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Sample records for nasa marshall center

  1. NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sackheim, Robert L.; Roth, Axel (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation gives an overview of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's activities and purposes. MSFC seeks to build on previous contacts and relationships with Russian rocket institutions, to better understand Russian rocket products and technical capabilities. The US launch vehicle and spacecraft industry are already using many Russian propulsion products and MSFC needs better technical knowledge and understanding of these products as this use increases. Further details are given on MSFC's role in determining and developing the scope of space propulsion, NASA's Integrated Space Transportation Plan, Earth to Orbit propulsion systems, Space Shuttle propulsion systems, proposed Shuttle safety upgrades, and in-space propulsion systems. MSFC's role in the construction and support of the International Space Station is also described.

  2. The Marshall Center: Its place in NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The organizational structure and facilities available at the Marshall Space Flight Center are described and the role of the Center in NASA program management is demonstrated in a review of the Center's past history and current development projects. Particular attention is given to space shuttle and the space transportation system; the preparation of experiments and management of Spacelab missions; and the development of the space telescope. Energy related activities discussed include the automatic guidance and control of the longwall shearing machine for coal extraction, systems for the solar heating and cooling of buildings, and the design of the solar power satellite. Products developed by Center personnel highlighted include the power factor controller to reduce electrical consumption by motors and the image enhancement process being used to restore early historical photographs. A free flying solar power source to increase mission duration of the orbiter and its payloads; techniques for the orbital assembly of large space structures; facilities for materials processing in space; the orbit transfer vehicle, solar electric propulsion systems; and the preparation of science and applications payloads are also described.

  3. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. W.; Carruth, M. R.; Edwards, D. L.; Finchum, A.; Maxwell, G.; Nabors, S.; Smalley, L.; Huston, D.; Ila, D.; Zimmerman, R.

    2004-01-01

    The NASA Barrel-Shaped Asymmetrical Capacitor (NACAP) has been extensively tested at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the National Space Science and Technology Center. Trichel pulse emission was first discovered here. The NACAP is a magnetohydrodynamic device for electric propulsion. In air it requires no onboard propellant nor any moving parts. No performance was observed in hard vacuum. The next step shall be optimizing the technology for future applications.

  4. NASA Deputy Administrator Tours Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1968-01-01

    Pictured from the left, in the Saturn I mockup, are: William Brooksbank, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Dr. Wernher von Braun, MSFC director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, executive officer of the Office of the Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, newly appointed deputy associate administrator for Manned Space Flight, technical. The party examined an ordinary man's shoe (held by Paine) outfitted for use in the Saturn I Workshop. The shoe had a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desired. Dr. Paine and his party indulged in a two-day tour at the Marshall Space Flight Center getting acquainted with Marshall personnel and programs. It was Paine's first visit to the center since assuming the NASA post on February 1, 1968.

  5. FOD Prevention at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    NASA now requires all flight hardware projects to develop and implement a Foreign Object Damage (FOD) Prevention Program. With the increasing use of composite and bonded structures, NASA now also requires an Impact Damage Protection Plan for these items. In 2009, Marshall Space Flight Center released an interim directive that required all Center organizations to comply with FOD protocols established by on-site Projects, to include prevention of impact damage. The MSFC Technical Standards Control Board authorized the development of a new MSFC technical standard for FOD Prevention.

  6. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  7. Plasma Propulsion Research at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheehy, Jeffrey A.

    2004-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is pursuing a range of research efforts aimed at identifying and developing new technologies for primary spacecraft propulsion. Efficient high-power electric propulsion (Ep) thrusters are a particular area of emphasis; these would enable the relatively rapid transit of large payloads about the solar system for unmanned or manned science and exploration. Such a mission would make heavy demands on the propulsion system, which may be required to run reliably for several years at a specific impulse approaching 10,OOO s with an efficiency of turning electrical power into jet power of at least 70%. The transit time to a destination scales approximately inversely with the cube root of the specific power, which is the ratio of jet power to power-plant mass. Consequently, reducing a trip time by half requires roughly an eight-fold increase in specific power. Given a renewed NASA commitment to space nuclear power, developing efficient EP thrusters with high jet power (> 100 kW) would seem to provide the most direct means of significantly increasing the specific power and hence reducing trip times. In particular, electromagnetic devices, with their high inherent thrust densities, should be better suited to high power applications than thrusters which depend exclusively on electrostatic forces for propellant acceleration.

  8. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebo, George

    2002-01-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  9. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lebo, George

    2002-01-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  10. Science Outreach at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebo, George

    2002-07-01

    At the end of World War II Duane Deming, an internationally known economist enunciated what later came to be called "Total Quality Management" (TQM). The basic thrust of this economic theory called for companies and governments to identify their customers and to do whatever was necessary to meet their demands and to keep them satisfied. It also called for companies to compete internally. That is, they were to build products that competed with their own so that they were always improving. Unfortunately most U.S. corporations failed to heed this advice. Consequently, the Japanese who actively sought Deming's advice and instituted it in their corporate planning, built an economy that outstripped that of the U.S. for the next three to four decades. Only after U.S. corporations reorganized and fashioned joint ventures which incorporated the tenets of TQM with their Japanese competitors did they start to catch up. Other institutions such as the U.S. government and its agencies and schools face the same problem. While the power of the U.S. government is in no danger of being usurped, its agencies and schools face real problems which can be traced back to not heeding Deming's advice. For example, the public schools are facing real pressure from private schools and home school families because they are not meeting the needs of the general public, Likewise, NASA and other government agencies find themselves shortchanged in funding because they have failed to convince the general public that their missions are important. In an attempt to convince the general public that its science mission is both interesting and important, in 1998 the Science Directorate at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) instituted a new outreach effort using the interact to reach the general public as well as the students. They have called it 'Science@NASA'.

  11. X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce high-strength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications-namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  12. The Electrostatic Levitation Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Hyers, Robert W.; Savage, Larry; Robinson, Michael B.; Rathz, Thomas J.; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Containerless processing is an important area of research in materials science. Electrostatic levitation (ESL) represents an emerging technology which permits containerless processing in a vacuum environment. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) established a levitation facility to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station. During ESL processing, charged specimens are levitated in the electrostatic field produced by the system's electrodes. Three sets of positioning electrodes represent the heart of the MSFC system. Two dual-axis position sensitive detectors provide input for the PID control-loop computer. Sample position is maintained by adjusting the control voltages for the power supplies of the positioning electrodes. A UV source refreshes the charge on specimens during processing via the photoelectric effect. Lasers permit sample heating independent of positioning. The processing chamber typically operates under vacuum condition approximately = 10(exp -7) Torr. Electrostatic levitation provides a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. Topics of investigation include thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams and other aspects of materials processing. Current capabilities and recent results of processing studies for metals, alloys and oxides will be reviewed.

  13. X-ray optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Dell, Stephen L.; Atkins, Carolyn; Broadway, David M.; Elsner, Ronald F.; Gaskin, Jessica A.; Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Kilaru, Kiranmayee; Kolodziejczak, Jeffery J.; Ramsey, Brian D.; Roche, Jacqueline M.; Swartz, Douglas A.; Tennant, Allyn F.; Weisskopf, Martin C.; Zavlin, Vyacheslav E.

    2015-05-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) engages in research, development, design, fabrication, coating, assembly, and testing of grazing-incidence optics (primarily) for x-ray telescope systems. Over the past two decades, MSFC has refined processes for electroformed-nickel replication of grazing-incidence optics, in order to produce highstrength, thin-walled, full-cylinder x-ray mirrors. In recent years, MSFC has used this technology to fabricate numerous x-ray mirror assemblies for several flight (balloon, rocket, and satellite) programs. Additionally, MSFC has demonstrated the suitability of this technology for ground-based laboratory applications—namely, x-ray microscopes and cold-neutron microscopes and concentrators. This mature technology enables the production, at moderately low cost, of reasonably lightweight x-ray telescopes with good (15-30 arcsecond) angular resolution. However, achieving arcsecond imaging for a lightweight x-ray telescope likely requires development of other technologies. Accordingly, MSFC is conducting a multi-faceted research program toward enabling cost-effective production of lightweight high-resolution x-ray mirror assemblies. Relevant research topics currently under investigation include differential deposition for post-fabrication figure correction, in-situ monitoring and control of coating stress, and direct fabrication of thin-walled full-cylinder grazing-incidence mirrors.

  14. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report - May 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2015-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Mission Systems Office (ZP).

  15. An illustrated chronology of the NASA Marshall Center and MSFC programs 1960-1973

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akens, D. S.

    1974-01-01

    The role that NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center played in the space program during the past 13 years is highlighted with pictures and text, plus background information concerning events that were important in the center's formation.

  16. Climate Variability and Impact at NASA's Marshal Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smoot, James L.; Jedlovec, Gary; Williams, Brett

    2013-01-01

    Climate analysis for the Southeast U. S. has indicated that inland regions have experienced an average temperature increase of 2F since 1970. This trend is generally characterized by warmer winters with an indication of increased precipitation in the Fall season. Extended periods of limited rainfall in the Spring and Summer periods have had greater areal coverage and, at other times the number of precipitation events has been increasing. Climate model projections for the next 10-70 years indicate warmer temperatures for the Southeast U.S., particularly in the Spring and Summer, with some indication of more extremes in temperature and precipitation as shown in the table below. The realization of these types of regional climate changes in the form of extended heat waves and droughts and their subsequent stress on facilities, infrastructure, and workforce could have substantial impact on the activities and functions of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will present the results of an examination of the 100 year temperature and precipitation record for MSFC. Local warming has cause an increase in daily maximum and minimum temperatures by nearly 3F, with a substantial increase in the number of maximum temperatures exceeding 90F and a decrease in the number of days with minimum temperatures below freezing. These trends have substantial impact of the number of heating / cooling degree days for the area. Yearly precipitation totals are inversely correlated with the change in mean temperature and the frequency of heavy rain events has remain consistent with the changes in yearly totals. An extended heat wave index was developed which shows an increase in frequency of heat waves over the last 35 years and a subsequent reduction in precipitation during the heat waves. This trend will contribute to more intense drought conditions over the northern Alabama region, increasing the potential of destructive wildfires in and around

  17. Vice President Pence Visits NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Vice President Mike Pence offered his thanks Monday to employees working on NASA’s human spaceflight programs during a tour of the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The Vice President saw the progress being made on NASA’s Space Launch System (SLS), the world’s most powerful deep space rocket, that will send astronauts on missions around the Moon and ultimately to Mars. He also visited Marshall’s Payload Operations Integration Center, where the agency manages all research aboard the International Space Station.

  18. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  19. Space Science Research and Technology at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Charles L.

    2007-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the various projects and programs managed in the Space Science Programs and Projects Office at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. Projects in the portfolio include NASA's Chandra X-Ray telescope, Hinode solar physics satellite, various advanced space propulsion technologies, including solar sails and tethers, as well as NASA's Discovery and New Frontiers Programs.

  20. NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center Hydrostatic Bearing Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benjamin, Theodore G.

    1991-01-01

    The basic approach for analyzing hydrostatic bearing flows at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is briefly discussed. The Hydrostatic Bearing Team has responsibility for assessing and evaluating flow codes; evaluating friction, ignition, and galling effects; evaluating wear; and performing tests. The Office of Aerospace and Exploration Technology Turbomachinery Seals Tasks consist of tests and analysis. The MSFC in-house analyses utilize one-dimensional bulk-flow codes. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) analysis is used to enhance understanding of bearing flow physics or to perform parametric analysis that are outside the bulk flow database. As long as the bulk flow codes are accurate enough for most needs, they will be utilized accordingly and will be supported by CFD analysis on an as-needed basis.

  1. The NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center drop tube user's manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.

    1990-01-01

    A comprehensive description of the structural and instrumentation hardware and the experimental capabilities of the 105-meter Marshall Space Flight Center Drop Tube Facility is given. This document is to serve as a guide to the investigator who wishes to perform materials processing experiments in the Drop Tube. Particular attention is given to the Tube's hardware to which an investigator must interface to perform experiments. This hardware consists of the permanent structural hardware (with such items as vacuum flanges), and the experimental hardware (with the furnaces and the sample insertion devices). Two furnaces, an electron-beam and an electromagnetic levitator, are currently used to melt metallic samples in a process environment that can range from 10(exp -6) Torr to 1 atmosphere. Details of these furnaces, the processing environment gases/vacuum, the electrical power, and data acquisition capabilities are specified to allow an investigator to design his/her experiment to maximize successful results and to reduce experimental setup time on the Tube. Various devices used to catch samples while inflicting minimum damage and to enhance turnaround time between experiments are described. Enough information is provided to allow an investigator who wishes to build his/her own furnace or sample catch devices to easily interface it to the Tube. The experimental instrumentation and data acquisition systems used to perform pre-drop and in-flight measurements of the melting and solidification process are also detailed. Typical experimental results are presented as an indicator of the type of data that is provided by the Drop Tube Facility. A summary bibliography of past Drop Tube experiments is provided, and an appendix explaining the noncontact temperature determination of free-falling drops is provided. This document is to be revised occasionally as improvements to the Facility are made and as the summary bibliography grows.

  2. In-Space Manufacturing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center: Enabling Technologies for Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bean, Quincy; Johnston, Mallory; Ordonez, Erick; Ryan, Rick; Prater, Tracie; Werkeiser, Niki

    2015-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is currently engaged in a number of in-space manufacturing(ISM)activities that have the potential to reduce launch costs, enhance crew safety, and provide the capabilities needed to undertake long duration spaceflight safely and sustainably.

  3. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, January - June 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1992-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during Jan. to Jun. 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, and H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  4. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory report, March - May 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1994-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during March-May 1994. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  5. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Observatory Report, July to December 1992

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during July-December 1992. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  6. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar observatory report, January - June 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    This report provides a description of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and gives a summary of its observations and data reduction during January-June 1993. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, an H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code.

  7. FOD Prevention at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2010-01-01

    NASA-MSFC directive MID 5340.1 requires FOD prevention for all flight hardware projects, and requires all support organizations to comply. MSFC-STD-3598 implements a standard approach for FOD prevention, tailored from NAS 412. Three levels of FOD Sensitive Area are identified, adopting existing practices at other NASA facilities. Additional emphasis is given to prevention of impact damage and mitigation of facility FOD sources, especially leaks and spills. Impact Damage Susceptible (IDS) items are identified as FOD-sensitive as well as hardware vulnerable to entrapment of small items.

  8. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program

    SciTech Connect

    2011-02-22

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration’s (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  9. Propulsion Research at the Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John; Rodgers, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is engaged in research activities aimed at providing the bases for fundamental advancement of a range of space propulsion technologies. There are four broad research themes. Advanced chemical propulsion studies focus on the detailed chemistry and transport processes for high-pressure combustion, and on the understanding and control of combustion stability. New high-energy propellant research ranges from theoretical prediction of new propellant properties through experimental characterization propellant performance, material interactions, aging properties, and ignition behavior. Another research area involves advanced nuclear electric propulsion with new robust and lightweight materials and with designs for advanced fuels. Nuclear electric propulsion systems are characterized using simulated nuclear systems, where the non-nuclear power source has the form and power input of a nuclear reactor. This permits detailed testing of nuclear propulsion systems in a non-nuclear environment. In-space propulsion research is focused primarily on high power plasma thruster work. New methods for achieving higher thrust in these devices are being studied theoretically and experimentally. Solar thermal propulsion research is also underway for in-space applications. The fourth of these research areas is advanced energetics. Specific research here includes the containment of ion clouds for extended periods. This is aimed at proving the concept of antimatter trapping and storage for use ultimately in propulsion applications. Another activity in this involves research into lightweight magnetic technology for space propulsion applications.

  10. Propulsion Research at the Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blevins, John; Rodgers, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    The Propulsion Research Center of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is engaged in research activities aimed at providing the bases for fundamental advancement of a range of space propulsion technologies. There are four broad research themes. Advanced chemical propulsion studies focus on the detailed chemistry and transport processes for high-pressure combustion, and on the understanding and control of combustion stability. New high-energy propellant research ranges from theoretical prediction of new propellant properties through experimental characterization propellant performance, material interactions, aging properties, and ignition behavior. Another research area involves advanced nuclear electric propulsion with new robust and lightweight materials and with designs for advanced fuels. Nuclear electric propulsion systems are characterized using simulated nuclear systems, where the non-nuclear power source has the form and power input of a nuclear reactor. This permits detailed testing of nuclear propulsion systems in a non-nuclear environment. In-space propulsion research is focused primarily on high power plasma thruster work. New methods for achieving higher thrust in these devices are being studied theoretically and experimentally. Solar thermal propulsion research is also underway for in-space applications. The fourth of these research areas is advanced energetics. Specific research here includes the containment of ion clouds for extended periods. This is aimed at proving the concept of antimatter trapping and storage for use ultimately in propulsion applications. Another activity in this involves research into lightweight magnetic technology for space propulsion applications.

  11. Vice President Visits Marshall Space Flight Center on This Week @NASA – September 29, 2017

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-29

    Vice President Mike Pence visited our Marshall Space Flight Center on Sept. 25 to thank employees working on NASA’s human spaceflight programs. He also spoke to the three NASA astronauts currently serving onboard the International Space Station. During a tour, the Vice President also saw progress being made on our Space Launch System rocket, that will send astronauts in our Orion spacecraft on missions around the Moon and ultimately to Mars. Also, NASA Data and Tech Aid in Disaster Relief, Congressional Hearing on August 21 Solar Eclipse, OSIRIS-REx Views Earth During Flyby, and “Bladed Terrain” on Pluto Made of Frozen Methane!

  12. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Revised 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.; Cooke, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide natural environments engineering support to programs and projects. The Natural Environments Branch is responsible for natural environments definitions, modeling, database development, and analytical assessments of effects. Natural Environments Branch personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, models and analytical tools have been developed in the areas of planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modeling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. This paper will build on a previous paper published in 2006 and provide updated descriptions of the capabilities within the Natural Environments Branch1. Updates describing improvements and new releases of several analytical tools and models will be presented. Separate sections will specifically describe modifications in the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), and the Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation (MSAFE) capabilities.

  13. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center, Revised 2009

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.; Cooke, William J.

    2009-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide natural environments engineering support to programs and projects. The Natural Environments Branch is responsible for natural environments definitions, modeling, database development, and analytical assessments of effects. Natural Environments Branch personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, models and analytical tools have been developed in the areas of planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modeling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. This paper will build on a previous paper published in 2006 and provide updated descriptions of the capabilities within the Natural Environments Branch1. Updates describing improvements and new releases of several analytical tools and models will be presented. Separate sections will specifically describe modifications in the Meteoroid Engineering Model (MEM), and the Marshall Solar Activity Future Estimation (MSAFE) capabilities.

  14. Ares Launch Vehicles Development Awakens Historic Test Stands at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbacher, Daniel L.; Burt, Richard K.

    2008-01-01

    This paper chronicles the rebirth of two national rocket testing assets located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: the Dynamic Test Stand (also known as the Ground Vibration Test Stand) and the Static Test Stand (also known as the Main Propulsion Test Stand). It will touch on the historical significance of these special facilities, while introducing the requirements driving modifications for testing a new generation space transportation system, which is set to come on line after the Space Shuttle is retired in 2010. In many ways, America's journey to explore the Moon begins at the Marshall Center, which is developing the Ares I crew launch vehicle and the Ares V cargo launch vehicle, along with managing the Lunar Precursor Robotic Program and leading the Lunar Lander descent stage work, among other Constellation Program assignments. An important component of this work is housed in Marshall's Engineering Directorate, which manages more than 40 facilities capable of a full spectrum of rocket and space transportation technology testing - from small components to full-up engine systems. The engineers and technicians who operate these test facilities have more than a thousand years of combined experience in this highly specialized field. Marshall has one of the few government test groups in the United States with responsibility for the overall performance of a test program from conception to completion. The Test Laboratory has facilities dating back to the early 1960s, when the test stands needed for the Apollo Program and other scientific endeavors were commissioned and built along the Marshall Center's southern boundary, with logistics access by air, railroad, and barge or boat on the Tennessee River. NASA and its industry partners are designing and developing a new human-rated system based on the requirements for safe, reliable, and cost-effective transportation solutions. Given below are summaries of the Dynamic Test Stand and the Static Test Stand capabilities

  15. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Earth Global Reference Atmospheric Model-2010 Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leslie, F. W.; Justus, C. G.

    2011-01-01

    Reference or standard atmospheric models have long been used for design and mission planning of various aerospace systems. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Global Reference Atmospheric Model was developed in response to the need for a design reference atmosphere that provides complete global geographical variability and complete altitude coverage (surface to orbital altitudes), as well as complete seasonal and monthly variability of the thermodynamic variables and wind components. In addition to providing the geographical, height, and monthly variation of the mean atmospheric state, it includes the ability to simulate spatial and temporal perturbations.

  16. Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) Development Activities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center - 2006 Accomplishments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ballard, Richard O.

    2007-01-01

    In 2005-06, the Prometheus program funded a number of tasks at the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support development of a Nuclear Thermal Propulsion (NTP) system for future manned exploration missions. These tasks include the following: 1. NTP Design Develop Test & Evaluate (DDT&E) Planning 2. NTP Mission & Systems Analysis / Stage Concepts & Engine Requirements 3. NTP Engine System Trade Space Analysis and Studies 4. NTP Engine Ground Test Facility Assessment 5. Non-Nuclear Environmental Simulator (NTREES) 6. Non-Nuclear Materials Fabrication & Evaluation 7. Multi-Physics TCA Modeling. This presentation is a overview of these tasks and their accomplishments

  17. Focus on Marshall: The Marshall Center Turns 50! (Part 2)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This month, the Focus on Marshall team invites you to a very special ceremony -- the NASA verison of a "birthday party" as the Marshall Space Flight Center turns 50 years old. Join them for the unv...

  18. Current Activities and Capabilities of the Terrestrial Environment Group at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.; Batts, Wade

    1997-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) designated Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) the center of excellence for space transportation. The Aerospace Environments and Effects (AEE) team of the Electromagnetics and Aerospace Environments Branch (EL23) in the Systems Analysis and Integration Laboratory at MSFC, supports the center of excellence designation by providing near-Earth space, deep space, planetary, and terrestrial environments expertise to projects as required. The Terrestrial Environment (TE) group within the AEE team maintains an extensive TE data base. Statistics and models derived from this data are applied to the design and development of new aerospace vehicles, as well as performance enhancement of operational vehicles such as the Space Shuttle. The TE is defined as the Earth's atmospheric environment extending from the surface to orbital insertion altitudes (approximately 90 km).

  19. Potential utilization of the NASA/George C. Marshall Space Flight Center in earthquake engineering research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scholl, R. E. (Editor)

    1979-01-01

    Earthquake engineering research capabilities of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) facilities at George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Alabama, were evaluated. The results indicate that the NASA/MSFC facilities and supporting capabilities offer unique opportunities for conducting earthquake engineering research. Specific features that are particularly attractive for large scale static and dynamic testing of natural and man-made structures include the following: large physical dimensions of buildings and test bays; high loading capacity; wide range and large number of test equipment and instrumentation devices; multichannel data acquisition and processing systems; technical expertise for conducting large-scale static and dynamic testing; sophisticated techniques for systems dynamics analysis, simulation, and control; and capability for managing large-size and technologically complex programs. Potential uses of the facilities for near and long term test programs to supplement current earthquake research activities are suggested.

  20. RS-88 Pad Abort Demonstrator Thrust Chamber Assembly Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farr, Rebecca A.; Sanders, Timothy M.

    1990-01-01

    This paper documents the effort conducted to collect hot-tire dynamic and acoustics environments data during 50,000-lb thrust lox-ethanol hot-fire rocket testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in November-December 2003. This test program was conducted during development testing of the Boeing Rocketdyne RS-88 development engine thrust chamber assembly (TCA) in support of the Orbital Space Plane (OSP) Crew Escape System Propulsion (CESP) Program Pad Abort Demonstrator (PAD). In addition to numerous internal TCA and nozzle measurements, induced acoustics environments data were also collected. Provided here is an overview of test parameters, a discussion of the measurements, test facility systems and test operations, and a quality assessment of the data collected during this test program.

  1. INSPACE CHEMICAL PROPULSION SYSTEMS AT NASA's MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER: HERITAGE AND CAPABILITIES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, P. S.; Sheehy, J. A.; Blevins, J. A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V rocket and the Space Shuttle external tank, solid rocket boosters, and main engines. This paper highlights a lesser known but very rich side of MSFC-its heritage in the development of in-space chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for spacecraft propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the flight development activities associated with upper stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology (DART), X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and multiple technology development activities. This paper also highlights MSFC s advanced chemical propulsion research capabilities, including an overview of the center s Propulsion Systems Department and ongoing activities. The authors highlight near-term and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant. This paper concludes by assessing the value of the full range of aforementioned activities, strengths, and capabilities in light of NASA s exploration missions.

  2. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Brandon S.; Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    To successfully operate a photovoltaic (PV) array system in space requires planning and testing to account for the effects of the space environment. It is critical to understand space environment interactions not only on the PV components, but also the array substrate materials, wiring harnesses, connectors, and protection circuitry (e.g. blocking diodes). Key elements of the space environment which must be accounted for in a PV system design include: Solar Photon Radiation, Charged Particle Radiation, Plasma, and Thermal Cycling. While solar photon radiation is central to generating power in PV systems, the complete spectrum includes short wavelength ultraviolet components, which photo-ionize materials, as well as long wavelength infrared which heat materials. High energy electron radiation has been demonstrated to significantly reduce the output power of III-V type PV cells; and proton radiation damages material surfaces - often impacting coverglasses and antireflective coatings. Plasma environments influence electrostatic charging of PV array materials, and must be understood to ensure that long duration arcs do not form and potentially destroy PV cells. Thermal cycling impacts all components on a PV array by inducing stresses due to thermal expansion and contraction. Given such demanding environments, and the complexity of structures and materials that form a PV array system, mission success can only be ensured through realistic testing in the laboratory. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has developed a broad space environment test capability to allow PV array designers and manufacturers to verify their system's integrity and avoid costly on-orbit failures. The Marshall Space Flight Center test capabilities are available to government, commercial, and university customers. Test solutions are tailored to meet the customer's needs, and can include performance assessments, such as flash testing in the case of PV cells.

  3. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this video clip is an animated illustration of the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit.

  4. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this rendering illustrates the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit with its solar panels partially extended.

  5. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Contributes to Solar B/Hinode

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    Hinode (Sunrise), formerly known as Solar-B before reaching orbit, was launched from the Uchinoura Space Center in Japan on September 23, 2006. Hinode was designed to probe into the Sun's magnetic field to better understand the origin of solar disturbances which interfere with satellite communications, electrical power transmission grids, and the safety of astronauts traveling beyond the Earth's magnetic field. Hinode is circling Earth in a polar orbit that places the instruments in continuous sunlight for nine months each year and allows data dumps to a high latitude European Space Agency (ESA) ground station every orbit. NASA and other science teams will support instrument operations and data collection from the spacecraft's operation center at the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency's (JAXA's) Institute of Space and Aeronautical Science facility located in Tokyo. The Hinode spacecraft is a collaboration among space agencies of Japan, the United States, the United Kingdom, and Europe. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) managed development of three instruments comprising the spacecraft; the Solar Optical Telescope (SOT); the X-Ray Telescope (XRT); and the Extreme Ultraviolet (EUV) Imaging Spectrometer (EIS). Provided by the Multimedia support group at MSFC, this rendering illustrates the Solar-B Spacecraft in earth orbit with its solar panels completely extended.

  6. Capabilities of the Natural Environments Branch at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, David L.; Suggs, Rob; Roberts, Barry C.

    2006-01-01

    The Natural Environment Branch at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has the responsibility to provide engineering support to programs and projects in natural environments. The Natural Environments Branch (EV13) is responsible for natural environments definitions, modelling, database development and effects assessments. EV13 personnel develop requirements for flight projects and provide operational support for space and launch vehicle systems. To accomplish these responsibilities, Branch . personnel have developed modelling and analytical tools which include planetary atmospheres, meteoroids, ionizing radiation, plasmas and ionospheres, magnetic and gravitational fields, spacecraft charging modelling, and radiation effects on electronic parts. NASA s Meteoroid Environment Office is operated within the EV13 and provides meteoroid engineering models and shower forecasts to spacecraft designers and operators. This paper will describe the capabilities within the Natural Environments Effects Branch including; examples of natural environment definitions, radiation transport, output from the Global Reference Atmosphere Models for Earth, Venus, Mars, Titan, and Neptune), recent NASCAP 2K results from solar sail modelling, and meteor stream models

  7. An Overview of the Electrostatic Levitation Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry; Soellner, Wolfgang; Huie, Doug

    1998-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important area of research in microgravity materials science. This method provides access to the metastable state of an undercooled melt. Containerless processing provides a high-purity environment for the study of reactive, high-temperature materials. Reduced gravity affords several benefits for containerless processing, for example greatly reduced positioning forces are required and therefore samples of greater mass can be studied. Additionally in reduced gravity, larger specimens will maintain spherical shape which will facilitate modeling efforts. Space Systems/LORAL developed an Electrostatic Containerless Processing System (ESCAPES) as a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature- transformation diagrams and other aspects of materials processing. These capabilities are critical to the research programs of several Principal Investigators supported by the Microgravity Materials Science Program of NASA. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently acquired the ESCAPES system from LORAL. MSFC is now developing a levitation facility to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station.

  8. An Overview of the Electrostatic Levitation Facility at Nasa's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Jan R.; Robinson, Michael B.; Savage, Larry; Soellner, Wolfgang; Huie, Doug

    1999-01-01

    Containerless processing represents an important area of research in microgravity materials science. This method provides access to the metastable state of an undercooled melt. Containerless processing provides a high-purity environment for the study of reactive, high-temperature materials. Reduced gravity affords several benefits for containerless processing; for example, greatly reduced positioning forces are required and therefore samples of greater mass can be studied. Additionally, in reduced gravity larger specimens will maintain spherical shape which will facilitate modeling efforts. Space Systems/LORAL developed an Electrostatic Containerless Processing System (ESCAPES) as a materials science research tool for investigations of refractory solids and melts. ESCAPES is designed for the investigation of thermophysical properties, phase equilibria, metastable phase formation, undercooling and nucleation, time-temperature-transformation diagrams, and other aspects of materials processing. These capabilities are critical to the research programs of several Principal Investigators supported by the Microgravity Materials Science Program of NASA. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) recently acquired the ESCAPES system from LORAL. MSFC is now developing a levitation facility in order to provide a critical resource to the microgravity materials science research community and to continue and enhance ground-based research in the support of the development of flight experiments during the transition to Space Station.

  9. Capabilities of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Finchum, Andy; Evans, Steve; Nehls, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for materials science at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). With an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns, a variety of projectile and target types and sizes can be accommodated. The ITF allows for simulation of impactors from rain to micrometeoroids and orbital debris on materials being investigated for space, atmospheric, and ground use. Expendable, relatively simple launch assemblies are used to obtain well-documented results for impact conditions comparable to those from ballistic and rocket sled ranges at considerably lower cost. In addition, for applications requiring study of impacts at speeds in excess of those attainable by gun launches, hydrocode simulations, validated by test data, can be used to extend the velocity range. In addition to serving various NASA directorates, the ITF has performed testing on behalf of the European and Russian space agencies, as well as the Department of Defense, and academic institutions. The m s contributions not only enable safer space flight for NASA s astronauts, but can help design materials and structures to protect soldiers and civilians on Earth, through advances in body armor, aircraft survivability, and a variety of other applications.

  10. Capabilities of NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovater, Mary; Hubbs, Whitney; Finchum, Andy; Evans, Steve; Nehls, Mary

    2006-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for materials science at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). With an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns, a variety of projectile and target types and sizes can be accommodated. The ITF allows for simulation of impactors from rain to micrometeoroids and orbital debris on materials being investigated for space, atmospheric, and ground use. Expendable, relatively simple launch assemblies are used to obtain well-documented results for impact conditions comparable to those from ballistic and rocket sled ranges at considerably lower cost. In addition, for applications requiring study of impacts at speeds in excess of those attainable by gun launches, hydrocode simulations, validated by test data, can be used to extend the velocity range. In addition to serving various NASA directorates, the ITF has performed testing on behalf of the European and Russian space agencies, as well as the Department of Defense, and academic institutions. The m s contributions not only enable safer space flight for NASA s astronauts, but can help design materials and structures to protect soldiers and civilians on Earth, through advances in body armor, aircraft survivability, and a variety of other applications.

  11. J-2X Gas Generator Development Testing at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reynolds, D. C.; Hormonzian, Carlo

    2010-01-01

    NASA is developing a liquid oxygen/liquid hydrogen rocket engine for upper stage and trans-lunar applications of the Ares vehicles for the Constellation program. This engine, designated the J-2X, is a higher pressure, higher thrust variant of the Apollo-era J-2 engine. Development was contracted to Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne in 2006. Over the past several years, two phases of testing have been completed on the development of the gas generator for the J-2X engine. The hardware has progressed through a variety of workhorse injector, chamber, and feed system configurations. Several of these configurations have resulted in combustion instability of the gas generator assembly. Development of the final configuration of workhorse hardware (which will ultimately be used to verify critical requirements on a component level) has required a balance between changes in the injector and chamber hardware in order to successfully mitigate the combustion instability without sacrificing other engine system requirements. This paper provides an overview of the two completed test series, performed at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The requirements, facility setup, hardware configurations, and test series progression are detailed. Significant levels of analysis have been performed in order to provide design solutions to mitigate the combustion stability issues, and these are briefly covered. Also discussed are the results of analyses related to either anomalous readings or off-nominal testing throughout the two test series.

  12. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center solar observatory report, January to December 1989

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, James E.

    1990-01-01

    A description is provided of the NASA-Marshall's Solar Vector Magnetograph Facility and a summary of its observations and data reduction during January to December 1989 is given. The systems that make up the facility are a magnetograph telescope, and H-alpha telescope, a Questar telescope, and a computer code. The data are represented by longitudinal contours with azimuth plots.

  13. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Controls Systems Design and Analysis Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilligan, Eric

    2014-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center maintains a critical national capability in the analysis of launch vehicle flight dynamics and flight certification of GN&C algorithms. MSFC analysts are domain experts in the areas of flexible-body dynamics and control-structure interaction, thrust vector control, sloshing propellant dynamics, and advanced statistical methods. Marshall's modeling and simulation expertise has supported manned spaceflight for over 50 years. Marshall's unparalleled capability in launch vehicle guidance, navigation, and control technology stems from its rich heritage in developing, integrating, and testing launch vehicle GN&C systems dating to the early Mercury-Redstone and Saturn vehicles. The Marshall team is continuously developing novel methods for design, including advanced techniques for large-scale optimization and analysis.

  14. Plasma Liner Research for MTF at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thio, Y. C. F.; Eskridge, R.; Lee, M.; Martin, A.; Smith, J.; Cassibry, J. T.; Wu, S. T.; Kirkpatrick, R. C.; Knapp, C. E.; Turchi, P. J.; hide

    2002-01-01

    The current research effort at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in MTF is directed towards exploring the critical physics issues of potential embodiments of MTF for propulsion, especially standoff drivers involving plasma liners for MTF. There are several possible approaches for forming plasma liners. One approach consists of using a spherical array of plasma jets to form a spherical plasma shell imploding towards the center of a magnetized plasma, a compact toroid. Current experimental plan and status to explore the physics of forming a 2-D plasma liner (shell) by merging plasma jets are described. A first-generation coaxial plasma guns (Mark-1) to launch the required plasma jets have been built and tested. Plasma jets have been launched reproducibly with a low jitter, and velocities in excess of 50 km/s for the leading edge of the plasma jet. Some further refinements are being explored for the plasma gun, Successful completion of these single-gun tests will be followed by an experimental exploration of the problems of launching a multiple number of these jets simultaneously to form a cylindrical plasma liner.

  15. Applied Virtual Reality Research and Applications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P.

    1995-01-01

    A Virtual Reality (VR) applications program has been under development at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since 1989. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, assess, validate, and utilize VR in hardware development, operations development and support, mission operations training and science training. Before this technology can be utilized with confidence in these applications, it must be validated for each particular class of application. That is, the precision and reliability with which it maps onto real settings and scenarios, representative of a class, must be calculated and assessed. The approach of the MSFC VR Applications Program is to develop and validate appropriate virtual environments and associated object kinematic and behavior attributes for specific classes of applications. These application-specific environments and associated simulations will be validated, where possible, through empirical comparisons with existing, accepted tools and methodologies. These validated VR analytical tools will then be available for use in the design and development of space systems and operations and in training and mission support systems. Specific validation studies for selected classes of applications have been completed or are currently underway. These include macro-ergonomic "control-room class" design analysis, Spacelab stowage reconfiguration training, a full-body micro-gravity functional reach simulator, and a gross anatomy teaching simulator. This paper describes the MSFC VR Applications Program and the validation studies.

  16. Spacecraft Chemical Propulsion Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center: Heritage and Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McRight, Patrick S.; Sheehy, Jeffrey A.; Blevins, John A.

    2005-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is well known for its contributions to large ascent propulsion systems such as the Saturn V and the Space Shuttle. This paper highlights a lesser known but equally rich side of MSFC - its heritage in spacecraft chemical propulsion systems and its current capabilities for in-space propulsion system development and chemical propulsion research. The historical narrative describes the efforts associated with developing upper-stage main propulsion systems such as the Saturn S-IVB as well as orbital maneuvering and reaction control systems such as the S-IVB auxiliary propulsion system, the Skylab thruster attitude control system, and many more recent activities such as Chandra, the Demonstration of Automated Rendezvous Technology, X-37, the X-38 de-orbit propulsion system, the Interim Control Module, the US Propulsion Module, and several technology development activities. Also discussed are MSFC chemical propulsion research capabilities, along with near- and long-term technology challenges to which MSFC research and system development competencies are relevant.

  17. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  18. Capabilities and History of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Hydrogen Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Hydrogen Test Facility (HTF) has conducted mechanical testing for aerospace materials at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for many years. One of the first facilities of its kind to run high-pressure cryogenic permeability tests in liquid hydrogen, HTF is now characterized as a unique national resource capable of overcoming hazardous conditions to perform tests directly in various hydrogen environments. At HTF, custom test systems are operated in eight structurally reinforced test cells from 0 to 68,948 kPa (0 to 10,000 psi) at -253 to 982 C (--423 to 1800 F) in hydrogen, air, helium, and nitrogen, with other environments available upon request. Standard mechanical procedures include compression, fatigue crack growth rate, four-point bend, high/low cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, shear, strain-to-crack, and tensile testing. Cryogenic permeability and thermal conductivity and gaseous creep testing are offered, as well as simulated service under different combinations of operating environment(s), stress, pressure, and ambient-to-extreme temperatures. Advanced tests are routinely developed upon demand, and special component testing is also available. Current efforts include the renovation of two high-pressure gaseous test cells to generate data for a J-2X engine designed for Constellation's Ares I and V vehicles. In the past, HTF has supported other critical NASA programs, such as Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Next Generation Launch Technologies. During the 1990's, hundreds of tests were conducted in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen during development of the Space Shuttle's super lightweight tank, which provided the thrust required to achieve low Earth orbit for the International Space Station. This facility was designed and built in 1963. Originally called the Low Temperature Test Facility, it became known as the Cryogenic Test Facility in the late 1980's and HTF in the early 1990's.

  19. Capabilities and History of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Hydrogen Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malone, T. W.

    2007-01-01

    The Hydrogen Test Facility (HTF) has conducted mechanical testing for aerospace materials at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center for many years. One of the first facilities of its kind to run high-pressure cryogenic permeability tests in liquid hydrogen, HTF is now characterized as a unique national resource capable of overcoming hazardous conditions to perform tests directly in various hydrogen environments. At HTF, custom test systems are operated in eight structurally reinforced test cells from 0 to 68,948 kPa (0 to 10,000 psi) at -253 to 982 C (--423 to 1800 F) in hydrogen, air, helium, and nitrogen, with other environments available upon request. Standard mechanical procedures include compression, fatigue crack growth rate, four-point bend, high/low cycle fatigue, fracture toughness, shear, strain-to-crack, and tensile testing. Cryogenic permeability and thermal conductivity and gaseous creep testing are offered, as well as simulated service under different combinations of operating environment(s), stress, pressure, and ambient-to-extreme temperatures. Advanced tests are routinely developed upon demand, and special component testing is also available. Current efforts include the renovation of two high-pressure gaseous test cells to generate data for a J-2X engine designed for Constellation's Ares I and V vehicles. In the past, HTF has supported other critical NASA programs, such as Apollo, Space Shuttle, and Next Generation Launch Technologies. During the 1990's, hundreds of tests were conducted in liquid hydrogen and liquid nitrogen during development of the Space Shuttle's super lightweight tank, which provided the thrust required to achieve low Earth orbit for the International Space Station. This facility was designed and built in 1963. Originally called the Low Temperature Test Facility, it became known as the Cryogenic Test Facility in the late 1980's and HTF in the early 1990's.

  20. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the NASA / Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) project is to advance and develop Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) technologies. The ART project began in 1996 as part of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The project is composed of several activities including RBCC engine ground testing, tool development, vehicle / mission studies, and component testing / development. The major contractors involved in the ART project are Aerojet and Rocketdyne. A large database of RBCC ground test data was generated for the air-augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet, scramjet, and ascent rocket modes of operation for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. Transition between consecutive modes was also demonstrated as well as trajectory simulation. The Rocketdyne freejet tests were conducted at GASL in the Flight Acceleration Simulation Test (FAST) facility. During a single test, the FAST facility is capable of simulating both the enthalpy and aerodynamic conditions over a range of Mach numbers in a flight trajectory. Aerojet performed freejet testing in the Pebble Bed facility at GASL as well as direct-connect testing at GASL. Aerojet also performed sea-level static (SLS) testing at the Aerojet A-Zone facility in Sacramento, CA. Several flight-type flowpath components were developed under the ART project. Aerojet designed and fabricated ceramic scramjet injectors. The structural design of the injectors will be tested in a simulated scramjet environment where thermal effects and performance will be assessed. Rocketdyne will be replacing the cooled combustor in the A5 rig with a flight-weight combustor that is near completion. Aerojet's formed duct panel is currently being fabricated and will be tested in the SLS rig in Aerojet's A-Zone facility. Aerojet has already successfully tested a cooled cowl panel in the same facility. In addition to MSFC, other NASA centers have contributed to the ART project as well. Inlet testing

  1. Accomplishments of the Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) RBCC Project at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Karl W.; McArthur, J. Craig (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The focus of the NASA / Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Reusable Technologies (ART) project is to advance and develop Rocket-Based Combined-Cycle (RBCC) technologies. The ART project began in 1996 as part of the Advanced Space Transportation Program (ASTP). The project is composed of several activities including RBCC engine ground testing, tool development, vehicle / mission studies, and component testing / development. The major contractors involved in the ART project are Aerojet and Rocketdyne. A large database of RBCC ground test data was generated for the air-augmented rocket (AAR), ramjet, scramjet, and ascent rocket modes of operation for both the Aerojet and Rocketdyne concepts. Transition between consecutive modes was also demonstrated as well as trajectory simulation. The Rocketdyne freejet tests were conducted at GASL in the Flight Acceleration Simulation Test (FAST) facility. During a single test, the FAST facility is capable of simulating both the enthalpy and aerodynamic conditions over a range of Mach numbers in a flight trajectory. Aerojet performed freejet testing in the Pebble Bed facility at GASL as well as direct-connect testing at GASL. Aerojet also performed sea-level static (SLS) testing at the Aerojet A-Zone facility in Sacramento, CA. Several flight-type flowpath components were developed under the ART project. Aerojet designed and fabricated ceramic scramjet injectors. The structural design of the injectors will be tested in a simulated scramjet environment where thermal effects and performance will be assessed. Rocketdyne will be replacing the cooled combustor in the A5 rig with a flight-weight combustor that is near completion. Aerojet's formed duct panel is currently being fabricated and will be tested in the SLS rig in Aerojet's A-Zone facility. Aerojet has already successfully tested a cooled cowl panel in the same facility. In addition to MSFC, other NASA centers have contributed to the ART project as well. Inlet testing

  2. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)-designated center for the development of space launch systems. MSFC is particularly known for propulsion system development. Many engineering skills and technical disciplines are needed to accomplish this mission. This presentation will focus on the work of the Fluid Dynamics Branch (ER42). ER42 resides in the Propulsion Systems Department at MSFC. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments. This work begins with design trades and parametric studies, and continues through development, risk assessment, anomaly investigation and resolution, and failure investigations. Applications include the propellant delivery system including the main propulsion system (MPS) and turbomachinery; combustion devices for liquid engines and solid rocket motors; coupled systems; and launch environments. An advantage of the branch is that it is neither analysis nor test centric, but discipline centric. Fluid dynamics assessments are made by analysis, from lumped parameter modeling through unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD); testing, which can be cold flow or hot fire; or a combination of analysis and testing. Integration of all discipline methods into one branch enables efficient and accurate support to the projects. To accomplish this work, the branch currently employs approximately fifty engineers divided into four teams -- Propellant Delivery CFD, Combustion Driven Flows CFD, Unsteady and Experimental Flows, and Acoustics and Stability. This discussion will highlight some of the work performed in the branch and the direction in which the branch is headed.

  3. Python-Based Scientific Analysis and Visualization of Precipitation Systems at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, Timothy J.

    2015-01-01

    At NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Python is used several different ways to analyze and visualize precipitating weather systems. A number of different Python-based software packages have been developed, which are available to the larger scientific community. The approach in all these packages is to utilize pre-existing Python modules as well as to be object-oriented and scalable. The first package that will be described and demonstrated is the Python Advanced Microwave Precipitation Radiometer (AMPR) Data Toolkit, or PyAMPR for short. PyAMPR reads geolocated brightness temperature data from any flight of the AMPR airborne instrument over its 25-year history into a common data structure suitable for user-defined analyses. It features rapid, simplified (i.e., one line of code) production of quick-look imagery, including Google Earth overlays, swath plots of individual channels, and strip charts showing multiple channels at once. These plotting routines are also capable of significant customization for detailed, publication-ready figures. Deconvolution of the polarization-varying channels to static horizontally and vertically polarized scenes is also available. Examples will be given of PyAMPR's contribution toward real-time AMPR data display during the Integrated Precipitation and Hydrology Experiment (IPHEx), which took place in the Carolinas during May-June 2014. The second software package is the Marshall Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor (MRMS) Mosaic Python Toolkit, or MMM-Py for short. MMM-Py was designed to read, analyze, and display three-dimensional national mosaicked reflectivity data produced by the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory (NSSL). MMM-Py can read MRMS mosaics from either their unique binary format or their converted NetCDF format. It can also read and properly interpret the current mosaic design (4 regional tiles) as well as mosaics produced prior to late July 2013 (8 tiles). MMM-Py can easily stitch multiple tiles together to provide a

  4. Space Environment Testing of Photovoltaic Array Systems at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Todd A.; Vaughn, Jason A.; Wright, Kenneth H., Jr.; Phillips, Brandon S.

    2015-01-01

    CubeSats, Communication Satellites, and Outer Planet Science Satellites all share one thing in common: Mission success depends on maintaining power in the harsh space environment. For a vast majority of satellites, spacecraft power is sourced by a photovoltaic (PV) array system. Built around PV cells, the array systems also include wiring, substrates, connectors, and protection diodes. Each of these components must function properly throughout the mission in order for power production to remain at nominal levels. Failure of even one component can lead to a crippling loss of power. To help ensure PV array systems do not suffer failures on-orbit due to the space environment, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has developed a wide ranging test and evaluation capability. Key elements of this capability include: Testing: a. Ultraviolet (UV) Exposure b. Charged Particle Radiation (Electron and Proton) c. Thermal Cycling d. Plasma and Beam Environments Evaluation: a. Electrostatic Discharge (ESD) Screening b. Optical Inspection and easurement c. PV Power Output including Large Area Pulsed Solar Simulator (LAPSS) measurements This paper will describe the elements of the space environment which particularly impact PV array systems. MSFC test capabilities will be described to show how the relevant space environments can be applied to PV array systems in the laboratory. A discussion of MSFC evaluation capabilities will also be provided. The sample evaluation capabilities offer test engineers a means to quantify the effects of the space environment on their PV array system or component. Finally, examples will be shown of the effects of the space environment on actual PV array materials tested at MSFC.

  5. NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Improves Cooling System Performance: Best Management Practice Case Study #10: Cooling Towers (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding sustainability program that revolves around energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. MSFC identified a problematic cooling loop with six separate compressor heat exchangers and a history of poor efficiency. The facility engineering team at MSFC partnered with Flozone Services, Incorporated to implement a comprehensive water treatment platform to improve the overall efficiency of the system.

  6. The Process of Science Communications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.; Treise, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    The communication of new scientific knowledge and understanding is an integral component of science research, essential for its continued survival. Like any learning- based activity, science cannot continue without communication between and among peers so that skeptical inquiry and learning can take place. This communication provides necessary organic support to maintain the development of new knowledge and technology. However, communication beyond the peer-community is becoming equally critical for science to survive as an enterprise into the 21st century. Therefore, scientists not only have a 'noble responsibility' to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding to audiences within and beyond the peer-community, but their fulfillment of this responsibility is necessary to maintain the survival of the science enterprise. Despite the critical importance of communication to the viability of science, the skills required to perform effective science communications historically have not been taught as a part of the training of scientist, and the culture of science is often averse to significant communication beyond the peer community. Thus scientists can find themselves ill equipped and uncomfortable with the requirements of their job in the new millennium. At NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, we have developed and implemented an integrated science communications process, providing an institutional capability to help scientist accurately convey the content and meaning of new scientific knowledge to a wide variety of audiences, adding intrinsic value to the research itself through communication, while still maintaining the integrity of the peer-review process. The process utilizes initial communication through the world-wide web at the site http://science.nasa.gov to strategically leverage other communications vehicles and to reach a wide-variety of audiences. Here we present and discuss the basic design of the science communications process, now in

  7. The Process of Science Communications at NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horack, John M.; Treise, Deborah

    1998-01-01

    The communication of new scientific knowledge and understanding is an integral component of science research, essential for its continued survival. Like any learning- based activity, science cannot continue without communication between and among peers so that skeptical inquiry and learning can take place. This communication provides necessary organic support to maintain the development of new knowledge and technology. However, communication beyond the peer-community is becoming equally critical for science to survive as an enterprise into the 21st century. Therefore, scientists not only have a 'noble responsibility' to advance and communicate scientific knowledge and understanding to audiences within and beyond the peer-community, but their fulfillment of this responsibility is necessary to maintain the survival of the science enterprise. Despite the critical importance of communication to the viability of science, the skills required to perform effective science communications historically have not been taught as a part of the training of scientist, and the culture of science is often averse to significant communication beyond the peer community. Thus scientists can find themselves ill equipped and uncomfortable with the requirements of their job in the new millennium. At NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center, we have developed and implemented an integrated science communications process, providing an institutional capability to help scientist accurately convey the content and meaning of new scientific knowledge to a wide variety of audiences, adding intrinsic value to the research itself through communication, while still maintaining the integrity of the peer-review process. The process utilizes initial communication through the world-wide web at the site http://science.nasa.gov to strategically leverage other communications vehicles and to reach a wide-variety of audiences. Here we present and discuss the basic design of the science communications process, now in

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC), including its history and activities. The six enterprises to carry out NASA's mission are: Space Science; Earth Science; Biological and Physical Research; Aerospace Technology; Education (our newest); and Space Flight. These are explained, as well as MSFC's contributions toward these NASA enterprises. The presentation also covers cooperation between MSFC and the Department of Defense (DoD).

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geveden, Rex D.

    2003-01-01

    This presentation gives an overview of Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC), including its history and activities. The six enterprises to carry out NASA's mission are: Space Science; Earth Science; Biological and Physical Research; Aerospace Technology; Education (our newest); and Space Flight. These are explained, as well as MSFC's contributions toward these NASA enterprises. The presentation also covers cooperation between MSFC and the Department of Defense (DoD).

  10. Marshall's George Hopson Recieves NASA's Highest Honors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    After four decades of contribution to America's space program, George Hopson, manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project at Marshall Space Flight Center, accepted NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Awarded to those who, by distinguished ability or courage, have made a personal contribution to the NASA mission, NASA's Distinguished Service Medal is the highest honor NASA confers. Hopson's contributions to America's space program include work on the country's first space station, Skylab; the world's first reusable space vehicle, the Space Shuttle; and the International Space Station. Hopson joined NASA's Marshall team as chief of the Fluid and Thermal Systems Branch in the Propulsion Division in 1962, and later served as chief of the Engineering Analysis Division of the Structures and Propulsion Laboratory. In 1979, he was named director of Marshall's Systems Dynamics Laboratory. In 1981, he was chosen to head the Center's Systems Analysis and Integration. Seven years later, in 1988, Hopson was appointed associate director for Space Transportation Systems and one year later became the manager of the Space Station Projects Office at Marshall. In 1994, Hopson was selected as deputy director for Space Systems in the Science and Engineering Directorate at Marshall where he supervised the Chief Engineering Offices of both marned and unmanned space systems. He was named manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project in 1997. In addition to the Distinguished Service Medal, Hopson has also been recognized with the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal and NASA's Exceptional Service Medal.

  11. Spatial interpretation of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Payload Operations Control Center using virtual reality technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindsey, Patricia F.

    1993-01-01

    In its search for higher level computer interfaces and more realistic electronic simulations for measurement and spatial analysis in human factors design, NASA at MSFC is evaluating the functionality of virtual reality (VR) technology. Virtual reality simulation generates a three dimensional environment in which the participant appears to be enveloped. It is a type of interactive simulation in which humans are not only involved, but included. Virtual reality technology is still in the experimental phase, but it appears to be the next logical step after computer aided three-dimensional animation in transferring the viewer from a passive to an active role in experiencing and evaluating an environment. There is great potential for using this new technology when designing environments for more successful interaction, both with the environment and with another participant in a remote location. At the University of North Carolina, a VR simulation of a the planned Sitterson Hall, revealed a flaw in the building's design that had not been observed during examination of the more traditional building plan simulation methods on paper and on computer aided design (CAD) work station. The virtual environment enables multiple participants in remote locations to come together and interact with one another and with the environment. Each participant is capable of seeing herself and the other participants and of interacting with them within the simulated environment.

  12. Designing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element and Integrating the Stack at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyles, Garry; Otte, Neil E.

    2008-01-01

    Fielding an integrated launch vehicle system entails many challenges, not the least of which is the fact that it has been over 30 years since the United States has developed a human-rated vehicle - the venerable Space Shuttle. Over time, whole generations of rocket scientists have passed through the aerospace community without the opportunity to perform such exacting, demanding, and rewarding work. However, with almost 50 years of experience leading the design, development, and end-to-end systems engineering and integration of complex launch vehicles, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center offers the in-house talent - both junior- and senior-level personnel - to shape a new national asset to meet the requirements for safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions.' These personnel are housed primarily in Marshall's Engineering Directorate and are matrixed into the programs and projects that reside at the rocket center. Fortunately, many Apollo era and Shuttle engineers, as well as those who gained valuable hands-on experience in the 1990s by conducting technology demonstrator projects such as the Delta-Clipper Experimental Advanced, X-33, X-34, and X-37, as well as the short-lived Orbital Space Plane, work closely with industry partners to advance the nation's strategic capability for human access to space. Currently, only three spacefaring nations have this distinction, including the United States, Russia, and, more recently, China. The U.S. National Space Policy of2006 directs that NASA provide the means to travel to space, and the NASA Appropriations Act of2005 provided the initial funding to begin in earnest to replace the Shuttle after the International Space Station construction is complete in 20 IO? These and other strategic goals and objectives are documented in NASA's 2006 Strategic Plan.3 In 2005, a team of NASA aerospace experts conducted the Exploration Systems Architecture Study, which recommended a two-vehicle approach to America's next space

  13. Overview of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) CFD Consortium for Applications in Propulsion Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcconnaughey, P. K.; Schutzenhofer, L. A.

    1992-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Consortium for Applications in Propulsion Technology (CAPT). The objectives of this consortium are discussed, as is the approach of managing resources and technology to achieve these objectives. Significant results by the three CFD CAPT teams (Turbine, Pump, and Combustion) are briefly highlighted with respect to the advancement of CFD applications, the development and evaluation of advanced hardware concepts, and the integration of these results and CFD as a design tool to support Space Transportation Main Engine and National Launch System development.

  14. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  15. Friction Stir Welding Development at NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including thin and thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  16. NASA Hispanic Heritage Month Employee Profile- Gustavo Martinez - Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-19

    In observance of National Hispanic Heritage Month, Gustavo Martinez, a propulsion engineer at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, is featured in this video profile. Martinez, a first-generation American of Mexican descent, earned his bachelors and masters in mechanical engineering from the University of Texas at El Paso. He works in the Liquid Engine System Branch of Marshall’s Propulsion Systems Department, supporting RS-25 engine systems analysis and test preparations for NASA’s Space Launch System. National Hispanic Heritage Month honors the cultures and contributions of Americans whose ancestors originated from Spain, Mexico, the Caribbean and Central and South America. The observation started in 1968 as Hispanic Heritage Week under President Lyndon Johnson and was expanded into law by President Ronald Reagan in 1988.

  17. Activities of the NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center pump stage technology team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, R.; Mcconnaughey, P.; Eastland, A.

    1992-01-01

    In order to advance rocket propulsion technology, the Consortium for Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Application in Propulsion Technology has been formed at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Consortium consists of three Teams: the turbine stage team, the pump stage team (PST), and the combustion devices team. The PST has formulated and is implementing a plan for pump technology development whose end product will be validated CFD codes suitable for application to pump components, test data suitable for validating CFD codes, and advanced pump components optimized using CFD codes. The PST's work during the fall of 1991 and the winter and spring of 1992 is discussed in this paper. This work is highlighted by CFD analyses of an advanced impeller design and collection of laser two-focus velocimeter data for the Space Shuttle Main Engine High Pressure Fuel Pump impeller.

  18. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-09-08

    President Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mrs. George C. Marshall unveil the bronze bust of General George C. Marshall during the dedication of the Marshall Space Flight Center. Eisenhower signed an Executive Order on October 21, 1959 directing the transfer of persornel from the Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency Development Operations Division to NASA. On March 15, 1960, another Executive Order announced that the space complex formed within the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal would become the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. The Center was activated on July 1, 1960, with dedication ceremonies taking place September 8, 1960.

  19. Designing the Ares I Crew Launch Vehicle Upper Stage Element and Integrating the Stack at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Otte, Neil E.; Lyles, Garry; Reuter, James L.; Davis, Daniel J.

    2008-01-01

    Fielding an integrated launch vehicle system entails many challenges, not the least of which is the fact that it has been over 30 years since the United States has developed a human-rated vehicle - the venerable Space Shuttle. Over time, whole generations of rocket scientists have passed through the aerospace community without the opportunity to perform such exacting, demanding, and rewarding work. However, with almost 50 years of experience leading the design, development, and end-to-end systems engineering and integration of complex launch vehicles, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Marshall Space Flight Center offers the in-house talent - both junior- and senior-level personnel - to shape a new national asset to meet the requirements for safe, reliable, and affordable space exploration solutions. The technical personnel are housed primarily in Marshall's Engineering Directorate and are matrixed into the programs and projects that reside at the rocket center. Fortunately, many Apollo-era and Shuttle engineers, as well as those who gained valuable hands-on experience in the 1990s by conducting technology demonstrator projects such as the Delta-Clipper Experimental Advanced, X-33, X-34, and X-37, as well as the short-lived Orbital Space Plane, work closely with industry partners to advance the nation's strategic capability for human access to space. The Ares Projects Office, resident at Marshall, is managing the design and development of America's new space fleet, including the Ares I, which will loft the Orion crew capsule for its first test flight in the 2013 timeframe, as well as the heavy-lift Ares V, which will round out the capability to leave low-Earth orbit once again, when it delivers the Altair lunar lander to orbit late next decade. This paper provides information about the approach to integrating the Ares I stack and designing the upper stage in house, using unique facilities and an expert workforce to revitalize the nation

  20. Future Nanotube Commercialization Opportunities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael; Shah, Sandeep; Kaul, Raj; Zhu, Shen; Vandiver, Terry; Zimmerman, Joe E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nanotube technology has broad applicability to programs at both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). MSFC has interest in applications of nanotubes as sensors and high strength lightweight materials for propulsion system components, avionic systems, and scientific instruments. MSFC is currently pursuing internal programs to develop nanotube temperature sensors, heat pipes, and metal matrix composites. In support of these application areas MSFC is interested in growth of long nanotubes, growth of nanotubes in the microgravity environment, and nanotubes fabricated from high temperature materials such as Boron Nitride or Silicon Carbide. AMCOM is similarly interested in nanotube applications which take advantage of the nanotube thermal conductance properties, high strength, and lightweight. Applications of interest to AMCOM include rocket motor casing structures, rocket nozzles, and lightweight structure and aeronautic skins.

  1. Future Nanotube Commercialization Opportunities at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Michael; Shah, Sandeep; Kaul, Raj; Zhu, Shen; Vandiver, Terry; Zimmerman, Joe E. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Nanotube technology has broad applicability to programs at both the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and the US Army Aviation and Missile Command (AMCOM). MSFC has interest in applications of nanotubes as sensors and high strength lightweight materials for propulsion system components, avionic systems, and scientific instruments. MSFC is currently pursuing internal programs to develop nanotube temperature sensors, heat pipes, and metal matrix composites. In support of these application areas MSFC is interested in growth of long nanotubes, growth of nanotubes in the microgravity environment, and nanotubes fabricated from high temperature materials such as Boron Nitride or Silicon Carbide. AMCOM is similarly interested in nanotube applications which take advantage of the nanotube thermal conductance properties, high strength, and lightweight. Applications of interest to AMCOM include rocket motor casing structures, rocket nozzles, and lightweight structure and aeronautic skins.

  2. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  3. Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group 88th Meeting: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Task Report, 2004

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2004-01-01

    Supported Return-to-Flight activities by providing surface climate data from Kennedy Space Center used primarily for ice and dew formation studies, and upper air wind analysis primarily used for ascent loads analyses. The MSFC Environments Group's Terrestrial and Planetary Environments Team documented Space Shuttle day-of-launch support activities by publishing a document in support of SSP Return-to-Flight activities entitled "Space Shuttle Program Flight Operations Support". The team also formalized the Shuttle Natural Environments Technical Panel and chaired the first special session of the SSP Natural Environments Panel meeting at KSC, November 4-7,2003.58 participants from NASA, DOD and other government agencies from across the country attended the meeting.

  4. Tailoring Systems Engineering Processes in a Conceptual Design Environment: A Case Study at NASA Marshall Spaceflight Center's ACO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulqueen, John; Maples, C. Dauphne; Fabisinski, Leo, III

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Systems Engineering as it is applied in a conceptual design space systems department at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Marshall Spaceflight Center (MSFC) Advanced Concepts Office (ACO). Engineering work performed in the NASA MFSC's ACO is targeted toward the Exploratory Research and Concepts Development life cycle stages, as defined in the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) System Engineering Handbook. This paper addresses three ACO Systems Engineering tools that correspond to three INCOSE Technical Processes: Stakeholder Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, and Integration, as well as one Project Process Risk Management. These processes are used to facilitate, streamline, and manage systems engineering processes tailored for the earliest two life cycle stages, which is the environment in which ACO engineers work. The role of systems engineers and systems engineering as performed in ACO is explored in this paper. The need for tailoring Systems Engineering processes, tools, and products in the ever-changing engineering services ACO provides to its customers is addressed.

  5. Space Environmental Effects (SEE) Testing Capability: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Crave, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Finchum, Charles; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the space environment can lead to materials degradation, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. Ground based testing is critical in predicting performance NASA/MSFC's expertise and capabilities make up the most complete SEE testing capability available.

  6. Development of Multilayer Coatings for Hard X-Ray Optics at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gurgew, Danielle N.; Broadway, David M.; Ramsey, Brian; Gregory, Don

    2017-01-01

    Broadband X-ray multilayer coatings are under development at NASA MSFC for use on future astronomical X-ray telescopes. Multilayer coatings deposited onto the reflecting surfaces of X-ray optics can provide a large bandpass enabling observations of higher energy astrophysical objects and phenomena.

  7. The Direction of Fluid Dynamics for Liquid Propulsion at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griffin, Lisa W.

    2012-01-01

    The Fluid Dynamics Branch's (ER42) at MSFC mission is to support NASA and other customers with discipline expertise to enable successful accomplishment of program/project goals. The branch is responsible for all aspects of the discipline of fluid dynamics, analysis and testing, applied to propulsion or propulsion-induced loads and environments, which includes the propellant delivery system, combustion devices, coupled systems, and launch and separation events. ER42 supports projects from design through development, and into anomaly and failure investigations. ER42 is committed to continually improving the state-of-its-practice to provide accurate, effective, and timely fluid dynamics assessments and in extending the state-of-the-art of the discipline.

  8. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-04-15

    Representing the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Headquarters and the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), these officials performed the major work in the formation of MSFC. (Left to right) Delmar M. Morris, Deputy Director for Administration, MSFC; Eberhard Rees, Deputy Director for Research and Development, MSFC; Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director, MSFC; Dr. T. Keith Glernan, NASA Administrator; and Maj. Gen. Don R. Ostrander, Director, Office of Launch Vehicle Program, NASA

  9. Research Status of IEC Experiments at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dobson, Chris; Hrbud, Ivana; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This presentation provides an overview of IEC (Inertial Electrostatic Confinement) research and experiments at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Topics covered include: apparatus involvement, iec schematics, iec plasma images, iec deuterium experiments, thomson scattering, detector options and experiment results.

  10. 108 Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group Meeting (RCC-MG) NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report - April 2017

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2017-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Technology Office (ST).

  11. 107 Range Commanders Council Meteorology Group Meeting (RCC-MG): NASA Marshall Space Flight Center Range Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roberts, Barry C.

    2016-01-01

    The following is a summary of the major meteorological/atmospheric projects and research that have been or currently are being accomplished at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Listed below are highlights of work done during the past 6 months in the Engineering Directorate (ED) and in the Science and Mission Systems Office (ZP).

  12. With a laser beam centered on its panel of photovoltaic cells, a model plane makes the first flight of an aircraft powered by a laser beam inside a building at NASA Marshall.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    With a laser beam centered on its panel of photovoltaic cells, a lightweight model plane makes the first flight of an aircraft powered by a laser beam inside a building at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center.

  13. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-07-01

    Dr. Wernher von Braun and Maj. Gen. August Schomburg officiate the official transfer of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) to the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on July 1, 1960. The Official transfer ceremony took place in the front of the ABMA-MSFC joint headquarters, building 4488, Redstone Arsenal, Alabama.

  14. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Saves Water With High-Efficiency Toilet and Urinal Program: Best Management Practice Case Study #6 - Toilets and Urinals (Fact Sheet)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2011-02-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has a longstanding, successful sustainability program that focuses on energy and water efficiency as well as environmental protection. Because MSFC was built in the 1960s, most of the buildings house outdated, inefficient restroom fixtures. The facility engineering team at MSFC developed an innovative efficiency model for replacing these older toilets and urinals.

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Arthur J., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department is a resource for Educator, Students and Lifelong Learners. This paper will highlight the Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department with references to other NASA Education Departments nationwide. The principal focus will be on the responsibilities of the Pre-college Education Team which is responsible for supporting K- 12 teachers highlighting how many of the NASA Pre-college Offices engage teachers and their students in better understanding NASA's inspiring missions, unique facilities, and specialized workforce to carryout these many agency-wide tasks, goals and objectives. Attendee's will learn about the Marshall Educational Alliance Teams, as well, which is responsible for using NASA's unique assets to support all types of learning. All experience and knowledge levels, all grades K-12, and teachers in these specified groupings will gain a true appreciation of what is available for them, through Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department. An agency-wide blue directory booklet will be distributed to all attendees, for future references and related points of contact.

  16. Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Arthur J., Jr.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department is a resource for Educator, Students and Lifelong Learners. This paper will highlight the Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department with references to other NASA Education Departments nationwide. The principal focus will be on the responsibilities of the Pre-college Education Team which is responsible for supporting K- 12 teachers highlighting how many of the NASA Pre-college Offices engage teachers and their students in better understanding NASA's inspiring missions, unique facilities, and specialized workforce to carryout these many agency-wide tasks, goals and objectives. Attendee's will learn about the Marshall Educational Alliance Teams, as well, which is responsible for using NASA's unique assets to support all types of learning. All experience and knowledge levels, all grades K-12, and teachers in these specified groupings will gain a true appreciation of what is available for them, through Marshall Space Flight Center's Education Department. An agency-wide blue directory booklet will be distributed to all attendees, for future references and related points of contact.

  17. An evaluation of the total quality management implementation strategy for the advanced solid rocket motor project at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. M.S. Thesis - Tennessee Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Sullivan, Kenneth W.

    1991-01-01

    An evaluation of the NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) strategy to implement Total Quality Management (TQM) in the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) Project is presented. The evaluation of the implementation strategy reflected the Civil Service personnel perspective at the project level. The external and internal environments at MSFC were analyzed for their effects on the ASRM TQM strategy. Organizational forms, cultures, management systems, problem solving techniques, and training were assessed for their influence on the implementation strategy. The influence of ASRM's effort was assessed relative to its impact on mature projects as well as future projects at MSFC.

  18. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1960-07-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center was activated on July 1, 1960 as a part of NASA, which had been established on October 1, 1958 by Congressional passage of the National Aeronautics and Space Act. The nucleus of NASA was the Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later named the National Advisory Committee for Aeronauts (NACA). The NACA was founded in 1915 to study the problems of flight and to recommend practical solutions to basic aircraft design and construction problems. NACA's wind turnels and other research facilities made NACA technical reports the basis for aviation progress for more than 40 years.

  19. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. F. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The Faculty Fellowship program was revived in the summer of 2015 at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, following a period of diminished faculty research activity here since 2006 when budget cuts in the Headquarters' Education Office required realignment. Several senior Marshall managers recognized the need to involve the Nation's academic research talent in NASA's missions and projects to the benefit of both entities. These managers invested their funds required to establish the renewed Faculty Fellowship program in 2015, a 10-week residential research involvement of 16 faculty in the laboratories and offices at Marshall. These faculty engineers and scientists worked with NASA collaborators on NASA projects, bringing new perspectives and solutions to bear. This Technical Memorandum is a compilation of the research reports of the 2015 Marshall Faculty Fellowship program, along with the Program Announcement (appendix A) and the Program Description (appendix B). The research touched on seven areas-propulsion, materials, instrumentation, fluid dynamics, human factors, control systems, and astrophysics. The propulsion studies included green propellants, gas bubble dynamics, and simulations of fluid and thermal transients. The materials investigations involved sandwich structures in composites, plug and friction stir welding, and additive manufacturing, including both strength characterization and thermosets curing in space. The instrumentation projects involved spectral interfero- metry, emissivity, and strain sensing in structures. The fluid dynamics project studied the water hammer effect. The human factors project investigated the requirements for close proximity operations in confined spaces. Another team proposed a controls system for small launch vehicles, while in astrophysics, one faculty researcher estimated the practicality of weather modification by blocking the Sun's insolation, and another found evidence in satellite data of the detection of a warm

  20. A Decade of Friction Stir Welding R and D at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center and a Glance into the Future

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Jeff; Carter, Bob; Lawless, Kirby; Nunes, Arthur; Russell, Carolyn; Suites, Michael; Schneider, Judy

    2006-01-01

    Welding at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, has taken a new direction through the last 10 years. Fusion welding processes, namely variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA) and tungsten inert gas (TIG) were once the corner stone of welding development in the Space Flight Center's welding laboratories, located in the part of MSFC know as National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCM). Developed specifically to support the Shuttle Program's External Tank and later International Space Station manufacturing programs, was viewed as the paragon of welding processes for joining aluminum alloys. Much has changed since 1994, however, when NASA's Jeff Ding brought the FSW process to the NASA agency. Although, at that time, FSW was little more than a "lab curiosity", NASA researchers started investigating where the FSW process would best fit NASA manufacturing programs. A laboratory FSW system was procured and the first welds were made in fall of 1995. The small initial investment NASA made into the first FSW system has certainly paid off for the NASA agency in terms of cost savings, hardware quality and notoriety. FSW is now a part of Shuttle External Tank (ET) production and the preferred weld process for the manufacturing of components for the new Crew Launch Vehicle (CLV) and Heavy Lift Launch Vehicle (HLLV) that will take this country back to the moon. It is one of the solid state welding processes being considered for on-orbit space welding and repair, and is of considerable interest for Department of Defense @OD) manufacturing programs. MSFC involvement in these and other programs makes NASA a driving force in this country's development of FSW and other solid state welding technologies. Now, a decade later, almost the entire on-going welding R&D at MSFC now focuses on FSW and other more advanced solid state welding processes.

  1. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workmen at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) dock on the Ternessee River unload S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage, from the NASA barge Palaemon. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings in Marshall's S-IB static test stand.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center Test Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamilton, Jeffrey T.

    2005-01-01

    The Test Laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has over 50 facilities across 400+ acres inside a secure, fenced facility. The entire Center is located inside the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal, a 40,000 acre military reservation. About 150 Government and 250 contractor personnel operate facilities capable of all types of propulsion and structural testing, from small components to engine systems and structural strength, structural dynamic and environmental testing. We have tremendous engineering expertise in research, evaluation, analysis, design and development, and test of space transportation systems, subsystems, and components.

  3. SLS Engine Section Test Article Moves From NASA Barge Pegasus To Test Stand at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-18

    The NASA barge Pegasus made its first trip to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama on May 15. It arrived carrying the first piece of Space Launch System hardware built at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The barge left Michoud on April 28 with the core stage engine section test article, traveling 1,240 miles by river to Marshall. The rocket's engine section is the bottom of the core stage and houses the four RS-25 engines. The engine section test article was moved from the barge to Marshall’s Building 4619 where it will be tested. The bottom part of the test article is structurally the same as the engine section that will be flown as part of the SLS core stage. The shiny metal top part simulates the rocket's liquid hydrogen tank, which is the fuel tank that joins to the engine section. The test article will endure tests that pull, push, and bend it, subjecting it to millions of pounds of force. This ensures the structure can withstand the incredible stresses produced by the 8.8 million pounds of thrust during launch and ascent.

  4. Gene Kranz Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On October 19, 2006, former NASA director of Mission Operations Gene Kranz was a keynote speaker at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) 2006 Annual Safety Day program. The best selling author of 'Failure Is Not An Option' and past Apollo flight director was featured during a morning session called 'Coffee and Kranz'. Marshall employees hung on his every word as he told the fascinating story of Apollo 13. Kranz was the acting flight director during the Apollo 13 mission, a mission that seemed doomed to fail due to an onboard explosion. Kranz and his flight control team worked around the clock relentlessly, solving problem after problem, until the crew was returned safely to Earth.

  5. Gene Kranz Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    On October 19, 2006, former NASA director of Mission Operations Gene Kranz was a keynote speaker at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) 2006 Annual Safety Day program. The best selling author of 'Failure Is Not An Option' and past Apollo flight director was featured during a morning session called 'Coffee and Kranz'. Marshall employees hung on his every word as he told the fascinating story of Apollo 13. Kranz was the acting flight director during the Apollo 13 mission, a mission that seemed doomed to fail due to an onboard explosion. Kranz and his flight control team worked around the clock relentlessly, solving problem after problem, until the crew was returned safely to Earth.

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center Faculty Fellowship Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Six, N. F.; Karr, G.

    2017-01-01

    The research projects conducted by the 2016 Faculty Fellows at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center included propulsion studies on propellant issues, and materials investigations involving plasma effects and friction stir welding. Spacecraft Systems research was conducted on wireless systems and 3D printing of avionics. Vehicle Systems studies were performed on controllers and spacecraft instruments. The Science and Technology group investigated additive construction applied to Mars and Lunar regolith, medical uses of 3D printing, and unique instrumentation, while the Test Laboratory measured pressure vessel leakage and crack growth rates.

  7. Trip report: Marshall Space Center computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbour, J. R.; Andrews, M. K.

    BIR Inc. is a small company out of the Chicago area which sells equipment for producing images by tomography. They have built a relatively large instrument, called ACTIS, for NASA at the Marshall Space Center in Huntsville, Alabama and still gave access to this instrument. BIR has a grant from the Department of Energy (DOE) to determine the utility of computed tomography (CT) for characterization of nuclear and hazardous waste within the DOE complex. As part of this effort, the potential of this technique for obtaining images of canistered waste forms has been investigated. Funding for data acquisition was provided through this grant.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Solar Wind Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, K. H.; Schneider, T. A.; Vaughn, J. A.; Whittlesey, P. L.

    2017-01-01

    Historically, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has operated a Solar Wind Facility (SWF) to provide long term particle and photon exposure to material samples. The requirements on the particle beam details were not stringent as the cumulative fluence level is the test goal. Motivated by development of the faraday cup instrument on the NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP) mission, the MSFC SWF has been upgraded to included high fidelity particle beams providing broadbeam ions, broadbeam electrons, and narrow beam protons or ions, which cover a wide dynamic range of solar wind velocity and flux conditions. The large vacuum chamber with integrated cryo-shroud, combined with a 3-axis positioning system, provides an excellent platform for sensor development and qualification. This short paper provides some details of the SWF charged particle beams characteristics in the context of the Solar Probe Plus program requirements. Data will be presented on the flux and energy ranges as well as beam stability.

  9. The Benefits of Marshall Center’s Student Interns

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Marshall Space Flight Center student interns share insight about this key NASA Education initiative, and demonstrate the variety of potential internships -- and career opportunities -- available at...

  10. NASA EVEX Experiment Launches from the Marshall Islands

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-27

    Red and white vapor clouds filled the skies over the Marshall Islands as part of NASA’s Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX). The red cloud was formed by the release of lithium vapor and the white tracer clouds were formed by the release of trimethyl aluminum (TMA). These clouds allowed scientists on the ground from various locations in the Marshall Islands to observe the neutral winds in the ionosphere. Credit: NASA/Jon Grant --- The Equatorial Vortex Experiment (EVEX) was successfully conducted during the early morning hours (eastern time) May 7 from Roi Namur, Republic of the Marshall Islands. A NASA Terrier-Oriole sounding rocket was launched at 3:39 a.m. EDT and was followed by a launch of Terrier-Improved Malemute sounding rocket 90 seconds later. Preliminary indications are that both rockets released their vapor clouds of lithium or trimethyl aluminum, which were observed from various locations in the area, and all science instruments on the rockets worked as planned. More information on EVEX can be found at www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sounding-rockets/news/evex.html These were the second and third rockets of four planned for launch during this year’s campaign in the Marshall Islands. The first and fourth rockets are supporting the Metal Oxide Space Cloud experiment (MOSC), which is studying radio frequency propagation. NASA image use policy. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center enables NASA’s mission through four scientific endeavors: Earth Science, Heliophysics, Solar System Exploration, and Astrophysics. Goddard plays a leading role in NASA’s accomplishments by contributing compelling scientific knowledge to advance the Agency’s mission. Follow us on Twitter Like us on Facebook Find us on Instagram

  11. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Space Vehicle's induction into the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

  12. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as an Alabama Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The site was desinated as such in 1979.

  13. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, located on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama,commemorates the designation of the Saturn V Rocket as a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1980.

  14. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Space Vehicle's induction into the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

  15. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, located on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama,commemorates the designation of the Saturn V Rocket as a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1980.

  16. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as an Alabama Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The site was desinated as such in 1979.

  17. Historical Sign at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This sign, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Redstone Test Site as a National Historic Landmark. The site was inducted into the National Register of Historical Places in 1976.

  18. Historical Sign at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This sign, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Redstone Test Site as a National Historic Landmark. The site was inducted into the National Register of Historical Places in 1976.

  19. Styx tours Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-04-27

    Keith Parrish, left, of the Space Systems Department at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, discusses the process of the Environmental Control and Life Support System with Marshall Center Director Todd May, second from left, and members of the legendary rock band Styx during a tour of Marshall April 27. Inspired by NASA’s goal of sending humans to Mars in the 2030s, the band’s upcoming album, "The Mission," musically chronicles a futuristic, crewed mission to Mars. While Styx’s mission may be only realized through their iconic sound, NASA’s mission is well underway with the new Space Launch System

  20. Vice President Pence Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Air Force Two lands with Vice President Mike Pence along with Congressman Robert Aderholt at the Redstone Army Airfield in Huntsville, Alabama, on Monday, Sept. 25. They were greeted by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center Director Todd May and Redstone Arsenal’s Lt. Gen. Edward Daly. The Vice President is visiting NASA’s Marshall Center to meet with employees, view test hardware for NASA’s Space Launch System — America’s new deep-space rocket, and tour the Payload Operations Integration Center, “science central” for the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Emmett Given)

  1. New Marshall Center Test Stand 4697 Construction Time-Lapse

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-27

    In less than two minutes watch structural Test Stand 4697 rise at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center from the start of construction in May 2014 to the end of the stand's construction phase in September 2016. The stand will subject the 196,000-gallon liquid oxygen tank of the Space Launch System's massive core stage to the same stresses and pressures it must endure at launch and in flight. Now, Marshall teams are installing sophisticated fluid transfer and pressurization systems, hydraulic controls, electrical control and data systems, fiber optics cables and special test equipment to prepare for the arrival of the test tank in 2017. (NASA/MSFC/David Olive)

  2. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center Recent Studies and Technology Developments in the Area of SSA/Orbital Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiegmann, Bruce M.; Hovater, Mary; Kos, Larry

    2012-01-01

    NASA/MSFC has been investigating the various aspects of the growing orbital debris problem since early 2009. Data shows that debris ranging in size from 5 mm to 10 cm presents the greatest threat to operational spacecraft today. Therefore, MSFC has focused its efforts on small orbital debris. Using off-the-shelf analysis packages, like the ESA MASTER software, analysts at MSFC have begun to characterize the small debris environment in LEO to support several spacecraft concept studies and hardware test programs addressing the characterization, mitigation, and ultimate removal, if necessary, of small debris. The Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) architectural study investigated the overall effectiveness of removing small orbital debris from LEO using a low power, space-based laser. The Small Orbital Debris Detection, Acquisition, and Tracking (SODDAT) conceptual technology demonstration spacecraft was developed to address the challenges of in-situ small orbital debris environment classification including debris observability and instrument requirements for small debris observation. Work is underway at MSFC in the areas of hardware and testing. By combining off the shelf digital video technology, telescope lenses, and advanced video image FPGA processing, MSFC is building a breadboard of a space based, passive orbital tracking camera that can detect and track faint objects (including small debris, satellites, rocket bodies, and NEOs) at ranges of tens to hundreds of kilometers and speeds in excess of 15 km/sec,. MSFC is also sponsoring the development of a one-of-a-kind Dynamic Star Field Simulator with a high resolution large monochrome display and a custom collimator capable of projecting realistic star images with simple orbital debris spots (down to star magnitude 11-12) into a passive orbital detection and tracking system with simulated real-time angular motions of the vehicle mounted sensor. The dynamic star field simulator can be expanded for multiple

  3. NASAs Marshall Space Flight Center Recent Studies and Technology Developments in the Area of SSA/Orbital Debris

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiegman, B.; Hovater, M.; Kos, L.

    2012-09-01

    NASA/MSFC has been investigating the various aspects of the growing orbital debris problem since early 2009. Data shows that debris ranging in size from 5 mm to 10 cm presents the greatest threat to operational spacecraft today. Therefore, MSFC has focused its efforts on small orbital debris. Using off-the-shelf analysis packages, like the ESA MASTER software, analysts at MSFC have begun to characterize the small debris environment in LEO to support several spacecraft concept studies and hardware test programs addressing the characterization, mitigation, and ultimate removal, if necessary, of small debris. The Small Orbital Debris Active Removal (SODAR) architectural study investigated the overall effectiveness of removing small orbital debris from LEO using a low power, space-based laser. The Small Orbital Debris Detection, Acquisition, and Tracking (SODDAT) conceptual technology demonstration spacecraft was developed to address the challenges of in-situ small orbital debris environment classification including debris observability and instrument requirements for small debris observation. Work is underway at MSFC in the areas of hardware and testing. By combining off the shelf digital video technology, telescope lenses, and advanced video image FPGA processing, MSFC is building a breadboard of a space based, passive orbital tracking camera that can detect and track faint objects (including small debris, satellites, rocket bodies, and NEOs) at ranges of tens to hundreds of kilometers and speeds in excess of 15 km/sec,. MSFC is also sponsoring the development of a one-of-a-kind Dynamic Star Field Simulator with a high resolution large monochrome display and a custom collimator capable of projecting realistic star images with simple orbital debris spots (down to star magnitude 11-12) into a passive orbital detection and tracking system with simulated real-time angular motions of the vehicle mounted sensor. The dynamic star field simulator can be expanded for multiple

  4. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    Workmen at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) dock on the Ternessee River unload S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first stage, from the NASA barge Palaemon. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings in MSFC's S-IB static test stand.

  5. Space Station Science Supported by Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Smith, Tommy R.

    2003-01-01

    The science program at Marshall Space Flight Center will be reviewed in the context of the overall NASA science program. An overview will be given on how Marshall science supports the International Space Station research program. The Microgravity research capabilities at Marshall's Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory will be reviewed. The environment in orbit provides a unique opportunity to study Materials Science and Biotechnology in the absence of sedimentation and convection. There are a number of peer-selected investigations that have been selected to fly on the Space Station that have been conceived and are led by Marshall civil service and contractor scientists. In addition to Microgravity research the Station will enable research in New Initiative Research Areas that focus on enabling humans to live, work, and explore the solar system safely. The specific scientific instruments that have been developed for Materials Science and Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station will be discussed.

  6. Space Station Science Supported by Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, Ann F.; Curreri, Peter A.; Smith, Tommy R.

    2003-01-01

    The science program at Marshall Space Flight Center will be reviewed in the context of the overall NASA science program. An overview will be given on how Marshall science supports the International Space Station research program. The Microgravity research capabilities at Marshall's Biological and Physical Space Research Laboratory will be reviewed. The environment in orbit provides a unique opportunity to study Materials Science and Biotechnology in the absence of sedimentation and convection. There are a number of peer-selected investigations that have been selected to fly on the Space Station that have been conceived and are led by Marshall civil service and contractor scientists. In addition to Microgravity research the Station will enable research in New Initiative Research Areas that focus on enabling humans to live, work, and explore the solar system safely. The specific scientific instruments that have been developed for Materials Science and Biotechnology Research on the International Space Station will be discussed.

  7. National Emission Standards for Hazardous Air Pollutants (NESHAP) Memorandum of Agreement (MOA) Between NASA Headquarters and MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) for NASA Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Clark-Ingram, Marceia A.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents a memorandum of agreement on Clean Air Regulations. NASA headquarters (code JE and code M) has asked MSFC to serve as principle center for review of Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations. The purpose of the principle center is to provide centralized support to NASA headquarters for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process and to identify the potential impact of proposed CAA reguations on NASA program hardware and supporting facilities. The materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of NASA's programmatic hardware contain HAPs (Hazardous Air Pollutants), VOCs (Volatile Organic Compounds), and ODC (Ozone Depleting Chemicals). This paper is presented in viewgraph form.

  8. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1940-01-01

    The German Rocket Team, also known as the Von Braun Rocket Team, poses for a group photograph at Fort Bliss, Texas. After World War II ended in 1945, Dr. Wernher von Braun led some 120 of his Peenemuende Colleagues, who developed the V-2 rocket for the German military during the War, to the United Sttes under a contract to the U.S. Army Corps as part of Operation Paperclip. During the following five years the team worked on high altitude firings of the captured V-2 rockets at the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico, and a guided missile development unit at Fort Bliss, Texas. In April 1950, the group was transferred to the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, and continued to work on the development of the guided missiles for the U.S. Army until transferring to a newly established field center of the National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA), George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  9. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  10. Marshall Center Director Todd May Briefs Vice President Mike Pence

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Vice President Mike Pence talks with Marshall Space Flight Center Director Todd May and Congressman Robert Aderholt (R-AL) (left) about NASA’s Space Launch System, the agency’s new deep space rocket. May explained progress being made on the rocket. The Vice President visited NASA Marshall in Huntsville, Alabama on Sept. 25, 2017, and saw SLS core stage engine section test hardware (on the right). The engine section is the bottom of the core stage where the four RS-25 engines attach and produce two million pounds of thrust. The SLS engine section is undergoing structural testing.

  11. Project LASER Volunteer, Marshall Space Flight Center Education Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  12. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama commemorates the Neutral Buoyancy Space Simulator as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1986 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  13. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  14. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Propulsion and Structural Test Facility as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service of the United States Interior. The site was designated as a landmark in 1985.

  15. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Launch Vehicle as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1984 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  16. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center Small Business Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garrison, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the small business opportunities that are available with the Marshall Space Flight Center. It includes information on all forms of opportunities available and information sources: subcontracting, websites, contacts and a separate section on Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) & Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) Programs

  18. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Propulsion and Structural Test Facility as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service of the United States Interior. The site was designated as a landmark in 1985.

  19. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  20. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  1. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Launch Vehicle as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1984 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  2. Historical Plaque at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama commemorates the Neutral Buoyancy Space Simulator as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1986 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  3. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-04-12

    The urgency and importance of the Marshall Space Flight Center's mission in the 1960s was apparent from the begirning. It became even more apparent on April 12, 1962, when the Soviet cosmonaut, Yuri Gagarin, became the first man in space.

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center Materials and Processes Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tramel, Terri L.

    2012-01-01

    Marshall?s Materials and Processes Laboratory has been a core capability for NASA for over fifty years. MSFC has a proven heritage and recognized expertise in materials and manufacturing that are essential to enable and sustain space exploration. Marshall provides a "systems-wise" capability for applied research, flight hardware development, and sustaining engineering. Our history of leadership and achievements in materials, manufacturing, and flight experiments includes Apollo, Skylab, Mir, Spacelab, Shuttle (Space Shuttle Main Engine, External Tank, Reusable Solid Rocket Motor, and Solid Rocket Booster), Hubble, Chandra, and the International Space Station. MSFC?s National Center for Advanced Manufacturing, NCAM, facilitates major M&P advanced manufacturing partnership activities with academia, industry and other local, state and federal government agencies. The Materials and Processes Laborato ry has principal competencies in metals, composites, ceramics, additive manufacturing, materials and process modeling and simulation, space environmental effects, non-destructive evaluation, and fracture and failure analysis provide products ranging from materials research in space to fully integrated solutions for large complex systems challenges. Marshall?s materials research, development and manufacturing capabilities assure that NASA and National missions have access to cutting-edge, cost-effective engineering design and production options that are frugal in using design margins and are verified as safe and reliable. These are all critical factors in both future mission success and affordability.

  5. George C. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    Many of NASA's missions would not be possible if it were not for the investments made in research advancements and technology development efforts. The technologies developed at Marshall Space Flight Center contribute to NASA's strategic array of missions through technology development and accomplishments. The scientists, researchers, and technologists of Marshall Space Flight Center who are working these enabling technology efforts are facilitating NASA's ability to fulfill the ambitious goals of innovation, exploration, and discovery.

  6. NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model. 2.0

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, J. K.

    2002-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the NASA Marshall Engineering Thermosphere Model-Version 2.0 (MET-V 2.0) and contains an explanation on the use of the computer program along with an example of the MET-V 2.0 model products. The MET-V 2.0 provides an update to the 1988 version of the model. It provides information on the total mass density, temperature, and individual species number densities for any altitude between 90 and 2,500 km as a function of latitude, longitude, time, and solar and geomagnetic activity. A description is given for use of estimated future 13-mo smoothed solar flux and geomagnetic index values as input to the model. Address technical questions on the MET-V 2.0 and associated computer program to Jerry K. Owens, Spaceflight Experiments Group, Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, AL 35812 (256-961-7576; e-mail Jerry.Owens@msfc.nasa.gov).

  7. Space Science and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spann, James

    2005-01-01

    Space Science a t Marshall Space Flight Center is diverse and very interesting. It ranges from high energy astrophysics to astrobiology, from solar physics to space weather to dusty plasmas. I will present some of the more interesting investigations regarding auroral physics, what it takes to build a space camera, and laboratory investigations of dust. There will be time for questions and answers at the conclusion.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-01-25

    Gene Porter Bridwell served as the director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 6, 1994 until February 3, 1996, when he retired from NASA after thirty-four years service. Bridwell, a Marshall employee since 1962, had been Marshall's Space Shuttle Projects Office Director and Space Station Redesign Team deputy manager. Under Bridwell, Marshall worked to develop its role as a Center of Excellence for propulsion and for providing access to space.

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center: 50 Years, 50 Seconds

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Talk about time flying! Take a look at this super-fast review of highlights from the past 50 years at the Marshall Center. This year, Marshall is celebrating its 50th anniversary, highlighting its ...

  10. Loads Combination Research at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferebee, R.

    2000-01-01

    This is the result of a study conducted by the Structural Dynamics Division of the Marshall Space Flight Center concerning the combination of low- and high-frequency dynamic loads for spacecraft design. Low-frequency transient loads are combined with high frequency acoustically induced loads to arrive at a limit load, for design purposes. Different methods are used for combining the loads which can lead to considerable variation in limit loads, depending on which NASA Center did the calculation. This study investigates several different combination methods and compares the combination methods with Spacelab 1 flight data. In addition, the relative timing of low- and high-frequency loads is examined.

  11. Vice President Pence Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Air Force Two lands with Vice President Mike Pence along with Congressman Robert Aderholt at the Redstone Army Airfield in Huntsville, Alabama, on Monday, Sept. 25. The Vice President is visiting NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center, located on Redstone Arsenal, to meet with employees, view test hardware for NASA’s Space Launch System — America’s new deep-space rocket, and tour the Payload Operations Integration Center, “science central” for the International Space Station. Photo Credit: (NASA/Emmett Given)

  12. Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center - A brief history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.; Fisher, M. F.; Mccool, A. A.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The history of propulsion development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized, beginning with the development of the propulsion system for the Redstone missile. This course of propulsion development continues through the Jupiter IRBM, the Saturn family of launch vehicles and the engines that powered them, the Centaur upper stage and RL-10 engine, the Reactor In-Flight Test stage and the NERVA nuclear engine. The Space Shuttle Main Engine and Solid Rocket Boosters are covered, as are spacecraft propulsion systems, including the reaction control systems for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory and the Space Station. The paper includes a description of several technology efforts such as those in high pressure turbomachinery, aerospike engines, and the AS203 cyrogenic fluid management flight experiment. These and other propulsion projects are documented, and the scope of activities in support of these efforts at Marshall delineated.

  13. Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center - A brief history

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. W.; Fisher, M. F.; Mccool, A. A.; Mccarty, J. P.

    1991-01-01

    The history of propulsion development at the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized, beginning with the development of the propulsion system for the Redstone missile. This course of propulsion development continues through the Jupiter IRBM, the Saturn family of launch vehicles and the engines that powered them, the Centaur upper stage and RL-10 engine, the Reactor In-Flight Test stage and the NERVA nuclear engine. The Space Shuttle Main Engine and Solid Rocket Boosters are covered, as are spacecraft propulsion systems, including the reaction control systems for the High Energy Astronomy Observatory and the Space Station. The paper includes a description of several technology efforts such as those in high pressure turbomachinery, aerospike engines, and the AS203 cyrogenic fluid management flight experiment. These and other propulsion projects are documented, and the scope of activities in support of these efforts at Marshall delineated.

  14. Human Factors Engineering at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, M. C.; Hutchinson, Sonya L.

    1999-01-01

    The mission of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is to develop, implement, and maintain systems for space transportation and microgravity research. Factors impacting the MSFC position as a leader in advancing science and technology include: (1) heightened emphasis on safety; (2) increased interest in effective resource utilization; and (3) growing importance of employing systems and procedures that pragmatically support mission science. In light of these factors, MSFC is integrating human factors engineering (HFE) into the systems engineering process. This paper describes the HFE program, applications of HFE in MSFC projects, and the future of HFE at MSFC.

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Investments Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, Mike

    2014-01-01

    NASA is moving forward with prioritized technology investments that will support NASA's exploration and science missions, while benefiting other Government agencies and the U.S. aerospace enterprise. center dotThe plan provides the guidance for NASA's space technology investments during the next four years, within the context of a 20-year horizon center dotThis plan will help ensure that NASA develops technologies that enable its 4 goals to: 1.Sustain and extend human activities in space, 2.Explore the structure, origin, and evolution of the solar system, and search for life past and present, 3.Expand our understanding of the Earth and the universe and have a direct and measurable impact on how we work and live, and 4.Energize domestic space enterprise and extend benefits of space for the Nation.

  16. Astronaut Shane Kimbrough Visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-08-31

    NASA astronaut Shane Kimbrough presents highlights from his Expedition 49-50 mission aboard the International Space Station Sept. 19 to students from theU.S. Space & Rocket Center's Space Camp and team members at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. While serving as commander of the station, Kimbrough conducted four spacewalks, during which he installed new batteries and relay boxes, and helped move a pressurized mating adapter for future commercial crew spacecraft visiting the outpost. He also contributed to hundreds of experiments in biology, biotechnology, physical science and Earthobservations. One of these experiments was the Microgravity Expanded Stem Cells investigation, results of which could lead to the treatment of diseases andinjury in space and provide a way to improve stem cell production for medical therapies on Earth.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center Autumn 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mike; Clar, Harry E.

    2006-01-01

    The East Test Area at Marshall Space Flight Center has five major test stands, each of which has two or more test positions, not counting the SSME and RD-180 engine test facilities in the West Test Area. These research and development facilities are capable of testing high pressure pumps, both fuel and oxidizer, injectors, chambers and sea-level engine assemblies, as well as simulating deep space environments in the 12, 15 and 20 foot vacuum chambers. Liquid propellant capabilities are high pressure hydrogen (liquid and gas), methane (liquid and gas), and RP-1 and high pressure LOX. Solid propellant capability includes thrust measurement and firing capability up to 1/6 scale Shuttle SRB segment. In the past six months MSFC supported multiple space access and exploration programs in the previous six months. Major programs were Space Exploration, Shuttle External Tank research, Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) development, as well as research programs for NASA and other customers. At Test Stand 115 monopropellant ignition testing was conducted on one position. At the second position multiple ignition/variable burn time cycles were conducted on Vacuum Plasma Spatter (VPS) coated injectors. Each injector received fifty cycles; the propellants were LOX Hydrogen and the ignition source was TEA. Following completion of the monopropellant test series the stand was reconfigured to support ignition testing on a LOX Methane injector system. At TS 116 a thrust stand used to test Booster Separation Motors from the Shuttle SRB system was disassembled and moved from Chemical Systems Division s Coyote Canyon plant to MSFC. The stand was reassembled and readied for BSM testing. Also, a series of tests was run on a Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne Low Element Density (LED) injector engine. The propellants for this engine are LOX and LH2. At TS 300 the 20 foot vacuum chamber was configured to support hydrogen testing in the Multipurpose Hydrogen Test Bed (MHTB) test article. This testing

  18. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  19. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This is a portrait of General George C. Marshall in Army uniform. The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established in Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  20. Creating a rocket-building institution - The history of the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael D.

    1990-01-01

    This paper will examine the early history of NASA Marshall Space Flight Center to identify major changes in the Center during the period that it was responsible for developing the Saturn family of launch vehicles. The principal conclusion is that the unique change experienced by Marshall during the Saturn era was its shift from an in-house, self-sustaining organization to an institution responsible for managing the Saturn-related performance of a nationwide network of aerospace contractors.

  1. Research and technology, 1984: Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moorehead, T. W. (Editor)

    1984-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center conducts research programs in space sciences, materials processing in space, and atmospheric sciences, as well as technology programs in such areas as propulsion, materials, processes, and space power. This Marshall Space Flight Center 1984 Annual Report on Research and Technology contains summaries of the more significant scientific and technical results obtained during FY-84.

  2. Vice President Dan Quale visits Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-22

    Vice President Dan Quayle holds up an inscribed plaque presented by Marshall Space Flight Center Director T. J. Lee (right) during Quayle's August 31, 1992 visit. While at Marshall, Quayle participated in a roundtable discussion with aerospace managers and addressed Center employees in Building 4755.

  3. Brian Dunlap Tours Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    W. Brain Dunlap (left), high school student from Youngstown, Ohio, is pictured here with Harry Coons of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during a visit to the center. Dunlap was among 25 winners of a contest in which some 3,500 high school students proposed experiments for the following year's Skylab mission. The nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The winning students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited MSFC where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment.

  4. Brian Dunlap Tours Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    W. Brain Dunlap (left), high school student from Youngstown, Ohio, is pictured here with Harry Coons of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) during a visit to the center. Dunlap was among 25 winners of a contest in which some 3,500 high school students proposed experiments for the following year's Skylab mission. The nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The winning students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited MSFC where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment.

  5. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  6. Digital Data Matrix Scanner Developnent At Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Research at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center has resulted in a system for reading hidden identification codes using a hand-held magnetic scanner. It's an invention that could help businesses improve inventory management, enhance safety, improve security, and aid in recall efforts if defects are discovered. Two-dimensional Data Matrix symbols consisting of letters and numbers permanently etched on items for identification and resembling a small checkerboard pattern are more efficient and reliable than traditional bar codes, and can store up to 100 times more information. A team led by Fred Schramm of the Marshall Center's Technology Transfer Department, in partnership with PRI,Torrance, California, has developed a hand-held device that can read this special type of coded symbols, even if covered by up to six layers of paint. Before this new technology was available, matrix symbols were read with optical scanners, and only if the codes were visible. This latest improvement in digital Data Matrix technologies offers greater flexibility for businesses and industries already using the marking system. Paint, inks, and pastes containing magnetic properties are applied in matrix symbol patterns to objects with two-dimensional codes, and the codes are read by a magnetic scanner, even after being covered with paint or other coatings. The ability to read hidden matrix symbols promises a wide range of benefits in a number of fields, including airlines, electronics, healthcare, and the automotive industry. Many industries would like to hide information on a part, so it can be read only by the party who put it there. For instance, the automotive industry uses direct parts marking for inventory control, but for aesthetic purposes the marks often need to be invisible. Symbols have been applied to a variety of materials, including metal, plastic, glass, paper, fabric and foam, on everything from electronic parts to pharmaceuticals to livestock. The portability of the hand

  7. Ride With Astronauts In Flyby Salute to Marshall Center Test Stand Construction Teams

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-09-27

    NASA astronaut Don Pettit captured this video from the cockpit with Victor Glover as they and fellow astronauts Barry "Butch” Wilmore and Stephanie Wilson banked low over Marshall Space Flight Center at Huntsville, Alabama, saluting to teams finishing construction of Test Stand 4697. In the short video edited by Pettit, viewers fly along from the astronauts' takeoff in two NASA T-38 jets from Ellington Field Joint Reserve Base in Houston to their landing at Huntsville International Airport for meetings at Marshall. (NASA/Don Pettit)

  8. Power to Explore: A History of the Marshall Space Flight Center, 1960-1990

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunar, Andrew J.; Waring, Stephen P.

    1999-01-01

    This scholarly study of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center places the institution in social, political, scientific and technological context. It traces the evolution of Marshall, located in Huntsville, Alabama, from its origins as an Army missile development organization to its status in 1990 as one of the most diversified of NASA's field Center. Chapters discuss military rocketry programs in Germany and the United States, Apollo-Saturn, Skylab, Space shuttle, Spacelab, the Space Station, and various scientific and technical projects including the Hubble Space Telescope. It sheds light not only on the history of space technology, science and exploration, but also on the Cold War, federal politics and complex organizations.

  9. Marshall Center Breaks Ground For New Engineering Directorate Building Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    This artist's concept portrays the plan for the new Engineering Directorate office to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The first of several new buildings to be constructed as replacements for older Center facilities, the 5-story, 139,000-square-foot building will house approximately 500 current Marshall employees that provide development and research engineering services for the Marshall Center. Ground breaking ceremonies took place on June 10, 2003 at the construction site, southwest of the Martin and Rideout Roads intersection on Redstone Arsenal. GSC Construction of Waynesboro, Georgia has been selected as the contractor for the facility, which is scheduled for a September 2004 completion.

  10. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center presents Enhancing Standards Based Science Curriculum through NASA Content Relevancy: A Model for Sustainable Teaching-Research Integration Dr. Robert Gabrys, Raquel Marshall, Dr. Evelina Felicite-Maurice, Erin McKinley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, R. H.; Gabrys, R.

    2016-12-01

    NASA Goddard Space Flight Center has developed a systemic educator professional development model for the integration of NASA climate change resources into the K-12 classroom. The desired outcome of this model is to prepare teachers in STEM disciplines to be globally engaged and knowledgeable of current climate change research and its potential for content relevancy alignment to standard-based curriculum. The application and mapping of the model is based on the state education needs assessment, alignment to the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS), and implementation framework developed by the consortium of district superintendents and their science supervisors. In this presentation, we will demonstrate best practices for extending the concept of inquiry-based and project-based learning through the integration of current NASA climate change research into curriculum unit lessons. This model includes a significant teacher development component focused on capacity development for teacher instruction and pedagogy aimed at aligning NASA climate change research to related NGSS student performance expectations and subsequent Crosscutting Concepts, Science and Engineering Practices, and Disciplinary Core Ideas, a need that was presented by the district steering committee as critical for ensuring sustainability and high-impact in the classroom. This model offers a collaborative and inclusive learning community that connects classroom teachers to NASA climate change researchers via an ongoing consultant/mentoring approach. As a result of the first year of implementation of this model, Maryland teachers are implementing NGSS unit lessons that guide students in open-ended research based on current NASA climate change research.

  11. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  12. Thermal Stir Welding Development at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ding, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Solid state welding processes have become the focus of welding process development at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike fusion weld processes such as tungsten inert gas (TIG), variable polarity plasma arc (VPPA), electron beam (EB), etc., solid state welding processes do not melt the material during welding. The resultant microstructure can be characterized as a dynamically recrystallized morphology much different than the casted, dentritic structure typical of fusion weld processes. The primary benefits of solid state processes over fusion weld processes include superior mechanic properties and the elimination of thermal distortion and residual stresses. These solid state processes attributes have profoundly influenced the direction of advanced welding research and development within the NASA agency. Thermal Stir Welding (TSW) is a new solid state welding process being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Unlike friction stir welding, the heating, stirring and forging elements of the weld process can be decoupled for independent control. An induction coil induces energy into a workpiece to attain a desired plastic temperature. An independently controlled stir rod, captured within non-rotating containment plates, then stirs the plasticized material followed by forging plates/rollers that work the stirred weld joint. The independent control (decoupling) of heating, stirring and forging allows, theoretically, for the precision control of microstructure morphology. The TSW process is being used to evaluate the solid state joining of Haynes 230 for ARES J-2X applications. It is also being developed for 500-in (12.5 mm) thick commercially pure grade 2 titanium for navy applications. Other interests include Inconel 718 and stainless steel. This presentation will provide metallurgical and mechanical property data for these high melting temperature alloys.

  13. Marshall Space Flight Center Technology Capabilities for Use in Space Situational Awareness Activities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gagliano, Larry; McLeod, Todd; Hovater, Mary A.

    2017-01-01

    Marshall performs research, integrates information, matures technologies, and enhances science to bring together a diverse portfolio of products and services of interest for Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Space Asset Management (SAM), all of which can be accessed through partnerships with Marshall. Integrated Space Situational Awareness and Asset Management (ISSAAM) is an initiative of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to improve space situational awareness and space asset management through technical innovation, collaboration, and cooperation with U.S. Government agencies and the global space community. Marshall Space Flight Center provides solutions for complex issues with in-depth capabilities, a broad range of experience, and expertise unique in the world, and all available in one convenient location. NASA has longstanding guidelines that are used to assess space objects. Specifically, Marshall Space Flight Center has the capabilities, facilities and expertise to address the challenges that space objects, such as near-Earth objects (NEO) or Orbital Debris pose. ISSAAM's three pronged approach brings together vital information and in-depth tools working simultaneously toward examining the complex problems encountered in space situational awareness. Marshall's role in managing, understanding and planning includes many projects grouped under each prong area: Database/Analyses/Visualization; Detection/Tracking/ Mitigation/Removal. These are not limited to those listed below.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center Telescience Resource Kit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Telescience Resource Kit (TReK) is a suite of software applications that can be used to monitor and control assets in space or on the ground. The Telescience Resource Kit was originally developed for the International Space Station program. Since then it has been used to support a variety of NASA programs and projects including the WB-57 Ascent Vehicle Experiment (WAVE) project, the Fast Affordable Science and Technology Satellite (FASTSAT) project, and the Constellation Program. The Payloads Operations Center (POC), also known as the Payload Operations Integration Center (POIC), provides the capability for payload users to operate their payloads at their home sites. In this environment, TReK provides local ground support system services and an interface to utilize remote services provided by the POC. TReK provides ground system services for local and remote payload user sites including International Partner sites, Telescience Support Centers, and U.S. Investigator sites in over 40 locations worldwide. General Capabilities: Support for various data interfaces such as User Datagram Protocol, Transmission Control Protocol, and Serial interfaces. Data Services - retrieve, process, record, playback, forward, and display data (ground based data or telemetry data). Command - create, modify, send, and track commands. Command Management - Configure one TReK system to serve as a command server/filter for other TReK systems. Database - databases are used to store telemetry and command definition information. Application Programming Interface (API) - ANSI C interface compatible with commercial products such as Visual C++, Visual Basic, LabVIEW, Borland C++, etc. The TReK API provides a bridge for users to develop software to access and extend TReK services. Environments - development, test, simulations, training, and flight. Includes standalone training simulators.

  15. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  16. General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center, a NASA field installation, was established at Huntsville, Alabama, in 1960. The Center was named in honor of General George C. Marshall, the Army Chief of Staff during World War II, Secretary of State, and Nobel Prize Wirner for his world-renowned Marshall Plan.

  17. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John H.; Frazier, Michael K.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An investment in the future, NASA has designated a new initiative where government, industry, and academia collaborate to meet the manufacturing needs of future space systems. The Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama has the principal responsibility for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). The mission of the NCAM is to build partnerships that will jointly conduct program planning and develop strategies to perform manufacturing research and technology development for critical national missions.

  18. Pulse Detonation Rocket Engine Research at NASA Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Christopher I.

    2003-01-01

    This viewgraph representation provides an overview of research being conducted on Pulse Detonation Rocket Engines (PDRE) by the Propulsion Research Center (PRC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center. PDREs have a theoretical thermodynamic advantage over Steady-State Rocket Engines (SSREs) although unsteady blowdown processes complicate effective use of this advantage in practice; PRE is engaged in a fundamental study of PDRE gas dynamics to improve understanding of performance issues. Topics covered include: simplified PDRE cycle, comparison of PDRE and SSRE performance, numerical modeling of quasi 1-D rocket flows, time-accurate thrust calculations, finite-rate chemistry effects in nozzles, effect of F-R chemistry on specific impulse, effect of F-R chemistry on exit species mole fractions and PDRE performance optimization studies.

  19. NASA News Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-10-31

    The NASA News Center, seen here, is the hub of news operations for the media, providing information and contacts about Space Shuttle processing and other activities around KSC. News Center staff also conduct media tours, escorting journalists and photo/videographers to key sites such as the launch pads and Vehicle Assembly Building as needed.

  20. NASA Propagation Information Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Ernest K.; Flock, Warren L.

    1989-01-01

    The NASA Propagation Information Center became formally operational in July 1988. It is located in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering of the University of Colorado at Boulder. The Center is several things: a communications medium for the propagation with the outside world, a mechanism for internal communication within the program, and an aid to management.

  1. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) was created on October 1, 1958, to perform civilian research related to space flight and aeronautics. President Eisenhower commissioned Dr. T. Keith Glernan, right, as the first administrator for NASA and Dr. Hugh L. Dryden as deputy administrator.

  2. The Arecibo Remote Command Center at Franklin and Marshall College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crawford, Fronefield; Jenet, Fredrick; Siemens, Xavier; Lommen, Andrea N.; Handzo, Emma; Mahany, Nicolas; Rolph, Kristina; Blazer, Sierra; Camuccio, Richard; Gebeyehu, Abel; Haylon, Christopher; Lederer, Mark; Lefebvre, Kathleen; Liang, Yaoyue; Mix, Daniel; McMahon, John; Morrow, Christopher; Munro, Jonathan; Nesselrodt, Ryan; Rose, Caitlin; TenBrook, Chase; Tibbetts, Matthew; Tran, Lam; Umberger, Rachel; Wilson, Emily; Wymer, Kristen

    2015-01-01

    We present an overview of the recently established Arecibo Remote Command Center (ARCC) program at Franklin and Marshall College. ARCC allows undergraduates to remotely use the Arecibo 305-m radio telescope for pulsar survey observations and to search the data collected for new radio pulsars using a custom pulsar candidate viewer. Students at Franklin and Marshall also have the opportunity to interact with and make research presentations via teleconference to other ARCC groups located at the University of Texas at Brownsville and the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee. This program serves as an effective introduction to radio pulsar research, and students develop skills that can be usefully employed in other pulsar research projects. A total of 22 Franklin and Marshall students have participated in ARCC since 2013. To date, one new pulsar has been found by the Franklin and Marshall ARCC group.

  3. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1973-01-01

    Dr. Rocco A. Petrone served at director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from January 26, 1973 to March 15, 1974. Prior to his tenure at Marshall, Petrone served as director of the Apollo program and director of launch operations at Kennedy Space Center. His career in rocket development and space programs began with his participation in the development of the Redstone missiles at the Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. Upon his departure from Marshall, Petrone served as NASA Associate Administrator for Center Operations.

  4. Walt Disney visited Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Walt Disney toured the West Test Area during his visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center on April 13, 1965. The three in center foreground are Karl Heimburg, Director, Test Division; Dr. von Braun, Director, MSFC; and Walt Disney. The Dynamic Test Stand with the S-1C stage being installed is in the background.

  5. Walt Disney visited Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1965-01-01

    Walt Disney toured the West Test Area during his visit to the Marshall Space Flight Center on April 13, 1965. The three in center foreground are Karl Heimburg, Director, Test Division; Dr. von Braun, Director, MSFC; and Walt Disney. The Dynamic Test Stand with the S-1C stage being installed is in the background.

  6. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1959-08-11

    In this picture, negotiations are under way between officials of the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) on August 11, 1959. Seated at the table with his back to the camera, is Dr. T. Keith Glernan, NASA Administrator. At the head of the table is Major General John Barclay, Commander of ABMA and at the right side of the table are Colonel John G. Zierdt of ABMA and Dr. von Braun.

  7. Origin of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1961-05-25

    Speaking to Congress and the Nation at the joint session of Congress on May 25, 1961, President Kennedy said : "I believe that this Nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to Earth." National Aeronautic and Space Administration (NASA) achieved the goal of the first manned lunar landing on July 20, 1969.

  8. Marshall Space Flight Center's Virtual Reality Applications Program 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hale, Joseph P., II

    1993-01-01

    A Virtual Reality (VR) applications program has been under development at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since 1989. Other NASA Centers, most notably Ames Research Center (ARC), have contributed to the development of the VR enabling technologies and VR systems. This VR technology development has now reached a level of maturity where specific applications of VR as a tool can be considered. The objectives of the MSFC VR Applications Program are to develop, validate, and utilize VR as a Human Factors design and operations analysis tool and to assess and evaluate VR as a tool in other applications (e.g., training, operations development, mission support, teleoperations planning, etc.). The long-term goals of this technology program is to enable specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process and develop more effective training and mission support systems. The capability to perform specialized Human Factors analyses earlier in the hardware and operations development process is required to better refine and validate requirements during the requirements definition phase. This leads to a more efficient design process where perturbations caused by late-occurring requirements changes are minimized. A validated set of VR analytical tools must be developed to enable a more efficient process for the design and development of space systems and operations. Similarly, training and mission support systems must exploit state-of-the-art computer-based technologies to maximize training effectiveness and enhance mission support. The approach of the VR Applications Program is to develop and validate appropriate virtual environments and associated object kinematic and behavior attributes for specific classes of applications. These application-specific environments and associated simulations will be validated, where possible, through empirical comparisons with existing, accepted tools and methodologies. These validated VR analytical

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-16

    After four decades of contribution to America's space program, George Hopson, manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project at Marshall Space Flight Center, accepted NASA's Distinguished Service Medal. Awarded to those who, by distinguished ability or courage, have made a personal contribution to the NASA mission, NASA's Distinguished Service Medal is the highest honor NASA confers. Hopson's contributions to America's space program include work on the country's first space station, Skylab; the world's first reusable space vehicle, the Space Shuttle; and the International Space Station. Hopson joined NASA's Marshall team as chief of the Fluid and Thermal Systems Branch in the Propulsion Division in 1962, and later served as chief of the Engineering Analysis Division of the Structures and Propulsion Laboratory. In 1979, he was named director of Marshall's Systems Dynamics Laboratory. In 1981, he was chosen to head the Center's Systems Analysis and Integration. Seven years later, in 1988, Hopson was appointed associate director for Space Transportation Systems and one year later became the manager of the Space Station Projects Office at Marshall. In 1994, Hopson was selected as deputy director for Space Systems in the Science and Engineering Directorate at Marshall where he supervised the Chief Engineering Offices of both marned and unmanned space systems. He was named manager of the Space Shuttle Main Engine Project in 1997. In addition to the Distinguished Service Medal, Hopson has also been recognized with the NASA Outstanding Leadership Medal and NASA's Exceptional Service Medal.

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2016

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tinker, M. L.; Abney, M. B. (Compiler); Reynolds, D. W. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2017-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center is essential to human space exploration and our work is a catalyst for ongoing technological development. As we address the challenges facing human deep space exploration, we advance new technologies and applications here on Earth, expand scientific knowledge and discovery, create new economic opportunities, and continue to lead global space exploration.

  11. Maskmaking facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Routh, D. E.

    1972-01-01

    Research and development maskmaking facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Information is provided on the level of cleanliness and the environmental control within the various work areas. The available equipment and its function in the maskmaking process are detailed.

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center 1989 annual chronology of events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael

    1990-01-01

    A chronological listing of the major events for the Marshall Space Flight Center for the calendar year 1989 is provided. The MSFC Historian, Management Operations Office, compiled the chronology from various sources and from supplemental information provided by the major MSFC organizations.

  13. Initiating Sustainable Operations at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel E.; Orrell, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a preliminary sustainability assessment to identify sustainable projects for potential implementation at its facility in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will discuss the results of that assessment, highlighting current and future initiatives aimed at integrating sustainability into daily operations.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center 1990 annual chronology of events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Michael

    1991-01-01

    A chronological listing is provided of the major events for the Marshall Space Flight Center for the calendar year 1990. The MSFC Historian, Management Operations Office, compiled the chronology from various sources and from supplemental information provided by the major MSFC organizations.

  15. Initiating Sustainable Operations at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, Daniel E.; Orrell, Josh

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center conducted a preliminary sustainability assessment to identify sustainable projects for potential implementation at its facility in Huntsville, Alabama. This presentation will discuss the results of that assessment, highlighting current and future initiatives aimed at integrating sustainability into daily operations.

  16. The 1991 Marshall Space Flight Center research and technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    A compilation of 194 articles addressing research and technology activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is given. Activities are divided into three major areas: advanced studies addressing transportation systems, space systems, and space science activities conducted primarily in the Program Development Directorate; research tasks carried out in the Space Science Laboratory; and technology programs hosted by a wide array of organizations at the Center. The theme for this year's report is 'Building for the Future'.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-08-31

    Vice-president Dan Quayle and Alabama Governor Guy Hunt are greeted by Marshall Center Director Thomas J. Lee (1989-1994) (center) and NASA Administrator Dan Goldin (shaking hands with Vice-president Quayle) at the space station engineering mock-up.

  18. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-06-20

    President George Bush delivers an address to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) employees during his visit to the center. President Bush gave NASA employees an objective to send missions back to the moon to stay then continue on to Mars, referring to the Space Station project.

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-02-11

    Thomas Jack Lee served as the sixth director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from July 6, 1989 to January 6, 1994. Prior to the appointment, Lee held positions as Center Deputy Director (1980 - 1989) and Spacelab Program Manager (1973 - 1980). Lee began his NASA career in July 1960 when he transferred to the newly formed MSFC from Redstone Arsenal's Army Ballistic Missile Agency.

  20. Space Shuttle Orbiter - 101 Enterprise - Arrival - Redstone Arsenal Airstrip - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), AL

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-03-13

    S78-27238 (13 March 1978) --- The space shuttle orbiter 101 Enterprise approaches riding atop its 747 carrier aircraft, arrives at the Redstone Arsenal airstrip near Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), Huntsville, Alabama, on March 13, 1978. It is to undergo ground vibration tests along with the external tank and solid rocket boosters, in preparation for Orbiter Flight Tests (OFT) in which its successor craft (Orbiter 102) will take several two-man crews into Earth orbit. Photo credit: NASA

  1. NASA Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations have greatly impacted materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of aerospace hardware. Code JE/ NASA's Environmental Management Division at NASA Headquarters recognized the need for a formal, Agency-wide review process of CAA regulations. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was selected as the 'Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations'. This presentation describes the centralized support provided by MSFC for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process.

  2. NASA Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations have greatly impacted materials and processes utilized in the manufacture of aerospace hardware. Code JE/ NASA's Environmental Management Division at NASA Headquarters recognized the need for a formal, Agency-wide review process of CAA regulations. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was selected as the 'Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations'. This presentation describes the centralized support provided by MSFC for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process.

  3. The Payload Operations Center (POC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space Station (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph show the Safety Coordination Manager (SCM) at a work station. The SCM monitors science experiments to ensure they are conducted in a safe manner in accordance with strict safety regulations.

  4. The Paylod Operations Center (POC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space Station (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph shows the Photo and TV Operations Manager (PHANTOM) at a work station. The PHANTOM configures all video systems aboard the ISS and ensures they are working properly, providing a video link from the ISS to the POC.

  5. The Payload Operations Center (POC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    The Payload Operations Center (POC) is the science command post for the International Space Station (ISS). Located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, it is the focal point for American and international science activities aboard the ISS. The POC's unique capabilities allow science experts and researchers around the world to perform cutting-edge science in the unique microgravity environment of space. The POC is staffed around the clock by shifts of payload flight controllers. At any given time, 8 to 10 flight controllers are on consoles operating, plarning for, and controlling various systems and payloads. This photograph show the Safety Coordination Manager (SCM) at a work station. The SCM monitors science experiments to ensure they are conducted in a safe manner in accordance with strict safety regulations.

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Evans, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility s unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. The current and proposed ITF capabilities range from rain to micrometeoroids allowing the widest test parameter range possible for materials investigations in support of space, atmospheric, and ground environments. These test capabilities including hydrometeor, single/multi-particle, ballistic gas guns, exploding wire gun, and light gas guns combined with Smooth Particle Hydrodynamics Code (SPHC) simulations represent the widest range of impact test capabilities in the country.

  8. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first (S-IVB) stage, arrives at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) S-IB static test stand. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  9. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's first (S-IVB) stage, on its way to Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) west test area. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  10. SLS Engine Section Test Article Arrives at Marshall on NASA Barge Pegasus

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-16

    The NASA barge Pegasus made it’s first trip to NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama on May 15. It arrived carrying the first piece of Space Launch System hardware built at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans. The barge left Michoud on April 28 with the core stage engine section test article, traveling 1,240 miles by river to Marshall. The rocket's engine section is the bottom of the core stage and houses the four RS-25 engines. The engine section test article will be moved to Marshall’s Building 4619 where it will be tested. The bottom part of the test article is structurally the same as the engine section that will be flown as part of the SLS core stage. The shiny metal top part simulates the rocket's liquid hydrogen tank, which is the fuel tank that joins to the engine section. The test article will endure tests that pull, push, and bend it, subjecting it to millions of pounds of force. This ensures the structure can withstand the incredible stresses produced by the 8.8 million pounds of thrust during launch and ascent.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1968-04-24

    Pictured from the left, in the Saturn I mockup, are: William Brooksbank, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Propulsion and Vehicle Engineering Laboratory; Dr. Thomas O. Paine, Deputy Administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA); Dr. Wernher von Braun, MSFC director; Colonel Clare F. Farley, executive officer of the Office of the Administrator; and Charles J. Donlan, newly appointed deputy associate administrator for Manned Space Flight, technical. The party examined an ordinary man’s shoe (held by Paine) outfitted for use in the Saturn I Workshop. The shoe had a unique fastener built into the sole to allow an astronaut to move about the workshop floor and to remain in one position if he desired. Dr. Paine and his party indulged in a two-day tour at the Marshall Space Flight Center getting acquainted with Marshall personnel and programs. It was Paine’s first visit to the center since assuming the NASA post on February 1, 1968.

  12. NASA New England Outreach Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA New England Outreach Center in Nashua, New Hampshire was established to serve as a catalyst for heightening regional business awareness of NASA procurement, technology and commercialization opportunities. Emphasis is placed on small business participation, with the highest priority given to small disadvantaged businesses, women-owned businesses, HUBZone businesses, service disabled veteran owned businesses, and historically black colleges and universities and minority institutions. The Center assists firms and organizations to understand NASA requirements and to develop strategies to capture NASA related procurement and technology opportunities. The establishment of the NASA Outreach Center serves to stimulate business in a historically underserved area. NASA direct business awards have traditionally been highly present in the West, Midwest, South, and Southeast areas of the United States. The Center guides and assists businesses and organizations in the northeast to target opportunities within NASA and its prime contractors and capture business and technology opportunities. The Center employs an array of technology access, one-on-one meetings, seminars, site visits, and targeted conferences to acquaint Northeast firms and organizations with representatives from NASA and its prime contractors to learn about and discuss opportunities to do business and access the inventory of NASA technology. This stimulus of interaction also provides firms and organizations the opportunity to propose the use of their developed technology and ideas for current and future requirements at NASA. The Center provides a complement to the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center in developing prospects for commercialization of NASA technology. In addition, the Center responds to local requests for assistance and NASA material and documents, and is available to address immediate concerns and needs in assessing opportunities, timely support to interact with NASA Centers on

  13. Powered by a laser beam directed at it from a pedestal, a model plane makes the first flight of an aircraft powered by laser energy inside a building at NASA Marshall.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-18

    Powered by a laser beam directed at it from a center pedestal, a lightweight model plane makes the first flight of an aircraft powered by laser energy inside a building at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  15. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) KM Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnadoe, Tom; McCarter, Mike

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center s Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities with in the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center Of Excellence (AISCE), Intergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KM implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to support the planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have been performed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural/KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  16. Green Monopropellant Status at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burnside, Christopher G.; Pierce, Charles W.; Pedersen, Kevin W.

    2016-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing investigations into the use of green monopropellants as a replacement for hydrazine in spacecraft propulsion systems. Work to date has been to push technology development through multiple activities designed to understand the capabilities of these technologies. Future work will begin to transition to mission pull as these technologies are mature while still keeping a solid goal of pushing technology development as opportunities become available. The AF-M315E activities began with hot-fire demonstration testing of a 1N monopropellant thruster in FY 14 and FY15. Following successful completion of the preliminary campaign, changes to the test stand to accommodate propellant conditioning capability and better control of propellant operations was incorporated to make testing more streamlined. The goal is to conduct hot-fire testing with warm and cold propellants using the existing feed system and original thruster design. Following the 1N testing, a NASA owned 100 mN thruster will be hot-fire tested in the same facility to show feasibility of scaling to smaller thrusters for cubesat applications. The end goal is to conduct a hot-fire test of an integrated cubesat propulsion system using an SLM printed propellant tank, an MSFC designed propulsion system electronic controller and the 100 mN thruster. In addition to the AF-M315E testing, MSFC is pursuing hot-fire testing with LMP-103S. Following our successful hot-fire testing of the 22N thruster in April 2015, a test campaign was proposed for a 440N LMP-103S thruster with Orbital ATK and Plasma Processes. This activity was funded through the Space Technology Mission Directorate (STMD) ACO funding call in the last quarter of CY15. Under the same funding source a test activity with Busek and Glenn Research Center for testing of 5N AF-M315E thrusters was proposed and awarded. Both activities are in-work with expected completion of hot-fire testing by the end of FY17. MSFC is

  17. NASA's Principal Center for Review of Clean Air Act Regulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia

    2003-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was selected as the Principal Center for review of Clean Air Act (CAA) regulations. The CAA Principal Center is tasked to: 1) Provide centralized support to NASA/HDQ Code JE for the management and leadership of NASA's CAA regulation review process; 2) Identify potential impact from proposed CAA regulations to NASA program hardware and supporting facilities. The Shuttle Environmental Assurance Initiative, one of the responsibilities of the NASA CAA Working Group (WG), is described in part of this viewgraph presentation.

  18. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-07-18

    Dr. Ernst Stuhlinger, a member of von Braun's original German rocket team who directed the Research Projects Office, spoke about the importance of teachers in his life during a reception honoring educators attending the NASA Student Launch Initiative Rocketry Workshop at the Marshall Space Flight Center in July, 2003.

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1997-07-11

    Marshall's eighth Center Director Dr. Jerroll W. Littles (1996-1998) and his wife are pictured with President Bill Clinton in the Oval Office of the White House following the presentation of the Presidential Rank Award for Distinguished Service. Other NASA honorees and their spouses are also pictured.

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1988-09-19

    Marshall's fifth Center Director, James R. Thompson (1986-1989), in the control room of the Solid Rocket Booster (SRB)automated thermal protection system (TPS) removal facility. Under Dr. Thompson's leadership, the shuttle program was rekindled after the Challenger explosion. Return to Flight kept NASA 's future programs alive.

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  3. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Gray, Perry

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960s, then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California, The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a 'National Asset' by the DoD, The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  4. Marshall Space Flight Center's Impact Testing Facility Capabilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steve; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney

    2008-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Impact Testing Facility (ITF) serves as an important installation for space and missile related materials science research. The ITF was established and began its research in spacecraft debris shielding in the early 1960% then played a major role in the International Space Station debris shield development. As NASA became more interested in launch debris and in-flight impact concerns, the ITF grew to include research in a variety of impact genres. Collaborative partnerships with the DoD led to a wider range of impact capabilities being relocated to MSFC as a result of the closure of Particle Impact Facilities in Santa Barbara, California. The Particle Impact Facility had a 30 year history in providing evaluations of aerospace materials and components during flights through rain, ice, and solid particle environments at subsonic through hypersonic velocities. The facility's unique capabilities were deemed a "National Asset" by the DoD. The ITF now has capabilities including environmental, ballistic, and hypervelocity impact testing utilizing an array of air, powder, and two-stage light gas guns to accommodate a variety of projectile and target types and sizes. Relocated test equipment was dated and in need of upgrade. Numerous upgrades including new instrumentation, triggering circuitry, high speed photography, and optimized sabot designs have been implemented. Other recent research has included rain drop demise characterization tests to obtain data for inclusion in on-going model development. Future ITF improvements will be focused on continued instrumentation and performance enhancements. These enhancements will allow further, more in-depth, characterization of rain drop demise characterization and evaluation of ice crystal impact. Performance enhancements also include increasing the upper velocity limit of the current environmental guns to allow direct environmental simulation for missile components. The current and proposed

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1994-01-19

    STS-61 astronauts Kathryn Thornton, Jeffrey Hoffman and Thomas Akers (standing) sign autographs in Marshall Space Flight Center's Morris Auditorium, January 19, 1994. Space Shuttle crews traditionally visited NASA field centers following each mission to present mission highlights and recognize employees who made contributions to the Shuttle program. Many of the techniques used during the STS-61 Hubble Space Telescope Servicing mission were rehearsed at the Center's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator.

  6. Vehicle Engineering Development Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Mark F.; Champion, Robert H., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    New initiatives in the Space Transportation Directorate at the Marshall Space Flight Center include an emphasis on Vehicle Engineering to enhance the strong commitment to the Directorate's projects in the development of flight hardware and flight demonstrators for the advancement of space transportation technology. This emphasis can be seen in the activities of a newly formed organization in the Transportation Directorate, The Vehicle Subsystems Engineering Group. The functions and type of activities that this group works on are described. The current projects of this group are outlined including a brief description of the status and type of work that the group is performing. A summary section is included to describe future activities.

  7. S-IB-211 at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1967-01-01

    S-IB-211, the flight version of the Saturn IB launch vehicle's (S-IVB) first stage, after installation at the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) S-IB static test stand. Between December 1967 and April 1968, the stage would undergo seven static test firings. The S-IB, developed by the MSFC and built by the Chrysler Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility near New Orleans, Louisiana, utilized eight H-1 engines and each produced 200,000 pounds of thrust.

  8. Robotic welding at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Clyde S.

    1992-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is developing welding and robotics technologies to improve manufacturing of space hardware. Commercial robots are used for these development programs, but they are teamed with advanced sensors, process controls, and computer simulation to form highly productive manufacturing systems. Application of welding robotics and controls to structural welding for the space shuttle and space station Freedom programs is addressed. Several advanced welding process sensors under development for application to space hardware are discussed, as well as the application of commercial robotic simulation software to provide offline programming.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-01

    Mr. David A. King has been named the tenth Director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Appointed to take Director's office June 15, 2003, King has been serving as Deputy Director of MSFC since November 2002. With 20 years experience in spacecraft and high-technology systems, Mr. King began his NASA career at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Florida in 1983 as a main propulsion system engineer. He later served as flow director for the Space Shuttle Discovery and then as the acting deputy director of the installation Operations Directorate. He was appointed deputy director of Shuttle Processing in 1996, Launch Director in 1997, and director of Shuttle Processing in 1999.

  10. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  11. Actions Needed to Ensure Scientific and Technical Information is Adequately Reviewed at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    This audit was initiated in response to a hotline complaint regarding the review, approval, and release of scientific and technical information (STI) at Johnson Space Center. The complainant alleged that Johnson personnel conducting export control reviews of STI were not fully qualified to conduct those reviews and that the reviews often did not occur until after the STI had been publicly released. NASA guidance requires that STI, defined as the results of basic and applied scientific, technical, and related engineering research and development, undergo certain reviews prior to being released outside of NASA or to audiences that include foreign nationals. The process includes technical, national security, export control, copyright, and trade secret (e.g., proprietary data) reviews. The review process was designed to preclude the inappropriate dissemination of sensitive information while ensuring that NASA complies with a requirement of the National Aeronautics and Space Act of 1958 (the Space Act)1 to provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information resulting from NASA research activities. We focused our audit on evaluating the STI review process: specifically, determining whether the roles and responsibilities for the review, approval, and release of STI were adequately defined and documented in NASA and Center-level guidance and whether that guidance was effectively implemented at Goddard Space Flight Center, Johnson Space Center, Langley Research Center, and Marshall Space Flight Center. Johnson was included in the review because it was the source of the initial complaint, and Goddard, Langley, and Marshall were included because those Centers consistently produce significant amounts of STI.

  12. A History of Solid Propulsion at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shackelford, Ben

    1998-01-01

    The talk describes the solid propulsion systems used on space launch vehicles developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The development approach, in simple terms, some of the technology developed, and features of the motors will be described. Vehicle programs involved are the SATURN vehicles, the Space Shuttle, the joint Air Force/NASA Inertial Upper Stage, and the McDonald Douglas Payload Assist Module series. The documentation supporting the talk consists of illustrations of the vehicles, and the solid propellant rocket motors, and includes some summary information on the motors.

  13. Human Motion Tracking at Marshall Space Flight Center's Collaborative Engineering Center ANVIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henderson, Steven J.; Hamilton, George S.

    2004-01-01

    The installation and use of electromagnetic human motion trackers requires a specially designed and metal-free environment for optimal performance. Such an area is not readily available at the Marshall Space Flight Center Collaborative Engineering Center ANVIL. Our paper details a systems engineering approach to installing and operating Ascension Technologies Ethernet MotionStar tracking system in a sub-optimal environment, used with the JACK human computer model's motion capture capabilities. We also discuss how this system is integrated into the Marshall Space Flight Center's Human Engineering process.

  14. Processes and Procedures of the Higher Education Programs at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Pamala D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of my research was to investigate the policies, processes, procedures and timelines for the higher education programs at Marshall Space Flight Center. The three higher education programs that comprised this research included: the Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP), the National Research Council/Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA) and the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP). The GSRP award fellowships each year to promising U.S. graduate students whose research interest coincides with NASA's mission. Fellowships are awarded for one year and are renewable for up to three years to competitively selected students. Each year, the award provides students the opportunity to spend a period in residence at a NASA center using that installation's unique facilities. This program is renewable for three years, students must reapply. The National Research Council conducts the Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA), a national competition to identify outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists and engineers and experience senior scientists and engineers, for tenure as guest researchers at NASA centers. The Resident Research Associateship Program provides an opportunity for recipients of doctoral degrees to concentrate their research in association with NASA personnel, often as a culmination to formal career preparation. The program also affords established scientists and engineers an opportunity for research without any interruptions and distracting assignments generated from permanent career positions. All opportunities for research at NASA Centers are open to citizens of the U.S. and to legal permanent residents. The Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is conducted each summer. NASA awards research fellowships to university faculty through the NASA/American Society for Engineering Education. The program is designed to promote an exchange of ideas between university faculties, NASA scientists and engineers. Selected

  15. Processes and Procedures of the Higher Education Programs at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heard, Pamala D.

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of my research was to investigate the policies, processes, procedures and timelines for the higher education programs at Marshall Space Flight Center. The three higher education programs that comprised this research included: the Graduate Student Researchers Program (GSRP), the National Research Council/Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA) and the Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP). The GSRP award fellowships each year to promising U.S. graduate students whose research interest coincides with NASA's mission. Fellowships are awarded for one year and are renewable for up to three years to competitively selected students. Each year, the award provides students the opportunity to spend a period in residence at a NASA center using that installation's unique facilities. This program is renewable for three years, students must reapply. The National Research Council conducts the Resident Research Associateships Program (NRC/RRA), a national competition to identify outstanding recent postdoctoral scientists and engineers and experience senior scientists and engineers, for tenure as guest researchers at NASA centers. The Resident Research Associateship Program provides an opportunity for recipients of doctoral degrees to concentrate their research in association with NASA personnel, often as a culmination to formal career preparation. The program also affords established scientists and engineers an opportunity for research without any interruptions and distracting assignments generated from permanent career positions. All opportunities for research at NASA Centers are open to citizens of the U.S. and to legal permanent residents. The Summer Faculty Fellowship Program (SFFP) is conducted each summer. NASA awards research fellowships to university faculty through the NASA/American Society for Engineering Education. The program is designed to promote an exchange of ideas between university faculties, NASA scientists and engineers. Selected

  16. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1999-01-01

    This presentation discuss the Marshall Space Flight Center Operations and Responsibilities. These are propulsion, microgravity experiments, international space station, space transportation systems, and advance vehicle research.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-30

    Through Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Education Department, over 400 MSFC employees have volunteered to support educational program during regular work hours. Project LASER (Learning About Science, Engineering, and Research) provides support for mentor/tutor requests, education tours, classroom presentations, and curriculum development. This program is available to teachers and students living within commuting distance of the NASA/MSFC in Huntsville, Alabama (approximately 50-miles radius). This image depicts students viewing their reflections in an x-ray mirror with Marshall optic engineer Vince Huegele at the Discovery Laboratory, which is an onsite MSFC laboratory facility that provides hands-on educational workshop sessions for teachers and students learning activities.

  18. NASA InterCenter Collaboration Increases ROI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lankford, Kimberly; Best, Susan; Felton, Larry; Newhouse, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Funding for National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) space mission operations is tighter than ever in the current environment of federal government deficit reductions. Conventional wisdom would expect this environment to drive increasing competition between NASA centers for the limited available funds. However, recent inter-center activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center emphasize collaboration rather than competition and demonstrate the value of partnerships to increase the return on shrinking investments. These efforts cover a variety of activities and potential returns. To facilitate sharing data from test and verification through operations without levying requirements on data format or software tools, the HOSC is working with multiple centers on an evolutionary path toward a distributed data architecture and archive. The approach reduces the required investment by allowing the partners to reuse their existing formats and tools, while facilitating gone ]stop h user visibility into and controlled access to the full complement of data regardless of user or data location. The HOSC is also working on two activities to promote sharing operations implementations and leveraging the experts and expertise across multiple NASA sites. In one, the use of Consultative Committee for Space Data Systems (CCSDS) standards for the message abstraction layer provides an interoperability layer on top of existing ground data system communication architectures. This allows missions to select the most appropriate solutions for their requirements with a minimal investment in rehosting the components in a coherent operational environment. The other emphasizes shared tools and increased remote access to minimize travel for tests and critical activities and reduce the floor space required for a dedicated operations center. This paper summarizes these and other inter-center collaboration activities at the HOSC and the

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-01-01

    Dr. Eberhard Rees served as director of the Marshall Space Flight Center from March 1, 1970 until January 19, 1973 when he retired from NASA. Prior to his appointment as Director, Rees served as the Center's deputy director under Dr. Wernher von Braun, 1960-1970. Rees came to the United States as part of the Dr. Wernher von Braun's German Rocket team following World War II. He transferred to Huntsville, Alabama from Fort Bliss, Texas in 1950 to work for the Army's rocket program at Redstone Arsenal. From 1956 to 1960 he served as deputy director of development operations at the Army Ballistic Missile Agency under von Braun. In 1960 Rees was transferred to NASA's Marshall Center.

  20. The Marshall Space Flight Center Drop Tube Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathz, Thomas J.; Robinson, Michael B.; Hofmeister, William H.; Bayuzick, Robert J.

    1990-12-01

    A description of the structural and instrumentation hardware and the improved experimental capabilities of the 105-m Marshall Space Flight Center Drop Tube Facility is described. The structure comprising the Drop Tube Facility is designed to provide a high-vacuum facility in a vertical orientation. The low-gravity environment obtained during free-fall and the containerless materials processing capabilities are discussed. Two furnaces, an electron-beam and an electromagnetic levitator, are used to melt metallic samples in a process environment ranging from 10-6 Torr to 1 atm. Specifics of the vacuum control and gas delivery systems are provided. The experimental instrumentation and data acquisition systems used to perform predrop and in-flight measurements of the melting and solidification process are discussed. Typical experimental results are presented as an indicator of the performance of the Drop Tube Facility.

  1. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center High Speed Turbopump Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Moore, Chip; Thom, Robert

    2000-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center has a unique test rig that is used to test and develop rolling element bearings used in high-speed cryogenic turbopumps. The tester is unique in that it uses liquid hydrogen as the coolant for the bearings. This test rig can simulate speeds and loads experienced in the Space Shuttle Main Engine turbopumps. With internal modifications, the tester can be used for evaluating fluid film, hydrostatic, and foil bearing designs. At the present time, the test rig is configured to run two ball bearings or a ball and roller bearing, both with a hydrostatic bearing. The rig is being used to evaluate the lifetimes of hybrid bearings with silicon nitride rolling elements and steel races.

  3. Nanotechnology Concepts at Marshall Space Flight Center: Engineering Directorate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, B.; Kaul, R.; Shah, S.; Smithers, G.; Watson, M. D.

    2001-01-01

    Nanotechnology is the art and science of building materials and devices at the ultimate level of finesse: atom by atom. Our nation's space program has need for miniaturization of components, minimization of weight, and maximization of performance, and nanotechnology will help us get there. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) Engineering Directorate is committed to developing nanotechnology that will enable MSFC missions in space transportation, space science, and space optics manufacturing. MSFC has a dedicated group of technologists who are currently developing high-payoff nanotechnology concepts. This poster presentation will outline some of the concepts being developed including, nanophase structural materials, carbon nanotube reinforced metal and polymer matrix composites, nanotube temperature sensors, and aerogels. The poster will outline these concepts and discuss associated technical challenges in turning these concepts into real components and systems.

  4. Capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finchum, Andy; Nehls, Mary; Young, Whitney; Gray, Perry; Suggs, Bart; Lowrey, Nikki M.

    2011-01-01

    The test and analysis capabilities of the Impact Testing Facility at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center are described. Nine different gun systems accommodate a wide range of projectile and target sizes and shapes at velocities from subsonic through hypersonic, to accomplish a broad range of ballistic and hypervelocity impact tests. These gun systems include ballistic and microballistic gas and powder guns, a two-stage light gas gun, and specialty guns for weather encounter studies. The ITF "rain gun" is the only hydrometeor impact gun known to be in existence in the United States that can provide single impact performance data with known raindrop sizes. Simulation of high velocity impact is available using the Smooth Particle Hydrodynamic Code. The Impact Testing Facility provides testing, custom test configuration design and fabrication, and analytical services for NASA, the Department of Defense, academic institutions, international space agencies, and private industry in a secure facility located at Marshall Space Flight Center, on the US Army's Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. This facility performs tests that are subject to International Traffic in Arms Regulations (ITAR) and DoD secret classified restrictions as well as proprietary and unrestricted tests for civil space agencies, academic institutions, and commercial aerospace and defense companies and their suppliers.

  5. Marshall Space Flight Center - Launching the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shivers, Alisa; Shivers, Herbert

    2010-01-01

    Topics include: NASA Centers around the country, launching a legacy (Explorer I), Marshall's continuing role in space exploration, MSFC history, lifting from Earth, our next mission STS 133, Space Shuttle propulsion systems, Space Shuttle facts, Space Shuttle and the International Space Station, technologies/materials originally developed for the space program, astronauts come from all over, potential future missions and example technologies, significant accomplishments, living and working in space, understanding our world, understanding worlds beyond, from exploration to innovation, inspiring the next generation, space economy, from exploration to opportunity, new program assignments, NASA's role in education, and images from deep space including a composite of a galaxy with a black hole, Sagittarius A, Pillars of Creation, and an ultra deep field

  6. Marshall Space Flight Center Engineering Directorate Overview: Launching the Future of Science and Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miley, Steven C.

    2009-01-01

    The Marshall Small Business Association (MSBA) serves as a central point of contact to inform and educate small businesses interested in pursuing contracting and subcontracting opportunities at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The MSBA meets quarterly to provide industry with information about how to do business with Marshall and to share specific information about Marshall s mission, which allows private businesses to envision how they might contribute. For the February 19 meeting, the Engineering Directorate will give an overview of its unique capabilities and how it is organized to provide maximum support for the programs and projects resident at Marshall, for example, the Space Shuttle Propulsion Office, Ares Projects Office, and Science and Mission Systems Office. This briefing provides a top-level summary of the work conducted by Marshall s largest organization, while explaining how resources are deployed to perform the volume of work under Marshall s purview.

  7. Research and technology, fiscal year 1986, Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center is continuing its vigorous efforts in space-related research and technology. Extensive activities in advanced studies have led to the approval of the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle as a new start. Significant progress was made in definition studies of liquid rocket engine systems for future space transportation needs and the conceptualization of advanced laucnch vehicles. The space systems definition studies have brought the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility and Gravity Probe-B to a high degree of maturity. Both are ready for project implementation. Also discussed include significant advances in low gravity sciences, solar terrestrial physics, high energy astrophysics, atmospheric sciences, propulsion systems, and on the critical element of the Space Shuttle Main Engine in particular. The goals of improving the productivity of high-cost repetitive operations on reusable transportation systems, and extending the useful life of such systems are examined. The research and technology highlighted provides a foundation for progress on the Hubble Space Telescope, the Space Station, all elements of the Space Transportation System, and the many other projects assigned to this Center.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-17

    A replica of the Saturn V rocket that propelled man from the confines of Earth's gravity to the surface of the Moon was built on the grounds of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. in time for the 30th arniversary celebration of that historic occasion. Marshall Space Flight Center and its team of German rocket scientists headed by Dr. Wernher von Braun were responsible for the design and development of the Saturn V rocket. Pictured are MSFC's current Center Director Art Stephenson, Alabama Congressman Bud Cramer, NASA Administrator Dan Goldin, and director of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center Mike Wing during the dedication ceremony.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-09-01

    Mr. Arthur G. Stephenson has been serving as the ninth Director of NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center since his appointment on September 11, 1998. Prior to his appointment, Mr. Stephenson worked for TRW, Redondo Beach, California, for 28 years and was president of Oceaneering Advanced Technologies in Houston, Texas, at the time of his appointment. Mr. Stephenson has over 30 years of experience as a manager in spacecraft and high-technology systems.

  10. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  11. SLS Rocket Hardware Moved to NASA Marshall Stand for Upcoming Test Series (30-second timelapse)

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    A test version of the launch vehicle stage adapter (LVSA) for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, is moved to a 65-foot-tall test stand at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The test version LVSA will be stacked with other test pieces of the upper part of the SLS rocket and pushed, pulled and twisted as part of an upcoming test series to ensure each structure can withstand the incredible stresses of launch. The LVSA joins the core stage simulator, which was loaded into the test stand Sept. 21. The other three qualification articles and the Orion simulator will complete the stack later this fall. SLS will be the world’s most powerful rocket, and with the Orion spacecraft, take astronauts to deep-space destinations, including the Journey to Mars. More information on the upcoming test series can be found here: http://go.nasa.gov/2dS8yXB

  12. Overview of Marshall Space Flight Center Activities for the Combustion Stability Tool Development Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kenny, R. J.; Greene, W. D.

    2016-01-01

    This presentation covers the overall scope, schedule, and activities associated with the NASA - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) involvement with the Combustion Stability Tool Development (CSTD) program. The CSTD program is funded by the Air Force Space & Missile Systems Center; it is approximately two years in duration and; and it is sponsoring MSFC to: design, fabricate, & execute multi-element hardware testing, support Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) single element testing, and execute testing of a small-scale, multi-element combustion chamber. Specific MSFC Engineering Directorate involvement, per CSTD-sponsored task, will be outlined. This presentation serves a primer for the corresponding works that provide details of the technical work performed by individual groups within MSFC.

  13. Development of Advanced Hydrocarbon Fuels at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bai, S. D.; Dumbacher, P.; Cole, J. W.

    2002-01-01

    This was a small-scale, hot-fire test series to make initial measurements of performance differences of five new liquid fuels relative to rocket propellant-1 (RP-1). The program was part of a high-energy-density materials development at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and the fuels tested were quadricyclane, 1-7 octodiyne, AFRL-1, biclopropylidene, and competitive impulse noncarcinogenic hypergol (CINCH) (di-methyl-aminoethyl-azide). All tests were conducted at MSFC. The first four fuels were provided by the U.S. Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL), Edwards Air Force Base, CA. The U.S. Army, Redstone Arsenal, Huntsville, AL, provided the CINCH. The data recorded in all hot-fire tests were used to calculate specific impulse and characteristic exhaust velocity for each fuel, then compared to RP-1 at the same conditions. This was not an exhaustive study, comparing each fuel to RP-1 at an array of mixture ratios, nor did it include important fuel parameters, such as fuel handling or long-term storage. The test hardware was designed for liquid oxygen (lox)/RP-1, then modified for gaseous oxygen/RP-1 to avoid two-phase lox at very small flow rates. All fuels were tested using the same thruster/injector combination designed for RP-1. The results of this test will be used to determine which fuels will be tested in future test programs.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-17

    A replica of the Saturn V rocket that propelled man from the confines of Earth's gravity to the surface of the Moon was built on the grounds of the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL. in time for the 30th arniversary celebration of that historic occasion. Marshall Space Flight Center and its team of German rocket scientists headed by Dr. Wernher von Braun were responsible for the design and development of the Saturn V rocket. Pictured are MSFC's current Center Director Art Stephenson, Alabama Congressman Bud Cramer, and NASA Administrator Dan Goldin during the dedication ceremony.

  15. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew L.; Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2011-01-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula s "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA s National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA s SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT s experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  16. Explore The NASA Safety Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-01

    The NASA Safety Center (NSC) reports to NASA’s Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and supports the Safety and Mission Assurance (SMA) requirements of NASA’s portfolio of programs and projects. The NSC focuses on development of the personnel, processes and tools needed for the safe and successful achievement of NASA’s strategic goals.

  17. Marshall Space Flight Center Ground Systems Development and Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, Gina

    2016-01-01

    Ground Systems Development and Integration performs a variety of tasks in support of the Mission Operations Laboratory (MOL) and other Center and Agency projects. These tasks include various systems engineering processes such as performing system requirements development, system architecture design, integration, verification and validation, software development, and sustaining engineering of mission operations systems that has evolved the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) into a leader in remote operations for current and future NASA space projects. The group is also responsible for developing and managing telemetry and command configuration and calibration databases. Personnel are responsible for maintaining and enhancing their disciplinary skills in the areas of project management, software engineering, software development, software process improvement, telecommunications, networking, and systems management. Domain expertise in the ground systems area is also maintained and includes detailed proficiency in the areas of real-time telemetry systems, command systems, voice, video, data networks, and mission planning systems.

  18. Simulation of the coupled multi-spacecraft control testbed at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosh, Dave; Montgomery, Raymond C.

    1994-01-01

    The capture and berthing of a controlled spacecraft using a robotic manipulator is an important technology for future space missions and is presently being considered as a backup option for direct docking of the Space Shuttle to the Space Station during assembly missions. The dynamics and control of spacecraft configurations that are manipulator-coupled with each spacecraft having independent attitude control systems is not well understood and NASA is actively involved in both analytic research on this three dimensional control problem for manipulator coupled active spacecraft and experimental research using a two dimensional ground based facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This paper first describes the MSFC testbed and then describes a two link arm simulator that has been developed to facilitate control theory development and test planning. The motion of the arms and the payload is controlled by motors located at the shoulder, elbow, and wrist.

  19. Robotic and automatic welding development at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, C. S.; Jackson, M. E.; Flanigan, L. A.

    1988-01-01

    Welding automation is the key to two major development programs to improve quality and reduce the cost of manufacturing space hardware currently undertaken by the Materials and Processes Laboratory of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. Variable polarity plasma arc welding has demonstrated its effectiveness on class 1 aluminum welding in external tank production. More than three miles of welds were completed without an internal defect. Much of this success can be credited to automation developments which stabilize the process. Robotic manipulation technology is under development for automation of welds on the Space Shuttle's main engines utilizing pathfinder systems in development of tooling and sensors for the production applications. The overall approach to welding automation development undertaken is outlined. Advanced sensors and control systems methodologies are described that combine to make aerospace quality welds with a minimum of dependence on operator skill.

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-01

    This photograph shows Justin Varnadore, son of a Marshall TV employee, at the controls of one of the many displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a "real" Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  1. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-02-01

    Andy Jenkins, an engineer for the Lab on a Chip Applications Development program, helped build the Applications Development Unit (ADU-25), a one-of-a-kind facility for controlling and analyzing processes on chips with extreme accuracy. Pressure is used to cause fluids to travel through network of fluid pathways, or micro-channels, embossed on the chips through a process similar to the one used to print circuits on computer chips. To make customized chips for various applications, NASA has an agreement with the U.S. Army's Micro devices and Micro fabrication Laboratory at Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama, where NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is located. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for many applications, such as studying how fluidic systems work in spacecraft and identifying microbes in self-contained life support systems. Chips could even be designed for use on Earth, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  2. NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, David; Wetzel, Scott

    2000-01-01

    The NASA SLR Operational Center is responsible for: 1) NASA SLR network control, sustaining engineering, and logistics; 2) ILRS mission operations; and 3) ILRS and NASA SLR data operations. NASA SLR network control and sustaining engineering tasks include technical support, daily system performance monitoring, system scheduling, operator training, station status reporting, system relocation, logistics and support of the ILRS Networks and Engineering Working Group. These activities ensure the NASA SLR systems are meeting ILRS and NASA mission support requirements. ILRS mission operations tasks include mission planning, mission analysis, mission coordination, development of mission support plans, and support of the ILRS Missions Working Group. These activities ensure than new mission and campaign requirements are coordinated with the ILRS. Global Normal Points (NP) data, NASA SLR FullRate (FR) data, and satellite predictions are managed as part of data operations. Part of this operation includes supporting the ILRS Data Formats and Procedures Working Group. Global NP data operations consist of receipt, format and data integrity verification, archiving and merging. This activity culminates in the daily electronic transmission of NP files to the CDDIS. Currently of all these functions are automated. However, to ensure the timely and accurate flow of data, regular monitoring and maintenance of the operational software systems, computer systems and computer networking are performed. Tracking statistics between the stations and the data centers are compared periodically to eliminate lost data. Future activities in this area include sub-daily (i.e., hourly) NP data management, more stringent data integrity tests, and automatic station notification of format and data integrity issues.

  3. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2003-01-01

    NASA has designated the Principal Center Assignment to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM is NASA s leading resource for the aerospace manufacturing research, development, and innovation needs that are critical to the goals of the Agency. Through this initiative NCAM s people work together with government, industry, and academia to ensure the technology base and national infrastructure are available to develop innovative manufacturing technologies with broad application to NASA Enterprise programs, and U.S. industry. Educational enhancements are ever-present within the NCAM focus to promote research, to inspire participation and to support education and training in manufacturing. Many important accomplishments took place during 2002. Through NCAM, NASA was among five federal agencies involved in manufacturing research and development (R&D) to launch a major effort to exchange information and cooperate directly to enhance the payoffs from federal investments. The Government Agencies Technology Exchange in Manufacturing (GATE-M) is the only active effort to specifically and comprehensively address manufacturing R&D across the federal government. Participating agencies include the departments of Commerce (represented by the National Institute of Standards and Technology), Defense, and Energy, as well as the National Science Foundation and NASA. MSFC s ongoing partnership with the State of Louisiana, the University of New Orleans, and Lockheed Martin Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) progressed significantly. Major capital investments were initiated for world-class equipment additions including a universal friction stir welding system, composite fiber placement machine, five-axis machining center, and ten-axis laser ultrasonic nondestructive test system. The NCAM consortium of five universities led by University of New Orleans with Mississippi State University

  4. NASA's National Center for Advanced Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, John

    2003-01-01

    NASA has designated the Principal Center Assignment to the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for implementation of the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM). NCAM is NASA s leading resource for the aerospace manufacturing research, development, and innovation needs that are critical to the goals of the Agency. Through this initiative NCAM s people work together with government, industry, and academia to ensure the technology base and national infrastructure are available to develop innovative manufacturing technologies with broad application to NASA Enterprise programs, and U.S. industry. Educational enhancements are ever-present within the NCAM focus to promote research, to inspire participation and to support education and training in manufacturing. Many important accomplishments took place during 2002. Through NCAM, NASA was among five federal agencies involved in manufacturing research and development (R&D) to launch a major effort to exchange information and cooperate directly to enhance the payoffs from federal investments. The Government Agencies Technology Exchange in Manufacturing (GATE-M) is the only active effort to specifically and comprehensively address manufacturing R&D across the federal government. Participating agencies include the departments of Commerce (represented by the National Institute of Standards and Technology), Defense, and Energy, as well as the National Science Foundation and NASA. MSFC s ongoing partnership with the State of Louisiana, the University of New Orleans, and Lockheed Martin Corporation at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) progressed significantly. Major capital investments were initiated for world-class equipment additions including a universal friction stir welding system, composite fiber placement machine, five-axis machining center, and ten-axis laser ultrasonic nondestructive test system. The NCAM consortium of five universities led by University of New Orleans with Mississippi State University

  5. Associate Administrator, Robert Lightfoot address the Marshall Association.

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2015-07-28

    NASA ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR ROBERT LIGHTFOOT SHARED HIS PERSONAL REFLECTIONS ON LEADERSHIP WITH MARSHALL ASSOCIATION MEMBERS AND GUESTS DURING A LUNCHEON JULY 28 AT NASA’S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER.

  6. Internal Social Media at Marshall Space Flight Center - An Engineer's Snapshot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.

    2013-01-01

    In the brief span of about six years (2004-2010), social media radically enhanced people's ways of maintaining recreational friendships. Social media's impact on public affairs (PAO) and community engagement is equally striking: NASA has involved millions of non-NASA viewers in its activities via outward-facing social media, often in a very two-way street fashion. Use of social media as an internal working tool by NASA's tens of thousands of civil servants, onsite contractor employees, and external stakeholders is evolving more slowly. This paper examines, from an engineer's perspective, Marshall Space Flight Center s (MSFC) efforts to bring the power of social media to the daily working environment. Primary emphasis is on an internal Social Networking Service called Explornet that could be scaled Agency-wide. Other topics include MSFC use of other social media day-to-day for non-PAO purposes, some specialized uses of social techniques in space flight control operations, and how to help a community open up so it can discover and adopt what works well.

  7. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-12-01

    Helen Cole, the project manager for the Lab-on-a-Chip Applications Development program, and Lisa Monaco, the project scientist for the program, insert a lab on a chip into the Caliper 42 which is specialized equipment that controls processes on commercial chips to support development of lab-on-a-chip applications. The system has special microscopes and imaging systems, so scientists can process and study different types of fluid, chemical, and medical tests conducted on chips. For example, researchers have examined fluorescent bacteria as it flows through the chips' fluid channels or microfluidic capillaries. Researchers at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, have been studying how the lab-on-a-chip technology can be used for microbial detection, water quality monitoring, and detecting biosignatures of past or present life on Mars. The Marshall Center team is also collaborating with scientists at other NASA centers and at universities to develop custom chip designs for not only space applications, but for many Earth applications, such as for detecting deadly microbes in heating and air systems. (NASA/MSFC/D.Stoffer)

  8. MARCH, 2017 MARSHALL ASSOCIATION LUNCHEON GUEST SPEAKER

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-03-21

    THOMAS ZURBUCHEN, RIGHT, NASA ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR FOR THE SCIENCE MISSION DIRECTORATE, SPEAKS WITH DENNON CLARDY, LEFT, DEPUTY MANAGER OF THE SCIENCE & TECHNOLOGY OFFICE AT NASA’S MARSHALL SPACE FLIGHT CENTER IN HUNTSVILLE, ALABAMA, AND SHAWN MCINERY, AFTER HIS KEYNOTE ADDRESS AT THE MARCH 21 LUNCHEON MEETING OF THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION. ZURBUCHEN, WHO ASSUMED HIS NEW ROLE IN OCTOBER 2016, ALSO TOURED KEY MARSHALL MANUFACTURING AND TEST FACILITIES. THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION IS THE CENTER’S PROFESSIONAL, EMPLOYEE SERVICE ORGANIZATION.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-04-06

    Portrait of Marshall's third Center Director Dr. Rocco A. Petrone (1973-1974) standing in front of a Saturn V rocket. Dr. Petrone personally supervised the Apollo 11 Mission and then became Director of the Apollo program in 1969 before coming to Marshall. At Marshall he continued to direct the marned space flight programs.

  10. NASA Dryden's Educator and Visitor Centers Reopen

    NASA Image and Video Library

    The City of Palmdale, NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center and the AERO Institute recently hosted the reopening of NASA Dryden's Educator Resource and Visitor Centers. Now housed at the AERO Instit...

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-03-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  12. Marshall Space Flight Center surface modeling and grid generation applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Robert W.; Benjamin, Theodore G.; Cornelison, Joni W.

    1995-01-01

    The Solid Rocket Motors (SRM) used by NASA to propel the Space Shuttle employ gimballing nozzles as a means for vehicular guidance during launch and ascent. Gimballing a nozzle renders the pressure field of the exhaust gases nonaxisymmetric. This has two effects: (1) it exerts a torque and side load on the nozzle; and (2) the exhaust gases flow circumferentially in the aft-dome region, thermally loading the flexible boot, case-to-nozzle joint, and casing insulation. The use of CFD models to simulate such flows is imperative in order to assess SRM design. The grids for these problems were constructed by obtaining information from drawings and tabulated coordinates. The 2D axisymmetric grids were designed and generated using the EZ-Surf and GEN2D surface and grid generation codes. These 2D grids were solved using codes such as FDNS, GASP, and MINT. These axisymmetric grids were rotated around the center-line to form 3D nongimballed grids. These were then gimballed around the pivot point and the gaps or overlaps resurfaced to obtain the final domains, which contained approximately 366,000 grid points. The 2D solutions were then rotated and manipulated as appropriate for geometry and used as initial guesses in the final solution. The analyses were used in answering questions about flight criteria.

  13. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.

    1999-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, the Center is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which requires a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated with-in MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Division. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that has been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research Center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  14. NASA Airline Operations Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mogford, Richard H.

    2016-01-01

    This is a PowerPoint presentation NASA airline operations center (AOC) research. It includes information on using IBM Watson in the AOC. It also reviews a dispatcher decision support tool call the Flight Awareness Collaboration Tool (FACT). FACT gathers information about winter weather onto one screen and includes predictive abilities. It should prove to be useful for airline dispatchers and airport personnel when they manage winter storms and their effect on air traffic. This material is very similar to other previously approved presentations with the same title.

  15. Cloud Computing Applications in Support of Earth Science Activities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molthan, A.; Limaye, A. S.

    2011-12-01

    Currently, the NASA Nebula Cloud Computing Platform is available to Agency personnel in a pre-release status as the system undergoes a formal operational readiness review. Over the past year, two projects within the Earth Science Office at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have been investigating the performance and value of Nebula's "Infrastructure as a Service", or "IaaS" concept and applying cloud computing concepts to advance their respective mission goals. The Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center focuses on the transition of unique NASA satellite observations and weather forecasting capabilities for use within the operational forecasting community through partnerships with NOAA's National Weather Service (NWS). SPoRT has evaluated the performance of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model on virtual machines deployed within Nebula and used Nebula instances to simulate local forecasts in support of regional forecast studies of interest to select NWS forecast offices. In addition to weather forecasting applications, rapidly deployable Nebula virtual machines have supported the processing of high resolution NASA satellite imagery to support disaster assessment following the historic severe weather and tornado outbreak of April 27, 2011. Other modeling and satellite analysis activities are underway in support of NASA's SERVIR program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data and forecast models to monitor environmental change and improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas. Leveraging SPoRT's experience, SERVIR is working to establish a real-time weather forecasting model for Central America. Other modeling efforts include hydrologic forecasts for Kenya, driven by NASA satellite observations and reanalysis data sets provided by the broader meteorological community. Forecast modeling efforts are supplemented by short-term forecasts of convective initiation, determined by

  16. Advanced Manufacturing at the Marshall Space Flight Center and Application to Ares I and Ares V Launch Vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carruth, Ralph

    2008-01-01

    There are various aspects of advanced manufacturing technology development at the field centers of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been given the assignment to lead the National Center for Advanced Manufacturing (NCAM) at MSFC and pursue advanced development and coordination with other federal agencies for NASA. There are significant activities at the Marshall Center as well as at the Michoud Assembly Facility (MAF) in New Orleans which we operate in conjunction with the University of New Orleans. New manufacturing processes in metals processing, component development, welding operations, composite manufacturing and thermal protection system material and process development will be utilized in the manufacturing of the United States two new launch vehicles, the Ares I and the Ares V. An overview of NCAM will be presented as well as some of the development activities and manufacturing that are ongoing in Ares Upper Stage development. Some of the tools and equipment produced by Italian owned companies and their application in this work will be mentioned.

  17. Unveiling the Broze Bust of General George C. Marshall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1960-01-01

    President Eisenhower and Mrs. Marshall unveil the bronze bust of General George C. Marshall at the dedication ceremony of the NASA George C. Marshall Space Flight Center on September 8. 1960. On March 15, 1960, a Presidential Executive Order arnouced that the missile development complex within the boundaries of Redstone Arsenal would become the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The Center was activated on July 1, 1960

  18. Design and implementation of robust decentralized control laws for the ACES structure at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, Emmanuel G., Jr.; Phillips, Douglas J.; Hyland, David C.

    1990-01-01

    Many large space system concepts will require active vibration control to satisfy critical performance requirements such as line-of-sight accuracy. In order for these concepts to become operational it is imperative that the benefits of active vibration control be practically demonstrated in ground based experiments. The results of the experiment successfully demonstrate active vibration control for a flexible structure. The testbed is the Active Control Technique Evaluation for Spacecraft (ACES) structure at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center. The ACES structure is dynamically traceable to future space systems and especially allows the study of line-of-sight control issues.

  19. An Overview of In-Stu Treatability Studies at Marshall Space Flight Center, Huntsville, Alabama

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McElroy, Bill; Keith, Amy; Glasgow, J. K.; Dasappa, Srini; McCaleb, Rebecca (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is located in Huntsville, Alabama (north-central Alabama), on approximately 1,840 acres near the center of the U.S. Army's Redstone Arsenal (RSA). MSFC is the National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) principal propulsion development center. Its scientists, engineers, and support personnel play a major role in the National Space Transportation System by managing space shuttle mission activities, including the microgravity laboratory. In addition, MSFC will be a significant contributor to several of NASA's future programs, including the Reusable Launch Vehicle (X-33), International Space Station, and Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility, as well as research on a variety of space science applications. MSFC has been used to develop, test and manufacture space vehicles and components since 1960, when civilian rocketry and missile activities were transferred from RSA to MSFC. In 1994, MSFC was placed on the National Priority List for the management of hazardous waste sites, under the requirements of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act (CERCLA). One requirement of the CERCLA program is to evaluate the nature and extent of environmental contamination resulting from identified CERCLA sites, assess the public health and environmental risks associated with the identified contamination, and identify potential remedial actions. A CERCLA remedial investigation (RI) for the groundwater system has identified at least five major plumes of chlorinated volatile organic compounds (CVOCs) in the groundwater beneath the facility. These plumes are believed to be the result of former management practices at 14 main facility locations (termed "source areas") where CVOCs were released to the subsurface. Trichloroethene (TCE) is the predominant CVOC and is common to all the plumes. Perchloroethene (PCE) also exists in two of the plumes. In addition to TCE and PCE, carbon tetrachloride and 1

  20. 2016 Year in Review Video- NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-12-22

    The work underway today at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center is making it possible to send humans beyond Earth’s orbit and into deep space on bold new missions of space exploration. Marshall teams are designing and building NASA’s Space Launch System, the most powerful rocket ever built and the only launch vehicle capable of launching human explorers to Mars. Using the International Space Station’s orbiting lab, Marshall flight controllers provided round-the-clock oversight of science experiments, supporting the first-ever DNA sequencing in space, pioneering 3-D printing capabilities and advancing human health research. Several successful New Frontiers deep-space robotic missions including OSIRIS-REx, New Horizons and Juno, made new discoveries and refined theories of the solar system. And Marshall collaborations with outside partners are yielding innovative technologies and solving technical challenges that are making the Journey to Mars a reality.

  1. NASA Marshall Impact Testing Facility Capabilities Applicable to Lunar Dust Work

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, Steven W.; Finchum, Andy; Hubbs, Whitney; Eskridge, Richard; Martin, Jim

    2008-01-01

    The Impact Testing Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center has several guns that would be of use in studying impact phenomena with respect to lunar dust. These include both ballistic guns, using compressed gas and powder charges, and hypervelocity guns, either light gas guns or an exploding wire gun. In addition, a plasma drag accelerator expected to reach 20 km/s for small particles is under development. Velocity determination and impact event recording are done using ultra-high-speed cameras. Simulation analysis is also available using the SPHC hydrocode.

  2. Marshall Space Flight Center Research and Technology Report 2015

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keys, A. S. (Compiler); Tinker, M. L. (Compiler); Sivak, A. D. (Compiler); Morris, H. C. (Compiler)

    2015-01-01

    The investments in technology development we made in 2015 not only support the Agency's current missions, but they will also enable new missions. Some of these projects will allow us to develop an in-space architecture for human space exploration; Marshall employees are developing and testing cutting-edge propulsion solutions that will propel humans in-space and land them on Mars. Others are working on technologies that could support a deep space habitat, which will be critical to enable humans to live and work in deep space and on other worlds. Still others are maturing technologies that will help new scientific instruments study the outer edge of the universe-instruments that will provide valuable information as we seek to explore the outer planets and search for life.

  3. Winners of the Skylab Student Program at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    One of the most successful of the Skylab educational efforts was the Skylab Student Project. A nationwide scientific competition was sponsored by the National Science Teachers Association and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) in which secondary students were encouraged to submit proposals for experiments to be conducted on Skylan in Earth orbit the following year. After the official announcement of this project, over 4,000 students responded with 3,409 proposals. The winning 25 students, along with their parents and sponsor teachers, visited Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the lead center for Skylab, where they met with scientists and engineers, participated in design reviews for their experiments, and toured MSFC facilities. Of the 25 students, 6 did not see their experiments conducted on Skylab because the experiments were not compatible with Skylab hardware and timelines. Of the 19 remaining, 11 experiments required the manufacture of additional equipment. This photograph is a group shot of the 25 winners, parents, and sponsors when they met for the first time on the steps of Building 4200 at MSFC in the Spring of 1972.

  4. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center's neutral buoyancy simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director, points and asks a question about the operation of the center's neutral buoyancy facility in the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. The facility was used to test and evaluate hardware and operations hat were planned for Apollo applications program flights.

  5. Dr. Wernher Von Braun at the Marshall Space Flight Center's neutral buoyancy simulator.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Dr. Wernher Von Braun, Marshall Space Flight Center director, points and asks a question about the operation of the center's neutral buoyancy facility in the Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory. The facility was used to test and evaluate hardware and operations hat were planned for Apollo applications program flights.

  6. Battery and cell testing at NASA. Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitt, Tom; Jackson, Lorna

    1992-01-01

    An overview covering the ten cell/battery tests ongoing at MSFC are presented. The presentation is not intended to give specific test results on any test. The purpose and related program that applies to each test is acknowledged. Except for the Combined Release and Radiation Effects Satellite (CRRES), all are energy-stored and retrieval devices at low earth orbit (LEO) cycles.

  7. Cooperative VAS program with NASA Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, D. D.

    1985-01-01

    The importance of mesoscale moisture information in the forecasting of weather events is discussed. A test is being prepared with the March 6, 1982 Vertical Atmospheric Sounder/Atmospheric Variability Experiment (VAS/AVE) case study to be run on the sub-synoptic scale model (SSM). Model intracomparison of three carefully designed simulations should isolate the role of mesoscale information in the initial conditions for both mositure and vertical motion. Three simulations will be made for the period 1200Z 6 March to 0000Z 7 March starting with the regular synoptic time data of 1200Z. The distinction between the three cases arises from data manipulation at 1800Z midway through the forecast period: (1) Control Case: no alterations at 1800Z. (2) Moisture Information Suppression: at 1800Z the model simulation field for water vapor, which by this time contains considerable mesoscale structure, is replaced by a smoothed version from which the mesoscale structure has been eliminated. No other variables are structure altered. (3) Vertical Motion Information Suppression: at 1800Z the model is subjected to a dead start procedure which primarily imposes a nondivergent constraint of the horizontal motion field field suppressing vertical motion. The main effect is to eliminate the mesoscale component. Comparison of results for the 1800Z to 0000Z time period will give the information desired.

  8. NASA Ames Research Center: An Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tu, Eugene; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    This overview of NASA Ames Research Center is intended to give the target audience of university students a general understanding of the mission, core competencies, and research goals of NASA and Ames.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2001-01-01

    This photograph shows the Starship 2040 leaving the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) for the exhibit site. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at MSFC, the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit, automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids and emergency and safety systems, are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a "real" Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  10. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-06-01

    This photograph shows onlookers viewing displays within the Starship 2040 exhibit on display at Joe Davis Stadium in Huntsville, Alabama. Developed by the Space Transportation Directorate at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), the Starship 2040 exhibit is housed in a 48-ft (14.6-m) tractor and trailer rig, permitting it to travel around the Nation, demonstrating NASA's vision of what commercial spaceflight might be like 40 years from now. All the irnovations suggested aboard the exhibit (automated vehicle health monitoring systems, high-energy propulsion drive, navigational aids, and emergency and safety systems) are based on concepts and technologies now being studied at NASA Centers and partner institutions around the Nation. NASA is the Nation's premier agency for development of the space transportation system, including future-generation reusable launch vehicles. Such systems, the keys to a "real" Starship 2040, require revolutionary advances in critical aerospace technologies, from thermal, magnetic, chemical, and propellantless propulsion systems to new energy sources such as space solar power or antimatter propulsion. These and other advances are now being studied, developed, and tested at NASA field centers and partner institutions all over the Nation.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA);Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. This photo shows the completed center with the additional arnex (right of building) that added an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to the already existent NSSTC, nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-27

    Filled with anticipation, students from three Huntsville area high schools: Randolph, Sparkman and Johnson High Schools, counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides them with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, two Johnson High School students pose with their rocket.

  13. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-27

    Filled with anticipation, students from three Huntsville area high schools: Randolph, Sparkman, and Johnson High Schools, counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, a rocket built by Johnson High School students soars to it projected designation.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-27

    Filled with anticipation, students from three Huntsville area high schools: Randolph, Sparkman, and Johnson High Schools, counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides them with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, three Sparkman High School students pose with their rocket.

  15. 'Focus on Marshall' Features Marshall’s 50th Anniversary

    NASA Image and Video Library

    On March 15, 1960, President Dwight Eisenhower issued an executive order designating NASA's first field center as the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center. On the November episode of “Focus on ...

  16. Assessment of MSFC's supervisory training programs and courses. [marshall space flight center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brindley, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    Courses and special programs to train supervisors at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) were to determine the adequacy of the present MSFC Supervisory Training Program and to recommend changes, if appropriate. The content, procedures, and student evaluations of the required Office of Personnel Management (OPM) 80 hours training for supervisors, the optional 120 hours, the MSFC Management Development Program (MDP), NASA's Management Education Program (MEP), various OPM and special contract programs, pertinent procedural guidelines, regulations, and letters, as well as various MSFC computer reports which indicate who took what training were analyzed. Various interviews with MSFC personnel involved in training are included. Recommendations consist of: (1) the choice of courses selected for the basic required OPM 80 hours be improved; (2) the optional 120 hours be discontinued and a shorter module be developed dealing with managerial decision making and human relations skills; (3) the MDP and MEP be continued as at present; and (4) that a broad array of developmental strategies be incorporated to provide a variety of opportunities for supervisory improvement.

  17. Using the World Wide Web for GIDEP Problem Data Processing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, John W.; Haraway, Sandra W.; Whirley, J. Don

    1999-01-01

    Since April 1997, Marshall Space Flight Center has been using electronic transfer and the web to support our processing of the Government-Industry Data Exchange Program (GIDEP) and NASA ALERT information. Specific aspects include: (1) Extraction of ASCII text information from GIDEP for loading into Word documents for e-mail to ALERT actionees; (2) Downloading of GIDEP form image formats in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) for internal storage display on the MSFC ALERT web page; (3) Linkage of stored GRDEP problem forms with summary information for access from the MSFC ALERT Distribution Summary Chart or from an html table of released MSFC ALERTs (4) Archival of historic ALERTs for reference by GIDEP ID, MSFC ID, or MSFC release date; (5) On-line tracking of ALERT response status using a Microsoft Access database and the web (6) On-line response to ALERTs from MSFC actionees through interactive web forms. The technique, benefits, effort, coordination, and lessons learned for each aspect are covered herein.

  18. Powder Processing of High Temperature Cermets and Carbides at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salvail, Pat; Panda, Binayak; Hickman, Robert R.

    2007-01-01

    The Materials and Processing Laboratory at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center is developing Powder Metallurgy (PM) processing techniques for high temperature cermet and carbide material consolidation. These new group of materials would be utilized in the nuclear core for Nuclear Thermal Rockets (NTR). Cermet materials offer several advantages for NTR such as retention of fission products and fuels, better thermal shock resistance, hydrogen compatibility, high thermal conductivity, and high strength. Carbide materials offer the highest operating temperatures but are sensitive to thermal stresses and are difficult to process. To support the effort, a new facility has been setup to process refractory metal, ceramic, carbides and depleted uranium-based powders. The facility inciudes inert atmosphere glove boxes for the handling of reactive powders, a high temperature furnace, and powder processing equipment used for blending, milling, and sieving. The effort is focused on basic research to identify the most promising compositions and processing techniques. Several PM processing methods including Cold and Hot Isostatic Pressing are being evaluated to fabricate samples for characterization and hot hydrogen testing.

  19. Using the World Wide Web for GIDEP Problem Data Processing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, John W.; Haraway, Sandra W.; Whirley, J. Don

    1999-01-01

    Since April 1997, Marshall Space Flight Center has been using electronic transfer and the web to support our processing of the Government-Industry Data Exchange Program (GIDEP) and NASA ALERT information. Specific aspects include: (1) Extraction of ASCII text information from GIDEP for loading into Word documents for e-mail to ALERT actionees; (2) Downloading of GIDEP form image formats in Adobe Acrobat (.pdf) for internal storage display on the MSFC ALERT web page; (3) Linkage of stored GRDEP problem forms with summary information for access from the MSFC ALERT Distribution Summary Chart or from an html table of released MSFC ALERTs (4) Archival of historic ALERTs for reference by GIDEP ID, MSFC ID, or MSFC release date; (5) On-line tracking of ALERT response status using a Microsoft Access database and the web (6) On-line response to ALERTs from MSFC actionees through interactive web forms. The technique, benefits, effort, coordination, and lessons learned for each aspect are covered herein.

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-06-18

    NASA scientist, in the Space Sciences lab at Marshall, works with capillary optics that generate more intense X-rays than conventional sources. This capability is useful in studying the structure of important proteins.

  1. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-06-20

    President George Bush and Alabama Governor Guy Hunt are greeted by Marshall's sixth Center Director Thomas J. Lee (1989-1994) upon their arrival at Redstone Arsenal (RSA) airfield. This was the first sitting president to visit Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) since President Kennedy's visit almost 30 years ago.

  2. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-07-08

    Dr. William R. Lucas, Marshall's fourth Center Director (1974-1986), delivers a speech in front of a picture of the lunar landscape with Earth looming in the background while attending a Huntsville Chamber of Commerce reception honoring his achievements as Director of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  3. NASA Shared Services Center breaks ground

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-02-24

    NASA officials and elected leaders were on hand for the groundbreaking ceremony of the NASA Shared Services Center Feb. 24, 2006, on the grounds of Stennis Space Center. The NSSC provides agency centralized administrative processing, human resources, procurement and financial services. From left, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Mike Olivier, Stennis Space Center Director Rick Gilbrech, Computer Sciences Corp. President Michael Laphen, NASA Deputy Administrator Shana Dale, Rep. Gene Taylor, Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin and Shared Services Center Executive Director Arbuthnot use golden shovels to break ground at the site.

  4. NASA Shared Services Center breaks ground

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    NASA officials and elected leaders were on hand for the groundbreaking ceremony of the NASA Shared Services Center Feb. 24, 2006, on the grounds of Stennis Space Center. The NSSC provides agency centralized administrative processing, human resources, procurement and financial services. From left, Louisiana Economic Development Secretary Mike Olivier, Stennis Space Center Director Rick Gilbrech, Computer Sciences Corp. President Michael Laphen, NASA Deputy Administrator Shana Dale, Rep. Gene Taylor, Sen. Trent Lott, Mississippi Gov. Haley Barbour, NASA Administrator Mike Griffin and Shared Services Center Executive Director Arbuthnot use golden shovels to break ground at the site.

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-29

    The National Space Science and Technology Center (NSSTC), located in Huntsville, Alabama, is a laboratory for cutting-edge research in selected scientific and engineering disciplines. The major objectives of the NSSTC are to provide multiple fields of expertise coming together to solve solutions to science and technology problems, and gaining recognition as a world-class science research organization. The center, opened in August 2000, focuses on space science, Earth sciences, information technology, optics and energy technology, biotechnology and materials science, and supports NASA's mission of advancing and communicating scientific knowledge using the environment of space for research. In addition to providing basic and applied research, NSSTC, with its student participation, also fosters the next generation of scientists and engineers. NSSTC is a collaborated effort between NASA and the state of Alabama through the Space Science and Technology alliance, a group of six universities including the Universities of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH),Tuscaloosa (UA), and Birmingham (UAB); the University of South Alabama in Mobile (USA); Alabama Agricultural and Mechanical University (AM) in Huntsville; and Auburn University (AU) in Auburn. Participating federal agencies include NASA, Marshall Space Flight Center, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Department of Defense, the National Science Foundation, and the Department of Energy. Industries involved include the Space Science Research Center, the Global Hydrology and Climate Center, the Information Technology Research Center, the Optics and Energy Technology Center, the Propulsion Research Center, the Biotechnology Research Center, and the Materials Science Research Center. An arnex, scheduled for completion by summer 2002, will add an additional 80,000 square feet (7,432 square meters) to NSSTC nearly doubling the size of the core facility. At full capacity, the completed NSSTC will top 200

  6. Physical Examination to Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Employees

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Nurse performs tonometry examination, which measure the tension of the eyeball, during an employee's arnual physical examination given by MSFC Occupational Medicine Environmental Health Services under the Center Operations Directorate.

  7. Environmental statement for the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center and Mississippi Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The environmental impact was investigated for the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center, and the Mississippi Test Facility. The installations are described, and the missions, environmental impact, and commitment of resources are discussed. It is concluded that there are negligible adverse environmental effects related to these two installations.

  8. Development of automated electromagnetic compatibility test facilities at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Cecil A.

    1986-01-01

    The efforts to automate the electromagentic compatibility (EMC) test facilites at Marshall Flight Center were examined. A battery of nine standard tests is to be integrated by means of a desktop computer-controller in order to provide near real-time data assessment, store the data acquired during testing on flexible disk, and provide computer production of the certification report.

  9. Scientific involvement in Skylab by the Space Sciences Laboratory of the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkler, C. E. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The involvement of the Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Sciences Laboratory in the Skylab program from the early feasibility studies through the analysis and publication of flight scientific and technical results is described. This includes mission operations support, the Apollo telescope mount, materials science/manufacturing in space, optical contamination, environmental and thermal criteria, and several corollary measurements and experiments.

  10. Marshall Space Flight Center and the Reactor-in-Flight Stage: A Look Back at Using Nuclear Propulsion to Power Space Vehicles in the 1960's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, Mike

    2003-01-01

    This paper examines the Marshall Space Flight Center s role in the Reactor-In-Flight (RIlT) project that NASA was involved with in the early 1960 s. The paper outlines the project s relation to the joint NASA-Atomic Energy Commission nuclear initiative known as Project Rover. It describes the justification for the RIFT project, its scope, and the difficulties that were encountered during the project. It also provides as assessment of NASA s overall capabilities related to nuclear propulsion in the early 1960 s.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-01-17

    Marshall's sixth Center Director Thomas J. Lee (1989-1994) touring the Payload Operations Control Center (POCC). The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) saw its launch into orbit under the leadership of Dr. Lee's administration.

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-17

    Prior to the commencement of Apollo 11th's 30th arniversary festivities at Marshall Space Flight Center, visiting Saturn astronauts take a tour of the Center. Pictured are (L/R): Dick Gordon, Owen Garriott and Edgar Mitchell

  13. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Burdine, Robert V. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature Si02 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  14. New Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeff; Stahl, H. Philip (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A new cryogenic optical testing capability exists at Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Optics Manufacturing Technology Center (SOMTC). SOMTC has been performing optical wavefront testing at cryogenic temperatures since 1999 in the X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility's (XRCF's) large vacuum chamber. Recently the cryogenic optical testing capability has been extended to a smaller vacuum chamber. This smaller horizontal cylindrical vacuum chamber has been outfitted with a helium-cooled liner that can be connected to the facility's helium refrigeration system bringing the existing kilowatt of refrigeration capacity to bear on a 1 meter diameter x 2 meter long test envelope. Cryogenic environments to less than 20 Kelvin are now possible in only a few hours. SOMTC's existing instruments (the Instantaneous Phase-shifting Interferometer (IPI) from ADE Phase-Shift Technologies and the PhaseCam from 4D Vision Technologies) view the optic under test through a 150 mm clear aperture BK-7 window. Since activation and chamber characterization tests in September 2001, the new chamber has been used to perform a cryogenic (less than 30 Kelvin) optical test of a 22.5 cm diameter x 127 cm radius of curvature SiO2 mirror, a cryogenic survival (less than 30 Kelvin) test of an adhesive, and a cryogenic cycle (less than 20 Kelvin) test of a ULE mirror. A vibration survey has also been performed on the test chamber. Chamber specifications and performance data, vibration environment data, and limited test results will be presented.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-12

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in the Science Operation Area (SOA) are payload specialists’ first Materials Processing Test during NASA/NASDA joint ground activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Fight Center (MSFC).

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-09-12

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in joint ground activities during the SL-J mission are NASA/NASDA personnel at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-12

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Featured together in the Science Operation Area (SOA) are payload specialists’ first Materials Processing Test during NASA/NASDA joint ground activities at the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  18. [X-33 Research By NASA Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Lockheed Martin Skunk Works has compiled an Annual Performance Report of the X-33/RLV Program. This report consists of individual reports from all industry team members, as well as NASA team centers. This portion of the report is comprised of overviews of each NASA Center's contribution to the program during the period 1 Apr. 1998 - 31 Mar. 1999.

  19. NASA's engineering research centers and interdisciplinary education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gordon I.

    1990-01-01

    A new program of interactive education between NASA and the academic community aims to improve research and education, provide long-term, stable funding, and support cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research. The mission of NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is discussed and it is pointed out that the OAET conducts about 10 percent of its total R&D program at U.S. universities. Other NASA university-based programs are listed including the Office of Commercial Programs Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) and the National Space Grant program. The importance of university space engineering centers and the selection of the nine current centers are discussed. A detailed composite description is provided of the University Space Engineering Research Centers. Other specialized centers are described such as the Center for Space Construction, the Mars Mission Research Center, and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration. Approaches to educational outreach are discussed.

  20. NASA's engineering research centers and interdisciplinary education

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, Gordon I.

    1990-01-01

    A new program of interactive education between NASA and the academic community aims to improve research and education, provide long-term, stable funding, and support cross-disciplinary and multi-disciplinary research. The mission of NASA's Office of Aeronautics, Exploration and Technology (OAET) is discussed and it is pointed out that the OAET conducts about 10 percent of its total R&D program at U.S. universities. Other NASA university-based programs are listed including the Office of Commercial Programs Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) and the National Space Grant program. The importance of university space engineering centers and the selection of the nine current centers are discussed. A detailed composite description is provided of the University Space Engineering Research Centers. Other specialized centers are described such as the Center for Space Construction, the Mars Mission Research Center, and the Center for Intelligent Robotic Systems for Space Exploration. Approaches to educational outreach are discussed.

  1. Watch 60-Seconds of Major SLS Hardware Being Moved and Put in the Test Stand at NASA Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-13

    A test version of the launch vehicle stage adapter (LVSA) for NASA’s new rocket, the Space Launch System, is moved to a 65-foot-tall test stand at the agency’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The test version LVSA will be stacked with other test pieces of the upper part of the SLS rocket and pushed, pulled and twisted as part of an upcoming test series to ensure each structure can withstand the incredible stresses of launch. The LVSA joins the core stage simulator, which was loaded into the test stand Sept. 21. The other three qualification articles and the Orion simulator will complete the stack later this fall. SLS will be the world’s most powerful rocket, and with the Orion spacecraft, take astronauts to deep-space destinations, including the Journey to Mars. More information on the upcoming test series can be found here: http://go.nasa.gov/2dS8yXB

  2. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-06-10

    This artist's concept portrays the plan for the new Engineering Directorate office to be constructed at the Marshall Space Flight Center. The first of several new buildings to be constructed as replacements for older Center facilities, the 5-story, 139,000-square-foot building will house approximately 500 current Marshall employees that provide development and research engineering services for the Marshall Center. Ground breaking ceremonies took place on June 10, 2003 at the construction site, southwest of the Martin and Rideout Roads intersection on Redstone Arsenal. GSC Construction of Waynesboro, Georgia has been selected as the contractor for the facility, which is scheduled for a September 2004 completion.

  3. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    In this photograph, students from all over the country gathered and discussed their Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Design Challenge project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama. These students who are just "typical teens," have been spending their time tackling some of the same challenges NASA engineers face when designing propulsion systems at MSFC. The ETO Design Challenge is a hands-on educational program, targeted to middle school students, in which students are assigned a project engaging in related design challenges in their classrooms under the supervision of their teachers. The project is valuable because it can be used by any student, and any teacher, even those without technical backgrounds. Student in 12 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Missouri, Montana, New York, Ohio, Ternessee, Virginia, and Washington, are taking part in MSFC's Earth-to-Orbit program. NASA uses such programs to support educational excellence while participating in educational outreach programs through centers around the country. One of the students' teachers, Joanne Fluvog, commented, "the biggest change I've seen is in the students' motivation and their belief in their ability to think." Justin O'Connor and Jeff Alden, students of Lane Middle School in Portland, Oregon, participated in the ETO program and said being involved in a real engineering project has made them realize that "science is cool."

  4. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-17

    In this photograph, Jeff Alden (left) and Justin O'Cornor, two middle school students at Lane Middle School in Portland, Oregon are demonstrating their Earth-to-Orbit (ETO) Design Challenge project at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama. Jeff and Justin, who are just a couple of "typical teens," have been spending their time tackling some of the same challenges NASA engineers face when designing propulsion systems at MSFC. The ETO Design Challenge is a hands-on educational program, targeted to middle school students, in which students are assigned a project engaging in related design challenges in their classrooms under the supervision of their teachers. The project is valuable because it can be used by any student and any teacher, even those without technical backgrounds. Students in 12 states: Alabama, Arkansas, California, Colorado, Illinois, Missouri, Montana, New York, Ohio, Tennessee, Virginia, and Washington, are taking part in the MSFC's Earth-to-Orbit program. NASA uses such programs to support educational excellence while participating in educational outreach programs through centers around the country. The Oregon students' teacher, Joanne Fluvog, commented, "the biggest change I've seen is in the students' motivation and their belief in their ability to think." Both Justin and Jeff said being involved in a real engineering project has made them realize that "science is cool."

  5. Laboratory Instruments Available to Support Space Station Researchers at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panda, Binayak; Gorti, Sridhar

    2013-01-01

    A number of research instruments are available at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to support ISS researchers and their investigations. These modern analytical tools yield valuable and sometimes new informative resulting from sample characterization. Instruments include modern scanning electron microscopes equipped with field emission guns providing analytical capabilities that include angstron-level image resolution of dry, wet and biological samples. These microscopes are also equipped with silicon drift X-ray detectors (SDD) for fast yet precise analytical mapping of phases, as well as electron back-scattered diffraction (EBSD) units to map grain orientations in crystalline alloys. Sample chambers admit large samples, provide variable pressures for wet samples, and quantitative analysis software to determine phase relations. Advances in solid-state electronics have also facilitated improvements for surface chemical analysis that are successfully employed to analyze metallic materials and alloys, ceramics, slags, and organic polymers. Another analytical capability at MSFC is a mganetic sector Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (SIMS) that quantitatively determines and maps light elements such as hydrogen, lithium, and boron along with their isotopes, identifies and quantifies very low level impurities even at parts per billion (ppb) levels. Still other methods available at MSFC include X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS) that can determine oxidation states of elements as well as identify polymers and measure film thicknesses on coated materials, Scanning Auger electron spectroscopy (SAM) which combines surface sensitivity, spatial lateral resolution (approximately 20 nm), and depth profiling capabilities to describe elemental compositions in near surface regions and even the chemical state of analyzed atoms. Conventional Transmission Electron Microscope (TEM) for observing internal microstructures at very high magnifications and the Electron Probe

  6. Contamination Control and Hardware Processing Solutions at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, DeWitt H.; Hampton, Tammy; Huey, LaQuieta; Mitchell, Mark; Norwood, Joey; Lowrey, Nikki

    2012-01-01

    The Contamination Control Team of Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processes Laboratory supports many Programs/ Projects that design, manufacture, and test a wide range of hardware types that are sensitive to contamination and foreign object damage (FOD). Examples where contamination/FOD concerns arise include sensitive structural bondline failure, critical orifice blockage, seal leakage, and reactive fluid compatibility (liquid oxygen, hydrazine) as well as performance degradation of sensitive instruments or spacecraft surfaces such as optical elements and thermal control systems. During the design phase, determination of the sensitivity of a hardware system to different types or levels of contamination/FOD is essential. A contamination control and FOD control plan must then be developed and implemented through all phases of ground processing, and, sometimes, on-orbit use, recovery, and refurbishment. Implementation of proper controls prevents cost and schedule impacts due to hardware damage or rework and helps assure mission success. Current capabilities are being used to support recent and on-going activities for multiple Mission Directorates / Programs such as International Space Station (ISS), James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), Space Launch System (SLS) elements (tanks, engines, booster), etc. The team also advances Green Technology initiatives and addresses materials obsolescence issues for NASA and external customers, most notably in the area of solvent replacement (e.g. aqueous cleaners containing hexavalent chrome, ozone depleting chemicals (CFC s and HCFC's), suspect carcinogens). The team evaluates new surface cleanliness inspection and cleaning technologies (e.g. plasma cleaning), and maintains databases for processing support materials as well as outgassing and optical compatibility test results for spaceflight environments.

  7. Space Environmental Effects Testing Capability at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWittBurns, H.; Craven, Paul; Finckenor, Miria; Nehls, Mary; Schneider, Todd; Vaughn, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the effects of the space environment on materials and systems is fundamental and essential for mission success. If not properly understood and designed for, the effects of the environment can lead to degradation of materials, reduction of functional lifetime, and system failure. In response to this need, the Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world class Space Environmental Effects (SEE) expertise and test facilities to simulate the space environment. Capabilities include multiple unique test systems comprising the most complete SEE testing capability available. These test capabilities include charged particle radiation (electrons, protons, ions), ultraviolet radiation (UV), vacuum ultraviolet radiation (VUV), atomic oxygen, plasma effects, space craft charging, lunar surface and planetary effects, vacuum effects, and hypervelocity impacts as well as the combination of these capabilities. In addition to the uniqueness of the individual test capabilities, MSFC is the only NASA facility where the effects of the different space environments can be tested in one location. Combined with additional analytical capabilities for pre- and post-test evaluation, MSFC is a one-stop shop for materials testing and analysis. The SEE testing and analysis are performed by a team of award winning experts nationally recognized for their contributions in the study of the effects of the space environment on materials and systems. With this broad expertise in space environmental effects and the variety of test systems and equipment available, MSFC is able to customize tests with a demonstrated ability to rapidly adapt and reconfigure systems to meet customers needs. Extensive flight experiment experience bolsters this simulation and analysis capability with a comprehensive understanding of space environmental effects.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1998-11-04

    NASA engineers successfully tested a Russian-built rocket engine on November 4, 1998 at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Advanced Engine Test Facility, which had been used for testing the Saturn V F-1 engines and Space Shuttle Main engines. The MSFC was under a Space Act Agreement with Lockheed Martin Astronautics of Denver to provide a series of test firings of the Atlas III propulsion system configured with the Russian-designed RD-180 engine. The tests were designed to measure the performance of the Atlas III propulsion system, which included avionics and propellant tanks and lines, and how these components interacted with the RD-180 engine. The RD-180 is powered by kerosene and liquid oxygen, the same fuel mix used in Saturn rockets. The RD-180, the most powerful rocket engine tested at the MSFC since Saturn rocket tests in the 1960s, generated 860,000 pounds of thrust.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-01

    This is a close-up of a sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy inside the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) vacuum chamber at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  10. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-01-01

    This Photo, which appeared on the July cover of `Physics Today', is of the Electrostatic Levitator (ESL) at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The ESL uses static electricity to suspend an object (about 3-4 mm in diameter) inside a vacuum chamber allowing scientists to record a wide range of physical properties without the sample contracting the container or any instruments, conditions that would alter the readings. Once inside the chamber, a laser heats the sample until it melts. The laser is then turned off and the sample cools, changing from a liquid drop to a solid sphere. In this particular shot, the ESL contains a solid metal sample of titanium-zirconium-nickel alloy. Since 1977, the ESL has been used at MSFC to study the characteristics of new metals, ceramics, and glass compounds. Materials created as a result of these tests include new optical materials, special metallic glasses, and spacecraft components.

  11. Marshall Space Flight Center 1960-1985: 25th anniversary report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Marshall Space FLight Center marks its 25th aniversary with a record of notable achievements. These accomplishments are the essence of the Marshall Center's history. Behind the scenes of the space launches and missions, however, lies the story of challenges faced and problems solved. The highlights of that story are presented. The story is organized not as a straight chronology but as three parallel reviews of the major assignments: propulsion systems and launch vehicles, space science research and technology, and manned space systems. The general goals were to reach space, to know and understand the space environment, and to inhabit and utilize space for the benefit of mankind. Also included is a chronology of major events, presented as a fold-out chart for ready reference.

  12. The Marshall Space Flight Center KC-135 zero gravity test program for FY 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shurney, R. E. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    During FY-82, researchers and experimenters from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) conducted 11 separate investigations during 26.3 hr of testing aboard the KC-135 zero-gravity aircraft, based at Ellington Air force Base, Texas. Although this represented fewer hours than initially projected, all experiment and test objectives were met or exceeded. This Technical Memorandum compiles all results achieved by MSFC users during FY-82, a year considered to be highly productive.

  13. Development of an EUV Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-08-22

    those requirements, the EUV source characteristics, the wavelength resolution that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray ...that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray Calibration Facility and the NSSTC EUV test chamber) where this facility will be...EUV) source has been added to the test facilities at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to extend the wavelength coverage from Xray to the EUV

  14. Development of a NEW Vector Magnetograph at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Hagyard, Mona; Gary, Allen; Smith, James; Adams, Mitzi; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the Experimental Vector Magnetograph that has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This instrument was designed to improve linear polarization measurements by replacing electro-optic and rotating waveplate modulators with a rotating linear analyzer. Our paper will describe the motivation for developing this magnetograph, compare this instrument with traditional magnetograph designs, and present a comparison of the data acquired by this instrument and original MSFC vector magnetograph.

  15. Development of a NEW Vector Magnetograph at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Hagyard, Mona; Gary, Allen; Smith, James; Adams, Mitzi; Rose, M. Franklin (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the Experimental Vector Magnetograph that has been developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This instrument was designed to improve linear polarization measurements by replacing electro-optic and rotating waveplate modulators with a rotating linear analyzer. Our paper will describe the motivation for developing this magnetograph, compare this instrument with traditional magnetograph designs, and present a comparison of the data acquired by this instrument and original MSFC vector magnetograph.

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-12

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) of Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1992-09-12

    The science laboratory, Spacelab-J (SL-J), flown aboard the STS-47 flight was a joint venture between NASA and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) utilizing a manned Spacelab module. The mission conducted 24 materials science and 20 life science experiments, of which 35 were sponsored by NASDA, 7 by NASA, and two collaborative efforts. Materials science investigations covered such fields as biotechnology, electronic materials, fluid dynamics and transport phenomena, glasses and ceramics, metals and alloys, and acceleration measurements. Life sciences included experiments on human health, cell separation and biology, developmental biology, animal and human physiology and behavior, space radiation, and biological rhythms. Test subjects included the crew, Japanese koi fish (carp), cultured animal and plant cells, chicken embryos, fruit flies, fungi and plant seeds, and frogs and frog eggs. Pictured along with George Norris in the Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) are NASDA alternate payload specialists Dr. Doi and Dr. Mukai.

  18. Capabilities of the Materials Contamination Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burns, Howard; Albyn, Keith; Edwards, David; Boothe, Richard; Finchum, Charles; Finckenor, Miria

    2003-01-01

    The Materials Contamination Team at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has been recognized for its contributions supporting the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft development programs. These programs include the Reusable Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM), Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the International Space Station (ISS). The Environmental Effects Group, with the Materials Contamination Team and the Space Environmental Effects Team has been an integral part of NASA's success by the testing, evaluation, and qualification of materials, hardware, and processes. This paper focuses on the capabilities of the Materials Contamination Team. The Materials Contamination Team's realm of responsibility includes establishing contamination control during all phases of hardware development, including design, manufacturing, assembly, test, transportation, launch site processing, on-orbit exposure, return, and refurbishment. The team continues its mission of reducing the risk of equipment failure due to molecular or particulate contamination. Contamination is a concern in the Space Shuttle with sensitive bond-lines and reactive fluid (liquid oxygen) compatibility as well as for spacecraft with sensitive optics, such as Hubble Space Telescope and Chandra X-ray Observatory. The Materials Contamination Team has a variety of facilities and instrumentation capable of contaminant detection, identification, and monitoring. The team addresses material applications dealing with environments, including production facilities, clean rooms, and on-orbit exposure. The optically stimulated electron emission (OSEE) system, the Ultraviolet (UV) fluorescence (UVF) surface contamination detection, and the Surface Optics Corporation 400 (SOC 400) portable hand-held Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectrometer are state-of-the-art tools for in-process molecular contamination detection. The team of engineers and technicians also develop contamination calibration standards

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Space Vehicle’s induction into the National Register of Historic Places by the United States Department of the Interior.

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1970-11-18

    Pictured here is astronaut Ed Gibson in Marshall Space Flight Center's Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) during Skylab Extra Vehicular Activity (EVA) training. This overall view shows a mockup of the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM) Transfer Work Station.

  1. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as an Alabama Historic Civil Engineering Landmark. The site was desinated as such in 1979.

  2. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, located on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama,commemorates the designation of the Saturn V Rocket as a National Historic Mechanical Engineering Landmark by the American Society of Mechanical Engineers in 1980.

  3. INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2010-11-17

    Flags are planted on the roof of the new INFINITY at NASA Stennis Space Center facility under construction just west of the Mississippi Welcome Center at exit 2 on Interstate 10. Stennis and community leaders celebrated the 'topping out' of the new science center Nov. 17, marking a construction milestone for the center. The 72,000-square-foot science and education center will feature space and Earth galleries to showcase the science that underpins the missions of the agencies at Stennis Space Center. The center is targeted to open in 2012.

  4. Transition Marshall Space Flight Center Wind Profiler Splicing Algorithm to Launch Services Program Upper Winds Tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauman, William H., III

    2014-01-01

    NASAs LSP customers and the future SLS program rely on observations of upper-level winds for steering, loads, and trajectory calculations for the launch vehicles flight. On the day of launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds and provide forecasts to the launch team via the AMU-developed LSP Upper Winds tool for launches at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. This tool displays wind speed and direction profiles from rawinsondes released during launch operations, the 45th Space Wing 915-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP, and output from numerical weather prediction models.The goal of this task was to splice the wind speed and direction profiles from the 45th Space Wing (45 SW) 915-MHz Doppler radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs) and KSC 50-MHz DRWP at altitudes where the wind profiles overlap to create a smooth profile. In the first version of the LSP Upper Winds tool, the top of the 915-MHz DRWP wind profile and the bottom of the 50-MHz DRWP were not spliced, sometimes creating a discontinuity in the profile. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Natural Environments Branch (NE) created algorithms to splice the wind profiles from the two sensors to generate an archive of vertically complete wind profiles for the SLS program. The AMU worked with MSFC NE personnel to implement these algorithms in the LSP Upper Winds tool to provide a continuous spliced wind profile.The AMU transitioned the MSFC NE algorithms to interpolate and fill data gaps in the data, implement a Gaussian weighting function to produce 50-m altitude intervals in each sensor, and splice the data together from both DRWPs. They did so by porting the MSFC NE code written with MATLAB software into Microsoft Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). After testing the new algorithms in stand-alone VBA modules, the AMU replaced the existing VBA code in the LSP Upper Winds tool with the new

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-09

    NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility, located in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana, is an 832 acre site that is a government-owned, contractor-operated component of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The facility was acquired by NASA in 1961 at the recommendation of Dr. Wernher von Braun and his rocket team in Huntsville Alabama. The cavernous plant served as the assembly facility for the Saturn launch vehicles and most recently the external tank (ET) used for the Space Shuttle Program. The facility features one of the world's biggest manufacturing plants with 43 acres under one roof and a port with deep-water access for the transportation of large space structures. When completed, space hardware is towed on a barge across the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida and up to Kennedy Space Center. The original tract of land was part of a 34,500 acre French Royal land grant to local merchant, Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent in 1763. Later, the land was acquired by French transplant Antoine Michoud, the son of Napoleon's Administrator of Domains, who moved to the city in 1827. Michoud operated a sugar cane plantation and refinery on the site until his death in 1863. His heirs continued operating the refinery and kept the original St. Maxent estate intact into the 20th century. Visible on the right, is one of two brick smokestacks from the original refinery that still stand before the Michoud facility today.

  6. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-09-09

    NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility, located in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana, is an 832 acre site that is a government-owned, contractor-operated component of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The facility was acquired by NASA in 1961 at the recommendation of Dr. Wernher von Braun and his rocket team in Huntsville Alabama. The cavernous plant served as the assembly facility for the Saturn launch vehicles and most recently the external tank (ET) used for the Space Shuttle Program. The facility features one of the world's biggest manufacturing plants with 43 acres under one roof and a port with deep-water access for the transportation of large space structures. When completed, space hardware is towed on a barge across the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida and up to Kennedy Space Center. The original tract of land was part of a 34,500 acre French Royal land grant to local merchant, Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent in 1763. Later, the land was acquired by French transplant Antoine Michoud, the son of Napoleon's Administrator of Domains, who moved to the city in 1827. Michoud operated a sugar cane plantation and refinery on the site until his death in 1863. His heirs continued operating the refinery and kept the original St. Maxent estate intact into the 20th century. Two brick smokestacks from the original refinery still stand before the Michoud facility today.

  7. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-09

    This photo (a frontal view) is of one of many segments of the Eastman-Kodak mirror assembly being tested for the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) project at the X-Ray Calibration Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). MSFC is supporting Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in developing the JWST by taking numerous measurements to predict its future performance. The tests are conducted in a vacuum chamber cooled to approximate the super cold temperatures found in space. During its 27 years of operation, the facility has performed testing in support of a wide array of projects, including the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), Solar A, Chandra technology development, Chandra High Resolution Mirror Assembly and science instruments, Constellation X-Ray Mission, and Solar X-Ray Imager, currently operating on a Geostationary Operational Environment Satellite. The JWST is NASA's next generation space telescope, a successor to the Hubble Space Telescope, named in honor of NASA's second administrator, James E. Webb. It is scheduled for launch in 2010 aboard an expendable launch vehicle. It will take about 3 months for the spacecraft to reach its destination, an orbit of 940,000 miles in space.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-11

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, racers from C-1 High School in Lafayette County, Missouri, get ready to tackle the course. The team pedaled its way to victory over 29 other teams to take first place honors. It was the second year in a row a team from the school has placed first in the high school division. (NASA/MSFC)

  9. Marshall Space Flight Center Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) Knowledge Management (KM) Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caraccioli, Paul; Varnedoe, Tom; Smith, Randy; McCarter, Mike; Wilson, Barry; Porter, Richard

    2006-01-01

    NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Propulsion Systems Department (PSD) is four months into a fifteen month Knowledge Management (KM) initiative to support enhanced engineering decision making and analyses, faster resolution of anomalies (near-term) and effective, efficient knowledge infused engineering processes, reduced knowledge attrition, and reduced anomaly occurrences (long-term). The near-term objective of this initiative is developing a KM Pilot project, within the context of a 3-5 year KM strategy, to introduce and evaluate the use of KM within PSD. An internal NASA/MSFC PSD KM team was established early in project formulation to maintain a practitioner, user-centric focus throughout the conceptual development, planning and deployment of KM technologies and capabilities within the PSD. The PSD internal team is supported by the University of Alabama's Aging Infrastructure Systems Center of Excellence (AISCE), lntergraph Corporation, and The Knowledge Institute. The principle product of the initial four month effort has been strategic planning of PSD KNI implementation by first determining the "as is" state of KM capabilities and developing, planning and documenting the roadmap to achieve the desired "to be" state. Activities undertaken to suppoth e planning phase have included data gathering; cultural surveys, group work-sessions, interviews, documentation review, and independent research. Assessments and analyses have beon pedormed including industry benchmarking, related local and Agency initiatives, specific tools and techniques used and strategies for leveraging existing resources, people and technology to achieve common KM goals. Key findings captured in the PSD KM Strategic Plan include the system vision, purpose, stakeholders, prioritized strategic objectives mapped to the top ten practitioner needs and analysis of current resource usage. Opportunities identified from research, analyses, cultural1KM surveys and practitioner interviews include

  10. The Marshall Space Flight Center Development of Mirror Modules for the ART-XC Instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gubarev, Mikhail V.; Ramsey, B.; ODell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 sq cm at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  11. The Marshall Space Flight Center development of mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument aboard the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubarev, M.; Ramsey, B.; O'Dell, S. L.; Elsner, R.; Kilaru, K.; McCracken, J.; Pavlinsky, M.; Tkachenko, A.; Lapshov, I.

    2012-09-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is developing x-ray mirror modules for the ART-XC instrument on board the Spectrum-Roentgen-Gamma Mission under a Reimbursable Agreement between NASA and the Russian Space Research Institute (IKI.) ART-XC will consist of seven co-aligned x-ray mirror modules with seven corresponding CdTe focal plane detectors. Currently, four of the modules are being fabricated by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC.) Each MSFC module consist of 28 nested Ni/Co thin shells giving an effective area of 65 cm2 at 8 keV, response out to 30 keV, and an angular resolution of 45 arcsec or better HPD. Delivery of these modules to the IKI is scheduled for summer 2013. We present a status of the ART x-ray modules development at the MSFC.

  12. GHRC: NASAs Hazardous Weather Distributed Active Archive Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, Rahul; Bugbee, Kaylin

    2016-01-01

    The Global Hydrology Resource Center (GHRC; ghrc.nsstc.nasa.gov) is one of NASA's twelve Distributed Active Archive Centers responsible for providing access to NASA's Earth science data to users worldwide. Each of NASA's twelve DAACs focuses on a specific science discipline within Earth science, provides data stewardship services and supports its research community's needs. Established in 1991 as the Marshall Space Flight Center DAAC and renamed GHRC in 1997, the data center's original mission focused on the global hydrologic cycle. However, over the years, data holdings, tools and expertise of GHRC have gradually shifted. In 2014, a User Working Group (UWG) was established to review GHRC capabilities and provide recommendations to make GHRC more responsive to the research community's evolving needs. The UWG recommended an update to the GHRC mission, as well as a strategic plan to move in the new direction. After a careful and detailed analysis of GHRC's capabilities, research community needs and the existing data landscape, a new mission statement for GHRC has been crafted: to provide a comprehensive active archive of both data and knowledge augmentation services with a focus on hazardous weather, its governing dynamical and physical processes, and associated applications. Within this broad mandate, GHRC will focus on lightning, tropical cyclones and storm-induced hazards through integrated collections of satellite, airborne, and in-situ data sets. The new mission was adopted at the recent 2015 UWG meeting. GHRC will retain its current name until such time as it has built substantial data holdings aligned with the new mission.

  13. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-04-16

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, Virginia and the MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-07-13

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-03-22

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. With the help of the NBS, building a space station became more of a reality. In a joint venture between NASA/Langley Research Center in Hampton, VA and MSFC, the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS) was developed and demonstrated at MSFC's NBS. The primary objective of this experiment was to test the ACCESS structural assembly concept for suitability as the framework for larger space structures and to identify ways to improve the productivity of space construction. Pictured is a demonstration of ACCESS.

  16. Networking at NASA. Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garman, John R.

    1991-01-01

    A series of viewgraphs on computer networks at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) are given. Topics covered include information resource management (IRM) at JSC, the IRM budget by NASA center, networks evolution, networking as a strategic tool, the Information Services Directorate charter, and SSC network requirements, challenges, and status.

  17. NASA IN THE PARK

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-18

    MORE THAN 7,500 PEOPLE ATTENDED NASA MARSHALL SPACE CENTER AND DOWNTOWN HUNTSVILLE, INC.’S THIRD ANNUAL CELEBRATION OF NASA AND THE COMMUNITY JUNE 18. THIS YEAR, THE EVENT MOVED TO HUNTSVILLE’S BIG SPRING PARK.

  18. Large space structures controls research and development at Marshall Space Flight Center: Status and future plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, H. J.

    1983-01-01

    Work performed in Large Space Structures Controls research and development program at Marshall Space Flight Center is described. Studies to develop a multilevel control approach which supports a modular or building block approach to the buildup of space platforms are discussed. A concept has been developed and tested in three-axis computer simulation utilizing a five-body model of a basic space platform module. Analytical efforts have continued to focus on extension of the basic theory and subsequent application. Consideration is also given to specifications to evaluate several algorithms for controlling the shape of Large Space Structures.

  19. Improving Performance of the System Safety Function at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kiessling, Ed; Tippett, Donald D.; Shivers, Herb

    2004-01-01

    The Columbia Accident Investigation Board (CAIB) determined that organizational and management issues were significant contributors to the loss of Space Shuttle Columbia. In addition, the CAIB observed similarities between the organizational and management climate that preceded the Challenger accident and the climate that preceded the Columbia accident. To prevent recurrence of adverse organizational and management climates, effective implementation of the system safety function is suggested. Attributes of an effective system safety program are presented. The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) system safety program is analyzed using the attributes. Conclusions and recommendations for improving the MSFC system safety program are offered in this case study.

  20. Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle has three main engines that are used for lift off into orbit. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps on each engine. A main element of the pumps are the bearings supporting the main shaft that spins the turbine and pumps. These bearings must spin at high speeds, support the radial and axial thrust loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of lubrication. This paper describes the bearing testing that was done at the Marshall Space Flight Center and the results that were obtained to provide the best bearing design possible for safe and reliable engine performance.

  1. Development of a EUV Test Facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, Edward; Pavelitz, Steve; Kobayashi, Ken; Robinson, Brian; Cirtain, Johnathan; Gaskin, Jessica; Winebarger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    This paper will describe a new EUV test facility that is being developed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) to test EUV telescopes. Two flight programs, HiC - high resolution coronal imager (sounding rocket) and SUVI - Solar Ultraviolet Imager (GOES-R), set the requirements for this new facility. This paper will discuss those requirements, the EUV source characteristics, the wavelength resolution that is expected and the vacuum chambers (Stray Light Facility, Xray Calibration Facility and the EUV test chamber) where this facility will be used.

  2. In-situ Thermal Treatment of Trichloroethene at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Jason; McElroy, William J.; Glasgow, Jason; Heron, Gorm; Galligan, Jim; Parker, Ken; Davis, E. F.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the in-situ thermal treatment of trichloroethene at Marshall space Flight Center. The contents include: 1) Background 1 and 2; 2) Source Area-13; 3) In-situ Thermal Treatment; 4) SA-13 Lithology; 5) SA-13 In-Situ Thermal TS; 6) SA-13 ISTD System Components; 7) ISTD Overview; 8) Heaters; 9) SA-13 ISTD Wellfield Layout; 10) SA-13 Well Field; 11) ISTD Process and Instrumentation; 12) Treatment Zone Temperature; 13) SA-13 System Removals; 14) SA-13 DNAPL (typical photos); 15) Treatment Results 1-5; and 16) SA-13 TCE Removal Summary.

  3. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  4. Cryogenic Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey; Baker, Mark; Carpenter, Jay; Eng, Ron; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; McCracken, Jeff; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie

    2006-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing sub-liquid nitrogen temperature testing since 1999. Optical wavefront measurement, thermal structural deformation, mechanism functional & calibration, and simple cryo-conditioning tests have been completed. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The chamber's payload envelope and the facility s refrigeration capacity have both been increased. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area improving access for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. The facility's capabilities, configuration, and performance data will be presented.

  5. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 by 14 Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel Technical Handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simon, Erwin

    1971-01-01

    This report is a description of the 14 x l4-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel facility at the Marshall Space Flight Center and is published as a handbook for the potential user of the facility who is not otherwise familiar with its operation. The following items are presented to illustrate the capabilities and operation of the tunnel: (1) facility description, (2) performance and operational characteristics, (3) model design, (4) instrumentation and data recording equipment, (5) data processing and presentation, and (6) preliminary test information required.

  6. Optical Characteristics of the Marshall Space Flight Center Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    West, E. A.; Porter, J. G.; Davis, J. M.; Gary, G. A.; Adams, M.; Smith, S.; Hraba, J. F.

    2001-01-01

    This paper will describe the scientific objectives of the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Solar Ultraviolet Magnetograph Investigation (SUMI) and the optical components that have been developed to meet those objectives. In order to test the scientific feasibility of measuring magnetic fields in the UV, a sounding rocket payload is being developed. This paper will discuss: (1) the scientific measurements that will be made by the SUMI sounding rocket program, (2) how the optics have been optimized for simultaneous measurements of two magnetic lines CIV (1550 Angstroms) and MgII (2800 Angstroms), and (3) the optical, reflectance, transmission and polarization measurements that have been made on the SUMI telescope mirror and polarimeter.

  7. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-22

    Filled with anticipation, students from two local universities, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), and Alabama Agricultural Mechanical University (AM), counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides the students with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. UAH students designed and built the rocket and AM students designed the payload. In this picture, AM students prepare their payload, an experiment that measures the amount of hydrogen produced during electroplating with nickel in a brief period of micrgravity, prior to launch.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-23

    Filled with anticipation, students from two local universities, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), and Alabama Agricultural Mechanical University (AM), counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides the students with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, the combined efforts of students from UAH and AM sent this rocket soaring into flight. Students at UAH built the rocket and AM students developed its scientific payload, an experiment that measures the amount of hydrogen produced during electroplating with nickel in a brief period of micrgravity.

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-22

    Filled with anticipation, students from two local universities, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), and Alabama Agricultural Mechanical University (AM), counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides the students with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, a student from AM and his mentor install their payload into the launch vehicle which was built by the team of UAH students. The scientific payload, developed and built by the team of AM students, measured the amount of hydrogen produced during electroplating with nickel in a brief period of micrgravity.

  10. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-22

    Filled with anticipation, students from two local universities, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), and Alabama Agricultural Mechanical University (AM), counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides the students with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, the University students prepare their rocket for launch. Students at UAH built the rocket and AM students developed its scientific payload, an experiment that measures the amount of hydrogen produced during electroplating with nickel in a brief period of micrgravity.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-05-22

    Filled with anticipation, students from two local universities, the University of Alabama in Huntsville (UAH), and Alabama Agricultural Mechanical University (AM), counted down to launch the rockets they designed and built at the Army test site on Redstone Arsenal in Huntsville, Alabama. The projected two-mile high launch culminated more than a year's work and demonstrated the student team's ability to meet the challenge set by the Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Student Launch Initiative (SLI) Program to apply science and math to experience, judgment, and common sense, and proved to NASA officials that they have successfully built reusable launch vehicles (RLVs), another challenge set by NASA's SLI program. MSFC's SLI program is an educational effort that aims to motivate students to pursue careers in science, math, and engineering. It provides the students with hands-on, practical aerospace experience. In this picture, the university students prepare their rocket for flight on the launch pad. Students at UAH built the rocket and AM students developed its scientific payload, an experiment that measures the amount of hydrogen produced during electroplating with nickel in a brief period of micrgravity.

  12. NASA selects new space research centers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) announced the selection of seven new Centers for the Commercial Development of Space (CCDS) on July 28, 1987. The centers will be eligible for NASA grants of as much as $1 million annually for the next 5 years to carry on scientific and technical research related to the commercial development of space. The locations and concentrations of the new centers are as follows: The University of Tennessee Space Institute-Center for Advanced Space Propulsion, Tullahoma, Tenn.Auburn University-Center for the Commercial Development of Space Power, Auburn, Ala.Environmental Research Institute of Michigan—Center for the Commercial Development of Autonomous and Man-Controlled Robotic Sensing Systems in Space, Ann Arbor, Mich.Pennsylvania State University-Center for Secretion Research, University Park, Penn.University of Colorado-Center for Bioserve Space Technologies, Boulder, Colo.Case Western Reserve University-Center on Materials for Space Structures, Cleveland, Ohio.Texas A&M Research Foundation-Center for Commercial Development of Space Power, College Station, Tex.

  13. JIM GREEN ADDRESSES THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-06-28

    JIM GREEN, DIRECTOR OF PLANETARY SCIENCE AT NASA HEADQUARTERS, ADDRESSES MARSHALL TEAM MEMBERS DURING A JUNE 28 LUNCHEON HOSTED BY THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION. OVER THE COURSE OF HIS 35-YEAR CAREER AT NASA, HE HAS SUPPORTED A DIVERSE ARRAY OF PLANETARY SCIENCE MISSIONS, AND RECENTLY SERVED AS SCIENCE ADVISOR FOR THE FILM ADAPTATION OF "THE MARTIAN." GREEN'S PRESENTATION WAS TITLED "THE MARTIAN: SCIENCE FICTION VS. SCIENCE FACT," IN WHICH HE DISCUSSED THE MOVIE AND THE NATION'S JOURNEY TO MARS. THE MARSHALL ASSOCIATION IS THE CENTER'S PROFESSIONAL, EMPLOYEE SERVICE ORGANIZATION.

  14. Supporting Multiple Programs and Projects at NASA's Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stewart, Camiren L.

    2014-01-01

    With the conclusion of the shuttle program in 2011, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) had found itself at a crossroads for finding transportation of United States astronauts and experiments to space. The agency would eventually hand off the taxiing of American astronauts to the International Space Station (ISS) that orbits in Low Earth Orbit (LEO) about 210 miles above the earth under the requirements of the Commercial Crew Program (CCP). By privatizing the round trip journey from Earth to the ISS, the space agency has been given the additional time to focus funding and resources to projects that operate beyond LEO; however, adding even more stress to the agency, the premature cancellation of the program that would succeed the Shuttle Program - The Constellation Program (CxP) -it would inevitably delay the goal to travel beyond LEO for a number of years. Enter the Space Launch System (SLS) and the Orion Multipurpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). Currently, the SLS is under development at NASA's Marshall Spaceflight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, while the Orion Capsule, built by government contractor Lockheed Martin Corporation, has been assembled and is currently under testing at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) in Florida. In its current vision, SLS will take Orion and its crew to an asteroid that had been captured in an earlier mission in lunar orbit. Additionally, this vehicle and its configuration is NASA's transportation to Mars. Engineers at the Kennedy Space Center are currently working to test the ground systems that will facilitate the launch of Orion and the SLS within its Ground Services Development and Operations (GSDO) Program. Firing Room 1 in the Launch Control Center (LCC) has been refurbished and outfitted to support the SLS Program. In addition, the Spaceport Command and Control System (SCCS) is the underlying control system for monitoring and launching manned launch vehicles. As NASA finds itself at a junction, so does all of its

  15. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center, National...

  16. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center, National...

  17. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center, National...

  18. 14 CFR 1206.401 - Location of NASA Information Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Location of NASA Information Centers. 1206... § 1206.401 Location of NASA Information Centers. (a) NASA will maintain the following Information Centers... which copies of Agency forms may be obtained: (1) NASA Headquarters (HQ) Information Center, National...

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-09-01

    A team of NASA researchers from Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) and Dryden Flight Research center have proven that beamed light can be used to power an aircraft, a first-in-the-world accomplishment to the best of their knowledge. Using an experimental custom built radio-controlled model aircraft, the team has demonstrated a system that beams enough light energy from the ground to power the propeller of an aircraft and sustain it in flight. Special photovoltaic arrays on the plane, similar to solar cells, receive the light energy and convert it to electric current to drive the propeller motor. In a series of indoor flights this week at MSFC, a lightweight custom built laser beam was aimed at the airplane `s solar panels. The laser tracks the plane, maintaining power on its cells until the end of the flight when the laser is turned off and the airplane glides to a landing. The laser source demonstration represents the capability to beam more power to a plane so that it can reach higher altitudes and have a greater flight range without having to carry fuel or batteries, enabling an indefinite flight time. The demonstration was a collaborative effort between the Dryden Center at Edward's, California, where the aircraft was designed and built, and MSFC, where integration and testing of the laser and photovoltaic cells was done. Laser power beaming is a promising technology for consideration in new aircraft design and operation, and supports NASA's goals in the development of revolutionary aerospace technologies. Photographed with their invention are (from left to right): David Bushman and Tony Frackowiak, both of Dryden; and MSFC's Robert Burdine.

  20. The George C. Marshall Space Flight Center's 14 X 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel: A Historical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, A.

    1994-01-01

    A history of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) George C. Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) 14 x 14-Inch Trisonic Wind Tunnel is presented. Its early and continuing role in the United States space program is shown through highlights of the tunnel's history and the major programs tested in the tunnel over the past 40 years. The 14-Inch Tunnel has its beginning with the Army in the late 1950's under the Army Ballistic Missile Agency (ABMA). Such programs as the Redstone, Jupiter, Pershing, and early Saturn were tested in the 14-Inch Tunnel in the late 1950's. America's first launch vehicle, the Jupiter C, was designed and developed using the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel. Under NASA, the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel has made large contributions to the Saturn, Space Transportation System, and future launch vehicle programs such as Shuttle-C and the National Launch System. A technical description of the tunnel is presented for background information on the type and capabilities of the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel. The report concludes in stating: the 14-Inch Wind Tunnel as in speed of sound; transonic, at or near the speed of sound the past, will continue to play a large but unseen role in he development of America's space program.

  1. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is the second volume in the 1994 annual report for the NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center's Sixth Annual Symposium. This conference covered: (1) Combustors and Nozzles; (2) Turbomachinery Aero- and Hydro-dynamics; (3) On-board Propulsion systems; (4) Advanced Propulsion Applications; (5) Vaporization and Combustion; (6) Heat Transfer and Fluid Mechanics; and (7) Atomization and Sprays.

  2. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-04-12

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 10th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Sixty-eight teams, representing high schools and colleges from all over the United States, and Puerto Rico, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team. In this photograph, Team No. 1 from North Dakota State University in Fargo conquers one of several obstacles on their way to victory. The team captured first place honors in the college level competition.

  3. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-12

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. In this photograph, the New Orleans area schools team #2 from New Orleans, Louisiana maneuvers through an obstacle course. The team captured second place in the high school division competition. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by the development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  4. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-13

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. This photograph shows the Cornell #2 team driving their vehicle through the course. The team finished the race in second place in the college division. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle, that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a human powered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems, similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-04-13

    Students from across the United States and as far away as Puerto Rico and South America came to Huntsville, Alabama for the 9th annual Great Moonbuggy Race at the U.S. Space Rocket Center. Seventy-seven teams, representing high schools and colleges from 21 states, Puerto Rico, and Columbia, raced human powered vehicles over a lunar-like terrain. A team from Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, took the first place honor in the college division. In this photograph, the Cornell #1 team, the collegiate first place winner, maneuvers their vehicle through the course. Vehicles powered by two team members, one male and one female, raced one at a time over a half-mile obstacle course of simulated moonscape terrain. The competition is inspired by development, some 30 years ago, of the Lunar Roving Vehicle (LRV), a program managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. The LRV team had to design a compact, lightweight, all-terrain vehicle that could be transported to the Moon in the small Apollo spacecraft. The Great Moonbuggy Race challenges students to design and build a humanpowered vehicle so they will learn how to deal with real-world engineering problems similar to those faced by the actual NASA LRV team.

  6. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1996-03-15

    Portrait of Marshall's eighth Center Director Dr. Jerroll W. Littles (1996-1998). During the two short years as Center Director, Dr. Littles' administration was responsible for the space lab mission, the space science projects, alternative light-weight launch vehicles and their engine development.

  7. Marshall Space Flight Center's role in EASE/ACCESS mission management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hawkins, Gerald W.

    1987-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Spacelab Payload Project Office was responsible for the mission management and development of several successful payloads. Two recent space construction experiments, the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) and the Assembly Concept for Construction of Erectable Space Structures (ACCESS), were combined into a payload managed by the center. The Ease/ACCESS was flown aboard the Space Shuttle Mission 61-B. The EASE/ACCESS experiments were the first structures assembled in space, and the method used to manage this successful effort will be useful for future space construction missions. The MSFC mission management responsibilities for the EASE/ACCESS mission are addressed and how the lessons learned from the mission can be applied to future space construction projects are discussed.

  8. Marshall Center Director Todd May Presents Vice President Mike Pence With Space Launch System Model

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-09-25

    Marshall Space Flight Center Director Todd May (left) presents Vice President Mike Pence (center) with a Space Launch System model. May, Vice President Pence, and Congressman Robert Aderholt (R-AL) (right) are standing in front of an SLS test stand where the engine section, the bottom section of the 212-foot-tall core stage, is being tested. Earlier, engineers working on the test gave the Vice President a close up look at test hardware. The test hardware is for the SLS core stage engine section, which is the bottom of the core stage where the four RS-25 engines are housed. The engine section structure must withstand the incredible stresses produced by more than 8 million pounds of thrust during launch and ascent.

  9. The NRC Research Associateship Program has Greatly Enhanced the Solar Research at Marshall Space Flight Center During the Last Quarter Century

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, G. A.

    2003-01-01

    Under the educational Resident Research Associateships (RRA) program, NASA Headquarters funds post-doctoral research scientists through a contract with the National Research Council (NRC). This short article reviews the important influence that the RRAs have had on solar research at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Through the RRA program the National Research Council under the National Academy of Sciences has provided the Marshall Space Flight Center s Solar Physics Group with 29 post-doctorial research associateships since 1975. This starting date corresponds with the increased research activity in solar physics at MSFC. A number of MSFC scientists had been working on and supporting NASA s Skylab Mission in operation from May 1973 until February 1974. This scientific effort included the development MSFC s X-ray telescope SO56 and the development of the United States first full-vector magnetograph. Numerous engineers and scientists at MSFC supported the development and operation of the cluster of solar telescopes on the Apollo Telescope Mount (ATM), a principal part of the Skylab orbiting workshop. With the enormous volume of new and exciting solar data of the solar corona, MSFC dedicated a group of scientists to analyze these data and develop new solar instruments and programs. With this new initiative, came the world- renowned solar prominence expert, Dr. Einar Tandberg-Hanssen, from the High Altitude Observatory in Boulder, Colorado and the support of the first two RRAs in support of solar physics research.

  10. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1980-02-27

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, theprospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Pictured is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) student working in a spacesuit on the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project which was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and MIT. The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle. The MIT student in this photo is assembling two six-beam tetrahedrons.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1980-01-07

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Pictured is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) student working in a spacesuit on the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project which was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and MIT. The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle. The MIT student in this photo is assembling two six-beam tetrahedrons.

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-08-24

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Another facet of the space station would be electrical cornectors which would be used for powering tools the astronauts would need for construction, maintenance and repairs. Shown is an astronaut training during an underwater electrical connector test in the NBS.

  13. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1980-05-06

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. Construction methods had to be efficient due to the limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. As part of this experimentation, the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle. Pictured is an entire unit that has been constructed and is sitting in the bottom of a mock-up shuttle cargo bay pallet.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1977-04-12

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built.Pictured is an experiment where the astronaut is required to move a large object which weighed 19,000 pounds. It was moved with realitive ease once the astronaut became familiar with his environment and his near weightless condition. Experiments of this nature provided scientists with the information needed regarding weight and mass allowances astronauts could manage in preparation for building a permanent space station in the future.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1978-07-21

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Included in the plans for the space station was a space telescope. This telescope would be attached to the space station and directed towards outerspace. Astronomers hoped that the space telescope would provide a look at space that is impossible to see from Earth because of Earth's atmosphere and other man made influences. Pictured is a large structure that is being used as the antenna base for the space telescope.

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1980-07-08

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Pictured is a Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) student working in a spacesuit on the Experimental Assembly of Structures in Extravehicular Activity (EASE) project which was developed as a joint effort between MFSC and MIT. The EASE experiment required that crew members assemble small components to form larger components, working from the payload bay of the space shuttle.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-09-09

    NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility, located in eastern New Orleans, Louisiana, is an 832 acre site that is a government-owned, contractor-operated component of the George C. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The facility was acquired by NASA in 1961 at the recommendation of Dr. Wernher von Braun and his rocket team in Huntsville Alabama. The cavernous plant served as the assembly facility for the Saturn launch vehicles and most recently the external tank (ET) used for the Space Shuttle Program. The facility features one of the world's biggest manufacturing plants with 43 acres under one roof and a port with deep-water access for the transportation of large space structures. When completed, space hardware is towed on a barge across the Gulf of Mexico, around Florida and up to Kennedy Space Center. The original tract of land was part of a 34,500 acre French Royal land grant to local merchant, Gilbert Antoine de St. Maxent in 1763. Later, the land was acquired by French transplant Antoine Michoud, the son of Napoleon's Administrator of Domains, who moved to the city in 1827. Michoud operated a sugar cane plantation and refinery on the site until his death in 1863. His heirs continued operating the refinery and kept the original St. Maxent estate intact into the 20th century. Two brick smokestacks from the original refinery still stand before the Michoud facility today as seen in the lower half of this photograph taken in the 1960's, while the upper half reflects the area during the time of the sugar cane plantation workers.

  18. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  19. The Center Master Plan For NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigach, Kristin M.

    2004-01-01

    The Center Master Plan for NASA Glenn Research Center is a comprehensive survey of NASA Glenn's current facility assets and a vision of how we see the facilities will change over the next 20 years in order to support the changing NASA Mission. This Center Master Plan is a vital management tool used by all organizations for making near term decisions and in future planning. During the summer of 2004, I worked with Joseph Morris, the Chief Architect in the Facilities Division, on beginning this Center Master Planning Process. The previous Master Plan was completed by the Center in 1985 and contained general information on the background of the facility as well as maps detailing environmental and historic records, land use, utilities, etc. The new Master Plan is required for the Center by NASA headquarters and will include similar types of information as used in the past. The new study will provide additional features including showing how individual buildings are linked to the programs and missions that they serve. The Master Plan will show practical future options for the facility s assets with a twenty year look ahead. The Plan will be electronically retrievable so that it becomes a communications tool for Center personnel. A Center Master Plan, although required, is very beneficial to NASA Glenn Research Center in aiding management with the future direction of the campus. Keeping up-to-date information and future plans readily available to all of NASA Glenn will insure that future real property development efficiently and effectively supports the missions camed out and supported by the Center. A Center Master Plan will also facilitate coordination with Center supported programs, stakeholders, and customers. In addition, it will provide a basis for cooperative planning with local and other governmental organizations and ultimately ensure that future budgets include the Center program needs described in the plan. This will ensure that development plans are safe

  20. Test and Analysis Capabilities of the Space Environment Effects Team at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Edwards, D. L.; Vaughn, J. A.; Schneider, T. A.; Hovater, M. A.; Hoppe, D. T.

    2002-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center has developed world-class space environmental effects testing facilities to simulate the space environment. The combined environmental effects test system exposes temperature-controlled samples to simultaneous protons, high- and low-energy electrons, vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) radiation, and near-ultraviolet (NUV) radiation. Separate chambers for studying the effects of NUV and VUV at elevated temperatures are also available. The Atomic Oxygen Beam Facility exposes samples to atomic oxygen of 5 eV energy to simulate low-Earth orbit (LEO). The LEO space plasma simulators are used to study current collection to biased spacecraft surfaces, arcing from insulators and electrical conductivity of materials. Plasma propulsion techniques are analyzed using the Marshall magnetic mirror system. The micro light gas gun simulates micrometeoroid and space debris impacts. Candidate materials and hardware for spacecraft can be evaluated for durability in the space environment with a variety of analytical techniques. Mass, solar absorptance, infrared emittance, transmission, reflectance, bidirectional reflectance distribution function, and surface morphology characterization can be performed. The data from the space environmental effects testing facilities, combined with analytical results from flight experiments, enable the Environmental Effects Group to determine optimum materials for use on spacecraft.

  1. NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) Presentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webster, William P.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA Center for Climate Simulation (NCCS) offers integrated supercomputing, visualization, and data interaction technologies to enhance NASA's weather and climate prediction capabilities. It serves hundreds of users at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, as well as other NASA centers, laboratories, and universities across the US. Over the past year, NCCS has continued expanding its data-centric computing environment to meet the increasingly data-intensive challenges of climate science. We doubled our Discover supercomputer's peak performance to more than 800 teraflops by adding 7,680 Intel Xeon Sandy Bridge processor-cores and most recently 240 Intel Xeon Phi Many Integrated Core (MIG) co-processors. A supercomputing-class analysis system named Dali gives users rapid access to their data on Discover and high-performance software including the Ultra-scale Visualization Climate Data Analysis Tools (UV-CDAT), with interfaces from user desktops and a 17- by 6-foot visualization wall. NCCS also is exploring highly efficient climate data services and management with a new MapReduce/Hadoop cluster while augmenting its data distribution to the science community. Using NCCS resources, NASA completed its modeling contributions to the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCG) Fifth Assessment Report this summer as part of the ongoing Coupled Modellntercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5). Ensembles of simulations run on Discover reached back to the year 1000 to test model accuracy and projected climate change through the year 2300 based on four different scenarios of greenhouse gases, aerosols, and land use. The data resulting from several thousand IPCC/CMIP5 simulations, as well as a variety of other simulation, reanalysis, and observationdatasets, are available to scientists and decision makers through an enhanced NCCS Earth System Grid Federation Gateway. Worldwide downloads have totaled over 110 terabytes of data.

  2. NASA Glenn Research Center's Hypersonic Propulsion Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palac, Donald T.

    1999-01-01

    NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), as NASA's lead center for aeropropulsion, is responding to the challenge of reducing the cost of space transportation through the integration of air-breathing propulsion into launch vehicles. Air- breathing launch vehicle (ABLV) propulsion requires a marked departure from traditional propulsion applications. and stretches the technology of both rocket and air-breathing propulsion. In addition, the demands of the space launch mission require an unprecedented level of integration of propulsion and vehicle systems. GRC is responding with a program with rocket-based combined cycle (RBCC) propulsion technology as its main focus. RBCC offers the potential for simplicity, robustness, and performance that may enable low-cost single-stage-to-orbit (SSTO) transportation. Other technologies, notably turbine-based combined cycle (TBCC) propulsion, offer benefits such as increased robustness and greater mission flexibility, and are being advanced, at a slower pace, as part of GRC's program in hypersonics.

  3. Center Overview and UAV Highlights at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feng, Deborah; Yan, Jerry Chi Yiu

    2017-01-01

    The PowerPoint presentation gives an overview of NASA Ames Research Center and its core competencies, as well as some of the highlights of Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) and Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) accomplishments and innovations by researchers at Ames.

  4. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-08

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. The subcommittee was briefed on MSFC’s manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. In this photograph, MSFC Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun meets with Congressmen in the MSFC boardroom. Pictured from left to right are: Jack Cramer, NASA Headquarters; Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative of Louisiana; John W. Davis, Democratic representative of Georgia; R. Walter Riehlman, Republican representative of New York; Olin E. Teague, Democratic representative of Texas; Dr. Wernher von Braun, Director of MSFC; James G. Fulton, Republican representative of Pennsylvania; Ken Hechler, Democratic representative of West Virginia; and Erich Neubert of MSFC.

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2004-07-28

    The grand opening of NASA’s new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies located at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, Alabama, took place in July 2004. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory (PRL) serves as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of innovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility is the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, features a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility allows it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellant propulsion. An important area of emphasis is the development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and sets the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications.

  6. Nozzle Side Load Testing and Analysis at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruf, Joseph H.; McDaniels, David M.; Brown, Andrew M.

    2009-01-01

    Realistic estimates of nozzle side loads, the off-axis forces that develop during engine start and shutdown, are important in the design cycle of a rocket engine. The estimated magnitude of the nozzle side loads has a large impact on the design of the nozzle shell and the engine s thrust vector control system. In 2004 Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) began developing a capability to quantify the relative magnitude of side loads caused by different types of nozzle contours. The MSFC Nozzle Test Facility was modified to measure nozzle side loads during simulated nozzle start. Side load results from cold flow tests on two nozzle test articles, one with a truncated ideal contour and one with a parabolic contour are provided. The experimental approach, nozzle contour designs and wall static pressures are also discussed

  7. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  8. Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System Test Facility at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Springer, Darlene

    1989-01-01

    Different aspects of Space Station Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) testing are currently taking place at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). Unique to this testing is the variety of test areas and the fact that all are located in one building. The north high bay of building 4755, the Core Module Integration Facility (CMIF), contains the following test areas: the Subsystem Test Area, the Comparative Test Area, the Process Material Management System (PMMS), the Core Module Simulator (CMS), the End-use Equipment Facility (EEF), and the Pre-development Operational System Test (POST) Area. This paper addresses the facility that supports these test areas and briefly describes the testing in each area. Future plans for the building and Space Station module configurations will also be discussed.

  9. Improved Cryogenic Optical Test Capability at Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray Cryogenic Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kegley, Jeffrey; Haight, Harlan; Hogue, William; Carpenter, Jay; Siler, Richard; Wright, Ernie; Eng, Ron; Baker, Mark; McCracken, Jeff

    2005-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center's X-ray & Cryogenic Test Facility (XRCF) has been performing optical wavefront testing and thermal structural deformation testing at subliquid nitrogen cryogenic temperatures since 1999. Recent modifications have been made to the facility in support of the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) program. The test article envelope and the chamber's refrigeration capacity have both been increased. A new larger helium-cooled enclosure has been added to the existing enclosure increasing both the cross-sectional area and the length. This new enclosure is capable of supporting six JWST Primary Mirror Segment Assemblies. A second helium refrigeration system has been installed essentially doubling the cooling capacity available at the facility. Modifications have also been made to the optical instrumentation area. Improved access is now available for both the installation and operation of optical instrumentation outside the vacuum chamber. Chamber configuration, specifications, and performance data will be presented.

  10. Friction Stir Welding Development at National Aeronautics and Space Administration-Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhat, Biliyar N.; Carter, Robert W.; Ding, Robert J.; Lawless, Kirby G.; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.; Russell, Carolyn K.; Shah, Sandeep R.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents an over-view of friction stir welding (FSW) process development and applications at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). FSW process development started as a laboratory curiosity but soon found support from many users. The FSW process advanced very quickly and has found many applications both within and outside the aerospace industry. It is currently being adapted for joining key elements of the Space Shuttle External Tank for improved producibility and reliability. FSW process modeling is done to better understand and improve the process. Special tools have been developed to weld variable thickness materials including very thin and very thick materials. FSW is now being applied to higher temperature materials such as copper and to advanced materials such as metal matrix composites. FSW technology is being successfully transferred from MSFC laboratory to shop floors of many commercial companies.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Redstone Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Dynamic Test Stand as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1985 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  13. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the Saturn V Launch Vehicle as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1984 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2007-03-28

    This photograph depicts a hot fire test of the Shuttle Booster Separation Motor (BSM) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) test stand 116. The objective of the test was to test the aft heat seal in flight configuration. The function of the motor is to separate the Shuttle vehicle from the boosters that carry it into space.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-16

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama, commemorates the designation of the Propulsion and Structural Test Facility as a National Historic Landmark by the National Park Service of the United States Interior. The site was designated as a landmark in 1985.

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2000-10-26

    This plaque, displayed on the grounds of Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Alabama commemorates the Neutral Buoyancy Space Simulator as a National Historic Landmark. The site was designated as such in 1986 by the National Park Service of the United States Department of the Interior.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1993-02-23

    This photograph was taken in the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) during the testing of the Japanese Experimental Module. The NBS provided the weightless environment encountered in space needed for testing and the practices of extra-vehicular activities.

  18. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1967-08-15

    An astronaut wearing a pressurized space suit performed a work task while suspended in a “zero-gravity” simulator known as the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at Marshall Space Flight Center. This particular task was one of many performed by astronauts while checking out the mockup for the Apollo Telescope Mount.

  19. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1995-07-12

    Astronauts Tamara Jernigan (#1) and David Wolf (#2) are training in the Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) at Marshall Space Flight center with an exercise for International Space Station Alpha. The NBS provided the weightless environment encountered in space needed for testing and the practices of Extravehicular Activities (EVA).

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-17

    Apollo 11 Astronaut Buzz Aldrin has his footprints casted during the dedication ceremony of the rocket fountain at Building 4200 at Marshall Space Flight Center. The casts of Aldrin's footprints will be placed in the newly constructed Von Braun courtyard representing the accomplishments of the Apollo 11 lunar landing.

  1. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1987-03-01

    The Peenemunde Rocket Team reunited on the steps of Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Headquarter Building 4200 for a reunion. The Peenemunde Rocket team were first assembled in Germany prior to World War II. They came to the United States at the end of the War and became the nucleus of the United States Army's rocket program.

  2. An Overview of the Materials Science Research at the Marshall Space Flight Center Electrostatic Levitator Facility and Recent CDDF Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Containerless processing is an important tool for materials research. The freedom from a crucible allows processing of liquid materials in a metastable undercooled state, as well as allowing processing of high temperature and highly reactive melts. Electrostatic levitation (ESL) is a containerless method which provides a number of unique advantages, including the ability to process non-conducting materials, the ability to operate in ultra-high vacuum or at moderate gas pressure (approx. = 5 atm), and the decoupling of positioning force from sample heating. ESL also has the potential to reduce internal flow velocities below those possible with electromagnetic, acoustic, or aero-acoustic techniques. In electrostatic levitation, the acceleration of gravity (or residual acceleration in reduced gravity) is opposed by the action of an applied electric field on a charged sample. Microgravity allows electrostatic levitation to work even more effectively. The ESL facility at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center is in use for materials research and thermophysical property measurement by a number of different internal and external investigators. Results from the recent CDDF studies on the high energy X-ray beamline at the Advanced Photon Source of Argonne National Laboratory will be presented. The Microgravity Research Program supports the facility.

  3. Marshall Avionics Testbed System (MAST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Wayne D.

    1989-01-01

    Work accomplished in the summer of 1989 in association with the NASA/ASEE Summer Faculty Research Fellowship Program at Marshall Space Flight Center is summarized. The project was aimed at developing detailed specifications for the Marshall Avionics System Testbed (MAST). This activity was to include the definition of the testbed requirements and the development of specifications for a set of standard network nodes for connecting the testbed to a variety of networks. The project was also to include developing a timetable for the design, implementation, programming and testing of the testbed. Specifications of both hardware and software components for the system were to be included.

  4. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    On 8-9 Sep. 1993, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center (PERC) at The Pennsylvania State University held its Fifth Annual Symposium. PERC was initiated in 1988 by a grant from the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology as a part of the University Space Engineering Research Center (USERC) program; the purpose of the USERC program is to replenish and enhance the capabilities of our Nation's engineering community to meet its future space technology needs. The Centers are designed to advance the state-of-the-art in key space-related engineering disciplines and to promote and support engineering education for the next generation of engineers for the national space program and related commercial space endeavors. Research on the following areas was initiated: liquid, solid, and hybrid chemical propulsion, nuclear propulsion, electrical propulsion, and advanced propulsion concepts.

  5. NASA(Field Center Based) Technology Commercialization Centers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Under the direction of the IC(sup 2) Institute, the Johnson Technology Commercialization Center has met or exceeded all planned milestones and metrics during the first two and a half years of the NTCC program. The Center has established itself as an agent for technology transfer and economic development in- the Clear Lake community, and is positioned to continue as a stand-alone operation. This report presents data on the experimental JTCC program, including all objective measures tracked over its duration. While the metrics are all positive, the data indicates a shortage of NASA technologies with strong commercial potential, barriers to the identification and transfer of technologies which may have potential, and small financial return to NASA via royalty-bearing licenses. The Center has not yet reached the goal of self-sufficiency based on rental income, and remains dependent on NASA funding. The most important issues raised by the report are the need for broader and deeper community participation in the Center, technology sourcing beyond JSC, and the form of future funding which will be appropriate.

  6. STS-35 Mission Manager Actions Room at the Marshall Space Flight Center Spacelab Payload Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activities at the Mission Manager Actions Room during the mission.

  7. HUT Data Inspected at Marshall Space Flight Center During the STS-35 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Due to loss of data used for pointing and operating the ultraviolet telescopes, MSFC ground teams were forced to aim the telescopes with fine tuning by the flight crew. This photo captures the activity of viewing HUT data in the Mission Manager Actions Room during the mission.

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-07-14

    A model of the new Aries I crew launch vehicle, for which NASA is designing, testing and evaluating hardware and related systems, is seen here on display at the Marshall Space Fight Center (MSFC), in Huntsville, Alabama. The Ares I crew launch vehicle is the rocket that will carry a new generation of space explorers into orbit. Under the goals of the Vision for Space Exploration, Ares I is a chief component of the cost-effective space transportation infrastructure being developed by NASA’s Constellation Program. These transportation systems will safely and reliably carry human explorers back to the moon, and then onward to Mars and other destinations in the solar system. The Ares I effort includes multiple project element teams at NASA centers and contract organizations around the nation, and is led by the Exploration Launch Projects Office at NASA’s MFSC. Together, these teams are developing vehicle hardware, evolving proven technologies, and testing components and systems. Their work builds on powerful, reliable space shuttle propulsion elements and nearly a half-century of NASA space flight experience and technological advances. Ares I is an inline, two-stage rocket configuration topped by the Crew Exploration Vehicle, its service module and a launch abort system. The launch vehicle’s first stage is a single, five-segment reusable solid rocket booster derived from the Space Shuttle Program’s reusable solid rocket motor that burns a specially formulated and shaped solid propellant called polybutadiene acrylonitrile (PBAN). The second or upper stage will be propelled by a J-2X main engine fueled with liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen. In addition to its primary mission of carrying crews of four to six astronauts to Earth orbit, the launch vehicle’s 25-ton payload capacity might be used for delivering cargo to space, bringing resources and supplies to the International Space Station or dropping payloads off in orbit for retrieval and transport to

  9. Meteorological regimes for the classification of aerospace air quality predictions for NASA-Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, J. B.; Sloan, J. C.

    1976-01-01

    A method is described for developing a statistical air quality assessment for the launch of an aerospace vehicle from the Kennedy Space Center in terms of existing climatological data sets. The procedure can be refined as developing meteorological conditions are identified for use with the NASA-Marshall Space Flight Center Rocket Exhaust Effluent Diffusion (REED) description. Classical climatological regimes for the long range analysis can be narrowed as the synoptic and mesoscale structure is identified. Only broad synoptic regimes are identified at this stage of analysis. As the statistical data matrix is developed, synoptic regimes will be refined in terms of the resulting eigenvectors as applicable to aerospace air quality predictions.

  10. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2002-10-30

    Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC's) building 4200 hosts a new spaceflight history museum referred to as the Heritage Gallery, allowing employees and visitors alike to have the opportunity to experience history first hand. On display are many models of launch vehicles and spacecraft that have made the center famous. It features a full-scale mockup of the lunar roving vehicle, three built-in multimedia displays, a large theater screen, and two glass cases that house memorabilia such as personal items belonging to Wernher von Braun, MSFC's first Center Director. The new Heritage Gallery features the accomplishments of several past and present members of the Marshall team. Attending the ribbon cutting ceremony are: (left to right) Gerhard Reisig; Cort Durocher, executive director of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics; Ernst Stuhlinger; Konrad Darnenburg; Werner Dahm; Walter Jacobi; and host of event, Center Director Art Stephenson.

  11. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1974-02-01

    Huntsville’s Jack Giles, Alabama State Senator (left), and Dr. Rocco Petrone, Marshall Space Flight Center Director (Middle), speak with Astronaut Owen Garriott who is inside the Apollo 16 Command Module on display at the Alabama Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, Alabama. The successful Apollo 16 manned lunar landing mission took place April 16, 1972 through April 27, 1972. (Photograph courtesy of Huntsville/Madison County Public Library)

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-10-02

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center’s (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand along with their wives are (left to right), Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, (holding certificate), Ed, Buckbee, Space and Rocket Center Director; Harvie Jones, Huntsville Architect; Dick Smith; and Joe Jones.

  13. Test Facilities Capability Handbook: Volume 1 - Stennis Space Center (SSC); Volume 2 - Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hensarling, Paula L.

    2007-01-01

    The John C. Stennis Space Center (SSC) is located in Southern Mississippi near the Mississippi-Louisiana state line. SSC is chartered as the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Center of Excellence for large space transportation propulsion system testing. This charter has led to many unique test facilities, capabilities and advanced technologies provided through the supporting infrastructure. SSC has conducted projects in support of such diverse activities as liquid, and hybrid rocket testing and development; material development; non-intrusive plume diagnostics; plume tracking; commercial remote sensing; test technology and more. On May 30, 1996 NASA designated SSC the lead center for rocket propulsion testing, giving the center total responsibility for conducting and/or managing all NASA rocket engine testing. Test services are now available not only for NASA but also for the Department of Defense, other government agencies, academia, and industry. This handbook was developed to provide a summary of the capabilities that exist within SSC. It is intended as a primary resource document, which will provide the reader with the top-level capabilities and characteristics of the numerous test facilities, test support facilities, laboratories, and services. Due to the nature of continually evolving programs and test technologies, descriptions of the Center's current capabilities are provided. Periodic updates and revisions of this document will be made to maintain its completeness and accuracy.

  14. NASA Lewis Research Center Futuring Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boroush, Mark; Stover, John; Thomas, Charles

    1987-01-01

    On October 21 and 22, 1986, the Futures Group ran a two-day Futuring Workshop on the premises of NASA Lewis Research Center. The workshop had four main goals: to acquaint participants with the general history of technology forecasting; to familiarize participants with the range of forecasting methodologies; to acquaint participants with the range of applicability, strengths, and limitations of each method; and to offer participants some hands-on experience by working through both judgmental and quantitative case studies. Among the topics addressed during this workshop were: information sources; judgmental techniques; quantitative techniques; merger of judgment with quantitative measurement; data collection methods; and dealing with uncertainty.

  15. PNT Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sands, Obed

    2017-01-01

    This presentation provides a review of Position Navigation and Timing activities at the Glenn Research Center. Topics include 1) contributions to simulation studies for the Space Service Volume of the Global Navigation Satellite System, 2) development and integration efforts for a Software Defined Radio (SDR) waveform for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) testbed, currently onboard the International Space Station and 3) a GPS L5 testbed intended to explore terrain mapping capabilities with communications signals. Future directions are included and a brief discussion of NASA, GRC and the SCAN office.

  16. NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Thomas L.; Storey, Richard W.; Youngbluth, Otto

    1987-01-01

    The NASA Langley Research Center tethered balloon system operations are covered in this report for the period of 1979 through 1983. Meteorological data, ozone concentrations, and other data were obtained from in situ measurements. The large tethered balloon had a lifting capability of 30 kilograms to 2500 meters. The report includes descriptions of the various components of the balloon systems such as the balloons, the sensors, the electronics, and the hardware. Several photographs of the system are included as well as a list of projects including the types of data gathered.

  17. Aerothermodynamics research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.

    1987-01-01

    Research activity in the aerothermodynamics branch at the NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed. Advanced concepts and mission studies relating to the next generation aerospace transportation systems are summarized and directions for continued research identified. Theoretical and computational studies directed at determining flow fields and radiative and convective heating loads in real gases are described. Included are Navier-Stokes codes for equilibrium and thermochemical nonequilibrium air. Experimental studies in the 3.5-ft hypersonic wind tunnel, the ballistic ranges, and the electric arc driven shock tube are described. Tested configurations include generic hypersonic aerospace plane configurations, aeroassisted orbital transfer vehicle shapes and Galileo probe models.

  18. Overview of Iodine Propellant Hall Thruster Development Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Haag, Thomas; Benavides, Gabriel; Hickman, Tyler; Smith, Timothy; Williams, George; Myers, James; Polzin, Kurt; Dankanich, John; Byrne, Larry; Szabo, James; Lee, Lauren

    2016-01-01

    NASA is continuing to invest in advancing Hall thruster technologies for implementation in commercial and government missions. There have been several recent iodine Hall propulsion system development activities performed by the team of the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Busek Co. Inc. In particular, the work focused on qualification of the 200 W Busek BHT-200-I and the continued development of the 600 W BHT-600-I Hall thruster propulsion systems. This paper presents an overview of these development activities and also reports on the results of short duration tests that were performed on the engineering model BHT-200-I and the development model BHT-600-I Hall thrusters.

  19. Overview of Iodine Propellant Hall Thruster Development Activities at NASA Glenn Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kamhawi, Hani; Benavides, Gabriel; Haag, Thomas; Hickman, Tyler; Smith, Timothy; Williams, George; Myers, James; Polzin, Kurt; Dankanich, John; Byrne, Larry; hide

    2016-01-01

    NASA is continuing to invest in advancing Hall thruster technologies for implementation in commercial and government missions. There have been several recent iodine Hall propulsion system development activities performed by the team of the NASA Glenn Research Center, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, and Busek Co. Inc. In particular, the work focused on qualification of the Busek BHT-200-I, 200 W and the continued development of the BHT-600-I Hall thruster propulsion systems. This presentation presents an overview of these development activities and also reports on the results of short duration tests that were performed on the engineering model BHT-200-I and the development model BHT-600-I Hall thrusters.

  20. Precision Cleaning and Verification Processes Used at Marshall Space Flight Center for Critical Hardware Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Caruso, Salvadore V.; Cox, Jack A.; McGee, Kathleen A.

    1998-01-01

    Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration performs many research and development programs that require hardware and assemblies to be cleaned to levels that are compatible with fuels and oxidizers (liquid oxygen, solid propellants, etc.). Also, MSFC is responsible for developing large telescope satellites which require a variety of optical systems to be cleaned. A precision cleaning shop is operated within MSFC by the Fabrication Services Division of the Materials & Processes Laboratory. Verification of cleanliness is performed for all precision cleaned articles in the Environmental and Analytical Chemistry Branch. Since the Montreal Protocol was instituted, MSFC had to find substitutes for many materials that have been in use for many years, including cleaning agents and organic solvents. As MSFC is a research center, there is a great variety of hardware that is processed in the Precision Cleaning Shop. This entails the use of many different chemicals and solvents, depending on the nature and configuration of the hardware and softgoods being cleaned. A review of the manufacturing cleaning and verification processes, cleaning materials and solvents used at MSFC and changes that resulted from the Montreal Protocol will be presented.

  1. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  2. Overview of Fluid Dynamics Activities at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Roberto; Griffin, Lisa W.; Wang, Ten-See

    1999-01-01

    Since its inception 40 years ago, Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) has had the need to maintain and advance state-of-the-art flow analysis and cold-flow testing capability to support its roles and missions. This overview discusses the recent organizational changes that have occurred at MSFC with emphasis on the resulting three groups that form the core of fluid dynamics expertise at MSFC: the Fluid Physics and Dynamics Group, the Applied Fluid Dynamics Analysis Group, and the Experimental Fluid Dynamics Group. Recently completed activities discussed include the analysis and flow testing in support of the Fastrac engine design, the X-33 vehicle design, and the X34 propulsion system design. Ongoing activities include support of the RLV vehicle design, Liquid Fly Back Booster aerodynamic configuration definition, and RLV focused technologies development. Other ongoing activities discussed are efforts sponsored by the Center Director's Discretionary Fund (CDDF) to develop an advanced incompressible flow code and to develop optimization techniques. Recently initiated programs and their anticipated required fluid dynamics support are discussed. Based on recent experiences and on the anticipated program needs, required analytical and experimental technique improvements are presented. Due to anticipated budgetary constraints, there is a strong need to leverage activities and to pursue teaming arrangements in order to advance the state-of-the-art and to adequately support concept development. Throughout this overview there is discussion of the lessons learned and of the capabilities demonstrated and established in support of the hardware development programs.

  3. Stress Analysis and Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center to Study Cause and Corrective Action of Space Shuttle External Tank Stringer Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingate, Robert J.

    2012-01-01

    After the launch scrub of Space Shuttle mission STS-133 on November 5, 2010, large cracks were discovered in two of the External Tank intertank stringers. The NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, as managing center for the External Tank Project, coordinated the ensuing failure investigation and repair activities with several organizations, including the manufacturer, Lockheed Martin. To support the investigation, the Marshall Space Flight Center formed an ad-hoc stress analysis team to complement the efforts of Lockheed Martin. The team undertook six major efforts to analyze or test the structural behavior of the stringers. Extensive finite element modeling was performed to characterize the local stresses in the stringers near the region of failure. Data from a full-scale tanking test and from several subcomponent static load tests were used to confirm the analytical conclusions. The analysis and test activities of the team are summarized. The root cause of the stringer failures and the flight readiness rationale for the repairs that were implemented are discussed.

  4. NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, James P.

    2001-01-01

    This report is a summary of the primary activities and metrics for the NASA Northeast Regional Technology Transfer Center, operated by the Center for Technology Commercialization, Inc. (CTC). This report covers the contract period January 1, 2000 - March 31, 2001. This report includes a summary of the overall CTC Metrics, a summary of the Major Outreach Events, an overview of the NASA Business Outreach Program, a summary of the Activities and Results of the Technology into the Zone program, and a Summary of the Major Activities and Initiatives performed by CTC in supporting this contract. Between January 1, 2000 and March 31, 2001, CTC has facilitated 10 license agreements, established 35 partnerships, provided assistance 517 times to companies, and performed 593 outreach activities including participation in 57 outreach events. CTC also assisted Goddard in executing a successful 'Technology into the Zone' program.' CTC is pleased to have performed this contract, and looks forward to continue providing their specialized services in support of the new 5 year RTTC Contract for the Northeast region.

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1979-08-13

    Once the United States' space program had progressed from Earth's orbit into outerspace, the prospect of building and maintaining a permanent presence in space was realized. To accomplish this feat, NASA launched a temporary workstation, Skylab, to discover the effects of low gravity and weightlessness on the human body, and also to develop tools and equipment that would be needed in the future to build and maintain a more permanent space station. The structures, techniques, and work schedules had to be carefully designed to fit this unique construction site. The components had to be lightweight for transport into orbit, yet durable. The station also had to be made with removable parts for easy servicing and repairs by astronauts. All of the tools necessary for service and repairs had to be designed for easy manipulation by a suited astronaut. And construction methods had to be efficient due to limited time the astronauts could remain outside their controlled environment. In lieu of all the specific needs for this project, an environment on Earth had to be developed that could simulate a low gravity atmosphere. A Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS) was constructed by NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in 1968. Since then, NASA scientists have used this facility to understand how humans work best in low gravity and also provide information about the different kinds of structures that can be built. Included in the plans for the space station was a space telescope. This telescope would be attached to the space station and directed towards outerspace. Astronomers hoped that the space telescope would provide a look at space that is impossible to see from Earth because of Earth's atmosphere and other man made influences. In an effort to make replacement and repairs easier on astronauts the space telescope was designed to be modular. Practice makes perfect as demonstrated in this photo: an astronaut practices moving modular pieces of the space telescope in the Neutral

  6. 77 FR 67029 - NASA Advisory Council Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-08

    ... SPACE ADMINISTRATION NASA Advisory Council Meeting AGENCY: National Aeronautics and Space Administration... amended, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration announces a meeting of the NASA Advisory... are local time. ADDRESSES: NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, Building 4200, Room P- 110, Marshall...

  7. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2006-10-19

    On October 19, 2006, former NASA director of Mission Operations Gene Kranz was a keynote speaker at the Marshall Space Flight Center’s (MSFC’s) 2006 Annual Safety Day program. The best selling author of “Failure Is Not An Option” and past Apollo flight director was featured during a morning session called “Coffee and Kranz”. Marshall employees hung on his every word as he told the fascinating story of Apollo 13. Kranz was the acting flight director during the Apollo 13 mission, a mission that seemed doomed to fail due to an onboard explosion. Kranz and his flight control team worked around the clock relentlessly, solving problem after problem, until the crew was returned safely to Earth.

  8. Faces of Marshall: Erika Andrews

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Human Resources Specialist Erika Andrews tells how she came to work at NASA as a specialist in organiz...

  9. Faces of Marshall: Arthur Brown

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Several Marshall employees were interviewed as part of Marshall's 50th Anniversary activities. Metallurgist Arthur Brown shares how his high school drafting and welding success led him to a NASA ca...

  10. May 20, 2016 Administrator Bolden Press Conference at Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-05-20

    NASA Administrator Charles Bolden presented the Small Business Administrator's Cup -- awarded for managing the agency's most effective small business program -- to NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. It is the fifth time in eight years Marshall has earned the prize, which honors innovative practices that promote small business participation in a variety of NASA initiatives, and recognizes the winning center's significant contributions to the agency's small business programs. The award is sponsored annually by NASA's Office of Small Business Programs. Following the award ceremony, Bolden met with the media.

  11. Results of Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator testing at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Benjamin E.; Cook, Jerry

    1993-06-01

    The Small-scale Solid Rocket Combustion Simulator (SSRCS) program was established at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), and used a government/industry team consisting of Hercules Aerospace Corporation, Aerotherm Corporation, United Technology Chemical Systems Division, Thiokol Corporation and MSFC personnel to study the feasibility of simulating the combustion species, temperatures and flow fields of a conventional solid rocket motor (SRM) with a versatile simulator system. The SSRCS design is based on hybrid rocket motor principles. The simulator uses a solid fuel and a gaseous oxidizer. Verification of the feasibility of a SSRCS system as a test bed was completed using flow field and system analyses, as well as empirical test data. A total of 27 hot firings of a subscale SSRCS motor were conducted at MSFC. Testing of the Small-scale SSRCS program was completed in October 1992. This paper, a compilation of reports from the above team members and additional analysis of the instrumentation results, will discuss the final results of the analyses and test programs.

  12. At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army's Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was originally designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage. Modifications to the S-IC Test Stand began in 1975 to accommodate space shuttle external tank testing. This view is from the 15th level of the test stand during the modification process.

  13. Marshall Space Flight Center's Tower Vector Magnetograph: Upgrades, Hardware, and Operations for the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) solar group announces the successful upgrade of our tower vector magnetograph. In operation since 1973, the last major alterations to the system (which includes telescope, filter, polarizing optics, camera, and data acquisition computer) were made in 1982, when we upgraded from an SEC Vidicon camera to a CCD. In 1985, other changes were made which increased the field-of-view from 5 x 5 arc min (2.4 arc sec per pixel) to 6 x 6 arc min with a resolution of 2.81 arc sec. In 1989, the Apollo Telescope Mount H-alpha telescope was coaligned with the optics of the magnetograph. The most recent upgrades (year 2000), funded to support the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission, have resulted in a pixel size of 0.64 arc sec over a 7 x 5.2 arc min field-of-view (binning 1x1). This poster describes the physical characteristics of the new system and compares spatial resolution, timing, and versatility with the old system. Finally, we provide a description of our Internet web site, which includes images of our most recent observations, and links to our data archives, as well as the history of magnetography at MSFC and education outreach pages.

  14. Marshall Space Flight Center's Tower Vector Magnetograph: Upgrades, Hardware, and Operations for the HESSI Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adams, M. L.; Hagyard, M. J.; West, E. A.; Smith, J. E.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) solar group announces the successful upgrade of our tower vector magnetograph. In operation since 1973, the last major alterations to the system (which includes telescope, filter, polarizing optics, camera, and data acquisition computer) were made in 1982, when we upgraded from an SEC Vidicon camera to a CCD. In 1985, other changes were made which increased the field-of-view from 5 x 5 arc min (2.4 arc sec per pixel) to 6 x 6 arc min with a resolution of 2.81 arc sec. In 1989, the Apollo Telescope Mount H-alpha telescope was coaligned with the optics of the magnetograph. The most recent upgrades (year 2000), funded to support the High Energy Solar Spectroscopic Imager (HESSI) mission, have resulted in a pixel size of 0.64 arc sec over a 7 x 5.2 arc min field-of-view (binning 1x1). This poster describes the physical characteristics of the new system and compares spatial resolution, timing, and versatility with the old system. Finally, we provide a description of our Internet web site, which includes images of our most recent observations, and links to our data archives, as well as the history of magnetography at MSFC and education outreach pages.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2003-02-01

    A new, world-class laboratory for research into future space transportation technologies is under construction at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) in Huntsville, AL. The state-of-the-art Propulsion Research Laboratory will serve as a leading national resource for advanced space propulsion research. Its purpose is to conduct research that will lead to the creation and development of irnovative propulsion technologies for space exploration. The facility will be the epicenter of the effort to move the U.S. space program beyond the confines of conventional chemical propulsion into an era of greatly improved access to space and rapid transit throughout the solar system. The Laboratory is designed to accommodate researchers from across the United States, including scientists and engineers from NASA, the Department of Defense, the Department of Energy, universities, and industry. The facility, with 66,000 square feet of useable laboratory space, will feature a high degree of experimental capability. Its flexibility will allow it to address a broad range of propulsion technologies and concepts, such as plasma, electromagnetic, thermodynamic, and propellantless propulsion. An important area of emphasis will be development and utilization of advanced energy sources, including highly energetic chemical reactions, solar energy, and processes based on fission, fusion, and antimatter. The Propulsion Research Laboratory is vital for developing the advanced propulsion technologies needed to open up the space frontier, and will set the stage of research that could revolutionize space transportation for a broad range of applications. This photo depicts construction workers taking part in a tree topping ceremony as the the final height of the laboratory is framed. The ceremony is an old German custom of paying homage to the trees that gave their lives in preparation of the building site.

  16. NASA Propulsion Engineering Research Center, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Over the past year, the Propulsion Engineering Research Center at The Pennsylvania State University continued its progress toward meeting the goals of NASA's University Space Engineering Research Centers (USERC) program. The USERC program was initiated in 1988 by the Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology to provide an invigorating force to drive technology advancements in the U.S. space industry. The Propulsion Center's role in this effort is to provide a fundamental basis from which the technology advances in propulsion can be derived. To fulfill this role, an integrated program was developed that focuses research efforts on key technical areas, provides students with a broad education in traditional propulsion-related science and engineering disciplines, and provides minority and other under-represented students with opportunities to take their first step toward professional careers in propulsion engineering. The program is made efficient by incorporating government propulsion laboratories and the U.S. propulsion industry into the program through extensive interactions and research involvement. The Center is comprised of faculty, professional staff, and graduate and undergraduate students working on a broad spectrum of research issues related to propulsion. The Center's research focus encompasses both current and advanced propulsion concepts for space transportation, with a research emphasis on liquid propellant rocket engines. The liquid rocket engine research includes programs in combustion and turbomachinery. Other space transportation modes that are being addressed include anti-matter, electric, nuclear, and solid propellant propulsion. Outside funding supports a significant fraction of Center research, with the major portion of the basic USERC grant being used for graduate student support and recruitment. The remainder of the USERC funds are used to support programs to increase minority student enrollment in engineering, to maintain Center

  17. CFD Modeling Activities at the NASA Stennis Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allgood, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on NASA Stennis Space Center's Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Modeling activities is shown. The topics include: 1) Overview of NASA Stennis Space Center; 2) Role of Computational Modeling at NASA-SSC; 3) Computational Modeling Tools and Resources; and 4) CFD Modeling Applications.

  18. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial...

  19. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2011-01-01 2010-01-01 true NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial...

  20. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial...

  1. 14 CFR 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. 1201... ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial Applications Centers. (a... and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network of Industrial...

  2. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1976-10-02

    On October 02, 1976, Marshall Space Flight Center’s (MSFC) Redstone test stand was received into the National Registry of Historical Places. Photographed in front of the Redstone test stand are Dr. William R. Lucas, MSFC Center Director from June 15, 1974 until July 3, 1986, as he is accepting a certificate of registration from Madison County Commission Chairman James Record, and Huntsville architect Harvie Jones.

  3. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-16

    Author of Rocket Boys Homer Hickam, Jr. (left) and Marshall Space Flight Center Director Art Stephenson during a conference at Morris Auditorium. Homer Hickam worked at MSFC during the Apollo project years. As a young man, Mr. Hickam always dreamed of becoming a rocket scientist and following in the footsteps fo Wernher von Braun. Years later he would see his dream realized and had written Rocket Boys commemorating his life and the people at MSFC.

  4. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-01-07

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares, active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability enabling repair of the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral

  5. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-01-07

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares,active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability enabling the repair of the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC

  6. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-01-07

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares, active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability enabling the repair of the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC

  7. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-01-07

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares,active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability, enabling repair to the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral

  8. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-01

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares, active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability enabling the repair of the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC

  9. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1983-04-01

    In February 1980, a satellite called Solar Maximum Mission Spacecraft, or Solar Max, was launched into Earth's orbit. Its primary objective was to provide a detailed study of solar flares, active regions on the Sun's surface, sunspots, and other solar activities. Additionally, it was to measure the total output of radiation from the Sun. Not much was known about solar activity at that time except for a slight knowledge of solar flares. After its launch, Solar Max fulfilled everyone's expectations. However, after a year in orbit, Solar Max's Altitude Control System malfunctioned, preventing the precise pointing of instruments at the Sun. NASA scientists were disappointed at the lost data, but not altogether dismayed because Solar Max had been designed for Space Shuttle retrievability enabling the repair of the satellite. On April 6, 1984, Space Shuttle Challenger (STS-41C), Commanded by astronaut Robert L. Crippen and piloted by Francis R. Scobee, launched on a historic voyage. This voyage initiated a series of firsts for NASA; the first satellite retrieval, the first service use of a new space system called the Marned Maneuvering Unit (MMU), the first in-orbit repair, the first use of the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), and the Space Shuttle Challenger's first space flight. The mission was successful in retrieving Solar Max. Mission Specialist Dr. George D. Nelson, using the MMU, left the orbiter's cargo bay and rendezvoused with Solar Max. After attaching himself to the satellite, he awaited the orbiter to maneuver itself nearby. Using the RMS, Solar Max was captured and docked in the cargo bay while Dr. Nelson replaced the altitude control system and the coronagraph/polarimeter electronics box. After the repairs were completed, Solar Max was redeposited in orbit with the assistance of the RMS. Prior to the April 1984 launch, countless man-hours were spent preparing for this mission. The crew of Challenger spent months at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC

  10. Technology transfer needs and experiences: The NASA Research Center perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.

    1992-01-01

    Viewgraphs on technology transfer needs and experiences - the NASA Research Center perspective are provided. Topics covered include: functions of NASA, incentives and benefits, technology transfer mechanisms, economics of technology commercialization, examples, and conclusions.

  11. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Richard, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) will provide a collaborative and virtual forum to integrate all disciplines of the human system to address spaceflight, aviation, and terrestrial human health and performance topics and issues. The NHHPC will serve a vital role as integrator, convening members to share information and capture a diverse knowledge base, while allowing the parties to collaborate to address the most important human health and performance topics of interest to members. The Center and its member organizations will address high-priority risk reduction strategies, including research and technology development, improved medical and environmental health diagnostics and therapeutics, and state-of-the art design approaches for human factors and habitability. Once full established in 2011, the NHHPC will focus on a number of collaborative projects focused on human health and performance, including workshops, education and outreach, information sharing and knowledge management, and research and technology development projects, to advance the study of the human system for spaceflight and other national and international priorities.

  12. NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. R.; Richard, E. E.

    2010-01-01

    The NASA Human Health and Performance Center (NHHPC) will provide a collaborative and virtual forum to integrate all disciplines of the human system to address spaceflight, aviation, and terrestrial human health and performance topics and issues. The NHHPC will serve a vital role as integrator, convening members to share information and capture a diverse knowledge base, while allowing the parties to collaborate to address the most important human health and performance topics of interest to members. The Center and its member organizations will address high-priority risk reduction strategies, including research and technology development, improved medical and environmental health diagnostics and therapeutics, and state-of-the art design approaches for human factors and habitability. Once full established in 2011, the NHHPC will focus on a number of collaborative projects focused on human health and performance, including workshops, education and outreach, information sharing and knowledge management, and research and technology development projects, to advance the study of the human system for spaceflight and other national and international priorities.

  13. Using CFD as Rocket Injector Design Tool: Recent Progress at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin; West, Jeff; Williams, Robert; Lin, Jeff; Rocker, Marvin; Canabal, Francisco; Robles, Bryan; Garcia, Robert; Chenoweth, James

    2003-01-01

    The choice of tools used for injector design is in a transitional phase between exclusive reliance on the empirically based correlations and extensive use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD). The Next Generation Launch Technology (NGLT) Program goals emphasizing lower costs and increased reliability have produced a need to enable CFD as an injector design tool in a shorter time frame. This is the primary objective of the Staged Combustor Injector Technology Task currently under way at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). The documentation of this effort begins with a very brief status of current injector design tools. MSFC's vision for use of CFD as a tool for combustion devices design is stated and discussed with emphasis on the injector. The concept of the Simulation Readiness Level (SRL), comprised of solution fidelity, robustness and accuracy, is introduced and discussed. This quantitative measurement is used to establish the gap between the current state of demonstrated capability and that necessary for regular use in the design process. MSFC's view of the validation process is presented and issues associated with obtaining the necessary data are noted and discussed. Three current experimental efforts aimed at generating validation data are presented. The importance of uncertainty analysis to understand the data quality is also demonstrated. First, a brief status of current injector design tools is provided as context for the current effort. Next, the MSFC vision for using CFD as an injector design tool is stated. A generic CFD-based injector design methodology is also outlined and briefly discussed. Three areas where MSFC is using injector CFD analyses for program support will be discussed. These include the Integrated Powerhead Development (IPD) engine which uses hydrogen and oxygen propellants in a full flow staged combustion (FFSC) cycle and the TR-107 and the RS84 engine both of which use RP-1 and oxygen in an ORSC cycle. Finally, an attempt is made to

  14. NASA Now: International Space Station Payload Operations

    NASA Image and Video Library

    In this episode of NASA Now, you’ll hear Katie Presson of the Payload Operations Integration team at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., discuss investigations being conducte...

  15. NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    NASA GLENN RESEARCH CENTER EMPLOYEE ENJOYS CAPTURING NASA'S NEXT GENERATION ASTRONAUT PORTRAITS AT PICTURE YOURSELF IN SPACE BOOTH AT THE WRIGHT PATTERSON AIR FORCE BASE OPEN HOUSE - AIR POWER 2003, MAY 10-11, 2003

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1963-03-29

    At its founding, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) inherited the Army’s Jupiter and Redstone test stands, but much larger facilities were needed for the giant stages of the Saturn V. From 1960 to 1964, the existing stands were remodeled and a sizable new test area was developed. The new comprehensive test complex for propulsion and structural dynamics was unique within the nation and the free world, and they remain so today because they were constructed with foresight to meet the future as well as on going needs. Construction of the S-IC Static test stand complex began in 1961 in the west test area of MSFC, and was completed in 1964. The S-IC static test stand was designed to develop and test the 138-ft long and 33-ft diameter Saturn V S-IC first stage, or booster stage, weighing in at 280,000 pounds. Required to hold down the brute force of a 7,500,000-pound thrust produced by 5 F-1 engines, the S-IC static test stand was designed and constructed with the strength of hundreds of tons of steel and 12,000,000 pounds of cement, planted down to bedrock 40 feet below ground level. The foundation walls, constructed with concrete and steel, are 4 feet thick. The base structure consists of four towers with 40-foot-thick walls extending upward 144 feet above ground level. The structure was topped by a crane with a 135-foot boom. With the boom in the upright position, the stand was given an overall height of 405 feet, placing it among the highest structures in Alabama at the time. In addition to the stand itself, related facilities were constructed during this time. Built directly east of the test stand was the Block House, which served as the control center for the test stand. The two were connected by a narrow access tunnel which housed the cables for the controls. Again to the east, just south of the Block House, was a newly constructed Pump House. Its function was to provide water to the stand to prevent melting damage during testing. The water was sprayed

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1999-07-19

    Noted author and previous Marshall Space Flight Center employee Mr. Homer Hickam Jr. poses in front of a placque commemorating his achievement in realizing his dreams of becoming a rocket scientist. The dedication site is located at the U. S. Space and Rocket Center in Huntsville, AL, and is used by amature rocket builders attending the Space Camp to launch their self-made rockets like Mr. Hickam did as a youth growing up in rural West Virginia. Posing with Mr. Hickam is the Madison County Commissioner Mr. Mike Gillispie.

  18. History of Space Shuttle Main Engine Turbopump Bearing Testing at the Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Howard; Thom, Robert; Moore, Chip; Haluck, Dave

    2010-01-01

    The Space Shuttle is propelled into orbit by two solid rocket motors and three liquid fed main engines. After the solid motors fall away, the shuttle engines continue to run for a total time of 8 minutes. These engines are fed propellants by low and high pressure turbopumps. A critical part of the turbopump is the main shaft that supports the drive turbine and the pump inducer and impeller. Rolling element bearings hold the shaft in place during rotation. If the bearings were to fail, the shaft would move, allowing components to rub in a liquid oxygen or hydrogen environment, which could have catastrophic results. These bearings are required to spin at very high speeds, support radial and axial loads, and have high wear resistance without the benefit of a conventional means of lubrication. The Rocketdyne built Shuttle turbopumps demonstrated their capability to perform during launches; however, the seven hour life requirement was not being met. One of the limiting factors was the bearings. In the late 1970's, an engineering team was formed at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC), to develop a test rig and plan for testing the Shuttle s main engine high pressure oxygen turbopump (HPOTP) bearings. The goals of the program were to better understand the operation of bearings in a cryogenic environment and to further develop and refine existing computer models used to predict the operational limits of these bearings. In 1982, testing began in a rig named the Bearing and Seal Material Tester or BSMT as it was commonly called. The first testing investigated the thermal margin and thermal runaway limits of the HPOTP bearings. The test rig was later used to explore potential bearing improvements in the area of increased race curvatures, new cage materials for better lubrication, new wear resistant rolling element materials, and other ideas to improve wear life. The most notable improvements during this tester s time was the incorporation of silicon nitride balls and

  19. ISDN at NASA Lewis Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakes, Catherine Murphy; Goldberg, Fredric; Eubanks, Steven W.

    1992-01-01

    An expository investigation of the potential impact of the Integrated Services Digital Network (ISDN) at NASA Lewis Research Center is described. To properly frame the subject, the paper contains a detailed survey of the components of Narrowband ISDN. The principles and objectives are presented as decreed by the Consultative Committee for International Telephone and Telegraph (CCITT). The various channel types are delineated and their associated service combinations are described. The subscriber-access network functions are explained pictorially via the ISDN reference configuration. A section on switching techniques is presented to enable the reader to understand the emergence of the concept of fast packet switching. This new technology is designed to operate over the high bandwidth, low error rate transmission media that characterizes the LeRC environment. A brief introduction to the next generation of networks is covered with sections on Broadband ISDM (B-ISDN), Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM), and Synchronous Optical Networks (SONET). Applications at LeRC are presented, first in terms of targets of opportunity, then in light of compatibility constraints. In-place pilot projects and testing are described that demonstrate actual usage at LeRC.

  20. Aerothermodynamics at NASA-Langley Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weilmuenster, K. James

    2001-01-01

    The Aerothermodynamics Branch at NASA - Langley Research Center is tasked with developing, assessing and applying aerothermodynamic technologies to enable the development of hypersonic aircraft, launch vehicles, and planetary/earth entry systems. To accomplish this mission, the Branch capitalizes on the synergism between the experimental and computational facilities/tools which reside in the branch and a staff that can draw on five decades of experience in aerothermodynamics. The Aerothermodynamics Branch is staffed by 30 scientists/engineers. The staff, of which two-thirds are less than 40 years old, is split evenly between experimentalists and computationalists. Approximately 90 percent of the staff work on space transportation systems while the remainder work on planetary missions. The Branch manages 5 hypersonic wind tunnels which are staffed by 14 technicians, numerous high end work stations and a SGI Origin 2000 system. The Branch also utilizes other test facilities located at Langley as well as other national and international test sites. Large scale computational requirements are met by access to Agency resources.

  1. NASA Johnson Space Center: Total quality partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlan, Charlie; Boyd, Alfred A.

    1992-01-01

    The development of and benefits realized from a joint NASA, support contractor continuous improvement process at the Johnson Space Center (JSC) is traced. The joint effort described is the Safety, Reliability, and Quality Assurance Directorate relationship with its three support contractors which began in early 1990. The Continuous Improvement effort started in early 1990 with an initiative to document and simplify numerous engineering change evaluation processes. This effort quickly grew in scope and intensity to include process improvement teams, improvement methodologies, awareness, and training. By early 1991, the support contractor had teams in place and functioning, program goals established and a cultural change effort underway. In mid-l991 it became apparent that a major redirection was needed to counter a growing sense of frustration and dissatisfaction from teams and managers. Sources of frustration were isolated to insufficient joint participation on teams, and to a poorly defined vision. Over the next year, the effort was transformed to a truly joint process. The presentation covers the steps taken to define vision, values, goals, and priorities and to form a joint Steering Committee and joint process improvement teams. The most recent assessment against the President's award criteria is presented as a summary of progress. Small, but important improvement results have already demonstrated the value of the joint effort.

  2. Thermal performance evaluation of the Northrop model NSC-01-0732 concentrating solar collector array at outdoor conditions. [Marshall Space Flight Center solar house test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The thermal efficiency of the concentrating, tracking solar collector was tested after ten months of operation at the Marshall Space Flight Center solar house. The test procedures and results are presented.

  3. PSP Testing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, J. H.; Hand, L. A.; Schairer, E. T.; Mehta, R. D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    Pressure sensitive paints (PSPs) are now used routinely for measuring surface pressures on wind tunnel models at transonic and supersonic Mach numbers. The method utilizes a surface coating containing fluorescent or phosphorescent materials, the brightness of which varies with the local air pressure on the surface. The present paper will summarize PSP activities (in progress and planned) at the NASA Ames Research Center. One of the main accomplishments at NASA Ames has been the development of a PSP measurement system that is production testing capable. This system has been integrated successfully into the large-scale wind tunnel facilities at Ames. There are several problems related to PSP testing which are unique to large-scale wind tunnel testing. The hardware is often difficult to set-up and must operate under harsh conditions (e.g. high pressures and low temperatures). The data acquisition and reduction times need to be kept to a minimum so that the overall wind tunnel productivity is not compromised. The pressure sensitive paints needs to be very robust; the paints must readily adhere to different surfaces with varying geometries and remain functional for long running times. The paint must have well understood, and preferably minimal, temperature sensitivity since fine control of the tunnel temperature is not easily achievable in the larger wind tunnels. In an effort to improve the overall accuracy of the PSP technique, we are currently evaluating some referenced pressure sensitive paints which contain a pressure- independent luminophor in addition to the one which is affected by the surface pressure. The two luminophors are chosen so that their emission wavelengths are somewhat different. Then by taking two 'wind-on' images with either two cameras (with different filters) or one camera with a rotating filter system, the need for 'wind-off' images can be eliminated. The ratio of the two wind-on images accounts for nonuniform lighting and model motion problems

  4. NASA News Center Building at the Press Site

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2017-05-03

    This is the NASA News Center at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, where reporters from television, radio, print and online media outlets have monitored countless launches, landings and other space events in order to deliver the news to the world.

  5. 14 CFR § 1201.402 - NASA Industrial Applications Centers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false NASA Industrial Applications Centers. Â... STATEMENT OF ORGANIZATION AND GENERAL INFORMATION General Information § 1201.402 NASA Industrial... aerospace knowledge and innovative technology to nonaerospace sectors of the economy—NASA operates a network...

  6. NASA Dryden Flight Research Center C-17 Research Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Chris

    2007-01-01

    A general overview of NASA Dryden Flight Research Center's C-17 Aircraft is presented. The topics include: 1) 2006 Activities PHM Instrumentation Refurbishment; 2) Acoustic and Vibration Sensors; 3) Gas Path Sensors; 4) NASA Instrumentation System Racks; 5) NASA C-17 Simulator; 6) Current Activities; 7) Future Work; 8) Lawn Dart ; 9) Weight Tub; and 10) Parachute Test Vehicle.

  7. The Western Aeronautical Test Range of NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, A. L.

    1984-01-01

    An overview of the Western Aeronautical Test Range (WATR) of NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) is presented in this paper. The three WATR facilities are discussed, and three WATR elements - mission control centerns, communications systems, real-time processing and display systems, and tracking systems -are reviewed. The relationships within the NASA WATR, with respect to the NASA aeronautics program, are also discussed.

  8. Using CFD as a Rocket Injector Design Tool: Recent Progress at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Kevin; West, Jeff; Williams, Robert; Lin, Jeff; Canabal, Francisco; Rocker, marvin; Robles, Bryan; Garcia, Robert; Chenoweth, James

    2005-01-01

    New programs are forcing American propulsion system designers into unfamiliar territory. For instance, industry s answer to the cost and reliability goals set out by the Next Generation Launch Technology Program are engine concepts based on the Oxygen- Rich Staged Combustion Cycle. Historical injector design tools are not well suited for this new task. The empirical correlations do not apply directly to the injector concepts associated with the ORSC cycle. These legacy tools focus primarily on performance with environment evaluation a secondary objective. Additionally, the environmental capability of these tools is usually one-dimensional while the actual environments are at least two- and often three-dimensional. CFD has the potential to calculate performance and multi-dimensional environments but its use in the injector design process has been retarded by long solution turnaround times and insufficient demonstrated accuracy. This paper has documented the parallel paths of program support and technology development currently employed at Marshall Space Flight Center in an effort to move CFD to the forefront of injector design. MSFC has established a long-term goal for use of CFD for combustion devices design. The work on injector design is the heart of that vision and the Combustion Devices CFD Simulation Capability Roadmap that focuses the vision. The SRL concept, combining solution fidelity, robustness and accuracy, has been established as a quantitative gauge of current and desired capability. Three examples of current injector analysis for program support have been presented and discussed. These examples are used to establish the current capability at MSFC for these problems. Shortcomings identified from this experience are being used as inputs to the Roadmap process. The SRL evaluation identified lack of demonstrated solution accuracy as a major issue. Accordingly, the MSFC view of code validation and current MSFC-funded validation efforts were discussed in

  9. The Evolution of Friction Stir Welding Theory at Marshall Space Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nunes, Arthur C.

    2012-01-01

    From 1995 to the present the friction stir welding (FSW) process has been under study at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC). This is an account of the progressive emergence of a set of conceptual tools beginning with the discovery of the shear surface, wiping metal transfer, and the invention of a kinematic model and making possible a treatment of both metallurgical structure formation and process dynamics in friction stir welding from a unified point of view. It is generally observed that the bulk of the deformation of weld metal around the FSW pin takes place in a very narrow, almost discontinuous zone with high deformation rates characteristic of metal cutting. By 1999 it was realized that this zone could be treated as a shear surface like that in simple metal cutting models. At the shear surface the seam is drawn out and compressed and pressure and flow conditions determine whether or not a sound weld is produced. The discovery of the shear surface was followed by the synthesis of a simple 3- flow kinematic model of the FSW process. Relative to the tool the flow components are: (1) an approaching translational flow at weld speed V, (2) a rotating cylindrical plug flow with the angular velocity of the tool , and (3) a relatively slow ring vortex flow (like a smoke ring) encircling the tool and driven by shoulder scrolls and pin threads. The rotating plug flow picks up an element of weld metal, rotates it around with the tool, and deposits it behind the tool ( wiping metal transfer ); it forms plan section loops in tracers cut through by the tool. Radially inward flow from the ring vortex component retains metal longer in the rotating plug and outward flow expels metal earlier; this interaction forms the looping weld seam trace and the tongue and groove bimetallic weld contour. The radial components of the translational and ring vortex flows introduce parent metal intrusions into the small grained nugget material close to the tool shoulder; if this feature is

  10. Renewable Energy at NASA's Johnson Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowall, Lindsay

    2014-01-01

    NASA's Johnson Space Center has implemented a great number of renewable energy systems. Renewable energy systems are necessary to research and implement if we humans are expected to continue to grow and thrive on this planet. These systems generate energy using renewable sources - water, wind, sun - things that we will not run out of. Johnson Space Center is helping to pave the way by installing and studying various renewable energy systems. The objective of this report will be to examine the completed renewable energy projects at NASA's Johnson Space Center for a time span of ten years, beginning in 2003 and ending in early 2014. This report will analyze the success of each project based on actual vs. projected savings and actual vs. projected efficiency. Additionally, both positive and negative experiences are documented so that lessons may be learned from past experiences. NASA is incorporating renewable energy wherever it can, including into buildings. According to the 2012 JSC Annual Sustainability Report, there are 321,660 square feet of green building space on JSC's campus. The two projects discussed here are major contributors to that statistic. These buildings were designed to meet various Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Certification criteria. LEED Certified buildings use 30 to 50 percent less energy and water compared to non-LEED buildings. The objectives of this project were to examine data from the renewable energy systems in two of the green buildings onsite - Building 12 and Building 20. In Building 12, data was examined from the solar photovoltaic arrays. In Building 20, data was examined from the solar water heater system. By examining the data from the two buildings, it could be determined if the renewable energy systems are operating efficiently. Objectives In Building 12, the data from the solar photovoltaic arrays shows that the system is continuously collecting energy from the sun, as shown by the graph below. Building 12

  11. NASA CORE - A Worldwide Distribution Center for Educational Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaiser-Holscott, K.

    2005-05-01

    The Lorain County Joint Vocational School District (JVS) administers NASA's Central Operation of Resources for Educators (CORE) for the purpose of: A. Operating a mail order service to supply educators around the world with NASA's educational materials; B. Servicing NASA Education Programs/Projects with NASA's educational materials; C. Supporting the NASA Educator Resource Center Network with technology resources for the next generation of ERC. D. Support NASA's mission to inspire the next generation of explorers...as only NASA can; E. Inspire and motivate students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics. This is accomplished by the continued operation of a central site that educators can contact to obtain information about NASA educational programs and research; obtain NASA educational publications and media; and receive technical support for NASA multimedia materials. In addition CORE coordinates the efforts of the 67 NASA Educator Resource Centers to establish a more effective network to serve educators. CORE directly supports part of NASA's core mission, To Inspire the Next Generation of Explorers.as only NASA can. CORE inspires and motivates students to pursue careers in geography, science, technology, engineering and mathematics by providing educators with exciting and NASA-unique educational material to enhance the students' learning experience. CORE is located at the Lorain County Joint Vocational School (JVS) in Oberlin, Ohio. Students at the JVS assist with the daily operations of CORE. This assistance provides the students with valuable vocational training opportunities and helps the JVS reduce the amount of funding needed to operate CORE. CORE has vast experience in the dissemination of NASA educational materials as well as a network of NASA Education Resource Centers who distribute NASA materials to secondary and post-secondary schools and universities, informal educators, and other interested individuals and

  12. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-08

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. The subcommittee was briefed on MSFC’s manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. In this photograph, MSFC Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Joe Waggoner, Democratic representative of Louisiana, discuss Apollo models.

  13. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-08

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. The subcommittee was briefed on MSFC’s manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. In this photograph, MSFC Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun and R. Walter Riehlman, Republican representative of New York, discuss Apollo models.

  14. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-08

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. The subcommittee was briefed on MSFC’s manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. In this photograph, MSFC Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun and Richard L. Roudebush, Republican representative of Indiana, discuss Apollo models.

  15. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-03

    Members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on January 3, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. Shown here at MSFC’s Manufacturing Engineering Laboratory are (left to right): Dr. Eberhard Rees, MSFC; Congressman George P. Miller, Democratic representative of California; Congressman F. Edward Hebert, Democratic representative of Louisiana; Congressman Robert R. Casey, Democratic representative of Texas; and Werner Kuers, MSFC.

  16. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1962-03-08

    The members of the House Committee on Science and Astronautics visited the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) on March 9, 1962 to gather firsthand information of the nation’s space exploration program. The congressional group was composed of members of the Subcommittee on Manned Space Flight. The subcommittee was briefed on MSFC’s manned space efforts earlier in the day and then inspected mockups of the Saturn I Workshop and the Apollo Telescope Mount, two projects developed by MSFC for the post-Apollo program. In this photograph, MSFC Director, Dr. Wernher von Braun, bids farewell to Texas Democratic Representative Olin E. Teague before departure at the Redstone Arsenal Airstrip.

  17. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1986-02-06

    Preparing for the eventual launch of the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), an astronaut prepares himself for the rigorous duties of maintenance and repairs after launch, at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). The NBS provided mock-ups of the HST, the Remote Manipulator System (RMS), the orbiter's cargo bay, and the low-gravity environment that the astronauts would encounter while working in space. All aspects of shuttle missions were pre-plarned and practiced at the NBS to forego any problems in space.

  18. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1991-07-24

    Two years prior to being used during a shuttle mission, the Transfer to Orbit System (TOS) is being demonstrated at Marshall Space Flight Center's (MSFC) Neutral Buoyancy Simulator (NBS). TOS is an upper stage launch system used to place satellites into higher orbits. TOS was used only once, on September 12, 1993 when the Space Shuttle Discovery (STS51) deployed ACTS (Advanced Communications Technology Satellite). The test pictured was to provide an evaluation of the extravehicular activity (EVA) tools that were to be used by future shuttle crews.

  19. 'Focus on Marshall' Highlights 10 Years of Space Station Support and World's Largest 'Can Crusher'

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Ten years ago, NASA's Payload Operations Center at Marshall worked its first science mission for the International Space Station. Since then, the science command post has coordinated over 1,100 exp...

  20. Around Marshall

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1990-12-03

    The primary objective of the STS-35 mission was round the clock observation of the celestial sphere in ultraviolet and X-Ray astronomy with the Astro-1 observatory which consisted of four telescopes: the Hopkins Ultraviolet Telescope (HUT); the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (WUPPE); the Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope (UIT); and the Broad Band X-Ray Telescope (BBXRT). The Huntsville Operations Support Center (HOSC) Spacelab Payload Operations Control Center (SL POCC) at the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) was the air/ground communication channel used between the astronauts and ground control teams during the Spacelab missions. Teams of controllers and researchers directed on-orbit science operations, sent commands to the spacecraft, received data from experiments aboard the Space Shuttle, adjusted mission schedules to take advantage of unexpected science opportunities or unexpected results, and worked with crew members to resolve problems with their experiments. Pictured is the TV OPS area of the SL POCC.