%) had vestibular symptoms at the end of the surgery, and four patients at the time of VOG recording. Vertigo was experienced immediately after the operation in five, floating sensation in two, and unspecific dizziness in two patients. Vestibular symptoms were mild or moderate in most patients. The occurrence of nystagmus did not correlate with vestibular symptoms (p > 0.05).

  1. Cognitive Rehabilitation in Bilateral Vestibular Patients: A Computational Perspective.

    PubMed

    Ellis, Andrew W; Schöne, Corina G; Vibert, Dominique; Caversaccio, Marco D; Mast, Fred W

    2018-01-01

    There is evidence that vestibular sensory processing affects, and is affected by, higher cognitive processes. This is highly relevant from a clinical perspective, where there is evidence for cognitive impairments in patients with peripheral vestibular deficits. The vestibular system performs complex probabilistic computations, and we claim that understanding these is important for investigating interactions between vestibular processing and cognition. Furthermore, this will aid our understanding of patients' self-motion perception and will provide useful information for clinical interventions. We propose that cognitive training is a promising way to alleviate the debilitating symptoms of patients with complete bilateral vestibular loss (BVP), who often fail to show improvement when relying solely on conventional treatment methods. We present a probabilistic model capable of processing vestibular sensory data during both passive and active self-motion. Crucially, in our model, knowledge from multiple sources, including higher-level cognition, can be used to predict head motion. This is the entry point for cognitive interventions. Despite the loss of sensory input, the processing circuitry in BVP patients is still intact, and they can still perceive self-motion when the movement is self-generated. We provide computer simulations illustrating self-motion perception of BVP patients. Cognitive training may lead to more accurate and confident predictions, which result in decreased weighting of sensory input, and thus improved self-motion perception. Using our model, we show the possible impact of cognitive interventions to help vestibular rehabilitation in patients with BVP.

  2. Diversity of vestibular nuclei neurons targeted by cerebellar nodulus inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Hui; Blázquez, Pablo M; Dickman, J David; Angelaki, Dora E

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A functional role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula (lobules X and IXc,d of the vermis) for vestibular processing has been strongly suggested by direct reciprocal connections with the vestibular nuclei, as well as direct vestibular afferent inputs as mossy fibres. Here we have explored the types of neurons in the macaque vestibular nuclei targeted by nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition using orthodromic identification from the caudal vermis. We found that all nodulus-target neurons are tuned to vestibular stimuli, and most are insensitive to eye movements. Such non-eye-movement neurons are thought to project to vestibulo-spinal and/or thalamo-cortical pathways. Less than 20% of nodulus-target neurons were sensitive to eye movements, suggesting that the caudal vermis can also directly influence vestibulo-ocular pathways. In general, response properties of nodulus-target neurons were diverse, spanning the whole continuum previously described in the vestibular nuclei. Most nodulus-target cells responded to both rotation and translation stimuli and only a few were selectively tuned to translation motion only. Other neurons were sensitive to net linear acceleration, similar to otolith afferents. These results demonstrate that, unlike the flocculus and ventral paraflocculus which target a particular cell group, nodulus/ventral uvula inhibition targets a large diversity of cell types in the vestibular nuclei, consistent with a broad functional significance contributing to vestibulo-ocular, vestibulo-thalamic and vestibulo-spinal pathways. PMID:24127616

  3. Vestibular rehabilitation therapy: review of indications, mechanisms, and key exercises.

    PubMed

    Han, Byung In; Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-12-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals.

  4. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns

    PubMed Central

    Bush, Matthew L.; Dougherty, William

    2015-01-01

    Objective Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Study Design Case-controlled cohort study Setting Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Main Outcome Measure Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. Results We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p=0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. Conclusions There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty. PMID:25700790

  5. Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy: Review of Indications, Mechanisms, and Key Exercises

    PubMed Central

    Song, Hyun Seok; Kim, Ji Soo

    2011-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) is an exercise-based treatment program designed to promote vestibular adaptation and substitution. The goals of VRT are 1) to enhance gaze stability, 2) to enhance postural stability, 3) to improve vertigo, and 4) to improve activities of daily living. VRT facilitates vestibular recovery mechanisms: vestibular adaptation, substitution by the other eye-movement systems, substitution by vision, somatosensory cues, other postural strategies, and habituation. The key exercises for VRT are head-eye movements with various body postures and activities, and maintaining balance with a reduced support base with various orientations of the head and trunk, while performing various upper-extremity tasks, repeating the movements provoking vertigo, and exposing patients gradually to various sensory and motor environments. VRT is indicated for any stable but poorly compensated vestibular lesion, regardless of the patient's age, the cause, and symptom duration and intensity. Vestibular suppressants, visual and somatosensory deprivation, immobilization, old age, concurrent central lesions, and long recovery from symptoms, but there is no difference in the final outcome. As long as exercises are performed several times every day, even brief periods of exercise are sufficient to facilitate vestibular recovery. Here the authors review the mechanisms and the key exercises for each of the VRT goals. PMID:22259614

  6. Assessment of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Training and Practice Patterns.

    PubMed

    Bush, Matthew L; Dougherty, William

    2015-08-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) can benefit patients with a variety of balance and vestibular disorders. This expanding field requires knowledgeable and experienced therapists; however, the practice and experience of those providing this care may vary greatly. The purpose of this study was to analyze variations in training and practice patterns among practicing vestibular rehabilitation therapists. Case-controlled cohort study. Investigation of outpatient physical therapy and audiology practices that offer vestibular rehabilitation conducted by a tertiary academic referral center. Questionnaire-based investigation of level of training in vestibular disorders and therapy, practice patterns of vestibular rehabilitation, and referral sources for VRT patients. We identified 27 subjects within the state of Kentucky who practice vestibular rehabilitation and the questionnaire response rate was 63%. Responses indicated that 53% of respondents had no training in VRT during their professional degree program. Attendance of a course requiring demonstration of competence and techniques was 24% of participants. The development of VRT certification was significantly more favored by those who attended such courses compared with those who did not (p = 0.01). 50% of therapists have direct access to patients without physician referrals. There is a wide range of educational background and training among those practicing VRT. This variability in experience may affect care provided within some communities. Certification is not necessary for the practice of VRT but the development of certification is favored among some therapists to improve standardization of practice of this important specialty.

  7. Postural compensation for vestibular loss and implications for rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Horak, Fay B

    2010-01-01

    This chapter summarizes the role of the vestibular system in postural control so that specific and effective rehabilitation can be designed that facilitates compensation for loss of vestibular function. Patients with bilateral or unilateral loss of peripheral vestibular function are exposed to surface perturbations to quantify automatic postural responses. Studies also evaluated the effects of audio- and vibrotactile-biofeedback to improve stability in stance and gait. The most important role of vestibular information for postural control is to control orientation of the head and trunk in space with respect to gravitoinertial forces, particularly when balancing on unstable surfaces. Vestibular sensory references are particularly important for postural control at high frequencies and velocities of self-motion, to reduce trunk drift and variability, to provide an external reference frame for the trunk and head in space; and to uncouple coordination of the trunk from the legs and the head-in-space from the body CoM. The goal of balance rehabilitation for patients with vestibular loss is to help patients 1) use remaining vestibular function, 2) depend upon surface somatosensory information as their primary postural sensory system, 3) learn to use stable visual references, and 4) identify efficient and effective postural movement strategies.

  8. Vestibular animal models: contributions to understanding physiology and disease.

    PubMed

    Straka, Hans; Zwergal, Andreas; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2016-04-01

    Our knowledge of the vestibular sensory system, its functional significance for gaze and posture stabilization, and its capability to ensure accurate spatial orientation perception and spatial navigation has greatly benefitted from experimental approaches using a variety of vertebrate species. This review summarizes the attempts to establish the roles of semicircular canal and otolith endorgans in these functions followed by an overview of the most relevant fields of vestibular research including major findings that have advanced our understanding of how this system exerts its influence on reflexive and cognitive challenges encountered during daily life. In particular, we highlight the contributions of different animal models and the advantage of using a comparative research approach. Cross-species comparisons have established that the morpho-physiological properties underlying vestibular signal processing are evolutionarily inherent, thereby disclosing general principles. Based on the documented success of this approach, we suggest that future research employing a balanced spectrum of standard animal models such as fish/frog, mouse and primate will optimize our progress in understanding vestibular processing in health and disease. Moreover, we propose that this should be further supplemented by research employing more "exotic" species that offer unique experimental access and/or have specific vestibular adaptations due to unusual locomotor capabilities or lifestyles. Taken together this strategy will expedite our understanding of the basic principles underlying vestibular computations to reveal relevant translational aspects. Accordingly, studies employing animal models are indispensible and even mandatory for the development of new treatments, medication and technical aids (implants) for patients with vestibular pathologies.

  9. UAS-NAS Stakeholder Feedback Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Randall, Debra; Murphy, Jim; Grindle, Laurie

    2016-01-01

    The need to fly UAS in the NAS to perform missions of vital importance to national security and defense, emergency management, science, and to enable commercial applications has been continually increasing over the past few years. To address this need, the NASA Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate (ARMD) Integrated Aviation Systems Program (IASP) formulated and funded the Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Integration in the National Airspace System (NAS) Project (hereafter referred to as UAS-NAS Project) from 2011 to 2016. The UAS-NAS Project identified the following need statement: The UAS community needs routine access to the global airspace for all classes of UAS. The Project identified the following goal: To provide research findings to reduce technical barriers associated with integrating UAS into the NAS utilizing integrated system level tests in a relevant environment. This report provides a summary of the collaborations between the UAS-NAS Project and its primary stakeholders and how the Project applied and incorporated the feedback.

  10. Improving Sensorimotor Function Using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during spaceflight, particularly during G-transition phases. Post flight sensorimotor changes may include postural and gait instability, spatial disorientation, and visual performance decrements, all of which can degrade operational capabilities of the astronauts and endanger the crew. Crewmember safety would be improved if these detrimental effects of spaceflight could be mitigated by a sensorimotor countermeasure and even further if adaptation to baseline could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate the potential use of stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a technology to improve sensorimotor function. We hypothesize that low levels of SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through stochastic resonance (SR). The SR phenomenon occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. Two studies have been initiated to investigate the beneficial effects and potential practical usage of SVS. In both studies, electrical vestibular stimulation is applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes using a constant current stimulator. The first study aims to determine the repeatability of the effect of vestibular stimulation on sensorimotor performance and perception in order to better understand the practical use of SVS. The beneficial effect of low levels of SVS on balance performance has been shown in the past. This research uses the same balance task repeated multiple times within a day and across days to study the repeatability of the stimulation effects. The balance test consists of 50 sec trials in which the subject stands with his or her feet together, arms crossed, and eyes closed on compliant foam. Varying levels of SVS, ranging from 0-700 micro A, are applied across different trials. The subject-specific optimal SVS level is that which results in the best balance performance as measured by inertial

  11. Greenhouse policy study from NAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggs, William Ward

    The National Academy of Sciences will produce a study for the Environmental Protection Agency on policy responses to global warming. The report is due out before the end of 1990.Dan J. Evans, former U.S. Senator and former Governor of Washington, will chair a panel of the Commission on Science, Engineering, and Public Policy, a body of the councils of the NAS, National Academy of Engineering, and Institute of Medicine. Evans is a registered civil engineer and previously chaired the Pacific Northwest Electric Power and Conservation Planning Council.The 13-person panel includes AGU members Stephen Schneider of the National Center for Atmospheric Research and Robert Frosch, Vice President of Research Laboratores at General Motors Corp., Jessica Mathews, Vice President of the World Resources Institute, and Sir Crispin Tickell, the United Kingdom's Ambassador to the United Nations.

  12. Supercomputing 2002: NAS Demo Abstracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, John (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The hyperwall is a new concept in visual supercomputing, conceived and developed by the NAS Exploratory Computing Group. The hyperwall will allow simultaneous and coordinated visualization and interaction of an array of processes, such as a the computations of a parameter study or the parallel evolutions of a genetic algorithm population. Making over 65 million pixels available to the user, the hyperwall will enable and elicit qualitatively new ways of leveraging computers to accomplish science. It is currently still unclear whether we will be able to transport the hyperwall to SC02. The crucial display frame still has not been completed by the metal fabrication shop, although they promised an August delivery. Also, we are still working the fragile node issue, which may require transplantation of the compute nodes from the present 2U cases into 3U cases. This modification will increase the present 3-rack configuration to 5 racks.

  13. The Development of the Vestibular Apparatus Under Conditions of Weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vinnikov, Y. A.; Gazenko, O. G.; Lychakov, D. V.; Palmbakh, L. R.

    1984-01-01

    A series of experiments has been carried out on the effect of space flight conditions on morphogenesis and the structure of the vestibular apparatus in amphibian and fish larvae. Larval development proceeded in weightlessness without serious morphological defects. The vestibular apparatus developed; its organization in the experimental animals did not differ qualitatively from that in the controls. The specific external stimulus (gravitation) appears not to be a necessary condition for the development of a gravitation receptor in ontogenesis although the appearance of the vestibular apparatus in phylogenesis was apparently related to this stimulus.

  14. Fluoxetine for vestibular dysfunction and anxiety: a prospective pilot study.

    PubMed

    Simon, Naomi M; Parker, Stephen W; Wernick-Robinson, Mara; Oppenheimer, Julia E; Hoge, Elizabeth A; Worthington, John J; Korbly, Nicole B; Pollack, Mark H

    2005-01-01

    Anxiety states and disorders amplify the symptoms and impairment associated with vestibular dysfunction. Five patients with inner ear vestibular dysfunction and anxiety were prospectively treated with fluoxetine, 20-60 mg/day, and received an extensive battery of assessments at baseline and after 12 weeks of treatment. Fluoxetine led to significant or near significant reductions in anxiety measures and in impairment due to dizziness; improvements in clinical balance function and vestibular function were less clear. The data add to the literature suggesting a role for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in the treatment of dizziness and anxiety.

  15. Outcomes after vestibular rehabilitation and Wii® therapy in patients with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction.

    PubMed

    Verdecchia, Daniel H; Mendoza, Marcela; Sanguineti, Florencia; Binetti, Ana C

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular rehabilitation therapy is an exercise-based programme designed to promote central nervous system compensation for inner ear deficit. The objective of the present study was to analyse the differences in the perception of handicap, the risk of falls, and gaze stability in patients diagnosed with chronic unilateral vestibular hypofunction before and after vestibular rehabilitation treatment with complementary Wii® therapy. A review was performed on the clinical histories of patients in the vestibular rehabilitation area of a university hospital between April 2009 and May 2011. The variables studied were the Dizziness Handicap Inventory, the Dynamic Gait Index and dynamic visual acuity. All subjects received complementary Wii® therapy. There were 69 cases (41 woman and 28 men), with a median age of 64 years. The initial median Dizziness Handicap Inventory score was 40 points (range 0-84, percentile 25-75=20-59) and the final, 24 points (range 0-76, percentile 25-75=10.40), P<.0001. The initial median for the Dynamic Gait Index score was 21 points (range 8-24, percentile 25-75=17.5-2.3) and the final, 23 (range 12-24, percentile 25-75=21-23), P<.0001. The initial median for dynamic visual acuity was 2 (range 0-6, percentile 25-75=1-4) and the final, 1 (range 0-3, percentile 25-75=0-2), P<.0001. A reduction was observed in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory Values. Values for the Dynamic Gait Index increased and dynamic visual acuity improved. All these variations were statistically significant. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Patología Cérvico-Facial. All rights reserved.

  16. Subclinical vestibular dysfunction in migraine patients: a preliminary study of ocular and rectified cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chul-Ho; Jang, Min-Uk; Choi, Hui-Chul; Sohn, Jong-Hee

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified various vestibular symptoms and laboratory abnormalities in migraineurs. Although the vestibular tests may be abnormal, the changes may exist without vestibular symptoms. To date, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) has been the easiest and simplest test for measuring vestibular function in clinical practice. Cervical VEMP (cVEMP) represents a vestibulo-collic reflex, whereas ocular VEMP (oVEMP) reflects a vestibulo-ocular pathway. Therefore, we determined whether ocular and rectified cervical VEMPs differed in patients with migraine or tension type headache (TTH) and compared the results to controls with no accompanying vestibular symptoms. The present study included 38 females with migraine without aura, 30 with episodic TTH, and 50 healthy controls without vestibular symptoms. oVEMP and cVEMP using a blood pressure manometer were recorded during a headache-free period. From the VEMP graphs, latency and amplitude parameters were analyzed, especially following EMG rectification in cVEMP. With respect to oVEMP, the migraine group exhibited significantly longer mean latencies of bilateral n1 and left p1 than the other groups (p < 0.05). Amplitudes of n1-p1 were lower than in other groups, but the difference did not reach statistical significance. In regards to cVEMP, p13 and n23 latencies and amplitudes after rectification did not differ significantly among groups. An abnormal interictal oVEMP profile was associated with subclinical vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs, suggesting pathology within the vestibulo-ocular reflex. oVEMP is a more reliable measure than cVEMP to evaluate vestibular function in migraineurs, although results from the two tests in patients with migraine are complementary.

  17. Optokinetic and Vestibular Responsiveness in the Macaque Rostral Vestibular and Fastigial Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Ayanna S.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2009-01-01

    We recorded from rostral vestibular (VN) and rostral fastigial nuclei (FN) neurons that did not respond to eye movements during three-dimensional (3D) vestibular and optokinetic stimulation (OKS). The majority of neurons in both areas (76 and 69% in VN and FN, respectively) responded during both rotational and translational motion. Preferred directions scattered throughout 3D space for translation but showed some preference for pitch/roll over yaw for rotation. VN/FN neurons were also tested during OKS while monkeys suppressed their optokinetic nystagmus by fixating a head-fixed target. Only a handful of cells (VN: 17%, FN: 6%) modulated during 0.5-Hz OKS suppression, but the number of responsive cells increased (VN: 40%, FN: 48%) during 0.02-Hz OKS. Preferred directions for rotation and OKS were not matched on individual neurons, and OKS gains were smaller than the respective gains during rotation. These results were generally similar for VN and FN neurons. We conclude that optokinetic-vestibular convergence might not be as prevalent as earlier studies have suggested. PMID:19073813

  18. Vestibular compensation after vestibular schwannoma surgery: normalization of the subjective visual vertical and disability.

    PubMed

    Batuecas-Caletrio, Angel; Santacruz-Ruiz, Santiago; Muñoz-Herrera, Angel; Sousa, Pablo; Otero, Alvaro; Perez-Fernandez, Nicolas

    2013-05-01

    The degree of caloric weakness before surgery influences faster or slower recovery of patients undergoing vestibular schwannoma surgery. The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) is a good index to show the recovery of patients as it relates directly to an improvement or not of the subjective visual vertical (SVV). To evaluate the process of recovery of patients as measured by the SVV and the DHI after surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma. We studied 24 consecutive patients of the University Hospital of Salamanca who underwent vestibular schwannoma surgery. We assessed age, tumour size, degree of canalicular weakness and preoperative SVV, and their relationship with DHI and SVV at discharge and also at 1, 3 and 6 months postoperatively. Patients with lesser degrees of caloric weakness took longer to normalize SVV than those with a higher caloric weakness before surgery (p < 0.05). There was a significant correlation between DHI and improvements in SVV with time. The differences disappeared in 6 months where all patients, with greater or lesser degree of caloric weakness, had the same results.

  19. Multisensory effects on somatosensation: a trimodal visuo-vestibular-tactile interaction

    PubMed Central

    Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Herbelin, Bruno; Blanke, Olaf; Haggard, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Vestibular information about self-motion is combined with other sensory signals. Previous research described both visuo-vestibular and vestibular-tactile bilateral interactions, but the simultaneous interaction between all three sensory modalities has not been explored. Here we exploit a previously reported visuo-vestibular integration to investigate multisensory effects on tactile sensitivity in humans. Tactile sensitivity was measured during passive whole body rotations alone or in conjunction with optic flow, creating either purely vestibular or visuo-vestibular sensations of self-motion. Our results demonstrate that tactile sensitivity is modulated by perceived self-motion, as provided by a combined visuo-vestibular percept, and not by the visual and vestibular cues independently. We propose a hierarchical multisensory interaction that underpins somatosensory modulation: visual and vestibular cues are first combined to produce a multisensory self-motion percept. Somatosensory processing is then enhanced according to the degree of perceived self-motion. PMID:27198907

  20. Surgical access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radkevich, L. A.; Ayzikov, G. S.

    1981-01-01

    A posteroventral approach for access to separate branches of the cat vestibular nerve is presented which permits simultaneous surgical access to the ampullary and otolithic nerves. Surgical procedures are discussed.

  1. Vestibular signals in primate cortex for self-motion perception.

    PubMed

    Gu, Yong

    2018-04-21

    The vestibular peripheral organs in our inner ears detect transient motion of the head in everyday life. This information is sent to the central nervous system for automatic processes such as vestibulo-ocular reflexes, balance and postural control, and higher cognitive functions including perception of self-motion and spatial orientation. Recent neurophysiological studies have discovered a prominent vestibular network in the primate cerebral cortex. Many of the areas involved are multisensory: their neurons are modulated by both vestibular signals and visual optic flow, potentially facilitating more robust heading estimation through cue integration. Combining psychophysics, computation, physiological recording and causal manipulation techniques, recent work has addressed both the encoding and decoding of vestibular signals for self-motion perception. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. [Anatomicopathological relation between facial nerve and large vestibular Schwannoma].

    PubMed

    Jiang, T; Yu, C; Guo, E; Guan, S; Yan, C

    2001-05-10

    To study the anatomicopathological relation between facial nerve and large vestibular schwannoma. Operation by suboccipital retrosigmoid sinus approach was performed on 40 cases with large vestibular schwannoma, During the operation, the anatomicopathological relation between the facial nerve and the vestibular schwannoma was observed directly. The facial nerve was found to be located ventrally (deep under the tumor), dorsally (over the tumor), at the upper pole of the tumor (near the tentorium cerebelli), at the lower pole of the tumor (near the rear group cranial nerves), or aberrant (unable to be identified because of infiltration of tumor). In 31 cases, mainly with parenchymatous tumor, the facial nerve was flat in shape. In 9 cases, mainly with cystic tumor, the facial nerve was bandlike. The facial nerve varies greatly in neuroanatomy among patients with large vestibular schwannoma. Strengthening of operative monitoring can increase the safety of operation.

  3. Certain aspects of the vestibular problem in space medicine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Vestibulovegetative disorders on manned space flights are discussed. A study relating to the vestibular stimuli in respiration, diaphoresis cardiac rhythm and a broad complex of hemodynamic indices was conducted. Certain tests for astronaut candidates are discussed.

  4. Vestibular rehabilitation: clinical benefits to patients with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Zeigelboim, Bianca Simone; Klagenberg, Karlin Fabianne; Teive, Hélio A Ghizoni; Munhoz, Renato Puppi; Martins-Bassetto, Jackeline

    2009-06-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the vestibular rehabilitation (VR) exercises by means of an assessment before and after the application of the Brazilian version of the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaire. Twelve patients were studied, the following procedures were carried out: anamnesis, otorhinolaryngological and vestibular evaluation, and the application of the DHI before and after the VR. Clinically resting tremors and subjective postural instability were the motor complaints most frequently associated with complaints of vertigo in 12 cases (100%); in the vestibular exam, all the patients presented abnormalities, frequently from the uni and bilateral peripheral vestibular deficiency syndromes in 10 cases (83.3%); there was significant improvement in the physical, functional and emotional aspects of the DHI after the completion of the VR. The VR following the Cawthorne and Cooksey protocol were shown to be useful in managing subjective complaints of several aspects evaluated in this protocol.

  5. Design and performance characteristics of a mechanically driven vestibular stimulator.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1964-01-01

    In order to determine basic response characteristics of mammalian vestibular systems, the sytems so important for spatial orientation, a device to provide programs of controlled angular accelerations about the vertical axis was required. The small ro...

  6. Effect of gravity on vestibular neural development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Tomko, D. L.

    1998-01-01

    The timing, molecular basis, and morphophysiological and behavioral consequences of the interaction between external environment and the internal genetic pool that shapes the nervous system over a lifetime remain important questions in basic neuroscientific research. Space station offers the opportunity to study this interaction over several life cycles in a variety of organisms. This short review considers past work in altered gravity, particularly on the vestibular system, as the basis for proposing future research on space station, and discusses the equipment necessary to achieve goals. It is stressed that, in keeping with the international investment being made in this research endeavor, both the questions asked and the technologies to be developed should be bold. Advantage must be taken of this unique research environment to expand the frontiers of neuroscience. Copyright 1998 Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  7. Vestibular ataxia and its measurement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fregly, A. R.

    1974-01-01

    Methods involved in and results obtained with a new comprehensive ataxia test battery are described, and definitions of spontaneous and induced vestibular ataxia in man are given in terms of these findings. In addition, the topic of alcohol-induced ataxia in relation to labyrinth function is investigated. Items in the test battery comprise a sharpened Romberg test, in which the subject stands on the floor with eyes closed and arms folded against his chest, feet heel-to-toe, for 60 seconds; an eyes-open walking test; an eyes-open standing test; an eyes-closed standing test; an eyes-closed on-leg standing test; an eyes-closed walk a line test; an eyes-closed heel-to-toe walking test; and supplementary ataxia tests such as the classical Romberg test.

  8. State Anxiety Subjective Imbalance and Handicap in Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Saman, Yougan; Mclellan, Lucie; Mckenna, Laurence; Dutia, Mayank B; Obholzer, Rupert; Libby, Gerald; Gleeson, Michael; Bamiou, Doris-Eva

    2016-01-01

    Evidence is emerging for a significant clinical and neuroanatomical relationship between balance and anxiety. Research has suggested a potentially priming effect with anxiety symptoms predicting a worsening of balance function in patients with underlying balance dysfunction. We propose to show that a vestibular stimulus is responsible for an increase in state anxiety, and there is a relationship between increased state anxiety and worsening balance function. (1) To quantify state anxiety following a vestibular stimulus in patients with a chronic vestibular deficit. (2) To determine if state anxiety during a vestibular stimulus would correlate with the severity of chronic balance symptoms and handicap. Two separate cohorts of vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients underwent vestibular tests (electronystagmography, cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, and caloric responses) and questionnaire assessments [vertigo handicap questionnaire (VHQ), vertigo symptom scale (VSS), and state-trait anxiety inventory (STAIY)]. Fifteen post-resection VS patients, with complete unilateral vestibular deafferentation, were assessed at a minimum of 6 months after surgery in Experiment 1 (Aim 1). Forty-five patients with VS in situ formed the cohort for Experiment 2 (Aim 2). Experiment 1: VS subjects (N = 15) with a complete post-resection unilateral vestibular deafferentation completed a state anxiety questionnaire before caloric assessment and again afterward with the point of maximal vertigo as the reference (Aim 1). Experiment 2: state anxiety measured at the point of maximal vertigo following a caloric assessment was compared between two groups of patients with VS in situ presenting with balance symptoms (Group 1, N = 26) and without balance symptoms (Group 2, N = 11) (Aim 2). The presence of balance symptoms was defined as having a positive score on the VSS-VER. In Experiment 1, a significant difference (p < 0.01) was found when comparing STAIY

  9. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dai, M.; Raphan, T.; Kozlovskaya, I.; Cohen, B.

    1998-01-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  10. Vestibular adaptation to space in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Dai, M; Raphan, T; Kozlovskaya, I; Cohen, B

    1998-07-01

    Otolith-induced eye movements of rhesus monkeys were studied before and after the 1989 COSMOS 2044 and the 1992 to 1993 COSMOS 2229 flights. Two animals flew in each mission for approximately 2 weeks. After flight, spatial orientation of the angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was altered. In one animal the time constant of postrotatory nystagmus, which had been shortened by head tilts with regard to gravity before flight, was unaffected by the same head tilts after flight. In another animal, eye velocity, which tended to align with a gravitational axis before flight, moved toward a body axis after flight. This shift of orientation disappeared by 7 days after landing. After flight, the magnitude of compensatory ocular counter-rolling was reduced by about 70% in both dynamic and static tilts. Modulation in vergence in response to naso-occipital linear acceleration during off-vertical axis rotation was reduced by more than 50%. These changes persisted for 11 days after recovery. An up and down asymmetry of vertical nystagmus was diminished for 7 days. Gains of the semicircular canal-induced horizontal and vertical angular vestibulo-ocular reflexes were unaffected in both flights, but the gain of the roll angular vestibulo-ocular reflex was decreased. These data indicate that there are short- and long-term changes in otolith-induced eye movements after adaptation to microgravity. These experiments also demonstrate the unique value of the monkey as a model for studying effects of vestibular adaptation in space. Eye movements can be measured in three dimensions in response to controlled vestibular and visual stimulation, and the results are directly applicable to human beings. Studies in monkeys to determine how otolith afferent input and central processing is altered by adaptation to microgravity should be an essential component of future space-related research.

  11. Timing of neuron development in the rodent vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keefe, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    The timing of cell generation (onset and duration) in the developing rat vestibular and proprioceptive systems is investigated. The results clearly indicate a defined time-span for generation of all neurons in the central nervous system nuclei studied. This cytogenetic period in both vestibular and proprioceptive sensory nuclei is determined to occur during and immediately after placentation, a potentially critical period for spaceflight exposure due to alterations in maternal physiology.

  12. Vestibular stimulation, spatial hemineglect and dysphasia, selective effects.

    PubMed

    Vallar, G; Papagno, C; Rusconi, M L; Bisiach, E

    1995-09-01

    The selectivity of the effects of vestibular stimulation was investigated in a left brain-damaged patient suffering from right visuo-spatial hemineglect and severe dysplasia. Vestibular stimulation temporarily improved the former but not the latter disorder. These results support the view that this treatment improves hemineglect by a specific effect, running counter the rightward distortion of egocentric co-ordinates, rather than by a general hemispheric activation.

  13. Diversity of head shaking nystagmus in peripheral vestibular disease.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Beom; Huh, Se Hyung; Ban, Jae Ho

    2012-06-01

    To evaluate the characteristics of head shaking nystagmus in various peripheral vestibular diseases. Retrospective case series. Tertiary referral center. Data of 235 patients with peripheral vestibular diseases including vestibular neuritis, Ménière's disease, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, were retrospectively analyzed. All subjects presented between August 2009 and July 2010. Patients were tested for vestibular function including head shaking nystagmus and caloric information. Regarding vestibular neuritis, all tests were again performed during the 1-month follow-up. Head shaking nystagmus was classified as monophasic or biphasic and, according to the affected ear, was divided as ipsilesional or contralesional. Of the 235 patients, 87 patients revealed positive head shaking nystagmus. According to each disease, positive rates of head shaking nystagmus were as follows: 35 (100%) of 35 cases of vestibular neuritis, 11 (68.8%) of 16 cases of Ménière's disease, and 41 (22.2%) of 184 cases of benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. All cases of vestibular neuritis initially presented as a monophasic, contralesional beating, head shaking nystagmus. However, 1 month after first visit, the direction of nystagmus was changed to biphasic (contralesional first then ipsilesional beating) in 25 cases (72.5%) but not in 10 cases (27.5%). There was a significant correlation between the degree of initial caloric weakness and the biphasic conversion of head shaking nystagmus (p = 0.02). In 72.5% of vestibular neuritis cases, head shaking nystagmus was converted to biphasic during the subacute period. The larger the initial canal paresis was present, the more frequent the biphasic conversion of head shaking nystagmus occurred. However, Ménière's disease and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo did not have specific patterns of head shaking nystagmus.

  14. Changes in the Vestibular System with Age: An Abstracted Bibliography,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-04-30

    group." COMMENT: Similar to other articles in this series, showing significant loss of afferents (and possibly efferents) in the vestibular nerve. k...marked dependence of postural stability on vision . In them, the disturbing optokinetic stimulus leads to a marked ipsilateral postural deviation or...SUBJECTS (Number-age): N/A EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES: Review FINDINGS: 1. No mention of vestibular functioning. 2. Review sections on vision , audition

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of the most frequent vestibular syndromes].

    PubMed

    Kanashiro, Aline Mizuta Kozoroski; Pereira, Cristiana Borges; Melo, Antonio Carlos de Paiva; Scaff, Milberto

    2005-03-01

    The aims of this study were to identify the most common vestibular syndromes in a dizziness unit, and to observe their clinical aspects and response to treatment. Five hundred and fifteen patients were studied retrospectively in two institutions. Aspects of anamnesis, physical examination and the response to treatment were evaluated. The most frequent syndromes were: benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (VPPB) (28.5%), phobic postural vertigo (11.5%), central vertigo (10.1%), vestibular neuritis (9.7%), Meniere disease (8.5%), and migraine (6.4%). A good response to treatment was observed in most patients with migraine (78.8%), VPPB (64%), vestibular neuritis (62%), Meniere disease (54.5%) and vestibular paroxismia (54.5%). On the other hand, patients with downbeat nystagmus and bilateral vestibulopathy had poor response (52.6% and 42.8%, respectively). The diagnosis of these most frequent vestibular syndromes were established through anamnesis and physical examination (with specific clinical tests for evaluation of the vestibular function). The correct diagnosis and adequate treatment are important since these syndromes may have a good prognosis.

  16. Patterning of sympathetic nerve activity in response to vestibular stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerman, I. A.; McAllen, R. M.; Yates, B. J.

    2000-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for the vestibular system in regulation of autonomic outflow during postural adjustments. In the present paper we review evidence for the patterning of sympathetic nerve activity elicited by vestibular stimulation. In response to electrical activation of vestibular afferents, firing of sympathetic nerves located throughout the body is altered. However, activity of the renal nerve is most sensitive to vestibular inputs. In contrast, high-intensity simultaneous activation of cutaneous and muscle inputs elicits equivalent changes in firing of the renal, superior mesenteric and lumbar colonic nerves. Responses of muscle vasoconstrictor (MVC) efferents to vestibular stimulation are either inhibitory (Type I) or are comprised of a combination of excitation and inhibition (Type II). Interestingly, single MVC units located in the hindlimb exhibited predominantly Type I responses while those located in the forelimb and face exhibited Type II responses. Furthermore, brachial and femoral arterial blood flows were dissociated in response to vestibular stimulation, such that brachial vascular resistance increased while femoral resistance decreased. These studies demonstrate that vestibulosympathetic reflexes are patterned according to both the anatomical location and innervation target of a particular sympathetic nerve, and can lead to distinct changes in local blood flow.

  17. Auditory and vestibular dysfunctions in systemic sclerosis: literature review.

    PubMed

    Rabelo, Maysa Bastos; Corona, Ana Paula

    2014-01-01

    To describe the prevalence of auditory and vestibular dysfunction in individuals with systemic sclerosis (SS) and the hypotheses to explain these changes. We performed a systematic review without meta-analysis from PubMed, LILACS, Web of Science, SciELO and SCOPUS databases, using a combination of keywords "systemic sclerosis AND balance OR vestibular" and "systemic sclerosis AND hearing OR auditory." We included articles published in Portuguese, Spanish, or English until December 2011 and reviews, letters, and editorials were excluded. We found 254 articles, out of which 10 were selected. The study design was described, and the characteristics and frequency of the auditory and vestibular dysfunctions in these individuals were listed. Afterwards, we investigated the hypothesis built by the authors to explain the auditory and vestibular dysfunctions in SS. Hearing loss was the most common finding, with prevalence ranging from 20 to 77%, being bilateral sensorineural the most frequent type. It is hypothesized that the hearing impairment in SS is due to vascular changes in the cochlea. The prevalence of vestibular disorders ranged from 11 to 63%, and the most frequent findings were changes in caloric testing, positional nystagmus, impaired oculocephalic response, changes in clinical tests of sensory interaction, and benign paroxysmal positional vertigo. High prevalence of auditory and vestibular dysfunctions in patients with SS was observed. Conducting further research can assist in early identification of these abnormalities, provide resources for professionals who work with these patients, and contribute to improving the quality of life of these individuals.

  18. Isolation and culture of adult mouse vestibular nucleus neurons

    PubMed

    Him, Aydın; Altuntaş, Serap; Öztürk, Gürkan; Erdoğan, Ender; Cengiz, Nureddin

    2017-12-19

    Background/aim: Isolated cell cultures are widely used to study neuronal properties due to their advantages. Although embryonic animals are preferred for culturing, their morphological or electrophysiological properties may not reflect adult neurons, which may be important in neurodegenerative diseases. This paper aims to develop a method for preparing isolated cell cultures of medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) from adult mice and describe its morphological and electrophysiological properties.Materials and methods: Vestibular nucleus neurons were mechanically and enzymatically isolated and cultured using a defined medium with known growth factors. Cell survival was measured with propidium iodide, and electrophysiological properties were investigated with current-clamp recording.Results: Vestibular neurons grew neurites in cultures, gaining adult-like morphological properties, and stayed viable for 3 days in culture. Adding bovine calf serum, nerve growth factor, or insulin-like growth factor into the culture medium enhanced neuronal viability. Current-clamp recording of the cultured neurons revealed tonic and phasic-type neurons with similar input resistance, resting membrane potential, action potential amplitude, and duration. Conclusion: Vestibular neurons from adult mice can be cultured, and regenerate axons in a medium containing appropriate growth factors. Culturing adult vestibular neurons provides a new method to study age-related pathologies of the vestibular system.

  19. NAS Decadal Review Town Hall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine is seeking community input for a study on the future of materials research (MR). Frontiers of Materials Research: A Decadal Survey will look at defining the frontiers of materials research ranging from traditional materials science and engineering to condensed matter physics. Please join members of the study committee for a town hall to discuss future directions for materials research in the United States in the context of worldwide efforts. In particular, input on the following topics will be of great value: progress, achievements, and principal changes in the R&D landscape over the past decade; identification of key MR areas that have major scientific gaps or offer promising investment opportunities from 2020-2030; and the challenges that MR may face over the next decade and how those challenges might be addressed. This study was requested by the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation. The National Academies will issue a report in 2018 that will offer guidance to federal agencies that support materials research, science policymakers, and researchers in materials research and other adjoining fields. Learn more about the study at http://nas.edu/materials.

  20. Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy: evaluation of the vestibular system with cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Iannella, Giannicola; Manno, Alessandra; Libonati, Laura; Onesti, Emanuela; Vestri, Annarita; Fegatelli, Danilo Alunni; Angeletti, Diletta; Pace, Annalisa; Gulotta, Giampiero; Gagliardi, Silvia; Inghilleri, Maurizio

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the possibility of vestibular damage in a group of patients suffering from chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP) using a diagnostic protocol including the caloric test, C-VEMPs and O-VEMPs. Twenty patients suffering from CIDP (mean age 58.5 years, range 33-80 years; 4 women and 16 men) were investigated. To assess any eventual audio-vestibular involvement, all patients of the study underwent pure tone audiometry, Fitzgerald-Hallpike caloric vestibular test, C-VEMPs and O-VEMPs. In 11 patients with CIDP values of both O-VEMPs and C-VEMPs were either absent or abnormal. An absent trace at O-VEMPs testing occurred in 36% of these pathological patients, whereas an increase of n10 latency and amplitude was present in the other 64% . A specific diagnostic protocol including the caloric test, C-VEMPS, O-VEMPS, could be useful when employed for identifying vestibular damage in CIDP patients.

  1. Preservation of auditory and vestibular function after surgical removal of bilateral vestibular schwannomas in a patient with neurofibromatosis type 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.; Brackmann, D. E.; Hitselberger, W. E.; Purdy, J.

    1995-01-01

    The outcome of acoustic neuroma (vestibular schwannoma) surgery continues to improve rapidly. Advances can be attributed to several fields, but the most important contributions have arisen from the identification of the genes responsible for the dominant inheritance of neurofibromatosis types 1 (NF1) and 2 (NF2) and the development of magnetic resonance imaging with gadolinium enhancement for the early anatomic confirmation of the pathognomonic, bilateral vestibular schwannomas in NF2. These advances enable early diagnosis and treatment when the tumors are small in virtually all subjects at risk for NF2. The authors suggest that advising young NF2 patients to wait until complications develop, especially hearing loss, before diagnosing and operating for bilateral eighth nerve schwannomas may not always be in the best interest of the patient. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first reported case of preservation of both auditory and vestibular function in a patient after bilateral vestibular schwannoma excision.

  2. Role of vestibular information in initiation of rapid postural responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Runge, C. F.; Shupert, C. L.; Horak, F. B.; Zajac, F. E.; Peterson, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have difficulty maintaining balance without stepping when standing in tandem, on compliant surfaces, across narrow beams, or on one foot, especially with eyes closed. Normal individuals (with no sensory impairment) maintain balance in these tasks by employing quick, active hip rotation (a "hip strategy"). The absence of a hip strategy in vestibular patients responding to translations of a short support surface has previously been taken as evidence that the use of hip strategy requires an intact vestibular system. However, many tasks requiring hip strategy alter one or a combination of important system characteristics, such as initial state of the body (tandem stance), dynamics (compliant surfaces), or biomechanical limits of stability (narrow beams). Therefore, the balance deficit in these tasks may result from a failure to account for these support surface alterations when planning and executing sensorimotor responses. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that vestibular information is critical to trigger a hip strategy even on an unaltered support surface, which imposes no changes on the system characteristics. We recorded the postural responses of vestibular patients and control subjects with eyes closed to rearward support surface translations of varying velocity, in erect stance on a firm, flat surface. Subjects were instructed to maintain balance without stepping, if possible. Faster translation velocities (25 cm/s or more) produced a consistent pattern of early hip torque (first 400 ms) in control subjects (i.e., a hip strategy). Most of the patients with bilateral vestibular loss responded to the same translation velocities with similar torques. Contrary to our hypothesis, we conclude that vestibular function is not necessary to trigger a hip strategy. We postulate, therefore, that the balance deficit previously observed in vestibular patients during postural tasks that elicit a hip strategy may have been due to

  3. NAS-current status and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, F. R.

    1987-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) has met its first major milestone, the NAS Processing System Network (NPSN) Initial Operating Configuration (IOC). The program has met its goal of providing a national supercomputer facility capable of greatly enhancing the Nation's research and development efforts. Furthermore, the program is fulfilling its pathfinder role by defining and implementing a paradigm for supercomputing system environments. The IOC is only the begining and the NAS Program will aggressively continue to develop and implement emerging supercomputer, communications, storage, and software technologies to strengthen computations as a critical element in supporting the Nation's leadership role in aeronautics.

  4. Passive motion reduces vestibular balance and perceptual responses

    PubMed Central

    Fitzpatrick, Richard C; Watson, Shaun R D

    2015-01-01

    With the hypothesis that vestibular sensitivity is regulated to deal with a range of environmental motion conditions, we explored the effects of passive whole-body motion on vestibular perceptual and balance responses. In 10 subjects, vestibular responses were measured before and after a period of imposed passive motion. Vestibulospinal balance reflexes during standing evoked by galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) were measured as shear reaction forces. Perceptual tests measured thresholds for detecting angular motion, perceptions of suprathreshold rotation and perceptions of GVS-evoked illusory rotation. The imposed conditioning motion was 10 min of stochastic yaw rotation (0.5–2.5 Hz ≤ 300 deg s−2) with subjects seated. This conditioning markedly reduced reflexive and perceptual responses. The medium latency galvanic reflex (300–350 ms) was halved in amplitude (48%; P = 0.011) but the short latency response was unaffected. Thresholds for detecting imposed rotation more than doubled (248%; P < 0.001) and remained elevated after 30 min. Over-estimation of whole-body rotation (30–180 deg every 5 s) before conditioning was significantly reduced (41.1 to 21.5%; P = 0.033). Conditioning reduced illusory vestibular sensations of rotation evoked by GVS (mean 113 deg for 10 s at 1 mA) by 44% (P < 0.01) and the effect persisted for at least 1 h (24% reduction; P < 0.05). We conclude that a system of vestibular sensory autoregulation exists and that this probably involves central and peripheral mechanisms, possibly through vestibular efferent regulation. We propose that failure of these regulatory mechanisms at different levels could lead to disorders of movement perception and balance control during standing. Key points Human activity exposes the vestibular organs to a wide dynamic range of motion. We aimed to discover whether the CNS regulates sensitivity to vestibular afference during exposure to ambient motion. Balance and perceptual

  5. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input.

    PubMed

    Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F; Jandl, Nico M; Helmchen, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC), visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs). Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain) was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly, proprioceptive

  6. Postural Control in Bilateral Vestibular Failure: Its Relation to Visual, Proprioceptive, Vestibular, and Cognitive Input

    PubMed Central

    Sprenger, Andreas; Wojak, Jann F.; Jandl, Nico M.; Helmchen, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular failure (BVF) suffer from postural and gait unsteadiness with an increased risk of falls. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential role of otolith, semicircular canal (SSC), visual, proprioceptive, and cognitive influences on the postural stability of BVF patients. Center-of-pressure displacements were recorded by posturography under six conditions: target visibility; tonic head positions in the pitch plane; horizontal head shaking; sensory deprivation; dual task; and tandem stance. Between-group analysis revealed larger postural sway in BVF patients on eye closure; but with the eyes open, BVF did not differ from healthy controls (HCs). Head tilts and horizontal head shaking increased sway but did not differ between groups. In the dual task condition, BVF patients maintained posture indistinguishable from controls. On foam and tandem stance, postural sway was larger in BVF, even with the eyes open. The best predictor for the severity of bilateral vestibulopathy was standing on foam with eyes closed. Postural control of our BVF was indistinguishable from HCs once visual and proprioceptive feedback is provided. This distinguishes them from patients with vestibulo-cerebellar disorders or functional dizziness. It confirms previous reports and explains that postural unsteadiness of BVF patients can be missed easily if not examined by conditions of visual and/or proprioceptive deprivation. In fact, the best predictor for vestibular hypofunction (VOR gain) was examining patients standing on foam with the eyes closed. Postural sway in that condition increased with the severity of vestibular impairment but not with disease duration. In the absence of visual control, impaired otolith input destabilizes BVF with head retroflexion. Stimulating deficient SSC does not distinguish patients from controls possibly reflecting a shift of intersensory weighing toward proprioceptive-guided postural control. Accordingly, proprioceptive

  7. Combined ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential in individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and in patients with Ménière's disease.

    PubMed

    Silva, Tatiana Rocha; de Resende, Luciana Macedo; Santos, Marco Aurélio Rocha

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential is a potential of mean latency that measures the muscle response to auditory stimulation. This potential can be generated from the contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and also from the contraction of extraocular muscles in response to high-intensity sounds. This study presents a combined or simultaneous technique of cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential in individuals with changes in the vestibular system, for use in otoneurologic diagnosis. To characterize the records and analyze the results of combined cervical and ocular VEMP in individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and in those with Ménière's disease. The study included 120 subjects: 30 subjects with vestibular hyporeflexia, 30 with Ménière's disease, and 60 individuals with normal hearing. Data collection was performed by simultaneously recording the cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. There were differences between the study groups (individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and individuals with Ménière's disease) and the control group for most of wave parameters in combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. For cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential, it was observed that the prolongation of latency of the P13 and N23 waves was the most frequent finding in the group with vestibular hyporeflexia and in the group with Ménière's disease. For ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential, prolonged latency of N10 and P15 waves was the most frequent finding in the study groups. Combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential presented relevant results for individuals with vestibular hyporeflexia and for those with Ménière's disease. There were differences between the study groups and the control group for most of the wave parameters in combined cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia

  8. Vestibular rehabilitation ameliorates chronic dizziness through the SIRT1 axis

    PubMed Central

    Kao, Chung-Lan; Tsai, Kun-Ling; Cheng, Yuan-Yang; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Lee, Shin-Da; Chan, Rai-Chi

    2014-01-01

    Dizziness is a common clinical symptom frequently referred to general neurologists and practitioners. Exercise intervention, in the form of vestibular rehabilitation, is known as an effective clinical management for dizziness. This intervention is reported to have a functional role in correcting dizziness, improving gaze stability, retraining balance and gait, and enhancing physical fitness. Dizziness is known to be highly related to inflammation and oxidative stress. SIRT1 is a major molecule for the regulation of inflammation and mitigation of oxidative stress in chronic diseases such as atherosclerosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the bio-molecular roles of SIRT1 involved in the pathogenesis of dizziness are still largely unclear. In this study, a total of 30 subjects were recruited (15 patients with chronic dizziness, and 15 age/gender matched non-dizzy control subjects). The dizzy subjects group received 18 sessions of 30-min vestibular training. We found that the mRNA and protein expression levels of SIRT1 in the blood samples of chronic dizzy patients were repressed compared with those of healthy controls. After vestibular training, the dizzy patients had significant symptomatic improvements. The SIRT1 expression and its downstream genes (PPAR-γ and PGC-1α) were upregulated after vestibular exercises in dizzy subjects. Notably, the catalytic activity of SIRT1, NADPH and antioxidant enzyme activities were also activated in dizzy patients after vestibular training. Furthermore, vestibular exercise training reduced oxidative events and p53 expression in patients with dizziness. This study demonstrated that vestibular exercise training improved dizziness symptoms, and mechanisms for alleviation of chronic dizziness may partly involve the activation of the SIRT1 axis and the repression of redox status. PMID:24624081

  9. Enhancement of Otolith Specific Ocular Responses Using Vestibular Stochastic Resonance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiedler, Matthew; De Dios, Yiri E.; Esteves, Julie; Galvan, Raquel; Wood, Scott; Bloomberg, Jacob; Mulavara, Ajitkumar

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Our goal is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular stochastic resonance (SR) that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and mitigate these risks. SR is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. Methods: Eye movement data were collected from 10 subjects during variable radius centrifugation (VRC). Subjects performed 11 trials of VRC that provided equivalent tilt stimuli from otolith and other graviceptor input without the normal concordant canal cues. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation, in the range of 0-1500 microamperes, was applied to the vestibular system using a constant current stimulator through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. In the VRC paradigm, subjects were accelerated to 216 deg./s. After the subjects no longer sensed rotation, the chair oscillated along a track at 0.1 Hz to provide tilt stimuli of 10 deg. Eye movements were recorded for 6 cycles while subjects fixated on a target in darkness. Ocular counter roll (OCR) movement was calculated from the eye movement data during periods of chair oscillations. Results: Preliminary analysis of the data revealed that 9 of 10 subjects showed an average increase of 28% in the magnitude of OCR responses to the equivalent tilt stimuli while experiencing vestibular SR. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-900 microamperes. Discussion: These results indicate that stochastic electrical stimulation of the vestibular system can improve otolith specific responses. This will have a

  10. Tonic Investigation Concept of Cervico-vestibular Muscle Afferents

    PubMed Central

    Dorn, Linda Josephine; Lappat, Annabelle; Neuhuber, Winfried; Scherer, Hans; Olze, Heidi; Hölzl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Interdisciplinary research has contributed greatly to an improved understanding of the vestibular system. To date, however, very little research has focused on the vestibular system's somatosensory afferents. To ensure the diagnostic quality of vestibular somatosensory afferent data, especially the extra cranial afferents, stimulation of the vestibular balance system has to be precluded. Objective Sophisticated movements require intra- and extra cranial vestibular receptors. The study's objective is to evaluate an investigation concept for cervico-vestibular afferents with respect to clinical feasibility. Methods A dedicated chair was constructed, permitting three-dimensional trunk excursions, during which the volunteer's head remains fixed. Whether or not a cervicotonic provocation nystagmus (c-PN) can be induced with static trunk excursion is to be evaluated and if this can be influenced by cervical monophasic transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (c-TENS) with a randomized test group. 3D-video-oculography (VOG) was used to record any change in cervico-ocular examination parameters. The occurring nystagmuses were evaluated visually due to the small caliber of nystagmus amplitudes in healthy volunteers. Results The results demonstrate: no influence of placebo-controlled c-TENS on the spontaneous nystagmus; a significant increase of the vertical nystagmus on the 3D-trunk-excursion chair in static trunk flexion with cervical provocation in all young healthy volunteers (n = 49); and a significant difference between vertical and horizontal nystagmuses during static trunk excursion after placebo-controlled c-TENS, except for the horizontal nystagmus during trunk torsion. Conclusion We hope this cervicotonic investigation concept on the 3D trunk-excursion chair will contribute to new diagnostic and therapeutic perspectives on cervical pathologies in vestibular head-to-trunk alignment. PMID:28050208

  11. Fifth Symposium on the Role of the Vestibular Organs in Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Vestibular problems of manned space flight are investigated for weightlessness and reduced gravity conditions with emphasis on space station development. Intensive morphological studies on the vestibular system and its central nervous system connections are included.

  12. Association Between Vestibular Vertigo and Motor Vehicle Accidents: Data From the 2016 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Wei, Eric X; Agrawal, Yuri

    2018-05-18

    Recent evidence has shown that individuals with vestibular impairment have higher rates of self-reported driving difficulty compared with individuals without vestibular impairment. However, it is unknown whether individuals with vestibular impairment are more likely to be involved in motor vehicle accidents. We used data from the 2016 National Health Interview Survey of U.S. adults to evaluate whether individuals with vestibular vertigo are more likely to experience motor vehicle accidents relative to individuals without vestibular vertigo. In multivariate analysis, vestibular vertigo was associated with an over threefold increased odds of motor vehicle accidents (odds ratio, 3.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.7-7.3). This study supports an assciation between vestibular dysfunction and driving impairment, and provides a relative risk of motor vehicle accidents associated with vestibular vertigo that clinicians may utilize in counseling patients on the potential safety hazards of driving.

  13. NASA Advanced Supercomputing (NAS) User Services Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pandori, John; Hamilton, Chris; Niggley, C. E.; Parks, John W. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing), its goals, and its mainframe computer assets. Also covered are its functions, including systems monitoring and technical support.

  14. UAS NAS IHITL Test Readiness Review (TRR)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jim; Brignola, Michael P.; Rorie, Conrad; Santiago, Confesor; Guminsky, Mike; Cross, Ken

    2014-01-01

    Requesting release of IHITL test readiness review (TRR) charts to ensure UAS-NAS project primary stakeholders, the Federal Aviation Administration through the RTCA special committee -228 and the Office of the Secretary of Defense Sense and Avoid Science and Research Panel, are well informed on the IHITL test plan and expected outcomes as they relate to their needs to safely fly UAS in the NAS.

  15. Effects of microgravity on vestibular ontogeny: direct physiological and anatomical measurements following space flight (STS-29)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, T. A.; Fermin, C.; Hester, P. Y.; Vellinger, J.

    1993-01-01

    Does space flight change gravity receptor development? The present study measured vestibular form and function in birds flown as embryos for 5 days in earth orbit (STS-29). No major changes in vestibular gross morphology were found. Vestibular response mean amplitudes and latencies were unaffected by space flight. However, the results of measuring vestibular thresholds were mixed and abnormal responses in 3 of the 8 flight animals raise important questions.

  16. The intrinsic organization of the vestibular complex: evidence for internuclear connectivity.

    PubMed

    Rubertone, J A; Mehler, W R; Cox, G E

    1983-03-14

    The HRP anterograde and retrograde labeling techniques provide evidence for extensive internuclear connectivity within the vestibular complex. Specifically: (1) the superior vestibular nucleus is topographically and reciprocally related to the spinal (spr) and medial vestibular nuclei (mv); (2) the lateral vestibular nucleus (lv) is reciprocally related to the mv, and (3) the lv receives afferent fibers from the spv but does not reciprocate this input.

  17. The Effect of Vestibular Rehabilitation Therapy Program on Sensory Organization of Deaf Children With Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Ebrahimi, Amir Abbas; Jamshidi, Ali Ashraf; Movallali, Guita; Rahgozar, Mehdi; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah

    2017-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of vestibular rehabilitation therapy program on the sensory organization of deaf children with bilateral vestibular dysfunction. This cross-sectional and analytic study was conducted on 24 students between the age of 7 and 12 years (6 girls and 18 boys) with the profound sensorineural hearing loss (PTA>90 dB). They were assessed through the balance subtest in Bruininks-Oseretsky test of motor proficiency (BOTMP). For children which the total score of the balance subtest was 3 standard deviation lower than their peers with typical development, vestibular function testing was completed pre-intervention. Posturography Sensory organization testing (SOT) was completed pre- and post-intervention with SPS (Synapsys, Marseille, France). Children with bilateral vestibular impairment were randomly assigned to either the exercise or control group. Exercise intervention consisted of compensatory training, emphasizing enhancement of visual and somatosensory function, and balance training. The exercise group entered in vestibular rehabilitation therapy program for 8 weeks. The children initially participating in the control group were provided the exercise intervention following the post-test. Based on the results there was significant difference in condition 5 and 6, areas of limits of stability (LOS), vestibular ratio and global score in posturography at the end of the intervention, but there was no significant difference in the control group in posturography (P<0.05). The results indicated that testing of vestibular, and postural control function, as well as intervention for deficiencies identified, should be included in deaf children rehabilitation program.

  18. Microgravity vestibular investigations (10-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, Millard F.

    1992-01-01

    Our perception of how we are oriented in space is dependent on the interaction of virtually every sensory system. For example, to move about in our environment we integrate inputs in our brain from visual, haptic (kinesthetic, proprioceptive, and cutaneous), auditory systems, and labyrinths. In addition to this multimodal system for orientation, our expectations about the direction and speed of our chosen movement are also important. Changes in our environment and the way we interact with the new stimuli will result in a different interpretation by the nervous system of the incoming sensory information. We will adapt to the change in appropriate ways. Because our orientation system is adaptable and complex, it is often difficult to trace a response or change in behavior to any one source of information in this synergistic orientation system. However, with a carefully designed investigation, it is possible to measure signals at the appropriate level of response (both electrophysiological and perceptual) and determine the effect that stimulus rearrangement has on our sense of orientation. The environment of orbital flight represents the stimulus arrangement that is our immediate concern. The Microgravity Vestibular Investigations (MVI) represent a group of experiments designed to investigate the effects of orbital flight and a return to Earth on our orientation system.

  19. Mapping the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP).

    PubMed

    Colebatch, James G

    2012-01-01

    Effects of different electrode placements and indifferent electrodes were investigated for the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) recorded from the sternocleidomastoid muscle (SCM). In 5 normal volunteers, the motor point of the left SCM was identified and an electrode placed there. A grid of 7 additional electrodes was laid out, along and across the SCM, based upon the location of the motor point. One reference electrode was placed over the sternoclavicular joint and another over C7. There were clear morphological changes with differing recording sites and for the two reference electrodes, but the earliest and largest responses were recorded from the motor point. The C7 reference affected the level of rectified EMG and was associated with an initial negativity in some electrodes. The latencies of the p13 potentials increased with distance from the motor point but the n23 latencies did not. Thus the p13 potential behaved as a travelling wave whereas the n23 behaved as a standing wave. The C7 reference may be contaminated by other evoked myogenic activity. Ideally recordings should be made with an active electrode over the motor point.

  20. Deconvolution of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Lütkenhöner, Bernd; Basel, Türker

    2012-02-07

    The vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) and the associated variance modulation can be understood by a convolution model. Two functions of time are incorporated into the model: the motor unit action potential (MUAP) of an average motor unit, and the temporal modulation of the MUAP rate of all contributing motor units, briefly called rate modulation. The latter is the function of interest, whereas the MUAP acts as a filter that distorts the information contained in the measured data. Here, it is shown how to recover the rate modulation by undoing the filtering using a deconvolution approach. The key aspects of our deconvolution algorithm are as follows: (1) the rate modulation is described in terms of just a few parameters; (2) the MUAP is calculated by Wiener deconvolution of the VEMP with the rate modulation; (3) the model parameters are optimized using a figure-of-merit function where the most important term quantifies the difference between measured and model-predicted variance modulation. The effectiveness of the algorithm is demonstrated with simulated data. An analysis of real data confirms the view that there are basically two components, which roughly correspond to the waves p13-n23 and n34-p44 of the VEMP. The rate modulation corresponding to the first, inhibitory component is much stronger than that corresponding to the second, excitatory component. But the latter is more extended so that the two modulations have almost the same equivalent rectangular duration. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Vestibular dysfunction in Turner syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Michael; Agrawal, Yuri

    2014-02-01

    Turner syndrome is a well-known cause of sensorineural hearing loss, and the lack of estrogen has been implicated in cochlear dysfunction. It has never been associated with vestibular dysfunction. We report a case of a patient with Turner syndrome who was found to have bilateral vestibular dysfunction based on video-oculography (VOG) testing. A single patient with a history of Turner syndrome who was found to have significant bilateral vestibular dysfunction. After noticing a deficit in the vestibulo-ocular reflexes on qualitative horizontal head impulse examination, the patient underwent VOG testing. VOG testing quantatively measures angular vestibulo-ocular reflex (AVOR) gain in the horizontal semicircular canal plane. AVOR gain represents the eye movement response to a head movement; in normal individuals the eye movement is fully compensatory and gain values are close to unity. VOG results showed AVOR gains of 0.29 and 0.36 on the right and left sides, respectively. We have presented a case of a woman with Turner syndrome with asymptomatic vestibular dysfunction demonstrated with VOG testing. Although there is a documented relationship between Turner syndrome and sensorineural hearing loss, there are no previous studies or case reports linking Turner syndrome and vestibular dysfunction. Additional research and added vigilance in monitoring Turner syndrome patients may be warranted.

  2. Otolith-Canal Convergence In Vestibular Nuclei Neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. David; Si, Xiao-Hong

    2002-01-01

    The current final report covers the period from June 1, 1999 to May 31, 2002. The primary objective of the investigation was to determine how information regarding head movements and head position relative to gravity is received and processed by central vestibular nuclei neurons in the brainstem. Specialized receptors in the vestibular labyrinths of the inner ear function to detect angular and linear accelerations of the head, with receptors located in the semicircular canals transducing rotational head movements and receptors located in the otolith organs transducing changes in head position relative to gravity or linear accelerations of the head. The information from these different receptors is then transmitted to central vestibular nuclei neurons which process the input signals, then project the appropriate output information to the eye, head, and body musculature motor neurons to control compensatory reflexes. Although a number of studies have reported on the responsiveness of vestibular nuclei neurons, it has not yet been possible to determine precisely how these cells combine the information from the different angular and linear acceleration receptors into a correct neural output signal. In the present project, rotational and linear motion stimuli were separately delivered while recording responses from vestibular nuclei neurons that were characterized according to direct input from the labyrinth and eye movement sensitivity. Responses from neurons receiving convergent input from the semicircular canals and otolith organs were quantified and compared to non-convergent neurons.

  3. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Özgür, Abdulkadir; Serdaroğlu Beyazal, Münevver; Terzi, Suat; Coşkun, Zerrin Özergin; Dursun, Engin

    2016-10-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic systemic inflammatory disease with unknown etiology. Although sacroiliac joint involvement is the classic sign along with the formed immune mediators, it may result in immune-mediated inner ear disease and may cause damage to the audiovestibular system. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) is a clinical reflex test used in the diagnosis of vestibular diseases and is performed by recording and evaluating the muscle potentials resulting from the stimulation of the vestibular system with different stimuli. The aim of this study is to evaluate the cervical VEMP test results in AS patients without vestibular symptoms. Thirty-three patients with AS and a control group of 30 healthy volunteers with similar demographic characteristics were evaluated in the study. VEMP wave latency, P13-N23 wave amplitude, and VEMP asymmetry ratio (VAR) values were compared between the groups. The relationship between clinical and laboratory findings of the AS patients and VEMP data were also investigated. Compared with healthy people, this study shows the response rate of patients with ankylosing spondylitis was reduced in the VEMP test, and P13-N23 wave amplitude showed a decrease in AS patients who had VEMP response (p < 0.001). There was no correlation between the clinical and laboratory findings and VEMP findings in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. The data obtained from this study suggest that AS may lead to decreased sensitivity of the vestibular system.

  4. Impaired math achievement in patients with acute vestibular neuritis.

    PubMed

    Moser, Ivan; Vibert, Dominique; Caversaccio, Marco D; Mast, Fred W

    2017-12-01

    Broad cognitive difficulties have been reported in patients with peripheral vestibular deficit, especially in the domain of spatial cognition. Processing and manipulating numbers relies on the ability to use the inherent spatial features of numbers. It is thus conceivable that patients with acute peripheral vestibular deficit show impaired numerical cognition. Using the number Stroop task and a short math achievement test, we tested 20 patients with acute vestibular neuritis and 20 healthy, age-matched controls. On the one hand, patients showed normal congruency and distance effects in the number Stroop task, which is indicative of normal number magnitude processing. On the other hand, patients scored lower than healthy controls in the math achievement test. We provide evidence that the lower performance cannot be explained by either differences in prior math knowledge (i.e., education) or slower processing speed. Our results suggest that peripheral vestibular deficit negatively affects numerical cognition in terms of the efficient manipulation of numbers. We discuss the role of executive functions in math performance and argue that previously reported executive deficits in patients with peripheral vestibular deficit provide a plausible explanation for the lower math achievement scores. In light of the handicapping effects of impaired numerical cognition in daily living, it is crucial to further investigate the mechanisms that cause mathematical deficits in acute PVD and eventually develop adequate means for cognitive interventions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual-vestibular processing deficits in mild traumatic brain injury.

    PubMed

    Wright, W G; Tierney, R T; McDevitt, J

    2017-01-01

    The search for reliable and valid signs and symptoms of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI), commonly synonymous with concussion, has lead to a growing body of evidence that individuals with long-lasting, unremitting impairments often experience visual and vestibular symptoms, such as dizziness, postural and gait disturbances. Investigate the role of visual-vestibular processing deficits following concussion. A number of clinically accepted vestibular, oculomotor, and balance assessments as well as a novel virtual reality (VR)-based balance assessment device were used to assess adults with post-acute concussion (n = 14) in comparison to a healthy age-matched cohort (n = 58). Significant between-group differences were found with the VR-based balance device (p = 0.001), with dynamic visual motion emerging as the most discriminating balance condition. The symptom reports collected after performing the oculomotor and vestibular tests: rapid alternating horizontal eye saccades, optokinetic stimulation, and gaze stabilization, were all sensitive to health status (p < 0.05), despite the absence of oculomotor abnormalities being observed, except for near-point convergence. The BESS, King-Devick, and Dynamic Visual Acuity tests did not detect between-group differences. Postural and visual-vestibular tasks most closely linked to spatial and self-motion perception had the greatest discriminatory outcomes. The current findings suggest that mesencephalic and parieto-occipital centers and pathways may be involved in concussion.

  6. Sensory convergence in the parieto-insular vestibular cortex

    PubMed Central

    Shinder, Michael E.

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular signals are pervasive throughout the central nervous system, including the cortex, where they likely play different roles than they do in the better studied brainstem. Little is known about the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC), an area of the cortex with prominent vestibular inputs. Neural activity was recorded in the PIVC of rhesus macaques during combinations of head, body, and visual target rotations. Activity of many PIVC neurons was correlated with the motion of the head in space (vestibular), the twist of the neck (proprioceptive), and the motion of a visual target, but was not associated with eye movement. PIVC neurons responded most commonly to more than one stimulus, and responses to combined movements could often be approximated by a combination of the individual sensitivities to head, neck, and target motion. The pattern of visual, vestibular, and somatic sensitivities on PIVC neurons displayed a continuous range, with some cells strongly responding to one or two of the stimulus modalities while other cells responded to any type of motion equivalently. The PIVC contains multisensory convergence of self-motion cues with external visual object motion information, such that neurons do not represent a specific transformation of any one sensory input. Instead, the PIVC neuron population may define the movement of head, body, and external visual objects in space and relative to one another. This comparison of self and external movement is consistent with insular cortex functions related to monitoring and explains many disparate findings of previous studies. PMID:24671533

  7. Extraterrestrial vestibular research, a new partial field of medical research into the human vestibular apparatus.

    PubMed

    Pichler, H J

    1967-01-01

    The first otologic professorial chair in the world was established by Politzer in Vienna as long ago as 1861. In 1914 an assistant of the 1st Vienna Ear Clinic with Politzer as its head, Barany, was awarded the Nobel Prize for Medicine for his fundamental investigations into the organ of equilibration and for his discovery of the caloric sensitivity of the semicircular canals. Since that time Barany is regarded as the founder of the physiology of the vestibular apparatus. During the period 1959 to 1963 a new conception of fundamental research into the vestibule was demanded and elaborated in Vienna with the postulate that, in all theoretical deliberations and practical experience, one should take into consideration that our experiments into the vestibule do not take place on a static platform but rather on a diversely moving one, namely the surface of the earth. This led to new findings in the field of research into the otolith apparatus. In 1962 it was discovered that the gravitation of the sun at the distance of earth-sun represents a supraliminal stimulus, namely both in the aphelion as well as in the perihelion position of the earth. In 1965 it was suggested in Vienna that a new branch of research into the vestibule should be established on an international level, the so-called extraterrestrial vestibular research. The importance of this new branch of research is discussed for all problems of orientation of human beings in space.

  8. Mutation spectrum and differential gene expression in cystic and solid vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhihua; Wang, Zhaoyan; Sun, Lianhua; Li, Xiaohua; Huang, Qi; Yang, Tao; Wu, Hao

    2014-03-01

    We sought to characterize the mutation spectrum of NF2 and the differential gene expression in cystic and solid vestibular schwannomas. We collected tumor tissue and blood samples of 31 cystic vestibular schwannomas and 114 solid vestibular schwannomas. Mutation screening of NF2 was performed in both tumor and blood DNA samples of all patients. cDNA microarray was used to analyze the differential gene expression between 11 cystic vestibular schwannomas and 6 solid vestibular schwannomas. Expression levels of top candidate genes were verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. NF2 mutations were identified in 34.5% of sporadic vestibular schwannomas, with all mutations being exclusively somatic. No significant difference was found between the mutation detection rates of cystic vestibular schwannoma (35.5%) and solid vestibular schwannoma (34.2%). cDNA microarray analysis detected a total of 46 differentially expressed genes between the cystic vestibular schwannoma and solid vestibular schwannoma samples. The significantly decreased expression of four top candidate genes, C1orf130, CNTF, COL4A3, and COL4A4, was verified by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. NF2 mutations are not directly involved in the cystic formation of vestibular schwannoma. In addition, the differential gene expression of cystic vestibular schwannoma reported in our study may provide useful insights into the molecular mechanism underlying this process.

  9. Association between vestibular function and motor performance in hearing-impaired children.

    PubMed

    Maes, Leen; De Kegel, Alexandra; Van Waelvelde, Hilde; Dhooge, Ingeborg

    2014-12-01

    The clinical balance performance of normal-hearing (NH) children was compared with the balance performance of hearing-impaired (HI) children with and without vestibular dysfunction to identify an association between vestibular function and motor performance. Prospective study. Tertiary referral center. Thirty-six children (mean age, 7 yr 5 mo; range, 3 yr 8 mo-12 yr 11 mo) divided into three groups: NH children with normal vestibular responses, HI children with normal vestibular responses, and HI children with abnormal vestibular function. A vestibular test protocol (rotatory and collic vestibular evoked myogenic potential testing) in combination with three clinical balance tests (balance beam walking, one-leg hopping, one-leg stance). Clinical balance performance. HI children with abnormal vestibular test results obtained the lowest quotients of motor performance, which were significantly lower compared with the NH group (p < 0.001 for balance beam walking and one-leg stance; p = 0.003 for one-leg hopping). The balance performance of the HI group with normal vestibular responses was better in comparison with the vestibular impaired group but still significantly lower compared with the NH group (p = 0.020 for balance beam walking; p = 0.001 for one-leg stance; not significant for one-leg hopping). These results indicate an association between vestibular function and motor performance in HI children, with a more distinct motor deterioration if a vestibular impairment is superimposed to the auditory dysfunction.

  10. The vestibular-related frontal cortex and its role in smooth-pursuit eye movements and vestibular-pursuit interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fukushima, Junko; Akao, Teppei; Kurkin, Sergei; Kaneko, Chris R.S.; Fukushima, Kikuro

    2006-01-01

    In order to see clearly when a target is moving slowly, primates with high acuity foveae use smooth-pursuit and vergence eye movements. The former rotates both eyes in the same direction to track target motion in frontal planes, while the latter rotates left and right eyes in opposite directions to track target motion in depth. Together, these two systems pursue targets precisely and maintain their images on the foveae of both eyes. During head movements, both systems must interact with the vestibular system to minimize slip of the retinal images. The primate frontal cortex contains two pursuit-related areas; the caudal part of the frontal eye fields (FEF) and supplementary eye fields (SEF). Evoked potential studies have demonstrated vestibular projections to both areas and pursuit neurons in both areas respond to vestibular stimulation. The majority of FEF pursuit neurons code parameters of pursuit such as pursuit and vergence eye velocity, gaze velocity, and retinal image motion for target velocity in frontal and depth planes. Moreover, vestibular inputs contribute to the predictive pursuit responses of FEF neurons. In contrast, the majority of SEF pursuit neurons do not code pursuit metrics and many SEF neurons are reported to be active in more complex tasks. These results suggest that FEF- and SEF-pursuit neurons are involved in different aspects of vestibular-pursuit interactions and that eye velocity coding of SEF pursuit neurons is specialized for the task condition. PMID:16917164

  11. Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potential elicited from binaural air-conducted stimulations: clinical feasibility in patients with peripheral vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Shinichi; Egami, Naoya; Inoue, Aki; Kinoshita, Makoto; Fujimoto, Chisato; Murofushi, Toshihisa; Yamasoba, Tatsuya

    2013-07-01

    Ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMPs) to binaural air-conducted stimulation (ACS) may provide a convenient way of assessing the crossed vestibulo-ocular reflex in patients with vestibular dysfunction as well as in healthy subjects. To investigate the clinical feasibility of using oVEMPs in response to binaural ACS to assess normal subjects and patients with vestibular dysfunction. The study investigated 24 normal subjects (14 men and 10 women, aged from 23 to 60 years) and 14 patients with unilateral peripheral vestibular dysfunction. Each subject underwent oVEMP testing in response to monaural ACS and binaural ACS (500 Hz tone burst, 135 dBSPL). In normal subjects, bilateral oVEMPs were elicited in 75% of subjects in response to monaural ACS and in 91% in response to binaural ACS. Asymmetry ratios (ARs) of the responses to binaural ACS were significantly smaller than those of the responses to monaural ACS (p < 0.01). In patients with unilateral vestibular dysfunction, there were no significant differences in the amplitude, latency, or AR of the responses between monaural and binaural ACS. Approximately 30% of patients showed reduced ARs to binaural ACS relative to monaural ACS, primarily due to contamination by uncrossed responses elicited in healthy ears.

  12. The Effects of Aging on Clinical Vestibular Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Maheu, Maxime; Houde, Marie-Soleil; Landry, Simon P.; Champoux, François

    2015-01-01

    Balance disorders are common issues for aging populations due to the effects of normal aging on peripheral vestibular structures. These changes affect the results of vestibular function evaluations and make the interpretation of these results more difficult. The objective of this article is to review the current state of knowledge of clinically relevant vestibular measures. We will first focus on otolith function assessment methods cervical-VEMP (cVEMP) and ocular-VEMP (oVEMP), then the caloric and video-head impulse test (vHIT) methods for semicircular canals assessment. cVEMP and oVEMP are useful methods, though research on the effects of age for some parameters are still inconclusive. vHIT results are largely independent of age as compared to caloric stimulation and should therefore be preferred for the evaluation of the semicircular canals function. PMID:26441824

  13. Neuroactive substances in the human vestibular end organs.

    PubMed

    Usami, S; Matsubara, A; Shinkawa, H; Matsunaga, T; Kanzaki, J

    1995-01-01

    In order to evaluate the involvement of neuroactive substances in the human vestibular periphery, the immunocytochemical distribution of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) was examined. SP-like immunoreactivity (LI) was present around and beneath sensory hair cells, probably corresponding to their afferent nerve endings. SP-LI was found predominantly in subpopulations of the primary afferents distributed in the peripheral region of the end organs. ChAT-LI and CGRP-LI were found throughout as small puncta below the hair cell layer, probably corresponding to efferent endings. The present results indicate that these neuroactive substances, previously described in animals, are also distributed in the human vestibular periphery, and almost certainly contribute to human vestibular function.

  14. Rapid adaptation of multisensory integration in vestibular pathways

    PubMed Central

    Carriot, Jerome; Jamali, Mohsen; Cullen, Kathleen E.

    2015-01-01

    Sensing gravity is vital for our perception of spatial orientation, the control of upright posture, and generation of our everyday activities. When an astronaut transitions to microgravity or returns to earth, the vestibular input arising from self-motion will not match the brain's expectation. Our recent neurophysiological studies have provided insight into how the nervous system rapidly reorganizes when vestibular input becomes unreliable by both (1) updating its internal model of the sensory consequences of motion and (2) up-weighting more reliable extra-vestibular information. These neural strategies, in turn, are linked to improvements in sensorimotor performance (e.g., gaze and postural stability, locomotion, orienting) and perception characterized by similar time courses. We suggest that furthering our understanding of the neural mechanisms that underlie sensorimotor adaptation will have important implications for optimizing training programs for astronauts before and after space exploration missions and for the design of goal-oriented rehabilitation for patients. PMID:25932009

  15. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-01-01

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity. PMID:24421761

  16. Cervical Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials: Norms and Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Isaradisaikul, Suwicha; Navacharoen, Niramon; Hanprasertpong, Charuk; Kangsanarak, Jaran

    2012-01-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing is a vestibular function test used for evaluating saccular and inferior vestibular nerve function. Parameters of VEMP testing include VEMP threshold, latencies of p1 and n1, and p1-n1 interamplitude. Less commonly used parameters were p1-n1 interlatency, interaural difference of p1 and n1 latency, and interaural amplitude difference (IAD) ratio. This paper recommends using air-conducted 500 Hz tone burst auditory stimulation presented monoaurally via an inserted ear phone while the subject is turning his head to the contralateral side in the sitting position and recording the responses from the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle. Normative values of VEMP responses in 50 normal audiovestibular volunteers were presented. VEMP testing protocols and normative values in other literature were reviewed and compared. The study is beneficial to clinicians as a reference guide to set up VEMP testing and interpretation of the VEMP responses. PMID:22577386

  17. Visual gravitational motion and the vestibular system in humans.

    PubMed

    Lacquaniti, Francesco; Bosco, Gianfranco; Indovina, Iole; La Scaleia, Barbara; Maffei, Vincenzo; Moscatelli, Alessandro; Zago, Myrka

    2013-12-26

    The visual system is poorly sensitive to arbitrary accelerations, but accurately detects the effects of gravity on a target motion. Here we review behavioral and neuroimaging data about the neural mechanisms for dealing with object motion and egomotion under gravity. The results from several experiments show that the visual estimates of a target motion under gravity depend on the combination of a prior of gravity effects with on-line visual signals on target position and velocity. These estimates are affected by vestibular inputs, and are encoded in a visual-vestibular network whose core regions lie within or around the Sylvian fissure, and are represented by the posterior insula/retroinsula/temporo-parietal junction. This network responds both to target motions coherent with gravity and to vestibular caloric stimulation in human fMRI studies. Transient inactivation of the temporo-parietal junction selectively disrupts the interception of targets accelerated by gravity.

  18. Migraine patients consistently show abnormal vestibular bedside tests.

    PubMed

    Maranhão, Eliana Teixeira; Maranhão-Filho, Péricles; Luiz, Ronir Raggio; Vincent, Maurice Borges

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are common disorders, with lifetime prevalences of 16% and 7% respectively, and co-morbidity around 3.2%. Vestibular syndromes and dizziness occur more frequently in migraine patients. We investigated bedside clinical signs indicative of vestibular dysfunction in migraineurs. To test the hypothesis that vestibulo-ocular reflex, vestibulo-spinal reflex and fall risk (FR) responses as measured by 14 bedside tests are abnormal in migraineurs without vertigo, as compared with controls. Cross-sectional study including sixty individuals - thirty migraineurs, 25 women, 19-60 y-o; and 30 gender/age healthy paired controls. Migraineurs showed a tendency to perform worse in almost all tests, albeit only the Romberg tandem test was statistically different from controls. A combination of four abnormal tests better discriminated the two groups (93.3% specificity). Migraine patients consistently showed abnormal vestibular bedside tests when compared with controls.

  19. The Vestibular Effects of Repeated Low-Level Blasts.

    PubMed

    Littlefield, Philip D; Pinto, Robin L; Burrows, Holly L; Brungart, Douglas S

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to use a prospective cohort of United States Marine Corps (USMC) instructors to identify any acute or long-term vestibular dysfunction following repeated blast exposures during explosive breaching training. They were assessed in clinic and on location during training at the USMC Methods of Entry School, Quantico, VA. Subjects received comprehensive baseline vestibular assessments and these were repeated in order to identify longitudinal changes. They also received shorter assessments immediately following blast exposure in order to identify acute findings. The main outcome measures were the Neurobehavioral Symptom Inventory, vestibular Visual Analog Scale (VAS) of subjective vestibular function, videonystagmography (VNG), vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP), rotary chair (including the unilateral centrifugation test), computerized dynamic posturography, and computerized dynamic visual acuity. A total of 11 breachers and 4 engineers were followed for up to 17 months. No acute effects or longitudinal deteriorations were identified, but there were some interesting baseline group differences. Upbeat positional nystagmus was common, and correlated (p<0.005) with a history of mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). Several instructors had abnormally short low-frequency phase leads on rotary chair testing. This study evaluated breaching instructors over a longer test period than any other study, and the results suggest that this population appears to be safe from a vestibular standpoint at the current exposure levels. Upbeat positional nystagmus correlated with a history of mTBI in this population, and this has not been described elsewhere. The data trends also suggest that this nystagmus could be an acute blast effect. However, the reasons for the abnormally short phase leads seen in rotary chair testing are unclear at this time. Further investigation seems warranted.

  20. The Vestibular System and Human Dynamic Space Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meiry, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    The motion sensors of the vestibular system are studied to determine their role in human dynamic space orientation and manual vehicle control. The investigation yielded control models for the sensors, descriptions of the subsystems for eye stabilization, and demonstrations of the effects of motion cues on closed loop manual control. Experiments on the abilities of subjects to perceive a variety of linear motions provided data on the dynamic characteristics of the otoliths, the linear motion sensors. Angular acceleration threshold measurements supplemented knowledge of the semicircular canals, the angular motion sensors. Mathematical models are presented to describe the known control characteristics of the vestibular sensors, relating subjective perception of motion to objective motion of a vehicle. The vestibular system, the neck rotation proprioceptors and the visual system form part of the control system which maintains the eye stationary relative to a target or a reference. The contribution of each of these systems was identified through experiments involving head and body rotations about a vertical axis. Compensatory eye movements in response to neck rotation were demonstrated and their dynamic characteristics described by a lag-lead model. The eye motions attributable to neck rotations and vestibular stimulation obey superposition when both systems are active. Human operator compensatory tracking is investigated in simple vehicle orientation control system with stable and unstable controlled elements. Control of vehicle orientation to a reference is simulated in three modes: visual, motion and combined. Motion cues sensed by the vestibular system through tactile sensation enable the operator to generate more lead compensation than in fixed base simulation with only visual input. The tracking performance of the human in an unstable control system near the limits of controllability is shown to depend heavily upon the rate information provided by the vestibular

  1. Short latency vestibular evoked potentials in the chicken embryo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, S. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1996-01-01

    Electrophysiological responses to pulsed linear acceleration stimuli were recorded in chicken embryos incubated for 19 or 20 days (E19/E20). Responses occurred within the first 16 ms following the stimulus onset. The evoked potentials disappeared following bilateral labyrinthectomy, but persisted following cochlear destruction alone, thus demonstrating that the responses were vestibular. Approximately 8 to 10 response peaks could be identified. The first 4 positive and corresponding negative components (early peaks with latencies < 6.0 ms) were scored and latencies and amplitudes quantified. Vestibular response latencies were significantly longer (P < 0.01) and amplitudes significantly smaller (P < 0.001) than those observed in 2-week-old birds. Mean response threshold for anesthetized embryos was -15.9dBre 1.0 g/ms, which was significantly higher (P < 0.03) than those observed in 2-week-old birds (-23.0dBre 1.0 g/ms). Latency/intensity functions (that is, slopes) were not significantly different between embryos and 2-week-old animals, but amplitude/intensity functions for embryos were significantly shallower than those for 2-week-old birds (P < 0.001). We presume that these differences reflect the refinement of sensory function that occurs following 19 to 20 days of incubation. The recording of vestibular evoked potentials provides an objective, direct and noninvasive measure of peripheral vestibular function in the embryo and, as such, the method shows promise as an investigative tool. The results of the present study form the definitive basis for using vestibular evoked potentials in the detailed study of avian vestibular ontogeny and factors that may influence it.

  2. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss☆

    PubMed Central

    Cutfield, Nicholas J.; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D.; Sharp, David J.; Bronstein, Adolfo M.

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  3. Visual and proprioceptive interaction in patients with bilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Cutfield, Nicholas J; Scott, Gregory; Waldman, Adam D; Sharp, David J; Bronstein, Adolfo M

    2014-01-01

    Following bilateral vestibular loss (BVL) patients gradually adapt to the loss of vestibular input and rely more on other sensory inputs. Here we examine changes in the way proprioceptive and visual inputs interact. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to investigate visual responses in the context of varying levels of proprioceptive input in 12 BVL subjects and 15 normal controls. A novel metal-free vibrator was developed to allow vibrotactile neck proprioceptive input to be delivered in the MRI system. A high level (100 Hz) and low level (30 Hz) control stimulus was applied over the left splenius capitis; only the high frequency stimulus generates a significant proprioceptive stimulus. The neck stimulus was applied in combination with static and moving (optokinetic) visual stimuli, in a factorial fMRI experimental design. We found that high level neck proprioceptive input had more cortical effect on brain activity in the BVL patients. This included a reduction in visual motion responses during high levels of proprioceptive input and differential activation in the midline cerebellum. In early visual cortical areas, the effect of high proprioceptive input was present for both visual conditions but in lateral visual areas, including V5/MT, the effect was only seen in the context of visual motion stimulation. The finding of a cortical visuo-proprioceptive interaction in BVL patients is consistent with behavioural data indicating that, in BVL patients, neck afferents partly replace vestibular input during the CNS-mediated compensatory process. An fMRI cervico-visual interaction may thus substitute the known visuo-vestibular interaction reported in normal subject fMRI studies. The results provide evidence for a cortical mechanism of adaptation to vestibular failure, in the form of an enhanced proprioceptive influence on visual processing. The results may provide the basis for a cortical mechanism involved in proprioceptive substitution of vestibular

  4. Kv1 channels and neural processing in vestibular calyx afferents.

    PubMed

    Meredith, Frances L; Kirk, Matthew E; Rennie, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Potassium-selective ion channels are important for accurate transmission of signals from auditory and vestibular sensory end organs to their targets in the central nervous system. During different gravity conditions, astronauts experience altered input signals from the peripheral vestibular system resulting in sensorimotor dysfunction. Adaptation to altered sensory input occurs, but it is not explicitly known whether this involves synaptic modifications within the vestibular epithelia. Future investigations of such potential plasticity require a better understanding of the electrophysiological mechanisms underlying the known heterogeneity of afferent discharge under normal conditions. This study advances this understanding by examining the role of the Kv1 potassium channel family in mediating action potentials in specialized vestibular afferent calyx endings in the gerbil crista and utricle. Pharmacological agents selective for different sub-types of Kv1 channels were tested on membrane responses in whole cell recordings in the crista. Kv1 channels sensitive to α-dendrotoxin and dendrotoxin-K were found to prevail in the central regions, whereas K(+) channels sensitive to margatoxin, which blocks Kv1.3 and 1.6 channels, were more prominent in peripheral regions. Margatoxin-sensitive currents showed voltage-dependent inactivation. Dendrotoxin-sensitive currents showed no inactivation and dampened excitability in calyces in central neuroepithelial regions. The differential distribution of Kv1 potassium channels in vestibular afferents supports their importance in accurately relaying gravitational and head movement signals through specialized lines to the central nervous system. Pharmacological modulation of specific groups of K(+) channels could help alleviate vestibular dysfunction on earth and in space.

  5. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tung, Victoria W. K.; Burton, Thomas J.; Quail, Stephanie L.; Mathews, Miranda A.; Camp, Aaron J.

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5–6, 8–9 and 27–28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2–3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27–28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27–28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27–28 months. Conclusion: this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed. PMID:26869921

  6. Motor Performance is Impaired Following Vestibular Stimulation in Ageing Mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Victoria W K; Burton, Thomas J; Quail, Stephanie L; Mathews, Miranda A; Camp, Aaron J

    2016-01-01

    Balance and maintaining postural equilibrium are important during stationary and dynamic movements to prevent falls, particularly in older adults. While our sense of balance is influenced by vestibular, proprioceptive, and visual information, this study focuses primarily on the vestibular component and its age-related effects on balance. C57Bl/6J mice of ages 1, 5-6, 8-9 and 27-28 months were tested using a combination of standard (such as grip strength and rotarod) and newly-developed behavioral tests (including balance beam and walking trajectory tests with a vestibular stimulus). In the current study, we confirm a decline in fore-limb grip strength and gross motor coordination as age increases. We also show that a vestibular stimulus of low frequency (2-3 Hz) and duration can lead to age-dependent changes in balance beam performance, which was evident by increases in latency to begin walking on the beam as well as the number of times hind-feet slip (FS) from the beam. Furthermore, aged mice (27-28 months) that received continuous access to a running wheel for 4 weeks did not improve when retested. Mice of ages 1, 10, 13 and 27-28 months were also tested for changes in walking trajectory as a result of the vestibular stimulus. While no linear relationship was observed between the changes in trajectory and age, 1-month-old mice were considerably less affected than mice of ages 10, 13 and 27-28 months. this study confirms there are age-related declines in grip strength and gross motor coordination. We also demonstrate age-dependent changes to finer motor abilities as a result of a low frequency and duration vestibular stimulus. These changes showed that while the ability to perform the balance beam task remained intact across all ages tested, behavioral changes in task performance were observed.

  7. Sensory substitution in bilateral vestibular a-reflexic patients

    PubMed Central

    Alberts, Bart B G T; Selen, Luc P J; Verhagen, Wim I M; Medendorp, W Pieter

    2015-01-01

    Patients with bilateral vestibular loss have balance problems in darkness, but maintain spatial orientation rather effectively in the light. It has been suggested that these patients compensate for vestibular cues by relying on extravestibular signals, including visual and somatosensory cues, and integrating them with internal beliefs. How this integration comes about is unknown, but recent literature suggests the healthy brain remaps the various signals into a task-dependent reference frame, thereby weighting them according to their reliability. In this paper, we examined this account in six patients with bilateral vestibular a-reflexia, and compared them to six age-matched healthy controls. Subjects had to report the orientation of their body relative to a reference orientation or the orientation of a flashed luminous line relative to the gravitational vertical, by means of a two-alternative-forced-choice response. We tested both groups psychometrically in upright position (0°) and 90° sideways roll tilt. Perception of body tilt was unbiased in both patients and controls. Response variability, which was larger for 90° tilt, did not differ between groups, indicating that body somatosensory cues have tilt-dependent uncertainty. Perception of the visual vertical was unbiased when upright, but showed systematic undercompensation at 90° tilt. Variability, which was larger for 90° tilt than upright, did not differ between patients and controls. Our results suggest that extravestibular signals substitute for vestibular input in patients’ perception of spatial orientation. This is in line with the current status of rehabilitation programs in acute vestibular patients, targeting at recognizing body somatosensory signals as a reliable replacement for vestibular loss. PMID:25975644

  8. Vertigo with sudden hearing loss: audio-vestibular characteristics.

    PubMed

    Pogson, Jacob M; Taylor, Rachael L; Young, Allison S; McGarvie, Leigh A; Flanagan, Sean; Halmagyi, G Michael; Welgampola, Miriam S

    2016-10-01

    Acute vertigo with sudden sensorineural hearing loss (SSNHL) is a rare clinical emergency. Here, we report the audio-vestibular test profiles of 27 subjects who presented with these symptoms. The vestibular test battery consisted of a three-dimensional video head impulse test (vHIT) of semicircular canal function and recording ocular and cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (oVEMP, cVEMP) to test otolith dysfunction. Unlike vestibular neuritis, where the horizontal and anterior canals with utricular function are more frequently impaired, 74 % of subjects with vertigo and SSNHL demonstrated impairment of the posterior canal gain (0.45 ± 0.20). Only 41 % showed impairment of the horizontal canal gains (0.78 ± 0.27) and 30 % of the anterior canal gains (0.79 ± 0.26), while 38 % of oVEMPs [asymmetry ratio (AR) = 41.0 ± 41.3 %] and 33 % of cVEMPs (AR = 47.3 ± 41.2 %) were significantly asymmetrical. Twenty-three subjects were diagnosed with labyrinthitis/labyrinthine infarction in the absence of evidence for an underlying pathology. Four subjects had a definitive diagnosis [Ramsay Hunt Syndrome, vestibular schwannoma, anterior inferior cerebellar artery (AICA) infarction, and traction injury]. Ischemia involving the common-cochlear or vestibulo-cochlear branches of the labyrinthine artery could be the simplest explanation for vertigo with SSNHL. Audio-vestibular tests did not provide easy separation between ischaemic and non-ischaemic causes of vertigo with SSNHL.

  9. Magnetic vestibular stimulation modulates default mode network fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Boegle, Rainer; Stephan, Thomas; Ertl, Matthias; Glasauer, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2016-02-15

    Strong magnetic fields (>1 Tesla) can cause dizziness and it was recently shown that healthy subjects (resting in total darkness) developed a persistent nystagmus even when remaining completely motionless within a MR tomograph. Consequently, it was speculated that this magnetic vestibular stimulation (MVS) might influence fMRI results, as nystagmus is indicative of an imbalance in the vestibular system, potentially influencing other systems via multisensory vestibular interactions. The objective of our study was to investigate whether MVS does indeed modulate BOLD signal fluctuations. We recorded eye movements, as well as, resting-state fMRI of 30 volunteers in darkness at 1.5 T and 3.0 T to answer the question whether MVS modulated parts of the default mode resting-state network (DMN) in accordance with the Lorentz-force model for MVS, while distinguishing this from the known signal increase due to field strength related imaging effects. Our results showed that modulation of the default mode network occurred mainly in areas associated with vestibular and ocular motor function, and was in accordance with the Lorentz-force model, i.e., double than the expected signal scaling due to field strength alone. We discuss the implications of our findings for the interpretation of studies using resting-state fMRI, especially those concerning vestibular research. We conclude that MVS needs to be considered in vestibular research to avoid biased results, but it might also offer the possibility of manipulating network dynamics and may thus help in studying the brain as a dynamical system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Patients with chronic dizziness following traumatic head injury typically have multiple diagnoses involving combined peripheral and central vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Q; Roberts, R E; Ahmad, H; Lobo, R; Patel, M; Ham, T; Sharp, D J; Seemungal, B M

    2017-04-01

    We hypothesised that chronic vestibular symptoms (CVS) of imbalance and dizziness post-traumatic head injury (THI) may relate to: (i) the occurrence of multiple simultaneous vestibular diagnoses including both peripheral and central vestibular dysfunction in individual patients increasing the chance of missed diagnoses and suboptimal treatment; (ii) an impaired response to vestibular rehabilitation since the central mechanisms that mediate rehabilitation related brain plasticity may themselves be disrupted. We report the results of a retrospective analysis of both the comprehensive clinical and vestibular laboratory testing of 20 consecutive THI patients with prominent and persisting vestibular symptoms still present at least 6months post THI. Individual THI patients typically had multiple vestibular diagnoses and unique to this group of vestibular patients, often displayed both peripheral and central vestibular dysfunction. Despite expert neuro-otological management, at two years 20% of patients still had persisting vestibular symptoms. In summary, chronic vestibular dysfunction in THI could relate to: (i) the presence of multiple vestibular diagnoses, increasing the risk of 'missed' vestibular diagnoses leading to persisting symptoms; (ii) the impact of brain trauma which may impair brain plasticity mediated repair mechanisms. Apart from alerting physicians to the potential for multiple vestibular diagnoses in THI, future work to identify the specific deficits in brain function mediating poor recovery from post-THI vestibular dysfunction could provide the rationale for developing new therapy for head injury patients whose vestibular symptoms are resistant to treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Volumetric Modulated Arc Radiotherapy for Vestibular Schwannomas

    SciTech Connect

    Lagerwaard, Frank J.; Meijer, Otto W.M.; Hoorn, Elles A.P. van der

    2009-06-01

    Purpose: To evaluate volumetric modulated arc radiotherapy (RapidArc [RA]), a novel approach allowing for rapid treatment delivery, for the treatment of vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: The RA plans were generated for a small (0.5 cm{sup 3}), intermediate (2.8 cm{sup 3}), and large (14.8 cm{sup 3}) VS. The prescription dose was 12.5 Gy to the encompassing 80% isodose. The RA plans were compared with conventional radiosurgery plans using both a single dynamic conformal arc (1DCA) and five noncoplanar dynamic conformal arcs (5DCA). Conformity indices (CI) and dose-volume histograms of critical organs were compared. The RA plan for the medium-sizedmore » VS was measured in a phantom using Gafchromic EBT films and compared with calculated dose distributions. Results: The RA planning was completed within 30 min in all cases, and calculated treatment delivery time (after patient setup) was 5 min vs. 20 min for 5DCA. A superior CI was achieved with RA, with a substantial decrease in low-dose irradiation of the normal brain achieved relative to 5DCA plans. Maximum doses to critical organs were similar for RA and 5DCA but were higher for 1DCA. Film measurements showed the differences between calculated and measured doses to be smaller than 1.5% in the high-dose area and smaller than 3% in the low-dose area. Conclusion: The RA plans consistently achieved a higher CI and decrease in areas of low-dose irradiation. This, together with shorter treatment delivery times, has led to RA replacing our conventional five-arc radiosurgery technique for VS.« less

  12. Consistent latencies of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Jen; Yeh, Te-Huei; Chang, Chun-Hsiang; Young, Yi-Ho

    2008-12-01

    This study investigated the association between neck length and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) latencies in healthy children, adolescents, and adults to elucidate when VEMP latencies reach consistent levels. Findings of VEMP tests in 14 healthy children, seven healthy adolescents, and 14 healthy adults were analyzed for correlations with neck length, which was measured as the distance of a line dropping vertically from the mastoid tip to the horizontal plane passing through the clavicle. All healthy children, adolescents, and adults exhibited present VEMP responses. Children, adolescents, and adults significantly differed in p13 latency, n23 latency, and p13-n23 interval. According to receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, the optimal cutoff values of p13 and n23 latencies between children and adults were 12.6 and 19.8 msec, respectively. Because the odds ratio of p13 latency was less than that of n23 latency, n23 latency was used to discriminate VEMP latencies between children and adults. Accordingly, a cutoff value of 15.3 cm for neck length was proposed as a criterion for predicting VEMP latency within the adult range. Consequently, a positive correlation between neck length and VEMP latency was observed when neck length was <15.3 cm, while above which level one need not account for neck length in evaluating VEMP latency. The intra-subject variability of norms can be enhanced if the normative data for VEMP characteristic parameters take structural variance into account. This study suggests that the adult range of VEMP latencies can be anticipated if neck length is >15.3 cm.

  13. Repeat Gamma Knife surgery for vestibular schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Lonneville, Sarah; Delbrouck, Carine; Renier, Cécile; Devriendt, Daniel; Massager, Nicolas

    2015-01-01

    Background: Gamma Knife (GK) surgery is a recognized treatment option for the management of small to medium-sized vestibular schwannoma (VS) associated with high-tumor control and low morbidity. When a radiosurgical treatment fails to stop tumor growth, repeat GK surgery can be proposed in selected cases. Methods: A series of 27 GK retreatments was performed in 25 patients with VS; 2 patients underwent three procedures. The median time interval between GK treatments was 45 months. The median margin dose used for the first, second, and third GK treatments was 12 Gy, 12 Gy, and 14 Gy, respectively. Six patients (4 patients for the second irradiation and 2 patients for the third irradiation) with partial tumor regrowth were treated only on the growing part of the tumor using a median margin dose of 13 Gy. The median tumor volume was 0.9, 2.3, and 0.7 cc for the first, second, and third treatments, respectively. Stereotactic positron emission tomography (PET) guidance was used for dose planning in 6 cases. Results: Mean follow-up duration was 46 months (range 24–110). At the last follow-up, 85% of schwannomas were controlled. The tumor volume decreased, remained unchanged, or increased after retreatment in 15, 8, and 4 cases, respectively. Four patients had PET during follow-up, and all showed a significant metabolic decrease of the tumor. Hearing was not preserved after retreatment in any patients. New facial or trigeminal palsy did not occur after retreatment. Conclusions: Our results support the long-term efficacy and low morbidity of repeat GK treatment for selected patients with tumor growth after initial treatment. PMID:26500799

  14. Vestibular response to pseudorandom angular velocity input: progress report.

    PubMed

    Lessard, C S; Wong, W C

    1987-09-01

    Space motion sickness was not reported during the first Apollo missions; however, since Apollo 8 through the current Shuttle and Skylab missions, approximately 50% of the crewmembers have experienced instances of space motion sickness. One of NASA's efforts to resolve the space adaptation syndrome is to model the vestibular response for both basic knowledge and as a possible predictor of an individual's susceptibility to the disorder. This report describes a method to analyze the vestibular system when subjected to a pseudorandom angular velocity input.

  15. Interrelated striated elements in vestibular hair cells of the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.; Bourne, C.

    1983-01-01

    A series of interrelated striated organelles in types I and II vestibular hair cells of the rat which appear to be less developed in cochlear hair cells have been revealed by unusual fixation procedures, suggesting that contractile elements may play a role in sensory transduction in the inner ear, especially in the vestibular system. Included in the series of interrelated striated elements are the cuticular plate and its basal attachments to the hair cell margins, the connections of the strut array of the kinociliary basal body to the cuticular plate, and striated organelles associated with the plasma membrane and extending below the apical junctional complexes.

  16. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in patients with acoustic neuromas.

    PubMed

    Takeichi, N; Sakamoto, T; Fukuda, S; Inuyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    To study the utility of VEMP (vestibular-evoked myogenic potential) in the diagnosis of acoustic neuromas. Eighteen patients with unilateral acoustic neuromas were subjected to this study. Myogenic potential responding to loud click stimuli was recorded at ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle. A normal range of VEMP was obtained from 20 controls. VEMP responses were compared with both, clinical symptoms and results of caloric tests. Thirteen out of 18 patients showed decreased responses of VEMP at the affected side. VEMP responses seemed to have little relation with dysequilibrium, spontaneous nystagmus, canal paresis and pure-tone hearing. VEMP is useful for detecting dysfunction of inferior vestibular nerve in patients with acoustic neuromas.

  17. Vestibular migraine: the most frequent entity of episodic vertigo.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Obermann, Mark; Celebisoy, Nese

    2016-04-01

    Vestibular migraine (VM) is the most common cause of episodic vertigo in adults as well as in children. The diagnostic criteria of the consensus document of the International Bárány Society for Neuro-Otology and the International Headache Society (2012) combine the typical signs and symptoms of migraine with the vestibular symptoms lasting 5 min to 72 h and exclusion criteria. Although VM accounts for 7% of patients seen in dizziness clinics and 9% of patients seen in headache clinics it is still underdiagnosed. This review provides an actual overview on the pathophysiology, the clinical characteristics to establish the diagnosis, the differential diagnosis, and the treatment of VM.

  18. Polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei of the squirrel monkey and their potential role in vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henley, C.; Igarashi, M.

    1993-01-01

    Polyamine synthesis increases in response to injurious stimuli including axotomy and denervation. Reduced eye nystagmus and head-deviation have been observed in unilateral labyrinthectomized (UL) guinea pigs treated with an inhibitor of polyamine synthesis, alpha-difluoromethylornithine (DFMO). We quantified polyamines in the lateral vestibular nuclei (LVN) of control and UL squirrel monkeys during the phase of vestibular compensation (VC) and performed an experiment to determine if DFMO reduces nystagmus previously observed in the guinea pig. Polyamines were detected in the LVN of control and UL squirrel monkeys. Putrescine and spermidine increased in the ipsilateral LVN 3 days after UL with no change in the contralateral LVN. No left-right differences were noted in the 5-day post-UL monkey. DFMO reduced nystagmus in a UL squirrel monkey. These findings suggest that polyamines are important in vestibular function and may contribute to nystagmus observed in VC.

  19. Plasticity of spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory synaptic activity in morphologically defined vestibular nuclei neurons during early vestibular compensation

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Mei; Hirsch, June C.

    2012-01-01

    After unilateral peripheral vestibular lesions, the brain plasticity underlying early recovery from the static symptoms is not fully understood. Principal cells of the chick tangential nucleus offer a subset of morphologically defined vestibular nuclei neurons to study functional changes after vestibular lesions. Chickens show posture and balance deficits immediately after unilateral vestibular ganglionectomy (UVG), but by 3 days most subjects begin to recover, although some remain uncompensated. With the use of whole cell voltage-clamp, spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) and miniature excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs and mIPSCs) were recorded from principal cells in brain slices 1 and 3 days after UVG. One day after UVG, sEPSC frequency increased on the lesion side and remained elevated at 3 days in uncompensated chickens only. Also by 3 days, sIPSC frequency increased on the lesion side in all operated chickens due to major increases in GABAergic events. Significant change also occurred in decay time of the events. To determine whether fluctuations in frequency and kinetics influenced overall excitatory or inhibitory synaptic drive, synaptic charge transfer was calculated. Principal cells showed significant increase in excitatory synaptic charge transfer only on the lesion side of uncompensated chickens. Thus compensation continues when synaptic charge transfer is in balance bilaterally. Furthermore, excessive excitatory drive in principal cells on the lesion side may prevent vestibular compensation. Altogether, this work is important for it defines the time course and excitatory and inhibitory nature of changing spontaneous synaptic inputs to a morphologically defined subset of vestibular nuclei neurons during critical early stages of recovery after UVG. PMID:21957228

  20. Significance of Vestibular Testing on Distinguishing the Nerve of Origin for Vestibular Schwannoma and Predicting the Preservation of Hearing

    PubMed Central

    He, Yu-Bo; Yu, Chun-Jiang; Ji, Hong-Ming; Qu, Yan-Ming; Chen, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Background: Determining the nerve of origin for vestibular schwannoma (VS), as a method for predicting hearing prognosis, has not been systematically considered. The vestibular test can be used to investigate the function of the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) and the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN). This study aimed to preoperatively distinguish the nerve of origin for VS patients using the vestibular test, and determine if this correlated with hearing preservation. Methods: A total of 106 patients with unilateral VS were enrolled in this study prospectively. Each patient received a caloric test, vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) test, and cochlear nerve function test (hearing) before the operation and 1 week, 3, and 6 months, postoperatively. All patients underwent surgical removal of the VS using the suboccipital approach. During the operation, the nerve of tumor origin (SVN or IVN) was identified by the surgeon. Tumor size was measured by preoperative magnetic resonance imaging. Results: The nerve of tumor origin could not be unequivocally identified in 38 patients (38/106, 35.80%). These patients were not subsequently evaluated. In 26 patients (nine females, seventeen males), tumors arose from the SVN and in 42 patients (18 females, 24 males), tumors arose from the IVN. Comparing with the nerve of origins (SVN and IVN) of tumors, the results of the caloric tests and VEMP tests were significantly different in tumors originating from the SVN and the IVN in our study. Hearing was preserved in 16 of 26 patients (61.54%) with SVN-originating tumors, whereas hearing was preserved in only seven of 42 patients (16.67%) with IVN-originating tumors. Conclusions: Our data suggest that caloric and VEMP tests might help to identify whether VS tumors originate from the SVN or IVN. These tests could also be used to evaluate the residual function of the nerves after surgery. Using this information, we might better predict the preservation of hearing for patients

  1. The Role of Cervical and Ocular Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials in the Assessment of Patients with Vestibular Schwannomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiarovano, Elodie; Darlington, Cynthia; Vidal, Pierre-Paul; Lamas, Georges; de Waele, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the clinical utility of VEMPs in patients suffering from unilateral vestibular schwannoma (VS) and to determine the optimal stimulation parameter (air conducted sound, bone conducted vibration) for evaluating the function of the vestibular nerve. Methods Data were obtained in 63 patients with non-operated VS, and 20 patients operated on VS. Vestibular function was assessed by caloric, cervical and ocular VEMP testing. 37/63 patients with conclusive ACS ocular VEMPs responses were studied separately. Results In the 63 non-operated VS patients, cVEMPs were abnormal in 65.1% of patients in response to AC STB and in 49.2% of patients to AC clicks. In the 37/63 patients with positive responses from the unaffected side, oVEMPs were abnormal in 75.7% of patients with ACS, in 67.6% with AFz and in 56.8% with mastoid BCV stimulation. In 16% of the patients, VEMPs were the only abnormal test (normal caloric and normal hearing). Among the 26 patients who did not show oVEMP responses on either side with ACS, oVEMPs responses could be obtained with AFz (50%) and with mastoid stimulation (89%). Conclusions The VEMP test demonstrated significant clinical value as it yielded the only abnormal test results in some patients suffering from a unilateral vestibular schwannoma. For oVEMPs, we suggest that ACS stimulation should be the initial test. In patients who responded to ACS and who had normal responses, BCV was not required. In patients with abnormal responses on the affected side using ACS, BCV at AFz should be used to confirm abnormal function of the superior vestibular nerve. In patients who exhibited no responses on either side to ACS, BCV was the only approach allowing assessment of the function of the superior vestibular nerve. We favor using AFz stimulation first because it is easier to perform in clinical practice than mastoid stimulation. PMID:25137289

  2. Systematic review of vestibular disorders related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Heinze, B; Swanepoel, D W; Hofmeyr, L M

    2011-09-01

    Disorders of the auditory and vestibular system are often associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. However, the extent and nature of these vestibular manifestations are unclear. To systematically review the current peer-reviewed literature on vestibular manifestations and pathology related to human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Systematic review of peer-reviewed articles related to vestibular findings in individuals with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Several electronic databases were searched. We identified 442 records, reduced to 210 after excluding duplicates and reviews. These were reviewed for relevance to the scope of the study. We identified only 13 reports investigating vestibular functioning and pathology in individuals affected by human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. This condition can affect both the peripheral and central vestibular system, irrespective of age and viral disease stage. Peripheral vestibular involvement may affect up to 50 per cent of patients, and central vestibular involvement may be even more prevalent. Post-mortem studies suggest direct involvement of the entire vestibular system, while opportunistic infections such as oto- and neurosyphilis and encephalitis cause secondary vestibular dysfunction resulting in vertigo, dizziness and imbalance. Patients with human immunodeficiency virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome should routinely be monitored for vestibular involvement, to minimise functional limitations of quality of life.

  3. Immunohistochemical profile of cytokines and growth factors expressed in vestibular schwannoma and in normal vestibular nerve tissue.

    PubMed

    Taurone, Samanta; Bianchi, Enrica; Attanasio, Giuseppe; Di Gioia, Cira; Ierinó, Rocco; Carubbi, Cecilia; Galli, Daniela; Pastore, Francesco Saverio; Giangaspero, Felice; Filipo, Roberto; Zanza, Christian; Artico, Marco

    2015-07-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, also known as acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors, which originate from myelin-forming Schwann cells. They develop in the vestibular branch of the eighth cranial nerve in the internal auditory canal or cerebellopontine angle. The clinical progression of the condition involves slow and progressive growth, eventually resulting in brainstem compression. The objective of the present study was to investigate the expression level and the localization of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), as well as the adhesion molecules, intracellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in order to determine whether these factors are involved in the transformation and development of human vestibular schwannoma. The present study investigated whether changes in inflammation are involved in tumor growth and if so, the mechanisms underlying this process. The results of the current study demonstrated that pro-inflammatory cytokines, including TGF-β1, IL-1β and IL-6 exhibited increased expression in human vestibular schwannoma tissue compared with normal vestibular nerve samples. TNF-α was weakly expressed in Schwann cells, confirming that a lower level of this cytokine is involved in the proliferation of Schwann cells. Neoplastic Schwann cells produce pro-inflammatory cytokines that may act in an autocrine manner, stimulating cellular proliferation. In addition, the increased expression of VEGF in vestibular schwannoma compared with that in normal vestibular nerve tissue, suggests that this factor may induce neoplastic growth via the promotion of angiogenesis. The present findings suggest that inflammation may promote angiogenesis and consequently contribute to tumor progression. In conclusion, the results of the present study indicated that VEGF and pro-inflammatory cytokines may be potential therapeutic targets in vestibular

  4. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Balatková, Zuzana; Chovanec, Martin; Čakrt, Ondřej; Hrubá, Silvie; Jeřábek, Jaroslav; Zvěřina, Eduard; Profant, Oliver; Fík, Zdeněk; Komarc, Martin; Kluh, Jan; Černý, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation (p < 0.05). This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896. PMID:28053986

  5. Vertigo Perception and Quality of Life in Patients after Surgical Treatment of Vestibular Schwannoma with Pretreatment Prehabituation by Chemical Vestibular Ablation.

    PubMed

    Čada, Zdeněk; Balatková, Zuzana; Chovanec, Martin; Čakrt, Ondřej; Hrubá, Silvie; Jeřábek, Jaroslav; Zvěřina, Eduard; Profant, Oliver; Fík, Zdeněk; Komarc, Martin; Betka, Jan; Kluh, Jan; Černý, Rudolf

    2016-01-01

    Surgical removal of vestibular schwannoma causes acute vestibular symptoms, including postoperative vertigo and oscillopsia due to nystagmus. In general, the dominant symptom postoperatively is vertigo. Preoperative chemical vestibular ablation can reduce vestibular symptoms postoperatively. We used 1.0 mL of 40 mg/mL nonbuffered gentamicin in three intratympanic installations over 2 days, 2 months preoperatively in 10 patients. Reduction of vestibular function was measured by the head impulse test and the caloric test. Reduction of vestibular function was found in all gentamicin patient groups. After gentamicin vestibular ablation, patients underwent home vestibular exercising for two months. The control group consisted of 10 patients who underwent only home vestibular training two months preoperatively. Postoperative rates of recovery and vertigo in both groups were evaluated with the Glasgow Benefit Inventory (GBI), the Glasgow Health Status Inventory (GHSI), and the Dizziness Handicap Inventory questionnaires, as well as survey of visual symptoms by specific questionnaire developed by us. There were no statistically significant differences between both groups with regard to the results of questionnaires. Patients who received preoperative gentamicin were more resilient to optokinetic and optic flow stimulation ( p < 0.05). This trial is registered with clinical study registration number NCT02963896.

  6. Organization of projections from the raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halberstadt, A. L.; Balaban, C. D.

    2003-01-01

    Previous anatomic and electrophysiological evidence suggests that serotonin modulates processing in the vestibular nuclei. This study examined the organization of projections from serotonergic raphe nuclei to the vestibular nuclei in rats. The distribution of serotonergic axons in the vestibular nuclei was visualized immunohistochemically in rat brain slices using antisera directed against the serotonin transporter. The density of serotonin transporter-immunopositive fibers is greatest in the superior vestibular nucleus and the medial vestibular nucleus, especially along the border of the fourth ventricle; it declines in more lateral and caudal regions of the vestibular nuclear complex. After unilateral iontophoretic injections of Fluoro-Gold into the vestibular nuclei, retrogradely labeled neurons were found in the dorsal raphe nucleus (including the dorsomedial, ventromedial and lateral subdivisions) and nucleus raphe obscurus, and to a minor extent in nucleus raphe pallidus and nucleus raphe magnus. The combination of retrograde tracing with serotonin immunohistofluorescence in additional experiments revealed that the vestibular nuclei receive both serotonergic and non-serotonergic projections from raphe nuclei. Tracer injections in densely innervated regions (especially the medial and superior vestibular nuclei) were associated with the largest numbers of Fluoro-Gold-labeled cells. Differences were observed in the termination patterns of projections from the individual raphe nuclei. Thus, the dorsal raphe nucleus sends projections that terminate predominantly in the rostral and medial aspects of the vestibular nuclear complex, while nucleus raphe obscurus projects relatively uniformly throughout the vestibular nuclei. Based on the topographical organization of raphe input to the vestibular nuclei, it appears that dense projections from raphe nuclei are colocalized with terminal fields of flocculo-nodular lobe and uvula Purkinje cells. It is hypothesized that

  7. Medial vestibular connections with the hypocretin (orexin) system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horowitz, Seth S.; Blanchard, Jane; Morin, Lawrence P.

    2005-01-01

    The mammalian medial vestibular nucleus (MVe) receives input from all vestibular endorgans and provides extensive projections to the central nervous system. Recent studies have demonstrated projections from the MVe to the circadian rhythm system. In addition, there are known projections from the MVe to regions considered to be involved in sleep and arousal. In this study, afferent and efferent subcortical connectivity of the medial vestibular nucleus of the golden hamster (Mesocricetus auratus) was evaluated using cholera toxin subunit-B (retrograde), Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (anterograde), and pseudorabies virus (transneuronal retrograde) tract-tracing techniques. The results demonstrate MVe connections with regions mediating visuomotor and postural control, as previously observed in other mammals. The data also identify extensive projections from the MVe to regions mediating arousal and sleep-related functions, most of which receive immunohistochemically identified projections from the lateral hypothalamic hypocretin (orexin) neurons. These include the locus coeruleus, dorsal and pedunculopontine tegmental nuclei, dorsal raphe, and lateral preoptic area. The MVe itself receives a projection from hypocretin cells. CTB tracing demonstrated reciprocal connections between the MVe and most brain areas receiving MVe efferents. Virus tracing confirmed and extended the MVe afferent connections identified with CTB and additionally demonstrated transneuronal connectivity with the suprachiasmatic nucleus and the medial habenular nucleus. These anatomical data indicate that the vestibular system has access to a broad array of neural functions not typically associated with visuomotor, balance, or equilibrium, and that the MVe is likely to receive information from many of the same regions to which it projects.

  8. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential findings in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Escorihuela García, Vicente; Llópez Carratalá, Ignacio; Orts Alborch, Miguel; Marco Algarra, Jaime

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an inflammatory disease involving the occurrence of demyelinating, chronic neurodegenerative lesions in the central nervous system. We studied vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in this pathology, to allow us to evaluate the saccule, inferior vestibular nerve and vestibular-spinal pathway non-invasively. There were 23 patients diagnosed with multiple sclerosis who underwent VEMP recordings, comparing our results with a control group consisting of 35 healthy subjects. We registered p13 and n23 wave latencies, interaural amplitude difference and asymmetry ratio between both ears. Subjects also underwent an otoscopy and audiometric examination. The prolongation of p13 and n23 wave latencies was the most notable characteristic, with a mean p13 wave latency of 19.53 milliseconds and a mean latency of 30.06 milliseconds for n23. In contrast, the asymmetry index showed no significant differences with our control group. In case of multiple sclerosis, the prolongation of the p13 and n23 VEMP wave latencies is a feature that has been attributed to slowing of conduction by demyelination of the vestibular-spinal pathway. In this regard, alteration of the response or lack thereof in these potentials has a locator value of injury to the lower brainstem. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  9. Stimulus Characteristics for Vestibular Stochastic Resonance to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; Kofman, Igor; Peters, Brian; Wood, Scott; Serrado, Jorge; Cohen, Helen; Reschke, Millard; Bloomberg, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can enhance the response of neural systems to relevant sensory signals. Studies have shown that imperceptible stochastic vestibular electrical stimulation, when applied to normal young and elderly subjects, significantly improved their ocular stabilization reflexes in response to whole-body tilt as well as balance performance during postural disturbances. The goal of this study was to optimize the amplitude characteristics of the stochastic vestibular signals for balance performance during standing on an unstable surface. Subjects performed a standard balance task of standing on a block of foam with their eyes closed. Bipolar stochastic electrical stimulation was applied to the vestibular system using constant current stimulation through electrodes placed over the mastoid process behind the ears. Amplitude of the signals varied in the range of 0-700 microamperes. Balance performance was measured using a force plate under the foam block, and inertial motion sensors were placed on the torso and head. Balance performance with stimulation was significantly greater (10%-25%) than with no stimulation. The signal amplitude at which performance was maximized was in the range of 100-300 microamperes. Optimization of the amplitude of the stochastic signals for maximizing balance performance will have a significant impact on development of vestibular SR as a unique system to aid recovery of function in astronauts after long-duration space flight or in patients with balance disorders.

  10. Complex vestibular macular anatomical relationships need a synthetic approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Mammalian vestibular maculae are anatomically organized for complex parallel processing of linear acceleration information. Anatomical findings in rat maculae are provided in order to underscore this complexity, which is little understood functionally. This report emphasizes that a synthetic approach is critical to understanding how maculae function and the kind of information they conduct to the brain.

  11. The Development of Vestibular Connections in Rat Embryos in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bruce, Laura L.; Fritzsch, Bernd

    1997-01-01

    Existing experimental embryological data suggests that the vestibular system initially develops in a very rigid and genetically controlled manner. Nevertheless, gravity appears to be a critical factor in the normal development of the vestibular system that monitors position with respect to gravity (saccule and utricle). In fact several studies have shown that prenatal exposure to microgravity causes temporary deficits in gravity-dependent righting behaviors, and prolonged exposure to hypergravity from conception to weaning causes permanent deficits in gravity-dependent righting behaviors. Data on hypergravity and microgravity exposure suggest some changes in the otolith formation during development, in particular the size although these changes may actually vary with the species involved. In adults exposed to microgravity there is a change in the synaptic density in the otic sensory epithelia suggesting that some adaptation may occur there. However, effects have also been reported in the brainstem. Several studies have shown synaptic changes in the lateral vestibular nucleus and in the nodulus of the cerebellum after neonatal exposure to hypergravity. We report here that synaptogenesis in the medial vestibular nucleus is retarded in developing rat embryos that were exposed to microgravity from gestation days 9 to 19.

  12. Mechanisms for vestibular disorders in space flight. Facts and hypotheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matsnev, E. I.

    1980-01-01

    This article discusses the vestibular disorders associated with space flight. It is found there is still no complete understanding of the changes occurring in the sensory systems of the body during weightlessness. Results of studies are presented, including results of a ground model.

  13. Vestibular Stimulation and Development of the Small Premature Infant.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Mary V.

    This study was designed to explore the effects of vestibular stimulation on the developmental behavior, respiratory functioning, weight and length gains, and morbidity and mortality rates of premature infants. A total of 20 infants participated in this study in 4 groups of 5 infants each. Group A infants were placed in a motorized hammock within…

  14. Predictors of vertigo in patients with untreated vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Jan Fredrik; Nilsen, Kathrin Skorpa; Vassbotn, Flemming Slinning; Møller, Per; Myrseth, Erling; Lund-Johansen, Morten; Goplen, Frederik Kragerud

    2015-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that vertigo is the most powerful negative predictor of quality of life in patients with vestibular schwannomas, but the variability in vertigo symptom severity is still poorly understood. We wanted to find out whether vertigo could be related to objective parameters such as tumor size, location, vestibular nerve function, hearing, and postural stability in patients with untreated vestibular schwannomas. Baseline data from prospective cohort study. Tertiary referral center. Four hundred thirty-four consecutive patients with unilateral VS diagnosed on MRI. Mean age 56 years (range 16-84 yr). Fifty-three percent women. Diagnostic, with a medical history, otolaryngological examination, pure-tone and speech audiometry, MRI, posturography, and videonystagmography with bithermal caloric tests. Dizziness measured on a 100-mm visual analog scale (VAS). Secondary outcome measures were canal paresis and postural imbalance (static and dynamic posturography). Three hundred three patients (70%) completed the VAS. Severe dizziness, defined as VAS 75 or greater, was reported by 9% of the patients. Larger tumors were associated with higher risk of postural instability and canal paresis. Moderate to severe dizziness was associated with postural imbalance and canal paresis, and possibly with small to medium-sized tumors. Postural instability was related to tumor size and canal paresis when measured by dynamic, but not with static, posturography. A minority of VS patients experience severe vestibular symptoms related to canal paresis and postural instability. A curvilinear relationship is hypothesized between tumor size and dizziness.

  15. Current concepts and future approaches to vestibular rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Tjernström, Fredrik; Zur, Oz; Jahn, Klaus

    2016-04-01

    Over the last decades methods of vestibular rehabilitation to enhance adaptation to vestibular loss, habituation to changing sensory conditions, and sensory reweighting in the compensation process have been developed. However, the use of these techniques still depends to a large part on the educational background of the therapist. Individualized assessment of deficits and specific therapeutic programs for different disorders are sparse. Currently, vestibular rehabilitation is often used in an unspecific way in dizzy patients irrespective of the clinical findings. When predicting the future of vestibular rehabilitation, it is tempting to foretell advances in technology for assessment and treatment only, but the current intense exchange between clinicians and basic scientists also predicts advances in truly understanding the complex interactions between the peripheral senses and central adaptation mechanisms. More research is needed to develop reliable techniques to measure sensory dependence and to learn how this knowledge can be best used--by playing off the patient's sensory strength or working on the weakness. To be able using the emerging concepts, the neuro-otological community must strive to educate physicians, physiotherapists and nurses to perform the correct examinations for assessment of individual deficits and to look for factors that might impede rehabilitation.

  16. Vertigo in Vestibular Schwannoma Patients Due to Other Pathologies.

    PubMed

    Sahyouni, Ronald; Moshtaghi, Omid; Haidar, Yarah M; Mahboubi, Hossein; Moshtaghi, Afsheen; Lin, Harrison W; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2017-12-01

    To report findings from a cohort of vestibular schwannoma (VS) patients presenting with vertigo from a secondary comorbid vestibular disorder; and to discuss management strategies for this subset of patients presenting with both episodic vertigo and VS. All VS patients who presented with vertigo as the primary symptom from 2012 to 2015 and endorsing no other major complaints were examined. Treatment with migraine lifestyle and prophylactic therapy, or Epley maneuver. Resolution of vertigo following medical treatment alone. Of the nine patients studied, seven (78%) suffered from vestibular migraine, and two (22%) experienced benign positional vertigo. All patients experienced complete resolution of symptoms after treatment. As a result of symptomatic improvement, seven patients (78%) avoided surgery in favor of observation, while two patients (22%) underwent radiosurgery due to continued tumor growth and other nonvertigo symptoms. VS patients can sometimes present with a history of recurrent episodic vertigo. The etiology of the vertigo could be due to the tumor itself or may be due to an underlying comorbidity such as vestibular migraine or benign positional vertigo. VS patients presenting with vertigo should undergo a standard vertigo history and examination to identify other potential causes of vertigo. Most VS patients in our cohort avoided intervention and had resolution of their vertigo.

  17. Spatial orientation of the vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raphan, T.; Dai, M.; Cohen, B.

    1992-01-01

    1. A simplified three-dimensional state space model of visual vestibular interaction was formulated. Matrix and dynamical system operators representing coupling from the semicircular canals and the visual system to the velocity storage integrator were incorporated into the model. 2. It was postulated that the system matrix for a tilted position was a composition of two linear transformations of the system matrix for the upright position. One transformation modifies the eigenvalues of the system matrix while another rotates the pitch and roll eigenvectors with the head, while maintaining the yaw axis eigenvector approximately spatially invariant. Using this representation, the response characteristics of the pitch, roll, and yaw eye velocity were obtained in terms of the eigenvalues and associated eigenvectors. 3. Using OKAN data obtained from monkeys and comparing to the model predictions, the eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the system matrix were identified as a function of tilt to the side or of tilt to the prone positions, using a modification of the Marquardt algorithm. The yaw eigenvector for right-side-down tilt and for downward pitch cross-coupling was approximately 30 degrees from the spatial vertical. For the prone position, the eigenvector was computed to be approximately 20 degrees relative to the spatial vertical. For both side-down and prone positions, oblique OKN induced along eigenvector directions generated OKAN which decayed to zero along a straight line with approximately a single time constant. This was verified by a spectral analysis of the residual sequence about the straight line fit to the decaying data. The residual sequence was associated with a narrow autocorrelation function and a wide power spectrum. 4. Parameters found using the Marquardt algorithm were incorporated into the model. Diagonal matrices in a head coordinate frame were introduced to represent the direct pathway and the coupling of the visual system to the integrator. Model

  18. Comparative analysis of vestibular ecomorphology in birds.

    PubMed

    Benson, Roger B J; Starmer-Jones, Ethan; Close, Roger A; Walsh, Stig A

    2017-12-01

    The bony labyrinth of vertebrates houses the semicircular canals. These sense rotational accelerations of the head and play an essential role in gaze stabilisation during locomotion. The sizes and shapes of the semicircular canals have hypothesised relationships to agility and locomotory modes in many groups, including birds, and a burgeoning palaeontological literature seeks to make ecological interpretations from the morphology of the labyrinth in extinct species. Rigorous tests of form-function relationships for the vestibular system are required to support these interpretations. We test the hypothesis that the lengths, streamlines and angles between the semicircular canals are related to body size, wing kinematics and flying style in birds. To do this, we applied geometric morphometrics and multivariate phylogenetic comparative methods to a dataset of 64 three-dimensional reconstructions of the endosseous labyrinth obtained using micro-computed tomography scanning of bird crania. A strong relationship between centroid size of the semicircular canals and body size indicates that larger birds have longer semicircular canals compared with their evolutionary relatives. Wing kinematics related to manoeuvrability (and quantified using the brachial index) explain a small additional portion of the variance in labyrinth size. We also find strong evidence for allometric shape change in the semicircular canals of birds, indicating that major aspects of the shape of the avian labyrinth are determined by spatial constraints. The avian braincase accommodates a large brain, a large eye and large semicircular canals compared with other tetrapods. Negative allometry of these structures means that the restriction of space within the braincase is intense in small birds. This may explain our observation that the angles between planes of the semicircular canals of birds deviate more strongly from orthogonality than those of mammals, and especially from agile, gliding and flying

  19. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lichtenberg, B. K.

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1-g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1-g. From

  20. Multivariate Analyses of Balance Test Performance, Vestibular Thresholds, and Age

    PubMed Central

    Karmali, Faisal; Bermúdez Rey, María Carolina; Clark, Torin K.; Wang, Wei; Merfeld, Daniel M.

    2017-01-01

    We previously published vestibular perceptual thresholds and performance in the Modified Romberg Test of Standing Balance in 105 healthy humans ranging from ages 18 to 80 (1). Self-motion thresholds in the dark included roll tilt about an earth-horizontal axis at 0.2 and 1 Hz, yaw rotation about an earth-vertical axis at 1 Hz, y-translation (interaural/lateral) at 1 Hz, and z-translation (vertical) at 1 Hz. In this study, we focus on multiple variable analyses not reported in the earlier study. Specifically, we investigate correlations (1) among the five thresholds measured and (2) between thresholds, age, and the chance of failing condition 4 of the balance test, which increases vestibular reliance by having subjects stand on foam with eyes closed. We found moderate correlations (0.30–0.51) between vestibular thresholds for different motions, both before and after using our published aging regression to remove age effects. We found that lower or higher thresholds across all threshold measures are an individual trait that account for about 60% of the variation in the population. This can be further distributed into two components with about 20% of the variation explained by aging and 40% of variation explained by a single principal component that includes similar contributions from all threshold measures. When only roll tilt 0.2 Hz thresholds and age were analyzed together, we found that the chance of failing condition 4 depends significantly on both (p = 0.006 and p = 0.013, respectively). An analysis incorporating more variables found that the chance of failing condition 4 depended significantly only on roll tilt 0.2 Hz thresholds (p = 0.046) and not age (p = 0.10), sex nor any of the other four threshold measures, suggesting that some of the age effect might be captured by the fact that vestibular thresholds increase with age. For example, at 60 years of age, the chance of failing is roughly 5% for the lowest roll tilt thresholds

  1. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lichtenberg, Byron K.

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1- g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1- g

  2. Vestibular factors influencing the biomedical support of humans in space.

    PubMed

    Lichtenberg, B K

    1988-01-01

    This paper will describe the biomedical support aspects of humans in space with respect to the vestibular system. The vestibular system is thought to be the primary sensory system involved in the short-term effects of space motion sickness although there is increasing evidence that many factors play a role in this complex set of symptoms. There is the possibility that an individual's inner sense of orientation may be strongly coupled with the susceptibility to space motion sickness. A variety of suggested countermeasures for space motion sickness will be described. Although there are no known ground-based tests that can predict space motion sickness, the search should go on. The long term effects of the vestibular system in weightlessness are still relatively unknown. Some preliminary data has shown that the otoconia are irregular in size and distribution following extended periods of weightlessness. The ramifications of this data are not yet known and because the data was obtained on lower order animals, definitive studies and results must wait until the space station era when higher primates can be studied for long durations. This leads us to artificial gravity, the last topic of this paper. The vestibular system is intimately tied to this question since it has been shown on Earth that exposure to a slow rotating room causes motion sickness for some period of time before adaptation occurs. If the artificial gravity is intermittent, will this mean that people will get sick every time they experience it? The data from many astronauts returning to Earth indicates that a variety of sensory illusions are present, especially immediately upon return to a 1-g environment. Oscillopsia or apparent motion of the visual surround upon head motion along with inappropriate eye motions for a given head motion, all indicate that there is much to be studied yet about the vestibular and CNS systems reaction to a sudden application of a steady state acceleration field like 1-g. From

  3. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients with vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Califano, Luigi; Iorio, Giuseppina; Salafia, Francesca; Mazzone, Salvatore; Califano, Maria

    2015-02-01

    To determine the utility of the hyperventilation test (HVT) in the diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma (VS). A retrospective analysis of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVIN) in 45 patients with unilateral VS. A tertiary referral center. Forty-five patients with VS; 30 patients with chronic vestibular neuritis; 20 healthy subjects with normal hearing and without symptoms or a history of vertigo, migraine, or neurological diseases (control group). Audiological and vestibular examination; "side-stream" measurement of end-tidal CO2 pressure (P(EtCO2)) to standardize the procedure; magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) centered on the cerebellopontine angle. An analysis of HVIN, its patterns, and its appearance threshold via the measurement of P(EtCO2) correlations with the tumor size. HVIN was observed in 40 of 45 cases (88.9%) in the schwannoma group and in 12 of 30 cases (40%) in the chronic vestibular neuritis group; HVIN was not observed in the control group (0/20 cases) (p < 0.001). In the schwannoma group, HVIN was evoked at a mean P(EtCO2) value of 16.5 ± 1.15 mm Hg. The hypofunctional labyrinth was identified with high sensibility and specificity through caloric test, head shaking test, and head thrust test. The excitatory pattern, which included HVIN with slow phases that beat toward the hypofunctional side, and the paretic pattern, which included HVIN with slow phases that beat toward the hypofunctional side, were not significantly associated with VS size (19.04 ± 10.56 mm for the excitatory pattern and 19.06 ± 11.01 mm for the paretic pattern). The difference in the VS size in HVIN+ (19.05 ± 10.60 mm) and HVIN- (8.40 ± 2.19 mm) cases was significant (p = 0.009). A 60-second hyperventilation event causes metabolic changes in the vestibular system and reveals a latent vestibular asymmetry. The presence of an excitatory pattern is the major criterion that suggests VS in patients with signs of unilateral vestibular deficit.

  4. The development of the ICF vestibular environmental scale.

    PubMed

    Whitney, Susan L; Alghadir, Ahmad; Alghwiri, Alia; Alshebber, Kefah M; Alshehri, Mohammed; Furman, Joseph M; Mueller, Martin; Grill, Eva

    2016-07-02

    People with vestibular disorders report changes in symptoms based on their environment with many situations increasing their symptoms. The purpose of this paper was to utilize the International Classification of Functioning Disability and Health (ICF) from the World Health Organization (WHO) to describe common environmental triggers for dizziness in persons living with balance and vestibular disorders. A multi-centre cross-sectional study was conducted with four different centres on three different continents, including patients from the United States (Pittsburgh), Germany (Munich), Jordan (Amman) and Saudi Arabia (Riyadh). Three hundred eighty one persons with vestibular disorders participated. A 9-item questionnaire (the Vestibular Environmental Scale) was developed from existing ICF items, which were compared to Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) scores. Sixty-five percent of participants reported that "quick movements in the vicinity" increased symptoms, "crowds" at 45%, and "design of buildings, e.g. narrow hallways, stairs, elevators" at 42%. The "crowds" item was a good positive predictor of psychogenic vertigo (OR 1.8, 95% Confidence Interval 1.03-3.16), while "food" (OR 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval 0.17-1.29) and "light" (OR 0.41 95% Confidence Interval 0.23-0.75) were negative predictors of psychogenic vertigo. There also was a positive correlation between the number of triggers and DHI score (Spearman correlation coefficient 0.47, p < 0.0001). Sixty-eight percent of the subjects reported an increase in symptoms with between 1 and 4 environmental triggers. In our cross cultural sample, environmental triggers affect dizziness in persons living with balance and vestibular disorders. The use of items from the ICF of the WHO may help to promote cross cultural sharing of information in persons with dizziness.

  5. Translabyrinthine surgery for disabling vertigo in vestibular schwannoma patients.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, W P; Hastan, D; van der Mey, A G L

    2007-06-01

    To determine the impact of translabyrinthine surgery on the quality of life in vestibular schwannoma patients with rotatory vertigo. Prospective study in 18 vestibular schwannoma patients. The study was conducted in a multispecialty tertiary care clinic. All 18 patients had a unilateral intracanalicular vestibular schwannoma, without serviceable hearing in the affected ear and severely handicapped by attacks of rotatory vertigo and constant dizziness. Despite an initial conservative treatment, extensive vestibular rehabilitation exercises, translabyrinthine surgery was performed because of the disabling character of the vertigo, which considerably continued to affect the patients' quality of life. Preoperative and postoperative quality of life using the Short Form 36 Health Survey (Short Form-36) scores and Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) scores. A total of 17 patients (94%) completed the questionnaire preoperatively and 3 and 12 months postoperatively. All Short Form-36 scales of the studied patients scored significantly lower when compared with the healthy Dutch control sample (P < 0.05). There was a significant improvement of DHI total scores and Short Form-36 scales on physical and social functioning, role-physical functioning, role-emotional functioning, mental health and general health at 12 months after surgery when compared with preoperative scores (P < 0.05). Vestibular schwannoma patients with disabling vertigo, experience significant reduced quality of life when compared with a healthy Dutch population. Translabyrinthine tumour removal significantly improved the patients' quality of life. Surgical treatment should be considered in patients with small- or medium-sized tumours and persisting disabling vertigo resulting in a poor quality of life.

  6. Prediction of Balance Compensation After Vestibular Schwannoma Surgery.

    PubMed

    Parietti-Winkler, Cécile; Lion, Alexis; Frère, Julien; Perrin, Philippe P; Beurton, Renaud; Gauchard, Gérome C

    2016-06-01

    Background Balance compensation after vestibular schwannoma (VS) surgery is under the influence of specific preoperative patient and tumor characteristics. Objective To prospectively identify potential prognostic factors for balance recovery, we compared the respective influence of these preoperative characteristics on balance compensation after VS surgery. Methods In 50 patients scheduled for VS surgical ablation, we measured postural control before surgery (BS), 8 (AS8) days after, and 90 (AS90) days after surgery. Based on factors found previously in the literature, we evaluated age, body mass index and preoperative physical activity (PA), tumor grade, vestibular status, and preference for visual cues to control balance as potential prognostic factors using stepwise multiple regression models. Results An asymmetric vestibular function was the sole significant explanatory factor for impaired balance performance BS, whereas the preoperative PA alone significantly contributed to higher performance at AS8. An evaluation of patients' balance recovery over time showed that PA and vestibular status were the 2 significant predictive factors for short-term postural compensation (BS to AS8), whereas none of these preoperative factors was significantly predictive for medium-term postoperative postural recovery (AS8 to AS90). Conclusions We identified specific preoperative patient and vestibular function characteristics that may predict postoperative balance recovery after VS surgery. Better preoperative characterization of these factors in each patient could inform more personalized presurgical and postsurgical management, leading to a better, more rapid balance recovery, earlier return to normal daily activities and work, improved quality of life, and reduced medical and societal costs. © The Author(s) 2015.

  7. UAS Integration into the NAS Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Jeff

    2010-01-01

    The goal of the UAS Integration in the NAS Project is to contribute capabilities that reduce technical barriers related to the safety and operational challenges associated with enabling routine UAS access to the NAS This goal will be accomplished through a two-phased approach of system-level integration of key concepts, technologies and/or procedures, and demonstrations of integrated capabilities in an operationally relevant environment. Technical objectives include: PHASE 1: a) Validating the key technical areas identified by this project. System-level analyses, a State of the Art Analysis (SOAA), and a ConOps will identify the challenges and barriers preventing routine UAS access to the NAS. b) Developing a national roadmap and gap analysis identifying specific deliverables in the area of operations, procedures, and technologies that will impact future policy decisions. PHASE 2: a) Provide regulators with a methodology for developing airworthiness requirements for UAS and data to support development of certifications standards and regulatory guidance. b) Provide systems-level integrated testing of concepts and/or capabilities that address barriers to routine access to the NAS. Through simulation and flight testing, address issues including separation assurance, communications requirements, and Pilot Aircraft Interfaces (PAIs) in operationally relevant environments

  8. Security Controls Hurt Research, NAS Warns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A National Academy of Sciences (NAS) report found no evidence that leaks of technical information from universities or other research centers have damaged national security. However, in areas where control is warranted, decisions should be based on criteria. These criteria and issues related to security control and technological transfer are…

  9. Hair cell specific NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in vestibular end organs: potential role of purinergic signaling in vestibular sensory transduction.

    PubMed

    O'Keeffe, Mary G; Thorne, Peter R; Housley, Gary D; Robson, Simon C; Vlajkovic, Srdjan M

    2012-01-01

    A complex extracellular nucleotide signalling system acting on P2 receptors is involved in regulation of cochlear function in the mammalian inner ear. Ectonucleoside triphosphate diphosphohydrolases (E-NTPDases) are ectonucleotidases that regulate P2 receptor signalling pathways in mammalian tissues by hydrolysing extracellular nucleotides to the respective nucleosides. All enzymes from the CD39/ENTPD family (NTPDase1-8) are expressed in the adult rat cochlea, but their expression and distribution in the vestibular end organ is unknown. This report demonstrates selective expression of NTPDase6 by rat vestibular hair cells. Hair cells transducing both angular acceleration (crista ampullaris) and static head position (maculae of the utricle and saccule) exhibited strong immunolabelling with a bias towards the sensory pole and in particular, the hair cell bundle. NTPDase6 is an intracellular enzyme that can be released in a soluble form from cell cultures and shows an enzymatic preference for nucleoside 5'-diphosphates, such as guanosine 5'-diphosphate (GDP) and uridine 5'-diphosphate (UDP). The main function of NTPDase6 may be the regulation of nucleotide levels in cellular organelles by regulating the conversion of nucleotides to nucleosides. NTPDase6 immunolocalisation in the vestibular end organ could be linked to the regulation of P2 receptor signalling and sensory transduction, including maintenance of vestibular hair bundles.

  10. Structural and functional connectivity mapping of the vestibular circuitry from human brainstem to cortex.

    PubMed

    Kirsch, V; Keeser, D; Hergenroeder, T; Erat, O; Ertl-Wagner, B; Brandt, T; Dieterich, M

    2016-04-01

    Structural and functional interconnections of the bilateral central vestibular network have not yet been completely delineated. This includes both ipsilateral and contralateral pathways and crossing sites on the way from the vestibular nuclei via the thalamic relay stations to multiple "vestibular cortex" areas. This study investigated "vestibular" connectivity in the living human brain in between the vestibular nuclei and the parieto-insular vestibular cortex (PIVC) by combined structural and functional connectivity mapping using diffusion tensor imaging and functional connectivity magnetic resonance imaging in 24 healthy right-handed volunteers. We observed a congruent functional and structural link between the vestibular nuclei and the ipsilateral and contralateral PIVC. Five separate and distinct vestibular pathways were identified: three run ipsilaterally, while the two others cross either in the pons or the midbrain. Two of the ipsilateral projections run through the posterolateral or paramedian thalamic subnuclei, while the third bypasses the thalamus to reach the inferior part of the insular cortex directly. Both contralateral pathways travel through the posterolateral thalamus. At the cortical level, the PIVC regions of both hemispheres with a right hemispherical dominance are interconnected transcallosally through the antero-caudal splenium. The above-described bilateral vestibular circuitry in its entirety takes the form of a structure of a rope ladder extending from the brainstem to the cortex with three crossings in the brainstem (vestibular nuclei, pons, midbrain), none at thalamic level and a fourth cortical crossing through the splenium of the corpus callosum.

  11. Ultrastructural localization of ChAT-like immunoreactivity in the human vestibular periphery.

    PubMed

    Kong, W J; Hussl, B; Thumfart, W F; Schrott-Fischer, A

    1998-05-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) has long been considered a neurotransmitter candidate in the efferent vestibular system of mammals. Recently, choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), the synthesizing enzyme for ACh, was immunocytochemically localized in all five end-organs of the rat vestibule (Kong et al. (1994) Hear. Res. 75, 192-200). However, there is little information in the literature concerning the cholinergic innervation in the vestibular periphery of man. In the present study the ultrastructural localization of the ChAT-like immunoreactivity in the human vestibular periphery was investigated in order to reveal the cholinergic innervation in the human vestibular end-organs. A modified method of pre-embedding immunoelectron microscopy was applied. It was found that the ChAT-like immunoreactivity was located in the bouton-type vesiculated nerve terminals in the vestibular neurosensory epithelia of man. These ChAT-like immunostained nerve terminals make synaptic contacts either with afferent chalices surrounding type I vestibular sensory hair cells, or with type II vestibular sensory hair cells. These results show that the ChAT-like immunoreactivity in the human vestibular periphery is confined to the efferent vestibular system. The ChAT-containing efferents innervate both type I hair cells and type II hair cells, making postsynaptic and presynaptic contacts, respectively. This study presents evidence that ACh is a neurotransmitter candidate in the efferent vestibular system of man.

  12. Artificial Balance: Restoration of the Vestibulo-Ocular Reflex in Humans with a Prototype Vestibular Neuroprosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Perez Fornos, Angelica; Guinand, Nils; van de Berg, Raymond; Stokroos, Robert; Micera, Silvestro; Kingma, Herman; Pelizzone, Marco; Guyot, Jean-Philippe

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system plays a crucial role in the multisensory control of balance. When vestibular function is lost, essential tasks such as postural control, gaze stabilization, and spatial orientation are limited and the quality of life of patients is significantly impaired. Currently, there is no effective treatment for bilateral vestibular deficits. Research efforts both in animals and humans during the last decade set a solid background to the concept of using electrical stimulation to restore vestibular function. Still, the potential clinical benefit of a vestibular neuroprosthesis has to be demonstrated to pave the way for a translation into clinical trials. An important parameter for the assessment of vestibular function is the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR), the primary mechanism responsible for maintaining the perception of a stable visual environment while moving. Here we show that the VOR can be artificially restored in humans using motion-controlled, amplitude modulated electrical stimulation of the ampullary branches of the vestibular nerve. Three patients received a vestibular neuroprosthesis prototype, consisting of a modified cochlear implant providing vestibular electrodes. Significantly higher VOR responses were observed when the prototype was turned ON. Furthermore, VOR responses increased significantly as the intensity of the stimulation increased, reaching on average 79% of those measured in healthy volunteers in the same experimental conditions. These results constitute a fundamental milestone and allow us to envision for the first time clinically useful rehabilitation of patients with bilateral vestibular loss. PMID:24808890

  13. Vestibular neurolabyrinthitis: a follow-up study with cervical and ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and the video head impulse test.

    PubMed

    Magliulo, Giuseppe; Gagliardi, Silvia; Ciniglio Appiani, Mario; Iannella, Giannicola; Re, Massimo

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate prospectively, in a group of patients affected by vestibular neurolabyrinthitis (VN), a diagnostic protocol including cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (C-VEMPs), ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (O-VEMPs), and the video head impulse test (vHIT). The diagnosis of VN was based on the patient's clinical history, an absence of associated auditory or neurologic symptoms, and a neuro-otological examination with an evaluation of lateral semicircular canal function by use of the Fitzgerald-Hallpike caloric vestibular test and the ice test. In our series, 55% of the cases were superior and inferior VN, 40% were superior VN, and 5% were inferior VN. These cases, however, comprised different degrees of vestibular involvement, as the individual vestibular end organs have different prognoses. Four patients had only deficits of the horizontal and superior semicircular canals or their ampullary nerves. The implementation of C-VEMPs, O-VEMPs, and the vHIT in a vestibular diagnostic protocol has made it possible to observe patients with ampullary VN in a way that has not been feasible with other types of vestibular examinations. The age of the patient seems to have some impact on recovery from VN. When recovery occurs in the utricular and saccular nerves first and in the ampullary nerves subsequently, it may be reasonable to expect a more favorable outcome.

  14. Visual-vestibular integration motion perception reporting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harm, Deborah L.; Reschke, Millard R.; Parker, Donald E.

    1999-01-01

    Self-orientation and self/surround-motion perception derive from a multimodal sensory process that integrates information from the eyes, vestibular apparatus, proprioceptive and somatosensory receptors. Results from short and long duration spaceflight investigations indicate that: (1) perceptual and sensorimotor function was disrupted during the initial exposure to microgravity and gradually improved over hours to days (individuals adapt), (2) the presence and/or absence of information from different sensory modalities differentially affected the perception of orientation, self-motion and surround-motion, (3) perceptual and sensorimotor function was initially disrupted upon return to Earth-normal gravity and gradually recovered to preflight levels (individuals readapt), and (4) the longer the exposure to microgravity, the more complete the adaptation, the more profound the postflight disturbances, and the longer the recovery period to preflight levels. While much has been learned about perceptual and sensorimotor reactions and adaptation to microgravity, there is much remaining to be learned about the mechanisms underlying the adaptive changes, and about how intersensory interactions affect perceptual and sensorimotor function during voluntary movements. During space flight, SMS and perceptual disturbances have led to reductions in performance efficiency and sense of well-being. During entry and immediately after landing, such disturbances could have a serious impact on the ability of the commander to land the Orbiter and on the ability of all crew members to egress from the Orbiter, particularly in a non-nominal condition or following extended stays in microgravity. An understanding of spatial orientation and motion perception is essential for developing countermeasures for Space Motion Sickness (SMS) and perceptual disturbances during spaceflight and upon return to Earth. Countermeasures for optimal performance in flight and a successful return to Earth require

  15. Synaptic plasticity in the medial vestibular nuclei: role of glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers in rat brainstem slices.

    PubMed

    Grassi, S; Pettorossi, V E

    2001-08-01

    The analysis of cellular-molecular events mediating synaptic plasticity within vestibular nuclei is an attempt to explain the mechanisms underlying vestibular plasticity phenomena. The present review is meant to illustrate the main results, obtained in vitro, on the mechanisms underlying long-term changes in synaptic strength within the medial vestibular nuclei. The synaptic plasticity phenomena taking place at the level of vestibular nuclei could be useful for adapting and consolidating the efficacy of vestibular neuron responsiveness to environmental requirements, as during visuo-vestibular recalibration and vestibular compensation. Following a general introduction on the most salient features of vestibular compensation and visuo-vestibular adaptation, which are two plastic events involving neuronal circuitry within the medial vestibular nuclei, the second and third sections describe the results from rat brainstem slice studies, demonstrating the possibility to induce long-term potentiation and depression in the medial vestibular nuclei, following high frequency stimulation of the primary vestibular afferents. In particular the mechanisms sustaining the induction and expression of vestibular long-term potentiation and depression, such as the role of various glutamate receptors and retrograde messengers have been described. The relevant role of the interaction between the platelet-activating factor, acting as a retrograde messenger, and the presynaptic metabotropic glutamate receptors, in determining the full expression of vestibular long-term potentiation is also underlined. In addition, the mechanisms involved in vestibular long-term potentiation have been compared with those leading to long-term potentiation in the hippocampus to emphasize the most significant differences emerging from vestibular studies. The fourth part, describes recent results demonstrating the essential role of nitric oxide, another retrograde messenger, in the induction of vestibular

  16. Current and Future Management of Bilateral Loss of Vestibular Sensation – An update on the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis Project

    PubMed Central

    Della Santina, Charles C.; Migliaccio, Americo A.; Hayden, Russell; Melvin, Thuy-Anh; Fridman, Gene Y.; Chiang, Bryce; Davidovics, Natan S.; Dai, Chenkai; Carey, John P.; Minor, Lloyd B.; Anderson, Iee-Ching; Park, HongJu; Lyford-Pike, Sofia; Tang, Shan

    2012-01-01

    Bilateral loss of vestibular sensation can disable individuals whose vestibular hair cells are injured by ototoxic medications, infection, Ménière’s disease or other insults to the labyrinth including surgical trauma during cochlear implantation. Without input to vestibulo-ocular and vestibulo-spinal reflexes that normally stabilize the eyes and body, affected patients suffer blurred vision during head movement, postural instability, and chronic disequilibrium. While individuals with some residual sensation often compensate for their loss through rehabilitation exercises, those who fail to do so are left with no adequate treatment options. An implantable neuroelectronic vestibular prosthesis that emulates the normal labyrinth by sensing head movement and modulating activity on appropriate branches of the vestibular nerve could significantly improve quality of life for these otherwise chronically dizzy patients. This brief review describes the impact and current management of bilateral loss of vestibular sensation, animal studies supporting the feasibility of prosthetic vestibular stimulation, and a vestibular prosthesis designed to restore sensation of head rotation in all directions. Similar to a cochlear implant in concept and size, the Johns Hopkins Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis (MVP) includes miniature gyroscopes to sense head rotation, a microcontroller to process inputs and control stimulus timing, and current sources switched between pairs of electrodes implanted within the vestibular labyrinth. In rodents and rhesus monkeys rendered bilaterally vestibular-deficient via treatment with gentamicin and/or plugging of semicircular canals, the MVP partially restores the vestibulo-ocular reflex for head rotations about any axis of rotation in 3-dimensional space. Our efforts now focus on addressing issues prerequisite to human implantation, including refinement of electrode designs and surgical technique to enhance stimulus selectivity and preserve

  17. To develop behavioral tests of vestibular functioning in the Wistar rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nielson, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Two tests of vestibular functioning in the rat were developed. The first test was the water maze. In the water maze the rat does not have the normal proprioceptive feedback from its limbs to help it maintain its orientation, and must rely primarily on the sensory input from its visual and vestibular systems. By altering lighting conditions and visual cues the vestibular functioning without visual cues was assessed. Whether there was visual compensation for some vestibular dysfunction was determined. The second test measured vestibular functioning of the rat's behavior on a parallel swing. In this test the rat's postural adjustments while swinging on the swing with the otoliths being stimulated were assessed. Less success was achieved in developing the parallel swing as a test of vestibular functioning than with the water maze. The major problem was incorrect initial assumptions of what the rat's probable behavior on the parallel swing would be.

  18. National Airspace System (NAS) open system architecture and protocols

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2003-08-14

    This standard establishes the open systems data communications architecture and authorized protocol standards for the National Airspace System (NAS). The NAS will consist of various types of processors and communications networks procured from a vari...

  19. NAS Panel endorses science center concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Science and technology centers, as proposed by President Ronald Reagan in his January 1987 State of the Union message, could make “significant contributions to science and to the nation's economic competitiveness,” according to a new report by a National Academy of Sciences (NAS) panel. What will be necessary to realize these contributions, the panel cautioned, are proper management, adequate resources, and, “above all, the selection of programs for which the centers are the most effective form of organization.”NSF plans to support science and technology centers, beginning October 1, 1988, which is the start of fiscal year 1988. NSF requested guidance from the NAS panel in implementing the program. Although other government agencies will participate in the program, NSF will play the primary role.

  20. NAS Grid Benchmarks. 1.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Frumkin, Michael; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We provide a paper-and-pencil specification of a benchmark suite for computational grids. It is based on the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) Parallel Benchmarks (NPB) and is called the NAS Grid Benchmarks (NGB). NGB problems are presented as data flow graphs encapsulating an instance of a slightly modified NPB task in each graph node, which communicates with other nodes by sending/receiving initialization data. Like NPB, NGB specifies several different classes (problem sizes). In this report we describe classes S, W, and A, and provide verification values for each. The implementor has the freedom to choose any language, grid environment, security model, fault tolerance/error correction mechanism, etc., as long as the resulting implementation passes the verification test and reports the turnaround time of the benchmark.

  1. NAS Technical Summaries, March 1993 - February 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    NASA created the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Program in 1987 to focus resources on solving critical problems in aeroscience and related disciplines by utilizing the power of the most advanced supercomputers available. The NAS Program provides scientists with the necessary computing power to solve today's most demanding computational fluid dynamics problems and serves as a pathfinder in integrating leading-edge supercomputing technologies, thus benefitting other supercomputer centers in government and industry. The 1993-94 operational year concluded with 448 high-speed processor projects and 95 parallel projects representing NASA, the Department of Defense, other government agencies, private industry, and universities. This document provides a glimpse at some of the significant scientific results for the year.

  2. Implementation of NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; Schultz, Matthew; Jin, Hao-Qiang; Yan, Jerry

    2000-01-01

    A number of features make Java an attractive but a debatable choice for High Performance Computing (HPC). In order to gauge the applicability of Java to the Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) we have implemented NAS Parallel Benchmarks in Java. The performance and scalability of the benchmarks point out the areas where improvement in Java compiler technology and in Java thread implementation would move Java closer to Fortran in the competition for CFD applications.

  3. Rescue of peripheral vestibular function in Usher syndrome mice using a splice-switching antisense oligonucleotide.

    PubMed

    Vijayakumar, Sarath; Depreux, Frederic F; Jodelka, Francine M; Lentz, Jennifer J; Rigo, Frank; Jones, Timothy A; Hastings, Michelle L

    2017-09-15

    Usher syndrome type 1C (USH1C/harmonin) is associated with profound retinal, auditory and vestibular dysfunction. We have previously reported on an antisense oligonucleotide (ASO-29) that dramatically improves auditory function and balance behavior in mice homozygous for the harmonin mutation Ush1c c.216G > A following a single systemic administration. The findings were suggestive of improved vestibular function; however, no direct vestibular assessment was made. Here, we measured vestibular sensory evoked potentials (VsEPs) to directly assess vestibular function in Usher mice. We report that VsEPs are absent or abnormal in Usher mice, indicating profound loss of vestibular function. Strikingly, Usher mice receiving ASO-29 treatment have normal or elevated vestibular response thresholds when treated during a critical period between postnatal day 1 and 5, respectively. In contrast, treatment of mice with ASO-29 treatment at P15 was minimally effective at rescuing vestibular function. Interestingly, ASO-29 treatment at P1, P5 or P15 resulted in sufficient vestibular recovery to support normal balance behaviors, suggesting a therapeutic benefit to balance with ASO-29 treatment at P15 despite the profound vestibular functional deficits that persist with treatment at this later time. These findings provide the first direct evidence of an effective treatment of peripheral vestibular function in a mouse model of USH1C and reveal the potential for using antisense technology to treat vestibular dysfunction. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Estimation of an Optimal Stimulus Amplitude for Using Vestibular Stochastic Stimulation to Improve Balance Function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goel, R.; Kofman, I.; DeDios, Y. E.; Jeevarajan, J.; Stepanyan, V.; Nair, M.; Congdon, S.; Fregia, M.; Peters, B.; Cohen, H.; hide

    2015-01-01

    Sensorimotor changes such as postural and gait instabilities can affect the functional performance of astronauts when they transition across different gravity environments. We are developing a method, based on stochastic resonance (SR), to enhance information transfer by applying non-zero levels of external noise on the vestibular system (vestibular stochastic resonance, VSR). The goal of this project was to determine optimal levels of stimulation for SR applications by using a defined vestibular threshold of motion detection.

  5. Evaluation of the chemical model of vestibular lesions induced by arsanilate in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Vignaux, G.; Univ Caen, Caen, F-14000; Chabbert, C.

    Several animal models of vestibular deficits that mimic the human pathology phenotype have previously been developed to correlate the degree of vestibular injury to cognate vestibular deficits in a time-dependent manner. Sodium arsanilate is one of the most commonly used substances for chemical vestibular lesioning, but it is not well described in the literature. In the present study, we used histological and functional approaches to conduct a detailed exploration of the model of vestibular lesions induced by transtympanic injection of sodium arsanilate in rats. The arsanilate-induced damage was restricted to the vestibular sensory organs without affecting the external ear, themore » oropharynx, or Scarpa's ganglion. This finding strongly supports the absence of diffusion of arsanilate into the external ear or Eustachian tubes, or through the eighth cranial nerve sheath leading to the brainstem. One of the striking observations of the present study is the complete restructuring of the sensory epithelia into a non sensory epithelial monolayer observed at 3 months after arsanilate application. This atrophy resembles the monolayer epithelia observed postmortem in the vestibular epithelia of patients with a history of lesioned vestibular deficits such as labyrinthectomy, antibiotic treatment, vestibular neuritis, or Ménière's disease. In cases of Ménière's disease, aminoglycosides, and platinum-based chemotherapy, vestibular hair cells are destroyed, regardless of the physiopathological process, as reproduced with the arsanilate model of vestibular lesion. These observations, together with those presented in this study of arsanilate vestibular toxicity, suggest that this atrophy process relies on a common mechanism of degeneration of the sensory epithelia.« less

  6. 3D hybrid electrode structure as implantable interface for a vestibular neural prosthesis in humans.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Klaus-P; Poppendieck, Wigand; Tätzner, Simon; DiGiovanna, Jack; Kos, Maria Izabel; Guinand, Nils; Guyot, Jean-P; Micera, Silvestro

    2011-01-01

    Implantable interfaces are essential components of vestibular neural prostheses. They interface the biological system with electrical stimulation that is used to restore transfer of vestibular information. Regarding the anatomical situation special 3D structures are required. In this paper, the design and the manufacturing process of a novel 3D hybrid microelectrode structure as interface to the human vestibular system are described. Photolithography techniques, assembling technology and rapid prototyping are used for manufacturing.

  7. Clinical approach to vaginal/vestibular masses in the bitch.

    PubMed

    Manothaiudom, K; Johnston, S D

    1991-05-01

    The most common causes of vaginal/vestibular masses in the bitch are vaginal prolapse, vaginal neoplasia, and urethral neoplasia protruding into the vaginal vault. Other possible causes are clitoral enlargement, vaginal polyps, uterine prolapse, and vaginal abscessation or hematoma. Vaginal prolapse usually can be distinguished from neoplasia by the age of the patient, the time of occurrence during the estrous cycle, and the site of origin of the mass. Prolapse usually occurs in bitches under 4 years of age during proestrus, estrus, or at the end of diestrus and usually arises from the floor of the vagina, except for urethral tumors that protrude from the external urethral orifice. Appropriate diagnostic workup of bitches with vaginal vestibular masses includes complete history and physical examination, vaginal cytologic and vaginoscopic examination, retrograde vaginography or urethrocystography, serum progesterone and estradiol concentrations, and, in the case of suspect neoplasms, surgical or excision biopsy of the mass.

  8. Eye instability induced by vestibular stimulation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ferraresi, A; Azzena, G B; Troiani, D

    2001-07-03

    The slow compensatory phases of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) in the rabbit tend to drift and the drift reverses the direction. This periodic alternating drift (PAD) has two peculiar characteristics: (1) it is induced by sinusoidal vestibular stimulation in naive animals, being evoked immediately after stimulus onset and persisting after the end of stimulation; (2) the peak velocity and period of the drift are dependent on stimulus amplitude. PAD of the rabbit has strong similarities with PAN, a periodic alternating nystagmus observed in humans with cerbellar disorders and in monkeys after nodulo-uvulectomy, although its peak velocity is smaller. It is hypothesized that PAD is due to a slight instability, caused by vestibular stimulation in darkness, of the cerebellar adaptive loop, which exerts a variable gain control on the time constant of the velocity storage integrator.

  9. Effects of Weightlessness on Vestibular Development of Quail

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritzsch, Bernd; Bruce, Laura L.

    1997-01-01

    The lack of gravity is known to alter vestibular responses in developing and adult vertebrates. One cause of these altered responses may be changes in the connections between the vestibular receptor and the brain. Therefore we propose to investigate the effects of gravity on the formations of connections between the gravity receptors of the ear and the brain in developing quail incubated in space beginning at an age before these connections are established (incubation day three) until near the time of hatching, when they are to some extent functional. This investigation will make use of a novel technique, the diffusion of a lipophilic dye, DiI, in fixed tissue. This technique can thus be used to analyze the connections in specimens fixed in orbit, thus eliminating changes due to the earth's gravity. The evaluation of the data will enable us to detect gross deviations from normal patterns as well as detailed quantitative deviations.

  10. Comparative Transduction Mechanisms of Vestibular Otolith Hair Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.

    1994-01-01

    Hair cells in the bullfrog vestibular otolith organs regenerate following aminoglycoside ototoxicity. Hair cells in these organs are differentially sensitive to gentamicin, with saccular hair cells and hair cells in the utricular striola being damaged at lower gentamicin concentrations than hair cells in the utricular extrastriola. Regenerating hair cells in these organs have short hair bundles and can be classified into a number of phenotypes using the same morphological criteria used to identify their mature counterparts. Our studies suggest that some supporting cells can convert, or transdifferentiate,into hair cells without an intervening cell division. By stimulating these processes in humans, clinicians may be able to alleviate human deafness and peripheral vestibular disorders by regenerating and replacing lost hair cells. In vivo and in vitro studies were done on cell proliferation and hair cell regeneration.

  11. Relationship between endolymphatic hydrops and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Katayama, Naomi; Yamamoto, Masako; Teranishi, Masaaki; Naganawa, Shinji; Nakata, Seiichi; Sone, Michihiko; Nakashima, Tsutomu

    2010-08-01

    Vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) can be used to examine endolymphatic hydrops, especially in the vestibule. To investigate the relationship between the degree of endolymphatic hydrops revealed by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and VEMP. Gadolinium diluted with saline was injected intratympanically in 49 ears (40 patients). One day after the injection, the endolymphatic space in the vestibule and the cochlea was visualized by 3 Tesla MRI. A VEMP test was done, and VEMP was judged as absent when the VEMP was within the noise level. VEMP was present in 21 ears and absent in 28 ears. Endolymphatic hydrops was significantly associated with the disappearance of VEMP. Endolymphatic hydrops in the vestibule had a stronger effect than endolymphatic hydrops in the cochlea. Five patients with extremely large vestibular hydrops showed no response of VEMP.

  12. Inertial vestibular coding of motion: concepts and evidence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hess, B. J.; Angelaki, D. E.

    1997-01-01

    Central processing of inertial sensory information about head attitude and motion in space is crucial for motor control. Vestibular signals are coded relative to a non-inertial system, the head, that is virtually continuously in motion. Evidence for transformation of vestibular signals from head-fixed sensory coordinates to gravity-centered coordinates have been provided by studies of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. The underlying central processing depends on otolith afferent information that needs to be resolved in terms of head translation related inertial forces and head attitude dependent pull of gravity. Theoretical solutions have been suggested, but experimental evidence is still scarce. It appears, along these lines, that gaze control systems are intimately linked to motor control of head attitude and posture.

  13. Representation of visual gravitational motion in the human vestibular cortex.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Bosco, Gianfranco; Zago, Myrka; Macaluso, Emiliano; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2005-04-15

    How do we perceive the visual motion of objects that are accelerated by gravity? We propose that, because vision is poorly sensitive to accelerations, an internal model that calculates the effects of gravity is derived from graviceptive information, is stored in the vestibular cortex, and is activated by visual motion that appears to be coherent with natural gravity. The acceleration of visual targets was manipulated while brain activity was measured using functional magnetic resonance imaging. In agreement with the internal model hypothesis, we found that the vestibular network was selectively engaged when acceleration was consistent with natural gravity. These findings demonstrate that predictive mechanisms of physical laws of motion are represented in the human brain.

  14. A model describing vestibular detection of body sway motion.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nashner, L. M.

    1971-01-01

    An experimental technique was developed which facilitated the formulation of a quantitative model describing vestibular detection of body sway motion in a postural response mode. All cues, except vestibular ones, which gave a subject an indication that he was beginning to sway, were eliminated using a specially designed two-degree-of-freedom platform; body sway was then induced and resulting compensatory responses at the ankle joints measured. Hybrid simulation compared the experimental results with models of the semicircular canals and utricular otolith receptors. Dynamic characteristics of the resulting canal model compared closely with characteristics of models which describe eye movement and subjective responses to body rotational motions. The average threshold level, in the postural response mode, however, was considerably lower. Analysis indicated that the otoliths probably play no role in the initial detection of body sway motion.

  15. Research on biophysical evaluation of the human vestibular system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, L. R.

    1974-01-01

    The human vestibular function was studied by the combined approach of advanced measurement and mathematical modelling. Fundamental measurements of some physical properties of endolymph and perilymph, combined with nystagmus measurements and fluid mechanical analysis of semicircular canal function furthered the theory of canal mechanical response to angular acceleration, caloric stimulation and relating linear acceleration. The effects of adaptation seen at low frequency angular stimulation were studied and modelled to remove some shortcomings of the torsion pendulum models. Otolith function was also studied experimentally and analytically, leading to a new set of models for subjective orientation. Applications to special problems of space, including the case of rotating spacecraft were investigated and the interaction of visual and vestibular cues and their relation to proprioceptive information was explored relative to postural control.

  16. Input/output properties of the lateral vestibular nucleus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R.; Bush, G.; Ehsanian, R.

    2004-01-01

    This article is a review of work in three species, squirrel monkey, cat, and rat studying the inputs and outputs from the lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN). Different electrophysiological shock paradigms were used to determine the synaptic inputs derived from thick to thin diameter vestibular nerve afferents. Angular and linear mechanical stimulations were used to activate and study the combined and individual contribution of inner ear organs and neck afferents. The spatio-temporal properties of LVN neurons in the decerebrated rat were studied in response to dynamic acceleration inputs using sinusoidal linear translation in the horizontal head plane. Outputs were evaluated using antidromic identification techniques and identified LVN neurons were intracellularly injected with biocytin and their morphology studied.

  17. Diagnostics and therapy of vestibular schwannomas – an interdisciplinary challenge

    PubMed Central

    Rosahl, Steffen; Bohr, Christopher; Lell, Michael; Hamm, Klaus; Iro, Heinrich

    2017-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas (VS) expand slowly in the internal auditory canal, in the cerebellopontine angle, inside the cochlear and the labyrinth. Larger tumors can displace and compress the brainstem. With an annual incidence of 1:100,000 vestibular schwannoma represent 6–7% of all intracranial tumors. In the cerebellopontine angle they are by far the most neoplasm with 90% of all lesions located in this region. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), audiometry, and vestibular diagnostics are the mainstays of the clinical workup for patients harboring tumors. The first part of this paper delivers an overview of tumor stages, the most common grading scales for facial nerve function and hearing as well as a short introduction to the examination of vestibular function. Upholding or improving quality of life is the central concern in counseling and treating a patient with vestibular schwannoma. Preservation of neuronal function is essential and the management options – watchful waiting, microsurgery and stereotactic radiation – should be custom-tailored to the individual situation of the patient. Continuing interdisciplinary exchange is important to monitor treatment quality and to improve treatment results. Recently, several articles and reviews have been published on the topic of vestibular schwannoma. On the occasion of the 88th annual meeting of the German Society of Oto-Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck surgery a special volume of the journal “HNO” will be printed. Hence this presentation has been designed to deviate from the traditional standard which commonly consists of a pure literature review. The current paper was conceptually woven around a series of interdisciplinary cases that outline examples for every stage of the disease that show characteristic results for management options to date. Systematic clinical decision pathways have been deduced from our experience and from results reported in the literature. These pathways are graphically outlined after

  18. Effects of droperidol in management of vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Johnson, W H; Fenton, R S; Evans, A

    1976-07-01

    The chemo-therapy of vestibular disease has involved a wide spectrum of pharmacological agents insofar as their mode of action is concerned. In our experience, however, droperidol is one pharmaceutical agent which is remarkably effective in depressing vestibular disturbance regardless of etiology. This medication (also called Inapsine) belongs to a relatively new class of compounds known as butyrophenones and its pharmacological action can best be described as a dopa blocking agent. The activity of droperidol on the nervous system first became evident when it was used in combination with the potent analgesic fentanyl citrate in order to produce an anesthetic condition that has been termed neuroleptanalgesia. This mixture (also called Innovar) is rapid in action and results in complete suppression of vestibular activity of both normal subjects and those with Ménière's disease as described by Dowdy, et al., in a preliminary report. These impressive results have prompted us to evaluate the effectiveness of this medication in the treatment of different disorders of the labyrinth. The patients chosen for evaluation were referred for vestibular examination at the Toronto General and St. Michael's Hospitals. Electronystagmography was used to record objectively the effects of the drugs being tested while subjective symptoms including side effects were also noted. These studies involved 20 patients receiving Innovar while 12 patients were tested with Inapsine. Innovar administered in a single dose (droperidol 5 mg, fentanyl 0.1 mg) to patients undergoing acute episodes of vestibular disease (vestibular neuronitis and Ménière's disease) was found effective in the following symptoms and/or signs: nausea, vertigo, nystagmus, the positive past-pointing test and the Romberg test. Innovar appeared to be effective in the amelioration of vomiting although the population was too small to demonstrate statistical significance in this regard. The drug mixture appeared to have no

  19. Verticality perception during and after galvanic vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Volkening, Katharina; Bergmann, Jeannine; Keller, Ingo; Wuehr, Max; Müller, Friedemann; Jahn, Klaus

    2014-10-03

    The human brain constructs verticality perception by integrating vestibular, somatosensory, and visual information. Here we investigated whether galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) has an effect on verticality perception both during and after application, by assessing the subjective verticals (visual, haptic and postural) in healthy subjects at those times. During stimulation the subjective visual vertical and the subjective haptic vertical shifted towards the anode, whereas this shift was reversed towards the cathode in all modalities once stimulation was turned off. Overall, the effects were strongest for the haptic modality. Additional investigation of the time course of GVS-induced changes in the haptic vertical revealed that anodal shifts persisted for the entire 20-min stimulation interval in the majority of subjects. Aftereffects exhibited different types of decay, with a preponderance for an exponential decay. The existence of such reverse effects after stimulation could have implications for GVS-based therapy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Experimental and clinical study of EHF treatment of vascular-vestibular dysfunction

    SciTech Connect

    Mal`tsev, A.E.; Abakarov, A.T.; Istomin, V.S.

    1994-07-01

    The authors present the results of a study of the effectiveness of EHF radiation on the cerebral hemodynamics, bioelectrical activity of the cerebral cortex, and functional state of the vestibular analyzer in chronic studies of cats using a model of vascular-vestibular dysfunction. The clinical part of the work reflects the results of studies of the functional state of cerebral blood circulation and the vestibular analyzer during the EHF treatment of angiovertebrogenic vestibular dysfunction in a background of initial manifestations of cerebral blood supply deficiency (angiodistonic variant).

  1. Vestibular involvement in cognition: Visuospatial ability, attention, executive function, and memory.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Robin T; Agrawal, Yuri

    2015-01-01

    A growing body of literature suggests the inner ear vestibular system has a substantial impact on cognitive function. The strongest evidence exists in connecting vestibular function to the cognitive domain of visuospatial ability, which includes spatial memory, navigation, mental rotation, and mental representation of three-dimensional space. Substantial evidence also exists suggesting the vestibular system has an impact on attention and cognitive processing ability. The cognitive domains of memory and executive function are also implicated in a number of studies. We will review the current literature, discuss possible causal links between vestibular dysfunction and cognitive performance, and suggest areas of future research.

  2. Convergence of limb, visceral, and vertical semicircular canal or otolith inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jian, B. J.; Shintani, T.; Emanuel, B. A.; Yates, B. J.

    2002-01-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine the patterns of convergence of non-labyrinthine inputs from the limbs and viscera onto vestibular nucleus neurons receiving signals from vertical semicircular canals or otolith organs. A secondary aim was to ascertain whether the effects of non-labyrinthine inputs on the activity of vestibular nucleus neurons is affected by bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions. The majority (72%) of vestibular nucleus neurons in labyrinth-intact animals whose firing was modulated by vertical rotations responded to electrical stimulation of limb and/or visceral nerves. The activity of even more vestibular nucleus neurons (93%) was affected by limb or visceral nerve stimulation in chronically labyrinthectomized preparations. Some neurons received non-labyrinthine inputs from a variety of peripheral sources, including antagonist muscles acting at the same joint, whereas others received inputs from more limited sources. There was no apparent relationship between the spatial and dynamic properties of a neuron's responses to tilts in vertical planes and the non-labyrinthine inputs that it received. These data suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs elicited during movement will modulate the processing of information by the central vestibular system, and may contribute to the recovery of spontaneous activity of vestibular nucleus neurons following peripheral vestibular lesions. Furthermore, some vestibular nucleus neurons with non-labyrinthine inputs may be activated only during particular behaviors that elicit a specific combination of limb and visceral inputs.

  3. Multisensory integration in early vestibular processing in mice: the encoding of passive vs. active motion

    PubMed Central

    Medrea, Ioana

    2013-01-01

    The mouse has become an important model system for studying the cellular basis of learning and coding of heading by the vestibular system. Here we recorded from single neurons in the vestibular nuclei to understand how vestibular pathways encode self-motion under natural conditions, during which proprioceptive and motor-related signals as well as vestibular inputs provide feedback about an animal's movement through the world. We recorded neuronal responses in alert behaving mice focusing on a group of neurons, termed vestibular-only cells, that are known to control posture and project to higher-order centers. We found that the majority (70%, n = 21/30) of neurons were bimodal, in that they responded robustly to passive stimulation of proprioceptors as well as passive stimulation of the vestibular system. Additionally, the linear summation of a given neuron's vestibular and neck sensitivities predicted well its responses when both stimuli were applied simultaneously. In contrast, neuronal responses were suppressed when the same motion was actively generated, with the one striking exception that the activity of bimodal neurons similarly and robustly encoded head on body position in all conditions. Our results show that proprioceptive and motor-related signals are combined with vestibular information at the first central stage of vestibular processing in mice. We suggest that these results have important implications for understanding the multisensory integration underlying accurate postural control and the neural representation of directional heading in the head direction cell network of mice. PMID:24089394

  4. The vestibular system: a spatial reference for bodily self-consciousness

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Serino, Andrea; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Self-consciousness is the remarkable human experience of being a subject: the “I”. Self-consciousness is typically bound to a body, and particularly to the spatial dimensions of the body, as well as to its location and displacement in the gravitational field. Because the vestibular system encodes head position and movement in three-dimensional space, vestibular cortical processing likely contributes to spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. We review here recent data showing vestibular effects on first-person perspective (the feeling from where “I” experience the world) and self-location (the feeling where “I” am located in space). We compare these findings to data showing vestibular effects on mental spatial transformation, self-motion perception, and body representation showing vestibular contributions to various spatial representations of the body with respect to the external world. Finally, we discuss the role for four posterior brain regions that process vestibular and other multisensory signals to encode spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness: temporoparietal junction, parietoinsular vestibular cortex, ventral intraparietal region, and medial superior temporal region. We propose that vestibular processing in these cortical regions is critical in linking multisensory signals from the body (personal and peripersonal space) with external (extrapersonal) space. Therefore, the vestibular system plays a critical role for neural representations of spatial aspects of bodily self-consciousness. PMID:24860446

  5. Effects of Saccular Function on Recovery of Subjective Dizziness After Vestibular Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Junhui; Jung, Jinsei; Lee, Jeon Mi; Suh, Michelle J; Kwak, Sang Hyun; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2017-08-01

    We attempted to investigate whether the integrity of saccular function influences the severity of subjective dizziness after vestibular rehabilitation in vestibular neuritis. Retrospective analysis. Tertiary referral center. Forty-six patients with acute unilateral vestibular neuritis were included. Diagnostic, therapeutic, and rehabilitative. All the patients completed vestibular rehabilitation therapy until their computerized dynamic posturography and rotary chair test results were significantly improved. The rehabilitation patients were classified into the normal to mild subjective dizziness and moderate to severe subjective dizziness groups according to the dizziness handicap inventory score (cutoff of 40). Differences between the two groups were analyzed. After rehabilitation, 32.6% of the patients still complained of moderate to severe dizziness. Age, sex distribution, the presence of comorbidities, caloric weakness, pre- and postrehabilitation gain values in rotary chair test, postrehabilitation composite scores in posturography, and the duration of rehabilitation were not significantly different between the two groups. However, initial dizziness handicap inventory (DHI) score and composite score in dynamic posturography were worse and the proportion of patients with absent cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential in the moderate to severe group was much higher (93.3% vs. 35.5%, p < 0.001). After multiple regression analysis of those factors, initial DHI score and absent cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential response were identified as being associated with higher postrehabilitation DHI score. Saccular dysfunction in acute vestibular neuritis can contribute to persistent subjective dizziness, even after the objective parameters of vestibular function tests have been improved by vestibular rehabilitation.

  6. Diabetes, vestibular dysfunction, and falls: analyses from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Yuri; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C; Schubert, Michael C; Minor, Lloyd B

    2010-12-01

    Patients with diabetes are at increased risk both for falls and for vestibular dysfunction, a known risk factor for falls. Our aims were 1) to further characterize the vestibular dysfunction present in patients with diabetes and 2) to evaluate for an independent effect of vestibular dysfunction on fall risk among patients with diabetes. National cross-sectional survey. Ambulatory examination centers. Adults from the United States aged 40 years and older who participated in the 2001-2004 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (n = 5,86). Diagnosis of diabetes, peripheral neuropathy, and retinopathy. Vestibular function measured by the modified Romberg Test of Standing Balance on Firm and Compliant Support Surfaces and history of falling in the previous 12 months. We observed a higher prevalence of vestibular dysfunction in patients with diabetes with longer duration of disease, greater serum hemoglobin A1c levels and other diabetes-related complications, suggestive of a dose-response relationship between diabetes mellitus severity and vestibular dysfunction. We also noted that vestibular dysfunction independently increased the odds of falling more than 2-fold among patients with diabetes (odds ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1-5.1), even after adjusting for peripheral neuropathy and retinopathy. Moreover, we found that including vestibular dysfunction, peripheral neuropathy, and retinopathy in multivariate models eliminated the significant association between diabetes and fall risk. Vestibular dysfunction may represent a newly recognized diabetes-related complication, which acts as a mediator of the effect of diabetes mellitus on fall risk.

  7. Convergence of limb, visceral, and vertical semicircular canal or otolith inputs onto vestibular nucleus neurons.

    PubMed

    Jian, B J; Shintani, T; Emanuel, B A; Yates, B J

    2002-05-01

    The major goal of this study was to determine the patterns of convergence of non-labyrinthine inputs from the limbs and viscera onto vestibular nucleus neurons receiving signals from vertical semicircular canals or otolith organs. A secondary aim was to ascertain whether the effects of non-labyrinthine inputs on the activity of vestibular nucleus neurons is affected by bilateral peripheral vestibular lesions. The majority (72%) of vestibular nucleus neurons in labyrinth-intact animals whose firing was modulated by vertical rotations responded to electrical stimulation of limb and/or visceral nerves. The activity of even more vestibular nucleus neurons (93%) was affected by limb or visceral nerve stimulation in chronically labyrinthectomized preparations. Some neurons received non-labyrinthine inputs from a variety of peripheral sources, including antagonist muscles acting at the same joint, whereas others received inputs from more limited sources. There was no apparent relationship between the spatial and dynamic properties of a neuron's responses to tilts in vertical planes and the non-labyrinthine inputs that it received. These data suggest that non-labyrinthine inputs elicited during movement will modulate the processing of information by the central vestibular system, and may contribute to the recovery of spontaneous activity of vestibular nucleus neurons following peripheral vestibular lesions. Furthermore, some vestibular nucleus neurons with non-labyrinthine inputs may be activated only during particular behaviors that elicit a specific combination of limb and visceral inputs.

  8. Management of mal de debarquement syndrome as vestibular migraines.

    PubMed

    Ghavami, Yaser; Haidar, Yarah M; Ziai, Kasra N; Moshtaghi, Omid; Bhatt, Jay; Lin, Harrison W; Djalilian, Hamid R

    2017-07-01

    Mal de debarquement syndrome (MdDS) is a balance disorder that typically starts after an extended exposure to passive motion, such as a boat or plane ride. Management is typically supportive (e.g. physical therapy), and symptoms that persist beyond 6 months have been described as unlikely to remit. This study was conducted to evaluate the response of patients with MdDS to management with migraine prophylaxis, including lifestyle changes and medical therapy. Prospective review. Ambulatory setting at a tertiary care medical center. Clinical history, detailed questionnaires, and audiograms were used to diagnose patients with MdDS. Those patients with the diagnosis of the MdDS were placed on our institutional vestibular migraine management protocol. Treatment response was assessed with a quality-of-life (QOL) survey and visual analog scale. Fifteen patients were diagnosed with MdDS, with a predominance of females (73%) and a mean age of 50 ± 13 years. Eleven patients (73%) responded well to management with a vestibular migraine protocol, which included lifestyle changes, as well as pharmacotherapy with verapamil, nortriptyline, topiramate, or a combination thereof. In comparison, a retrospective control group of 17 patients demonstrated a lower rate of improvement when treated with vestibular rehabilitation and physical therapy. Management of MdDS as vestibular migraine can improve patients' symptoms and increase the QOL. Nearly all the patients suffering from MdDS had a personal or family history of migraine headaches or had signs or symptoms suggestive of atypical migraine. 4 Laryngoscope, 127:1670-1675, 2017. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  9. Diagnosis and Management of Hereditary Meningioma and Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Adam

    2016-01-01

    Bilateral vestibular schwannomata and meningiomata are the tumours most commonly associated with neurofibromatosis type II (NF2). These tumours may also be seen in patients with schwannomatosis and familial meningioma, but these phenotypes are usually easy to distinguish. The main diagnostic challenge when managing these tumours is distinguishing between sporadic disease which carries low risk of subsequent tumours or NF2 with its associated morbidities and reduced life expectancy. This chapter outlines some of the diagnostic and management considerations along with associated evidence.

  10. Comparative anatomy of the vestibular nuclear complex in submammalian vertebrates.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehler, W. R.

    1972-01-01

    A synopsis of the literature on the natural history of the vestibular nuclear complex (VNC) in lower vertebrates is presented in an attempt to assess the knowledge available. The review discloses that there is considerable descriptive information that is widely dispersed in the literature. However, information about the topology, number, and cellular composition of the cell groups that compose the VNC is sketchy. Major cytological and hodological information is still needed to establish which parts of the VNC actually are homologous.

  11. The art of perception: Patients drawing their vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    van Leeuwen, Bibian M; Herruer, Jasmijn M; Putter, Hein; van der Mey, Andel G L; Kaptein, Adrian A

    2015-12-01

    Drawings made by patients are an innovative way to assess the perceptions of patients on their illness. The objective of this study, at a university tertiary referral center, on patients who have recently been diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma, was to examine whether patients' illness perceptions can be assessed by drawings and are related to their quality of life. Cross-sectional study. Patients diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma (mean age [range], 55.4 [17-85] years) between April 2011 and October 2012 were included (N = 253). Sociodemographics, illness perceptions (Brief Illness Perception Questionnaire [B-IPQ]), and disease-specific quality of life (Penn Acoustic Neuroma Quality of Life [PANQOL] scale) were assessed to evaluate the impact of being diagnosed with vestibular schwannoma. Furthermore, patients' drawings of their tumor were analyzed to explore the association between illness perceptions, drawings, and quality of life. Comparison of the B-IPQ scores of the current sample (N = 139; response rate 54.9%) with other disease samples shows a significantly lower score for patients with vestibular schwannoma on the Coherence dimension, indicating a low understanding of the illness. Illustration of emotions (N = 12) in the drawings gave a negative association with quality of life. Intercorrelations indicate a positive association between a low amount of physical and emotional consequences of the illness and a higher score on the Balance, Hearing, and Energy dimensions of the PANQOL. Patients' drawings give an insight into their perception of the tumor inside their head. Use of drawings may be helpful when developing and offering self-management programs. Quality of life appears to be significantly affected by the diagnosis. 4. © 2015 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. Alignment of angular velocity sensors for a vestibular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Digiovanna, Jack; Carpaneto, Jacopo; Micera, Silvestro; Merfeld, Daniel M

    2012-02-13

    Vestibular prosthetics transmit angular velocities to the nervous system via electrical stimulation. Head-fixed gyroscopes measure angular motion, but the gyroscope coordinate system will not be coincident with the sensory organs the prosthetic replaces. Here we show a simple calibration method to align gyroscope measurements with the anatomical coordinate system. We benchmarked the method with simulated movements and obtain proof-of-concept with one healthy subject. The method was robust to misalignment, required little data, and minimal processing.

  13. Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Stimulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-04-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-2-0012 TITLE: Treatment of Vestibular Dysfunction Using a Portable Stimulator PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Jorge M...Approved OMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time ...Dysfunction Using a Portable Stimulator Email: jorge.serrador@rutgers.edu U U U TABLE OF CONTENTS Page No. INTRODUCTION 4 KEYWORDS 4 ACCOMPLISHMENTS 4

  14. Clinical investigation of vestibular damage by antituberculous drugs.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, M; Natori, Y; Tachi, H; Yoshizawa, M; Takayama, S; Miura, H; Kanayama, M; Kamei, T

    1986-01-01

    Vestibular function testing was done regularly on the cases given streptomycin, kanamycin, or enviomycin and a method to detect the cases of vestibular dysfunction at an early stage was discussed, as well as the time these drugs should be discontinued. Subjects were 85 cases of tuberculosis treated with streptomycin, kanamycin, or enviomycin who were admitted to our hospital from December 1984 to May 1986. The method of equilibrium examination performed at regular intervals is as follows: standing test (Romberg test), stepping test, and Meyer zum Gottesberge's head-shaking test were done once a week for a month after starting antituberculous injections and they were re-examined once every 2 weeks for at least 3 months after beginning the injections. After the 3 months these tests were done once a month. Eight cases of vestibular damage due to streptomycin or enviomycin could be easily detected at an early stage by performing Meyer zum Gottesberge's head-shaking test, together with the standing test and the stepping test. Vestibular dysfunction is apt to occur after about 1 month or within a month from the start of daily injections especially with streptomycin. Therefore, the method of equilibrium examination, we suggest, is that the Meyer zum Gottesberge's head-shaking test, the standing test (Romberg test), and the stepping test should be performed once a week during the first month after the start of this drug. When the result of the Meyer zum Gottesberge's head-shaking test is less than 50% and swaying and/or rotation occur in the stepping test, the drugs being given should be discontinued.

  15. Student learns about the vestibular system in a microgravity demonstration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Gary Coulter, a special assistant to NASA's life sciences researchers, explains the workings of the irner ear to a Virginia student. The chair rotates to disorient the vestibular system in a simulation of research on how astronauts adapt to space and readapt to Earth. The activity was part of the Space Research and You education event held by NASA's Office of Biological and Physical Research on June 25, 2002, in Arlington, VA, to highlight the research that will be conducted on STS-107.

  16. Astronauts Conrad and Kerwin - Human Vestibular Function Experiment - JSC

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-01-01

    S73-20678 (1 March 1973) --- Astronaut Charles Conrad Jr., commander of the first manned Skylab mission, checks out the Human Vestibular Function, Experiment M131, during Skylab training at Johnson Space Center. Scientist-astronaut Joseph P. Kerwin, science pilot of the mission, goes over a checklist. The two men are in the work and experiments compartment of the crew quarters of the Skylab Orbital Workshop (OWS) trainer at JSC. Photo credit: NASA

  17. Acquired intolerance to organic solvents and results of vestibular testing

    SciTech Connect

    Gyntelberg, F.; Vesterhauge, S.; Fog, P.

    1986-01-01

    Among 160 consecutive patients referred to the Clinic of Occupational Medicine, Rigshospitalet, for symptoms connected with exposure to organic solvents, 20 exhibited symptoms of acquired intolerance to minor amounts of organic solvents. Later, an additional 30 consecutive patients with symptoms of acquired intolerance were included, yielding a total of 43 men and 7 women. The characteristics of the clinical syndrome described are complaints of dizziness, nausea, and weakness after exposure to minimal solvent vapor concentrations. After having tolerated long-term occupational exposure to moderate or high air concentrations of various organic solvents, the patients became intolerant within a short period ofmore » time. Since dizziness was a frequent complaint, we tried to obtain a measure of the patients' complaints using vestibular tests. As a diagnostic test the combined vestibular tests had a sensitivity of 0.55 and a specificity of 0.87. No differences between patients with and without intolerance could be detected by the vestibular tests used. We conclude that acquired intolerance to organic solvents is a new but characteristic and easily recognizable syndrome, often with severe consequences for the patient's working ability.« less

  18. Contribution of intracranial vertebral artery asymmetry to vestibular neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Y M; Chern, C M; Liao, W H; Hsu, L C; Lien, C F; Lirng, J F; Shiao, A S; Ko, J S C

    2011-07-01

    To test the hypothesis that vertebral artery hypoplasia (VAH) may affect the lateralisation of vestibular neuropathy (VN), probably through haemodynamic effect on the vestibular labyrinth. 69 patients with unilateral VN were examined with a magnetic resonance angiographic (MRA) and caloric test. 50 healthy subjects served as controls. The diagnosis of intracranial VAH was based on MRA if <0.22 cm in VA diameter and a diameter asymmetry index >40%. The authors then correlated the canal paretic side with the VAH side. MRA study revealed 29 VAH (right/left: 23/6) in VN subjects and six VAH in controls (right/left: 5/1). The RR of VAH in VN subjects compared with controls was elevated (RR=2.2; 95% CI 1.8 to 2.8). There was a high accordance rate between the side of VAH and VN. Among 29 patients with unilateral VAH, 65.5% (N=19) had an ipsilateral VN, in which left VAH showed a higher accordance rate (83.3%) than the right side (60.9%). VN subjects with vascular risk factors also had a higher VAH accordance rate (81%) than those without (25%). VAH may serve as a regional haemodynamic negative contributor and impede blood supply to the ipsilateral vestibular labyrinth, contributing to the development of VN, which could be enhanced by atherosclerotic risk factors and the left-sided location.

  19. Posterior insular cortex - a site of vestibular-somatosensory interaction?

    PubMed

    Baier, Bernhard; Zu Eulenburg, Peter; Best, Christoph; Geber, Christian; Müller-Forell, Wibke; Birklein, Frank; Dieterich, Marianne

    2013-09-01

    Background In previous imaging studies the insular cortex (IC) has been identified as an essential part of the processing of a wide spectrum of perception and sensorimotor integration. Yet, there are no systematic lesion studies in a sufficient number of patients examining whether processing of vestibular and the interaction of somatosensory and vestibular signals take place in the IC. Methods We investigated acute stroke patients with lesions affecting the IC in order to fill this gap. In detail, we explored signs of a vestibular tone imbalance such as the deviation of the subjective visual vertical (SVV). We applied voxel-lesion behaviour mapping analysis in 27 patients with acute unilateral stroke. Results Our data demonstrate that patients with lesions of the posterior IC have an abnormal tilt of SVV. Furthermore, re-analysing data of 20 patients from a previous study, we found a positive correlation between thermal perception contralateral to the stroke and the severity of the SVV tilt. Conclusions We conclude that the IC is a sensory brain region where different modalities might interact.

  20. Counteracting Muscle Atrophy using Galvanic Stimulation of the Vestibular System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.; Polyakov, Igor

    1999-01-01

    The unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles during space flight produces significant muscle atrophy and is one of the most serious health problems facing the space program. Various exercise regimens have been developed and used either alone or in combination with pharmacological techniques to ameliorate this atrophy, but no effective countermeasure exists for this problem. The research in this project was conducted to evaluate the potential use of vestibular galvanic stimulation (VGS) to prevent muscle atrophy resulting from unloading of weight bearing from antigravity muscles. This approach was developed based on two concepts related to the process of maintaining the status of the anti-gravity neuromuscular system. These two premises are: (1) The "tone," or bias on spinal motorneurons is affected by vestibular projections that contribute importantly to maintaining muscle health and status. (2) VGS can be used to modify the excitability, or 'tone' of motorneuron of antigravity muscles. Thus, the strategy is to use VGS to modify the gain of vestibular projections to antigravity muscles and thereby change the general status of these muscles.

  1. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, Richard A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1994-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not stain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type 1 hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type 2 hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  2. Regional differences in lectin binding patterns of vestibular hair cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baird, R. A.; Schuff, N. R.; Bancroft, J.

    1993-01-01

    Surface glycoconjugates of hair cells and supporting cells in the vestibular endorgans of the bullfrog were identified using biotinylated lectins with different carbohydrate specificities. Lectin binding in hair cells was consistent with the presence of glucose and mannose (CON A), galactose (RCA-I), N-acetylglucosamine (WGA), N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA), but not fucose (UEA-I) residues. Hair cells in the bullfrog sacculus, unlike those in the utriculus and semicircular canals, did not strain for N-acetylglucosamine (WGA) or N-acetylgalactosamine (VVA). By contrast, WGA and, to a lesser extent, VVA, differentially stained utricular and semicircular canal hair cells, labeling hair cells located in peripheral, but not central, regions. In mammals, WGA uniformly labeled Type I hair cells while labeling, as in the bullfrog, Type II hair cells only in peripheral regions. These regional variations were retained after enzymatic digestion. We conclude that vestibular hair cells differ in their surface glycoconjugates and that differences in lectin binding patterns can be used to identify hair cell types and to infer the epithelial origin of isolated vestibular hair cells.

  3. Saccadic entropy of head impulses in acute unilateral vestibular loss.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Li-Chun; Lin, Hung-Ching; Lee, Guo-She

    2017-10-01

    To evaluate the complexity of vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR) in patients with acute unilateral vestibular loss (AUVL) via entropy analysis of head impulses. Horizontal head impulse test (HIT) with high-velocity alternating directions was used to evaluate 12 participants with AUVL and 16 healthy volunteers. Wireless electro-oculography and electronic gyrometry were used to acquire eye positional signals and head velocity signals. The eye velocity signals were then obtained through differentiation, band-pass filtering. The approximate entropy of eye velocity to head velocity (R ApEn ) was used to evaluate chaos property. VOR gain, gain asymmetry ratio, and R ApEn asymmetry ratio were also used to compare the groups. For the lesion-side HIT of the patient group, the mean VOR gain was significantly lower and the mean R ApEn was significantly greater compared with both nonlesion-side HIT and healthy controls (p < 0.01, one-way analysis of variance). Both the R ApEn asymmetry ratio and gain asymmetry ratio of the AUVL group were significantly greater compared with those of the control group (p < 0.05, independent sample t test). Entropy and gain analysis of HIT using wireless electro-oculography system could be used to detect the VOR dysfunctions of AUVL and may become effective methods for evaluating vestibular disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  4. Brainstem abnormalities and vestibular nerve enhancement in acute neuroborreliosis.

    PubMed

    Farshad-Amacker, Nadja A; Scheffel, Hans; Frauenfelder, Thomas; Alkadhi, Hatem

    2013-12-21

    Borreliosis is a widely distributed disease. Neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific symptoms and signs and often remains difficult to diagnose in patients with central nervous system symptoms, particularly if the pathognomonic erythema chronica migrans does not develop or is missed. Thus, vigilance is mandatory in cases with atypical presentation of the disease and with potentially severe consequences if not recognized early. We present a patient with neuroborreliosis demonstrating brain stem and vestibular nerve abnormalities on magnetic resonance imaging. A 28-year-old Caucasian female presented with headaches, neck stiffness, weight loss, nausea, tremor, and gait disturbance. Magnetic resonance imaging showed T2-weighted hyperintense signal alterations in the pons and in the vestibular nerves as well as bilateral post-contrast enhancement of the vestibular nerves. Serologic testing of the cerebrospinal fluid revealed the diagnosis of neuroborreliosis. Patients infected with neuroborreliosis may present with unspecific neurologic symptoms and magnetic resonance imaging as a noninvasive imaging tool showing signal abnormalities in the brain stem and nerve root enhancement may help in establishing the diagnosis.

  5. Vestibular regeneration--experimental models and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Albu, Silviu; Muresanu, Dafin F

    2012-09-01

    Therapies aimed at the protection and/or regeneration of inner ear hair cells are of great interest, given the significant monetary and quality of life impact of balance disorders. Different viral vectors have been shown to transfect various cell types in the inner ear. The past decade has provided tremendous advances in the use of adenoviral vectors to achieve targeted treatment delivery. Several routes of delivery have been identified to introduce vectors into the inner ear while minimizing injury to surrounding structures. Recently, the transcription factor Atoh1 was determined to play a critical role in hair cell differentiation. Adenoviral-mediated overexpression of Atoh1 in culture and in vivo has demonstrated the ability to regenerate vestibular hair cells by causing transdifferentiation of neighbouring epithelial-supporting cells. Functional recovery of the vestibular system has also been documented following adenoviral-induced Atoh1 overexpression. Experiments demonstrating gene transfer in human vestibular epithelial cells reveal that the human inner ear is a suitable target for gene therapy. © 2012 The Authors Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine © 2012 Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine/Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Imaging anatomy of the vestibular and visual systems.

    PubMed

    Gunny, Roxana; Yousry, Tarek A

    2007-02-01

    This review will outline the imaging anatomy of the vestibular and visual pathways, using computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, with emphasis on the more recent developments in neuroimaging. Technical advances in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, such as the advent of multislice computed tomography and newer magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as T2-weighted magnetic resonance cisternography, have improved the imaging of the vestibular and visual pathways, allowing better visualization of the end organs and peripheral nerves. Higher field strength magnetic resonance imaging is a promising tool, which has been used to evaluate and resolve fine anatomic detail in vitro, as in the labyrinth. Advanced magnetic resonance imaging techniques such as functional magnetic resonance imaging and diffusion tractography have been used to identify cortical areas of activation and associated white matter pathways, and show potential for the future identification of complex neuronal relays involved in integrating these pathways. The assessment of the various components of the vestibular and the visual systems has improved with more detailed research on the imaging anatomy of these systems, the advent of high field magnetic resonance scanners and multislice computerized tomography, and the wider use of specific techniques such as tractography which displays white matter tracts not directly accessible until now.

  7. Astronaut Owen Garriott - Test Subject - Human Vestibular Function Experiment

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-08-09

    S73-34171 (9 Aug. 1973) --- Scientist-astronaut Owen K. Garriott, Skylab 3 science pilot, serves as test subject for the Skylab ?Human Vestibular Function? M131 Experiment, as seen in this photographic reproduction taken from a television transmission made by a color TV camera aboard the Skylab space station in Earth orbit. The objectives of the Skylab M131 experiment are to obtain data pertinent to establishing the validity of measurements of specific behavioral/physiological responses influenced by vestibular activity under one-g and zero-g conditions; to determine man?s adaptability to unusual vestibular conditions and predict habitability of future spacecraft conditions involving reduced gravity and Coriollis forces; and to measure the accuracy and variability in man?s judgment of spatial coordinates based on atypical gravity receptor cues and inadequate visual cures. Dr. Garriott is seated in the experiment?s litter chair which can rotate the test subject at predetermined rotational velocity or programmed acceleration/decelerational profile. Photo credit: NASA

  8. Sleep and vestibular adaptation: implications for function in microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hobson, J. A.; Stickgold, R.; Pace-Schott, E. F.; Leslie, K. R.

    1998-01-01

    Optimal human performance depends upon integrated sensorimotor and cognitive functions, both of which are known to be exquisitely sensitive to loss of sleep. Under the microgravity conditions of space flight, adaptation of both sensorimotor (especially vestibular) and cognitive functions (especially orientation) must occur quickly--and be maintained--despite any concurrent disruptions of sleep that may be caused by microgravity itself, or by the uncomfortable sleeping conditions of the spacecraft. It is the three-way interaction between sleep quality, general work efficiency, and sensorimotor integration that is the subject of this paper and the focus of new work in our laboratory. To record sleep under field conditions including microgravity, we utilize a novel system called the Nightcap that we have developed and extensively tested on normal and sleep-disordered subjects. To perturb the vestibular system in ground-based studies, we utilize a variety of experimental conditions including optokinetic stimulation and both minifying and reversing goggle paradigms that have been extensively studied in relation to plasticity of the vestibulo-ocular reflex. Using these techniques we will test the hypothesis that vestibular adaptation both provokes and is enhanced by REM sleep under both ground-based and space conditions. In this paper we describe preliminary results of some of our studies.

  9. Enhancing vestibular function in the elderly with imperceptible electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Serrador, Jorge M; Deegan, Brian M; Geraghty, Maria C; Wood, Scott J

    2018-01-10

    Age-related loss of vestibular function can result in decrements in gaze stabilization and increased fall risk in the elderly. This study was designed to see if low levels of electrical stochastic noise applied transcutaneously to the vestibular system can improve a gaze stabilization reflex in young and elderly subject groups. Ocular counter-rolling (OCR) using a video-based technique was obtained in 16 subjects during low frequency passive roll tilts. Consistent with previous studies, there was a significant reduction in OCR gains in the elderly compared to the young group. Imperceptible stochastic noise significantly increased OCR in the elderly (Mean 23%, CI: 17-35%). Increases in OCR gain were greatest for those with lowest baseline gain and were negligible in those with normal gain. Since stimulation was effective at low levels undetectable to subjects, stochastic noise may provide a new treatment alternative to enhance vestibular function, specifically otolith-ocular reflexes, in the elderly or patient populations with reduced otolith-ocular function.

  10. Are Covert Saccade Functionally Relevant in Vestibular Hypofunction?

    PubMed

    Hermann, R; Pelisson, D; Dumas, O; Urquizar, Ch; Truy, E; Tilikete, C

    2018-06-01

    The vestibulo-ocular reflex maintains gaze stabilization during angular or linear head accelerations, allowing adequate dynamic visual acuity. In case of bilateral vestibular hypofunction, patients use saccades to compensate for the reduced vestibulo-ocular reflex function, with covert saccades occurring even during the head displacement. In this study, we questioned whether covert saccades help maintain dynamic visual acuity, and evaluated which characteristic of these saccades are the most relevant to improve visual function. We prospectively included 18 patients with chronic bilateral vestibular hypofunction. Subjects underwent evaluation of dynamic visual acuity in the horizontal plane as well as video recording of their head and eye positions during horizontal head impulse tests in both directions (36 ears tested). Frequency, latency, consistency of covert saccade initiation, and gain of covert saccades as well as residual vestibulo-ocular reflex gain were calculated. We found no correlation between residual vestibulo-ocular reflex gain and dynamic visual acuity. Dynamic visual acuity performance was however positively correlated with the frequency and gain of covert saccades and negatively correlated with covert saccade latency. There was no correlation between consistency of covert saccade initiation and dynamic visual acuity. Even though gaze stabilization in space during covert saccades might be of very short duration, these refixation saccades seem to improve vision in patients with bilateral vestibular hypofunction during angular head impulses. These findings emphasize the need for specific rehabilitation technics that favor the triggering of covert saccades. The physiological origin of covert saccades is discussed.

  11. Mobile phones: influence on auditory and vestibular systems.

    PubMed

    Balbani, Aracy Pereira Silveira; Montovani, Jair Cortez

    2008-01-01

    Telecommunications systems emit radiofrequency, which is an invisible electromagnetic radiation. Mobile phones operate with microwaves (450900 MHz in the analog service, and 1,82,2 GHz in the digital service) very close to the users ear. The skin, inner ear, cochlear nerve and the temporal lobe surface absorb the radiofrequency energy. literature review on the influence of cellular phones on hearing and balance. systematic review. We reviewed papers on the influence of mobile phones on auditory and vestibular systems from Lilacs and Medline databases, published from 2000 to 2005, and also materials available in the Internet. Studies concerning mobile phone radiation and risk of developing an acoustic neuroma have controversial results. Some authors did not see evidences of a higher risk of tumor development in mobile phone users, while others report that usage of analog cellular phones for ten or more years increase the risk of developing the tumor. Acute exposure to mobile phone microwaves do not influence the cochlear outer hair cells function in vivo and in vitro, the cochlear nerve electrical properties nor the vestibular system physiology in humans. Analog hearing aids are more susceptible to the electromagnetic interference caused by digital mobile phones. there is no evidence of cochleo-vestibular lesion caused by cellular phones.

  12. Effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Jung, Jae Yun; Kim, Ji-Sun; Chung, Phil Sang; Woo, Seung Hoon; Rhee, Chung Ku

    2009-01-01

    Dizziness in the elderly is relatively common, but only a few studies are available. The purpose of this study was to analyze the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on dizziness in elderly patients. A total of 240 patients older than 70 years with dizziness who visited the dizziness center of a tertiary care university hospital from January 2000 to January 2004 were studied. The patients' charts were retrospectively reviewed. Thorough otolaryngologic and neurotologic evaluations and vestibular function testing were performed in every case to determine the specific causes of dizziness. General vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT) was performed in 103 cases (VRT group) and it was not done on the other 46 cases (non-VRT group). The intensity of dizziness and disequilibrium was evaluated by the verbal analogue scale and Activities-specific Balance Confidence questionnaires that were obtained at 3 weeks and at 3 months after the initiation of general VRT. The average age of the patients was 76.5 +/- 6.2 years. In 153 cases (63%), no specific causes for dizziness were found, which was attributed to presbyastasis. Improvement in dizziness in the VRT group was significantly higher than in the non-VRT group by the verbal analogue scale and Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale obtained at 3 weeks and at 3 months after the initiation of VRT. In the majority of elderly patients with dizziness, the etiology of dizziness is not found and is attributed to presbyastasis. General VRT seems to be an effective treatment for this elderly group.

  13. Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Preuss, Nora; Mast, Fred W; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Purchases are driven by consumers' product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making.

  14. Purchase decision-making is modulated by vestibular stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Preuss, Nora; Mast, Fred W.; Hasler, Gregor

    2014-01-01

    Purchases are driven by consumers’ product preferences and price considerations. Using caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), we investigated the role of vestibular-affective circuits in purchase decision-making. CVS is an effective noninvasive brain stimulation method, which activates vestibular and overlapping emotional circuits (e.g., the insular cortex and the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC)). Subjects were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation while they performed two purchase decision-making tasks. In Experiment 1 subjects had to decide whether to purchase or not. CVS significantly reduced probability of buying a product. In Experiment 2 subjects had to rate desirability of the products and willingness to pay (WTP) while they were exposed to CVS and sham stimulation. CVS modulated desirability of the products but not WTP. The results suggest that CVS interfered with emotional circuits and thus attenuated the pleasant and rewarding effect of acquisition, which in turn reduced purchase probability. The present findings contribute to the rapidly growing literature on the neural basis of purchase decision-making. PMID:24600365

  15. Stereotactic radiotherapy of vestibular schwannoma : Hearing preservation, vestibular function, and local control following primary and salvage radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Putz, Florian; Müller, Jan; Wimmer, Caterina; Goerig, Nicole; Knippen, Stefan; Iro, Heinrich; Grundtner, Philipp; Eyüpoglu, Ilker; Rössler, Karl; Semrau, Sabine; Fietkau, Rainer; Lettmaier, Sebastian

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this publication is to present long-term data on functional outcomes and tumor control in a cohort of 107 patients treated with stereotactic radiotherapy (RT) for vestibular schwannoma. Included were 107 patients with vestibular schwannoma (primary or recurrent following resection) treated with stereotactic RT (either fractioned or single-dose radiosurgery) between October 2002 and December 2013. Local control and functional outcomes were determined. Analysis of hearing preservation was limited to a subgroup of patients with complete audiometric data collected before treatment and during follow-up. Vestibular function test (FVT) results could be analyzed in a subset of patients and were compared to patient-reported dizziness. After a mean follow-up of 46.3 months, actuarial local control for the whole cohort was 100% after 2, 97.6% after 5, and 94.1% after 10 years. In patients with primary RT, serviceable hearing was preserved in 72%. Predictors for preservation of serviceable hearing in multivariate analysis were time of follow-up (odds ratio, OR = 0.93 per month; p = 0.021) and pre-RT tumor size (Koos stage I-IIa vs. IIb-IV; OR = 0.15; p = 0.031). Worsening of FVT results was recorded in 17.6% (N = 3). Profound discrepancy of patient-reported dizziness and FVT results was observed after RT. In patients with primary RT, worsening of facial nerve function occurred in 1.7% (N = 1). Stereotactic RT of vestibular schwannoma provides good functional outcomes and high control rates. Dependence of hearing preservation on time of follow-up and initial tumor stage has to be considered.

  16. Postural threat influences vestibular-evoked muscular responses.

    PubMed

    Lim, Shannon B; Cleworth, Taylor W; Horslen, Brian C; Blouin, Jean-Sébastien; Inglis, J Timothy; Carpenter, Mark G

    2017-02-01

    Standing balance is significantly influenced by postural threat. While this effect has been well established, the underlying mechanisms of the effect are less understood. The involvement of the vestibular system is under current debate, and recent studies that investigated the effects of height-induced postural threat on vestibular-evoked responses provide conflicting results based on kinetic (Horslen BC, Dakin CJ, Inglis JT, Blouin JS, Carpenter MG. J Physiol 592: 3671-3685, 2014) and kinematic (Osler CJ, Tersteeg MC, Reynolds RF, Loram ID. Eur J Neurosci 38: 3239-3247, 2013) data. We examined the effect of threat of perturbation, a different form of postural threat, on coupling (cross-correlation, coherence, and gain) of the vestibulo-muscular relationship in 25 participants who maintained standing balance. In the "No-Threat" conditions, participants stood quietly on a stable surface. In the "Threat" condition, participants' balance was threatened with unpredictable mediolateral support surface tilts. Quiet standing immediately before the surface tilts was compared to an equivalent time from the No-Threat conditions. Surface EMG was recorded from bilateral trunk, hip, and leg muscles. Hip and leg muscles exhibited significant increases in peak cross-correlation amplitudes, coherence, and gain (1.23-2.66×) in the Threat condition compared with No-Threat conditions, and significant correlations were observed between threat-related changes in physiological arousal and medium-latency peak cross-correlation amplitude in medial gastrocnemius (r = 0.408) muscles. These findings show a clear threat effect on vestibular-evoked responses in muscles in the lower body, with less robust effects of threat on trunk muscles. Combined with previous work, the present results can provide insight into observed changes during balance control in threatening situations. This is the first study to show increases in vestibular-evoked responses of the lower body muscles under conditions

  17. Bilateral Vestibular Deficiency: Quality of Life and Economic Implications.

    PubMed

    Sun, Daniel Q; Ward, Bryan K; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; Carey, John P; Della Santina, Charles C

    2014-06-01

    Bilateral vestibular deficiency (BVD) causes chronic imbalance and unsteady vision and greatly increases the risk of falls; however, its effects on quality of life and economic impact are not well defined. To quantify disease-specific and health-related quality of life, health care utilization, and economic impact on individuals with BVD in comparison with those with unilateral vestibular deficiency (UVD). Cross-sectional survey study of patients with BVD or UVD and healthy controls at an academic medical center. Vestibular dysfunction was diagnosed by means of caloric nystagmography. Survey questionnaire. Health status was measured using the Dizziness Handicap Index (DHI) and Health Utility Index Mark 3 (HUI3). Economic burden was estimated using participant responses to questions on disease-specific health care utilization and lost productivity. Fifteen patients with BVD, 22 with UVD, and 23 healthy controls participated. In comparison with patients with UVD and controls, patients with BVD had significantly worse DHI (P < .001) and HUI3 scores. Statistically significant between-group differences were observed for overall HUI3 score (P < .001) and for specific attributes including vision, hearing, ambulation, emotion, and pain (P < .001 for all). Generalized linear model analysis of clinical variables associated with HUI3 scores after adjustment for other variables (including sex, race, education, age, and frequency of dizziness-related outpatient clinic visits) showed that the presence of UVD (P < .001) or BVD (P < .001), increased dizziness-related emergency room visits (P = .002), and increased dizziness-related missed work days (P < .001) were independently associated with worse HUI3 scores. Patients with BVD and UVD incurred estimated mean (range) annual economic burdens of $13,019 ($0-$48,830) and $3531 ($0-$48,442) per patient, respectively. Bilateral vestibular deficiency significantly decreases quality of life and imposes

  18. Comparison of virtual reality based therapy with customized vestibular physical therapy for the treatment of vestibular disorders.

    PubMed

    Alahmari, Khalid A; Sparto, Patrick J; Marchetti, Gregory F; Redfern, Mark S; Furman, Joseph M; Whitney, Susan L

    2014-03-01

    We examined outcomes in persons with vestibular disorders after receiving virtual reality based therapy (VRBT) or customized vestibular physical therapy (PT) as an intervention for habituation of dizziness symptoms. Twenty subjects with vestibular disorders received VRBT and 18 received PT. During the VRBT intervention, subjects walked on a treadmill within an immersive virtual grocery store environment, for six sessions approximately one week apart. The PT intervention consisted of gaze stabilization, standing balance and walking exercises individually tailored to each subject. Before, one week after, and at six months after the intervention, subjects completed self-report and balance performance measures. Before and after each VRBT session, subjects also reported symptoms of nausea, headache, dizziness, and visual blurring. In both groups, significant improvements were noted on the majority of self-report and performance measures one week after the intervention. Subjects maintained improvements on self report and performance measures at six months follow up. There were not between group differences. Nausea, headache, dizziness and visual blurring increased significantly during the VRBT sessions, but overall symptoms were reduced at the end of the six-week intervention. While this study did not find a difference in outcomes between PT and VRBT, the mechanism by which subjects with chronic dizziness demonstrated improvement in dizziness and balance function may be different.

  19. Comparison of Virtual Reality Based Therapy with Customized Vestibular Physical Therapy for the Treatment of Vestibular Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Alahmari, Khalid A.; Sparto, Patrick J; Marchetti, Gregory F.; Redfern, Mark S.; Furman, Joseph M.; Whitney, Susan L.

    2017-01-01

    We examined outcomes in persons with vestibular disorders after receiving virtual reality based therapy (VRBT) or customized vestibular physical therapy (PT) as an intervention for habituation of dizziness symptoms. Twenty subjects with vestibular disorders received VRBT and 18 received PT. During the VRBT intervention, subjects walked on a treadmill within an immersive virtual grocery store environment, for 6 sessions approximately one week apart. The PT intervention consisted of gaze stabilization, standing balance and walking exercises individually tailored to each subject. Before, one week after, and at 6-months after the intervention, subjects completed self-report and balance performance measures. Before and after each VRBT session, subjects also reported symptoms of nausea, headache, dizziness, and visual blurring. In both groups, significant improvements were noted on the majority of self-report and performance measures one week after the intervention. Subjects maintained improvements on self report and performance measures at 6 months follow up. There were not between group differences. Nausea, headache, dizziness and visual blurring increased significantly during the VRBT sessions, but overall symptoms were reduced at the end of the six-week intervention. While this study did not find a difference in outcomes between PT and VRBT, the mechanism by which subjects with chronic dizziness demonstrated improvement in dizziness and balance function may be different. PMID:24608691

  20. Symptoms Associated with Vestibular Impairment in Veterans with Posttraumatic Stress Disorder

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) is a chronic and disabling, anxiety disorder resulting from exposure to life threatening events such as a serious accident, abuse or combat (DSM IV definition). Among veterans with PTSD, a common complaint is dizziness, disorientation and/or postural imbalance in environments such as grocery stores and shopping malls. The etiology of these symptoms in PTSD is poorly understood and some attribute them to anxiety or traumatic brain injury. There is a possibility that an impaired vestibular system may contribute to these symptoms since, symptoms of an impaired vestibular system include dizziness, disorientation and postural imbalance. To our knowledge, this is the first report to describe the nature of vestibular related symptoms in veterans with and without PTSD. We measured PTSD symptoms using the Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Checklist (PCL-C) and compared it to responses on vestibular function scales including the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI), the Vertigo Symptom Scale Short Form (VSS-SF), the Chambless Mobility Inventory (CMI), and the Neurobehavioral Scale Inventory (NSI) in order to identify vestibular-related symptoms. Our findings indicate that veterans with worse PTSD symptoms report increased vestibular related symptoms. Additionally veterans with PTSD reported 3 times more dizziness related handicap than veterans without PTSD. Veterans with increased avoidance reported more vertigo and dizziness related handicap than those with PTSD and reduced avoidance. We describe possible contributing factors to increased reports of vestibular symptoms in PTSD, namely, anxiety, a vestibular component as well as an interactive effect of anxiety and vestibular impairment. We also present some preliminary analyses regarding the contribution of TBI. This data suggests possible evidence for vestibular symptom reporting in veterans with PTSD, which may be explained by possible underlying vestibular impairment, worthy of further

  1. The differential effects of acute right- vs. left-sided vestibular failure on brain metabolism.

    PubMed

    Becker-Bense, Sandra; Dieterich, Marianne; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Bartenstein, Peter; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Brandt, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    The human vestibular system is represented in the brain bilaterally, but it has functional asymmetries, i.e., a dominance of ipsilateral pathways and of the right hemisphere in right-handers. To determine if acute right- or left-sided unilateral vestibular neuritis (VN) is associated with differential patterns of brain metabolism in areas representing the vestibular network and the visual-vestibular interaction, patients with acute VN (right n = 9; left n = 13) underwent resting state (18)F-FDG PET once in the acute phase and once 3 months later after central vestibular compensation. The contrast acute vs. chronic phase showed signal differences in contralateral vestibular areas and the inverse contrast in visual cortex areas, both more pronounced in VN right. In VN left additional regions were found in the cerebellar hemispheres and vermis bilaterally, accentuated in severe cases. In general, signal changes appeared more pronounced in patients with more severe vestibular deficits. Acute phase PET data of patients compared to that of age-matched healthy controls disclosed similarities to these patterns, thus permitting the interpretation that the signal changes in vestibular temporo-parietal areas reflect signal increases, and in visual areas, signal decreases. These data imply that brain activity in the acute phase of right- and left-sided VN exhibits different compensatory patterns, i.e., the dominant ascending input is shifted from the ipsilateral to the contralateral pathways, presumably due to the missing ipsilateral vestibular input. The visual-vestibular interaction patterns were preserved, but were of different prominence in each hemisphere and more pronounced in patients with right-sided failure and more severe vestibular deficits.

  2. Preliminary evidence of improved cognitive performance following vestibular rehabilitation in children with combined ADHD (cADHD) and concurrent vestibular impairment.

    PubMed

    Lotfi, Younes; Rezazadeh, Nima; Moossavi, Abdollah; Haghgoo, Hojjat Allah; Rostami, Reza; Bakhshi, Enayatollah; Badfar, Faride; Moghadam, Sedigheh Farokhi; Sadeghi-Firoozabadi, Vahid; Khodabandelou, Yousef

    2017-12-01

    Balance function has been reported to be worse in ADHD children than in their normal peers. The present study hypothesized that an improvement in balance could result in better cognitive performance in children with ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of comprehensive vestibular rehabilitation therapy on the cognitive performance of children with combined ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. Subject were 54 children with combined ADHD. Those with severe vestibular impairment (n=33) were randomly assigned to two groups that were matched for age. A rehabilitation program comprising overall balance and gate, postural stability, and eye movement exercises was assigned to the intervention group. Subjects in the control group received no intervention for the same time period. Intervention was administered twice weekly for 12 weeks. Choice reaction time (CRT) and spatial working memory (SWM) subtypes of the Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery (CANTAB) were completed pre- and post-intervention to determine the effects of vestibular rehabilitation on the cognitive performance of the subjects with ADHD and concurrent vestibular impairment. ANCOVA was used to compare the test results of the intervention and control group post-test. The percentage of correct trial scores for the CRT achieved by the intervention group post-test increased significantly compared to those of the control group (p=0.029). The CRT mean latency scores were significantly prolonged in the intervention group following intervention (p=0.007) compared to the control group. No significant change was found in spatial functioning of the subjects with ADHD following 12 weeks of intervention (p>0.05). The study highlights the effect of vestibular rehabilitation on the cognitive performance of children with combined ADHD and concurrent vestibular disorder. The findings indicate that attention can be affected by early vestibular

  3. NAS Parallel Benchmarks. 2.4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biegel, Bryan A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a new problem size, called Class D, for the NAS Parallel Benchmarks (NPB), whose MPI source code implementation is being released as NPB 2.4. A brief rationale is given for how the new class is derived. We also describe the modifications made to the MPI (Message Passing Interface) implementation to allow the new class to be run on systems with 32-bit integers, and with moderate amounts of memory. Finally, we give the verification values for the new problem size.

  4. Effects of weightlessness on the development of the vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    The chronic 2g centrifuge was constructed for testing weightlessness effects on development of vestibular apparatus and ocular nystagmus in the rat. Both the stationary and rotating rail tests were performed. A physiological review is presented on vestibular apparatus, along with a system analysis. Time constants and input threshold level of the system are also considered.

  5. Gap junction systems in the rat vestibular labyrinth: immunohistochemical and ultrastructural analysis.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T; Adams, J C; Paul, D L; Kimura, R S

    1994-09-01

    The distribution of gap junctions within the vestibular labyrinth was investigated using immunohistochemistry and transmission electron microscopy. Connexin26-like immunoreactivity was observed among supporting cells in each vestibular sensory epithelium. Reaction product was also present in the transitional epithelium of each vestibular endorgan and in the planum semilunatum of crista ampullaris. No connexin26-like immunoreactivity was observed among thin wall epithelial cells or among vestibular dark cells. In addition, fibrocytes within vestibular connective tissue were positively immunostained. Reaction product was also detected in the melanocyte area just beneath dark cells. Ultrastructural observations indicated that a gap junction network of vestibular supporting cells extends to the transitional epithelium and planum semilunatum and forms an isolated epithelial cell gap junction system in each vestibular endorgan. In contrast, no gap junctions were found among wall epithelial cells or among dark cells. Fibrocytes and melanocytes were coupled by gap junctions and belong to the connective tissue cell gap junction system, which is continuous throughout the vestibular system and the cochlea. The possible functional significance of these gap junction systems is discussed.

  6. Sensory Reinforcement: Effects of Response-Contingent Vestibular Stimulation on Multiply Handicapped Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandler, Allen G.; McLain, Susan C.

    1987-01-01

    Investigation of the reinforcing properties of vestibular stimulation with five multiply disabled severely retarded young children indicated that vestibular stimulation (10 seconds of swinging) was reinforcing to all subjects and was preferred (over food, praise, visual, and auditory stimulation) by four of the five children. (Author/DB)

  7. Paradoxical vestibular syndrome in a dog from western Newfoundland infected with French heartworm (Angiostrongylus vasorum)

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Hye-Yeon; Parent, Joane M.; Hagen, Chris; Colwell, Emily; Rist, Paul M.; Murphy, Nicole; Burton, Shelley; Conboy, Gary

    2016-01-01

    A dog from western Newfoundland was presented with paradoxical vestibular syndrome. First-stage larvae of Angiostrongylus vasorum were detected on fecal examination. Treatment with milbemycin oxime resulted in resolution of signs. This is the first report of the spread of this parasite to western Newfoundland and of paradoxical vestibular syndrome in a dog infected with A. vasorum. PMID:27928171

  8. Vestibular autonomic regulation (including motion sickness and the mechanism of vomiting)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balaban, C. D.

    1999-01-01

    Autonomic manifestations of vestibular dysfunction and motion sickness are well established in the clinical literature. Recent studies of 'vestibular autonomic regulation' have focused predominantly on autonomic responses to stimulation of the vestibular sense organs in the inner ear. These studies have shown that autonomic responses to vestibular stimulation are regionally selective and have defined a 'vestibulosympathetic reflex' in animal experiments. Outside the realm of experimental preparations, however, the importance of vestibular inputs in autonomic regulation is unclear because controls for secondary factors, such as affective/emotional responses and cardiovascular responses elicited by muscle contraction and regional blood pooling, have been inadequate. Anatomic and physiologic evidence of an extensive convergence of vestibular and autonomic information in the brainstem suggests though that there may be an integrated representation of gravitoinertial acceleration from vestibular, somatic, and visceral receptors for somatic and visceral motor control. In the case of vestibular dysfunction or motion sickness, the unpleasant visceral manifestations (e.g. epigastric discomfort, nausea or vomiting) may contribute to conditioned situational avoidance and the development of agoraphobia.

  9. The Effect of Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation on Postural Response of Down Syndrome Individuals on the Seesaw

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvalho, R. L.; Almeida, G. L.

    2011-01-01

    In order to better understand the role of the vestibular system in postural adjustments on unstable surfaces, we analyzed the effects of galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on the pattern of muscle activity and joint displacements (ankle knee and hip) of eight intellectually normal participants (control group--CG) and eight control group…

  10. Interaction of visual and vestibular stimulation on spatial coordinates for eye movements in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Errico, P; Ferraresi, A; Minciotti, M; Barmack, N H

    1998-07-01

    Researchers investigated how vestibular and optokinetic signals alter the spatial transformation of the coordinate system that governs the spatial orientation of reflexive eye movements. Also examined were the effects of sensory stimulation when vestibular and optokinetic signals act synergistically and when the two signals are in conflict.

  11. Multisensory Origin of the Subjective First-Person Perspective: Visual, Tactile, and Vestibular Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, Christian; Lopez, Christophe; Schmutz, Valentin; Duenas, Julio Angel; Martuzzi, Roberto; Blanke, Olaf

    2013-01-01

    In three experiments we investigated the effects of visuo-tactile and visuo-vestibular conflict about the direction of gravity on three aspects of bodily self-consciousness: self-identification, self-location, and the experienced direction of the first-person perspective. Robotic visuo-tactile stimulation was administered to 78 participants in three experiments. Additionally, we presented participants with a virtual body as seen from an elevated and downward-directed perspective while they were lying supine and were therefore receiving vestibular and postural cues about an upward-directed perspective. Under these conditions, we studied the effects of different degrees of visuo-vestibular conflict, repeated measurements during illusion induction, and the relationship to a classical measure of visuo-vestibular integration. Extending earlier findings on experimentally induced changes in bodily self-consciousness, we show that self-identification does not depend on the experienced direction of the first-person perspective, whereas self-location does. Changes in bodily self-consciousness depend on visual gravitational signals. Individual differences in the experienced direction of first-person perspective correlated with individual differences in visuo-vestibular integration. Our data reveal important contributions of visuo-vestibular gravitational cues to bodily self-consciousness. In particular we show that the experienced direction of the first-person perspective depends on the integration of visual, vestibular, and tactile signals, as well as on individual differences in idiosyncratic visuo-vestibular strategies. PMID:23630611

  12. The prevalence of vestibular symptoms in migraine or tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Akdal, Gülden; Ozge, Aynur; Ergör, Gül

    2013-01-01

    We assessed frequency of vestibular symptoms in Headache Clinic patients over 10 years. A descriptive study of 5111 consecutive patients with tension-type headache or migraine, analyzed for dizziness/ vertigo accompanying headache and for a lifetime history of motion-sickness, cyclic vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy. Migraine patients were re-grouped as those with vestibular symptoms (dizziness/vertigo or motion sickness) and those without and their data then re-analyzed. There were 1880 migraine patients and 3231 tension-type headache patients. Significantly more migraine patients than tension-type headache patients experienced vestibular symptoms (p< 0.0001). The migraine with vestibular symptoms group was significantly younger (p< 0.05) had more aura, more phonophobia with migraine attacks (p< 0.0001). Menstruation and reported sleep problems impacted on headaches. While past history of cyclical vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy was about twice as common in migraine with aura and it was also more common in migraine with vestibular symptoms than migraine without vestibular symptoms. Vestibular symptoms are common in migraine patients. Migraine with vestibular symptoms might constitute a special group, one more likely to have had cyclic vomiting, recurrent abdominal pain or atopy.

  13. Sympathetic Arousal to a Vestibular Stressor in High and Low Hostile Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmona, Joseph E.; Holland, Alissa K.; Stratton, Harrison J.; Harrison, David W.

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present experiment was to extend the literature on hostility and a cerebral systems based model of sympathetic arousal to a vestibular-based stress. Several authors have concluded that autonomic stress reactivity in high hostile individuals must be interpersonally based, whereas healthy vestibular system functioning does not depend…

  14. DOE Radiation Research Program is floundering - NAS

    SciTech Connect

    Lobsenz, G.

    1994-04-20

    The Energy Department's radiation health effects research program is floundering in a morass of administrative confusion due to an ill-considered 1990 joint management agreement between DOE and the Health and Human Services Department, a National Academy of Sciences panel says. The NAS panel said the [open quotes]administrative difficulties[close quotes] created by the DOE-HHS agreement appear to be [open quotes]stifling creativity and efficiency within DOE's Epidemiology Research Program, delaying the completion and publication of research.[close quotes] The panel also expressed concern that DOE has failed to adequately fund or staff its health research office, and that the department had no mastermore » research plan to identify research needs or set forth uniform, scientifically rigorous data collection procedures. The panel said DOE's lack of commitment was particularly evident in its failure to set up an effective health surveillance program for its nuclear work force. In addition, the panel said DOE had fallen short on promises to create a comprehensive computer bank of health research data that would be continually updated with new information gleaned from an ongoing worker surveillance program. While recommending enhancements, the NAS panel emphasized that DOE's health research program would not be able to function effectively until the department revamped its joint management agreement with HHS.« less

  15. Role of somatosensory and vestibular cues in attenuating visually induced human postural sway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.; Benolken, Martha S.

    1993-01-01

    The purpose was to determine the contribution of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory cues to the maintenance of stance in humans. Postural sway was induced by full field, sinusoidal visual surround rotations about an axis at the level of the ankle joints. The influences of vestibular and somatosensory cues were characterized by comparing postural sway in normal and bilateral vestibular absent subjects in conditions that provided either accurate or inaccurate somatosensory orientation information. In normal subjects, the amplitude of visually induced sway reached a saturation level as stimulus amplitude increased. The saturation amplitude decreased with increasing stimulus frequency. No saturation phenomena was observed in subjects with vestibular loss, implying that vestibular cues were responsible for the saturation phenomenon. For visually induced sways below the saturation level, the stimulus-response curves for both normal and vestibular loss subjects were nearly identical implying that (1) normal subjects were not using vestibular information to attenuate their visually induced sway, possibly because sway was below a vestibular-related threshold level, and (2) vestibular loss subjects did not utilize visual cues to a greater extent than normal subjects; that is, a fundamental change in visual system 'gain' was not used to compensate for a vestibular deficit. An unexpected finding was that the amplitude of body sway induced by visual surround motion could be almost three times greater than the amplitude of the visual stimulus in normals and vestibular loss subjects. This occurred in conditions where somatosensory cues were inaccurate and at low stimulus amplitudes. A control system model of visually induced postural sway was developed to explain this finding. For both subject groups, the amplitude of visually induced sway was smaller by a factor of about four in tests where somatosensory cues provided accurate versus inaccurate orientation information. This

  16. Role of somatosensory and vestibular cues in attenuating visually induced human postural sway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, R. J.; Benolken, M. S.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the contribution of visual, vestibular, and somatosensory cues to the maintenance of stance in humans. Postural sway was induced by full-field, sinusoidal visual surround rotations about an axis at the level of the ankle joints. The influences of vestibular and somatosensory cues were characterized by comparing postural sway in normal and bilateral vestibular absent subjects in conditions that provided either accurate or inaccurate somatosensory orientation information. In normal subjects, the amplitude of visually induced sway reached a saturation level as stimulus amplitude increased. The saturation amplitude decreased with increasing stimulus frequency. No saturation phenomena were observed in subjects with vestibular loss, implying that vestibular cues were responsible for the saturation phenomenon. For visually induced sways below the saturation level, the stimulus-response curves for both normal subjects and subjects experiencing vestibular loss were nearly identical, implying (1) that normal subjects were not using vestibular information to attenuate their visually induced sway, possibly because sway was below a vestibular-related threshold level, and (2) that subjects with vestibular loss did not utilize visual cues to a greater extent than normal subjects; that is, a fundamental change in visual system "gain" was not used to compensate for a vestibular deficit. An unexpected finding was that the amplitude of body sway induced by visual surround motion could be almost 3 times greater than the amplitude of the visual stimulus in normal subjects and subjects with vestibular loss. This occurred in conditions where somatosensory cues were inaccurate and at low stimulus amplitudes. A control system model of visually induced postural sway was developed to explain this finding. For both subject groups, the amplitude of visually induced sway was smaller by a factor of about 4 in tests where somatosensory cues provided

  17. Vestibular-somatosensory interactions: effects of passive whole-body rotation on somatosensory detection.

    PubMed

    Ferrè, Elisa Raffaella; Kaliuzhna, Mariia; Herbelin, Bruno; Haggard, Patrick; Blanke, Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Vestibular signals are strongly integrated with information from several other sensory modalities. For example, vestibular stimulation was reported to improve tactile detection. However, this improvement could reflect either a multimodal interaction or an indirect interaction driven by vestibular effects on spatial attention and orienting. Here we investigate whether natural vestibular activation induced by passive whole-body rotation influences tactile detection. In particular, we assessed the ability to detect faint tactile stimuli to the fingertips of the left and right hand during spatially congruent or incongruent rotations. We found that passive whole-body rotations significantly enhanced sensitivity to faint shocks, without affecting response bias. Critically, this enhancement of somatosensory sensitivity did not depend on the spatial congruency between the direction of rotation and the hand stimulated. Thus, our results support a multimodal interaction, likely in brain areas receiving both vestibular and somatosensory signals.

  18. ELECTROMYOGRAPHIC ACTIVITY OF STERNOCLEIDOMASTOID AND MASTICATORY MUSCLES IN PATIENTS WITH VESTIBULAR LESIONS

    PubMed Central

    Tartaglia, Gianluca M.; Barozzi, Stefania; Marin, Federico; Cesarani, Antonio; Ferrario, Virgilio F.

    2008-01-01

    This study evaluated the electromyographic characteristics of masticatory and neck muscles in subjects with vestibular lesions. Surface electromyography of the masseter, temporalis and sternocleidomastoid muscles was performed in 19 patients with Ménière's disease, 12 patients with an acute peripheral vestibular lesion, and 19 control subjects matched for sex and age. During maximum voluntary clenching, patients with peripheral vestibular lesions had the highest co-contraction of the sternocleidomastoid muscle (analysis of covariance, p=0.02), the control subjects had the smallest values, and the patients with Ménière's disease had intermediate values. The control subjects had larger standardized muscle activities than the other patient groups (p=0.001). In conclusion, during maximum voluntary tooth clenching, patients with vestibular alterations have both more active neck muscles, and less active masticatory muscles than normal controls. Results underline the importance of a more inclusive craniocervical assessment of patients with vestibular lesions. PMID:19082397

  19. An experimental vestibular neural prosthesis: design and preliminary results with rhesus monkeys stimulated with modulated pulses.

    PubMed

    Nie, Kaibao; Ling, Leo; Bierer, Steven M; Kaneko, Chris R S; Fuchs, Albert F; Oxford, Trey; Rubinstein, Jay T; Phillips, James O

    2013-06-01

    A vestibular neural prosthesis was designed on the basis of a cochlear implant for treatment of Meniere's disease and other vestibular disorders. Computer control software was developed to generate patterned pulse stimuli for exploring optimal parameters to activate the vestibular nerve. Two rhesus monkeys were implanted with the prototype vestibular prosthesis and they were behaviorally evaluated post implantation surgery. Horizontal and vertical eye movement responses to patterned electrical pulse stimulations were collected on both monkeys. Pulse amplitude modulated (PAM) and pulse rate modulated (PRM) trains were applied to the lateral canal of each implanted animal. Robust slow-phase nystagmus responses following the PAM or PRM modulation pattern were observed in both implanted monkeys in the direction consistent with the activation of the implanted canal. Both PAM and PRM pulse trains can elicit a significant amount of in-phase modulated eye velocity changes and they could potentially be used for efficiently coding head rotational signals in future vestibular neural prostheses.

  20. Vestibular Response to Electrical Stimulation of the Otolith Organs. Implications in the Development of A Vestibular Implant for the Improvement of the Sensation of Gravitoinertial Accelerations.

    PubMed

    Ramos de Miguel, Angel; Falcon Gonzalez, Juan Carlos; Ramos Macias, Angel

    2017-08-01

    Electrical stimulation of the utricular and saccular portions of the vestibular nerve improves stability in patients suffering from vestibular dysfunction. The main objective of this study was to evaluate a new technique, vestibular response telemetry (VRT), for measuring the electrically evoked vestibular compound action potential (saccular and utricular) after stimulating the otolith organ (saccular and utricular) in adults. This study used evidence that the otolith organ can be electrically stimulated in order to develop a new vestibular implant design to improve the sensation of gravitoinertial acceleration. Four adult patients were evaluated by using a variety of measurement procedures with novel VRT software. VRT values were obtained by stimulating with three full-band Nucleus CI24RE (ST) electrodes. Specific stimuli were used. Simultaneously, electrical ocular vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (eoVEMPs) were recorded in the contralateral side. Electrically evoked compound action potentials were obtained in 10 of the 12 electrodes tested, and eoVEMPs were recorded when VRT was present. In addition to the validation of this technique, a set of default clinical test parameters was established. The VRT response morphology consisted of a biphasic waveform with an initial negative peak (N1) followed by a positive peak (P1), and latencies were typically 400 μs for N1 and 800 μs for P1. The consequences for the development of a vestibular implant for the improvement of gravitoinertial acceleration sensation are also presented. The VRT measurement technique has been shown to be a useful tool to record neural response on the otolith organ, and thus it is a convenient tool to evaluate whether the implanted electrodes provide a neural response or not. This can be used for the early development of vestibular implants to improve gravitoinertial acceleration sensation.

  1. Differential Involvement during Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of the Superior and Inferior Divisions of the Vestibular Ganglia: Implications for Vestibular Neuritis

    PubMed Central

    Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Horn, Anja K. E.; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Hüfner, Katharina

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Controversy still surrounds both the etiology and pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis (VN). Especially uncertain is why the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) is more frequently affected than the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN), which is partially or totally spared. To address this question, we developed an improved method for preparing human vestibular ganglia (VG) and nerve. Subsequently, macro- and microanatomical as well as PCR studies were performed on 38 human ganglia from 38 individuals. The SVN was 2.4 mm longer than the IVN, and in 65% of the cases, the IVN ran in two separate bony canals, which was not the case for the SVN. Anastomoses between the facial and cochlear nerves were more common for the SVN (14/38 and 9/38, respectively) than for the IVN (7/38 and 2/38, respectively). Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we found only a few latently herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected VG (18.4%). In cases of two separate neuronal fields, infected neurons were located in the superior part only. In summary, these PCR and micro- and macroanatomical studies provide possible explanations for the high frequency of SVN infection in vestibular neuritis. IMPORTANCE Vestibular neuritis is known to affect the superior part of the vestibular nerve more frequently than the inferior part. The reason for this clinical phenomenon remains unclear. Anatomical differences may play a role, or if latent HSV-1 infection is assumed, the etiology may be due to the different distribution of the infection. To shed further light on this subject, we conducted different macro- and microanatomical studies. We also assessed the presence of HSV-1 in VG and in different sections of the VG. Our findings add new information on the macro- and microanatomy of the VG as well as the pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis. We also show that latent HSV-1 infection of VG neurons is less frequent than previously reported. PMID:28446678

  2. Differential Involvement during Latent Herpes Simplex Virus 1 Infection of the Superior and Inferior Divisions of the Vestibular Ganglia: Implications for Vestibular Neuritis.

    PubMed

    Himmelein, Susanne; Lindemann, Anja; Sinicina, Inga; Horn, Anja K E; Brandt, Thomas; Strupp, Michael; Hüfner, Katharina

    2017-07-15

    Controversy still surrounds both the etiology and pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis (VN). Especially uncertain is why the superior vestibular nerve (SVN) is more frequently affected than the inferior vestibular nerve (IVN), which is partially or totally spared. To address this question, we developed an improved method for preparing human vestibular ganglia (VG) and nerve. Subsequently, macro- and microanatomical as well as PCR studies were performed on 38 human ganglia from 38 individuals. The SVN was 2.4 mm longer than the IVN, and in 65% of the cases, the IVN ran in two separate bony canals, which was not the case for the SVN. Anastomoses between the facial and cochlear nerves were more common for the SVN (14/38 and 9/38, respectively) than for the IVN (7/38 and 2/38, respectively). Using reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR), we found only a few latently herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1)-infected VG (18.4%). In cases of two separate neuronal fields, infected neurons were located in the superior part only. In summary, these PCR and micro- and macroanatomical studies provide possible explanations for the high frequency of SVN infection in vestibular neuritis. IMPORTANCE Vestibular neuritis is known to affect the superior part of the vestibular nerve more frequently than the inferior part. The reason for this clinical phenomenon remains unclear. Anatomical differences may play a role, or if latent HSV-1 infection is assumed, the etiology may be due to the different distribution of the infection. To shed further light on this subject, we conducted different macro- and microanatomical studies. We also assessed the presence of HSV-1 in VG and in different sections of the VG. Our findings add new information on the macro- and microanatomy of the VG as well as the pathophysiology of vestibular neuritis. We also show that latent HSV-1 infection of VG neurons is less frequent than previously reported. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  3. Central and peripheral components of short latency vestibular responses in the chicken

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nazareth, A. M.; Jones, T. A.

    1998-01-01

    Far-field recordings of short latency vestibular responses to pulsed cranial translation are composed of a series of positive and negative peaks occurring within 10 ms following stimulus onset. In the bird, these vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) can be recorded noninvasively and have been shown in the chicken and quail to depend strictly upon the activation of the vestibular component of the eighth nerve. The utility of the VsEP in the study of vestibular systems is dependent upon a clear understanding of the neural sources of response components. The primary aim of the current research in the chicken was to critically test the hypotheses that 1) responses are generated by both peripheral and central neurons and 2) peaks P1 and N1 originate from first order vestibular neurons, whereas later waves primarily depend on activity in higher order neurons. The principal strategy used here was to surgically isolate the eighth nerve as it enters the brainstem. Interruption of primary afferents of the eighth nerve in the brainstem substantially reduced or eliminated peaks beyond P2, whereas P1 and N1 were generally spared. Surgical sections that spared vestibular pathways had little effect on responses. The degree of change in response components beyond N1 was correlated with the extent of damage to central vestibular relays. These findings support the conclusion that responses are produced by both peripheral and central elements of the vestibular system. Further, response peaks later than N1 appear to be dependent upon central relays, whereas P1 and N1 reflect activity of the peripheral nerve. These findings clarify the roles of peripheral and central neurons in the generation of vestibular evoked potentials and provide the basis for a more useful and detailed interpretation of data from vestibular response testing.

  4. Right-sided dominance of the bilateral vestibular system in the upper brainstem and thalamus.

    PubMed

    Dieterich, Marianne; Kirsch, V; Brandt, T

    2017-10-01

    MRI diffusion tensor imaging tractography was performed on the bilateral vestibular brainstem pathways, which run from the vestibular nuclei via the paramedian and posterolateral thalamic subnuclei to the parieto-insular vestibular cortex. Twenty-one right-handed healthy subjects participated. Quantitative analysis revealed a rope-ladder-like system of vestibular pathways in the brainstem with crossings at pontine and mesencephalic levels. Three structural types of right-left fiber distributions could be delineated: (1) evenly distributed pathways at the lower pontine level from the vestibular nuclei to the pontine crossing, (2) a moderate, pontomesencephalic right-sided lateralization between the pontine and mesencephalic crossings, and (3) a further increase of the right-sided lateralization above the mesencephalic crossing leading to the thalamic vestibular subnuclei. The increasing lateralization along the brainstem was the result of an asymmetric number of pontine and mesencephalic crossing fibers which was higher for left-to-right crossings. The dominance of the right vestibular meso-diencephalic circuitry in right-handers corresponds to the right-hemispheric dominance of the vestibular cortical network. The structural asymmetry apparent in the upper brainstem might be interpreted in relation to the different functions of the vestibular system depending on their anatomical level: a symmetrical sensorimotor reflex control of eye, head, and body mediated by the lower brainstem; a lateralized right-sided upper brainstem-thalamic function as part of the dominant right-sided cortical/subcortical vestibular system that enables a global percept of body motion and orientation in space.

  5. Representation of vestibular and visual cues to self-motion in ventral intraparietal (VIP) cortex

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aihua; Deangelis, Gregory C.; Angelaki, Dora E.

    2011-01-01

    Convergence of vestibular and visual motion information is important for self-motion perception. One cortical area that combines vestibular and optic flow signals is the ventral intraparietal area (VIP). We characterized unisensory and multisensory responses of macaque VIP neurons to translations and rotations in three dimensions. Approximately half of VIP cells show significant directional selectivity in response to optic flow, half show tuning to vestibular stimuli, and one-third show multisensory responses. Visual and vestibular direction preferences of multisensory VIP neurons could be congruent or opposite. When visual and vestibular stimuli were combined, VIP responses could be dominated by either input, unlike medial superior temporal area (MSTd) where optic flow tuning typically dominates or the visual posterior sylvian area (VPS) where vestibular tuning dominates. Optic flow selectivity in VIP was weaker than in MSTd but stronger than in VPS. In contrast, vestibular tuning for translation was strongest in VPS, intermediate in VIP, and weakest in MSTd. To characterize response dynamics, direction-time data were fit with a spatiotemporal model in which temporal responses were modeled as weighted sums of velocity, acceleration, and position components. Vestibular responses in VIP reflected balanced contributions of velocity and acceleration, whereas visual responses were dominated by velocity. Timing of vestibular responses in VIP was significantly faster than in MSTd, whereas timing of optic flow responses did not differ significantly among areas. These findings suggest that VIP may be proximal to MSTd in terms of vestibular processing but hierarchically similar to MSTd in terms of optic flow processing. PMID:21849564

  6. Development and Function of the Mouse Vestibular System in the Absence of Gravity Perception

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolgemuth, Debra J.

    2005-01-01

    The hypothesis that was tested in this research was that the absence of gravity perception, such as would occur in space, would affect the development and function of the vestibular and central nervous systems. Further, we postulated that these effects would be more significant at specific stages of post-natal development of the animal. We also proposed the use of molecular genetic approaches that would provide important information as to the hierarchy of gene function during the development and subsequent function of the vestibular system. The tilted (tlt) mutant mouse has been characterized as lacking the ability to provide sensory input to the gravity receptors. The tlt/tlt mutant mice were a particularly attractive model for the study of vestibular function since the primary defect was limited to the receptor part of the vestibular system, and there were no detectable abnormal phenotypes in other organ systems. The goal of the proposed studies was to assess immediate and delayed effects of the lack of gravity perception on the vestibular system. Particular attention was paid to characterizing primarily affected periods of vestibular morphogenesis, and to identifying downstream genetic pathways that are altered in the CNS of the tlt/tlt mutant mouse. The specific aims were: (1) to characterize the postnatal morphogenesis of the CNS in the tlt mutant mouse, using detailed morphometric analysis of isolated vestibular ganglia and brain tissue at different stages of postnatal development and assessment of apoptotic cell death; (2) to examine the expression of selected genes implicated by mutational analysis to be important in vestibular development or function by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry in the mutant mice; and (3) to identify other genes involved in vestibular development and function, using differential cloning strategies to isolate genes whose expression is changed in the mutant versus normal vestibular system.

  7. Vibration-induced nystagmus in patients with vestibular schwannoma: Characteristics and clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeon Mi; Kim, Mi Joo; Kim, Jin Won; Shim, Dae Bo; Kim, Jinna; Kim, Sung Huhn

    2017-07-01

    To investigate the clinical significance of vibration-induced nystagmus (VIN) in unilateral vestibular asymmetry and vestibular schwannoma. Thirteen patients with vestibular schwannoma underwent the VIN test, in which stimulation was applied to the mastoid processes and sternocleidomastoid (SCM) muscles on the ipsilateral and contralateral sides of lesions. Preoperative VIN was measured, and changes in VIN were followed up for 6months after tumor removal. Significance of VIN was determined by evaluation of its sensitivity, correlation with vestibular function tests and tumor volume, and postoperative changes. The overall pre and postoperative sensitivities of VIN were 92.3% and 100%, respectively, considering stimulation at all four sites. Maximum slow-phase velocity (MSPV) of VIN was linearly correlated with caloric weakness and tumor volume, especially when stimulation was applied to the SCM muscle. Postoperative MSPV of VIN exhibited stronger linear correlation with postoperative changes in canal paresis value and inverse correlation with tumor size upon stimulation of the ipsilateral SCM muscle than upon stimulation of other sites. During the 6-month follow-up period, persistence of VIN without changes in MSPV was observed even after vestibular compensation. Evoking VIN by stimulation of the mastoid processes and SCM muscles is effective for detecting vestibular asymmetry. It could also help determine the degree of vestibular asymmetry and volume of vestibular schwannoma if stimulation is applied to the SCM muscle. The results of this study could provide clues for the basic application of VIN in patients with vestibular loss and vestibular schwannoma. Copyright © 2017 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Refractory episodic vertigo: role of intratympanic gentamicin and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Celis-Aguilar, Erika; Hinojosa-González, Ramon; Vales-Hidalgo, Olivia; Coutinho-Toledo, Heloisa

    Even today, the treatment of intractable vertigo remains a challenge. Vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin stands as a good alternative in the management of refractory vertigo patients. To control intractable vertigo through complete saccular and horizontal canal vestibular ablation with intratympanic gentamicin treatment. Patients with refractory episodic vertigo were included. The inclusion criteria were: unilateral ear disease, moderate to profound sensorineural hearing loss, and failure to other treatments. Included patients underwent 0.5-0.8mL of gentamicin intratympanic application at a 30mg/mL concentration. Vestibular ablation was confirmed by the absence of response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. Audiometry, electronystagmography with iced water, and vestibular evoked myogenic potentials were performed in all patients. Ten patients were included; nine patients with Meniere's disease and one patient with (late onset) delayed hydrops. Nine patients showed an absent response on vestibular evoked myogenic potentials and no response on caloric tests. The only patient with low amplitude on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials had vertigo recurrence. Vertigo control was achieved in 90% of the patients. One patient developed hearing loss >30dB. Cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials confirmed vestibular ablation in patients treated with intratympanic gentamicin. High-grade vertigo control was due to complete saccular and horizontal canal ablation (no response to iced water in electronystagmography and no response on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials). Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  9. Elevation of internal auditory canal pressure by vestibular schwannomas.

    PubMed

    Badie, B; Pyle, G M; Nguyen, P H; Hadar, E J

    2001-09-01

    The exact mechanism of hearing loss, the most common presenting symptom in patients with vestibular schwannomas, remains unclear. To test whether increased pressure in the internal auditory canal from tumor growth is responsible for this clinical finding, the intracanalicular pressure in patients harboring these tumors was measured. Prospective study. Tertiary referral hospital. Fifteen consecutive patients undergoing a retrosigmoid approach for resection of vestibular schwannomas were included in the study. The intracanalicular pressure in every patient was measured by introducing a pressure microsensor into the internal auditory canal. The pressure readings, which were performed before tumor resection, were then correlated with tumor size and respective preoperative hearing status. Placement of the pressure monitor into the internal auditory canal revealed a biphasic waveform in every patient. Whereas the mean intracanalicular pressure was 20 mm Hg, there was significant variability among patients (range, 1-45 mm Hg). The intracanalicular pressure directly correlated with the amount of tumor in the internal auditory canal (r > 0.63, p < 0.012) but not with the total tumor size (r 0.075). Furthermore, eight patients with class A preoperative hearing (American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery classification) had lower intracanalicular pressures than did five patients with class B hearing (16 +/- 5 vs. 28 +/- 4). Although this observation suggested an inverse correlation between the intracanalicular pressure and hearing function, the difference between the two groups was not statistically significant (p = 0.14). Pressure on the cochlear nerve as a result of tumor growth in the internal auditory canal may be responsible for hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannomas. Modification of surgical techniques to address the elevated intracanalicular pressure may be beneficial in improving hearing preservation in these patients.

  10. Vestibular and Visual Contribution to Fish Behavior Under Microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijiri, K.

    Vestibular and visual information are two major factors fish use for controlling their posture under 1 G conditions. Parabolic flight experiments were carried out to observe the fish behavior under microgravity for several different strains of Medaka fish (Oryzias latipes). There existed a clear strain-difference in the behavioral response of the fish under microgravity: Some strains looped, while other strains did not loop at all. However, even the latter strains looped under microgravity conditions when kept in complete darkness, suggesting the contribution of visual information to the posture control under microgravity. In the laboratory, eyesight (visual acuity) was checked for each strain, using a rotating striped-drum apparatus. The results also showed a strain-difference, which gave a clue to the different degree of adaptability to microgravity among different strains. Beside loopings, some fish exhibited rolling movement around their body axis. Tracing each fish during and between parabolas, it was shown that to which side each fish rolls was determined specifically to each individual fish, and not to each strain. Thus, rolling direction is not genetically determined. This may support the otolith asymmetry hypothesis. Fish of a mutant strain (ha strain, having homozygous recessive of one gene ha) have some malfunction in otolith-vestibular system, and their behavior showed they are not dependent on gravity. Morphological abnormalities of their ear vesicles during the embryonic and baby stages were noted. Their eyesight and dorsal light responses were also studied. Progress in the project of establishing a new strain which has good eyesight and, at the same time, being deficient in otolith-vestibular system was reported. Crosses between the strain of good eyesight and ha strain were made, and to some extent, F2 fish have already shown such characteristics suited for living under microgravity conditions

  11. Exhibition of stochastic resonance in vestibular tilt motion perception.

    PubMed

    Galvan-Garza, R C; Clark, T K; Mulavara, A P; Oman, C M

    2018-04-03

    Stochastic Resonance (SR) is a phenomenon broadly described as "noise benefit". The application of subsensory electrical Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation (SVS) via electrodes behind each ear has been used to improve human balance and gait, but its effect on motion perception thresholds has not been examined. This study investigated the capability of subsensory SVS to reduce vestibular motion perception thresholds in a manner consistent with a characteristic bell-shaped SR curve. We measured upright, head-centered, roll tilt Direction Recognition (DR) thresholds in the dark in 12 human subjects with the application of wideband 0-30 Hz SVS ranging from ±0-700 μA. To conservatively assess if SR was exhibited, we compared the proportions of both subjective and statistical SR exhibition in our experimental data to proportions of SR exhibition in multiple simulation cases with varying underlying SR behavior. Analysis included individual and group statistics. As there is not an established mathematical definition, three humans subjectively judged that SR was exhibited in 78% of subjects. "Statistically significant SR exhibition", which additionally required that a subject's DR threshold with SVS be significantly lower than baseline (no SVS), was present in 50% of subjects. Both percentages were higher than simulations suggested could occur simply by chance. For SR exhibitors, defined by subjective or statistically significant criteria, the mean DR threshold improved by -30% and -39%, respectively. The largest individual improvement was -47%. At least half of the subjects were better able to perceive passive body motion with the application of subsensory SVS. This study presents the first conclusive demonstration of SR in vestibular motion perception. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. A CMOS Neural Interface for a Multichannel Vestibular Prosthesis

    PubMed Central

    Hageman, Kristin N.; Kalayjian, Zaven K.; Tejada, Francisco; Chiang, Bryce; Rahman, Mehdi A.; Fridman, Gene Y.; Dai, Chenkai; Pouliquen, Philippe O.; Georgiou, Julio; Della Santina, Charles C.; Andreou, Andreas G.

    2015-01-01

    We present a high-voltage CMOS neural-interface chip for a multichannel vestibular prosthesis (MVP) that measures head motion and modulates vestibular nerve activity to restore vision- and posture-stabilizing reflexes. This application specific integrated circuit neural interface (ASIC-NI) chip was designed to work with a commercially available microcontroller, which controls the ASIC-NI via a fast parallel interface to deliver biphasic stimulation pulses with 9-bit programmable current amplitude via 16 stimulation channels. The chip was fabricated in the ONSemi C5 0.5 micron, high-voltage CMOS process and can accommodate compliance voltages up to 12 V, stimulating vestibular nerve branches using biphasic current pulses up to 1.45 ± 0.06 mA with durations as short as 10 µs/phase. The ASIC-NI includes a dedicated digital-to-analog converter for each channel, enabling it to perform complex multipolar stimulation. The ASIC-NI replaces discrete components that cover nearly half of the 2nd generation MVP (MVP2) printed circuit board, reducing the MVP system size by 48% and power consumption by 17%. Physiological tests of the ASIC-based MVP system (MVP2A) in a rhesus monkey produced reflexive eye movement responses to prosthetic stimulation similar to those observed when using the MVP2. Sinusoidal modulation of stimulus pulse rate from 68–130 pulses per second at frequencies from 0.1 to 5 Hz elicited appropriately-directed slow phase eye velocities ranging in amplitude from 1.9–16.7°/s for the MVP2 and 2.0–14.2°/s for the MVP2A. The eye velocities evoked by MVP2 and MVP2A showed no significant difference (t-test, p = 0.034), suggesting that the MVP2A achieves performance at least as good as the larger MVP2. PMID:25974945

  13. Heat pulse excitability of vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons

    PubMed Central

    Brichta, Alan M.; Tabatabaee, Hessam; Boutros, Peter J.; Ahn, JoongHo; Della Santina, Charles C.; Poppi, Lauren A.; Lim, Rebecca

    2016-01-01

    In the present study we combined electrophysiology with optical heat pulse stimuli to examine thermodynamics of membrane electrical excitability in mammalian vestibular hair cells and afferent neurons. We recorded whole cell currents in mammalian type II vestibular hair cells using an excised preparation (mouse) and action potentials (APs) in afferent neurons in vivo (chinchilla) in response to optical heat pulses applied to the crista (ΔT ≈ 0.25°C per pulse). Afferent spike trains evoked by heat pulse stimuli were diverse and included asynchronous inhibition, asynchronous excitation, and/or phase-locked APs synchronized to each infrared heat pulse. Thermal responses of membrane currents responsible for APs in ganglion neurons were strictly excitatory, with Q10 ≈ 2. In contrast, hair cells responded with a mix of excitatory and inhibitory currents. Excitatory hair cell membrane currents included a thermoelectric capacitive current proportional to the rate of temperature rise (dT/dt) and an inward conduction current driven by ΔT. An iberiotoxin-sensitive inhibitory conduction current was also evoked by ΔT, rising in <3 ms and decaying with a time constant of ∼24 ms. The inhibitory component dominated whole cell currents in 50% of hair cells at −68 mV and in 67% of hair cells at −60 mV. Responses were quantified and described on the basis of first principles of thermodynamics. Results identify key molecular targets underlying heat pulse excitability in vestibular sensory organs and provide quantitative methods for rational application of optical heat pulses to examine protein biophysics and manipulate cellular excitability. PMID:27226448

  14. Vestibular suppressants after canalith repositioning in benign paroxysmal positional vertigo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min-Beom; Lee, Hyun S; Ban, Jae H

    2014-10-01

    To investigate the characteristics of residual symptoms and to evaluate the effects of adjuvant vestibular suppressants on residual symptoms after successful canalith repositioning procedures (CRPs). Individual randomized controlled trial. One hundred fifty patients with idiopathic benign paroxysmal positional vertigo who achieved successful CRPs on initial visit participated in this study. Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) questionnaires were completed before CRPs. All study populations were divided into three groups after successful CRPs on the initial visit day: the medication (V) group (treated with a vestibular suppressant [dimenhydrinate 50 mg per day]), the placebo (P) group, and the no medication (N) group. One week after successful CRPs, residual symptoms were checked and repeated DHI questionnaires were completed to compare residual symptoms. Among the 138 patients who did not show positional nystagmus at follow-up, 67 (48.5%) complained of residual symptoms. The presence of residual symptoms was more prevalent in the P and N group compared with the V group (P = .035, P = .017, respectively). The most frequent residual symptom was lightheadedness (n = 42). Moreover, in the V group, lightheadedness was significantly reduced compared with the P group (P = .029). However, in the analysis of DHI, total and subscale scores did not differ across the three groups before or after successful CRP. Vestibular suppressants significantly reduced residual symptoms compared to both placebo and no medication after CRP. However, there was no significant reduction in DHI score compared with the control group, suggesting that the residual symptoms could not be evaluated by DHI score alone. © 2014 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  15. Effect of practicing yoga on cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential.

    PubMed

    Shambhu, Tejaswini; Kumar, Shubhaganga Dhrruva; Prabhu, Prashanth

    2017-10-01

    The present study attempted to determine the effect of practicing yoga on functioning of sacculo-collic pathway using cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP). cVEMP was recorded from 40 participants (20 who practice yoga regularly and 20 who do not practice yoga regularly). The differences in amplitude of P1, N1, P1-N1 complex, asymmetry ratio and latencies of P1 and N1 of cVEMP were compared between both the groups. The results of the study showed that there was a significant increase (p < 0.05) in the amplitude of P1, N1 and P1-N1 complex and a significant reduction in latency (p < 0.05) for experimental group. The asymmetry ratio in individuals who practice yoga was significantly lower (Mean = 6.73) compared to the control group (Mean = 19.13). Multivariate regression analyses suggested that the number of years of yoga practice significantly predicted the amplitude of P1-N1 complex (β = 0.70, p < 0.01) and amplitude ratio (β = 0.72, p < 0.01). Thus, practicing yoga improves postural control and strengthens the muscles and vestibular system leading to enhanced cVEMP responses. The plastic changes in the vestibular system and increased muscular strength because of constant practicing of yoga could have led to changes in cVEMP responses. However, further studies on a larger group of individuals are essential for better clinical applicability of the results.

  16. Visual-Vestibular Conflict Detection Depends on Fixation.

    PubMed

    Garzorz, Isabelle T; MacNeilage, Paul R

    2017-09-25

    Visual and vestibular signals are the primary sources of sensory information for self-motion. Conflict among these signals can be seriously debilitating, resulting in vertigo [1], inappropriate postural responses [2], and motion, simulator, or cyber sickness [3-8]. Despite this significance, the mechanisms mediating conflict detection are poorly understood. Here we model conflict detection simply as crossmodal discrimination with benchmark performance limited by variabilities of the signals being compared. In a series of psychophysical experiments conducted in a virtual reality motion simulator, we measure these variabilities and assess conflict detection relative to this benchmark. We also examine the impact of eye movements on visual-vestibular conflict detection. In one condition, observers fixate a point that is stationary in the simulated visual environment by rotating the eyes opposite head rotation, thereby nulling retinal image motion. In another condition, eye movement is artificially minimized via fixation of a head-fixed fixation point, thereby maximizing retinal image motion. Visual-vestibular integration performance is also measured, similar to previous studies [9-12]. We observe that there is a tradeoff between integration and conflict detection that is mediated by eye movements. Minimizing eye movements by fixating a head-fixed target leads to optimal integration but highly impaired conflict detection. Minimizing retinal motion by fixating a scene-fixed target improves conflict detection at the cost of impaired integration performance. The common tendency to fixate scene-fixed targets during self-motion [13] may indicate that conflict detection is typically a higher priority than the increase in precision of self-motion estimation that is obtained through integration. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Vestibular-related neuroscience and manned space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Igarashi, Makoto

    1988-01-01

    The effects of weightlessness on the human vestibular system are examined, reviewing the results of recent investigations. The functional, neurophysiological, and neurochemical changes which occur during adaptation to weightlessness are discussed; theoretical models proposed to explain the underlying mechanism are outlined; and particular attention is given to the author's experiments on squirrel monkeys. There, good correlations were found between (1) the recovery of locomotor balance function in the acute compensation phase after unilateral labyrinthectomy and (2) the bilateral imbalance in the optical density of GABA-like immunoreactivity.

  18. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei.

    PubMed

    Yakushin, Sergei B; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic) information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO) and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS) neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46%) code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54%) changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral), providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing rates of VO

  19. Coding of Velocity Storage in the Vestibular Nuclei

    PubMed Central

    Yakushin, Sergei B.; Raphan, Theodore; Cohen, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Semicircular canal afferents sense angular acceleration and output angular velocity with a short time constant of ≈4.5 s. This output is prolonged by a central integrative network, velocity storage that lengthens the time constants of eye velocity. This mechanism utilizes canal, otolith, and visual (optokinetic) information to align the axis of eye velocity toward the spatial vertical when head orientation is off-vertical axis. Previous studies indicated that vestibular-only (VO) and vestibular-pause-saccade (VPS) neurons located in the medial and superior vestibular nucleus could code all aspects of velocity storage. A recently developed technique enabled prolonged recording while animals were rotated and received optokinetic stimulation about a spatial vertical axis while upright, side-down, prone, and supine. Firing rates of 33 VO and 8 VPS neurons were studied in alert cynomolgus monkeys. Majority VO neurons were closely correlated with the horizontal component of velocity storage in head coordinates, regardless of head orientation in space. Approximately, half of all tested neurons (46%) code horizontal component of velocity in head coordinates, while the other half (54%) changed their firing rates as the head was oriented relative to the spatial vertical, coding the horizontal component of eye velocity in spatial coordinates. Some VO neurons only coded the cross-coupled pitch or roll components that move the axis of eye rotation toward the spatial vertical. Sixty-five percent of these VO and VPS neurons were more sensitive to rotation in one direction (predominantly contralateral), providing directional orientation for the subset of VO neurons on either side of the brainstem. This indicates that the three-dimensional velocity storage integrator is composed of directional subsets of neurons that are likely to be the bases for the spatial characteristics of velocity storage. Most VPS neurons ceased firing during drowsiness, but the firing rates of VO

  20. Influence of mobility restriction on habituation of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gorgiladze, G. I.; Kazanskaya, G. S.

    1980-01-01

    Test results presented indicate that 30-day hypokinesia did not affect the intensity of nystagmus: velocity of slow phase, total number of jerks, and duration of the reaction in animals were the same as before mobility restriction and did not differ from those of the control group. However, hypokinesia resulted in the disappearance of habituation of the vestibulary system to repeated angular accelerations. The known hypokinetic changes in the endocrine system were studied. It was concluded that reduction in adrenergic function may be the cause of disappearance of vestibular apparatus habituation during hypokinesia.

  1. Cold shivering activity after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuzmina, G. I.

    1980-01-01

    The bioelectric activity of muscles (flexors and extensors of the forelimbs and hindlimbs) during cold shivering after unilateral destruction of the vestibular apparatus. It was found, that unilateral delabyrinthing produces bilateral facilitation of cold shivering in the flexor extremities more pronounced on the ipsilateral side. In the extensor muscles there was an absence of bioelectric activity both before and after delabyrinthing. Enhancement of cold shivering in the flexor extremities following intervention was evidently conditioned by removal of the inhibiting effect of the vestibulary apparatus on the function of special centers.

  2. A critical period for functional vestibular development in zebrafish

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorman, Stephen J.; Cordova, Rodolfo; Davies, Sarah A.

    2002-01-01

    We have determined a critical period for vestibular development in zebrafish by using a bioreactor designed by NASA to simulate microgravity for cells in culture. A critical period is defined as the briefest period of time during development when stimulus deprivation results in long lasting or permanent sensory deficits. Zebrafish eggs were collected within 3 hours of being laid and fertilized. In experiment 1, eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 3, 24, 30, 36, 48, or 72 hours postfertilization (hPF) and maintained in the bioreactor until 96 hPF. In experiment 2, eggs were placed in the bioreactor immediately after they were collected and maintained in the bioreactor until 24, 36, 48, 60, 66, 72, or 96 hPF. Beginning at 96 hPF, all larvae had their vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR) evaluated once each day for 5 days. Only larvae that hatched from eggs that were placed in the bioreactor before 30 hPF in experiment 1 or removed from the bioreactor later than 66 hPF in experiment 2 had VOR deficits that persisted for at least 5 days. These data suggest a critical period for vestibular development in the zebrafish that begins before 30 hPF and ends after 66 hPF. To confirm this, zebrafish eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 24 hPF and removed at 72 hPF. VORs were evaluated in these larvae once each day for 5 days beginning at 96 hPF. These larvae had VOR deficits that persisted for at least 5 days. In addition, larvae that had been maintained in the bioreactor from 24 to 66 hPF or from 30 to 72 hPF, had only temporary VOR deficits. In a final experiment, zebrafish eggs were placed in the bioreactor at 3 hPF and removed at 96 hPF but the bioreactor was turned off from 24 hPF to 72 hPF. These larvae had normal VORs when they were removed from the bioreactor at 96 hPF. Taken as a whole, these data support the idea that there is a critical period for functional maturation of the zebrafish vestibular system. The developmental period identified includes the timeframe

  3. A brief review of the clinical anatomy of the vestibular-ocular connections-how much do we know?

    PubMed

    Bronstein, A M; Patel, M; Arshad, Q

    2015-02-01

    The basic connectivity from the vestibular labyrinth to the eye muscles (vestibular ocular reflex, VOR) has been elucidated in the past decade, and we summarise this in graphic format. We also review the concept of 'velocity storage', a brainstem integrator that prolongs vestibular responses. Finally, we present new discoveries of how complex visual stimuli, such as binocular rivalry, influence VOR processing. In contrast to the basic brainstem circuits, cortical vestibular circuits are far from being understood, but parietal-vestibular nuclei projections are likely to be involved.

  4. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in a large series of vestibular patients.

    PubMed

    Califano, L; Melillo, M G; Vassallo, A; Mazzone, S

    2011-02-01

    The Hyperventilation Test is widely used in the "bed-side examination" of vestibular patients. It can either activate a latent nystagmus in central or peripheral vestibular diseases or it can interact with a spontaneous nystagmus, by reducing it or increasing it. Aims of this study were to determine the incidence, patterns and temporal characteristics of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in patients suffering from vestibular diseases, as well as its contribution to the differential diagnosis between vestibular neuritis and neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve, and its behaviour in some central vestibular diseases. The present study includes 1202 patients featuring, at vestibular examination, at least one sign of vestibular system disorders or patients diagnosed with a "Migraine-related vertigo" or "Chronic subjective dizziness". The overall incidence of Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was 21.9%. It was detected more frequently in retrocochlear vestibular diseases rather than in end-organ vestibular diseases: 5.3% in Paroxysmal Positional Vertigo, 37.1% in Menière's disease, 37.6% in compensated vestibular neuritis, 77.2% in acute vestibular neuritis and 91.7% in neuroma of the 8(th) cranial nerve. In acute vestibular neuritis, three HVIN patterns were observed: Paretic pattern: temporary enhancement of the spontaneous nystagmus; Excitatory pattern: temporary inhibition of the spontaneous nystagmus; Strong excitatory pattern: temporary inversion of the spontaneous nystagmus. Excitatory patterns proved to be time-dependent in that they disappeared and were replaced by the paretic pattern over a period of maximum 18 days since the beginning of the disorder. In acoustic neuroma, Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus was frequently observed (91.7%), either in the form of an excitatory pattern (fast phases towards the affected site) or in the form of a paretic pattern (fast phases towards the healthy side). The direction of the nystagmus is only partially related to

  5. Evaluating Inhibition of Motoneuron Firing From Electromyogram Data to Assess Vestibular Output Using Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials.

    PubMed

    Prakash, S R; Herrmann, Barbara S; Milojcic, Rupprecht; Rauch, Steven D; Guinan, John J

    2015-01-01

    Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) are due to vestibular responses producing brief inhibitions of muscle contractions that are detectable in electromyographic (EMG) responses. VEMP amplitudes are traditionally measured by the peak to peak amplitude of the averaged EMG response (VEMPpp) or by a normalized VEMPpp (nVEMPpp). However, a brief EMG inhibition does not satisfy the statistical assumptions for the average to be the optimal processing strategy. Here, it is postulated that the inhibition depth of motoneuron firing is the desired metric for showing the influence of the vestibular system on the muscle system. The authors present a metric called "VEMPid" that estimates this inhibition depth from the EMG data obtained in a usual VEMP data acquisition. The goal of this article was to compare how well VEMPid, VEMPpp, and nVEMPpp track inhibition depth. To find a robust method to compare VEMPid, VEMPpp, and nVEMPpp, realistic physiological models for the inhibition of VEMP EMG signals were made using VEMP data from four measurement sessions on each of the five normal subjects. Each of the resulting 20 EMG-production models was adjusted to match the EMG autocorrelation of an individual subject and session. Simulated VEMP traces produced by these models were used to compare how well VEMPid, VEMPpp, and nVEMPpp tracked model inhibition depth. Applied to simulated and real VEMP data, VEMPid showed good test-retest consistency and greater sensitivity at low stimulus levels than VEMPpp or nVEMPpp. For large-amplitude responses, nVEMPpp and VEMPid were equivalent in their consistency across subjects and sessions, but for low-amplitude responses, VEMPid was superior. Unnormalized VEMPpp was always worse than nVEMPpp or VEMPid. VEMPid provides a more reliable measurement of vestibular function at low sound levels than the traditional nVEMPpp, without requiring a change in how VEMP tests are performed. The calculation method for VEMPid should be applicable whenever

  6. Vestibular system and neural correlates of motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Alan D.

    1986-01-01

    Initial studies re-examine the role of certain central nervous system structures in the production of vestibular-induced vomiting and vomiting in general. All experiments were conducted using cats. Since these studies demonstrated that the essential role of various central structures in vestibular-induced vomiting is only poorly understood, efforts were re-directed to study the control of the effector muscles (diaphragm and abdominal muscles) that produce the pressure changes responsible for vomiting, with the goal of determining how this control mechanism is engaged during motion sickness. Experiments were conducted to localize the motoneurons that innervate the individual abdominal muscles and the portion of the diaphragm that surrounds the esophagus. A central question regarding respiratory muscle control during vomiting is whether these muscles are activated via the same brain stem pre-motor neurons that provide descending respiratory drive and/or by other descending input(s). In other experiments, the use of a combination of pitch and roll motions to produce motion sickness in unrestrained cats was evaluated. This stimulus combination can produce vomiting in only the most susceptible cats and is thus not as provacative a stimulus for cats as vertical linear acceleration.

  7. Histological preparation of developing vestibular otoconia for scanning electron microscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huss, D.; Dickman, J. D.

    2003-01-01

    The unique nature of vestibular otoconia as calcium carbonate biominerals makes them particularly susceptible to chemical deformation during histological processing. We fixed and stored otoconia from all three otolith endorgans of embryonic, hatchling and adult Japanese quail in glutaraldehyde containing either phosphate or non-phosphate buffers for varying lengths of time and processed them for scanning electron microscopy. Otoconia from all age groups and otolith endorgans processed in 0.1 M phosphate buffer (pH 7.4) showed abnormal surface morphology when compared to acetone fixed controls. Otoconia processed in 0.1 M sodium cacodylate or HEPES buffered artificial endolymph (pH 7.4) showed normal morphology that was similar to controls. The degree of otoconial deformation was directly related to the time exposed to phosphate buffer. Short duration exposure produced particulate deformations while longer exposures resulted in fused otoconia that formed solid sheets. Otoconial surface deformation and fusing was independent of the glutaraldehyde component of the histological processing. These findings should help vestibular researchers to develop appropriate histological processing protocols in future studies of otoconia.

  8. Evidence of a gustatory-vestibular pathway for protein transport.

    PubMed

    Gacek, Richard; Lyon, Michael J

    2010-02-01

    To demonstrate anatomically a pathway for protein transport from the palate to the vestibular system. The vestibulofacial anastomosis and associated ganglion cells were identified in a collection of 160 horizontally sectioned human temporal bones that had been stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (HRP) was applied to the greater superficial petrosal nerve in 4 Sprague-Dawley rats. After 30 hours, the rats were killed by intracardiac perfusion, and the seventh and eighth nerves with adjacent brainstem removed. Frozen sections cut at 30 mum through this block were then reacted for HRP, counterstained with neutral red, and mounted on slides for examination in the light microscope. Thirty-two of the 160 human temporal bones contained sections through the vestibulofacial anastomosis and its ganglion. In all cases, the ganglion was incorporated into the vestibular ganglion (VG) adjacent to the nervus intermedius. In all 4 experimental rats, HRP reaction product labeled a small number of ganglion cells in the VG adjacent to the nervus intermedius and facial nerve. These observations support the presence of a pathway from receptors in the palate to the VG.

  9. Vestibular-Evoked Myogenic Potentials in Bilateral Vestibulopathy

    PubMed Central

    Rosengren, Sally M.; Welgampola, Miriam S.; Taylor, Rachael L.

    2018-01-01

    Bilateral vestibulopathy (BVP) is a chronic condition in which patients have a reduction or absence of vestibular function in both ears. BVP is characterized by bilateral reduction of horizontal canal responses; however, there is increasing evidence that otolith function can also be affected. Cervical and ocular vestibular-evoked myogenic potentials (cVEMPs/oVEMPs) are relatively new tests of otolith function that can be used to test the saccule and utricle of both ears independently. Studies to date show that cVEMPs and oVEMPs are often small or absent in BVP but are in the normal range in a significant proportion of patients. The variability in otolith function is partly due to the heterogeneous nature of BVP but is also due to false negative and positive responses that occur because of the large range of normal VEMP amplitudes. Due to their variability, VEMPs are not part of the diagnosis of BVP; however, they are helpful complementary tests that can provide information about the extent of disease within the labyrinth. This article is a review of the use of VEMPs in BVP, summarizing the available data on VEMP abnormalities in patients and discussing the limitations of VEMPs in diagnosing bilateral loss of otolith function. PMID:29719527

  10. Vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs) in central neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Venhovens, J; Meulstee, J; Verhagen, W I M

    2016-01-01

    Several types of acoustic stimulation (i.e. tone bursts or clicks), bone-conducted vibration, forehead taps, and galvanic stimulation elicit myogenic potentials. These can be recorded in cervical and ocular muscles, the so called vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMPs). The cervical VEMP (cVEMP) resembles the vestibulo-collic reflex and the responses can be recorded from the ipsilateral sternocleidomastoid muscle. The ocular VEMP resembles the vestibulo-ocular reflex and can be recorded from extra-ocular muscles by a surface electrode beneath the contralateral infraorbital margin. Initially, the literature concerning VEMPs was limited to peripheral vestibular disorders, however, the field of VEMP testing is rapidly expanding, with an increasing focus on central neurological disorders. The current literature concerning VEMP abnormalities in central neurological disorders is critically reviewed, especially regarding the methodological aspects in relation to quality as well as the clinical interpretation of the VEMP results. Suggestions for further research are proposed as well as some clinically useful indications. Copyright © 2015 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. [Pigment and ion transport in the vestibular organ].

    PubMed

    Meyer zum Gottesberge-Orsulakova, A

    1985-07-01

    Pigments are found in various parts of the inner ear, especially in the neighbourhood of epithelia, which are supposed to be involved in the secretion and/or absorbtion of the endolymphatic fluid. Microprobe analysis (laser absorption mass micro analyzer "LAMMA" and X-ray) combined with morphological observations were performed in shock frozen, freeze-dried and plastic embedded inner ear tissue from the vestibular organ of pigmented guinea pig. Disturbance of the endolymphatic ionic composition (increased Na+) due to treatment with metabolic inhibitors (ethacrynic acid, ouabain) stimulated the migration of pigment granules and displacement of the dentritic processes of the melanocytes in a close vicinity to the presumably transporting vestibular epithelia (the dark and light cells and capillaries). The melanosomes obtained full range of metal ions that changed characteristically after treatment with metabolic inhibitors. It could be supposed that melanin presents some kind of reservoir for essential trace elements or compounds and may regulate numerous enzymatic and membrane functions by binding and releasing the metal ions.

  12. Small vestibular schwannomas presenting with facial nerve palsy.

    PubMed

    Espahbodi, Mana; Carlson, Matthew L; Fang, Te-Yung; Thompson, Reid C; Haynes, David S

    2014-06-01

    To describe the surgical management and convalescence of two patients presenting with severe facial nerve weakness associated with small intracanalicular vestibular schwannomas (VS). Retrospective review. Two adult female patients presenting with audiovestibular symptoms and subacute facial nerve paralysis (House-Brackmann Grade IV and V). In both cases, post-contrast T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging revealed an enhancing lesion within the internal auditory canal without lateral extension beyond the fundus. Translabyrinthine exploration demonstrated vestibular nerve origin of tumor, extrinsic to the facial nerve, and frozen section pathology confirmed schwannoma. Gross total tumor resection with VIIth cranial nerve preservation and decompression of the labyrinthine segment of the facial nerve was performed. Both patients recovered full motor function between 6 and 8 months after surgery. Although rare, small VS may cause severe facial neuropathy, mimicking the presentation of facial nerve schwannomas and other less common pathologies. In the absence of labyrinthine extension on MRI, surgical exploration is the only reliable means of establishing a diagnosis. In the case of confirmed VS, early gross total resection with facial nerve preservation and labyrinthine segment decompression may afford full motor recovery-an outcome that cannot be achieved with facial nerve grafting.

  13. [Efficacy of assisted balance training in chronic vestibular vertigo].

    PubMed

    Szirmai, Ágnes; Maihoub, Stefani; Tamás, László

    2018-03-01

    Physicians are found to have a great and increasing amount of patients suffering of vertigo in their everyday practice. For the treatment of the balance disorders, a vestibular training was introduced which played an influential role based on our study. Our aim was to create an easy and comprehensible training program which can be performed even with a family member. Our clinical treatment consists of intravenous vasoactive medicine administration, combined with vestibular training. For the investigation of the improvement we used the Jacobson and Newman questionnaire, and ultrasound-computer-craniocorpography. The statistical evaluation was based on ANOVA, Kruskal-Wallis test and Dunn's post method (p<0.05). After the combined clinical treatment, the patients' average training results showed improvement. Following the eight-day training, the patients scored higher results from day to day due to the improvement of their abilities while doing the different tasks. Moreover, the questionnaire results also showed the improvement of their status. By improving the brain stem circulation, combined with an assisting training program, there is a significant decrease in the complaints and an overall improvement in the quality of life, even though the imbalance cannot be cured. Orv Hetil. 2018; 159(12): 470-477.

  14. Vestibular Migraine: Clinical Challenges and Opportunities for Multidisciplinarity

    PubMed Central

    Luís, Leonel; Gonçalves, Freire; Pavão Martins, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Migraine and vertigo are two very prevalent conditions in general population. The coexistence of both in the same subject is a significant clinical challenge, since it is not always possible to understand whether they are causally related or associated by chance, requiring different diagnostic and therapeutic approaches. In this review we analyze and summarize the actual knowledge about vestibular migraine (VM), focusing on the new concepts proposed by the International Classification of Headache Disorders 3-beta and by the Bárány Society and also addressing the former concepts, which are still present in clinical practice. We conclude that clinical studies using a multidisciplinary approach are crucial in this field, since different specialists observe the same pathology with different eyes. Clinical presentation of VM is variable in what concerns vestibular symptoms temporal relation with migraine headache, as well as in their accompanying manifestations. Biomarkers, either genomics or functional, and molecular imaging techniques will be helpful to clarify many aspects of the complexity of this entity, helping to define to what extent can VM be considered a separate and independent clinical entity. PMID:28082766

  15. Clinical classification and neuro-vestibular evaluation in chronic dizziness.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sun-Young; Kim, Do-Hyung; Yang, Tae-Ho; Shin, Byoung-Soo; Jeong, Seul-Ki

    2015-01-01

    This study attempts to clarify the clinical characteristics of chronic dizziness and its relationships with specific vestibular, oculomotor, autonomic and psychiatric dysfunctions. 73 Patients with idiopathic chronic dizziness were recruited and classified based on history taking and clinical examination into the following four clinical subgroups; vestibular migraine (VM), dysautonomia, psychogenic, and unspecified groups. They were also evaluated using oculomotor, otolithic and autonomic function tests, and psychologic investigation. Patients in the VM group showed a high proportion of abnormality on smooth pursuit and otolithic function testing compared to the other groups. The dysautonomia group revealed significant abnormalities in sympathetic and cardiovagal autonomic function, while the psychogenic group had a high frequency of abnormality in sympathetic autonomic testing and in Beck's anxiety inventory scale. The unspecified group showed abnormalities on saccade, smooth pursuit and autonomic function testing. Clinical classification of patients with chronic dizziness was relevant and they showed a correlation with disease-specific abnormal results in oculomotor, otolithic, autonomic function and psychology testing. Appropriate diagnostic investigation based on precise clinical diagnosis of chronic dizziness reduces the need for extensive laboratory testing, neuroimaging, and other low-yield tests. Copyright © 2014 International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Impact of Diabetic Complications on Balance and Falls: Contribution of the Vestibular System

    PubMed Central

    Lin, James; Staecker, Hinrich; Whitney, Susan L.; Kluding, Patricia M.

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes causes many complications, including retinopathy and peripheral neuropathy, which are well understood as contributing to gait instability and falls. A less understood complication of diabetes is the effect on the vestibular system. The vestibular system contributes significantly to balance in static and dynamic conditions by providing spatially orienting information. It is noteworthy that diabetes has been reported to affect vestibular function in both animal and clinical studies. Pathophysiological changes in peripheral and central vestibular structures due to diabetes have been noted. Vestibular dysfunction is associated with impaired balance and a higher risk of falls. As the prevalence of diabetes increases, so does the potential for falls due to diabetic complications. The purpose of this perspective article is to present evidence on the pathophysiology of diabetes-related complications and their influence on balance and falls, with specific attention to emerging evidence of vestibular dysfunction due to diabetes. Understanding this relationship may be useful for screening (by physical therapists) for possible vestibular dysfunction in people with diabetes and for further developing and testing the efficacy of interventions to reduce falls in this population. PMID:26251477

  17. Left hemispheric dominance of vestibular processing indicates lateralization of cortical functions in rats.

    PubMed

    Best, Christoph; Lange, Elena; Buchholz, Hans-Georg; Schreckenberger, Mathias; Reuss, Stefan; Dieterich, Marianne

    2014-11-01

    Lateralization of cortical functions such as speech dominance, handedness and processing of vestibular information are present not only in humans but also in ontogenetic older species, e.g. rats. In human functional imaging studies, the processing of vestibular information was found to be correlated with the hemispherical dominance as determined by the handedness. It is located mainly within the right hemisphere in right handers and within the left hemisphere in left handers. Since dominance of vestibular processing is unknown in animals, our aim was to study the lateralization of cortical processing in a functional imaging study applying small-animal positron emission tomography (microPET) and galvanic vestibular stimulation in an in vivo rat model. The cortical and subcortical network processing vestibular information could be demonstrated and correlated with data from other animal studies. By calculating a lateralization index as well as flipped region of interest analyses, we found that the vestibular processing in rats follows a strong left hemispheric dominance independent from the "handedness" of the animals. These findings support the idea of an early hemispheric specialization of vestibular cortical functions in ontogenetic older species.

  18. Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction Associated With Chronic Exposure to Military Jet Propellant Type-Eight Jet Fuel.

    PubMed

    Fife, Terry D; Robb, Michael J A; Steenerson, Kristen K; Saha, Kamala C

    2018-01-01

    We describe three patients diagnosed with bilateral vestibular dysfunction associated with the jet propellant type-eight (JP-8) fuel exposure. Chronic exposure to aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are the main constituents of JP-8 military aircraft jet fuel, occurred over 3-5 years' duration while working on or near the flight line. Exposure to toxic hydrocarbons was substantiated by the presence of JP-8 metabolite n -hexane in the blood of one of the cases. The presenting symptoms were dizziness, headache, fatigue, and imbalance. Rotational chair testing confirmed bilateral vestibular dysfunction in all the three patients. Vestibular function improved over time once the exposure was removed. Bilateral vestibular dysfunction has been associated with hydrocarbon exposure in humans, but only recently has emphasis been placed specifically on the detrimental effects of JP-8 jet fuel and its numerous hydrocarbon constituents. Data are limited on the mechanism of JP-8-induced vestibular dysfunction or ototoxicity. Early recognition of JP-8 toxicity risk, cessation of exposure, and customized vestibular therapy offer the best chance for improved balance. Bilateral vestibular impairment is under-recognized in those chronically exposed to all forms of jet fuel.

  19. Brain or strain? Symptoms alone do not distinguish physiologic concussion from cervical/vestibular injury.

    PubMed

    Leddy, John J; Baker, John G; Merchant, Asim; Picano, John; Gaile, Daniel; Matuszak, Jason; Willer, Barry

    2015-05-01

    To compare symptoms in patients with physiologic postconcussion disorder (PCD) versus cervicogenic/vestibular PCD. We hypothesized that most symptoms would not be equivalent. In particular, we hypothesized that cognitive symptoms would be more often associated with physiologic PCD. Retrospective review of symptom reports from patients who completed a 22-item symptom questionnaire. University-based concussion clinic. Convenience sample of 128 patients who had symptoms after head injury for more than 3 weeks and who had provocative treadmill exercise testing. Subjects were classified as either physiologic PCD (abnormal treadmill performance and a normal cervical/vestibular physical examination) or cervicogenic/vestibular PCD (CGV, normal treadmill performance, and an abnormal cervical/vestibular physical examination). Self-reported symptoms. Univariate and multivariate methods, including t tests, tests of equivalence, a logistic regression model, k-nearest neighbor analysis, multidimensional scaling, and principle components analysis were used to see whether symptoms could distinguish PCD from CGV. None of the statistical methods used to analyze self-reported symptoms was able to adequately distinguish patients with PCD from patients with CGV. Symptoms after head injury, including cognitive symptoms, have traditionally been ascribed to brain injury, but they do not reliably discriminate between physiologic PCD and cervicogenic/vestibular PCD. Clinicians should consider specific testing of exercise tolerance and perform a physical examination of the cervical spine and the vestibular/ocular systems to determine the etiology of postconcussion symptoms. Symptoms after head injury, including cognitive symptoms, do not discriminate between concussion and cervical/vestibular injury.

  20. Vestibular Activation Differentially Modulates Human Early Visual Cortex and V5/MT Excitability and Response Entropy

    PubMed Central

    Guzman-Lopez, Jessica; Arshad, Qadeer; Schultz, Simon R; Walsh, Vincent; Yousif, Nada

    2013-01-01

    Head movement imposes the additional burdens on the visual system of maintaining visual acuity and determining the origin of retinal image motion (i.e., self-motion vs. object-motion). Although maintaining visual acuity during self-motion is effected by minimizing retinal slip via the brainstem vestibular-ocular reflex, higher order visuovestibular mechanisms also contribute. Disambiguating self-motion versus object-motion also invokes higher order mechanisms, and a cortical visuovestibular reciprocal antagonism is propounded. Hence, one prediction is of a vestibular modulation of visual cortical excitability and indirect measures have variously suggested none, focal or global effects of activation or suppression in human visual cortex. Using transcranial magnetic stimulation-induced phosphenes to probe cortical excitability, we observed decreased V5/MT excitability versus increased early visual cortex (EVC) excitability, during vestibular activation. In order to exclude nonspecific effects (e.g., arousal) on cortical excitability, response specificity was assessed using information theory, specifically response entropy. Vestibular activation significantly modulated phosphene response entropy for V5/MT but not EVC, implying a specific vestibular effect on V5/MT responses. This is the first demonstration that vestibular activation modulates human visual cortex excitability. Furthermore, using information theory, not previously used in phosphene response analysis, we could distinguish between a specific vestibular modulation of V5/MT excitability from a nonspecific effect at EVC. PMID:22291031

  1. Large basolateral processes on type II hair cells are novel processing units in mammalian vestibular organs.

    PubMed

    Pujol, Rémy; Pickett, Sarah B; Nguyen, Tot Bui; Stone, Jennifer S

    2014-10-01

    Sensory receptors in the vestibular system (hair cells) encode head movements and drive central motor reflexes that control gaze, body movements, and body orientation. In mammals, type I and II vestibular hair cells are defined by their shape, contacts with vestibular afferent nerves, and membrane conductance. Here we describe unique morphological features of type II vestibular hair cells in mature rodents (mice and gerbils) and bats. These features are cytoplasmic processes that extend laterally from the hair cell base and project under type I hair cells. Closer analysis of adult mouse utricles demonstrated that the basolateral processes of type II hair cells vary in shape, size, and branching, with the longest processes extending three to four hair cell widths. The hair cell basolateral processes synapse upon vestibular afferent nerves and receive inputs from vestibular efferent nerves. Furthermore, some basolateral processes make physical contacts with the processes of other type II hair cells, forming some sort of network among type II hair cells. Basolateral processes are rare in perinatal mice and do not attain their mature form until 3-6 weeks of age. These observations demonstrate that basolateral processes are significant signaling regions of type II vestibular hair cells and suggest that type II hair cells may directly communicate with each other, which has not been described in vertebrates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Altered auditory and vestibular functioning in individuals with low bone mineral density: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Singh, Niraj Kumar; Jha, Raghav Hira; Gargeshwari, Aditi; Kumar, Prawin

    2018-01-01

    Alteration in the process of bone remodelling is associated with falls and fractures due to increased bone fragility and altered calcium functioning. The auditory system consists of skeletal structures and is, therefore, prone to getting affected by altered bone remodelling. In addition, the vestibule consists of huge volumes of calcium (CaCO3) in the form of otoconia crystals and alteration in functioning calcium levels could, therefore, result in vestibular symptoms. Thus, the present study aimed at compiling information from various studies on assessment of auditory or vestibular systems in individuals with reduced bone mineral density (BMD). A total of 1977 articles were searched using various databases and 19 full-length articles which reported auditory and vestibular outcomes in persons with low BMD were reviewed. An intricate relationship between altered BMD and audio-vestibular function was evident from the studies; nonetheless, how one aspect of hearing or balance affects the other is not clear. Significant effect of reduced bone mineral density could probably be due to the metabolic changes at the level of cochlea, secondary to alterations in BMD. One could also conclude that sympathetic remodelling is associated with vestibular problems in individual; however, whether vestibular problems lead to altered BMD cannot be ascertained with confidence. The studies reviewed in the article provide an evidence of possible involvement of hearing and vestibular system abnormalities in individuals with reduced bone mineral density. Hence, the assessment protocol for these individuals must include hearing and balance evaluation as mandatory for planning appropriate management.

  3. Bilateral Vestibular Dysfunction Associated With Chronic Exposure to Military Jet Propellant Type-Eight Jet Fuel

    PubMed Central

    Fife, Terry D.; Robb, Michael J. A.; Steenerson, Kristen K.; Saha, Kamala C.

    2018-01-01

    We describe three patients diagnosed with bilateral vestibular dysfunction associated with the jet propellant type-eight (JP-8) fuel exposure. Chronic exposure to aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons, which are the main constituents of JP-8 military aircraft jet fuel, occurred over 3–5 years’ duration while working on or near the flight line. Exposure to toxic hydrocarbons was substantiated by the presence of JP-8 metabolite n-hexane in the blood of one of the cases. The presenting symptoms were dizziness, headache, fatigue, and imbalance. Rotational chair testing confirmed bilateral vestibular dysfunction in all the three patients. Vestibular function improved over time once the exposure was removed. Bilateral vestibular dysfunction has been associated with hydrocarbon exposure in humans, but only recently has emphasis been placed specifically on the detrimental effects of JP-8 jet fuel and its numerous hydrocarbon constituents. Data are limited on the mechanism of JP-8-induced vestibular dysfunction or ototoxicity. Early recognition of JP-8 toxicity risk, cessation of exposure, and customized vestibular therapy offer the best chance for improved balance. Bilateral vestibular impairment is under-recognized in those chronically exposed to all forms of jet fuel. PMID:29867750

  4. Baseline vestibular and auditory findings in a trial of post-concussive syndrome

    PubMed

    Meehan, Anna; Searing, Elizabeth; Weaver, Lindell; Lewandowski, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have reported high rates of auditory and vestibular-balance deficits immediately following head injury. This study uses a comprehensive battery of assessments to characterize auditory and vestibular function in 71 U.S. military service members with chronic symptoms following mild traumatic brain injury that did not resolve with traditional interventions. The majority of the study population reported hearing loss (70%) and recent vestibular symptoms (83%). Central auditory deficits were most prevalent, with 58% of participants failing the SCAN3:A screening test and 45% showing abnormal responses on auditory steady-state response testing presented at a suprathreshold intensity. Only 17% of the participants had abnormal hearing (⟩25 dB hearing loss) based on the pure-tone average. Objective vestibular testing supported significant deficits in this population, regardless of whether the participant self-reported active symptoms. Composite score on the Sensory Organization Test was lower than expected from normative data (mean 69.6 ±vestibular tests, vestibulo-ocular reflex, central auditory dysfunction, mild traumatic brain injury, post-concussive symptoms, hearing15.6). High abnormality rates were found in funduscopy torsion (58%), oculomotor assessments (49%), ocular and cervical vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (46% and 33%, respectively), and monothermal calorics (40%). It is recommended that a full peripheral and central auditory, oculomotor, and vestibular-balance evaluation be completed on military service members who have sustained head trauma.

  5. Unilateral vestibular schwannoma in a patient with schwannomatosis in the absence of LZTR1 mutation

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Gautam U.; Feldman, Michael J.; Wang, Herui; Ding, Dale; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2016-01-01

    The presence of vestibular schwannomas has long been considered an exclusion criterion for the diagnosis of schwannomatosis. Recently, 2 cases of vestibular schwannoma were reported in patients with schwannomatosis, leading to a revision of the diagnostic criteria for this genetic disorder. Overall, the relative infrequency of vestibular schwannomas in schwannomatosis is unexplained, and the genetics of this uncommon phenomenon have not been described. The authors report on a family with clinical manifestations consistent with schwannomatosis, including 4 affected members, that was identified as having an affected member harboring a unilateral cerebellopontine angle mass with extension into the internal auditory canal. Radiologically, this mass was consistent with a vestibular schwannoma and resulted in a symptomatic change in ipsilateral hearing (word recognition 86% at 52 dB) and increased latency of the wave I–V interval on auditory brainstem response testing. The patient was found to be negative for a germline mutation of NF2 and LZTR1, and her affected mother was found to harbor neither NF2 nor SMARCB1 mutations on genetic testing. Although vestibular schwannomas have been classically considered to not occur in the setting of schwannomatosis, this patient with schwannomatosis and a vestibular schwannoma further confirms that schwannomas can occur on the vestibular nerve in this syndrome. Further, this is the first such case found to be negative for a mutation on the LZTR1 gene. PMID:26848914

  6. Unilateral vestibular schwannoma in a patient with schwannomatosis in the absence of LZTR1 mutation.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Gautam U; Feldman, Michael J; Wang, Herui; Ding, Dale; Chittiboina, Prashant

    2016-12-01

    The presence of vestibular schwannomas has long been considered an exclusion criterion for the diagnosis of schwannomatosis. Recently, 2 cases of vestibular schwannoma were reported in patients with schwannomatosis, leading to a revision of the diagnostic criteria for this genetic disorder. Overall, the relative infrequency of vestibular schwannomas in schwannomatosis is unexplained, and the genetics of this uncommon phenomenon have not been described. The authors report on a family with clinical manifestations consistent with schwannomatosis, including 4 affected members, that was identified as having an affected member harboring a unilateral cerebellopontine angle mass with extension into the internal auditory canal. Radiologically, this mass was consistent with a vestibular schwannoma and resulted in a symptomatic change in ipsilateral hearing (word recognition 86% at 52 dB) and increased latency of the wave I-V interval on auditory brainstem response testing. The patient was found to be negative for a germline mutation of NF2 and LZTR1, and her affected mother was found to harbor neither NF2 nor SMARCB1 mutations on genetic testing. Although vestibular schwannomas have been classically considered to not occur in the setting of schwannomatosis, this patient with schwannomatosis and a vestibular schwannoma further confirms that schwannomas can occur on the vestibular nerve in this syndrome. Further, this is the first such case found to be negative for a mutation on the LZTR1 gene.

  7. Gait ataxia in humans: vestibular and cerebellar control of dynamic stability.

    PubMed

    Schniepp, Roman; Möhwald, Ken; Wuehr, Max

    2017-10-01

    During human locomotion, vestibular feedback control is fundamental for maintaining dynamic stability and adapting the gait pattern to external circumstances. Within the supraspinal locomotor network, the cerebellum represents the key site for the integration of vestibular feedback information. The cerebellum is further important for the fine-tuning and coordination of limb movements during walking. The aim of this review article is to highlight the shared structural and functional sensorimotor principles in vestibular and cerebellar locomotion control. Vestibular feedback for the maintenance of dynamic stability is integrated into the locomotor pattern via midline, caudal cerebellar structures (vermis, flocculonodular lobe). Hemispheric regions of the cerebellum facilitate feed-forward control of multi-joint coordination and higher locomotor functions. Characteristic features of the gait disorder in patients with vestibular deficits or cerebellar ataxia are increased levels of spatiotemporal gait variability in the fore-aft and the medio-lateral gait dimension. In the fore-aft dimension, pathologic increases of gait fluctuations critically depend on the locomotion speed and predominantly manifest during slow walking velocities. This feature is associated with an increased risk of falls in both patients with vestibular hypofunction as well as patients with cerebellar ataxia. Pharmacological approaches for the treatment of vestibular or cerebellar gait ataxia are currently not available. However, new promising options are currently tested in randomized, controlled trials (fampridine/FACEG; acetyl-DL-leucine/ALCAT).

  8. Improving Sensorimotor Function and Adaptation using Stochastic Vestibular Stimulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galvan, R. C.; Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Clark, T. K.; Merfeld, D. M.; Oman, C. M.

    2014-01-01

    Astronauts experience sensorimotor changes during adaption to G-transitions that occur when entering and exiting microgravity. Post space flight, these sensorimotor disturbances can include postural and gait instability, visual performance changes, manual control disruptions, spatial disorientation, and motion sickness, all of which can hinder the operational capabilities of the astronauts. Crewmember safety would be significantly increased if sensorimotor changes brought on by gravitational changes could be mitigated and adaptation could be facilitated. The goal of this research is to investigate and develop the use of electrical stochastic vestibular stimulation (SVS) as a countermeasure to augment sensorimotor function and facilitate adaptation. For this project, SVS will be applied via electrodes on the mastoid processes at imperceptible amplitude levels. We hypothesize that SVS will improve sensorimotor performance through the phenomena of stochastic resonance, which occurs when the response of a nonlinear system to a weak input signal is optimized by the application of a particular nonzero level of noise. In line with the theory of stochastic resonance, a specific optimal level of SVS will be found and tested for each subject [1]. Three experiments are planned to investigate the use of SVS in sensory-dependent tasks and performance. The first experiment will aim to demonstrate stochastic resonance in the vestibular system through perception based motion recognition thresholds obtained using a 6-degree of freedom Stewart platform in the Jenks Vestibular Laboratory at Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary. A range of SVS amplitudes will be applied to each subject and the subjectspecific optimal SVS level will be identified as that which results in the lowest motion recognition threshold, through previously established, well developed methods [2,3,4]. The second experiment will investigate the use of optimal SVS in facilitating sensorimotor adaptation to system

  9. Effects of high intensity noise on the vestibular system in rats

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Courtney; Yu, Yue; Huang, Jun; Maklad, Adel; Tang, Xuehui; Allison, Jerome; Mustain, William; Zhou, Wu; Zhu, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Some individuals with noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) also report balance problems. These accompanying vestibular complaints are not well understood. The present study used a rat model to examine the effects of noise exposure on the vestibular system. Rats were exposed to continuous broadband white noise (0–24kHz) at an intensity of 116dB sound pressure level (SPL) via insert ear phones in one ear for three hours under isoflurane anesthesia. Seven days after the exposure, a significant increase in ABR threshold (43.3±1.9dB) was observed in the noise-exposed ears, indicating hearing loss. Effects of noise exposure on vestibular function were assessed by three approaches. First, fluorescein-conjugated phalloidin staining was used to assess vestibular stereocilia following noise exposure. This analysis revealed substantial sensory stereocilia bundle loss in the saccular and utricular maculae as well as in the anterior and horizontal semicircular canal cristae, but not in the posterior semicircular canal cristae. Second, single unit recording of vestibular afferent activity was performed under pentobarbital anesthesia. A total of 548 afferents were recorded from 10 noise-treated rats and 12 control rats. Noise exposure produced a moderate reduction in baseline firing rates of regular otolith afferents and anterior semicircular canal afferents. Also a moderate change was noted in the gain and phase of the horizontal and anterior semicircular canal afferent’s response to sinusoidal head rotation (1 and 2Hz, 45 degrees/s peak velocity). Third, noise exposure did not result in significant changes in gain or phase of the horizontal rotational and translational vestibular-ocular reflex (VOR). These results suggest that noise exposure not only causes hearing loss, but also causes substantial damage in the peripheral vestibular system in the absence of immediate clinically measurable vestibular signs. These peripheral deficits, however, may lead to vestibular disorders

  10. Effects of bilateral vestibular nucleus lesions on cardiovascular regulation in conscious cats.

    PubMed

    Mori, R L; Cotter, L A; Arendt, H E; Olsheski, C J; Yates, B J

    2005-02-01

    The vestibular system participates in cardiovascular regulation during postural changes. In prior studies (Holmes MJ, Cotter LA, Arendt HE, Cas SP, and Yates BJ. Brain Res 938: 62-72, 2002, and Jian BJ, Cotter LA, Emanuel BA, Cass SP, and Yates BJ. J Appl Physiol 86: 1552-1560, 1999), transection of the vestibular nerves resulted in instability in blood pressure during nose-up body tilts, particularly when no visual information reflecting body position in space was available. However, recovery of orthostatic tolerance occurred within 1 wk, presumably because the vestibular nuclei integrate a variety of sensory inputs reflecting body location. The present study tested the hypothesis that lesions of the vestibular nuclei result in persistent cardiovascular deficits during orthostatic challenges. Blood pressure and heart rate were monitored in five conscious cats during nose-up tilts of varying amplitude, both before and after chemical lesions of the vestibular nuclei. Before lesions, blood pressure remained relatively stable during tilts. In all animals, the blood pressure responses to nose-up tilts were altered by damage to the medial and inferior vestibular nuclei; these effects were noted both when animals were tested in the presence and absence of visual feedback. In four of the five animals, the lesions also resulted in augmented heart rate increases from baseline values during 60 degrees nose-up tilts. These effects persisted for longer than 1 wk, but they gradually resolved over time, except in the animal with the worst deficits. These observations suggest that recovery of compensatory cardiovascular responses after loss of vestibular inputs is accomplished at least in part through plastic changes in the vestibular nuclei and the enhancement of the ability of vestibular nucleus neurons to discriminate body position in space by employing nonlabyrinthine signals.

  11. Vestibular vertigo and comorbid cognitive and psychiatric impairment: the 2008 National Health Interview Survey.

    PubMed

    Bigelow, Robin T; Semenov, Yevgeniy R; du Lac, Sascha; Hoffman, Howard J; Agrawal, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    Patients with vestibular disease have been observed to have concomitant cognitive and psychiatric dysfunction. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment and psychiatric conditions in a nationally representative sample of US adults. We performed a cross-sectional analysis using the 2008 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS), which included a Balance and Dizziness Supplement, and questions about cognitive function and psychiatric comorbidity. We evaluated the association between vestibular vertigo, cognitive impairment (memory loss, difficulty concentrating, confusion) and psychiatric diagnoses (depression, anxiety and panic disorder). We observed an 8.4% 1-year prevalence of vestibular vertigo among US adults. In adjusted analyses, individuals with vestibular vertigo had an eightfold increased odds of 'serious difficulty concentrating or remembering' (OR 8.3, 95% CI 4.8 to 14.6) and a fourfold increased odds of activity limitation due to difficulty remembering or confusion (OR 3.9, 95% CI 3.1 to 5.0) relative to the rest of the US adults. Individuals with vestibular vertigo also had a threefold increased odds of depression (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 3.9), anxiety (OR 3.2, 95% CI 2.8 to 3.6) and panic disorder (OR 3.4, 95% CI 2.9 to 4.0). Our findings indicate that vestibular impairment is associated with increased risk of cognitive and psychiatric comorbidity. The vestibular system is anatomically connected with widespread regions of the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and amygdala. Loss of vestibular inputs may lead to impairment of these cognitive and affective circuits. Further longitudinal research is required to determine if these associations are causal. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  12. Three-dimensional head-mounted gaming task procedure maximizes effects of vestibular rehabilitation in unilateral vestibular hypofunction: a randomized controlled pilot trial.

    PubMed

    Micarelli, Alessandro; Viziano, Andrea; Augimeri, Ivan; Micarelli, Domenico; Alessandrini, Marco

    2017-12-01

    Considering the emerging advantages related to virtual reality implementation in clinical rehabilitation, the aim of the present study was to discover possible (i) improvements achievable in unilateral vestibular hypofunction patients using a self-assessed head-mounted device (HMD)-based gaming procedure when combined with a classical vestibular rehabilitation protocol (HMD group) as compared with a group undergoing only vestibular rehabilitation and (ii) HMD procedure-related side effects. Therefore, 24 vestibular rehabilitation and 23-matched HMD unilateral vestibular hypofunction individuals simultaneously underwent a 4-week rehabilitation protocol. Both otoneurological measures (vestibulo-ocular reflex gain and postural arrangement by studying both posturography parameters and spectral values of body oscillation) and performance and self-report measures (Italian Dizziness Handicap Inventory; Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale; Zung Instrument for Anxiety Disorders, Dynamic Gait Index; and Simulator Sickness Questionnaire) were analyzed by means of a between-group/within-subject analysis of variance model. A significant post-treatment between-effect was found, and the HMD group demonstrated an overall improvement in vestibulo-ocular reflex gain on the lesional side, in posturography parameters, in low-frequency spectral domain, as well as in Italian Dizziness Handicap Inventory and Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale scores. Meanwhile, Simulator Sickness Questionnaire scores demonstrated a significant reduction in symptoms related to experimental home-based gaming tasks during the HMD procedure. Our findings revealed the possible advantages of HMD implementation in vestibular rehabilitation, suggesting it as an innovative, self-assessed, low-cost, and compliant tool useful in maximizing vestibular rehabilitation outcomes.

  13. Analysis of vestibular testing in patients with vestibular schwannoma based on the nerve of origin, the localization, and the size of the tumor.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mitsuya; Yamada, Chikako; Inoue, Rika; Kashio, Akinori; Saito, Yuki; Nakanishi, Wakako

    2008-10-01

    We aimed to analyze the factors influencing caloric response and vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) in vestibular schwannoma. The subjects comprised 130 patients with unilateral vestibular schwannoma pathologically diagnosed by surgery. Caloric response and the amplitude and latency of VEMP were measured and analyzed based on the nerve of origin, localization, and size of the tumor. The tumors were classified into 3 types based on localization: intracanalicular, intermediate, and medial; and into 4 grades based on size: 9 mm or less, 10 to 19 mm, 20 to 29 mm, and 30 mm or greater. : Abnormal rates of caloric response and VEMP in patients with tumors arising from the superior vestibular nerve were not significantly different from those in patients with tumors of the inferior vestibular nerve. In the intermediate and medial type-but not in the intracanalicular type-a significant difference in tumor size was observed between patients with normal caloric response and those with canal paresis as also between patients with normal VEMP and those with abnormal VEMP. In patients with tumors that maximally measured 10 to 19 mm or of the intermediate type, the p- and n-wave latencies of VEMP were significantly prolonged compared with those in the normal opposite ear. 1) The nerve of origin of tumors cannot be predicted based on caloric response and VEMP. 2) In the intermediate and medial types, caloric response and the VEMP amplitude are significantly diminished in association with an increase in tumor size. 3) Prolonged VEMP latencies seem to be not only caused by tumor compression to the brainstem or vestibular spinal tract but also by tumor compression isolated to the inferior vestibular nerve.

  14. The delayed rectifier, IKI, is the major conductance in type I vestibular hair cells across vestibular end organs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricci, A. J.; Rennie, K. J.; Correia, M. J.

    1996-01-01

    Hair cells were dissociated from the semicircular canal, utricle, lagena and saccule of white king pigeons. Type I hair cells were identified morphologically based on the ratios of neck width to cuticular plate width (NPR < 0.72) as well as neck width to cell body width (NBR < 0.64). The perforated patch variant of the whole-cell recording technique was used to measure electrical properties from type I hair cells. In voltage-clamp, the membrane properties of all identified type I cells were dominated by a predominantly outward potassium current, previously characterized in semicircular canal as IKI. Zero-current potential, activation, deactivation, slope conductance, pharmacologic and steady-state properties of the complex currents were not statistically different between type I hair cells of different vestibular end organs. The voltage dependence causes a significant proportion of this conductance to be active about the cell's zero-current potential. The first report of the whole-cell activation kinetics of the conductance is presented, showing a voltage dependence that could be best fit by an equation for a single exponential. Results presented here are the first data from pigeon dissociated type I hair cells from utricle, saccule and lagena suggesting that the basolateral conductances of a morphologically identified population of type I hair cells are conserved between functionally different vestibular end organs; the major conductance being a delayed rectifier characterized previously in semicircular canal hair cells as IKI.

  15. Development of Vestibular Stochastic Resonance as a Sensorimotor Countermeasure: Improving Otolith Ocular and Motor Task Responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulavara, Ajitkumar; Fiedler, Matthew; DeDios,Yiri E.; Galvan, Raquel; Bloomberg, Jacob; Wood, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Astronauts experience disturbances in sensorimotor function after spaceflight during the initial introduction to a gravitational environment, especially after long-duration missions. Stochastic resonance (SR) is a mechanism by which noise can assist and enhance the response of neural systems to relevant, imperceptible sensory signals. We have previously shown that imperceptible electrical stimulation of the vestibular system enhances balance performance while standing on an unstable surface. The goal of our present study is to develop a countermeasure based on vestibular SR that could improve central interpretation of vestibular input and improve motor task responses to mitigate associated risks.

  16. The effect of severity of unilateral vestibular dysfunction on symptoms, disabilities and handicap in vertiginous patients.

    PubMed

    Bamiou, D E; Davies, R A; McKee, M; Luxon, L M

    1999-02-01

    This study compares the symptoms, disabilities and handicap, as assessed by means of a questionnaire, in two groups of patients with a unilateral peripheral vestibular disorder: those with a total canal paresis and those with a partial canal paresis, as judged by the duration parameter using the Fitzgerald Hallpike caloric test in the absence of optic fixation. The results of the study indicate that the severity of dizziness, the Dizziness Index (severity x frequency) and the overall level of disabilities related to visual vertigo are less severe in unilateral profound or total loss of vestibular function than in unilateral mild vestibular loss.

  17. Habilitation of facial nerve dysfunction after resection of a vestibular schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Rudman, Kelli L; Rhee, John S

    2012-04-01

    Facial nerve dysfunction after resection of a vestibular schwannoma is one of the most common indications for facial nerve habilitation. This article presents an overview of common and emerging management options for facial habilitation following resection of a vestibular schwannoma. Immediate and delayed nerve repair options, as well as adjunctive surgical, medical, and physical therapies for facial nerve dysfunction, are discussed. Two algorithms are provided as guides for the assessment and treatment of facial nerve paralysis after resection of vestibular schwannoma. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. An Implementation Plan for NFS at NASA's NAS Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, Terance L.; Kutler, Paul (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    This document discusses how NASA's NAS can benefit from the Sun Microsystems' Network File System (NFS). A case study is presented to demonstrate the effects of NFS on the NAS supercomputing environment. Potential problems are addressed and an implementation strategy is proposed.

  19. Functional Imaging of Human Vestibular Cortex Activity Elicited by Skull Tap and Auditory Tone Burst

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noohi, F.; Kinnaird, C.; Wood, S.; Bloomberg, J.; Mulavara, A.; Seidler, R.

    2016-01-01

    The current study characterizes brain activation in response to two modes of vestibular stimulation: skull tap and auditory tone burst. The auditory tone burst has been used in previous studies to elicit either the vestibulo-spinal reflex (saccular-mediated colic Vestibular Evoked Myogenic Potentials (cVEMP)), or the ocular muscle response (utricle-mediated ocular VEMP (oVEMP)). Some researchers have reported that air-conducted skull tap elicits both saccular and utricle-mediated VEMPs, while being faster and less irritating for the subjects. However, it is not clear whether the skull tap and auditory tone burst elicit the same pattern of cortical activity. Both forms of stimulation target the otolith response, which provides a measurement of vestibular function independent from semicircular canals. This is of high importance for studying otolith-specific deficits, including gait and balance problems that astronauts experience upon returning to earth. Previous imaging studies have documented activity in the anterior and posterior insula, superior temporal gyrus, inferior parietal lobule, inferior frontal gyrus, and the anterior cingulate cortex in response to different modes of vestibular stimulation. Here we hypothesized that skull taps elicit similar patterns of cortical activity as the auditory tone bursts, and previous vestibular imaging studies. Subjects wore bilateral MR compatible skull tappers and headphones inside the 3T GE scanner, while lying in the supine position, with eyes closed. Subjects received both forms of the stimulation in a counterbalanced fashion. Pneumatically powered skull tappers were placed bilaterally on the cheekbones. The vibration of the cheekbone was transmitted to the vestibular system, resulting in the vestibular cortical response. Auditory tone bursts were also delivered for comparison. To validate our stimulation method, we measured the ocular VEMP outside of the scanner. This measurement showed that both skull tap and auditory

  20. The Need for Vendor Source Code at NAS. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Russell; Acheson, Steve; Blaylock, Bruce; Brock, David; Cardo, Nick; Ciotti, Bob; Poston, Alan; Wong, Parkson; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) Facility has a long standing practice of maintaining buildable source code for installed hardware. There are two reasons for this: NAS's designated pathfinding role, and the need to maintain a smoothly running operational capacity given the widely diversified nature of the vendor installations. NAS has a need to maintain support capabilities when vendors are not able; diagnose and remedy hardware or software problems where applicable; and to support ongoing system software development activities whether or not the relevant vendors feel support is justified. This note provides an informal history of these activities at NAS, and brings together the general principles that drive the requirement that systems integrated into the NAS environment run binaries built from source code, onsite.

  1. Association between ambient particulate matter and disorders of vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Han, Changwoo; Lim, Youn-Hee; Jung, Kweon; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2017-05-01

    Exposure to environmental chemicals has been suggested to alter the physiologic state of the inner and middle ear. However, it is unknown if particulate matter exposure is associated with acute vestibular dysfunction. To estimate the effects of particulate matter exposure on the number of hospital visits related to three major diseases of vestibular dysfunction, Meniere's disease (MD), benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and vestibular neuronitis (VN). Our study subject is from Korean National Health Insurance Service-National Sample Cohort, which is dynamic cohort consist of 1 million participants representing the Korean population. Among total cohort participants, we used the hospital visit data of 210,000 individuals who resided in Seoul from 2007 to 2010. Time series analysis using the Poisson generalized additive model and case-crossover analysis using conditional logistic regression were used to investigate the association between daily particulate matter levels (PM 2.5 , particulate matter <2.5μg/m 3 ; PM 10 , particulate matter <10μg/m 3 ; PM 10-2.5 , PM 10 - PM 2.5 ) and number of MD, BPPV, and VN hospital visits. Time series analysis showed that an interquartile range (IQR) increase in PM 10 and PM 10-2.5 on lag day 1 was associated with an increased risk of MD hospital visits [relative risk (RR), 95% confidence interval (CI), PM 10 : 1.09 (1.02-1.15); PM 10-2.5 : 1.06 (1.02-1.10)]. In addition, elderly individuals (≥60 years old) showed an increased risk of MD hospital visits after particulate matter exposure when compared to younger individuals. An IQR increase in particulate matter on lag day 1 was associated with a marginally significant increase in VN hospital visits [RR (95%CI), PM 2.5 : 1.11 (0.98-1.25); PM 10 : 1.07 (0.99-1.15); PM 10-2.5 : 1.04 (0.99-1.09)]. However, no association between particulate matter exposure and BPPV hospital visits was noted. Case-crossover analyses showed similar results to the time-series analysis across

  2. Adaptation of vestibular signals for self-motion perception

    PubMed Central

    St George, Rebecca J; Day, Brian L; Fitzpatrick, Richard C

    2011-01-01

    A fundamental concern of the brain is to establish the spatial relationship between self and the world to allow purposeful action. Response adaptation to unvarying sensory stimuli is a common feature of neural processing, both peripherally and centrally. For the semicircular canals, peripheral adaptation of the canal-cupula system to constant angular-velocity stimuli dominates the picture and masks central adaptation. Here we ask whether galvanic vestibular stimulation circumvents peripheral adaptation and, if so, does it reveal central adaptive processes. Transmastoidal bipolar galvanic stimulation and platform rotation (20 deg s−1) were applied separately and held constant for 2 min while perceived rotation was measured by verbal report. During real rotation, the perception of turn decayed from the onset of constant velocity with a mean time constant of 15.8 s. During galvanic-evoked virtual rotation, the perception of rotation initially rose but then declined towards zero over a period of ∼100 s. For both stimuli, oppositely directed perceptions of similar amplitude were reported when stimulation ceased indicating signal adaptation at some level. From these data the time constants of three independent processes were estimated: (i) the peripheral canal-cupula adaptation with time constant 7.3 s, (ii) the central ‘velocity-storage’ process that extends the afferent signal with time constant 7.7 s, and (iii) a long-term adaptation with time constant 75.9 s. The first two agree with previous data based on constant-velocity stimuli. The third component decayed with the profile of a real constant angular acceleration stimulus, showing that the galvanic stimulus signal bypasses the peripheral transformation so that the brainstem sees the galvanic signal as angular acceleration. An adaptive process involving both peripheral and central processes is indicated. Signals evoked by most natural movements will decay peripherally before adaptation can exert an

  3. Band limited chirp stimulation in vestibular evoked myogenic potentials.

    PubMed

    Walther, Leif Erik; Cebulla, Mario

    2016-10-01

    Air conducted vestibular evoked myogenic potentials (VEMP) can be elicited by various low frequency and intense sound stimuli, mainly clicks or short tone bursts (STB). Chirp stimuli are increasingly used in diagnostic audiological evaluations as an effective means to obtain acoustically evoked responses in narrowed or extended frequency ranges. We hypothesized in this study that band limited chirp stimulation, which covers the main sensitivity range of sound sensitive otolithic afferents (around 500 Hz), might be useful for application in cervical and ocular VEMP to air conduction. For this purpose we designed a chirp stimulus ranging 250-1000 Hz (up chirp). The chirp stimulus was delivered with a stimulus intensity of 100 dB nHL in normal subjects (n = 10) and patients with otolith involvement (vestibular neuritis) (n = 6). Amplitudes of the designed chirp ("CW-VEMP-chirp, 250-1000 Hz") were compared with amplitudes of VEMPs evoked by click stimuli (0.1 ms) and a short tone burst (STB, 1-2-1, 8 ms, 500 Hz). CVEMPs and oVEMPs were detectable in 9 of 10 normal individuals. Statistical evaluation in healthy patients revealed significantly larger cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes for CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) stimuli. CVEMP amplitudes evoked by CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) showed a high stability in comparison with click and STB stimulation. CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) showed abnormal cVEMP and oVEMP amplitudes in patients with vestibular neuritis, with the same properties as click and STB stimulated VEMPs. We conclude that the designed CW-VEMP-chirp (250-1000 Hz) is an effective stimulus which can be further used in VEMP diagnostic. Since a chirp stimulus can be easily varied in its properties, in particular with regard to frequency, this might be a promising tool for further investigations.

  4. The results of vestibular evoked myogenic potentials, with consideration of age-related changes, in vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo, and Meniere's disease.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seok Min; Yeo, Seung Geun; Kim, Sung Wan; Cha, Chang Il

    2008-08-01

    We interpreted VEMP findings in patients with the three major peripheral vertigo diseases, taking age-related changes into consideration. We found different abnormal VEMP rates among the three diseases, as well as differences in the proportion of parameters that were abnormal, according to the type of disease. Vestibular neuritis, benign paroxysmal positional vertigo (BPPV), and Meniere's disease, common diseases that cause peripheral vertigo, often affect the saccule or inferior vestibular nerve, which are pathways of vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP). Also, aging could have a primary effect on diminished VEMP responses. Our study investigated VEMP the findings in patients with the diseases in relation to their age. A total of 134 patients with vestibular neuritis, 62 with BPPV, and 29 with Meniere's disease were enrolled in this study. The VEMP findings in patients within the three disease groups were interpreted using our own normative ranges according to age. Abnormal VEMP rates in the vestibular neuritis, BPPV, and Meniere's disease groups were 36.6%, 25.8%, and 69%, respectively. The proportion of prolonged p13 latency in BPPV patients with abnormal VEMP responses was relatively high compared with the other two diseases. VEMP asymmetry in the patients with Meniere's disease was relatively high.

  5. Maternal susceptibility to nausea and vomiting of pregnancy: is the vestibular system involved?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. Owen

    2002-01-01

    Nausea and vomiting of pregnancy shares many characteristics with motion sickness, a vestibular dependent phenomenon. A number of physiologic changes that occur in normal pregnancy are also known to accompany nausea and vomiting in patients with motion sickness and certain vestibular disorders. This chapter summarizes some shared features of both phenomena. The unmasking of subclinical vestibular disorders may account for some cases of hyperemesis gravidarum. Hormonal effects on neurotransmitter function may also play a role in nausea and vomiting of pregnancy and in some vestibular disorders; however, the specific neural mechanisms of nausea and vomiting have not been identified. Until the neurochemical processes underlying these phenomena are understood, prevention and management will remain in the domain of astute, but so far limited, clinical observation.

  6. Problems of space biology. Volume 50: Nystagmometry for evaulation of the status of the vestibular function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levashov, M. M.; Kislyakov, V. A. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Various aspects of nystagmometry are studied, primarily those in which the study of hystagmus serves as a means to learn about the vestibular apparatus. Along with exhaustive published material, the monograph presents data from many years of research on the physioloigical mechanisms of nystagmus, the features of nystagmus when vestibular stimulation is combined with optokinetic, the pole of vertibular afferentation asymmetry in the asymmetry of reactions to optokinetic stimulus, a nystagmometric approach to studying the hydrodynamic interaction among semicircular canals, as well as several other questions. A great deal of attention is given to methods of recording nystagmus, calibrating nystagmograms, quantitative evaluation of nystagmographic material, new nystagmometric characteristics and diagnostic techniques. A diagnostic model is proposed which makes it possible to obtain important information on the condition of the vestibular system from results of vestibular testing.

  7. Zebrafish pax5 regulates development of the utricular macula and vestibular function.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Su-Jin; Vemaraju, Shruti; Moorman, Stephen J; Zeddies, David; Popper, Arthur N; Riley, Bruce B

    2006-11-01

    The zebrafish otic vesicle initially forms with only two sensory epithelia, the utricular and saccular maculae, which primarily mediate vestibular and auditory function, respectively. Here, we test the role of pax5, which is preferentially expressed in the utricular macula. Morpholino knockdown of pax5 disrupts vestibular function but not hearing. Neurons of the statoacoustic ganglion (SAG) develop normally. Utricular hair cells appear to form normally but a variable number subsequently undergo apoptosis and are extruded from the otic vesicle. Dendrites of the SAG persist in the utricle but become disorganized after hair cell loss. Hair cells in the saccule develop and survive normally. Otic expression of pax5 requires pax2a and fgf3, mutations in which cause vestibular defects, albeit by distinct mechanisms. Thus, pax5 works in conjunction with fgf3 and pax2a to establish and/or maintain the utricular macula and is essential for vestibular function. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  8. Sensitivity of caloric test and video head impulse as screening test for chronic vestibular complaints.

    PubMed

    Mezzalira, Raquel; Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; do Carmo Bilécki-Stipsky, Marcia Maria; Brugnera, Cibele; Grasel, Signe Schuster

    2017-08-01

    This study compared the results of the caloric test with those of the video head impulse test obtained during the same session and evaluated whether the former can be used to screen for non-acute vestibular dysfunction. A total of 157 participants complaining of dizziness with vestibular characteristics of varying durations and clinical courses completed the caloric test and video head impulse test. Significantly more caloric test results than video head impulse test results were abnormal. The results of the caloric test and video head impulse test are distinct but complement each other. Within our sample, the caloric test was more sensitive for vestibular dysfunction. Therefore, the video head impulse test is not a suitable screening tool of the vestibular system in patients with chronic complaints.

  9. Influence of combined visual and vestibular cues on human perception and control of horizontal rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zacharias, G. L.; Young, L. R.

    1981-01-01

    Measurements are made of manual control performance in the closed-loop task of nulling perceived self-rotation velocity about an earth-vertical axis. Self-velocity estimation is modeled as a function of the simultaneous presentation of vestibular and peripheral visual field motion cues. Based on measured low-frequency operator behavior in three visual field environments, a parallel channel linear model is proposed which has separate visual and vestibular pathways summing in a complementary manner. A dual-input describing function analysis supports the complementary model; vestibular cues dominate sensation at higher frequencies. The describing function model is extended by the proposal of a nonlinear cue conflict model, in which cue weighting depends on the level of agreement between visual and vestibular cues.

  10. Consequences and assessment of human vestibular failure: implications for postural control.

    PubMed

    Colebatch, James G

    2002-01-01

    Labyrinthine afferents respond to both angular velocity (semicircular canals) and linear acceleration (otoliths), including gravity. Given their response to gravity, the otoliths are likely to have an important role in the postural functions of the vestibular apparatus. Unilateral vestibular ablation has dramatic effects on posture in many animals, but less so in primates. Nevertheless, bilateral vestibular lesions lead to disabling symptoms in man related to disturbed ocular and postural control and impaired perception of slopes and accelerations. While seimicircular canal function can be assessed through its effects on vestibular ocular reflexes, assessment of otolith function in man has traditionally been much more difficult. Recent definition of a short latency vestibulocollic reflex, activated by sound and appearing to arise from the saccule, shows promise as a new method of non-invasive assessment of otolith function.

  11. A simple model for the generation of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential (VEMP).

    PubMed

    Wit, Hero P; Kingma, Charlotte M

    2006-06-01

    To describe the mechanism by which the vestibular evoked myogenic potential is generated. Vestibular evoked myogenic potential generation is modeled by adding a large number of muscle motor unit action potentials. These action potentials occur randomly in time along a 100 ms long time axis. But because between approximately 15 and 20 ms after a loud short sound stimulus (almost) no action potentials are generated during VEMP measurements in human subjects, no action potentials are present in the model during this time. The evoked potential is the result of the lack of amplitude cancellation in the averaged surface electromyogram at the edges of this 5 ms long time interval. The relatively simple model describes generation and some properties of the vestibular evoked myogenic potential very well. It is shown that, in contrast with other evoked potentials (BAEPs, VERs), the vestibular evoked myogenic potential is the result of an interruption of activity and not that of summed synchronized neural action potentials.

  12. Lack of effects of astemizole on vestibular ocular reflex, motion sickness, and cognitive performance in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, Randall L.; Homick, Jerry L.; Cintron, Nitza; Calkins, Dick S.

    1987-01-01

    Astemizole was orally administered to 20 subjects in a randomized, double-blind design to assess the efficacy of this peripherally active antihistamine as an antimotion sickness drug possessing no central side-effects. Measures of vestibular ocular reflex (VOR) were made to evaluate the agent as a selective vestibular depressant. Following one week of orally administered astemizole (30 mg daily), a Staircase Profile Test, a VOR test, and a variety of tests of cognitive performance were administered. These tests revealed no statistically significant effects of astemizole. This leads to the conclusion that, although the drug probably reaches the peripheral vestibular apparatus in man by crossing the blood-vestibular barrier, a selective peripheral antihistamine (H1) action is inadequate to control motion sickness induced through cross-coupled accelerative semicircular canal stimulation in a rotating chair.

  13. Hyperventilation-induced nystagmus in vestibular schwannoma and unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Mandalà, Marco; Giannuzzi, Annalisa; Astore, Serena; Trabalzini, Franco; Nuti, Daniele

    2013-07-01

    We evaluated the incidence and characteristics of hyperventilation-induced nystagmus (HVN) in 49 patients with gadolinium-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging evidence of vestibular schwannoma and 53 patients with idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss and normal radiological findings. The sensitivity and specificity of the hyperventilation test were compared with other audio-vestibular diagnostic tests (bedside examination of eye movements, caloric test, auditory brainstem responses) in the two groups of patients. The hyperventilation test scored the highest diagnostic efficiency (sensitivity 65.3 %; specificity 98.1 %) of the four tests in the differential diagnosis of vestibular schwannoma and idiopathic unilateral sensorineural hearing loss. Small tumors with a normal caloric response or caloric paresis were associated with ipsilateral HVN and larger tumors and severe caloric deficits with contralateral HVN. These results confirm that the hyperventilation test is a useful diagnostic test for predicting vestibular schwannoma in patients with unilateral sensorineural hearing loss.

  14. The effects of vestibular stimulation and fatigue on postural control in classical ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Hopper, Diana M; Grisbrook, Tiffany L; Newnham, Prudence J; Edwards, Dylan J

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of ballet-specific vestibular stimulation and fatigue on static postural control in ballet dancers and to establish whether these effects differ across varying levels of ballet training. Dancers were divided into three groups: professional, pre-professional, and recreational. Static postural control of 23 dancers was measured on a force platform at baseline and then immediately, 30 seconds, and 60 seconds after vestibular stimulation (pirouettes) and induction of fatigue (repetitive jumps). The professional dancers' balance was unaffected by both the vestibular stimulation and the fatigue task. The pre-professional and recreational dancers' static sway increased following both perturbations. It is concluded that professional dancers are able to compensate for vestibular and fatiguing perturbations due to a higher level of skill-specific motor training.

  15. Motility of vestibular hair cells in the chick.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Y; Sekitani, T

    1993-01-01

    Recent studies of the outer hair cells in cochlea have demonstrated active motilities. However, very little study has been done on the vestibular hair cells (VHCs). The present study shows the motile response of the VHCs induced by application of Ca2+/ATP promoting contraction. Reversible cell shape changes could be shown in 10 of 16 isolated type I hair cells and 9 of 15 isolated type II hair cells by applying the contraction solution. Furthermore, the sensory hair bundles in the utricular epithelium pivoted around the base and stood perpendicularly to the apical borderline of the epithelium in response to the application of the same solution. It is suggested that the contraction of the isolated VHCs may be transferred to tension which causes the sensory hair bundles to restrict their motion in normal tissue, instead of changing the cell shape.

  16. Vestibular models for design and evaluation of flight simulator motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bussolari, S. R.; Sullivan, R. B.; Young, L. R.

    1986-01-01

    The use of spatial orientation models in the design and evaluation of control systems for motion-base flight simulators is investigated experimentally. The development of a high-fidelity motion drive controller using an optimal control approach based on human vestibular models is described. The formulation and implementation of the optimal washout system are discussed. The effectiveness of the motion washout system was evaluated by studying the response of six motion washout systems to the NASA/AMES Vertical Motion Simulator for a single dash-quick-stop maneuver. The effects of the motion washout system on pilot performance and simulator acceptability are examined. The data reveal that human spatial orientation models are useful for the design and evaluation of flight simulator motion fidelity.

  17. Vestibular Function Research (VFR) experiment. Phase B: Design definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The Vestibular Functions Research (VFR) Experiment was established to investigate the neurosensory and related physiological processes believed to be associated with the space flight nausea syndrome and to develop logical means for its prediction, prevention and treatment. The VFR Project consists of ground and spaceflight experimentation using frogs as specimens. The phase B Preliminary Design Study provided for the preliminary design of the experiment hardware, preparation of performance and hardware specification and a Phase C/D development plan, establishment of STS (Space Transportation System) interfaces and mission operations, and the study of a variety of hardware, experiment and mission options. The study consist of three major tasks: (1) mission mode trade-off; (2) conceptual design; and (3) preliminary design.

  18. What can posturography tell us about vestibular function?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Black, F. O.

    2001-01-01

    Patients with balance disorders want answers to the following basic questions: (1) What is causing my problem? and (2) What can be done about my problem? Information to fully answer these questions must include status of both sensory and motor components of the balance control systems. Computerized dynamic posturography (CDP) provides quantitative assessment of both sensory and motor components of postural control along with how the sensory inputs to the brain interact. This paper reviews the scientific basis and clinical applications of CDP. Specifically, studies describing the integration of vestibular inputs with other sensory systems for postural control are briefly summarized. Clinical applications, including assessment, rehabilitation, and management are presented. Effects of aging on postural control along with prevention and management strategies are discussed.

  19. Middle ear impedance measurements in large vestibular aqueduct syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bilgen, Cem; Kirkim, Günay; Kirazli, Tayfun

    2009-06-01

    To assess the effect of inner ear pressure on middle ear impedance in patients with large vestibular aqueduct syndrome (LVAS). Data from admittance tympanometry and multifrequency tympanometry on 8 LVAS patients and control subjects were studied. Static acoustic compliance (SAC) values for the ears with stable sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL) were within the limits of the mean values of control groups except for two ears. The resonance frequency (RF) values of the ears with stable SNHL were lower than the mean values of control groups except for three ears. SAC values for the two ears with fluctuating SNHL were lower and the RF values were higher than the mean values of control groups. Decreased SAC values and increased RF values found in the ears with fluctuating SNHL might be an indirect indicator of increased inner ear pressure, while low RF values in the ears with stable SNHL might reflect the decreased inner ear impedance.

  20. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L.

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival. We are studying two aspects of this vestibular adaptation: (1) How does long-term exposure to microgravity and hypergravity affect the development of vestibular afferents? (2) How does short- term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during launch and landing, affect the vestibular system. During space flight the gravistatic receptors in the otolith organs are effectively unloaded. In hypergravity conditions they are overloaded. However, the angular acceleration receptors of the semicircular canals receive relatively normal stimulation in both micro- and hypergravity.Rat embryos exposed to microgravity from gestation day 10 (prior to vestibular function) until gestation day 20 (vestibular system is somewhat functional) showed that afferents from the posterior vertical canal projecting to the medial vestibular nucleus developed similarly in microgravity, hypergravity, and in controls . However, afferents from the saccule showed delayed development in microgravity as compared to development in hypergravity and in controls. Cerebellar plasticity is crucial for modification of sensory-motor control and learning. Thus we explored the possibility that strong vestibular stimuli would modify cerebellar motor control (i.e., eye movement, postural control, gut motility) by altering the morphology of cerebellar Purkinje cells. To study the effects of short-term exposures to strong vestibular stimuli we focused on structural changes in the vestibulo-cerebellum that are caused by strong vestibular stimuli. Adult mice were exposed to various combinations of constant and/or rapidly changing angular and linear accelerations for 8.5 min (the time length of shuttle launch). Our data shows that these stimuli cause intense excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, inducing up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis

  1. Health‐related quality of life and economic burden of vestibular loss in older adults

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Yuri; Semenov, Yevgeniy R.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Vestibular loss is a debilitating condition, and despite its high prevalence in older adults, the quality of life (QoL) burden of vestibular loss in older individuals has not been well‐studied. This report quantifies the impact on overall QoL and identifies domains of health most affected. We hypothesize vestibular loss will be associated with impairment in diverse domains of health‐related QoL. Study Design Prospective, case‐control study. Methods A convenience sample of 27 patients age ≥60 years with vestibular physiologic loss was recruited from an academic neurotology clinic. The patients did not have any identifiable cause of their vestibular loss other than aging. The convenience sample was compared to an age‐matched cross‐sectional sample of the general US population (n = 1266). The main outcome was QoL measured by the Ontario Health Utilities Index Mark III (HUI3). Results Compared to the general population, patients with vestibular loss had significantly lower overall unadjusted HUI3 scores (−0.32, p < 0.001). Multivariate regression analysis showed vestibular loss was significantly associated with poorer performance in vision (−0.11 p < 0.0001), speech (−0.15, p < 0.0001), dexterity (−0.13, p < 0.0001), and emotion (−0.07, p = 0.0065). Adjusted aggregate HUI3 was also significantly lower for vestibular loss (−0.15, p = 0.0105). These QoL decrements resulted in an average loss of 1.30 Quality‐Adjusted Life Years (QALYs). When using a $50,000/QALY willingness‐to‐pay threshold, vestibular loss was associated with a $64,929 lifetime economic burden per affected older adult, resulting in a total lifetime societal burden of $227 billion for the US population ≥60 years of age. Conclusions Loss of vestibular function with aging significantly decreases quality of life across multiple domains of well‐being. These QoL reductions are responsible for heavy societal economic burdens of vestibular

  2. Probabilistic Tractography of the Cranial Nerves in Vestibular Schwannoma.

    PubMed

    Zolal, Amir; Juratli, Tareq A; Podlesek, Dino; Rieger, Bernhard; Kitzler, Hagen H; Linn, Jennifer; Schackert, Gabriele; Sobottka, Stephan B

    2017-11-01

    Multiple recent studies have reported on diffusion tensor-based fiber tracking of cranial nerves in vestibular schwannoma, with conflicting results as to the accuracy of the method and the occurrence of cochlear nerve depiction. Probabilistic nontensor-based tractography might offer advantages in terms of better extraction of directional information from the underlying data in cranial nerves, which are of subvoxel size. Twenty-one patients with large vestibular schwannomas were recruited. The probabilistic tracking was run preoperatively and the position of the potential depictions of the facial and cochlear nerves was estimated postoperatively by 3 independent observers in a blinded fashion. The true position of the nerve was determined intraoperatively by the surgeon. Thereafter, the imaging-based estimated position was compared with the intraoperatively determined position. Tumor size, cystic appearance, and postoperative House-Brackmann score were analyzed with regard to the accuracy of the depiction of the nerves. The probabilistic tracking showed a connection that correlated to the position of the facial nerve in 81% of the cases and to the position of the cochlear nerve in 33% of the cases. Altogether, the resulting depiction did not correspond to the intraoperative position of any of the nerves in 3 cases. In a majority of cases, the position of the facial nerve, but not of the cochlear nerve, could be estimated by evaluation of the probabilistic tracking results. However, false depictions not corresponding to any nerve do occur and cannot be discerned as such from the image only. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Fractionated Stereotactic Radiotherapy of Vestibular Schwannomas Accelerates Hearing Loss

    SciTech Connect

    Rasmussen, Rune, E-mail: rune333@gmail.com; Claesson, Magnus; Stangerup, Sven-Eric

    2012-08-01

    Objective: To evaluate long-term tumor control and hearing preservation rates in patients with vestibular schwannoma treated with fractionated stereotactic radiotherapy (FSRT), comparing hearing preservation rates to an untreated control group. The relationship between radiation dose to the cochlea and hearing preservation was also investigated. Methods and Materials: Forty-two patients receiving FSRT between 1997 and 2008 with a minimum follow-up of 2 years were included. All patients received 54 Gy in 27-30 fractions during 5.5-6.0 weeks. Clinical and audiometry data were collected prospectively. From a 'wait-and-scan' group, 409 patients were selected as control subjects, matched by initial audiometric parameters. Radiation dosemore » to the cochlea was measured using the original treatment plan and then related to changes in acoustic parameters. Results: Actuarial 2-, 4-, and 10-year tumor control rates were 100%, 91.5%, and 85.0%, respectively. Twenty-one patients had serviceable hearing before FSRT, 8 of whom (38%) retained serviceable hearing at 2 years after FSRT. No patients retained serviceable hearing after 10 years. At 2 years, hearing preservation rates in the control group were 1.8 times higher compared with the group receiving FSRT (P=.007). Radiation dose to the cochlea was significantly correlated to deterioration of the speech reception threshold (P=.03) but not to discrimination loss. Conclusion: FSRT accelerates the naturally occurring hearing loss in patients with vestibular schwannoma. Our findings, using fractionation of radiotherapy, parallel results using single-dose radiation. The radiation dose to the cochlea is correlated to hearing loss measured as the speech reception threshold.« less

  4. [Enlarged vestibular aqueduct syndrome. A review of 55 paediatric patients].

    PubMed

    Santos, Saturnino; Sgambatti, Luciano; Bueno, Antonio; Albi, Gustavo; Suárez, Alicia; Domínguez, Maria Jesús

    2010-01-01

    Enlarged vestibular aqueduct (EVA) is the commonest congenital anomaly found with imaging techniques in paediatric sensorineural hearing loss (SNHL). Our aim was to describe clinical and audiological findings in paediatric hearing loss associated to EVA. Retrospective review of 55 children with imaging-technique EVA findings from 2000 to 2009. Subjective and/or objective audiological tests were analysed and audiological findings related to clinical features were described. Thirty-seven patients (67.27%) showed bilateral EVA and 18 (32.72%) were unilateral. Hearing loss was bilateral in 46 (83.63%) patients and unilateral in 9 (16.36%). Mean age at diagnosis was 3.78 years. Fifty-three (96.36%) children showed SNHL (28 bilateral and profound), while 2 (3.63%) patients had mixed hearing loss. There were 3 cases of hearing loss progression, 2 fluctuations, 2 of them were asymmetric and 2 patients suffered from vestibular symptoms. Concomitant image findings were 6 cochlear hypoplasia, 2 enlarged internal auditory canals, 1 enlarged vestibule and 1 hypoplastic lateral semicircular canal. Six clinical syndromes were found (2 cases of Down's, and 1 each of Jacobsen, Pendred, Waardenburg and branchio-oto-renal). One child was positive for GJB2 mutation. Familial hearing loss was demonstrated on 12 (21.8%) cases. The clinical picture of hearing loss associated to EVA is characterised by great variability. It should be included in the differential diagnosis of unexplained mixed hearing loss. Familial and syndromic findings have to be taken into consideration in the diagnostic evaluations of such patients. Knowledge about the natural history of this illness is needed so as to give parents prognostic information. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  5. Directional abnormalities of vestibular and optokinetic responses in cerebellar disease

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, M. F.; Zee, D. S.; Shelhamer, M. J. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Directional abnormalities of vestibular and optokinetic responses in patients with cerebellar degeneration are reported. Three-axis magnetic search-coil recordings of the eye and head were performed in eight cerebellar patients. Among these patients, examples of directional cross-coupling were found during (1) high-frequency, high-acceleration head thrusts; (2) constant-velocity chair rotations with the head fixed; (3) constant-velocity optokinetic stimulation; and (4) following repetitive head shaking. Cross-coupling during horizontal head thrusts consisted of an inappropriate upward eye-velocity component. In some patients, sustained constant-velocity yaw-axis chair rotations produced a mixed horizontal-torsional nystagmus and/or an increase in the baseline vertical slow-phase velocity. Following horizontal head shaking, some patients showed an increase in the slow-phase velocity of their downbeat nystagmus. These various forms of cross-coupling did not necessarily occur to the same degree in a given patient; this suggests that different mechanisms may be responsible. It is suggested that cross-coupling during head thrusts may reflect a loss of calibration of brainstem connections involved in the direct vestibular pathways, perhaps due to dysfunction of the flocculus. Cross-coupling during constant-velocity rotations and following head shaking may result from a misorientation of the angular eye-velocity vector in the velocity-storage system. Finally, responses to horizontal optokinetic stimulation included an inappropriate torsional component in some patients. This suggests that the underlying organization of horizontal optokinetic tracking is in labyrinthine coordinates. The findings are also consistent with prior animal-lesion studies that have shown a role for the vestibulocerebellum in the control of the direction of the VOR.

  6. Influence of vestibular activation on respiration in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monahan, Kevin D.; Sharpe, Melissa K.; Drury, Daniel; Ertl, Andrew C.; Ray, Chester A.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the semicircular canals and otolith organs on respiration in humans. On the basis of animal studies, we hypothesized that vestibular activation would elicit a vestibulorespiratory reflex. To test this hypothesis, respiratory measures, arterial blood pressure, and heart rate were measured during engagement of semicircular canals and/or otolith organs. Dynamic upright pitch and roll (15 cycles/min), which activate the otolith organs and semicircular canals, increased respiratory rate (Delta2 +/- 1 and Delta3 +/- 1 breaths/min, respectively; P < 0.05). Dynamic yaw and lateral pitch (15 cycles/min), which activate the semicircular canals, increased respiration similarly (Delta3 +/- 1 and Delta2 +/- 1, respectively; P < 0.05). Dynamic chair rotation (15 cycles/min), which mimics dynamic yaw but eliminates neck muscle afferent, increased respiration (Delta3 +/- 1; P < 0.05) comparable to dynamic yaw (15 cycles/min). Increases in respiratory rate were graded as greater responses occurred during upright (Delta5 +/- 2 breaths/min) and lateral pitch (Delta4 +/- 1) and roll (Delta5 +/- 1) performed at 30 cycles/min. Increases in breathing frequency resulted in increases in minute ventilation during most interventions. Static head-down rotation, which activates otolith organs, did not alter respiratory rate (Delta1 +/- 1 breaths/min). Collectively, these data indicate that semicircular canals, but not otolith organs or neck muscle afferents, mediate increased ventilation in humans and support the concept that vestibular activation alters respiration in humans.

  7. Vestibular Balance Deficits Following Head Injury: Recommendations Concerning Evaluation and Rehabilitation in the Military Setting

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-27

    audiogram, magnetic resonance imaging ( MRI ) scan, and a battery of neuro-vestibular tests, etc. (see appendix B). Many of the findings are detailed...bills108/s1217.html 19 E.g., driven by a laptop, tablet PC, or PDA.   42 The authors also considered testing needs immediately after referral (by the... MRI scan   72 Neuro-vestibular testing o Dynamic Computerized Postu rography o Rotat ional chair t est ing of gain, phase, and symmet ry o Step

  8. Muscarinic acetylcholine receptor subtype expression in avian vestibular hair cells, nerve terminals and ganglion cells.

    PubMed

    Li, G Q; Kevetter, G A; Leonard, R B; Prusak, D J; Wood, T G; Correia, M J

    2007-04-25

    Muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are widely expressed in the CNS and peripheral nervous system and play an important role in modulating the cell activity and function. We have shown that the cholinergic agonist carbachol reduces the pigeon's inwardly rectifying potassium channel (pKir2.1) ionic currents in native vestibular hair cells. We have cloned and sequenced pigeon mAChR subtypes M2-M5 and we have studied the expression of all five mAChR subtypes (M1-M5) in the pigeon vestibular end organs (semicircular canal ampullary cristae and utricular maculae), vestibular nerve fibers and the vestibular (Scarpa's) ganglion using tissue immunohistochemistry (IH), dissociated single cell immunocytochemistry (IC) and Western blotting (WB). We found that vestibular hair cells, nerve fibers and ganglion cells each expressed all five (M1-M5) mAChR subtypes. Two of the three odd-numbered mAChRs (M1, M5) were present on the hair cell cilia, supporting cells and nerve terminals. And all three odd numbered mAChRs (M1, M3 and M5) were expressed on cuticular plates, myelin sheaths and Schwann cells. Even-numbered mAChRs were seen on the nerve terminals. M2 was also shown on the cuticular plates and supporting cells. Vestibular efferent fibers and terminals were not identified in our studies. Results from WB of the dissociated vestibular epithelia, nerve fibers and vestibular ganglia were consistent with the results from IH and IC. Our findings suggest that there is considerable co-expression of the subtypes on the neural elements of the labyrinth. Further electrophysiological and pharmacological studies should delineate the mechanisms of action of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors on structures in the labyrinth.

  9. Vestibular-somatosensory convergence in head movement control during locomotion after long-duration space flight.

    PubMed

    Mulavara, A P; Ruttley, T; Cohen, H S; Peters, B T; Miller, C; Brady, R; Merkle, L; Bloomberg, J J

    2012-01-01

    Space flight causes astronauts to be exposed to adaptation in both the vestibular and body load-sensing somatosensory systems. The goal of these studies was to examine the contributions of vestibular and body load-sensing somatosensory influences on vestibular mediated head movement control during locomotion after long-duration space flight. Subjects walked on a motor driven treadmill while performing a gaze stabilization task. Data were collected from three independent subject groups that included bilateral labyrinthine deficient (LD) patients, normal subjects before and after 30 minutes of 40% bodyweight unloaded treadmill walking, and astronauts before and after long-duration space flight. Motion data from the head and trunk segments were used to calculate the amplitude of angular head pitch and trunk vertical translation movement while subjects performed a gaze stabilization task, to estimate the contributions of vestibular reflexive mechanisms in head pitch movements. Exposure to unloaded locomotion caused a significant increase in head pitch movements in normal subjects, whereas the head pitch movements of LD patients were significantly decreased. This is the first evidence of adaptation of vestibular mediated head movement responses to unloaded treadmill walking. Astronaut subjects showed a heterogeneous response of both increases and decreases in the amplitude of head pitch movement. We infer that body load-sensing somatosensory input centrally modulates vestibular input and can adaptively modify vestibularly mediated head-movement control during locomotion. Thus, space flight may cause central adaptation of the converging vestibular and body load-sensing somatosensory systems leading to alterations in head movement control.

  10. Adaptations of the vestibular system to short and long-term exposures to altered gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruce, L. L.

    2003-10-01

    Long-term space flight creates unique environmental conditions to which the vestibular system must adapt for optimal survival of a given organism. The development and maintenance of vestibular connections are controlled by environmental gravitational stimulation as well as genetically controlled molecular interactions. This paper describes the effects of hypergravity on axonal growth and dendritic morphology, respectively. Two aspects of this vestibular adaptation are examined: (1) How does long-term exposure to hypergravity affect the development of vestibular axons? (2) How does short-term exposure to extremely rapid changes in gravity, such as those that occur during shuttle launch and landing, affect dendrites of the vestibulocerebellar system? To study the effects of longterm exposures to altered gravity, embryonic rats that developed in hypergravity were compared to microgravity-exposed and control rats. Examination of the vestibular projections from epithelia devoted to linear and angular acceleration revealed that the terminal fields segregate differently in rat embryos that gestated in each of the gravitational environments.To study the effects of short-term exposures to altered gravity, mice were exposed briefly to strong vestibular stimuli and the vestibulocerebellum was examined for any resulting morphological changes. My data show that these stimuli cause intense vestibular excitation of cerebellar Purkinje cells, which induce up-regulation of clathrin-mediated endocytosis and other morphological changes that are comparable to those seen in long-term depression. This system provides a basis for studying how the vestibular environment can modify cerebellar function, allowing animals to adapt to new environments.

  11. Correlation of Fos expression and circling asymmetry during gerbil vestibular compensation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaufman, G. D.; Shinder, M. E.; Perachio, A. A.

    1999-01-01

    Vestibular compensation is a central nervous system process resulting in recovery of functional movement and control following a unilateral vestibular lesion. Small pressure injections of phosphorothioate 20mer oligonucleotides were used to probe the role of the Fos transcription protein during vestibular compensation in the gerbil brainstem. During isoflurane gas anesthesia, antisense probes against the c-fos mRNA sequence were injected into the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei unilaterally prior to a unilateral surgical labyrinthectomy. Anionic dyes, which did not interact with the oligonucleotides, were used to mark the injection site and help determine the extent of diffusion. The antiFos oligonucleotide injections reduced Fos expression at the injection site in neurons which normally express Fos after the lesion, and also affected circling behavior induced by hemilabyrinthectomy. With both ipsilateral and contralateral medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei injections, less ipsilateral and more contralateral circling was noted in animals injected with antiFos injections as compared to non-injected controls. The degree of change in these behaviors was dependent upon the side of the injection. Histologically, antiFos injections reduced the number of Fos immunolabeled neurons around the injection site, and increased Fos expression contralaterally. The correlation of the number of neurons with Fos expression to turning behavior was stronger for contralateral versus ipsilateral turns, and for neurons in the caudal and ipsilateral sub-regions of the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. The results are discussed in terms of neuronal firing activity versus translational activity based on the asymmetrical expression of the Fos inducible transcription factor in the medial vestibular and prepositus nuclei. Although ubiquitous in the brain, transcription factors like Fos can serve localized and specific roles in sensory-specific adaptive stimuli. Antisense

  12. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution.

    PubMed

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-04-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1-2 deg s(-1). After unilateral vestibular injury patients' direction-discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s(-1), and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s(-1)). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s(-1)), they never recovered to control values - a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues.

  13. Neuronal detection thresholds during vestibular compensation: contributions of response variability and sensory substitution

    PubMed Central

    Jamali, Mohsen; Mitchell, Diana E; Dale, Alexis; Carriot, Jerome; Sadeghi, Soroush G; Cullen, Kathleen E

    2014-01-01

    The vestibular system is responsible for processing self-motion, allowing normal subjects to discriminate the direction of rotational movements as slow as 1–2 deg s−1. After unilateral vestibular injury patients’ direction–discrimination thresholds worsen to ∼20 deg s−1, and despite some improvement thresholds remain substantially elevated following compensation. To date, however, the underlying neural mechanisms of this recovery have not been addressed. Here, we recorded from first-order central neurons in the macaque monkey that provide vestibular information to higher brain areas for self-motion perception. Immediately following unilateral labyrinthectomy, neuronal detection thresholds increased by more than two-fold (from 14 to 30 deg s−1). While thresholds showed slight improvement by week 3 (25 deg s−1), they never recovered to control values – a trend mirroring the time course of perceptual thresholds in patients. We further discovered that changes in neuronal response variability paralleled changes in sensitivity for vestibular stimulation during compensation, thereby causing detection thresholds to remain elevated over time. However, we found that in a subset of neurons, the emergence of neck proprioceptive responses combined with residual vestibular modulation during head-on-body motion led to better neuronal detection thresholds. Taken together, our results emphasize that increases in response variability to vestibular inputs ultimately constrain neural thresholds and provide evidence that sensory substitution with extravestibular (i.e. proprioceptive) inputs at the first central stage of vestibular processing is a neural substrate for improvements in self-motion perception following vestibular loss. Thus, our results provide a neural correlate for the patient benefits provided by rehabilitative strategies that take advantage of the convergence of these multisensory cues. PMID:24366259

  14. A new saccadic indicator of peripheral vestibular function based on the video head impulse test

    PubMed Central

    MacDougall, Hamish G.; McGarvie, Leigh A.; Rogers, Stephen J.; Manzari, Leonardo; Burgess, Ann M.; Curthoys, Ian S.; Weber, Konrad P.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: While compensatory saccades indicate vestibular loss in the conventional head impulse test paradigm (HIMP), in which the participant fixates an earth-fixed target, we investigated a complementary suppression head impulse paradigm (SHIMP), in which the participant is fixating a head-fixed target to elicit anticompensatory saccades as a sign of vestibular function. Methods: HIMP and SHIMP eye movement responses were measured with the horizontal video head impulse test in patients with unilateral vestibular loss, patients with bilateral vestibular loss, and in healthy controls. Results: Vestibulo-ocular reflex gains showed close correlation (R2 = 0.97) with slightly lower SHIMP than HIMP gains (mean gain difference 0.06 ± 0.05 SD, p < 0.001). However, the 2 paradigms produced complementary catch-up saccade patterns: HIMP elicited compensatory saccades in patients but rarely in controls, whereas SHIMP elicited large anticompensatory saccades in controls, but smaller or no saccades in bilateral vestibular loss. Unilateral vestibular loss produced covert saccades in HIMP, but later and smaller saccades in SHIMP toward the affected side. Cumulative HIMP and SHIMP saccade amplitude differentiated patients from controls with high sensitivity and specificity. Conclusions: While compensatory saccades indicate vestibular loss in conventional HIMP, anticompensatory saccades in SHIMP using a head-fixed target indicate vestibular function. SHIMP saccades usually appear later than HIMP saccades, therefore being more salient to the naked eye and facilitating vestibulo-ocular reflex gain measurements. The new paradigm is intuitive and easy to explain to patients, and the SHIMP results complement those from the standard video head impulse test. Classification of evidence: This case-control study provides Class III evidence that SHIMP accurately identifies patients with unilateral or bilateral vestibulopathies. PMID:27251884

  15. Where is straight ahead to a patient with unilateral vestibular loss?

    PubMed

    Saj, Arnaud; Honoré, Jacques; Bernard-Demanze, Laurence; Devèze, Arnaud; Magnan, Jacques; Borel, Liliane

    2013-05-01

    The vestibular system is classically associated with postural control, oculomotor reflexes and self-motion perception. The patients with vestibular loss are primarily concerned with balance and gait problems including head and trunk tilt and walking trajectory deviation to the lesioned side. These long-lasting postural and locomotor biases are thought to originate from changes in spatial perception of self. Indeed, we show here that vestibular cues are necessary for an accurate representation of body orientation. Patients with right (RVN; n=11) or left vestibular neurotomy (LVN; 9) as a treatment for Menière's disease were compared with 10 healthy controls. The subjective straight ahead (SSA) was investigated using a method disentangling lateral shift and tilt components of error. In the horizontal plane, subjects were required to align a rod with their body midline. In the frontal plane, they were asked to align the rod with the midline of head or trunk. The analysis of SSA clearly showed distinct results according to the side of the lesion. The LVN patients had a contralesional lateral shift of SSA. In addition, they showed an ipsilesional tilt, more severe for the head than for the trunk. By contrast, in RVN patients, the representation of the body midline was fairly accurate in both the horizontal and frontal planes and did not differ from that of control subjects. The present study shows deviations in body orientation representation after unilateral vestibular loss. Deviations are observed in the horizontal as well as in the frontal planes. Interestingly, only patients with left vestibular loss were concerned with these changes in perception of self-orientation in space. These data support the hypothesis of an asymmetric vestibular function in healthy subjects and confirm the similarity of functional disorders in patients with vestibular deficits or spatial neglect. For the first time, this similarity is found at the level of body representation. Copyright

  16. Who is at risk for ongoing dizziness and psychological strain after a vestibular disorder?

    PubMed

    Best, C; Tschan, R; Eckhardt-Henn, A; Dieterich, M

    2009-12-29

    Patients with vestibular vertigo syndromes often suffer from anxiety and depression, whereas patients with psychiatric disorders often experience subjective unsteadiness, dizziness, or vertigo. Thus, it has been hypothesized that the vestibular system may be interlinked with the emotion processing systems. The aim of the current study was to evaluate this hypothesis by correlating vestibular and psychiatric symptoms with the course of the disease over 1 year. This interdisciplinary, prospective, longitudinal study included a total of 68 patients with acute vestibular vertigo syndromes. Four subgroups of patients with benign paroxysmal positioning vertigo (BPPV, n=19), acute vestibular neuritis (VN, n=14), vestibular migraine (VM, n=27), or Menière's disease (MD, n=8) were compared. All patients underwent neurological and neuro-otological examinations and filled out standardized self-report inventories including the Vertigo Symptom Scale (VSS), the Vertigo Handicap Questionnaire (VHQ) and the Symptom Checklist 90R (GSI, SCL-90R) at five different times (T0-T4) in the course of 1 year. VM patients experienced significantly more "vertigo and related symptoms" (VSS-VER), "somatic anxiety and autonomic arousal" (VSS-AA), and "vertigo induced handicap" (VHQ) than all other patients (P<0.001-P=0.006). Patients with a positive history of psychiatric disorders had significantly more emotional distress (GSI, SCL-90R), regardless of the specific phenomenology of the four diagnostic subgroups. Finally, fluctuations of vestibular excitability correlated positively with the extent of subjectively perceived vertigo. VM patients are significantly more handicapped by vertigo and related symptoms. They show significantly elevated fluctuations of vestibular excitability, which correlate with the (subjective) severity of vertigo symptoms.

  17. Vestibular Assessment and Rehabilitation: Ten-Year Survey Trends of Audiologists' Opinions and Practice.

    PubMed

    Nelson, M Dawn; Akin, Faith W; Riska, Kristal M; Andresen, Kimberly; Mondelli, Stephanie Stamps

    2016-02-01

    The past decade has yielded changes in the education and training of audiologists and technological advancements that have become widely available for clinical balance function testing. It is unclear if recent advancements in vestibular instrumentation or the transition to an AuD degree have affected audiologists' vestibular clinical practice or opinions. The purpose of this study was to examine predominant opinions and practices for vestibular assessment (VA) and vestibular rehabilitation (VR) over the past decade and between master's- and AuD-level audiologists. A 31-question survey was administered to audiologists via U.S. mail in 2003 (N = 7,500) and electronically in 2014 (N = 9,984) with a response rate of 12% and 10%, respectively. There was an increase in the number of audiologists providing vestibular services in the past decade. Most respondents agreed that audiologists were the most qualified professionals to conduct VA. Less than half of the surveyed audiologists felt that graduate training was adequate for VA. AuD-level audiologists were more satisfied with graduate training and felt more comfortable performing VA compared to master's-level audiologists. Few respondents agreed that audiologists were the most qualified professionals to conduct VR or that graduate training prepared them to conduct VR. The basic vestibular test battery was unchanged across surveys and included: calorics, smooth pursuit, saccades, search for spontaneous, positional, gaze and optokinetic nystagmus, Dix-Hallpike, case history, and hearing evaluation. There was a trend toward greater use of air (versus water) calorics, videonystagmography (versus electronystagmography), and additional tests of vestibular and balance function. VA is a growing specialty area in the field of audiology. Better training opportunities are needed to increase audiologists' knowledge and skills for providing vestibular services. The basic tests performed during VA have remained relatively unchanged

  18. Peripheral generators of the vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) in the chick.

    PubMed

    Weisleder, P; Jones, T A; Rubel, E W

    1990-10-01

    Electrophysiological activity in response to linear acceleration stimuli was recorded from young chickens by means of subcutaneous electrodes. This investigation had 2 purposes: (1) to establish the vestibular origin of the potentials; and (2) to investigate the contribution of each vestibular labyrinth to the response. The stimuli consisted of pulses of linear acceleration delivered by a mechanical vibrator (shaker). In the first set of experiments vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs) were recorded prior to and 24 h after bilateral cochlea removal. In the second set of experiments responses were recorded before and after unilateral or bilateral intralabyrinthine injections of tetrodotoxin (TTX). Different groups of subjects were used for each experimental condition. The general morphology of the VsEPs was maintained after bilateral cochlea removal. Absolute latency of wave P2, the most prominent component of the response, was not significantly affected by the manipulation. Unilateral intralabyrinthine TTX injections consistently prolonged the latency and reduced the amplitude of wave P2. Following binaural TTX injections we were unable to elicit responses at the acceleration levels used in this study. The results from these experiments suggest that: (1) the activity recorded in response to linear acceleration stimuli is vestibular in origin; (2) when recorded from intact animals the evoked response is composed of activity from both vestibular systems; and (3) TTX consistently blocks the activity of the vestibular portion of the VIIIth cranial nerve.

  19. Calcitonin gene-related Peptide and choline acetyltransferase colocalization in the human vestibular periphery.

    PubMed

    Popper, Paul; Ishiyama, Akira; Lopez, Ivan; Wackym, Phillip A

    2002-01-01

    Within the vestibular system, calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) has been localized in the efferent terminals and their brainstem neuronal cell bodies in several animal models. Presently, very few studies have verified these findings in the vestibular system in adult primates or humans. CGRP immunoreactivity (CGRPi) and its colocalization with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChATi) in human vestibular end organs and Scarpa's ganglion were studied using polyclonal antibodies against CGRP and ChAT, at the light-microscopic level. The CGRPi axons ramified to produce numerous CGRPi terminals throughout the neurosensory epithelium of the maculae and cristae, primarily in the basal and midbasal areas. Numerous CGRPi efferent terminals made contact with both type II vestibular hair cells and the afferent chalices surrounding type I vestibular hair cells. All CGRP immunoreactive fibers also exhibited ChATi. As in the animal models, no CGRPi was found within Scarpa's ganglion. This study provides evidence for CGRPi in the human vestibular periphery and validates the biomedical relevance of the current animal models. Copyright 2002 S. Karger AG, Basel

  20. Monoclonal L-citrulline immunostaining reveals nitric oxide-producing vestibular neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holstein, G. R.; Friedrich, V. L. Jr; Martinelli, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    Nitric oxide is an unstable free radical that serves as a novel messenger molecule in the central nervous system (CNS). In order to understand the interplay between classic and novel chemical communication systems in vestibular pathways, the staining obtained using a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline was compared with the labeling observed using more traditional markers for the presence of nitric oxide. Brainstem tissue from adult rats was processed for immunocytochemistry employing a monoclonal antibody directed against L-citrulline, a polyclonal antiserum against neuronal nitric oxide synthase, and/or NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry. Our findings demonstrate that L-citrulline can be fixed in situ by vascular perfusion, and can be visualized in fixed CNS tissue sections by immunocytochemistry. Further, the same vestibular regions and cell types are labeled by NADPH-diaphorase histochemistry, by the neuronal nitric oxide synthase antiserum, and by our anti-L-citrulline antibody. Clusters of L-citrulline-immunoreactive neurons are present in subregions of the vestibular nuclei, including the caudal portion of the inferior vestibular nucleus, the magnocellular portion of the medial vestibular nucleus, and the large cells in the ventral tier of the lateral vestibular nucleus. NADPH-diaphorase histochemical staining of these neurons clearly demonstrated their multipolar, fusiform and globular somata and long varicose dendritic processes. These results provide support for the suggestion that nitric oxide serves key roles in both vestibulo-autonomic and vestibulo-spinal pathways.

  1. Evaluation of Vestibular Functions in Patients with Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada Disease.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Keishi; Morita, Shinya; Hoshino, Kimiko; Fukuda, Atsushi; Nakamaru, Yuji; Homma, Akihiro

    2017-01-01

    Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) disease is an idiopathic, multisystem autoimmune disorder characterized by bilateral, diffuse granulomatous uveitis associated with neurological, audiovestibular, and dermatological manifestations. The purpose of this study is to investigate vestibular functions in patients with VKH disease. A total of 43 patients with VKH disease in Hokkaido University Hospital were enrolled in this study. Subjective symptoms such as dizziness or vertigo and the results of various vestibular examinations including nystagmus testing, caloric testing, and vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (VEMP) testing were investigated. Eight of 42 patients (19.0%) complained of subjective vestibular symptoms. On the other hand, 12 of 28 patients (42.9%) showed nystagmus, and 7 of 15 patients (46.7%) showed unilateral or bilateral weakness in the caloric test. VEMP testing was performed for 16 patients. Seven (43.8%) and 8 (50.0%) patients were evaluated as abnormal in cervical VEMP and ocular VEMP testing, respectively. The rate of detection of nystagmus was significantly higher than that of subjective symptoms. As vestibular dysfunction in patients with VKH disease cannot be detected through history taking alone, nystagmus testing, caloric testing, and VEMP testing should be performed to evaluate vestibular functions associated with VKH disease. It is considered that abnormal VEMP findings are associated with otolith organ dysfunction. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities. We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions. PMID:20021676

  3. Gamma Knife radiosurgery for vestibular schwannoma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Arthurs, Benjamin J; Lamoreaux, Wayne T; Giddings, Neil A; Fairbanks, Robert K; Mackay, Alexander R; Demakas, John J; Cooke, Barton S; Lee, Christopher M

    2009-12-18

    Vestibular schwannomas, also called acoustic neuromas, are benign tumors of the vestibulocochlear nerve. Patients with these tumours almost always present with signs of hearing loss, and many also experience tinnitus, vertigo, and equilibrium problems. Following diagnosis with contrast enhanced MRI, patients may choose to observe the tumour with subsequent scans or seek active treatment in the form of microsurgery, radiosurgery, or radiotherapy. Unfortunately, definitive guidelines for treating vestibular schwannomas are lacking, because of insufficient evidence comparing the outcomes of therapeutic modalities.We present a contemporary case report, describing the finding of a vestibular schwannoma in a patient who presented with dizziness and a "clicking" sensation in the ear, but no hearing deficit. Audible clicking is a symptom that, to our knowledge, has not been associated with vestibular schwannoma in the literature. We discuss the diagnosis and patient's decision-making process, which led to treatment with Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Treatment resulted in an excellent radiographic response and complete hearing preservation. This case highlights an atypical presentation of vestibular schwannoma, associated with audible "clicks" and normal hearing. We also provide a concise review of the available literature on modern vestibular schwannoma treatment, which may be useful in guiding treatment decisions.

  4. Role of cerebellar nodulus and uvula on the vestibular quick phase spatial constancy.

    PubMed

    Pettorossi, V E; Grassi, S; Errico, P; Barmack, N H

    2001-01-01

    We investigated the orientation of quick phases (QPs) of vestibularly-induced eye movements in rabbits in response to "off-vertical" sinusoidal vestibular stimulation. We also examined the possible role of the cerebellar nodulus and ventral uvula in controlling QP spatial orientation and modification. During "off-vertical" vestibular stimulation QPs remained aligned with the earth's horizontal plane, while the slow phases (SPs) were aligned with the plane of vestibular stimulation. This suggests that QPs are coded in gravito-inertial coordinates and SPs in head coordinates. When rabbits were oscillated in the light (20 degrees peak-to-peak; 0.2 Hz) about an "off-vertical" axis for 2 h, the QPs changed their trajectory, abandoning the earth's horizontal plane to approach the plane of the stimulus. By contrast, in the absence of conjunctive optokinetic stimulation, QPs remained fixed in the earth's horizontal plane even after 2 h of "off-vertical" stimulation. The conjunctive combination of optokinetic and vestibular stimulation caused QPs to change their plane of rotation. After lesion of the nodulus-uvula the ability of rabbits to reorient QPs during conjoint vestibular-optokinetic stimulation was maintained. We conclude that the space orientation and adaptation of QPs do not require cerebellar control.

  5. Objective vestibular testing of children with dizziness and balance complaints following sports-related concussions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Guangwei; Brodsky, Jacob R

    2015-06-01

    To conduct objective assessment of children with balance and vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions and identify the underlying deficits by analyzing laboratory test outcomes. Case series with chart review. Pediatric tertiary care facility. Medical records were reviewed of 42 pediatric patients with balance and/or vestibular complaints following sports-related concussions who underwent comprehensive laboratory testing on their balance and vestibular function. Patients' characteristics were summarized and results analyzed. More than 90% of the children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion had at least 1 abnormal finding from the comprehensive balance and vestibular evaluation. The most frequent deficit was found in dynamic visual acuity test, followed by Sensory Organization Test and rotational test. Patient's balance problem associated with concussion seemed to be primarily instigated by vestibular dysfunction. Furthermore, semicircular canal dysfunction was involved more often than dysfunction of otolith organs. Yet, <10% of the children experienced a hearing loss following sports-related concussion. Vestibular impairment is common among children with protracted dizziness or imbalance following sports-related concussion. Our study demonstrated that proper and thorough evaluation is imperative to identify these underlying deficits and laboratory tests were helpful in the diagnosis and recommendation of following rehabilitations. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  6. Distorted own-body representations in patients with dizziness and during caloric vestibular stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Christophe; Nakul, Estelle; Preuss, Nora; Elzière, Maya; Mast, Fred W

    2018-06-06

    There is increasing evidence that vestibular disorders evoke deficits reaching far beyond imbalance, oscillopsia and spatial cognition. Yet, how vestibular disorders affect own-body representations, in particular the perceived body shape and size, has been overlooked. Here, we explored vestibular contributions to own-body representations using two approaches. Study 1 measured the occurrence and severity of distorted own-body representations in 60 patients with dizziness and 60 healthy controls using six items from the Cambridge Depersonalization Scale. 12% of the patients have experienced distorted own-body representations (their hands or feet felt larger or smaller), 37% reported abnormal sense of agency, 35% reported disownership for the body, and 22% reported disembodiment. These proportions were larger in patients than controls. Study 2 aimed at testing whether artificial stimulation of the vestibular apparatus produced comparable distortions of own-body representations in healthy volunteers. We compared the effects of right-warm/left-cold caloric vestibular stimulation (CVS), left-warm/right-cold CVS and sham CVS on internal models of the left and right hands using a pointing task. The perceived length of the dorsum of the hand was increased specifically during left-warm/right-cold CVS, and this effect was found for both hands. Our studies show a vestibular contribution to own-body representations and should help understand the complex symptomatology of patients with dizziness.

  7. Preoperative vestibular assessment protocol of cochlear implant surgery: an analytical descriptive study.

    PubMed

    Bittar, Roseli Saraiva Moreira; Sato, Eduardo Setsuo; Ribeiro, Douglas Jósimo Silva; Tsuji, Robinson Koji

    Cochlear implants are undeniably an effective method for the recovery of hearing function in patients with hearing loss. To describe the preoperative vestibular assessment protocol in subjects who will be submitted to cochlear implants. Our institutional protocol provides the vestibular diagnosis through six simple tests: Romberg and Fukuda tests, assessment for spontaneous nystagmus, Head Impulse Test, evaluation for Head Shaking Nystagmus and caloric test. 21 patients were evaluated with a mean age of 42.75±14.38 years. Only 28% of the sample had all normal test results. The presence of asymmetric vestibular information was documented through the caloric test in 32% of the sample and spontaneous nystagmus was an important clue for the diagnosis. Bilateral vestibular areflexia was present in four subjects, unilateral arreflexia in three and bilateral hyporeflexia in two. The Head Impulse Test was a significant indicator for the diagnosis of areflexia in the tested ear (p=0.0001). The sensitized Romberg test using a foam pad was able to diagnose severe vestibular function impairment (p=0.003). The six clinical tests were able to identify the presence or absence of vestibular function and function asymmetry between the ears of the same individual. Copyright © 2016 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Physical and sporting activities improve vestibular afferent usage and balance in elderly human subjects.

    PubMed

    Gauchard, G C; Jeandel, C; Perrin, P P

    2001-01-01

    Ageing is associated with a reduction in balance, in particular through dysfunction of each level of postural control, which results in an increased risk of falling. Conversely, the practice of physical activities has been shown to modulat