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Sample records for nasa-ames vertical motion

  1. Development and operation of a real-time simulation at the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sweeney, Christopher; Sheppard, Shirin; Chetelat, Monique

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility at the NASA Ames Research Center combines the largest vertical motion capability in the world with a flexible real-time operating system allowing research to be conducted quickly and effectively. Due to the diverse nature of the aircraft simulated and the large number of simulations conducted annually, the challenge for the simulation engineer is to develop an accurate real-time simulation in a timely, efficient manner. The SimLab facility and the software tools necessary for an operating simulation will be discussed. Subsequent sections will describe the development process through operation of the simulation; this includes acceptance of the model, validation, integration and production phases.

  2. NASA-Ames vertical gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, P. H.

    1984-01-01

    A national facility, the NASA-Ames vertical gun range (AVGR) has an excellent reputation for revealing fundamental aspects of impact cratering that provide important constraints for planetary processes. The current logistics in accessing the AVGR, some of the past and ongoing experimental programs and their relevance, and the future role of this facility in planetary studies are reviewed. Publications resulting from experiments with the gun (1979 to 1984) are listed as well as the researchers and subjects studied.

  3. Fidelity assessment of a UH-60A simulation on the NASA Ames vertical motion simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, Adolph, Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Helicopter handling qualities research requires that a ground-based simulation be a high-fidelity representation of the actual helicopter, especially over the frequency range of the investigation. This experiment was performed to assess the current capability to simulate the UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter on the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames, to develop a methodology for assessing the fidelity of a simulation, and to find the causes for lack of fidelity. The approach used was to compare the simulation to the flight vehicle for a series of tasks performed in flight and in the simulator. The results show that subjective handling qualities ratings from flight to simulator overlap, and the mathematical model matches the UH-60A helicopter very well over the range of frequencies critical to handling qualities evaluation. Pilot comments, however, indicate a need for improvement in the perceptual fidelity of the simulation in the areas of motion and visual cuing. The methodology used to make the fidelity assessment proved useful in showing differences in pilot work load and strategy, but additional work is needed to refine objective methods for determining causes of lack of fidelity.

  4. Piloted Evaluation of Modernized Limited Authority Control Laws in the NASA-Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sahasrabudhe, Vineet; Melkers, Edgar; Faynberg, Alexander; Blanken, Chris L.

    2003-01-01

    The UH-60 BLACK HAWK was designed in the 1970s, when the US Army primarily operated during the day in good visual conditions. Subsequently, the introduction of night-vision goggles increased the BLACK HAWK'S mission effectiveness, but the accident rate also increased. The increased accident rate is strongly tied to increased pilot workload as a result of a degradation in visual cues. Over twenty years of research in helicopter flight control and handling qualities has shown that these degraded handling qualities can be recovered by modifying the response type of the helicopter in low speed flight. Sikorsky Aircraft Corporation initiated a project under the National Rotorcraft Technology Center (NRTC) to develop modern flight control laws while utilizing the existing partial authority Stability Augmentation System (SAS) of the BLACK HAWK. This effort resulted in a set of Modernized Control Laws (MCLAWS) that incorporate rate command and attitude command response types. Sikorsky and the US Army Aeroflightdynamics Directorate (AFDD) conducted a piloted simulation on the NASA-Ames Vertical h4otion Simulator, to assess potential handling qualities and to reduce the risk of subsequent implementation and flight test of these modern control laws on AFDD's EH-60L helicopter. The simulation showed that Attitude Command Attitude Hold control laws in pitch and roll improve handling qualities in the low speed flight regime. These improvements are consistent across a range of mission task elements and for both good and degraded visual environments. The MCLAWS perform better than the baseline UH-60A control laws in the presence of wind and turbulence. Finally, while the improved handling qualities in the pitch and roll axis allow the pilot to pay more attention to the vertical axis and hence altitude performance also improves, it is clear from pilot comments and altitude excursions that the addition of an Altitude Hold function would further reduce workload and improve overall

  5. Feasibility and concept study to convert the NASA/AMES vertical motion simulator to a helicopter simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belsterling, C. A.; Chou, R. C.; Davies, E. G.; Tsui, K. C.

    1978-01-01

    The conceptual design for converting the vertical motion simulator (VMS) to a multi-purpose aircraft and helicopter simulator is presented. A unique, high performance four degrees of freedom (DOF) motion system was developed to permanently replace the present six DOF synergistic system. The new four DOF system has the following outstanding features: (1) will integrate with the two large VMS translational modes and their associated subsystems; (2) can be converted from helicopter to fixed-wing aircraft simulation through software changes only; (3) interfaces with an advanced cab/visual display system of large dimensions; (4) makes maximum use of proven techniques, convenient materials and off-the-shelf components; (5) will operate within the existing building envelope without modifications; (6) can be built within the specified weight limit and avoid compromising VMS performance; (7) provides maximum performance with a minimum of power consumption; (8) simple design minimizes coupling between motions and maximizes reliability; and (9) can be built within existing budgetary figures.

  6. Simulation of a synergistic six-post motion system on the flight simulator for advanced aircraft at NASA-Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bose, S. C.; Parris, B. L.

    1977-01-01

    Motion system drive philosophy and corresponding real-time software have been developed for the purpose of simulating the characteristics of a typical synergistic Six-Post Motion System (SPMS) on the Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA) at NASA-Ames which is a non-synergistic motion system. This paper gives a brief description of these two types of motion systems and the general methods of producing motion cues of the FSAA. An actuator extension transformation which allows the simulation of a typical SPMS by appropriate drive washout and variable position limiting is described.

  7. NASA Ames ATM Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denery, Dallas G.

    2000-01-01

    The NASA Ames research Center, in cooperation with the FAA and the industry, has a series of major research efforts underway that are aimed at : 1) improving the flow of traffic in the national airspace system; and 2) helping to define the future air traffic management system. The purpose of this presentation will be to provide a brief summary of some of these activities.

  8. NASA Ames Research Center Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyd, Jack

    2006-01-01

    A general overview of the NASA Ames Research Center is presented. The topics include: 1) First Century of Flight, 1903-2003; 2) NACA Research Centers; 3) 65 Years of Innovation; 4) Ames Projects; 5) NASA Ames Research Center Today-founded; 6) Astrobiology; 7) SOFIA; 8) To Explore the Universe and Search for Life: Kepler: The Search for Habitable Planets; 9) Crew Exploration Vehicle/Crew Launch Vehicle; 10) Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS); 11) Thermal Protection Materials and Arc-Jet Facility; 12) Information Science & Technology; 13) Project Columbia Integration and Installation; 14) Air Traffic Management/Air Traffic Control; and 15) New Models-UARC.

  9. Evaluation of the Rotational Throttle Interface for Converting Aircraft Utilizing the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozovski, David; Theodore, Colin R.

    2011-01-01

    An experiment was conducted to compare a conventional helicopter Thrust Control Lever (TCL) to the Rotational Throttle Interface (RTI) for tiltrotor aircraft. The RTI is designed to adjust its orientation to match the angle of the tiltrotor s nacelles. The underlying principle behind the design is to increase pilot awareness of the vehicle s configuration state (i.e. nacelle angle). Four test pilots flew multiple runs on seven different experimental courses. Three predominant effects were discovered in the testing of the RTI: 1. Unintentional binding along the control axis resulted in difficulties with precision power setting, 2. Confusion in which way to move the throttle grip was present during RTI transition modes, and 3. Pilots were not able to distinguish small angle differences during RTI transition. In this experiment the pilots were able to successfully perform all of the required tasks with both inceptors although the handling qualities ratings were slightly worse for the RTI partly due to unforeseen deficiencies in the design. Pilots did however report improved understanding of nacelle movement during transitions with the RTI.

  10. Transformation Systems at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray; Fischer, Bernd; Havelund, Klaus; Lowry, Michael; Pressburger, TOm; Roach, Steve; Robinson, Peter; VanBaalen, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the experiences of the Automated Software Engineering Group at the NASA Ames Research Center in the development and application of three different transformation systems. The systems span the entire technology range, from deductive synthesis, to logic-based transformation, to almost compiler-like source-to-source transformation. These systems also span a range of NASA applications, including solving solar system geometry problems, generating data analysis software, and analyzing multi-threaded Java code.

  11. NASA Ames Sonic Boom Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durston, Donald A.; Kmak, Francis J.

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sonic boom wind tunnel models were tested in the NASA Ames Research Center 9-by 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to reestablish related test techniques in this facility. The goal of the testing was to acquire higher fidelity sonic boom signatures with instrumentation that is significantly more sensitive than that used during previous wind tunnel entries and to compare old and new data from established models. Another objective was to perform tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons of data from a Gulfstream sonic boom model tested at the NASA Langley Research Center 4-foot by 4-foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel.

  12. NASA Ames Environmental Sustainability Report 2011

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clarke, Ann H.

    2011-01-01

    The 2011 Ames Environmental Sustainability Report is the second in a series of reports describing the steps NASA Ames Research Center has taken toward assuring environmental sustainability in NASA Ames programs, projects, and activities. The Report highlights Center contributions toward meeting the Agency-wide goals under the 2011 NASA Strategic Sustainability Performance Program.

  13. Terminal Area ATM Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobias, Leonard

    1997-01-01

    The presentation will highlight the following: (1) A brief review of ATC research underway 15 years ago; (2) A summary of Terminal Area ATM Tool Development ongoing at NASA Ames; and (3) A projection of research activities 10-15 years from now.

  14. Rotorcraft Research at the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aponso, Bimal Lalith; Tran, Duc T.; Schroeder, Jeffrey A.

    2009-01-01

    In the 1970 s the role of the military helicopter evolved to encompass more demanding missions including low-level nap-of-the-earth flight and operation in severely degraded visual environments. The Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at the NASA Ames Research Center was built to provide a high-fidelity simulation capability to research new rotorcraft concepts and technologies that could satisfy these mission requirements. The VMS combines a high-fidelity large amplitude motion system with an adaptable simulation environment including interchangeable and configurable cockpits. In almost 30 years of operation, rotorcraft research on the VMS has contributed significantly to the knowledge-base on rotorcraft performance, handling qualities, flight control, and guidance and displays. These contributions have directly benefited current rotorcraft programs and flight safety. The high fidelity motion system in the VMS was also used to research simulation fidelity. This research provided a fundamental understanding of pilot cueing modalities and their effect on simulation fidelity.

  15. NASA Ames aerospace systems directorate research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albers, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The Aerospace Systems Directorate is one of four research directorates at the NASA Ames Research Center. The Directorate conducts research and technology development for advanced aircraft and aircraft systems in intelligent computational systems and human-machine systems for aeronautics and space. The Directorate manages research and aircraft technology development projects, and operates and maintains major wind tunnels and flight simulation facilities. The Aerospace Systems Directorate's research and technology as it relates to NASA agency goals and specific strategic thrusts are discussed.

  16. Optical computing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Bualat, Maria G.; Downie, John D.; Galant, David; Gary, Charles K.; Hine, Butler P.; Ma, Paul W.; Pryor, Anna H.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1991-01-01

    Optical computing research at NASA Ames Research Center seeks to utilize the capability of analog optical processing, involving free-space propagation between components, to produce natural implementations of algorithms requiring large degrees of parallel computation. Potential applications being investigated include robotic vision, planetary lander guidance, aircraft engine exhaust analysis, analysis of remote sensing satellite multispectral images, control of space structures, and autonomous aircraft inspection.

  17. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The Aviation Systems Division at the NASA Ames Research Center conducts leading edge research in air traffic management concepts and technologies. This overview will present concepts and simulation results for research in traffic flow management, safe and efficient airport surface operations, super density terminal area operations, separation assurance and system wide modeling and simulation. A brief review of the ongoing air traffic management technology demonstration (ATD-1) will also be presented. A panel discussion, with Mr. Davis serving as a panelist, on air traffic research will follow the briefing.

  18. Theoretical Chemistry At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langhoff, Stephen

    1996-01-01

    The theoretical work being carried out in the Computational Chemistry Branch at NASA Ames will be overviewed. This overview will be followed by a more in-depth discussion of our theoretical work to determine molecular opacities for the TiO and water molecules and a discussion of our density function theory (DFT) calculations to determine the harmonic frequencies and intensities to the vibrational bands of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) to assess their role as carriers to the unidentified infrared (UIR) bands. Finally, a more in-depth discussion of our work in the area of computational molecular nanotechnology will be presented.

  19. Flight researh at NASA Ames Research Center: A test pilot's perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1987-01-01

    In 1976 NASA elected to assign responsibility for each of the various flight regimes to individual research centers. The NASA Ames Research Center at Moffett Field, California was designated lead center for vertical and short takeoff and landing, V/STOL research. The three most recent flight research airplanes being flown at the center are discussed from the test pilot's perspective: the Quiet Short Haul Research Aircraft; the XV-15 Tilt Rotor Research Aircraft; and the Rotor Systems Research Aircraft.

  20. NASA Ames UV-LED Poster Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaroux, Belgacem Amar

    2015-01-01

    UV-LED is a small satellite technology demonstration payload being flown on the Saudisat-4 spacecraft that is demonstrating non-contacting charge control of an isolated or floating mass using new solid-state ultra-violet light emitting diodes (UV-LEDs). Integrated to the rest of the spacecraft and launched on a Dnepr in June 19, 2014, the project is a collaboration between the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), Stanford University, and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). Beginning with its commissioning in December, 2015, the data collected by UV-LED have validated a novel method of charge control that will improve the performance of drag-free spacecraft allowing for concurrent science collection during charge management operations as well as reduce the mass, power and volume required while increasing lifetime and reliability of a charge management subsystem. UV-LED continues to operate, exploring new concepts in non-contacting charge control and collecting data crucial to understanding the lifetime of ultra-violet light emitting diodes in space. These improvements are crucial to the success of ground breaking missions such as LISA and BBO, and demonstrates the ability of low cost small satellite missions to provide technological advances that far exceed mission costs.

  1. NASA Ames Celebrates Curiosity Rover's Landing on Mars

    NASA Video Gallery

    Nearly 7,000 people came to NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, Calif., to watch the Mars Science Laboratory rover Curiosity land on Mars. A full day's worth of activities and discussions wit...

  2. NASA Ames Arc Jets and Range, Capabilities for Planetary Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fretter, Ernest F.

    2005-01-01

    NASA is pursuing innovative technologies and concepts as part of America's Vision for Space Exploration. The rapidly emerging field of nanotechnology has led to new concepts for multipurpose shields to prevent catastrophic loss of vehicles and crew against the triple threats of aeroheating during atmospheric entry, radiation (Solar and galactic cosmic rays) and Micrometorid/Orbital Debris (MMOD) strikes. One proposed concept is the Thermal Radiation Impact Protection System (TRIPS) using carbon nanotubes, hydrogenated carbon nanotubes, and ceramic coatings as a multi-use TPS. The Thermophysics Facilities Branch of the Space Technology Division at NASA Ames Research Center provides testing services for the development and validation of the present and future concepts being developed by NASA and national and International research firms. The Branch operates two key facilities - the Range Complex and the Arc Jets. The Ranges include both the Ames Vertical Gun Range (AVGR) and the Hypervelocity Free Flight (HFF) gas guns best suited for MMOD investigations. Test coupons can be installed in the AVGR or HFF and subjected to particle impacts from glass or metal particles from micron to _ inch (6.35-mm) diameters and at velocities from 5 to 8 kilometers per second. The facility can record high-speed data on film and provide damage assessment for analysis by the Principle Investigator or Ames personnel. Damaged articles can be installed in the Arc Jet facility for further testing to quantify the effects of damage on the heat shield s performance upon entry into atmospheric environments.

  3. Integration of MATLAB Simulink(Registered Trademark) Models with the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Emily K.; Vuong, Nghia D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the integration of MATLAB Simulink(Registered TradeMark) models into the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at NASA Ames Research Center. The VMS is a high-fidelity, large motion flight simulator that is capable of simulating a variety of aerospace vehicles. Integrating MATLAB Simulink models into the VMS needed to retain the development flexibility of the MATLAB environment and allow rapid deployment of model changes. The process developed at the VMS was used successfully in a number of recent simulation experiments. This accomplishment demonstrated that the model integrity was preserved, while working within the hard real-time run environment of the VMS architecture, and maintaining the unique flexibility of the VMS to meet diverse research requirements.

  4. Flight Test 4 Preliminary Results: NASA Ames SSI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Isaacson, Doug; Gong, Chester; Reardon, Scott; Santiago, Confesor

    2016-01-01

    Realization of the expected proliferation of Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) operations in the National Airspace System (NAS) depends on the development and validation of performance standards for UAS Detect and Avoid (DAA) Systems. The RTCA Special Committee 228 is charged with leading the development of draft Minimum Operational Performance Standards (MOPS) for UAS DAA Systems. NASA, as a participating member of RTCA SC-228 is committed to supporting the development and validation of draft requirements as well as the safety substantiation and end-to-end assessment of DAA system performance. The Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) Integration into the National Airspace System (NAS) Project conducted flight test program, referred to as Flight Test 4, at Armstrong Flight Research Center from April -June 2016. Part of the test flights were dedicated to the NASA Ames-developed Detect and Avoid (DAA) System referred to as JADEM (Java Architecture for DAA Extensibility and Modeling). The encounter scenarios, which involved NASA's Ikhana UAS and a manned intruder aircraft, were designed to collect data on DAA system performance in real-world conditions and uncertainties with four different surveillance sensor systems. Flight test 4 has four objectives: (1) validate DAA requirements in stressing cases that drive MOPS requirements, including: high-speed cooperative intruder, low-speed non-cooperative intruder, high vertical closure rate encounter, and Mode CS-only intruder (i.e. without ADS-B), (2) validate TCASDAA alerting and guidance interoperability concept in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors and in multiple-intruder encounters against both cooperative and non-cooperative intruders, (3) validate Well Clear Recovery guidance in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors, and (4) validate DAA alerting and guidance requirements in the presence of realistic sensor, tracking and navigational errors. The results will be

  5. Comparison Between Field Data and NASA Ames Wind Tunnel Data

    SciTech Connect

    Corbus, D.

    2005-11-01

    The objective of this analysis is to compare the measured data from the NASA Ames wind tunnel experiment to those collected in the field at the National Wind Technology Center (NWTC) with the same turbine configuration. The results of this analysis provide insight into what measurements can be made in the field as opposed to wind tunnel testing.

  6. Atmospheric Rotational Effects on Mars Based on the NASA Ames General Circulation Model: Angular Momentum Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanchez, Braulio V.; Haberle, Robert M.; Schaeffer, James

    2004-01-01

    The objective of the investigation is to determine the motion of the rotational axis of Mars as a result of mass variations in the atmosphere and condensation and sublimation of CO2 ice on the polar caps. A planet experiences this type of motion if it has an atmosphere, which is changing its mass distribution with respect to the solid body of the planet and/or it is asymmetrically changing the amount of ice at the polar caps. The physical principle involved is the conservation of angular momentum, one can get a feeling for it by sitting on a well oiled swivel chair holding a rotating wheel on a horizontal direction and then changing the rotation axis of the wheel to a vertical direction. The person holding the wheel and the chair would begin to rotate in opposite direction to the rotation of the wheel. The motions of Mars atmosphere and the ice caps variations are obtained from a mathematical model developed at the NASA Ames Research Center. The model produces outputs for a time span of one Martian year, which is equivalent to 687 Earth days. The results indicate that Mars axis of rotation moves in a spiral with respect to a reference point on the surface of the planet. It can move as far away as 35.3 cm from the initial location as a result of both mass variations in the atmosphere and asymmetric ice variations at the polar caps. Furthermore the pole performs close to two revolutions around the reference point during a Martian year. This motion is a combination of two motions, one produced by the atmospheric mass variations and another due to the variations in the ice caps. The motion due to the atmospheric variations is a spiral performing about two and a half revolutions around the reference point during which the pole can move as far as 40.9 cm. The motion due to variations in the ice caps is a spiral performing almost three revolutions during which the pole can move as far as 32.8 cm.

  7. Computational Fluid Dynamics Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holst, Terry L.

    1989-01-01

    The Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) Program at NASA Ames Research Center is reviewed and discussed. The technical elements of the CFD Program are listed and briefly discussed. These elements include algorithm research, research and pilot code development, scientific visualization, advanced surface representation, volume grid generation, and numerical optimization. Next, the discipline of CFD is briefly discussed and related to other areas of research at NASA Ames including experimental fluid dynamics, computer science research, computational chemistry, and numerical aerodynamic simulation. These areas combine with CFD to form a larger area of research, which might collectively be called computational technology. The ultimate goal of computational technology research at NASA Ames is to increase the physical understanding of the world in which we live, solve problems of national importance, and increase the technical capabilities of the aerospace community. Next, the major programs at NASA Ames that either use CFD technology or perform research in CFD are listed and discussed. Briefly, this list includes turbulent/transition physics and modeling, high-speed real gas flows, interdisciplinary research, turbomachinery demonstration computations, complete aircraft aerodynamics, rotorcraft applications, powered lift flows, high alpha flows, multiple body aerodynamics, and incompressible flow applications. Some of the individual problems actively being worked in each of these areas is listed to help define the breadth or extent of CFD involvement in each of these major programs. State-of-the-art examples of various CFD applications are presented to highlight most of these areas. The main emphasis of this portion of the presentation is on examples which will not otherwise be treated at this conference by the individual presentations. Finally, a list of principal current limitations and expected future directions is given.

  8. Hypersonic Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Michael J.; Bailey, F. Ron (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    This paper will describe the Airbreathing Hypersonic Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center. A main theme will be the "From Computation Through Flight" research effort. General research areas covered will include systems analysis, aerodynamics and aerothermodynamics, propulsion, materials, and flight research. Illustrative results from each discipline will be presented. The synergism between computational and experimental research will be demonstrated by examples. All examples given will have been published in the open literature.

  9. NASA Ames and Future of Space Exploration, Science, and Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Pushing the frontiers of aeronautics and space exploration presents multiple challenges. NASA Ames Research Center is at the forefront of tackling these issues, conducting cutting edge research in the fields of air traffic management, entry systems, advanced information technology, intelligent human and robotic systems, astrobiology, aeronautics, space, earth and life sciences and small satellites. Knowledge gained from this research helps ensure the success of NASA's missions, leading us closer to a world that was only imagined as science fiction just decades ago.

  10. Investigation of seismicity and related effects at NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility, Computer Center, Edwards, California

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cousineau, R. D.; Crook, R., Jr.; Leeds, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    This report discusses a geological and seismological investigation of the NASA Ames-Dryden Flight Research Facility site at Edwards, California. Results are presented as seismic design criteria, with design values of the pertinent ground motion parameters, probability of recurrence, and recommended analogous time-history accelerograms with their corresponding spectra. The recommendations apply specifically to the Dryden site and should not be extrapolated to other sites with varying foundation and geologic conditions or different seismic environments.

  11. Vertical motion simulator familiarization guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Danek, George L.

    1993-01-01

    The Vertical Motion Simulator Familiarization Guide provides a synoptic description of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) and descriptions of the various simulation components and systems. The intended audience is the community of scientists and engineers who employ the VMS for research and development. The concept of a research simulator system is introduced and the building block nature of the VMS is emphasized. Individual sections describe all the hardware elements in terms of general properties and capabilities. Also included are an example of a typical VMS simulation which graphically illustrates the composition of the system and shows the signal flow among the elements and a glossary of specialized terms, abbreviations, and acronyms.

  12. NASA/Ames Research Center's science and applications aircraft program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, G. Warren

    1991-01-01

    NASA-Ames Research Center operates a fleet of seven Science and Applications Aircraft, namely the C-141/Kuiper Airborne Observatory (KAO), DC-8, C-130, Lear Jet, and three ER-2s. These aircraft are used to satisfy two major objectives, each of equal importance. The first is to acquire remote and in-situ scientific data in astronomy, astrophysics, earth sciences, ocean processes, atmospheric physics, meteorology, materials processing and life sciences. The second major objective is to expedite the development of sensors and their attendant algorithms for ultimate use in space and to simulate from an aircraft, the data to be acquired from spaceborne sensors. NASA-Ames Science and Applications Aircraft are recognized as national and international facilities. They have performed and will continue to perform, operational missions from bases in the United States and worldwide. Historically, twice as many investigators have requested flight time than could be accommodated. This situation remains true today and is expected to increase in the years ahead. A major advantage of the existing fleet of aircraft is their ability to cover a large expanse of the earth's ecosystem from the surface to the lower stratosphere over large distances and time aloft. Their large payload capability allows a number of scientists to use multi-investigator sensor suites to permit simultaneous and complementary data gathering. In-flight changes to the sensors or data systems have greatly reduced the time required to optimize the development of new instruments. It is doubtful that spaceborne systems will ever totally replace the need for airborne science aircraft. The operations philosophy and capabilities exist at NASA-Ames Research Center.

  13. Planning and scheduling research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, Peter

    1990-01-01

    Planning and scheduling is the area of artificial intelligence research that focuses on the determination of a series of operations to achieve some set of (possibly) interacting goals and the placement of those operations in a timeline that allows them to be accomplished given available resources. Work in this area at the NASA Ames Research Center ranging from basic research in constrain-based reasoning and machine learning, to the development of efficient scheduling tools, to the application of such tools to complex agency problems is described.

  14. A Standard Kinematic Model for Flight Simulation at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    A standard kinematic model for aircraft simulation exists at NASA-Ames on a variety of computer systems, one of which is used to control the flight simulator for advanced aircraft (FSAA). The derivation of the kinematic model is given and various mathematical relationships are presented as a guide. These include descriptions of standardized simulation subsystems such as the atmospheric turbulence model and the generalized six-degrees-of-freedom trim routine, as well as an introduction to the emulative batch-processing system which enables this facility to optimize its real-time environment.

  15. NASA Ames Sustainability Initiatives: Aeronautics, Space Exploration, and Sustainable Futures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grymes, Rosalind A.

    2015-01-01

    In support of the mission-specific challenges of aeronautics and space exploration, NASA Ames produces a wealth of research and technology advancements with significant relevance to larger issues of planetary sustainability. NASA research on NexGen airspace solutions and its development of autonomous and intelligent technologies will revolutionize both the nation's air transporation systems and have applicability to the low altitude flight economy and to both air and ground transporation, more generally. NASA's understanding of the Earth as a complex of integrated systems contributes to humanity's perception of the sustainability of our home planet. Research at NASA Ames on closed environment life support systems produces directly applicable lessons on energy, water, and resource management in ground-based infrastructure. Moreover, every NASA campus is a 'city'; including an urbanscape and a workplace including scientists, human relations specialists, plumbers, engineers, facility managers, construction trades, transportation managers, software developers, leaders, financial planners, technologists, electricians, students, accountants, and even lawyers. NASA is applying the lessons of our mission-related activities to our urbanscapes and infrastructure, and also anticipates a leadership role in developing future environments for living and working in space.

  16. Air Traffic Management Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Katharine

    2005-01-01

    Since the late 1980's, NASA Ames researchers have been investigating ways to improve the air transportation system through the development of decision support automation. These software advances, such as the Center-TRACON Automation System (eTAS) have been developed with teams of engineers, software developers, human factors experts, and air traffic controllers; some ASA Ames decision support tools are currently operational in Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) facilities and some are in use by the airlines. These tools have provided air traffic controllers and traffic managers the capabilities to help reduce overall delays and holding, and provide significant cost savings to the airlines as well as more manageable workload levels for air traffic service providers. NASA is continuing to collaborate with the FAA, as well as other government agencies, to plan and develop the next generation of decision support tools that will support anticipated changes in the air transportation system, including a projected increase to three times today's air-traffic levels by 2025. The presentation will review some of NASA Ames' recent achievements in air traffic management research, and discuss future tool developments and concepts currently under consideration.

  17. The NASA Ames integral aircraft passenger seat concept - A human engineering approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kubokawa, C. C.

    1974-01-01

    A new NASA Ames concept for an aircraft passenger seat has been under research and development since 1968. It includes many human-factor features that will provide protection to the passenger from vibration, jostle, and high impact. It is comfortable and safer than any of the seats presently in use. An in-depth design, fabrication, and impact analysis was conducted in order to design a seat that will maximize passenger protection in high g impacts (20 g horizontal -Gx, 36 g vertical +Gz, 16 g lateral Gy). The method for absorbing impact energy was accomplished with a combination of stretching stainless steel cables, thread breaking of stitches, hydraulic mechanism and the special Temper Form cushions. The restraint system for the seat consisted of a lap belt and shoulder harness inertia reel combination.

  18. Development and Flight of the NASA-Ames Research Center Payload on Spacelab-J

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory K.; Ball, Sally M.; Stolarik, Thomas M.; Eodice, Michael T.

    1993-01-01

    Spacelab-J was an international Spacelab mission with numerous innovative Japanese and American materials and life science experiments. Two of the Spacelab-J experiments were designed over a period of more than a decade by a team from NASA-Ames Research Center. The Frog Embryology Experiment investigated and is helping to resolve a century-long quandary on the effects of gravity on amphibian development. The Autogenic Feedback Training Experiment, flown on Spacelab-J as part of a multi-mission investigation, studied the effects of Autogenic Feedback Therapy on limiting the effects of Space Motion Sickness on astronauts. Both experiments employed the use of a wide variety of specially designed hardware to achieve the experiment objectives. This paper reviews the development of both experiments, from the initial announcement of opportunity in 1978, through selection on Spacelab-J and subsequent hardware and science procedures development, culminating in the highly successful Spacelab-J flight in September 1992.

  19. Selected Topics in Overset Technology Development and Applications At NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, William M.; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a general overview of overset technology development and applications at NASA Ames Research Center. The topics include: 1) Overview of overset activities at NASA Ames; 2) Recent developments in Chimera Grid Tools; 3) A general framework for multiple component dynamics; 4) A general script module for automating liquid rocket sub-systems simulations; and 5) Critical future work.

  20. Computational Fluid Dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul

    1994-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) is beginning to play a major role in the aircraft industry of the United States because of the realization that CFD can be a new and effective design tool and thus could provide a company with a competitive advantage. It is also playing a significant role in research institutions, both governmental and academic, as a tool for researching new fluid physics, as well as supplementing and complementing experimental testing. In this presentation, some of the progress made to date in CFD at NASA Ames will be reviewed. The presentation addresses the status of CFD in terms of methods, examples of CFD solutions, and computer technology. In addition, the role CFD will play in supporting the revolutionary goals set forth by the Aeronautical Policy Review Committee established by the Office of Science and Technology Policy is noted. The need for validated CFD tools is also briefly discussed.

  1. Scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon V.; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Walatka, Pamela P.; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    The visualization methods used in computational fluid dynamics research at the NASA-Ames Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation facility are examined, including postprocessing, tracking, and steering methods. The visualization requirements of the facility's three-dimensional graphical workstation are outlined and the types hardware and software used to meet these requirements are discussed. The main features of the facility's current and next-generation workstations are listed. Emphasis is given to postprocessing techniques, such as dynamic interactive viewing on the workstation and recording and playback on videodisk, tape, and 16-mm film. Postprocessing software packages are described, including a three-dimensional plotter, a surface modeler, a graphical animation system, a flow analysis software toolkit, and a real-time interactive particle-tracer.

  2. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber: Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration tasks external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  3. The NASA Ames Controlled Environment Research Chamber - Present status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gross, Anthony R.; Korsmeyer, David J.; Harper, Lynn D.; Force, Edwin L.

    1994-01-01

    The Controlled Environment Research Chamber (CERC) at the NASA Ames Research Center was created for early-on investigation of promising new technologies for life support of advanced space exploration missions. The CERC facility is being used to address the advanced technology requirements necessary to implement an integrated working and living environment for a planetary habitat. The CERC, along with a human-powered centrifuge, a planetary terrain simulator, advanced displays, and a virtual reality capability, is able to develop and demonstrate applicable technologies for future planetary exploration. There will be several robotic mechanisms performing exploration taskes external to the habitat that will be controlled through the virtual environment to provide representative workloads for the crew. Finally, there will be a discussion of innovative new multidisciplinary test facilities, and how effective they are to the investigation of the wide range of human and machine problems inherent in exploration missions.

  4. Overview of the NASA AMES-Dryden Integrated Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackall, Dale; McBride, David; Cohen, Dorothea

    1990-01-01

    The Integrated Test Facility (ITF), being built at the NASA Ames Research Center's Dryden Flight Research Facility (ADFRF), will provide new real-time test capabilities for emerging research aircraft. An overview of the ITF and the real-time systems being developed to operate this unique facility are outlined in this paper. The ITF will reduce flight test risk by minimizing the difference between the flight- and ground-test environments. The ground-test environment is provided by combining real-time flight simulation with the actual aircraft. The generic capabilities of the ITF real-time systems, the real-time data recording, and the remotely augmented vehicle (RAV) monitoring system will be discussed. The benefits of applying simulation to aircraft-in-the-loop testing and RAV monitoring system capabilities to the X-29A flight research program will also be discussed.

  5. Computational Nanotechnology at NASA Ames Research Center, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Globus, Al; Bailey, David; Langhoff, Steve; Pohorille, Andrew; Levit, Creon; Chancellor, Marisa K. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Some forms of nanotechnology appear to have enormous potential to improve aerospace and computer systems; computational nanotechnology, the design and simulation of programmable molecular machines, is crucial to progress. NASA Ames Research Center has begun a computational nanotechnology program including in-house work, external research grants, and grants of supercomputer time. Four goals have been established: (1) Simulate a hypothetical programmable molecular machine replicating itself and building other products. (2) Develop molecular manufacturing CAD (computer aided design) software and use it to design molecular manufacturing systems and products of aerospace interest, including computer components. (3) Characterize nanotechnologically accessible materials of aerospace interest. Such materials may have excellent strength and thermal properties. (4) Collaborate with experimentalists. Current in-house activities include: (1) Development of NanoDesign, software to design and simulate a nanotechnology based on functionalized fullerenes. Early work focuses on gears. (2) A design for high density atomically precise memory. (3) Design of nanotechnology systems based on biology. (4) Characterization of diamonoid mechanosynthetic pathways. (5) Studies of the laplacian of the electronic charge density to understand molecular structure and reactivity. (6) Studies of entropic effects during self-assembly. Characterization of properties of matter for clusters up to sizes exhibiting bulk properties. In addition, the NAS (NASA Advanced Supercomputing) supercomputer division sponsored a workshop on computational molecular nanotechnology on March 4-5, 1996 held at NASA Ames Research Center. Finally, collaborations with Bill Goddard at CalTech, Ralph Merkle at Xerox Parc, Don Brenner at NCSU (North Carolina State University), Tom McKendree at Hughes, and Todd Wipke at UCSC are underway.

  6. Recent Developments in Ultra High Temperature Ceramics at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.; Gasch, Matt; Lawson, John W.; Gusman, Michael I.; Stackpole, Margaret M.

    2009-01-01

    NASA Ames is pursuing a variety of approaches to modify and control the microstructure of UHTCs with the goal of improving fracture toughness, oxidation resistance and controlling thermal conductivity. The overall goal is to produce materials that can perform reliably as sharp leading edges or nose tips in hypersonic reentry vehicles. Processing approaches include the use of preceramic polymers as the SiC source (as opposed to powder techniques), the addition of third phases to control grain growth and oxidation, and the use of processing techniques to produce high purity materials. Both hot pressing and field assisted sintering have been used to make UHTCs. Characterization of the mechanical and thermal properties of these materials is ongoing, as is arcjet testing to evaluate performance under simulated reentry conditions. The preceramic polymer approach has generated a microstructure in which elongated SiC grains grow in the form of an in-situ composite. This microstructure has the advantage of improving fracture toughness while potentially improving oxidation resistance by reducing the amount and interconnectivity of SiC in the material. Addition of third phases, such as Ir, results in a very fine-grained microstructure, even in hot-pressed samples. The results of processing and compositional changes on microstructure and properties are reported, along with selected arcjet results.

  7. Research activity at the shock tube facility at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    The real gas phenomena dominate the relaxation process occurring in the flow around hypersonic vehicles. The air flow around these vehicles undergoes vibrational excitation, chemical dissociation, and ionization. These chemical and kinetic phenomena absorb energy, change compressibility, cause temperature to fall, and density to rise. In high-altitude, low density environments, the characteristic thicknesses of the shock layers can be smaller than the relaxation distances required for the gas to attain chemical and thermodynamic equilibrium. To determine the effects of chemical nonequilibrium over a realistic hypersonic vehicle, it would be desirable to conduct an experiment in which all aspects of fluid flow are simulated. Such an experiment is extremely difficult to setup. The only practical alternative is to develop a theoretical model of the phenomena and to compute the flow around the vehicle including the chemical nonequilibrium, and compare the results with the experiments conducted in the facilities under conditions where only a portion of the flow phenomena is simulated. Three types of experimental data are needed to assist the aerospace community in this model development process: (1) data which will enhance our phenomenological understanding of the relaxation process, (2) data on rate reactions for the relevant reactions, and (3) data on bulk properties, such as spectral radiation emitted by the gas, for a given set of aerodynamic conditions. NASA Ames is in a process of collecting such data by simulating the required aerothermochemical conditions in an electric arc driven shock tube.

  8. A Perspective on NASA Ames Air Traffic Management Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes past and present air-traffic-management research at NASA Ames Research Center. The descriptions emerge from the perspective of a technical manager who supervised the majority of this research for the last four years. Past research contributions built a foundation for calculating accurate flight trajectories to enable efficient airspace management in time. That foundation led to two predominant research activities that continue to this day - one in automatically separating aircraft and the other in optimizing traffic flows. Today s national airspace uses many of the applications resulting from research at Ames. These applications include the nationwide deployment of the Traffic Management Advisor, new procedures enabling continuous descent arrivals, cooperation with industry to permit more direct flights to downstream way-points, a surface management system in use by two cargo carriers, and software to evaluate how well flights conform to national traffic management initiatives. The paper concludes with suggestions for prioritized research in the upcoming years. These priorities include: enabling more first-look operational evaluations, improving conflict detection and resolution for climbing or descending aircraft, and focusing additional attention on the underpinning safety critical items such as a reliable datalink.

  9. Radiometric validation of NASA's Ames Research Center's Sensor Calibration Laboratory.

    PubMed

    Brown, Steven W; Johnson, B Carol; Biggar, Stuart F; Zalewski, Edward F; Cooper, John; Hajek, Pavel; Hildum, Edward; Grant, Patrick; Barnes, Robert A; Butler, James J

    2005-10-20

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Ames Research Center's Airborne Sensor Facility (ASF) is responsible for the calibration of several airborne Earth-viewing sensor systems in support of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) investigations. The primary artifact used to calibrate these sensors in the reflective solar region from 400 to 2500 nm is a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source. In September 1999, a measurement comparison was made at the Ames ASF Sensor Calibration Facility to validate the radiometric scale, establish the uncertainties assigned to the radiance of this source, and examine its day-to-day repeatability. The comparison was one of a series of validation activities overseen by the EOS Calibration Program to ensure the radiometric calibration accuracy of sensors used in long-term, global, remote-sensing studies. Results of the comparison, including an evaluation of the Ames Sensor Calibration Laboratory (SCL) measurement procedures and assigned radiometric uncertainties, provide a validation of their radiometric scale at the time of the comparison. Additionally, the maintenance of the radiance scale was evaluated by use of independent, long-term, multiyear radiance validation measurements of the Ames sphere source. This series of measurements provided an independent assessment of the radiance values assigned to integrating sphere sources by the Ames SCF. Together, the measurements validate the SCF radiometric scale and assigned uncertainties over the time period from September 1999 through July 2003.

  10. Radiometric validation of NASA's Ames Research Center's Sensor Calibration Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven W.; Johnson, B. Carol; Biggar, Stuart F.; Zalewski, Edward F.; Cooper, John; Hajek, Pavel; Hildum, Edward; Grant, Patrick; Barnes, Robert A.; Butler, James J

    2005-10-20

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA's) Ames Research Center's Airborne Sensor Facility (ASF) is responsible for the calibration of several airborne Earth-viewing sensor systems in support of NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) investigations. The primary artifact used to calibrate these sensors in the reflective solar region from 400 to 2500 nm is a lamp-illuminated integrating sphere source. In September 1999, a measurement comparison was made at the Ames ASF Sensor Calibration Facility to validate the radiometric scale, establish the uncertainties assigned to the radiance of this source, and examine its day-to-day repeatability. The comparison was one of a series of validation activities overseen by the EOS Calibration Program to ensure the radiometric calibration accuracy of sensors used in long-term, global, remote-sensing studies. Results of the comparison, including an evaluation of the Ames Sensor Calibration Laboratory (SCL) measurement procedures and assigned radiometric uncertainties, provide a validation of their radiometric scale at the time of the comparison. Additionally, the maintenance of the radiance scale was evaluated by use of independent, long-term, multiyear radiance validation measurements of the Ames sphere source. This series of measurements provided an independent assessment of the radiance values assigned to integrating sphere sources by the Ames SCF. Together, the measurements validate the SCF radiometric scale and assigned uncertainties over the time period from September 1999 through July 2003.

  11. NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW Power Supply Modernization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choy, Yuen Ching; Ilinets, Boris V.; Miller, Ted; Nagel, Kirsten (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center 60 MW DC Power Supply was built in 1974 to provide controlled DC power for the Thermophysics Facility Arc Jet Laboratory. The Power Supply has gradually losing reliability due to outdated technology and component life limitation. NASA has decided to upgrade the existing rectifier modules with contemporary high-power electronics and control equipment. NASA plans to complete this project in 2001. This project includes a complete replacement of obsolete thyristor stacks in all six rectifier modules and rectifier bridge control system. High power water-cooled thyristors and freewheeling diodes will be used. The rating of each of the six modules will be 4000 A at 5500 V. The control firing angle signal will be sent from the Facility Control System to six modules via fiberoptic cable. The Power Supply control and monitoring system will include a Master PLC in the Facility building and a Slave PLC in each rectifier module. This system will also monitor each thyristor level in each stack and the auxiliary equipment.

  12. NASA/Ames Research Center DC-8 data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherniss, S. C.; Scofield, C. P.

    1991-01-01

    In-flight facility data acquisition, distribution, and recording on the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DC-8 are performed by the Data Acquisition and Distribution System (DADS). Navigational and environmental data collected by the DADS are converted to engineering units and distributed real-time to investigator stations once per second. Selected engineering units data are printed and displayed on closed circuit television monitors throughout flights. An in-flight graphical display of the DC-8 flight track (with barbs indicating wind direction and magnitude) has recently been added to the DADS capabilities. Logging of data run starts/stops and commentary from the mission director are also provided. All data are recorded to hard disk in-flight and archived to tape medium post-flight. Post-flight, hard copies of the track map and mission director's log are created by the DADS. The DADS is a distributed system consisting of a data subsystem, an Avionic Serial Data-to-VMEbus (ASD2VME) subsystem, and a host subsystem. Each subsystem has a dedicated central processing unit (CPU) and is capable of stand-alone operation. All three subsystems are housed in a single 20-slot VME chassis and communicate with each other over the VMEbus. The data and host subsystems are briefly discussed, and the DC-8 DADS internal configuration and system block diagram are presented.

  13. Current Testing Capabilities at the NASA Ames Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramsey, Alvin; Tam, Tim; Bogdanoff, David; Gage, Peter

    1999-01-01

    Capabilities for designing and performing ballistic range tests at the NASA Ames Research Center are presented. Computational tools to assist in designing and developing ballistic range models and to predict the flight characteristics of these models are described. A CFD code modeling two-stage gun performance is available, allowing muzzle velocity, maximum projectile base pressure, and gun erosion to be predicted. Aerodynamic characteristics such as drag and stability can be obtained at speeds ranging from 0.2 km/s to 8 km/s. The composition and density of the test gas can be controlled, which allows for an assessment of Reynolds number and specific heat ratio effects under conditions that closely match those encountered during planetary entry. Pressure transducers have been installed in the gun breech to record the time history of the pressure during launch, and pressure transducers have also been installed in the walls of the range to measure sonic boom effects. To illustrate the testing capabilities of the Ames ballistic ranges, an overview of some of the recent tests is given.

  14. Unique life sciences research facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, G. M.; Vasques, M.; Caldwell, W. F.; Tucker, J.

    1994-01-01

    The Life Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center has a suite of specialized facilities that enable scientists to study the effects of gravity on living systems. This paper describes some of these facilities and their use in research. Seven centrifuges, each with its own unique abilities, allow testing of a variety of parameters on test subjects ranging from single cells through hardware to humans. The Vestibular Research Facility allows the study of both centrifugation and linear acceleration on animals and humans. The Biocomputation Center uses computers for 3D reconstruction of physiological systems, and interactive research tools for virtual reality modeling. Psycophysiological, cardiovascular, exercise physiology, and biomechanical studies are conducted in the 12 bed Human Research Facility and samples are analyzed in the certified Central Clinical Laboratory and other laboratories at Ames. Human bedrest, water immersion and lower body negative pressure equipment are also available to study physiological changes associated with weightlessness. These and other weightlessness models are used in specialized laboratories for the study of basic physiological mechanisms, metabolism and cell biology. Visual-motor performance, perception, and adaptation are studied using ground-based models as well as short term weightlessness experiments (parabolic flights). The unique combination of Life Science research facilities, laboratories, and equipment at Ames Research Center are described in detail in relation to their research contributions.

  15. Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Human Robotic Study at Houghton Crater - virtual reality study from NASA Ames (FFC) Future Fight Central simulator tower L-R: Dr Geoffrey Briggs; Jen Jasper (seated); Dr Jan Akins and Mr. Tony Gross, Ames

  16. Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    Space Day 2002; Directors Breakfast @ NASA Ames Visitors Center for student Winners of Santa Clara Valley Science & Engineering Fair and San Francisco Bay Aera Science Fair (Students are addressed by Bob Rosen, Ames Associate Director for Aerospace Programs)

  17. NASA Ames Helps Search For and Study of Sutter's Mill Meteorites

    NASA Video Gallery

    Scientists, researchers and volunteers from NASA Ames, the SETI Institute and other organizations are searching for fragments of the Sutter's Mill Meteor that illuminated the sky over the Sierra Ne...

  18. Summary of proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hettinger, Lawrence J.; Mccauley, Michael E.; Cook, Anthony E.; Voorhees, James W.

    1989-01-01

    A program of research to investigate simulator induced sickness has recently been initiated under the sponsorship of NASA Ames Research Center to coordinate efforts to investigate and eventually eliminate the problem of simulator sickness. As part of this program, a Simulator Sickness Steering Committee has been assembled, comprised of eighteen representatives from the Army, Air Force, Navy, NASA, NATO, academia, and industry. The proceedings of the first meeting of the NASA Ames Simulator Sickness Steering Committee are summarized and discussed.

  19. Vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation device which provides up to plus or minus 40 feet of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing tasks, it appears that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least plus or minus 20 feet.

  20. 3rd Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie

    2015-01-01

    The Space Science and Astrobiology Division at NASA Ames Research Center consists of over 50 civil servants and more than 110 contractors, co-­-ops, post-­-docs and associates. Researchers in the division are pursuing investigations in a variety of fields including exoplanets, planetary science, astrobiology and astrophysics. In addition, division personnel support a wide variety of NASA missions including (but not limited to) Kepler, SOFIA, LADEE, JWST, and New Horizons. With such a wide variety of interesting research going on, distributed among three branches in at least 5 different buildings, it can be difficult to stay abreast of what one's fellow researchers are doing. Our goal in organizing this symposium is to facilitate communication and collaboration among the scientists within the division, and to give center management and other ARC researchers and engineers an opportunity to see what scientific research and science mission work is being done in the division. We are also continuing the tradition within the Space Science and Astrobiology Division to honor one senior and one early career scientist with the Pollack Lecture and the Early Career Lecture, respectively. With the Pollack Lecture, our intent is to select a senior researcher who has made significant contributions to any area of research within the space sciences, and we are pleased to honor Dr. William Borucki this year. With the Early Career Lecture, our intent is to select a young researcher within the division who, by their published scientific papers, shows great promise for the future in any area of space science research, and we are pleased to honor Dr. Melinda Kahre this year

  1. Initial Evaluations of LoC Prediction Algorithms Using the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krishnakumar, Kalmanje; Stepanyan, Vahram; Barlow, Jonathan; Hardy, Gordon; Dorais, Greg; Poolla, Chaitanya; Reardon, Scott; Soloway, Donald

    2014-01-01

    Flying near the edge of the safe operating envelope is an inherently unsafe proposition. Edge of the envelope here implies that small changes or disturbances in system state or system dynamics can take the system out of the safe envelope in a short time and could result in loss-of-control events. This study evaluated approaches to predicting loss-of-control safety margins as the aircraft gets closer to the edge of the safe operating envelope. The goal of the approach is to provide the pilot aural, visual, and tactile cues focused on maintaining the pilot's control action within predicted loss-of-control boundaries. Our predictive architecture combines quantitative loss-of-control boundaries, an adaptive prediction method to estimate in real-time Markov model parameters and associated stability margins, and a real-time data-based predictive control margins estimation algorithm. The combined architecture is applied to a nonlinear transport class aircraft. Evaluations of various feedback cues using both test and commercial pilots in the NASA Ames Vertical Motion-base Simulator (VMS) were conducted in the summer of 2013. The paper presents results of this evaluation focused on effectiveness of these approaches and the cues in preventing the pilots from entering a loss-of-control event.

  2. Extending the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model to Explore Mars’ Middle Atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brecht, Amanda; Hollingsworth, J.; Kahre, M.; Schaeffer, J.

    2013-10-01

    The NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (MGCM) upper boundary has been extended to ~120 km altitude (p ~10-5 mbar). The extension of the MGCM upper boundary initiates the ability to understand the connection between the lower and upper atmosphere of Mars through the middle atmosphere 70 - 120 km). Moreover, it provides the opportunity to support future missions (i.e. the 2013 MAVEN mission). A major factor in this extension is the incorporation of the Non-Local Thermodynamic Equilibrium (NLTE) heating (visible) and cooling (infrared). This modification to the radiative transfer forcing (i.e., RT code) has been significantly tested in a 1D vertical column and now has been ported to the full 3D Mars GCM. Initial results clearly show the effects of NLTE in the upper middle atmosphere. Diagnostic of seasonal mean fields and large-scale wave activity will be shown with insight into circulation patterns in the middle atmosphere. Furthermore, sensitivity tests with the resolution of the pressure and temperature grids, in which the k-coefficients are calculated upon, have been performed in the 1D RT code. Our progress on this research will be presented. Brecht is supported by NASA’s Postdoctoral Program at the Ames Research Center, administered by Oak Ridge Associated Universities through a contract with NASA.

  3. Eddy mixing coefficient values derived from simulations with the NASA Ames Mars GCM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Walsh, Thomas D.

    1993-01-01

    Values of eddy mixing coefficients, especially that for vertical mixing, are of particular importance for various photochemical models of the Mars atmosphere, which are either globally or zonally averaged. These models represent atmospheric transport processes in terms of eddy diffusion. While this is not appropriate for the advective transport by the mean meridional circulation (in general, a part of the eddy diffusion tensor actually does represent advection--a 'correction' to the Eulerian-mean circulation), it can be applied to simulate both the small- and larger-scale eddy transports of an atmospheric constituent. An effort is underway to estimate values of the eddy mixing coefficients for the Mars atmosphere using circulation data generated with the NASA Ames Mars GCM. This model simulates the three-dimensional winds in the atmosphere, and these are then used as inputs for a tracer transport model. The latter model has previously been used in interactive dust transport experiments with the Ames GCM. Idealized tracer transport experiments, with a conservative or nearly conservative hypothetical tracer, are performed to generate data from which the eddy diffusion coefficients can be estimated. Carrying out matched pairs of tracer experiments, using two very different initial states, permits all four components of the diffusion tensor to be determined. A large number of GCM experiments have been conducted, spanning a range of seasons and atmospheric dust loading, allowing the eddy mixing coefficients to be estimated for a variety of atmospheric conditions.

  4. Vertical Motions of Oceanic Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clague, D. A.; Moore, J. G.

    2006-12-01

    Oceanic volcanoes offer abundant evidence of changes in their elevations through time. Their large-scale motions begin with a period of rapid subsidence lasting hundreds of thousands of years caused by isostatic compensation of the added mass of the volcano on the ocean lithosphere. The response is within thousands of years and lasts as long as the active volcano keeps adding mass on the ocean floor. Downward flexure caused by volcanic loading creates troughs around the growing volcanoes that eventually fill with sediment. Seismic surveys show that the overall depression of the old ocean floor beneath Hawaiian volcanoes such as Mauna Loa is about 10 km. This gross subsidence means that the drowned shorelines only record a small part of the total subsidence the islands experienced. In Hawaii, this history is recorded by long-term tide-gauge data, the depth in drill holes of subaerial lava flows and soil horizons, former shorelines presently located below sea level. Offshore Hawaii, a series of at least 7 drowned reefs and terraces record subsidence of about 1325 m during the last half million years. Older sequences of drowned reefs and terraces define the early rapid phase of subsidence of Maui, Molokai, Lanai, Oahu, Kauai, and Niihau. Volcanic islands, such as Maui, tip down toward the next younger volcano as it begins rapid growth and subsidence. Such tipping results in drowned reefs on Haleakala as deep as 2400 m where they are tipped towards Hawaii. Flat-topped volcanoes on submarine rift zones also record this tipping towards the next younger volcano. This early rapid subsidence phase is followed by a period of slow subsidence lasting for millions of years caused by thermal contraction of the aging ocean lithosphere beneath the volcano. The well-known evolution along the Hawaiian chain from high to low volcanic island, to coral island, and to guyot is due to this process. This history of rapid and then slow subsidence is interrupted by a period of minor uplift

  5. A survey of planning and scheduling research at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zweben, Monte

    1989-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center has a diverse program in planning and scheduling. Some research projects as well as some applications are highlighted. Topics addressed include machine learning techniques, action representations and constraint-based scheduling systems. The applications discussed are planetary rovers, Hubble Space Telescope scheduling, and Pioneer Venus orbit scheduling.

  6. Evaluating Fatigue in Operational Settings: The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosekind, Mark R.; Gregory, Kevin; Miller, Donna; Webbon, Lissa; Oyung, Ray

    1996-01-01

    In response to a 1980 Congressional request, NASA Ames initiated a program to examine fatigue in flight operations. The Program objectives are to examine fatigue, sleep loss, and circadian disruption in flight operations, determine the effects of these factors on flight crew performance, and the development of fatigue countermeasures. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program conducts controlled laboratory experiments, full-mission flight simulations, and field studies. A range of subjective, behavioral, performance, physiological, and environmental measures are used depending on study objectives. The Program has developed substantial expertise in gathering data during actual flight operations and in other work settings. This has required the development of ambulatory and other measures that can be carried throughout the world and used at 41,000 feet in aircraft cockpits. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has examined fatigue in shorthaul, longhaul, overnight cargo, and helicopter operations. A recent study of planned cockpit rest periods demonstrated the effectiveness of a brief inflight nap to improve pilot performance and alertness. This study involved inflight reaction time/vigilance performance testing and EEG/EOG measures of physiological alertness. The NASA Ames Fatigue Countermeasures Program has applied scientific findings to the development of education and training materials on fatigue countermeasures, input to federal regulatory activities on pilot flight, duty, and rest requirements, and support of National Transportation Safety Board accident investigations. Current activities are examining fatigue in nonaugmented longhaul flights, regional/commuter flight operations, corporate/business aviation, and psychophysiological variables related to performance.

  7. Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion.

    PubMed

    Nesti, Alessandro; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Macneilage, Paul R; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s(2). Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power laws' exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weber's Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling. PMID:24158607

  8. Human sensitivity to vertical self-motion.

    PubMed

    Nesti, Alessandro; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Macneilage, Paul R; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2014-01-01

    Perceiving vertical self-motion is crucial for maintaining balance as well as for controlling an aircraft. Whereas heave absolute thresholds have been exhaustively studied, little work has been done in investigating how vertical sensitivity depends on motion intensity (i.e., differential thresholds). Here we measure human sensitivity for 1-Hz sinusoidal accelerations for 10 participants in darkness. Absolute and differential thresholds are measured for upward and downward translations independently at 5 different peak amplitudes ranging from 0 to 2 m/s(2). Overall vertical differential thresholds are higher than horizontal differential thresholds found in the literature. Psychometric functions are fit in linear and logarithmic space, with goodness of fit being similar in both cases. Differential thresholds are higher for upward as compared to downward motion and increase with stimulus intensity following a trend best described by two power laws. The power laws' exponents of 0.60 and 0.42 for upward and downward motion, respectively, deviate from Weber's Law in that thresholds increase less than expected at high stimulus intensity. We speculate that increased sensitivity at high accelerations and greater sensitivity to downward than upward self-motion may reflect adaptations to avoid falling.

  9. Replicating HAVE PIO on the NASA Ames VMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery

    2001-01-01

    This presentation discuss ground-based simulation, and flight-tests study (HAVE PIO). The purpose of this study is to determine if the amount of platform motion affects ability to replicate in-flight results.

  10. Vertical motions in the equatorial middle atmosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weisman, M. L.

    1979-01-01

    A single station vertical velocity equation which considers ageostrophic and diabatic effects derived from the first law of thermodynamics and a generalized thermal wind relation is presented. An analysis and verification procedure which accounts for measurement and calculation errors as well as time and space continuity arguments and theoretical predictions are described. Vertical velocities are calculated at every kilometer between 25 and 60 km and for approximately every three hours for the above diurnal period at Kourou (French Guiana), Fort Sherman (Panama Canal Zone), Ascension Island, Antigua (British West Indies) and Natal (Brazil). The results, plotted as time series cross sections, suggest vertical motions ranging in magnitude from 1 or 2 cm/sec at 30 km to as much as 15 cm/sec at 60 km. Many of the general features of the results agree well with atmospheric tidal predictions but many particular features suggest that both smaller time scale gravity waves (periods less than 6 hours) and synoptic type waves (periods greater than 1 day) may be interacting significantly with the tidal fields. The results suggest that vertical motions can be calculated for the equatorial middle atmosphere and must be considered a significant part of the motion for time scales from 8 to 24 hours.

  11. The viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clipson, Colin

    1994-01-01

    This paper will review and summarize research initiatives conducted between 1987 and 1992 at NASA Ames Research Center by a research team from the University of Michigan Architecture Research Laboratory. These research initiatives, funded by a NASA grant NAG2-635, examined the viability of establishing collaborative, reconfigurable research environments for the Human Performance Research Laboratory at NASA Ames in California. Collaborative Research Environments are envisioned as a way of enhancing the work of NASA research teams, optimizing the use of shared resources, and providing superior environments for housing research activities. The Integrated Simulation Project at NASA, Ames Human Performance Research Laboratory is one of the current realizations of this initiative.

  12. Status of Regenerative Life Support Research and Technology Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, Mark

    1998-01-01

    Future long duration manned space missions will require life support systems that minimize resupply requirements and ultimately approach self-sufficiency in space. This presentation will provide an overview of the Advanced Life Support program unclassified fundamental research and technology development activities being conducted at NASA Ames Research Center. Top level program goals and technical objectives, and the role of NASA-Ames within the Advanced Life Support program, will be reviewed. The presentation will focus on FY97 and FY98 research tasks that were directed at physicochemical processes with emphasis on system closure and self-sufficiency. Research areas include solid waste processing and resource recovery, water recycling, air regeneration, and regenerative system dynamics. Proposed future work and potential applications of this research to both terrestrial and space closed ecology experimentation in space will be addressed.

  13. A Unique RCM Application at the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonagofski, James M.; Machala, Anthony C.; Smith, Anthony M.; Presley, Leroy L. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is known internationally as a center of excellence for its capabilities and achievements in the field of developmental aerodynamics. The Center has a variety of aerodynamic test facilities including the largest wind tunnel in the world (with 40 x 80 deg and 80 x 120 deg atmospheric test sections) and the 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel which is the subject of this paper. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Experimental program for real gas flow code validation at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deiwert, George S.; Strawa, Anthony W.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Park, Chul

    1989-01-01

    The experimental program for validating real gas hypersonic flow codes at NASA Ames Rsearch Center is described. Ground-based test facilities used include ballistic ranges, shock tubes and shock tunnels, arc jet facilities and heated-air hypersonic wind tunnels. Also included are large-scale computer systems for kinetic theory simulations and benchmark code solutions. Flight tests consist of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment, the Space Shuttle, Project Fire 2, and planetary probes such as Galileo, Pioneer Venus, and PAET.

  15. Shock Tube and Ballistic Range Facilities at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Reda, Daniel C.; Cornelison, Charles J.; Cruden, Brett A.; Bogdanoff, David W.

    2010-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) facility and the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center are described. These facilities have been in operation since the 1960s and have supported many NASA missions and technology development initiatives. The facilities have world-unique capabilities that enable experimental studies of real-gas aerothermal, gas dynamic, and kinetic phenomena of atmospheric entry.

  16. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry; Brown, Jeff; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Steve; Brubaker, Tim

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnsons arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  17. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. Use of TALIF expanded at NASA Ames and to NASA Johnson's arc jet facility in the late 2000s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the original AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper documents the overall system design from measurement requirements to implementation. Representative data from the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems are also presented.

  18. The NASA Ames Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility: Experimental Simulation of the Atmospheric Break-Up of Meteors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilder, M. C.; Bogdanoff, D. W.

    2015-01-01

    The Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility at NASA Ames Research Center provides a potential platform for the experimental simulation of meteor breakup at conditions that closely match full-scale entry condition for select parameters. The poster describes the entry environment simulation capabilities of the Hypervelocity Free Flight Aerodynamic Facility (HFFAF) at NASA Ames Research Center and provides example images of the fragmentation of a hypersonic projectile for which break-up was initiated by mechanical forces (impact with a thin polymer diaphragm).

  19. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. II - Transient baroclinic eddies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, J. R.; Pollack, J. B.; Haberle, R. M.; Leovy, C. B.; Zurek, R. W.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    A large set of experiments performed with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model is analyzed to determine the properties, structure, and dynamics of the simulated transient baroclinic eddies. There is strong transient baroclinic eddy activity in the extratropics of the Northern Hemisphere during the northern autumn, winter, and spring seasons. The eddy activity remains strong for very large dust loadings, though it shifts northward. The eastward propagating eddies are characterized by zonal wavenumbers of 1-4 and periods of about 2-10 days. The properties of the GCM baroclinic eddies in the northern extratropics are compared in detail with analogous properties inferred from Viking Lander meteorology observations.

  20. Energy Remote Sensing Applications Projects at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. D.; Likens, W. C.; Mouat, D. A.

    1982-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center is active in energy projects primarily in the role of providing assistance to users in the solution of a number of problems related to energy. Data bases were produced which can be used, in combination with other sources of information, to solve spatially related energy problems. Six project activities at Ames are described which relate to energy and remote sensing. Two projects involve power demand forecasting and estimations using remote sensing and geographic information systems; two others involve transmission line routing and corridor analysis; one involves a synfuel user needs assessment through remote sensing; and the sixth involves the siting of energy facilities.

  1. Yesterday, today and tomorrow: A perspective of CFD at NASA's Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kutler, Paul; Gross, Anthony R.

    1987-01-01

    The opportunity to reflect on the computational fluid dynamics (CFD) progam at the NASA Ames Research Center (its beginning, its present state, and its direction for the future) is afforded. Essential elements of the research program during each period are reviewed, including people, facilities, and research problems. The burgeoning role that CFD is playing in the aerospace business is discussed, as is the necessity for validated CFD tools. The current aeronautical position of this country is assessed, as are revolutionary goals to help maintain its aeronautical supremacy in the world.

  2. A Survey of Knowledge Management Research & Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, Richard M.; Clancy, Daniel (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This chapter catalogs knowledge management research and development activities at NASA Ames Research Center as of April 2002. A general categorization scheme for knowledge management systems is first introduced. This categorization scheme divides knowledge management capabilities into five broad categories: knowledge capture, knowledge preservation, knowledge augmentation, knowledge dissemination, and knowledge infrastructure. Each of nearly 30 knowledge management systems developed at Ames is then classified according to this system. Finally, a capsule description of each system is presented along with information on deployment status, funding sources, contact information, and both published and internet-based references.

  3. Recent Progress in Entry Radiation Measurements in the NASA Ames Electric ARC Shock Tube Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.

    2012-01-01

    The Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) at NASA Ames Research Center is NASA's only working shock tube capable of obtaining conditions representative of entry in a multitude of planetary atmospheres. The facility is capable of mapping spectroscopic signatures of a wide range of planetary entries from the Vacuum Ultraviolet through Mid-Wave Infrared (120-5500 nm). This paper summarizes the tests performed in EAST for Earth, Mars and Venus entries since 2008, then focuses on a specific test case for CO2/N2 mixtures. In particular, the paper will focus on providing information for the proper interpretation of the EAST data.

  4. Drop motion induced by vertical vibrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sartori, Paolo; Quagliati, Damiano; Varagnolo, Silvia; Pierno, Matteo; Mistura, Giampaolo; Magaletti, Francesco; Massimo Casciola, Carlo

    2015-11-01

    We have studied the motion of liquid drops on an inclined plate subject to vertical vibrations. The liquids comprised distilled water and different aqueous solutions of glycerol, ethanol and isopropanol spanning the range 1-39 mm2 s-1 in kinematic viscosities and 40-72 mN m-1 in surface tension. At sufficiently low oscillating amplitudes, the drops are always pinned to the surface. Vibrating the plate above a certain amplitude yields sliding of the drop. Further increasing the oscillating amplitude drives the drop upward against gravity. In the case of the most hydrophilic aqueous solutions, this motion is not observed and the drop only slides downward. Images taken with a fast camera show that the drop profile evolves in a different way during sliding and climbing. In particular, the climbing drop experiences a much bigger variation in its profile during an oscillating period. Complementary numerical simulations of 2D drops based on a diffuse interface approach confirm the experimental findings. The overall qualitative behavior is reproduced suggesting that the contact line pinning due to contact angle hysteresis is not necessary to explain the drop climbing.

  5. Consolidated Laser-Induced Fluorescence Diagnostic Systems for the NASA Ames Arc Jet Facilities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay H.; Wilder, Michael C.; Porter, Barry J.; Brown, Jeffrey D.; Yeung, Dickson; Battazzo, Stephen J.; Brubaker, Timothy R.

    2016-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of atomic species for non-intrusive arc jet flow property measurement was first implemented at NASA Ames in the mid-1990s. In 2013-2014, NASA combined the agency's large-scale arc jet test capabilities at NASA Ames. Concurrent with that effort, the agency also sponsored a project to establish two comprehensive LIF diagnostic systems for the Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) and Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jets. The scope of the project enabled further engineering development of the existing IHF LIF system as well as the complete reconstruction of the AHF LIF system. The updated LIF systems are identical in design and capability. They represent the culmination of over 20 years of development experience in transitioning a specialized laboratory research tool into a measurement system for large-scale, high-demand test facilities. This paper will document the latest improvements of the LIF system design and demonstrations of the redeveloped AHF and IHF LIF systems.

  6. Bayesian Research at the NASA Ames Research Center,Computational Sciences Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Robin D.

    2003-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center is one of NASA s oldest centers, having started out as part of the National Advisory Committee on Aeronautics, (NACA). The site, about 40 miles south of San Francisco, still houses many wind tunnels and other aviation related departments. In recent years, with the growing realization that space exploration is heavily dependent on computing and data analysis, its focus has turned more towards Information Technology. The Computational Sciences Division has expanded rapidly as a result. In this article, I will give a brief overview of some of the past and present projects with a Bayesian content. Much more than is described here goes on with the Division. The web pages at http://ic.arc. nasa.gov give more information on these, and the other Division projects.

  7. Upper surface blowing noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bohn, A. J.; Shovlin, M. D.

    1980-01-01

    An experimental study of the propulsive-lift noise of the NASA-Ames quiet short-haul research aircraft (QSRA) is described. Comparisons are made of measured QSRA flyover noise and model propulsive-lift noise data available in references. Developmental tests of trailing-edge treatments were conducted using sawtooth-shaped and porous USB flap trailing-edge extensions. Small scale parametric tests were conducted to determine noise reduction/design relationships. Full-scale static tests were conducted with the QSRA preparatory to the selection of edge treatment designs for flight testing. QSRA flight and published model propulsive-lift noise data have similar characteristics. Noise reductions of 2 to 3 dB were achieved over a wide range of frequency and directivity angles in static tests of the QSRA. These noise reductions are expected to be achieved or surpassed in flight tests planned by NASA in 1980.

  8. Enthalpy By Energy Balance for Aerodynamic Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center Arc Jet Complex

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hightower, T. Mark; MacDonald, Christine L.; Martinez, Edward R.; Balboni, John A.; Anderson, Karl F.; Arnold, Jim O. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) Arc Jet Facilities' Aerodynamic Heating Facility (AHF) has been instrumented for the Enthalpy By Energy Balance (EB2) method. Diagnostic EB2 data is routinely taken for all AHF runs. This paper provides an overview of the EB2 method implemented in the AHF. The chief advantage of the AHF implementation over earlier versions is the non-intrusiveness of the instruments used. For example, to measure the change in cooling water temperature, thin film 1000 ohm Resistance Temperature Detectors (RTDs) are used with an Anderson Current Loop (ACL) as the signal conditioner. The ACL with 1000 ohm RTDs allows for very sensitive measurement of the increase in temperature (Delta T) of the cooling water to the arc heater, which is a critical element of the EB2 method. Cooling water flow rates are measured with non-intrusive ultrasonic flow meters.

  9. Reduction of Background Noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, Stephen M.; Allen, Christopher S.; Soderman, Paul T.; Olson, Larry E. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Background noise in both open-jet and closed wind tunnels adversely affects the signal-to-noise ratio of acoustic measurements. To measure the noise of increasingly quieter aircraft models, the background noise will have to be reduced by physical means or through signal processing. In a closed wind tunnel, such as the NASA Ames 40- by 80- Foot Wind Tunnel, the principle background noise sources can be classified as: (1) fan drive noise; (2) microphone self-noise; (3) aerodynamically induced noise from test-dependent hardware such as model struts and junctions; and (4) noise from the test section walls and vane set. This paper describes the steps taken to minimize the influence of each of these background noise sources in the 40 x 80.

  10. New Diagnostic, Launch and Model Control Techniques in the NASA Ames HFFAF Ballistic Range

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.

    2012-01-01

    This report presents new diagnostic, launch and model control techniques used in the NASA Ames HFFAF ballistic range. High speed movies were used to view the sabot separation process and the passage of the model through the model splap paper. Cavities in the rear of the sabot, to catch the muzzle blast of the gun, were used to control sabot finger separation angles and distances. Inserts were installed in the powder chamber to greatly reduce the ullage volume (empty space) in the chamber. This resulted in much more complete and repeatable combustion of the powder and hence, in much more repeatable muzzle velocities. Sheets of paper or cardstock, impacting one half of the model, were used to control the amplitudes of the model pitch oscillations.

  11. An evaluation plan of bus architectures and protocols using the NASA Ames intelligent redundant actuation system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defeo, P.; Chen, M.

    1987-01-01

    Means for evaluating data bus architectures and protocols for highly integrated flight control system applications are needed. Described are the criteria and plans to do this by using the NASA/Ames Intelligent Redundant Actuation System (IRAS) experimental set-up. Candidate bus architectures differ from one another in terms of: topology, access control, message transfer schemes, message characteristics, initialization. data flow control, transmission rates, fault tolerance, and time synchronization. The evaluation criteria are developed relative to these features. A preliminary, analytical evaluation of four candidate busses (MIL-STD-1553B, DATAC, Ethernet, and HSIS) is described. A bus must be exercised in a real-time environment to evaluate its dynamic characteristics. A plan for real-time evaluation of these four busses using a combination of hardware and simulation techniques is presented.

  12. THE NASA AMES POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON INFRARED SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE: THE COMPUTED SPECTRA

    SciTech Connect

    Bauschlicher, C. W.; Ricca, A.; Boersma, C.; Mattioda, A. L.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; Allamandola, L. J.; Sanchez de Armas, F.; Puerta Saborido, G.; Hudgins, D. M.

    2010-08-15

    The astronomical emission features, formerly known as the unidentified infrared bands, are now commonly ascribed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The laboratory experiments and computational modeling done at the NASA Ames Research Center to create a collection of PAH IR spectra relevant to test and refine the PAH hypothesis have been assembled into a spectroscopic database. This database now contains over 800 PAH spectra spanning 2-2000 {mu}m (5000-5 cm{sup -1}). These data are now available on the World Wide Web at www.astrochem.org/pahdb. This paper presents an overview of the computational spectra in the database and the tools developed to analyze and interpret astronomical spectra using the database. A description of the online and offline user tools available on the Web site is also presented.

  13. Building intelligent systems: Artificial intelligence research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedland, P.; Lum, H.

    1987-01-01

    The basic components that make up the goal of building autonomous intelligent systems are discussed, and ongoing work at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. It is noted that a clear progression of systems can be seen through research settings (both within and external to NASA) to Space Station testbeds to systems which actually fly on the Space Station. The starting point for the discussion is a truly autonomous Space Station intelligent system, responsible for a major portion of Space Station control. Attention is given to research in fiscal 1987, including reasoning under uncertainty, machine learning, causal modeling and simulation, knowledge from design through operations, advanced planning work, validation methodologies, and hierarchical control of and distributed cooperation among multiple knowledge-based systems.

  14. Waste Processing Research and Technology Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Kliss, Mark

    2004-01-01

    The current "store and return" approach for handling waste products generated during low Earth orbit missions will not meet the requirements for future human missions identified in NASA s new Exploration vision. The objective is to develop appropriate reliable waste management systems that minimize maintenance and crew time, while maintaining crew health and safety, as well as providing protection of planetary surfaces. Solid waste management requirements for these missions include waste volume reduction, stabilization and storage, water recovery, and ultimately recovery of carbon dioxide, nutrients and other resources from a fully regenerative food production life support system. This paper identifies the key drivers for waste management technology development within NASA, and provides a roadmap for the developmental sequence and progression of technologies. Recent results of research and technology development activities at NASA Ames Research Center on candidate waste management technologies with emphasis on compaction, lyophilization, and incineration are discussed.

  15. Development of Implicit Methods in CFD NASA Ames Research Center 1970's - 1980's

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pulliam, Thomas H.

    2010-01-01

    The focus here is on the early development (mid 1970's-1980's) at NASA Ames Research Center of implicit methods in Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD). A class of implicit finite difference schemes of the Beam and Warming approximate factorization type will be addressed. The emphasis will be on the Euler equations. A review of material pertinent to the solution of the Euler equations within the framework of implicit methods will be presented. The eigensystem of the equations will be used extensively in developing a framework for various methods applied to the Euler equations. The development and analysis of various aspects of this class of schemes will be given along with the motivations behind many of the choices. Various acceleration and efficiency modifications such as matrix reduction, diagonalization and flux split schemes will be presented.

  16. Transforming BIM to BEM: Generation of Building Geometry for the NASA Ames Sustainability Base BIM

    SciTech Connect

    O'Donnell, James T.; Maile, Tobias; Rose, Cody; Mrazovic, Natasa; Morrissey, Elmer; Regnier, Cynthia; Parrish, Kristen; Bazjanac, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    Typical processes of whole Building Energy simulation Model (BEM) generation are subjective, labor intensive, time intensive and error prone. Essentially, these typical processes reproduce already existing data, i.e. building models already created by the architect. Accordingly, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) developed a semi-automated process that enables reproducible conversions of Building Information Model (BIM) representations of building geometry into a format required by building energy modeling (BEM) tools. This is a generic process that may be applied to all building energy modeling tools but to date has only been used for EnergyPlus. This report describes and demonstrates each stage in the semi-automated process for building geometry using the recently constructed NASA Ames Sustainability Base throughout. This example uses ArchiCAD (Graphisoft, 2012) as the originating CAD tool and EnergyPlus as the concluding whole building energy simulation tool. It is important to note that the process is also applicable for professionals that use other CAD tools such as Revit (“Revit Architecture,” 2012) and DProfiler (Beck Technology, 2012) and can be extended to provide geometry definitions for BEM tools other than EnergyPlus. Geometry Simplification Tool (GST) was used during the NASA Ames project and was the enabling software that facilitated semi-automated data transformations. GST has now been superseded by Space Boundary Tool (SBT-1) and will be referred to as SBT-1 throughout this report. The benefits of this semi-automated process are fourfold: 1) reduce the amount of time and cost required to develop a whole building energy simulation model, 2) enable rapid generation of design alternatives, 3) improve the accuracy of BEMs and 4) result in significantly better performing buildings with significantly lower energy consumption than those created using the traditional design process, especially if the simulation model was used as a predictive

  17. THE VERTICAL COMPONENT OF THE SUPERGRANULAR MOTION

    SciTech Connect

    Duvall, T. L. Jr.; Birch, A. C.

    2010-12-10

    Supergranules are observed at the solar photosphere as a cellular horizontal flow pattern with flow diverging from cell centers and converging on cell boundaries. Clark and Johnson calculated that mass conservation leads to an expected vertical flow of only 10 m s{sup -1}, which has been difficult to observe. In the present work, Doppler images near the disk center from Michelson Doppler Imager are averaged about locations of cell centers to obtain the necessary signal-to-noise ratio to see the vertical flow. It is found that, for an average over 1100 cell centers, there is a 10 m s{sup -1} upflow at cell center and a 5 m s{sup -1} downflow at the cell boundaries, confirming the previous estimate. The rms vertical flow is 4 m s{sup -1}, smaller than Giovanelli's upper limit of 10 m s{sup -1}.

  18. Flow Quality Measurements in the NASA Ames Upgraded 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amaya, Max A.; Murthy, Sreedhara V.; George, M. W. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Among the many upgrades designed and implemented in the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel over the past few years, several directly affect flow quality in the test section: a turbulence reduction system with a honeycomb and two screens, a flow smoothing system in the back leg diffusers, an improved drive motor control system, and a full replacement set of composite blades for the compressor. Prior to the shut-down of the tunnel for construction activities, an 8-foot span rake populated with flow instrumentation was traversed in the test section to fully document the flow quality and establish a baseline against which the upgrades could be characterized. A similar set of measurements was performed during the recent integrated system test trials, but the scope was somewhat limited in accordance with the primary objective of such tests, namely to return the tunnel to a fully operational status. These measurements clearly revealed substantial improvements in flow angularity and significant reductions in turbulence level for both full-span and semi-span testing configurations, thus making the flow quality of the tunnel one of the best among existing transonic facilities.

  19. Satellite communications provisions on NASA Ames instrumented aircraft platforms for Earth science research/applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shameson, L.; Brass, J. A.; Hanratty, J. J.; Roberts, A. C.; Wegener, S. S.

    1995-01-01

    Earth science activities at NASA Ames are research in atmospheric and ecosystem science, development of remote sensing and in situ sampling instruments, and their integration into scientific research platform aircraft. The use of satellite communications can greatly extend the capability of these agency research platform aircraft. Current projects and plans involve satellite links on the Perseus UAV and the ER-2 via TDRSS and a proposed experiment on the NASA Advanced Communications Technology Satellite. Provisions for data links on the Perseus research platform, via TDRSS S-band multiple access service, have been developed and are being tested. Test flights at Dryden are planned to demonstrate successful end-to-end data transfer. A Unisys Corp. airborne satcom STARLink system is being integrated into an Ames ER-2 aircraft. This equipment will support multiple data rates up to 43 Mb/s each via the TDRS S Ku-band single access service. The first flight mission for this high-rate link is planned for August 1995. Ames and JPL have proposed an ACTS experiment to use real-time satellite communications to improve wildfire research campaigns. Researchers and fire management teams making use of instrumented aircraft platforms at a prescribed burn site will be able to communicate with experts at Ames, the U.S. Forest Service, and emergency response agencies.

  20. Design outline for a new multiman ATC simulation facility at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kreifeldt, J. G.; Gallagher, O.

    1977-01-01

    A new and unique facility for studying human factors aspects in aeronautics is being planned for use in the Man-Vehicle Systems Research Division at the NASA-Ames Research Center. This facility will replace the existing three cockpit-single ground controller station and be expandable to include approximately seven cockpits and two ground controller stations. Unlike the previous system, each cockpit will be mini-computer centered and linked to a main CPU to effect a distributed computation facility. Each simulator will compute its own flight dynamic and flight path predictor. Mechanical flight instruments in each cockpit will be locally supported and CRT cockpit displays of (e.g.) traffic and or RNAV information will be centrally computed and distributed as a means of extending the existing computational and graphical resources. An outline of the total design is presented which addresses the technical design options and research possibilities of this unique man-machine facility and which may also serve as a model for other real time distributed simulation facilities.

  1. The NASA/Ames Mars General Circulation Model: Model Improvements and Comparison with Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.; Colaprete, A.; Bridger, A. F. C.; McKay, C. P.; Murphy, J. R.; Schaeffer, J.; Freedman, R.; Fonda, Mark (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    For many years, the NASA/Ames Mars General Circulation Model (GCM) has been built around the UCLA B-grid dynamical core. An attached tracer transport scheme based on the aerosol microphysical model of Toon et al. (1988) provided a tool for studying dust storm transport and feedbacks (Murphy et al., 1995). While we still use a B-grid version of the model, the Ames group is now transitioning to the ARIES/GEOS Goddard C-grid dynamical core (Suarez and Takacs, 1995). The C-grid produces smoother fields when the model top is raised above 50 km, and has a built in transport scheme for an arbitrary number of tracers. All of our transport simulations are now carried out with the C-grid. We have also been updating our physics package. Several years ago we replaced our bulk boundary layer scheme with a level 2 type diffusive scheme, and added a multi-level soil model (Haberle et al., 2000). More recently we replaced our radiation code with a more generalized two-stream code that accounts for aerosol multiple scattering and gaseous absorption. This code gives us much more flexibility in choosing aerosol optical properties and radiatively active gases.

  2. Stanford/NASA-Ames Center of Excellence in model-based human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wandell, Brian A.

    1990-01-01

    The human operator plays a critical role in many aeronautic and astronautic missions. The Stanford/NASA-Ames Center of Excellence in Model-Based Human Performance (COE) was initiated in 1985 to further our understanding of the performance capabilities and performance limits of the human component of aeronautic and astronautic projects. Support from the COE is devoted to those areas of experimental and theoretical work designed to summarize and explain human performance by developing computable performance models. The ultimate goal is to make these computable models available to other scientists for use in design and evaluation of aeronautic and astronautic instrumentation. Within vision science, two topics have received particular attention. First, researchers did extensive work analyzing the human ability to recognize object color relatively independent of the spectral power distribution of the ambient lighting (color constancy). The COE has supported a number of research papers in this area, as well as the development of a substantial data base of surface reflectance functions, ambient illumination functions, and an associated software package for rendering and analyzing image data with respect to these spectral functions. Second, the COE supported new empirical studies on the problem of selecting colors for visual display equipment to enhance human performance in discrimination and recognition tasks.

  3. Emission Spectroscopy and Radiometric Measurements in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael W.; Raiche, George A.; Prabhu, Dinesh K.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma diagnostic measurement campaigns in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) have been conducted over the last several years with a view towards characterizing the flow in the arc jet facility by providing data necessary for modeling and simulation. Optical emission spectroscopy has been used in the plenum and in the free jet of the nozzle. Radiation incident over a probe surface has also been measured using radiometry. Plenum measurements have shown distinct radial profiles of temperature over a range of operating conditions. For cases where large amounts of cold air are added radially to the main arc-heated stream, the temperature profiles are higher by as much as 1500 K than the profiles assumed in flow simulations. Optical measurements perpendicular to the flow direction in the free jet showed significant contributions to the molecule emission through inverse pre-dissociation, thus allowing determination of atom number densities from molecular emission. This has been preliminarily demonstrated with the N2 1st Positive System. Despite the use of older rate coefficients, the resulting atom densities are reasonable and surprisingly close to flow predictions.

  4. Flow Property Measurement Using Laser-Induced Fluorescence in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Porter, Barry J.; Carballo, Julio Enrique

    2011-01-01

    The spectroscopic diagnostic technique of two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF) of atomic species has been applied to single-point measurements of velocity and static temperature in the NASA Ames Interaction Heating Facility (IHF) arc jet. Excitation spectra of atomic oxygen and nitrogen were recorded while scanning a tunable dye laser over the absorption feature. Thirty excitation spectra were acquired during 8 arc jet runs at two facility operating conditions; the number of scans per run varied between 2 and 6. Curve fits to the spectra were analyzed to recover their Doppler shifts and widths, from which the flow velocities and static temperatures, respectively, were determined. An increase in the number of independent flow property pairs from each as-measured scan was obtained by extracting multiple lower-resolution scans. The larger population sample size enabled the mean property values and their uncertainties for each run to be characterized with greater confidence. The average plus or minus 2 sigma uncertainties in the mean velocities and temperatures for all 8 runs were plus or minus 1.4% and plus or minus 11%, respectively.

  5. Simulation of 3-D Nonequilibrium Seeded Air Flow in the NASA-Ames MHD Channel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gupta, Sumeet; Tannehill, John C.; Mehta, Unmeel B.

    2004-01-01

    The 3-D nonequilibrium seeded air flow in the NASA-Ames experimental MHD channel has been numerically simulated. The channel contains a nozzle section, a center section, and an accelerator section where magnetic and electric fields can be imposed on the flow. In recent tests, velocity increases of up to 40% have been achieved in the accelerator section. The flow in the channel is numerically computed us ing a 3-D parabolized Navier-Stokes (PNS) algorithm that has been developed to efficiently compute MHD flows in the low magnetic Reynolds number regime: The MHD effects are modeled by introducing source terms into the PNS equations which can then be solved in a very efficient manner. The algorithm has been extended in the present study to account for nonequilibrium seeded air flows. The electrical conductivity of the flow is determined using the program of Park. The new algorithm has been used to compute two test cases that match the experimental conditions. In both cases, magnetic and electric fields are applied to the seeded flow. The computed results are in good agreement with the experimental data.

  6. Sources and levels of background noise in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soderman, Paul T.

    1988-01-01

    Background noise levels are measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel following installation of a sound-absorbent lining on the test-section walls. Results show that the fan-drive noise dominated the empty test-section background noise at airspeeds below 120 knots. Above 120 knots, the test-section broadband background noise was dominated by wind-induced dipole noise (except at lower harmonics of fan blade-passage tones) most likely generated at the microphone or microphone support strut. Third-octave band and narrow-band spectra are presented for several fan operating conditions and test-section airspeeds. The background noise levels can be reduced by making improvements to the microphone wind screen or support strut. Empirical equations are presented relating variations of fan noise with fan speed or blade-pitch angle. An empirical expression for typical fan noise spectra is also presented. Fan motor electric power consumption is related to the noise generation. Preliminary measurements of sound absorption by the test-section lining indicate that the 152 mm thick lining will adequately absorb test-section model noise at frequencies above 300 Hz.

  7. Training for life science experiments in space at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodrigues, Annette T.; Maese, A. Christopher

    1993-01-01

    As this country prepares for exploration to other planets, the need to understand the affects of long duration exposure to microgravity is evident. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Ames Research Center's Space Life Sciences Payloads Office is responsible for a number of non-human life sciences payloads on NASA's Space Shuttle's Spacelab. Included in this responsibility is the training of those individuals who will be conducting the experiments during flight, the astronauts. Preparing a crew to conduct such experiments requires training protocols that build on simple tasks. Once a defined degree of performance proficiency is met for each task, these tasks are combined to increase the complexity of the activities. As tasks are combined into in-flight operations, they are subjected to time constraints and the crew enhances their skills through repetition. The science objectives must be completely understood by the crew and are critical to the overall training program. Completion of the in-flight activities is proof of success. Because the crew is exposed to the background of early research and plans for post-flight analyses, they have a vested interest in the flight activities. The salient features of this training approach is that it allows for flexibility in implementation, consideration of individual differences, and a greater ability to retain experiment information. This training approach offers another effective alternative training tool to existing methodologies.

  8. A study of vertical motion requirements for landing simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1973-01-01

    Tests were conducted to determine the significance of vertical acceleration cues in the simulation of the visual approach and landing maneuver. Landing performance measures were obtained for four subject pilots operating a visual landing simulation mechanized in the Ames Height Control Test Apparatus, a device that provides up to plus or minus 40 ft of vertical motion. Test results indicate that vertical motion cues are utilized in the landing task, and that they are particularly important in the simulation of aircraft with marginal longitudinal-handling qualities. To assure vertical motion cues of the desired fidelity in the landing task, it appears, that a simulator must have excursion capabilities of at least 20 ft in either direction.

  9. NASA-Ames three-dimensional potential flow analysis system (POTFAN) equation solver code (SOLN) version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. E.; Bonnett, W. S.; Medan, R. T.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program known as SOLN was developed as an independent segment of the NASA-Ames three-dimensional potential flow analysis systems of linear algebraic equations. Methods used include: LU decomposition, Householder's method, a partitioning scheme, and a block successive relaxation method. Due to the independent modular nature of the program, it may be used by itself and not necessarily in conjunction with other segments of the POTFAN system.

  10. Formation of the Martian Polar Layered Terrains: Quantifying Polar Water Ice and Dust Surface Deposition During Current and Past Orbital Epochs with the NASA Ames GCM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmett, J. A.; Murphy, J. R.

    2016-09-01

    The NASA Ames GCM will be used to quantify net annual polar deposition rates of water ice and dust on Mars during current and past orbital epochs to investigate the formation history, structure, and stratigraphy of the polar layered terrains.

  11. Vertical plate motions in the West Siberian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vibe, Yulia; Clark, Stuart

    2015-04-01

    The West Siberian Basin is one of the world's largest sedimentary basins representing an important source of oil and gas. The Basin's history includes long periods of very slow subsidence coupled with periods of erosion and uplift. Despite that the Basin has been broadly explored the causes of these vertical motions are not yet understood. In this study we analyse the vertical motions by the means of backstripping. The new backstripping results refined by the paleo-water depth data give estimates of the subsidence and uplift rate. These results show a peculiar character of the vertical motions where the region of maximum subsidence migrated from the north to the south several times during the Basin's history. Such southward propagation of subsidence happened in the Late Jurassic, Aptian and in the Paleogene periods. The newly constrained local eustatic curve indicates that the Basin's vertical motions do not reflect the global sea level changes, but the more complicated tectonic processes. We put different data sets of the Basin's sediments and crust structure together with the new backstripping results in order to understand better the vertical motions and the processes underlying the irregular subsidence and uplift pattern of the West Siberian Basin

  12. Low-Disturbance Flow Characteristics of the NASA-Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; Davis, Sanford S. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance (quiet) supersonic wind tunnel has been commissioned at the NASA-Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory (FML) to support Supersonic Laminar Flow Control (SLFC) research. Known as the Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT), this tunnel is designed to operate at potential cruise Mach numbers and unit Reynolds numbers (Re) of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The need to better understand the receptivity of the transition phenomena on swept (HSCT) wings to attachment-line contamination and cross-flows has provided the impetus for building the LFSWT. Low-disturbance or "quiet" wind tunnels are known to be an essential part of any meaningful boundary layer transition research. In particular, the receptivity of supersonic boundary layers to wind tunnel disturbances can significantly alter the transition phenomena under investigation on a test model. Consequently, considerable effort has gone into the design of the LFSWT to provide quiet flow. The paper describes efforts to quantify the low-disturbance flows in the LFSWT operating at Mach 1.6, as a precursor to transition research on wing models. The research includes: (1) Flow measurements in both the test section and settling chamber of the LFSWT, using a full range of measurement techniques; (2) Study of the state of the test section boundary layer so far by using a single hot-wire mounted above the floor centerline, with and without boundary layer trips fitted at the test section entrance; (3) The effect of flow quality of unsteady supersonic diffuser flow, joint steps and gaps, and wall vibration.

  13. Research Activities at Plasma Research Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, S. P.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2000-01-01

    In order to meet NASA's requirements for the rapid development and validation of future generation electronic devices as well as associated materials and processes, enabling technologies are being developed at NASA-Ames Research Center using a multi-discipline approach. The first step is to understand the basic physics of the chemical reactions in the area of plasma reactors and processes. Low pressure glow discharges are indispensable in the fabrication of microelectronic circuits. These plasmas are used to deposit materials and also etch fine features in device fabrication. However, many plasma-based processes suffer from stability and reliability problems leading to a compromise in performance and a potentially increased cost for the semiconductor manufacturing industry. Although a great deal of laboratory-scale research has been performed on many of these processing plasmas, little is known about the gas-phase and surface chemical reactions that are critical in many etch and deposition processes, and how these reactions are influenced by the variation in operating conditions. Such a lack of understanding has hindered the development of process models that can aid in the scaling and improvement of plasma etch and deposition systems. Our present research involves the study of such plasmas. An inductively-coupled plasma (ICP) source in place of the standard upper electrode assembly of the Gaseous Electronics Conference (GEC) radio-frequency (RF) Reference Cell is used to investigate the discharge characteristics. This ICP source generates plasmas with higher electron densities and lower operating pressures than obtainable with the original parallel-plate version of the GEC Cell. This expanded operating regime is more relevant to new generations of industrial plasma systems being used by the microelectronics industry. The research goal is to develop an understanding of the physical phenomena involved in plasma processing and to measure much needed fundamental

  14. Multi-Mission Suitability of the NASA Ames Modular Common Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tietz, Sascha; Bell, James H.; Hine, Butler

    2009-01-01

    The obvious advantages of small spacecraft - their lower cost structure and the rapid development schedule - have enabled a large number of missions in the past. However, most of these missions have been focused on Earth observation from low Earth orbits. In 2006, the Small Spacecraft Division at the NASA Ames Research Center began the development of the Modular Common Bus, a spacecraft capable of delivering scientifically and technically useful payloads to a variety of destinations within 0.1 AU around the Earth. The core technologies used in the Common Bus design are a composite structure with body-mounted solar cells, an integrated avionics unit, and a high performance bipropellant propulsion system. Due to its modular approach, the Common Bus can be adapted to fit specific mission needs while still using a standardized and qualified set of components. Additionally a number of low cost launch vehicles are supported, resulting in overall mission costs of around $150M including the launch vehicle but excluding the science payloads. This significant reduction in cost and the shorter development time would enable NASA to conduct more frequent exploration missions within its budget and timeframe constraints, compared to the status quo. In this paper the suitability of the Common Spacecraft Bus for four different exploration scenarios is analyzed. These scenarios include a lunar orbiter, a lunar lander, a mission to a Sun-Earth Libration Point, and a rendezvous mission to a Near Earth Object. For each scenario, a preliminary design reference mission is developed and key design parameters for the spacecraft are determined.

  15. Surface Lander Missions to Mars: Support via Analysis of the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, James R.; Bridger, Alison F.C.; Haberle, Robert M.

    1997-01-01

    We have characterized the near-surface martian wind environment as calculated with a set of numerical simulations carried out with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model (Mars GCM). These wind environments are intended to offer future spacecraft missions to the martian surface a data base from which to choose those locations which meet the mission's criteria for minimal near surface winds to enable a successful landing. We also became involved in the development and testing of the wind sensor which is currently onboard the Mars-bound Pathfinder lander. We began this effort with a comparison of Mars GCM produced winds with those measured by the Viking landers during their descent through the martian atmosphere and their surface wind measurements during the 3+ martian year lifetime of the mission. Unexpected technical difficulties in implementing the sophisticated Planetary Boundary Layer (PBL) scheme of Haberle et al. (1993) within the Mars GCM precluded our carrying out this investigation with the desired improvement to the model's treatment of the PBL. Thus, our results from this effort are not as conclusive as we had anticipated. As it turns out, similar difficulties have been experienced by other Mars modelling groups in attempting to implement very similar PBL routines into their GCMs (Mars General Circulation Model Intercomparison Workshop, held at Oxford University, United Kingdom, July 22-24, 1996; organized by J. Murphy, J. Hollingsworth, M. Joshi). These problems, which arise due to the nature of the time stepping in each of the models, are near to being resolved at the present. The model discussions which follow herein are based upon results using the existing, less sophisticated PBL routine. We fully anticipate implementing the tools we have developed in the present effort to investigate GCM results with the new PBL scheme implemented, and thereafter producing the technical document detailing results from the analysis tools developed during this

  16. Entrainment instability and vertical motion as causes of stratocumulus breakup

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weaver, C. J.; Pearson, R., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Entrainment instability is thought to be a cause of stratocumulus breakup. At the interface between the cloud and the overlying air, mixtures may form which are negatively buoyant because of cloud droplet evaporation. Quantities devised to predict breakup are obtained from aircraft observations and are tested against cloud observations from satellite. Often, the parameters indicate that breakup should occur but the clouds remain, sometimes for several days. One possible explanation for breakup is vertical motion from passing synoptic cyclones. Several cases suggest that breakup is associated with the downward vertical motion from the cold air advected behind an eastward moving cyclone.

  17. Human comfort response to random motions with a dominant vertical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    Subjective ride comfort response ratings were measured on the Langley Visual Motion Simulator with vertical acceleration inputs with various power spectra shapes and magnitudes. The data obtained are presented.

  18. Simulation System Fidelity Assessment at the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Steven D.; Reardon, Scott E.; Tobias, Eric L.; Aponso, Bimal L.

    2013-01-01

    Fidelity is a word that is often used but rarely understood when talking about groundbased simulation. Assessing the cueing fidelity of a ground based flight simulator requires a comparison to actual flight data either directly or indirectly. Two experiments were conducted at the Vertical Motion Simulator using the GenHel UH-60A Black Hawk helicopter math model that was directly compared to flight data. Prior to the experiment the simulator s motion and visual system frequency responses were measured, the aircraft math model was adjusted to account for the simulator motion system delays, and the motion system gains and washouts were tuned for the individual tasks. The tuned motion system fidelity was then assessed against the modified Sinacori criteria. The first experiments showed similar handling qualities ratings (HQRs) to actual flight for a bob-up and sidestep maneuvers. The second experiment showed equivalent HQRs between flight and simulation for the ADS33 slalom maneuver for the two pilot participants. The ADS33 vertical maneuver HQRs were mixed with one pilot rating the flight and simulation the same while the second pilot rated the simulation worse. In addition to recording HQRs on the second experiment, an experimental Simulation Fidelity Rating (SFR) scale developed by the University of Liverpool was tested for applicability to engineering simulators. A discussion of the SFR scale for use on the Vertical Motion Simulator is included in this paper.

  19. 34. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION VIEWED FROM EAST TOWER, 7 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION VIEWED FROM EAST TOWER, 7 NOVEMBER 1940, FROM 16MN FILM SHOT BY PROFESSOR F.B. FARQUHARSON, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON. (LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, AT UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON (SEATTLE: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1941) - Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows at State Route 16, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  20. THE NASA AMES PAH IR SPECTROSCOPIC DATABASE VERSION 2.00: UPDATED CONTENT, WEB SITE, AND ON(OFF)LINE TOOLS

    SciTech Connect

    Boersma, C.; Mattioda, A. L.; Allamandola, L. J.; Bauschlicher, C. W. Jr.; Ricca, A.; Cami, J.; Peeters, E.; De Armas, F. Sánchez; Saborido, G. Puerta; Hudgins, D. M.

    2014-03-01

    A significantly updated version of the NASA Ames PAH IR Spectroscopic Database, the first major revision since its release in 2010, is presented. The current version, version 2.00, contains 700 computational and 75 experimental spectra compared, respectively, with 583 and 60 in the initial release. The spectra span the 2.5-4000 μm (4000-2.5 cm{sup -1}) range. New tools are available on the site that allow one to analyze spectra in the database and compare them with imported astronomical spectra as well as a suite of IDL object classes (a collection of programs utilizing IDL's object-oriented programming capabilities) that permit offline analysis called the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite. Most noteworthy among the additions are the extension of the computational spectroscopic database to include a number of significantly larger polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), the ability to visualize the molecular atomic motions corresponding to each vibrational mode, and a new tool that allows one to perform a non-negative least-squares fit of an imported astronomical spectrum with PAH spectra in the computational database. Finally, a methodology is described in the Appendix, and implemented using the AmesPAHdbIDLSuite, that allows the user to enforce charge balance during the fitting procedure.

  1. Recent Progress in Planetary Laboratory Astrophysics achieved with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salama, Farid; Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Bejaoui, Salma

    2016-10-01

    We describe the characteristics and the capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory [1]. COSmIC stands for "Cosmic Simulation Chamber" and is dedicated to the study of neutral and ionized molecules and nanoparticles under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate various space environments such as planetary atmospheres. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. The COSmIC experimental setup is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion, that generates a plasma in the stream of a free supersonic jet expansion, coupled to two high-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) and laser induced fluorescence (LIF) systems for photonic detection [2, 3], and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection [4].Recent results obtained using COSmIC will be highlighted. In particular, the progress that has been achieved in an on-going study investigating the formation and the characterization of laboratory analogs of Titan's aerosols generated from gas-phase molecular precursors [5] will be presented. Plans for future laboratory experiments on planetary molecules and aerosols in the growing field of planetary laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed, as well as the implications of studies underway for astronomical observations.References: [1] Salama F., in Organic Matter in Space, IAU S251, Kwok & Sandford eds, CUP, S251, 4, 357 (2008).[2] Biennier L., Salama, F., Allamandola L., & Scherer J., J. Chem. Phys., 118, 7863 (2003)[3] Tan X, & Salama F., J. Chem. Phys. 122, 84318 (2005)[4] Ricketts C., Contreras C., Walker, R., Salama F., Int. J. Mass Spec, 300

  2. An Overview of the NASA Ames Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murakami, David

    2012-01-01

    The Millimeter-Wave Thermal Launch System (MTLS) is a beamed-energy propulsion concept being designed at NASA Ames Research Center. This effort is in response to the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s announcement of the Ride the Light program. Our objective is to produce a design that goes beyond the feasibility analysis level of previous studies and provides a solid foundation for low cost access to space. The MTLS is designed to place a 500 lb payload into Low Earth Orbit (LEO) two times a day. This frequent launch, small payload niche is well suited for the particular advantages and constraints of beamed-energy propulsion, and has the potential to drastically increase access to space by reducing the cost per kilogram of placing payloads into LEO. This paper summarizes the findings of the MTLS study. The chemical rocket engine is in principle a simple device. It acts by releasing the chemical energy stored in propellants such as hydrogen and oxygen through combustion, then converting that thermal energy into kinetic energy by expansion through a nozzle. As such, it is fundamentally limited by the energy released in combustion reactions and the molecular weight of the products of those reactions. The highest performing conventional propellant combination, liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen, can produce vacuum specific impulses of around 450 seconds. The design space of current launch vehicles (which tend to be large, multi-stage, and expendable) are defined by these limitations. An entirely new approach may be necessary in order to enable future launch vehicles of radically improved capabilities. Beamed-energy propulsion (BEP) is an alternative approach that bypasses the energy limitations of chemical propulsion. Instead of relying on a chemical reaction as the energy source, it is supplied externally via a beam of electromagnetic energy produced on the ground. In the concept examined in the MTLS, this energy is absorbed by a heat exchanger which then

  3. Emission Spectroscopic Measurements with an Optical Probe in the NASA Ames IHF Arc Jet Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winter, Michael; Prabhu, Dinesh K.; Raiche, George A.; Terrazas-Salinas, Imelda; Hui, Frank C. L.

    2011-01-01

    An optical probe was designed to measure radiation (from inside the arc heater) incident on a test sample immersed in the arc-heated stream. Currently, only crude estimates are available for this incident radiation. Unlike efforts of the past, where the probe line of sight was inclined to the nozzle centerline, the present development focuses on having the probe line of sight coincide with the nozzle centerline. A fiber-coupled spectrometer was used to measure the spectral distribution of incident radiation in the wavelength range of 225 to 900 nm. The radiation heat flux in this wavelength range was determined by integration of measured emission spectral intensity calibrated to incident irradiance from an integrating sphere. Two arc-heater conditions, corresponding to stream bulk enthalpy levels of 12 and 22 MJ/kg, were investigated in the 13-inch diameter nozzle of the Interaction Heating Facility at NASA Ames Research Center. With the probe placed at a distance of 10 inches from the nozzle exit plane, total radiative heat fluxes were measured to be 3.3 and 8.4 W/sq cm for the 12 and 22 MJ/kg conditions, respectively. About 17% of these radiative fluxes were due to bound-bound radiation from atoms and molecules, while the remaining 83% could be attributed to continua (bound-free and/or free-free). A comparison with spectral simulation based on CFD solutions for the arc-heater flow field and with spectroscopic measurements in the plenum region indicates that more than 95% of the measured radiation is generated in the arc region. The total radiative heat flux from the line radiation could increase by a factor of two through contributions from wavelengths outside the measured range, i.e., from the vacuum ultraviolet (wavelengths less than 225 nm) and the infrared (wavelengths greater than 900 nm). An extrapolation of the continuum radiation to these two wavelength regions was not attempted. In the tested configuration, the measured radiative heat flux accounts for

  4. Construction of a 2- by 2-foot transonic adaptive-wall test section at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morgan, Daniel G.; Lee, George

    1986-01-01

    The development of a new production-size, two-dimensional, adaptive-wall test section with ventilated walls at the NASA Ames Research Center is described. The new facility incorporates rapid closed-loop operation, computer/sensor integration, and on-line interference assessment and wall corrections. Air flow through the test section is controlled by a series of plenum compartments and three-way slide vales. A fast-scan laser velocimeter was built to measure velocity boundary conditions for the interference assessment scheme. A 15.2-cm- (6.0-in.-) chord NACA 0012 airfoil model will be used in the first experiments during calibration of the facility.

  5. NASA Ames's electric arc-driven shock tube facility and research on nonequilibrium phenomena in low density hypersonic flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharma, Surendra P.

    1992-01-01

    Basic requirements for a ground test facility simulating low density hypersonic flows are discussed. Such facilities should be able to produce shock velocities in the range of 10-17 km/sec in an initial pressure of 0.010 to 0.050 Torr. The facility should be equipped with diagnostics systems to be able to measure the emitted radiation, characteristic temperatures and populations in various energy levels. In the light of these requirements, NASA Ames's electric arc-driven low density shock tube facility is described and available experimental diagnostics systems and computational tools are discussed.

  6. Vertical velocities from proper motions of red clump giants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López-Corredoira, M.; Abedi, H.; Garzón, F.; Figueras, F.

    2014-12-01

    Aims: We derive the vertical velocities of disk stars in the range of Galactocentric radii of R = 5 - 16 kpc within 2 kpc in height from the Galactic plane. This kinematic information is connected to dynamical aspects in the formation and evolution of the Milky Way, such as the passage of satellites and vertical resonance and determines whether the warp is a long-lived or a transient feature. Methods: We used the PPMXL survey, which contains the USNO-B1 proper motions catalog cross-correlated with the astrometry and near-infrared photometry of the 2MASS point source catalog. To improve the accuracy of the proper motions, the systematic shifts from zero were calculated by using the average proper motions of quasars in this PPMXL survey, and we applied the corresponding correction to the proper motions of the whole survey, which reduces the systematic error. From the color-magnitude diagram K versus (J - K) we selected the standard candles corresponding to red clump giants and used the information of their proper motions to build a map of the vertical motions of our Galaxy. We derived the kinematics of the warp both analytically and through a particle simulation to fit these data. Complementarily, we also carried out the same analysis with red clump giants spectroscopically selected with APOGEE data, and we predict the improvements in accuracy that will be reached with future Gaia data. Results: A simple model of warp with the height of the disk zw(R,φ) = γ(R - R⊙)sin(φ - φw) fits the vertical motions if dot {γ }/γ = -34±17 Gyr-1; the contribution to dot {γ } comes from the southern warp and is negligible in the north. If we assume this 2σ detection to be real, the period of this oscillation is shorter than 0.43 Gyr at 68.3% C.L. and shorter than 4.64 Gyr at 95.4% C.L., which excludes with high confidence the slow variations (periods longer than 5 Gyr) that correspond to long-lived features. Our particle simulation also indicates a probable abrupt decrease

  7. Optimization of blade motion of vertical axis turbine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, Zhi-yang; Han, Duan-feng

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, a method is proposed to improve the energy efficiency of the vertical axis turbine. First of all, a single disk multiple stream-tube model is used to calculate individual fitness. Genetic algorithm is adopted to optimize blade pitch motion of vertical axis turbine with the maximum energy efficiency being selected as the optimization objective. Then, a particular data processing method is proposed, fitting the result data into a cosine-like curve. After that, a general formula calculating the blade motion is developed. Finally, CFD simulation is used to validate the blade pitch motion formula. The results show that the turbine's energy efficiency becomes higher after the optimization of blade pitch motion; compared with the fixed pitch turbine, the efficiency of variable-pitch turbine is significantly improved by the active blade pitch control; the energy efficiency declines gradually with the growth of speed ratio; besides, compactness has lager effect on the blade motion while the number of blades has little effect on it.

  8. 35. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION FROM EAST TOWER SHOWING ANGULAR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. VERTICAL AND TORSIONAL MOTION FROM EAST TOWER SHOWING ANGULAR DISTORTION APPROACHING 45 DEGREES WITH LAMP POSTS APPEARING TO BE AT EIGHT ANGLES, 7 NOVEMBER 1940, FROM 16MN FILM SHOT BY PROFESSOR F.B. FARQUHARSON, UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON. (LABORATORY STUDIES ON THE TACOMA NARROWS BRIDGE, AT UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON SEATTLE: UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON, DEPARTMENT OF CIVIL ENGINEERING, 1941) - Tacoma Narrows Bridge, Spanning Narrows at State Route 16, Tacoma, Pierce County, WA

  9. Rising motion of a bubble layer near a vertical wall

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabiri, Sadegh; Bhuvankar, Pramod

    2015-11-01

    Bubbly flows in vertical pipes and channels form a wall-peak distribution of bubbles under certain conditions. The dynamics of the bubbles near the wall is different than in an unbounded liquid. Here we report the rising motion of bubbles in a liquid near a vertical wall. In a simulation of a bubbly flow in a periodic domain with a vertical wall on one side, an average pressure gradient is applied to the domain that balances the weight of the liquid phase. The upward flow is created by the rising motion of the bubbles. The bubbles are kept near the wall by the lateral lift force acting on them as a result of rising in a shear flow which is in turn generated by rising motion of bubbles. The rise velocity of the bubbles on the wall and the average rise velocity of the liquid depend on three dimensionless parameters, Archimedes number, Eotvos number, and the average volume fraction of bubbles near the wall. In the limit of small Eo, bubbles are nearly spherical and the dependency on Eo becomes negligible. In this limit, the scaling of the liquid Reynolds number with Archimedes number and the void fraction is presented.

  10. Investigations of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS Integrated Space Shuttle Vehicle Jet-Plume Model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 by11-Foot Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (IA80). Volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    The results are documented of jet plume effects wind tunnel test of the 0.020-scale 88-OTS launch configuration space shuttle vehicle model in the 11 x 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel. This test involved cold gas main propulsion system (MPS) and solid rocket motor (SRB) plume simulations at Mach numbers from 0.6 to 1.4. Integrated vehicle surface pressure distributions, elevon and rudder hinge moments, and wing and vertical tail root bending and torsional moments due to MPS and SRB plume interactions were determined. Nozzle power conditions were controlled per pretest nozzle calibrations. Model angle of attack was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg; model angle of sideslip was varied from -4 deg to +4 deg. Reynolds number was varied for certain test conditions and configurations, with the nominal freestream total pressure being 14.69 psia. Plotted force and pressure data are presented.

  11. Vertical plate motions in the West Siberian Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vibe, Yulia

    2014-05-01

    The West Siberian Basin is a sedimentary basin situated between the Ural Mountains and the Siberian Craton. The Basin has experienced several periods of subsidence and uplift since the arrival of the Siberian Traps c. 250 Ma. Although the Basin is extensively explored and hosts large reserves of Oil and Gas, the forces driving the vertical motions are poorly understood. In this work we attempt to analyse the amount, timing and location of subsidence and uplift in the Basin to shed light on the possible causes of these motions. A detailed description of sedimentary layers is published in a number of Soviet-era books and articles and serves as a basis for our research. This data is first converted into sediment grids through time. Subsequently, the sediments, the sediment load and the compaction are taken into account ('backstripping') to produce the depth of the Basin at respective time steps. With this technique we calculate the tectonic component of subsidence. Uncertainties related to uplift events are estimated by the unconformities in the stratigraphic charts. One of the possible driving forces of vertical motions is a change of force balance arising at plate boundaries. Since active plate tectonics have been absent from West Siberia since the formation of the Urengoy and Khodosey Rifts, c. 250Ma, we study the far-field tectonic effects as a potential driving mechanism. Indeed, some of the significant vertical events in the West Siberian Basin coincide with the major tectonic events around Siberia. An example is the spreading in the Arctic (Eurasian Basin) in the Eocene (56 Ma) which was synchronous with initiation of uplift events in the northern part of West Siberia. In the middle Oligocene (33 Ma), the northern and eastern parts of the basin were subjected to uplift as subsidence migrated southwards and the Basin rose above the sea level. This was coincident with the changes of plate motions in the northern North Atlantic and Indo-European collision.

  12. Vertical Motions in Convective Clouds Over Darwin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mallinson, H.; Schumacher, C.; Ahmed, F.

    2015-12-01

    Vertical motions are essential in parameterizing convection in large-scale models. Yet in tropical systems vertical motions are difficult to obtain, especially in areas of active convection. This study uses three months of profiler data from Darwin, Australia to directly compare vertical velocity and spectrum width with reflectivity at a height of 1 km (a near-surface rain proxy) for shallow, mid-level, and deep convective clouds. Vertical velocities for all convective clouds were also compared to echo-top heights of varying reflectivities to better understand convective cloud dynamics in relation to their vertical structure. In shallow convective clouds (tops <4 km) three distinct regimes appear: a weak up-and downdraft couplet at low reflectivities (0-15 dBz), a robust updraft at moderate reflectivities (20-35 dBz), and strong downdrafts at large reflectivities (>40 dBz). These regimes could represent different stages in the convective cloud life cycle with strong updrafts and moderate reflectivity occurring in the growing phase and strong downdrafts and large reflectivity occurring in the mature phase. The weak up-and downdraft couplet and low reflectivities suggest a dissipating phase. Mid-level convective clouds (tops 4-8 km) also show three distinct regimes: moderate updrafts at low reflectivities (possible growing phase), a weak up-and downdraft couplet at moderate reflectivities (possible dissipating phase), and strong up-and downdrafts at large reflectivities (mature phase). Deep convective clouds (tops >8 km) show strong updrafts above 4 km for all reflectivities with the strongest downdrafts occurring at large reflectivities. While maximum updrafts vary in height and occur at different reflectivities among cloud types, mean downdraft depth never exceeds 3 km and is always strongest at large reflectivities, which may allow better characterization of cold pool properties. Throughout all convective cloud types, spectrum width has the highest values at lower

  13. Overview Of Haze And Smoke Measurements in Northern High Latitudes And California During ARCTAS Using The NASA Ames Airborne Sunphotometer And Associated In Situ And Remote Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, P. B.; Redemann, J.; Livingston, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Ramachandran, S.; Johnson, R. R.; Clarke, A. D.; Howell, S. G.; McNaughton, C.; Holben, B.; O'Neill, N.; McArthur, B.; Reid, E.; Ferrare, R. A.; Hostetler, C. A.

    2009-12-01

    The 14-channel NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-14) operated in a suite of remote and in-situ sensors aboard the NASA P-3 aircraft during the 2008 Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS) field campaign. Included were 8 Spring flights in the Arctic and 13 Summer flights (3 in California and 10 in Canada), each coordinated with one or more satellite overpasses, other aircraft (e.g., NASA B-200 and DC-8, NOAA P-3), and/or ground-based Aerosol Robotic Network (AERONET) measurements. This presentation gives an overview of AATS-14 aerosol optical depth (AOD) spectra and related parameters such as Angstrom exponent and fine mode fraction. We quantify the mutual consistency of AODs calculated from measurements by AATS-14, by the HiGEAR (University of Hawaii Group for Environmental Aerosol Research) suite of P-3 in-situ optical instruments, and by AERONET . The vertical integral of the HiGEAR in-situ scattering and absorption coefficients recorded during spiral profiles typically falls within 10% ± 0.02 of the AATS-14 AOD values interpolated to 450, 550 and 700 nm. Corresponding Angstrom exponents typically differ by ~0.1. AATS-14 AODs adjusted for the contribution of the layer below the aircraft (estimated with HiGEAR data) generally agree with the full column AERONET values to within the combined uncertainties. Example results from multi-platform comparisons are also shown. These results provide context for the more detailed AATS-14 results in other presentations, e.g., by Redemann et al. (focusing on the multi-platform, multi-sensor smoke case of 30 Jun 2008), Livingston et al. (comparisons to MODIS, MISR, OMI, POLDER, CALIPSO, and airborne lidar), and Shinozuka et al. (relationship to cloud condensation nuclei and other measurements).

  14. M2-F1 mounted in NASA Ames Research Center 40x80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1962-01-01

    -47 aircraft and released. These initial car-tow tests produced enough flight data about the M2-F1 to proceed with flights behind the C-47 tow plane at greater altitudes. The C-47 took the craft to an altitude of 12,000 where free flights back to Rogers Dry Lake began. Pilot for the first series of flights of the M2-F1 was NASA research pilot Milt Thompson. Typical glide flights with the M2-F1 lasted about two minutes and reached speeds of 110 to l20 mph. A small solid landing rocket, referred to as the 'instant L/D rocket,' was installed in the rear base of the M2-F1. This rocket, which could be ignited by the pilot, provided about 250 pounds of thrust for about 10 seconds. The rocket could be used to extend the flight time near landing if needed. More than 400 ground tows and 77 aircraft tow flights were carried out with the M2-F1. The success of Dryden's M2-F1 program led to NASA's development and construction of two heavyweight lifting bodies based on studies at NASA's Ames and Langley research centers--the M2-F2 and the HL-10, both built by the Northrop Corporation, and the U.S. Air Force's X-24 program, with an X-24A and -B built by Martin. The Lifting Body program also heavily influenced the Space Shuttle program. The M2-F1 program demonstrated the feasibility of the lifting body concept for horizontal landings of atmospheric entry vehicles. It also demonstrated a procurement and management concept for prototype flight test vehicles that produced rapid results at very low cost (approximately $50,000, excluding salaries of government employees assigned to the project).

  15. Exploratory testing of supersonic ribbon parachutes in the NASA Ames 9-ft by 7-ft wind tunnel

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, W.B.; Buffington, R.J.; Peterson, C.W.

    1986-01-01

    Sandia National Laboratories conducted a test of ribbon parachutes in the NASA Ames Research Center 9-ft by 7-ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel. The Ribbon parachutes were 15 inches in diameter with Kevlar-29 suspension lines and nylon ribbons. Both 20-degree conical parachutes and hemisflo parachutes were tested behind two forebody shapes with several forebody diameters. Drag data and color Schlieren photographs were obtained over a Mach number range of 1.5 to 2.5 and a dynamic pressure range of 200 to 400 lbs/ft/sup 2/. Correlations of supersonic parachute drag with Mach number, forebody shape and diameter, canopy porosity, suspension line length, and inflated canopy diameter and stability are presented.

  16. An Experimental Evaluation of Advanced Rotorcraft Airfoils in the NASA Ames Eleven-foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flemming, Robert J.

    1984-01-01

    Five full scale rotorcraft airfoils were tested in the NASA Ames Eleven-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel for full scale Reynolds numbers at Mach numbers from 0.3 to 1.07. The models, which spanned the tunnel from floor to ceiling, included two modern baseline airfoils, the SC1095 and SC1094 R8, which have been previously tested in other facilities. Three advanced transonic airfoils, designated the SSC-A09, SSC-A07, and SSC-B08, were tested to confirm predicted performance and provide confirmation of advanced airfoil design methods. The test showed that the eleven-foot tunnel is suited to two-dimensional airfoil testing. Maximum lift coefficients, drag coefficients, pitching moments, and pressure coefficient distributions are presented. The airfoil analysis codes agreed well with the data, with the Grumman GRUMFOIL code giving the best overall performance correlation.

  17. Acquisition and Analysis of NASA Ames Sunphotometer Measurements during SAGE III Validation Campaigns and other Tropospheric and Stratospheric Research Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1251 provided funding from April 2001 through December 2003 for Mr. John Livingston of SRI International to collaborate with NASA Ames Research Center scientists and engineers in the acquisition and analysis of airborne sunphotometer measurements during various atmospheric field studies. Mr. Livingston participated in instrument calibrations at Mauna Loa Observatory, pre-mission hardware and software preparations, acquisition and analysis of sunphotometer measurements during the missions, and post-mission analysis of data and reporting of scientific findings. The atmospheric field missions included the spring 2001 Intensive of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the Asian Dust Above Monterey-2003 (ADAM-2003) experiment, and the winter 2003 Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II).

  18. Preliminary Computational Study for Future Tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot' x 7 foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearl, Jason M.; Carter, Melissa B.; Elmiligui, Alaa A.; WInski, Courtney S.; Nayani, Sudheer N.

    2016-01-01

    The NASA Advanced Air Vehicles Program, Commercial Supersonics Technology Project seeks to advance tools and techniques to make over-land supersonic flight feasible. In this study, preliminary computational results are presented for future tests in the NASA Ames 9 foot x 7 foot supersonic wind tunnel to be conducted in early 2016. Shock-plume interactions and their effect on pressure signature are examined for six model geometries. Near- field pressure signatures are assessed using the CFD code USM3D to model the proposed test geometries in free-air. Additionally, results obtained using the commercial grid generation software Pointwise Reigistered Trademark are compared to results using VGRID, the NASA Langley Research Center in-house mesh generation program.

  19. Adjoint Method and Predictive Control for 1-D Flow in NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Nhan; Ardema, Mark

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a modeling method and a new optimal control approach to investigate a Mach number control problem for the NASA Ames 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel. The flow in the wind tunnel is modeled by the 1-D unsteady Euler equations whose boundary conditions prescribe a controlling action by a compressor. The boundary control inputs to the compressor are in turn controlled by a drive motor system and an inlet guide vane system whose dynamics are modeled by ordinary differential equations. The resulting Euler equations are thus coupled to the ordinary differential equations via the boundary conditions. Optimality conditions are established by an adjoint method and are used to develop a model predictive linear-quadratic optimal control for regulating the Mach number due to a test model disturbance during a continuous pitch

  20. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns: Helping the Western United States Manage Natural Resources One Project at a Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Justice, Erin; Newcomer, Michelle

    2010-01-01

    The western half of the United States is made up of a number of diverse ecosystems ranging from arid desert to coastal wetlands and rugged forests. Every summer for the past 7 years students ranging from high school to graduate level gather at NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) as part of the DEVELOP Internship Program. Under the guidance of Jay Skiles [Ames Research Center (ARC) - Ames DEVELOP Manager] and Cindy Schmidt [ARC/San Jose State University Ames DEVELOP Coordinator] they work as a team on projects exploring topics including: invasive species, carbon flux, wetland restoration, air quality monitoring, storm visualizations, and forest fires. The study areas for these projects have been in Washington, Utah, Oregon, Nevada, Hawaii, Alaska and California. Interns combine data from NASA and partner satellites with models and in situ measurements to complete prototype projects demonstrating how NASA data and resources can help communities tackle their Earth Science related problems.

  1. A second-order effect of stratospheric vertical motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunten, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    A byproduct of stratospheric motion distinct from the normal downgradient transport represented by vertical eddy diffusion is studied. It is suggested that an air parcel executes a random walk over a range that could be several kilometers, and similar amplitudes could be present in wavelike oscillations. The photochemical loss rate should therefore be averaged over this range, which give an effect that is proportional to the curvature of the profile of loss rate, and is particularly large for fluorocarbon-11, CFCl3. Test computations are presented which indicate that the known discrepancy between observations and predictions for this compound can be at least partly reconciled for plausible values of the amplitude.

  2. Characteristics of vertical air motion in isolated convective clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jing; Wang, Zhien; Heymsfield, Andrew J.; French, Jeffrey R.

    2016-08-01

    The vertical velocity and air mass flux in isolated convective clouds are statistically analyzed using aircraft in situ data collected from three field campaigns: High-Plains Cumulus (HiCu) conducted over the midlatitude High Plains, COnvective Precipitation Experiment (COPE) conducted in a midlatitude coastal area, and Ice in Clouds Experiment-Tropical (ICE-T) conducted over a tropical ocean. The results show that small-scale updrafts and downdrafts (< 500 m in diameter) are frequently observed in the three field campaigns, and they make important contributions to the total air mass flux. The probability density functions (PDFs) and profiles of the observed vertical velocity are provided. The PDFs are exponentially distributed. The updrafts generally strengthen with height. Relatively strong updrafts (> 20 m s-1) were sampled in COPE and ICE-T. The observed downdrafts are stronger in HiCu and COPE than in ICE-T. The PDFs of the air mass flux are exponentially distributed as well. The observed maximum air mass flux in updrafts is of the order 104 kg m-1 s-1. The observed air mass flux in the downdrafts is typically a few times smaller in magnitude than that in the updrafts. Since this study only deals with isolated convective clouds, and there are many limitations and sampling issues in aircraft in situ measurements, more observations are needed to better explore the vertical air motion in convective clouds.

  3. Tilt and Translation Motion Perception during Off Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Reschke, Millard F.; Clement, Gilles

    2006-01-01

    The effect of stimulus frequency on tilt and translation motion perception was studied during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR), and compared to the effect of stimulus frequency on eye movements. Fourteen healthy subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 10deg and 20deg off-vertical at 0.125 Hz, and 20deg offvertical at 0.5 Hz. Oculomotor responses were recorded using videography, and perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a joystick with four degrees of freedom (pitch and roll tilt, mediallateral and anteriorposterior translation). During the lower frequency OVAR, subjects reported the perception of progressing along the edge of a cone. During higher frequency OVAR, subjects reported the perception of progressing along the edge of an upright cylinder. The modulation of both tilt recorded from the joystick and ocular torsion significantly increased as the tilt angle increased from 10deg to 20deg at 0.125 Hz, and then decreased at 0.5 Hz. Both tilt perception and torsion slightly lagged head orientation at 0.125 Hz. The phase lag of torsion increased at 0.5 Hz, while the phase of tilt perception did not change as a function of frequency. The amplitude of both translation perception recorded from the joystick and horizontal eye movements was negligible at 0.125 Hz and increased as a function of stimulus frequency. While the phase lead of horizontal eye movements decreased at 0.5 Hz, the phase of translation perception did not vary with stimulus frequency and was similar to the phase of tilt perception during all conditions. During dynamic linear acceleration in the absence of other sensory input (canal, vision) a change in stimulus frequency alone elicits similar changes in the amplitude of both self motion perception and eye movements. However, in contrast to the eye movements, the phase of both perceived tilt and translation motion is not altered by stimulus frequency. We conclude that the neural processing

  4. Extrapolation of vertical target motion through a brief visual occlusion.

    PubMed

    Zago, Myrka; Iosa, Marco; Maffei, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2010-03-01

    It is known that arbitrary target accelerations along the horizontal generally are extrapolated much less accurately than target speed through a visual occlusion. The extent to which vertical accelerations can be extrapolated through an occlusion is much less understood. Here, we presented a virtual target rapidly descending on a blank screen with different motion laws. The target accelerated under gravity (1g), decelerated under reversed gravity (-1g), or moved at constant speed (0g). Probability of each type of acceleration differed across experiments: one acceleration at a time, or two to three different accelerations randomly intermingled could be presented. After a given viewing period, the target disappeared for a brief, variable period until arrival (occluded trials) or it remained visible throughout (visible trials). Subjects were asked to press a button when the target arrived at destination. We found that, in visible trials, the average performance with 1g targets could be better or worse than that with 0g targets depending on the acceleration probability, and both were always superior to the performance with -1g targets. By contrast, the average performance with 1g targets was always superior to that with 0g and -1g targets in occluded trials. Moreover, the response times of 1g trials tended to approach the ideal value with practice in occluded protocols. To gain insight into the mechanisms of extrapolation, we modeled the response timing based on different types of threshold models. We found that occlusion was accompanied by an adaptation of model parameters (threshold time and central processing time) in a direction that suggests a strategy oriented to the interception of 1g targets at the expense of the interception of the other types of tested targets. We argue that the prediction of occluded vertical motion may incorporate an expectation of gravity effects. PMID:19882150

  5. Immersed false vertical room. A new motion sickness model.

    PubMed

    Coats, A C; Norfleet, W T

    1998-01-01

    We evaluated a new model of motion sickness--an enclosure decorated with visual cues to upright which was immersed either inverted or "front"-wall down, in Johnson Space Center's Weightless Environment Training Facility (WETF) pool. This "WETF False Vertical Room" (WFVR) was tested with 19 male and 3 female SCUBA diver subjects, aged 23 to 57, who alternately set clocks mounted near the room's 8 corners and made exaggerated pitch head movements. We found that (1) the WFVR test runs produced motion sickness symptoms in 56% and 36% of subjects in the room-inverted and room-front-down positions, respectively. (2) Pitch head movements were the most provocative acts, followed closely by setting the clocks--particularly when a clock face filled the visual field. (3) When measured with a self-ranking questionnaire, terrestrial motion sickness susceptibility correlated strongly (P < 0.005) with WFVR sickness susceptibility. (4) Standing instability, measured with a modified Fregly-Graybiel floor battery, also correlated strongly (P < 0.005) with WFVR sickness susceptibility. This result may reflect a relationship between visual dominance and WFVR sickness. (5) A control study demonstrated that the inverted and front-down positions produced WFVR sickness, but the upright position did not, and that adaptation may have occurred in some subjects with repeated exposure. The WFVR could become a useful terrestrial model of space motion sickness (SMS) because it duplicates the nature of the gravity-dependent sensory conflicts created by microgravity (visual and otolith inputs conflict while somatosensory gravity cues are minimized), and it also duplicates the nature of the provocative stimulus (sensory environment "rule change" versus application of motion to passive subject) more closely than any other proposed terrestrial SMS model. Also, unlike any other proposed terrestrial SMS model, the WFVR incorporates whole-body movement in all three spatial dimensions. However, the WFVR

  6. Feasibility of Measuring Mean Vertical Motion for Estimating Advection. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vickers, Dean; Mahrt, L.

    2005-01-01

    Numerous recent studies calculate horizontal and vertical advection terms for budget studies of net ecosystem exchange of carbon. One potential uncertainty in such studies is the estimate of mean vertical motion. This work addresses the reliability of vertical advection estimates by contrasting the vertical motion obtained from the standard practise of measuring the vertical velocity and applying a tilt correction, to the vertical motion calculated from measurements of the horizontal divergence of the flow using a network of towers. Results are compared for three different tilt correction methods. Estimates of mean vertical motion are sensitive to the choice of tilt correction method. The short-term mean (10 to 60 minutes) vertical motion based on the horizontal divergence is more realistic compared to the estimates derived from the standard practise. The divergence shows long-term mean (days to months) sinking motion at the site, apparently due to the surface roughness change. Because all the tilt correction methods rely on the assumption that the long-term mean vertical motion is zero for a given wind direction, they fail to reproduce the vertical motion based on the divergence.

  7. Recent developments in rotary-balance testing of fighter aircraft configurations at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Malcolm, G. N.; Schiff, L. B.

    1985-01-01

    Two rotary balance apparatuses were developed for testing airplane models in a coning motion. A large scale apparatus, developed for use in the 12-Foot Pressure Wind tunnel primarily to permit testing at high Reynolds numbers, was recently used to investigate the aerodynamics of 0.05-scale model of the F-15 fighter aircraft. Effects of Reynolds number, spin rate parameter, model attitude, presence of a nose boom, and model/sting mounting angle were investigated. A smaller apparatus, which investigates the aerodynamics of bodies of revolution in a coning motion, was used in the 6-by-6 foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel to investigate the aerodynamic behavior of a simple representation of a modern fighter, the Standard Dynamic Model (SDM). Effects of spin rate parameter and model attitude were investigated. A description of the two rigs and a discussion of some of the results obtained in the respective test are presented.

  8. Analytical study of the effects of wind tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise. [NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gliebe, P. R.; Kerschen, E. J.

    1979-01-01

    The influence of tunnel turbulence on turbofan rotor noise was carried out to evaluate the effectiveness of the NASA Ames 40 by 80 foot tunnel in simulating flight levels of fan noise. A previously developed theory for predicting rotor/turbulence interaction noise was refined and extended to include first-order effects of inlet turbulence anisotropy. This theory was then verified by carrying out extensive data/theory comparisons. The resulting model computer program was then employed to carry out a parametric study of the effects of fan size, blade number, and operating line on rotor/turbulence noise for outdoor test stand. NASA Ames wind tunnel, and flight inlet turbulence conditions. A major result of this study is that although wind tunnel rotor/turbulence noise levels are not as low as flight levels they are substantially lower than the outdoor test stand levels and do not mask other sources of fan noise.

  9. An Experimental Study of the Ground Transportation System (GTS) Model in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Ft Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storms, Bruce L.; Ross, James C.; Heineck, James T.; Walker, Stephen M.; Driver, David M.; Zilliac, Gregory G.; Bencze, Daniel P. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 1/8-scale Ground Transportation System (GTS) model was studied experimentally in the NASA Ames 7- by 10-Ft Wind Tunnel. Designed for validation of computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the GTS model has a simplified geometry with a cab-over-engine design and no tractor-trailer gap. As a further simplification, all measurements of the GTS model were made without wheels. Aerodynamic boattail plates were also tested on the rear of the trailer to provide a simple geometry modification for computation. The experimental measurements include body-axis drag, surface pressures, surface hot-film anemometry, oil-film interferometry, and 3-D particle image velocimetry (PIV). The wind-averaged drag coefficient with and without boattail plates was 0.225 and 0.277, respectively. PIV measurements behind the model reveal a significant reduction in the wake size due to the flow turning provided by the boattail plates. Hot-film measurements on the side of the cab indicate laminar separation with turbulent reattachment within 0.08 trailer width for zero and +/- 10 degrees yaw. Oil film interferometry provided quantitative measurements of skin friction and qualitative oil flow images. A complete set of the experimental data and the surface definition of the model are included on a CD-ROM for further analysis and comparison.

  10. The Real-Time Wall Interference Correction System of the NASA Ames 12-Foot Pressure Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ulbrich, Norbert

    1998-01-01

    An improved version of the Wall Signature Method was developed to compute wall interference effects in three-dimensional subsonic wind tunnel testing of aircraft models in real-time. The method may be applied to a full-span or a semispan model. A simplified singularity representation of the aircraft model is used. Fuselage, support system, propulsion simulator, and separation wake volume blockage effects are represented by point sources and sinks. Lifting effects are represented by semi-infinite line doublets. The singularity representation of the test article is combined with the measurement of wind tunnel test reference conditions, wall pressure, lift force, thrust force, pitching moment, rolling moment, and pre-computed solutions of the subsonic potential equation to determine first order wall interference corrections. Second order wall interference corrections for pitching and rolling moment coefficient are also determined. A new procedure is presented that estimates a rolling moment coefficient correction for wings with non-symmetric lift distribution. Experimental data obtained during the calibration of the Ames Bipod model support system and during tests of two semispan models mounted on an image plane in the NASA Ames 12 ft. Pressure Wind Tunnel are used to demonstrate the application of the wall interference correction method.

  11. Development of the NASA-Ames low disturbance supersonic wind tunnel for transition research up to Mach 2.5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.; King, Lyndell S.; Reda, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    A unique, low-disturbance supersonic wind tunnel is being developed at NASA-Ames to support supersonic laminar flow control research at cruise Mach numbers of the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). The distinctive aerodynamic features of this new quiet tunnel will be a low-disturbance settling chamber, laminar boundary layers on the nozzle walls and steady supersonic diffuser flow. Furthermore, this new wind tunnel will operate continuously at uniquely low compression ratios (less than unity). This feature allows an existing non-specialist compressor to be used as a major part of the drive system. In this paper, we highlight activities associated with drive system development, the establishment of natural laminar flow on the test section walls, and instrumentation development for transition detection. Experimental results from an 1/8th-scale model of the supersonic wind tunnel are presented and discussed in association with theoretical predictions. Plans are progressing to build the full-scale wind tunnel by the end of 1993.

  12. Performance tests for the NASA Ames Research Center 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, W. J.; Giddings, T. A.

    1984-01-01

    An evaluation is presented of initial tests conducted to assess the performance of the NASA Ames 20 cm x 40 cm oscillating flow wind tunnel. The features of the tunnel are described and two aspects of tunnel operation are discussed. The first is an assessment of the steady mainstream and boundary layer flows and the second deals with oscillating mainstream and boundary layer flows. Experimental results indicate that in steady flow the test section mainstream velocity is uniform in the flow direction and in cross section. The freestream turbulence intensity is about 0.2 percent. With minor exceptions the steady turbulent boundary layer generated on the top wall of the test section exhibits the characteristics of a zero pressure gradient turbulent boundary layer generated on a flat plate. The tunnel was designed to generate sinusoidal oscillating mainstream flows. Experiments confirm that the tunnel produces sinusoidal mainstream velocity variations for the range of frequencies (up to 15 Hz). The results of this study demonstrate that the tunnel essentially produces the flows that it was designed to produce.

  13. Simulation of Shuttle launch G forces and acoustic loads using the NASA Ames Research Center 20G centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaw, T. L.; Corliss, J. M.; Gundo, D. P.; Mulenburg, G. M.; Breit, G. A.; Griffith, J. B.

    1994-01-01

    The high cost and long times required to develop research packages for space flight can often be offset by using ground test techniques. This paper describes a space shuttle launch and reentry simulating using the NASA Ames Research Center's 20G centrifuge facility. The combined G-forces and acoustic environment during shuttle launch and landing were simulated to evaluate the effect on a payload of laboratory rates. The launch G force and acoustic profiles are matched to actual shuttle launch data to produce the required G-forces and acoustic spectrum in the centrifuge test cab where the rats were caged on a free-swinging platform. For reentry, only G force is simulated as the aero-acoustic noise is insignificant compared to that during launch. The shuttle G-force profiles of launch and landing are achieved by programming the centrifuge drive computer to continuously adjust centrifuge rotational speed to obtain the correct launch and landing G forces. The shuttle launch acoustic environment is simulated using a high-power, low-frequency audio system. Accelerometer data from STS-56 and microphone data from STS-1 through STS-5 are used as baselines for the simulations. This paper provides a description of the test setup and the results of the simulation with recommendations for follow-on simulations.

  14. On Laminar to Turbulent Transition of Arc-Jet Flow in the NASA Ames Panel Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gokcen, Tahir; Alunni, Antonella I.

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides experimental evidence and supporting computational analysis to characterize the laminar to turbulent flow transition in a high enthalpy arc-jet facility at NASA Ames Research Center. The arc-jet test data obtained in the 20 MW Panel Test Facility include measurements of surface pressure and heat flux on a water-cooled calibration plate, and measurements of surface temperature on a reaction-cured glass coated tile plate. Computational fluid dynamics simulations are performed to characterize the arc-jet test environment and estimate its parameters consistent with the facility and calibration measurements. The present analysis comprises simulations of the nonequilibrium flowfield in the facility nozzle, test box, and flowfield over test articles. Both laminar and turbulent simulations are performed, and the computed results are compared with the experimental measurements, including Stanton number dependence on Reynolds number. Comparisons of computed and measured surface heat fluxes (and temperatures), along with the accompanying analysis, confirm that that the boundary layer in the Panel Test Facility flow is transitional at certain archeater conditions.

  15. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2, NASA Ames Research Center, September 12-14, 2005

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), held on September 12-14, 2005, was cosponsored by the Department of Energy Office of Science (DOE/SC) and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), in cooperation with the Joint Engineering Team (JET) of the Federal Networking and Information Technology Research and Development (NITRD) Program's Large Scale Networking (LSN) Coordinating Group. The ONT2 workshop was a follow-on to an August 2004 Workshop on Optical Network Testbeds (ONT1). ONT1 recommended actions by the Federal agencies to assure timely development and implementation of optical networking technologies and infrastructure. Hosted by the NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California, the ONT2 workshop brought together representatives of the U.S. advanced research and education (R&E) networks, regional optical networks (RONs), service providers, international networking organizations, and senior engineering and R&D managers from Federal agencies and national research laboratories. Its purpose was to develop a common vision of the optical network technologies, services, infrastructure, and organizations needed to enable widespread use of optical networks; recommend activities for transitioning the optical networking research community and its current infrastructure to leading-edge optical networks over the next three to five years; and present information enabling commercial network infrastructure providers to plan for and use leading-edge optical network services in that time frame.

  16. A three-dimensional orthogonal laser velocimeter for the NASA Ames 7- by 10-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunagan, Stephen E.; Cooper, Donald L.

    1995-01-01

    A three-component dual-beam laser-velocimeter system has been designed, fabricated, and implemented in the 7-by 10-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The instrument utilizes optical access from both sides and the top of the test section, and is configured for uncoupled orthogonal measurements of the three Cartesian coordinates of velocity. Bragg cell optics are used to provide fringe velocity bias. Modular system design provides great flexibility in the location of sending and receiving optics to adapt to specific experimental requirements. Near-focus Schmidt-Cassegrain optic modules may be positioned for collection of forward or backward scattered light over a large solid angle, and may be clustered to further increase collection solid angle. Multimode fiber optics transmit collected light to the photomultiplier tubes for processing. Counters are used to process the photomultiplier signals and transfer the processed data digitally via buffered interface controller to the host MS-DOS computer. Considerable data reduction and graphical display programming permit on-line control of data acquisition and evaluation of the incoming data. This paper describes this system in detail and presents sample data illustrating the system's capability.

  17. Vertical air motions over the Tropical Western Pacific for validating cloud resolving and regional models

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Christopher R.

    2015-03-16

    The objective of this project was to estimate the vertical air motion using Doppler velocity spectra from two side-by-side vertically pointing radars. The retrieval technique was applied to two different sets of radars. This first set was 50- and 920-MHz vertically pointing radars near Darwin, Australia. The second set was 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz vertically pointing radars deployed at SGP for MC3E. The retrieval technique uses the longer wavelength radar (50 or 449 MHz) to observe both the vertical air motion and precipitation motion while the shorter wavelength radar (920 MHz or 2.8 GHz) observes just the precipitation motion. By analyzing their Doppler velocity spectra, the precipitation signal in the 920 MHz or 2.8 GHz radar is used to mask-out the precipitation signal in the 50 or 449 MHz radar spectra, leaving just the vertical air motion signal.

  18. Researcher's guide to the NASA Ames Flight Simulator for Advanced Aircraft (FSAA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinacori, J. B.; Stapleford, R. L.; Jewell, W. F.; Lehman, J. M.

    1977-01-01

    Performance, limitations, supporting software, and current checkout and operating procedures are presented for the flight simulator, in terms useful to the researcher who intends to use it. Suggestions to help the researcher prepare the experimental plan are also given. The FSAA's central computer, cockpit, and visual and motion systems are addressed individually but their interaction is considered as well. Data required, available options, user responsibilities, and occupancy procedures are given in a form that facilitates the initial communication required with the NASA operations' group.

  19. NASA Ames Research Center R and D Services Directorate Biomedical Systems Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pollitt, J.; Flynn, K.

    1999-01-01

    The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate teams with NASA, other government agencies and/or industry investigators for the development, design, fabrication, manufacturing and qualification testing of space-flight and ground-based experiment hardware for biomedical and general aerospace applications. In recent years, biomedical research hardware and software has been developed to support space-flight and ground-based experiment needs including the E 132 Biotelemetry system for the Research Animal Holding Facility (RAHF), E 100 Neurolab neuro-vestibular investigation systems, the Autogenic Feedback Systems, and the Standard Interface Glove Box (SIGB) experiment workstation module. Centrifuges, motion simulators, habitat design, environmental control systems, and other unique experiment modules and fixtures have also been developed. A discussion of engineered systems and capabilities will be provided to promote understanding of possibilities for future system designs in biomedical applications. In addition, an overview of existing engineered products will be shown. Examples of hardware and literature that demonstrate the organization's capabilities will be displayed. The Ames Research Center R&D Services Directorate is available to support the development of new hardware and software systems or adaptation of existing systems to meet the needs of academic, commercial/industrial, and government research requirements. The Ames R&D Services Directorate can provide specialized support for: System concept definition and feasibility Mathematical modeling and simulation of system performance Prototype hardware development Hardware and software design Data acquisition systems Graphical user interface development Motion control design Hardware fabrication and high-fidelity machining Composite materials development and application design Electronic/electrical system design and fabrication System performance verification testing and qualification.

  20. A piloted evaluation of an oblique-wing research aircraft motion simulation with decoupling control laws

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kempel, Robert W.; Mcneill, Walter E.; Gilyard, Glenn B.; Maine, Trindel A.

    1988-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center developed an oblique-wing research plane from NASA's digital fly-by-wire airplane. Oblique-wing airplanes show large cross-coupling in control and dynamic behavior which is not present on conventional symmetric airplanes and must be compensated for to obtain acceptable handling qualities. The large vertical motion simulator at NASA Ames-Moffett was used in the piloted evaluation of a proposed flight control system designed to provide decoupled handling qualities. Five discrete flight conditions were evaluated ranging from low altitude subsonic Mach numbers to moderate altitude supersonic Mach numbers. The flight control system was effective in generally decoupling the airplane. However, all participating pilots objected to the high levels of lateral acceleration encountered in pitch maneuvers. In addition, the pilots were more critical of left turns (in the direction of the trailing wingtip when skewed) than they were of right turns due to the tendency to be rolled into the left turns and out of the right turns. Asymmetric side force as a function of angle of attack was the primary cause of lateral acceleration in pitch. Along with the lateral acceleration in pitch, variation of rolling and yawing moments as functions of angle of attack caused the tendency to roll into left turns and out of right turns.

  1. Current Background Noise Sources and Levels in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel: A Status Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Christopher S.; Jaeger, Stephen; Soderman, Paul; Koga, Dennis (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Background noise measurements were made of the acoustic environment in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) at NASA Ames Research Center. The measurements were acquired subsequent to the 40x80 Aeroacoustic Modernization Project, which was undertaken to improve the anechoic characteristics of the 40x80's closed test section as well as reduce the levels of background noise in the facility. The resulting 40x80 anechoic environment was described by Soderman et. al., and the current paper describes the resulting 40x80 background noise, discusses the sources of the noise, and draws comparisons to previous 40x80 background noise levels measurements. At low wind speeds or low frequencies, the 40x80 background noise is dominated by the fan drive system. To obtain the lowest fan drive noise for a given tunnel condition, it is possible in the 40x80 to reduce the fans' rotational speed and adjust the fans' blade pitch, as described by Schmidtz et. al. This idea is not new, but has now been operationally implemented with modifications for increased power at low rotational speeds. At low to mid-frequencies and at higher wind speeds, the dominant noise mechanism was thought to be caused by the surface interface of the previous test section floor acoustic lining. In order to reduce this noise mechanism, the new test section floor lining was designed to resist the pumping of flow in and out of the space between the grating slats required to support heavy equipment. In addition, the lining/flow interface over the entire test section was designed to be smoother and quieter than the previous design. At high wind speeds or high frequencies, the dominant source of background noise in the 40x80 is believed to be caused by the response of the in-flow microphone probes (required by the nature of the closed test section) to the fluctuations in the freestream flow. The resulting background noise levels are also different for probes of various

  2. Vertical Mandibular Range of Motion in Anesthetized Dogs and Cats.

    PubMed

    Gracis, Margherita; Zini, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The main movement of the temporomandibular joint of dogs and cats is in vertical dimensions (opening and closing the mouth). An objective evaluation of the vertical mandibular range of motion (vmROM) may favor early diagnosis of a number of conditions affecting the joint mobility. vmROM, corresponding to the maximum interincisal opening, was measured in 260 dogs and 127 cats anesthetized between June 2011 and April 2015 because of oral or maxillofacial problems and procedures. Animals with a known history of or having current diseases considered to hamper mandibular extension were excluded from the study. Dogs were divided into four subgroups, based on body weight: subgroup 1 (≤5.0 kg, 51 dogs), subgroup 2 (5.1-10.0 kg, 56 dogs), subgroup 3 (10.1-25 kg, 66 dogs), and subgroup 4 (>25.1 kg, 87 dogs). The mean vmROM of all dogs was 107 ± 30 mm (median 109, range 40-180); in subgroup 1 was 67 ± 15 mm (median 67, range 40-100), in subgroup 2 was 93 ± 15 mm (median 93, range 53-128), in subgroup 3 was 115 ± 19 mm (median 116, range 59-154), and in subgroup 4 was 134 ± 19 mm (median 135, range 93-180). The mean vmROM of the cats was 62 ± 8 mm (median 63, range 41-84). Correlations between vmROM, age, sex, and body weight were evaluated. In dogs, vmROM did not correlate with age, and in cats a weak positive correlation was found. vmROM and body weight were positively correlated in both populations, except dog subgroup 2. Overall, mean vmROM and body weight were significantly higher in male than in female, both in dogs and in cats. However, vmROM did not differ between sexes in any of the canine subgroups, and only in subgroup 4 male dogs were significantly heavier than females. Evaluation of vmROM should be incorporated into every diagnostic examination as it may be valuable in showing changes over time for every single patient. PMID:27446939

  3. Vertical Mandibular Range of Motion in Anesthetized Dogs and Cats

    PubMed Central

    Gracis, Margherita; Zini, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The main movement of the temporomandibular joint of dogs and cats is in vertical dimensions (opening and closing the mouth). An objective evaluation of the vertical mandibular range of motion (vmROM) may favor early diagnosis of a number of conditions affecting the joint mobility. vmROM, corresponding to the maximum interincisal opening, was measured in 260 dogs and 127 cats anesthetized between June 2011 and April 2015 because of oral or maxillofacial problems and procedures. Animals with a known history of or having current diseases considered to hamper mandibular extension were excluded from the study. Dogs were divided into four subgroups, based on body weight: subgroup 1 (≤5.0 kg, 51 dogs), subgroup 2 (5.1–10.0 kg, 56 dogs), subgroup 3 (10.1–25 kg, 66 dogs), and subgroup 4 (>25.1 kg, 87 dogs). The mean vmROM of all dogs was 107 ± 30 mm (median 109, range 40–180); in subgroup 1 was 67 ± 15 mm (median 67, range 40–100), in subgroup 2 was 93 ± 15 mm (median 93, range 53–128), in subgroup 3 was 115 ± 19 mm (median 116, range 59–154), and in subgroup 4 was 134 ± 19 mm (median 135, range 93–180). The mean vmROM of the cats was 62 ± 8 mm (median 63, range 41–84). Correlations between vmROM, age, sex, and body weight were evaluated. In dogs, vmROM did not correlate with age, and in cats a weak positive correlation was found. vmROM and body weight were positively correlated in both populations, except dog subgroup 2. Overall, mean vmROM and body weight were significantly higher in male than in female, both in dogs and in cats. However, vmROM did not differ between sexes in any of the canine subgroups, and only in subgroup 4 male dogs were significantly heavier than females. Evaluation of vmROM should be incorporated into every diagnostic examination as it may be valuable in showing changes over time for every single patient. PMID:27446939

  4. Joint NASA Ames/Langley Experimental Evaluation of Integrated Air/Ground Operations for En Route Free Maneuvering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barhydt, Richard; Kopardekar, Parimal; Battiste, Vernol; Doble, Nathan; Johnson, Walter; Lee, Paul; Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy

    2005-01-01

    In order to meet the anticipated future demand for air travel, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is investigating a new concept of operations known as Distributed Air-Ground Traffic Management (DAG-TM). Under the En Route Free Maneuvering component of DAG-TM, appropriately equipped autonomous aircraft self separate from other autonomous aircraft and from managed aircraft that continue to fly under today s Instrument Flight Rules (IFR). Controllers provide separation services between IFR aircraft and assign traffic flow management constraints to all aircraft. To address concept feasibility issues pertaining to integrated air/ground operations at various traffic levels, NASA Ames and Langley Research Centers conducted a joint human-in-the-loop experiment. Professional airline pilots and air traffic controllers flew a total of 16 scenarios under four conditions: mixed autonomous/managed operations at three traffic levels and a baseline all-managed condition at the lowest traffic level. These scenarios included en route flights and descents to a terminal area meter fix in airspace modeled after the Dallas Ft. Worth area. Pilots of autonomous aircraft met controller assigned meter fix constraints with high success. Separation violations by subject pilots did not appear to vary with traffic level and were mainly attributable to software errors and procedural lapses. Controller workload was lower for mixed flight conditions, even at higher traffic levels. Pilot workload was deemed acceptable under all conditions. Controllers raised several safety concerns, most of which pertained to the occurrence of near-term conflicts between autonomous and managed aircraft. These issues are being addressed through better compatibility between air and ground systems and refinements to air and ground procedures.

  5. ELAPSE - NASA AMES LISP AND ADA BENCHMARK SUITE: EFFICIENCY OF LISP AND ADA PROCESSING - A SYSTEM EVALUATION

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, G. J.

    1994-01-01

    One area of research of the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center is devoted to the analysis and enhancement of processors and advanced computer architectures, specifically in support of automation and robotic systems. To compare systems' abilities to efficiently process Lisp and Ada, scientists at Ames Research Center have developed a suite of non-parallel benchmarks called ELAPSE. The benchmark suite was designed to test a single computer's efficiency as well as alternate machine comparisons on Lisp, and/or Ada languages. ELAPSE tests the efficiency with which a machine can execute the various routines in each environment. The sample routines are based on numeric and symbolic manipulations and include two-dimensional fast Fourier transformations, Cholesky decomposition and substitution, Gaussian elimination, high-level data processing, and symbol-list references. Also included is a routine based on a Bayesian classification program sorting data into optimized groups. The ELAPSE benchmarks are available for any computer with a validated Ada compiler and/or Common Lisp system. Of the 18 routines that comprise ELAPSE, provided within this package are 14 developed or translated at Ames. The others are readily available through literature. The benchmark that requires the most memory is CHOLESKY.ADA. Under VAX/VMS, CHOLESKY.ADA requires 760K of main memory. ELAPSE is available on either two 5.25 inch 360K MS-DOS format diskettes (standard distribution) or a 9-track 1600 BPI ASCII CARD IMAGE format magnetic tape. The contents of the diskettes are compressed using the PKWARE archiving tools. The utility to unarchive the files, PKUNZIP.EXE, is included. The ELAPSE benchmarks were written in 1990. VAX and VMS are trademarks of Digital Equipment Corporation. MS-DOS is a registered trademark of Microsoft Corporation.

  6. Nanotechnology at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Meyyappan, Meyya; Yan, Jerry (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Advanced miniaturization, a key thrust area to enable new science and exploration missions, provides ultrasmall sensors, power sources, communication, navigation, and propulsion systems with very low mass, volume, and power consumption. Revolutions in electronics and computing will allow reconfigurable, autonomous, 'thinking' spacecraft. Nanotechnology presents a whole new spectrum of opportunities to build device components and systems for entirely new space architectures: (1) networks of ultrasmall probes on planetary surfaces; (2) micro-rovers that drive, hop, fly, and burrow; and (3) collections of microspacecraft making a variety of measurements.

  7. Model Deformation Measurements of Sonic Boom Models in the NASA Ames 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schairer, Edward T.; Kushner, Laura K.; Garbeff, Theodore J.; Heineck, James T.

    2015-01-01

    The deformations of two sonic-boom models were measured by stereo photogrammetry during tests in the 9- by 7-Ft Supersonic Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The models were geometrically similar but one was 2.75 times as large as the other. Deformation measurements were made by simultaneously imaging the upper surfaces of the models from two directions by calibrated cameras that were mounted behind windows of the test section. Bending and twist were measured at discrete points using conventional circular targets that had been marked along the leading and trailing edges of the wings and tails. In addition, continuous distributions of bending and twist were measured from ink speckles that had been applied to the upper surfaces of the model. Measurements were made at wind-on (M = 1.6) and wind-off conditions over a range of angles of attack between 2.5 deg. and 5.0 deg. At each condition, model deformation was determined by comparing the wind-off and wind-on coordinates of each measurement point after transforming the coordinates to reference coordinates tied to the model. The necessary transformations were determined by measuring the positions of a set of targets on the rigid center-body of the models whose model-axes coordinates were known. Smoothly varying bending and twist measurements were obtained at all conditions. Bending displacements increased in proportion to the square of the distance to the centerline. Maximum deflection of the wingtip of the larger model was about 5 mm (2% of the semispan) and that of the smaller model was 0.9 mm (1% of the semispan). The change in wing twist due to bending increased in direct proportion to distance from the centerline and reached a (absolute) maximum of about -1? at the highest angle of attack for both models. The measurements easily resolved bending displacements as small as 0.05 mm and bending-induced changes in twist as small as 0.05 deg.

  8. NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) Tests of a 10 deg Cone at Mach 1.6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolf, Stephen W. D.; Laub, James A.

    1997-01-01

    This work is part of the ongoing qualification of the NASA Ames Laminar Flow Supersonic Wind Tunnel (LFSWT) as a low-disturbance (quiet) facility suitable for transition research. A 10 deg cone was tested over a range of unit Reynolds numbers (Re = 2.8 to 3.8 million per foot (9.2 to 12.5 million per meter)) and angles of incidence (O deg to 10 deg) at Mach 1.6. The location of boundary layer transition along the cone was measured primarily from surface temperature distributions, with oil flow interferometry and Schlieren flow visualization providing confirmation measurements. With the LFSWT in its normal quiet operating mode, no transition was detected on the cone in the test core, over the Reynolds number range tested at zero incidence and yaw. Increasing the pressure disturbance levels in the LFSWT test section by a factor of five caused transition onset on the cone within the test core, at zero incidence and yaw. When operating the LFSWT in its normal quiet mode, transition could only be detected in the test core when high angles of incidence (greater than 5 deg) for cones were set. Transition due to elevated pressure disturbances (Tollmien-Schlichting) and surface trips produced a skin temperature rise of order 4 F (2.2 C). Transition due to cross flows on the leeward side of the cone at incidence produced a smaller initial temperature rise of only order 2.5 F (1.4 C), which indicates a slower transition process. We can conclude that these cone tests add further proof that the LFSWT test core is normally low-disturbance (pressure fluctuations greater than 0.1%), as found by associated direct flow quality measurements discussed in this report. Furthermore, in a quiet test environment, the skin temperature rise is sensitive to the type of dominant instability causing transition. The testing of a cone in the LFSWT provides an excellent experiment for the development of advanced transition detection techniques.

  9. An Overview of Current Capabilities and Research Activities in the Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prevot, Thomas; Smith, Nancy M.; Palmer, Everett; Callantine, Todd; Lee, Paul; Mercer, Joey; Homola, Jeff; Martin, Lynne; Brasil, Connie; Cabrall, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    The Airspace Operations Laboratory at NASA Ames conducts research to provide a better understanding of roles, responsibilities, and requirements for human operators and automation in future air traffic management (ATM) systems. The research encompasses developing, evaluating, and integrating operational concepts and technologies for near-, mid-, and far-term air traffic operations. Current research threads include efficient arrival operations, function allocation in separation assurance and efficient airspace and trajectory management. The AOL has developed powerful air traffic simulation capabilities, most notably the Multi Aircraft Control System (MACS) that is used for many air traffic control simulations at NASA and its partners in government, academia and industry. Several additional NASA technologies have been integrated with the AOL's primary simulation capabilities where appropriate. Using this environment, large and small-scale system-level evaluations can be conducted to help make near-term improvements and transition NASA technologies to the FAA, such as the technologies developed under NASA's Air Traffic Management Demonstration-1 (ATD-1). The AOL's rapid prototyping and flexible simulation capabilities have proven a highly effective environment to progress the initiation of trajectory-based operations and support the mid-term implementation of NextGen. Fundamental questions about accuracy requirements have been investigated as well as realworld problems on how to improve operations in some of the most complex airspaces in the US. This includes using advanced trajectory-based operations and prototype tools for coordinating arrivals to converging runways at Newark airport and coordinating departures and arrivals in the San Francisco and the New York metro areas. Looking beyond NextGen, the AOL has started exploring hybrid human/automation control strategies as well as highly autonomous operations in the air traffic control domain. Initial results

  10. New results from the analyses of the solid phase of the NASA Ames Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jesse L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-11-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature between N2 and CH4 that leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment was developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier molecules, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth.Following a recent in situ mass spectrometry study of the gas phase that demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature (Sciamma-O’Brien et al., Icarus, 243, 325 (2014)), we have performed a complementary study of the solid phase. The findings are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited onto various substrates for ex situ analyses. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates, and that different growth mechanisms seem to occur depending on the gas mixture. They also allow the determination of the size distribution of the THS solid grains. A Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry analysis coupled with Collision Induced Dissociation has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile functional groups, showing evidence of nitrogen chemistry. Infrared and µIR spectra of samples deposited on KBr and Si substrates show the

  11. A New Way of Doing Business: Reusable Launch Vehicle Advanced Thermal Protection Systems Technology Development: NASA Ames and Rockwell International Partnership

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carroll, Carol W.; Fleming, Mary; Hogenson, Pete; Green, Michael J.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    NASA Ames Research Center and Rockwell International are partners in a Cooperative Agreement (CA) for the development of Thermal Protection Systems (TPS) for the Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Technology Program. This Cooperative Agreement is a 30 month effort focused on transferring NASA innovations to Rockwell and working as partners to advance the state-of-the-art in several TPS areas. The use of a Cooperative Agreement is a new way of doing business for NASA and Industry which eliminates the traditional customer/contractor relationship and replaces it with a NASA/Industry partnership.

  12. Results of the NASA/MSFC FA-23 plume technology test program performed in the NASA/Ames unitary wind tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hendershot, K. C.

    1977-01-01

    A 2.25% scale model of the space shuttle external tank and solid rocket boosters was tested in the NASA/Ames Unitary 11 x 11 foot transonic and 9 x 7 foot supersonic tunnels to obtain base pressure data with firing solid propellant exhaust plumes. Data system difficulties prevented the acquisition of any useful data in the 9 x 7 tunnel. However, 28 successful rocket test firings were made in the 11 x 11 tunnel, providing base pressure data at Mach numbers of 0.5, 0.9, 1.05, 1.2, and 1.3 and at plume pressure ratios ranging from 11 to 89.

  13. Investigation of pitch motion portion in vertical response at sides of a Tension-Leg Platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabeshpour, Mohammad Reza; Malayjerdi, Ebrahim

    2016-06-01

    Tendons vertically moor Tension-Leg Platforms (TLPs), thus, a deep understanding of physical tendon stresses requires the determination of the total axial deformation of the tendons, which is a combination of the heave, pitch, and surging responses. The vertical motion of the lateral sides of the TLP is coupled with surge and constitutes a portion of the pitch motion. Tendons are connected to the sides of the TLP; hence, the total displacement of the lateral sides is related to the total deformation of the tendons and the total axial stress. Therefore, investigating the total vertical response at the sides of the TLP is essential. The coupling between various degrees of freedom is not considered in the Response Amplitude Operator (RAO). Therefore, in frequency domain analysis, the estimated vertical RAO is incomplete. Also, in the time domain, only the heave motion at the center of TLP is typically studied; this problem needs to be addressed. In this paper, we investigate the portion of the pitch motion in the vertical response at the sides of the TLP in both the frequency and time domains. Numerical results demonstrate a significant effect of the pitch motion in the vertical motion of the edges of the TLP in some period ranges.

  14. Multi-component ground motion response spectra for coupled horizontal, vertical, angular accelerations, and tilt

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, E.; Graizer, V.

    2007-01-01

    Rotational and vertical components of ground motion are almost always ignored in design or in the assessment of structures despite the fact that vertical motion can be twice as much as the horizontal motion and may exceed 2g level, and rotational excitation may reach few degrees in the proximity of fault rupture. Coupling of different components of ground excitation may significantly amplify the seismic demand by introducing additional lateral forces and enhanced P-?? effects. In this paper, a governing equation of motion is postulated to compute the response of a SDOF oscillator under a multi-component excitation. The expanded equation includes secondary P-?? components associated with the combined impacts of tilt and vertical excitations in addition to the inertial forcing terms due to the angular and translational accelerations. The elastic and inelastic spectral ordinates traditionally generated considering the uniaxial input motion are compared at the end with the multi-component response spectra of coupled horizontal, vertical and tilting motions. The proposed multi-component response spectrum reflects kinematic characteristics of the ground motion that are not identifiable by the conventional spectrum itself, at least for the near-fault region where high intensity vertical shaking and rotational excitation are likely to occur.

  15. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 September 12-14, 2006 NASA Ames Research Center

    SciTech Connect

    Joe Mambretti Richard desJardins

    2006-05-01

    A new generation of optical networking services and technologies is rapidly changing the world of communications. National and international networks are implementing optical services to supplement traditional packet routed services. On September 12-14, 2005, the Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), an invitation-only forum hosted by the NASA Research and Engineering Network (NREN) and co-sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), was held at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. The aim of ONT2 was to help the Federal Large Scale Networking Coordination Group (LSN) and its Joint Engineering Team (JET) to coordinate testbed and network roadmaps describing agency and partner organization views and activities for moving toward next generation communication services based on leading edge optical networks in the 3-5 year time frame. ONT2 was conceived and organized as a sequel to the first Optical Network Testbeds Workshop (ONT1, August 2004, www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). ONT1 resulted in a series of recommendations to LSN. ONT2 was designed to move beyond recommendations to agree on a series of “actionable objectives” that would proactively help federal and partner optical network testbeds and advanced research and education (R&E) networks to begin incorporating technologies and services representing the next generation of advanced optical networks in the next 1-3 years. Participants in ONT2 included representatives from innovative prototype networks (Panel A), basic optical network research testbeds (Panel B), and production R&D networks (Panels C and D), including “JETnets,” selected regional optical networks (RONs), international R&D networks, commercial network technology and service providers (Panel F), and senior engineering and R&D managers from LSN agencies and partner organizations. The overall goal of ONT2 was to identify and coordinate short and medium term activities and milestones for researching, developing, identifying

  16. Dominant influence of volcanic loading on vertical motions of the Hawaiian Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huppert, Kimberly L.; Royden, Leigh H.; Perron, J. Taylor

    2015-05-01

    Rates of island vertical motion above intra-plate hotspots record the processes that arise from interactions between lithospheric plates and mantle plumes. To assess the contribution of mantle and lithospheric processes to surface motion above the Hawaiian hotspot, we compare simple models of lithospheric deformation to vertical motion rates measured from dated paleoshorelines and tide gauge records in the Hawaiian Islands. Our analysis shows that observed uplift and subsidence rates mainly record the flexural response of the lithosphere to volcanic loads. The effective elastic plate thickness that best fits the spatial distribution of subsidence and uplift rates is ∼40 km, consistent with previous estimates based on total vertical deflection. Because volcanic loading dominates the vertical motion signal, Hawaiian Islands appear to follow a predictable trajectory of vertical motion when they reside within one flexural half-wavelength of the active volcanic center. Islands initially subside at rapid and decreasing rates in the first ∼1 Myr following their construction, uplift relatively slowly ∼1-2.5 Myr following their construction, and eventually subside again, but at slow rates, within ∼5 Myr of their construction. This observed pattern of uplift and subsidence is consistent with the pattern of vertical motion predicted to result from volcanic loading at the Hawaiian hotspot. Lithospheric migration over the long-wavelength topographic swell associated with the Hawaiian hotspot has a comparatively minor influence on island uplift and subsidence. Its contribution to island vertical motion is not readily observed in our data, with the possible exception of some uplift observed in the past ∼500 kyr on O'ahu that might correspond to non-steady state behavior of the Hawaiian plume.

  17. Effect of working position on vertical motion straightness of open hydrostatic guideways in grinding machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zha, Jun; Wang, Zhiwei; Xue, Fei; Chen, Yaolong

    2016-08-01

    Hydrostatic guideways have various applications in precision machine tools due to their high motion accuracy. The analysis of motion straightness in hydrostatic guideways is generally ignoring the external load on the slider. A variation force also exists, caused by the different working positions, together with the dead load of the slider and that of other auxiliary devices. The effect of working position on vertical motion straightness is investigated based on the equivalent static model, considering the error averaging effort of pressured oil film in open hydrostatic guideways. Open hydrostatic guideways in LGF1000 are analyzed with this approach. The theoretical results show that the slider has maximum vertical motion straightness when the working position is closer the guiderail of Y axis. The vertical motion straightness reaches a minimum value as the working position is located at the center of the two guiderails on the Y axis. The difference between the maximum and minimum vertical motion straightness is 34.7%. The smaller vertical motion straightness is attributed to the smaller spacing of the two pads centers, along the Y direction. The experimental results show that the vertical motion straightness is 4.15 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is located in the middle of the X beam, and 5.08 μm/1200 mm, when the working position is approaching the Y guiderails, denoting an increase of 18.3%. The changing trends of the measured results validate the correctness of the theoretical model. The research work can be used to reveal the variation law of accuracy of the open hydrostatic guideways, under different working positions, to predict the machining precision, and provides the basis for an error compensation strategy for gantry type grinding machines.

  18. The effects of vertical motion on the performance of current meters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thibodeaux, K.G.; Futrell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A series of tests to determine the correction coefficients for Price type AA and Price type OAA current meters, when subjected to vertical motion in a towing tank, have been conducted. During these tests, the meters were subjected to vertical travel that ranged from 1.0 to 4.0 ft and vertical rates of travel that ranged from 0.33 to 1.20 ft/sec while being towed through the water at speeds ranging from 0 to 8 ft/sec. The tests show that type AA and type OAA current meters are affected adversely by the rate of vertical motion and the distance of vertical travel. In addition, the tests indicate that when current meters are moved vertically, correction coefficients must be applied to the observed meter velocities to correct for the registration errors that are induced by the vertical motion. The type OAA current meter under-registers and the type AA current meter over-registers in observed meter velocity. These coefficients for the type OAA current meter range from 0.99 to 1.49 and for the type AA current meter range from 0.33 to 1.07. When making current meter measurements from a boat or a cableway, errors in observed current meter velocity will occur when the bobbing of a boat or cableway places the current meter into vertical motion. These errors will be significant when flowing water is < 2 ft/sec and the rate of vertical motion is > 0.3 ft/sec. (Author 's abstract)

  19. Approximate formula for the vertical asymptote of projectile motion in midair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergey Chudinov, Peter

    2010-01-01

    The classic problem of the motion of a point mass (projectile) thrown at an angle to the horizon is reviewed. The air drag force is taken into account with the drag factor assumed to be constant. An analytical approach is used for the investigation. An approximate formula is obtained for one of the characteristics of the motion - the vertical asymptote. The value of an asymptote is determined directly by the initial conditions of throwing. Analytically derived values of asymptotes in comparison with numerical values obtained by integrating the equations of motion are given. The motion of a baseball is presented as an example.

  20. Energy harvesting from coherent resonance of horizontal vibration of beam excited by vertical base motion

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, C. B.; Qin, W. Y.

    2014-09-15

    This letter investigates the energy harvesting from the horizontal coherent resonance of a vertical cantilever beam subjected to the vertical base excitation. The potential energy of the system has two symmetric potential wells. So, under vertical excitation, the system can jump between two potential wells, which will lead to the large vibration in horizontal direction. Two piezoelectric patches are pasted to harvest the energy. From experiment, it is found that the vertical excitation can make the beam turn to be bistable. The system can transform vertical vibration into horizontal vibration of low frequency when excited by harmonic motion. The horizontal coherence resonance can be observed when excited by a vertical white noise. The corresponding output voltages of piezoelectric films reach high values.

  1. Opponent backgrounds reduce discrimination sensitivity to competing motions: effects of different vertical motions on horizontal motion perception.

    PubMed

    Silva, Andrew E; Liu, Zili

    2015-08-01

    We examined the relationship between two distinct motion phenomena. First, locally balanced stimuli in which opposing motion signals are presented spatially near one another fail to cause a robust firing pattern in brain area MT. The brain's response to this motion is effectively suppressed, a phenomenon known as opponency. Second, past research has found that discrimination sensitivity to a target motion is negatively affected by a superimposed irrelevant motion signal - a process we call "perceptual suppression." In the current study, we examined how opponency affects the strength of perceptual suppression. We found unexpected results: a target motion embedded within an opponent background was harder to discriminate than a target motion embedded within a non-opponent background. We argue that this pattern of results runs contrary to the clear prediction stemming from the current understanding of the role of opponency in motion processing and tentatively offer an explanation based on recent MT physiology.

  2. Long-Term Mean Vertical Motion over the Tropical Pacific: Wind-Profiling Doppler Radar Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gage, K. S.; McAfee, J. R.; Carter, D. A.; Ecklund, W. L.; Riddle, A. C.; Reid, G. C.; Balsley, B. B.

    1991-12-01

    Measurement from Christmas Island (2^circN, 157^circW) of long-term mean vertical motions in the tropical atmosphere using very-high-frequency wind-profiling Doppler radar show that there is a transition from downward motion in the free troposphere to upward motion in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The observations in the free troposphere are consistent with a balance between adiabatic and diabatic heating and cooling rates in a clear atmosphere. Comparison of the results at Christmas Island during El Nino and non-El Nino conditions with earlier results obtained for stratiform rain conditions over Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, show that cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropopause likely play an important role in determining the sense and magnitude of vertical motions in this region. These results have implications for the exchange of mass between the troposphere and stratosphere over the tropics.

  3. Long-Term Mean Vertical Motion over the Tropical Pacific: Wind-Profiling Doppler Radar Measurements.

    PubMed

    Gage, K S; McAfee, J R; Carter, D A; Ecklund, W L; Riddle, A C; Reid, G C; Balsley, B B

    1991-12-20

    Measurement from Christmas Island (2 degrees N, 157 degrees W) of long-term mean vertical motions in the tropical atmosphere using very-high-frequency wind-profiling Doppler radar show that there is a transition from downward motion in the free troposphere to upward motion in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The observations in the free troposphere are consistent with a balance between adiabatic and diabatic heating and cooling rates in a clear atmosphere. Comparison of the results at Christmas Island during El Niño and non-El Niño conditions with earlier results obtained for stratiform rain conditions over Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia, show that cirrus clouds in the vicinity of the tropopause likely play an important role in determining the sense and magnitude of vertical motions in this region. These results have implications for the exchange of mass between the troposphere and stratosphere over the tropics.

  4. Motion-Based Piloted Simulation Evaluation of a Control Allocation Technique to Recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craun, Robert W.; Acosta, Diana M.; Beard, Steven D.; Leonard, Michael W.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Weinstein, Michael; Yildiz, Yildiray

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes the maturation of a control allocation technique designed to assist pilots in the recovery from pilot induced oscillations (PIOs). The Control Allocation technique to recover from Pilot Induced Oscillations (CAPIO) is designed to enable next generation high efficiency aircraft designs. Energy efficient next generation aircraft require feedback control strategies that will enable lowering the actuator rate limit requirements for optimal airframe design. One of the common issues flying with actuator rate limits is PIOs caused by the phase lag between the pilot inputs and control surface response. CAPIO utilizes real-time optimization for control allocation to eliminate phase lag in the system caused by control surface rate limiting. System impacts of the control allocator were assessed through a piloted simulation evaluation of a non-linear aircraft simulation in the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator. Results indicate that CAPIO helps reduce oscillatory behavior, including the severity and duration of PIOs, introduced by control surface rate limiting.

  5. Thermal modeling of the NASA-Ames Research Center Cryogenic Optical Test Facility and a single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ng, Y. S.; Augason, Gordon C.; Young, Jeffrey A.; Howard, Steven D.; Melugin, Ramsey K.

    1990-01-01

    A thermal model of the dewar and optical system of the Cryogenic Optical Test Facility at NASA-Ames Research Center was developed using the computer codes SINDA and MONTE CARLO. The model was based on the geometry, boundary conditions, and physical properties of the test facility and was developed to investigate heat transfer mechanisms and temperatures in the facility and in test mirrors during cryogenic optical tests. A single-arch, fused-natural-quartz mirror was the first mirror whose thermal loads and temperature distributions were modeled. From the temperature distribution, the thermal gradients in the mirror were obtained. The model predicted that a small gradient should exist for the single arch mirror. This was later verified by the measurement of mirror temperatures. The temperatures, predicted by the model at various locations within the dewar, were in relatively good agreement with the measured temperatures. The model is applicable to both steady-state and transient cooldown operations.

  6. A Tale of Two Small Business Grants: The Best of Times, the Worst of Times from the NASA Ames Small Business Innovative Research (SBIR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojiro, Daniel R.; Lee, Geoffrey S.

    2006-01-01

    The purposes of the SBIR Program are to: stimulate technological innovation in the private sector; strengthen the role of Small Business Concerns (SBCs) in meeting Federal research and development needs; increase the commercial application of these research results; and encourage participation of socially and economically disadvantaged persons and women-owned small businesses. The process can be highly rewarding, providing the small business with resources to pursue research and development with a focus on providing NASA with new and advanced capabilities. We present two examples of how the NASA Ames SBIR Program has addressed these purposes, nurturing innovative ideas from small, businesses into commercially viable products that also address analytical needs in space research. These examples, from the Science Instruments for Conducting Solar System Exploration Subtopic, describe the journey from innovative concept to analytical instrument, one successful and one hampered by numerous roadblocks (including some international intrigue}.

  7. Large-scale vertical motion calculations in the AVE IV Experiment. [of atmospheric wind velocity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, G. S.

    1976-01-01

    Using 3- and 6-h consecutive rawinsonde and surface data from NASA's AVE IV Experiment, synoptic-scale vertical motion calculations are made using an adiabatic technique and three variations of the kinematic technique. Both subjective and objective comparisons in space and time between the sign and magnitude of the computed vertical velocities and precipitation intensities are made. These comparisons are conducted to determine which method would consistently produce realistic magnitudes, patterns, and vertical profiles of vertical velocity essential to the diagnostic study of the relationship between severe convective storms and their environment in AVE IV. The kinematic method, adjusted to the adiabatic value at 100 mb, proved to produce the best overall vertical velocities.

  8. GPS Imaging of Global Vertical Land Motion for Sea Level Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Hamlington, B. D.

    2015-12-01

    Coastal vertical land motion contributes to the signal of local relative sea level change. Moreover, understanding global sea level change requires understanding local sea level rise at many locations around Earth. It is therefore essential to understand the regional secular vertical land motion attributable to mantle flow, tectonic deformation, glacial isostatic adjustment, postseismic viscoelastic relaxation, groundwater basin subsidence, elastic rebound from groundwater unloading or other processes that can change the geocentric height of tide gauges anchored to the land. These changes can affect inferences of global sea level rise and should be taken into account for global projections. We present new results of GPS imaging of vertical land motion across most of Earth's continents including its ice-free coastlines around North and South America, Europe, Australia, Japan, parts of Africa and Indonesia. These images are based on data from many independent open access globally distributed continuously recording GPS networks including over 13,500 stations. The data are processed in our system to obtain solutions aligned to the International Terrestrial Reference Frame (ITRF08). To generate images of vertical rate we apply the Median Interannual Difference Adjusted for Skewness (MIDAS) algorithm to the vertical times series to obtain robust non-parametric estimates with realistic uncertainties. We estimate the vertical land motion at the location of 1420 tide gauges locations using Delaunay-based geographic interpolation with an empirically derived distance weighting function and median spatial filtering. The resulting image is insensitive to outliers and steps in the GPS time series, omits short wavelength features attributable to unstable stations or unrepresentative rates, and emphasizes long-wavelength mantle-driven vertical rates.

  9. Simulation System Optimization for Rotorcraft Research on the Vertical Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beard, Steven D.; Reardon, Scott; Tobias, Eric Luke; Aponso, Bimal Lalith

    2012-01-01

    A handling qualities experiment was run on the Vertical Motion Simulator using the GenHel math model configured for a UH60A Blackhawk helicopter. In order to obtain valid handling qualities ratings, the simulation system including the math model were optimized to provide realistic cues. The aircraft math model was adjusted to account for the simulator motion system delays and the motion systems gains and washouts were tuned for the bob-up, precision hover and sidestep tasks. The handling qualities ratings from this experiment showed good correlation to flight ratings.

  10. Investigation of a model vertical motion liquid damper: comparing numerical simulation and experimental evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papadopoulos, Chris; Tabatabai, Habib; Buechel, Craig

    2005-05-01

    Tuned Liquid Dampers (TLD) are used to limit horizontal vibrations in structures, and offer practical alternatives to Tuned Mass Dampers (TMD). However, to our knowledge, liquid damping systems have not been developed to reduce vertical vibrations. In this work, we develop a model for a Vertical Motion Liquid Damper (VMLD), idealized as a discrete, two degree of freedom system. One degree of freedom represents the 'target' structure that is to be damped, and the other represents the approximate, one-dimensional motion of a liquid in a U-shaped tube. Internal losses due to the fluid oscillation serve to limit and control motions of the target structure. The U-shaped tube has a flexible joint such that one vertical portion and the horizontal portion of the tube remain fixed, and the remaining vertical portion of the tube is affixed to the vibrating structure, allowing the liquid to become excited. The equations of motion are derived using Lagrange's Equations, and are integrated using Runge-Kutta algorithms that are available in Matlab. An experimental model was built in the laboratory, consisting of a mass attached to the end of a cantilevered beam (corresponding to the target structure), and a U-tube made from PVC pipe. The various damping and stiffness parameters of the system were calibrated independently based on experimental data. Measured data from the experimental model show reasonable agreement with numerical simulations.

  11. Asymmetric Eyewall Vertical Motion in a High-Resolution Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Pu, Zhao-Xia

    2003-01-01

    This study examines a high-resolution simulation of Hurricane Bonnie. Results from the simulation will be compared to the conceptual model of Heymsfield et al. (2001) to determine the extent to which this conceptual model explains vertical motions and precipitation growth in the eyewall.

  12. Vertical ground motion and its effects on liquefaction resistance of fully saturated sand deposits

    PubMed Central

    Kontoe, Stavroula; Taborda, David M. G.; Potts, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil liquefaction has been extensively investigated over the years with the aim to understand its fundamental mechanism and successfully remediate it. Despite the multi-directional nature of earthquakes, the vertical seismic component is largely neglected, as it is traditionally considered to be of much lower amplitude than the components in the horizontal plane. The 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence in New Zealand is a prime example that vertical accelerations can be of significant magnitude, with peak amplitudes well exceeding their horizontal counterparts. As research on this topic is very limited, there is an emerging need for a more thorough investigation of the vertical motion and its effect on soil liquefaction. As such, throughout this study, uni- and bidirectional finite-element analyses are carried out focusing on the influence of the input vertical motion on sand liquefaction. The effects of the frequency content of the input motion, of the depth of the deposit and of the hydraulic regime, using variable permeability, are investigated and exhaustively discussed. The results indicate that the usual assumption of linear elastic response when compressional waves propagate in a fully saturated sand deposit does not always hold true. Most importantly post-liquefaction settlements appear to be increased when the vertical component is included in the analysis. PMID:27616931

  13. Vertical ground motion and its effects on liquefaction resistance of fully saturated sand deposits

    PubMed Central

    Kontoe, Stavroula; Taborda, David M. G.; Potts, David M.

    2016-01-01

    Soil liquefaction has been extensively investigated over the years with the aim to understand its fundamental mechanism and successfully remediate it. Despite the multi-directional nature of earthquakes, the vertical seismic component is largely neglected, as it is traditionally considered to be of much lower amplitude than the components in the horizontal plane. The 2010–2011 Canterbury earthquake sequence in New Zealand is a prime example that vertical accelerations can be of significant magnitude, with peak amplitudes well exceeding their horizontal counterparts. As research on this topic is very limited, there is an emerging need for a more thorough investigation of the vertical motion and its effect on soil liquefaction. As such, throughout this study, uni- and bidirectional finite-element analyses are carried out focusing on the influence of the input vertical motion on sand liquefaction. The effects of the frequency content of the input motion, of the depth of the deposit and of the hydraulic regime, using variable permeability, are investigated and exhaustively discussed. The results indicate that the usual assumption of linear elastic response when compressional waves propagate in a fully saturated sand deposit does not always hold true. Most importantly post-liquefaction settlements appear to be increased when the vertical component is included in the analysis.

  14. Ground motion prediction equations for horizontal and vertical components of acceleration in Northern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soghrat, M. R.; Ziyaeifar, M.

    2016-05-01

    Recent studies have shown that the vertical component of ground motion can be quite destructive on a variety of structural systems. Development of response spectrum for design of buildings subjected to vertical component of earthquake needs ground motion prediction equations (GMPEs). The existing GMPEs for northern Iranian plateau are proposed for the horizontal component of earthquake, and there is not any specified GMPE for the vertical component of earthquake in this region. Determination of GMPEs is mostly based on regression analyses on earthquake parameters such as magnitude, site class, distance, and spectral amplitudes. In this study, 325 three-component records of 55 earthquakes with magnitude ranging from M w 4.1 to M w 7.3 are used for estimation on the regression coefficients. Records with distances less than 300 km are selected for analyses in the database. The regression analyses on earthquake parameters results in determination of GMPEs for peak ground acceleration and spectral acceleration for both horizontal and vertical components of the ground motion. The correlation between the models for vertical and horizontal GMPEs is studied in details. These models are later compared with some other available GMPEs. According to the result of this investigation, the proposed GMPEs are in agreement with the other relationships that were developed based on the local and regional data.

  15. Comparison of dynamic stall phenomena for pitching and vertical translation motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fukushima, T.; Dadone, L. U.

    1977-01-01

    Test data for vertical translation motions of the V0012 and V23010-1.58 airfoils were compared with force pitch and oscillation data to determine qualitative differences in dynamic stall behavior. Chordwise differential pressure variations were examined in detail for the test conditions displaying dynamic stall. The comparison revealed a number of differences both in the onset of stall and in the progression separation as a function of the type of motion. The evidence of secondary stall events following the recovery from initial stall were found to be dependent on the type of motion, but additional data will be needed to incorporate vertical translation effects into the empirical approximation of dynamic stall.

  16. Diagnosis of vertical motions from VAS retrievals during a convective outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Funk, T. W.; Fuelberg, H. E.

    1985-01-01

    GOES-VAS satellite retrievals are used to investigate an intense convective outbreak over the Mississippi River Valley on 21-22 July 1982. The primary goals are to assess the strengths and weaknesses of three methods for computing vertical motion using satellite retrievals and to determine the effects of short interval observations on the calculations. Then, the vertical motions are incorporated with thermodynamic parameters to assess the usefulness of VAS data in delineating factors leading to storm formation. Results indicate that the quasi-geotrophic omega equation provided patterns and magnitudes most consistent with observed weather events and the 12 h radiosonde-derived motions. The vorticity method generally produced reasonable patterns, especially over the convective outbreak, although magnitudes were large due to its time derivative.

  17. Macroscopic Streaming Associated With Vertical, Cyclic Motion of Interface Confined in a Cylindrical Enclosure

    SciTech Connect

    Jun Shimizu; Takahiro Ito; Yoshiyuki Tsuji; Yutaka Kukita

    2002-07-01

    The interface between overlaid fluids can become unstable when the fluids are excited vertically. The instability caused by the variation in the vertical acceleration is known by the name of the Faraday waves. Ito et al. (1999) studied a combined excitation problem where the fluids were excited vertically in a stationary cylinder while the interface motion was restricted by the mobility of the fluid-fluid-wall contact line. They found that, under such circumstances, the symmetric fundamental mode grows on the interface, even for excitation amplitude and frequency falling in the stable regime of the Faraday wave instability. Furthermore, they found that the contact line exhibits stick-slip-like motion for the combination of fluids and wall material used in their experiments (water and kerosene oil in a cylinder made of acrylic resin). In this paper, we describe and discuss the fluid motions associated with the excitation of fluids and interface wave. It is shown that a unidirectional flow (macroscopic streaming) is induced below the center of the interface when it is excited vertically to produce axisymmetric wave of large amplitudes. This unidirectional, jet-like flow induces a large-scale recirculating flow which extends several cylinder diameters away from the interface, a spatial scale considerably greater than the wavelength or amplitude of the interface waves, and has a time scale much greater than the excitation interval. It is shown that the phase angle between the wave-induced fluid motion and the fluid motion associated with the viscous force along the interface plays an important role in establishing the large scale stream motion of the fluids. (authors)

  18. Vertical ground motion and historical sea-level records in Dakar (Senegal)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Cozannet, Gonéri; Raucoules, Daniel; Wöppelmann, Guy; Garcin, Manuel; Da Sylva, Sylvestre; Meyssignac, Benoit; Gravelle, Médéric; Lavigne, Franck

    2015-08-01

    With growing concerns regarding future impacts of sea-level in major coastal cities, the most accurate information is required regarding local sea-level changes with respect to the coast. Besides global and regional sea-level changes, local coastal vertical ground motions can substantially contribute to local changes in sea-level. In some cases, such ground motions can also limit the usefulness of tide-gauge records, which are a unique source of information to evaluate global sea-level changes before the altimetry era. Using satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry, this study aims at characterizing vertical coastal ground motion in Dakar (Senegal), where a unique century-long record in Africa has been rediscovered. Given the limited number of available images, we use a stacking procedure to compute ground motion velocities in the line of sight over 1992-2010. Despite a complex geology and a rapid population growth and development, we show that the city as a whole is unaffected by differential ground motions larger than 1 mm year-1. Only the northern part of the harbor displays subsidence patterns after 2000, probably as a consequence of land reclamation works. However, these ground motions do not affect the historical tide gauge. Our results highlight the value of the historical sea-level records of Dakar, which cover a 100 year time-span in a tropical oceanic region of Africa, where little data are available for past sea-level reconstructions.

  19. Large-Scale Mid- and Upper-Tropospheric Vertical Motions and MJO Convective Onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Scott; Houze, Robert

    2015-04-01

    Reanalysis (ERA-Interim) is used to demonstrate that anomalies of large-scale vertical motion with ~30 day variability at Addu City, Maldives, exist to the west of the Indian Ocean prior to the occurrence of widespread, organized convection associated with convectively active Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) events during DYNAMO/AMIE. The upward motions are associated with large negative anomalies of 150 hPa velocity potential, extend as low as 700 hPa, and apparently circumnavigate the globe several times. Sustained, widespread, organized convection does not initially develop until 0-2 days after large-scale upper-tropospheric upward motion anomalies arrive over the Indian Ocean. Over low-precipitation regions where they are not reinforced by latent heating, the magnitude of the equatorial anomalies is as large as 0.03 Pa s-1. Using large-scale forcing data derived from a sounding array in conjunction with ground-based radar, typical profiles of environmental heating, vertical motion, and moisture advection are computed for periods prior to those during which deep convection is prevalent and those during which moderately deep cumulonimbi do not form into deep clouds. In both environmental regimes, convection with tops between 3 and 7 km are present. Drying by horizontal advection is also ubiquitous. During periods when moderately deep cumulonimbus do not tend to grow into deep convection, vertical moisture advection is insufficient on the large-scale to overcome drying by horizontal advection. Prior to sustenance of deep convection,vertical advection of moisture in the mid- to upper-troposphere overcomes drying by horizontal advection such that the total (horizontal + vertical) moisture advection throughout the troposphere is positive. In order to do so, upward motion in the middle- and upper-troposphere, in excess of the median by as much as 0.03 Pa s-1, is necessary. The large-scale upward motions connected to equatorially trapped, eastward propagating divergent

  20. Effects of Different Heave Motion Components on Pilot Pitch Control Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Zavala, Melinda A.

    2016-01-01

    The study described in this paper had two objectives. The first objective was to investigate if a different weighting of heave motion components decomposed at the center of gravity, allowing for a higher fidelity of individual components, would result in pilot manual pitch control behavior and performance closer to that observed with full aircraft motion. The second objective was to investigate if decomposing the heave components at the aircraft's instantaneous center of rotation rather than at the center of gravity could result in additional improvements in heave motion fidelity. Twenty-one general aviation pilots performed a pitch attitude control task in an experiment conducted on the Vertical Motion Simulator at NASA Ames under different hexapod motion conditions. The large motion capability of the Vertical Motion Simulator also allowed for a full aircraft motion condition, which served as a baseline. The controlled dynamics were of a transport category aircraft trimmed close to the stall point. When the ratio of center of gravity pitch heave to center of gravity heave increased in the hexapod motion conditions, pilot manual control behavior and performance became increasingly more similar to what is observed with full aircraft motion. Pilot visual and motion gains significantly increased, while the visual lead time constant decreased. The pilot visual and motion time delays remained approximately constant and decreased, respectively. The neuromuscular damping and frequency both decreased, with their values more similar to what is observed with real aircraft motion when there was an equal weighting of the heave of the center of gravity and heave due to rotations about the center of gravity. In terms of open- loop performance, the disturbance and target crossover frequency increased and decreased, respectively, and their corresponding phase margins remained constant and increased, respectively. The decomposition point of the heave components only had limited

  1. Vertical Crustal Motion Derived from Satellite Altimetry and Tide Gauges, and Comparisons with DORIS Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ray, R. D.; Beckley, B. D.; Lemoine, F. G.

    2010-01-01

    A somewhat unorthodox method for determining vertical crustal motion at a tide-gauge location is to difference the sea level time series with an equivalent time series determined from satellite altimetry, To the extent that both instruments measure an identical ocean signal, the difference will be dominated by vertical land motion at the gauge. We revisit this technique by analyzing sea level signals at 28 tide gauges that are colocated with DORIS geodetic stations. Comparisons of altimeter-gauge vertical rates with DORIS rates yield a median difference of 1.8 mm/yr and a weighted root-mean-square difference of2.7 mm/yr. The latter suggests that our uncertainty estimates, which are primarily based on an assumed AR(l) noise process in all time series, underestimates the true errors. Several sources of additional error are discussed, including possible scale errors in the terrestrial reference frame to which altimeter-gauge rates are mostly insensitive, One of our stations, Male, Maldives, which has been the subject of some uninformed arguments about sea-level rise, is found to have almost no vertical motion, and thus is vulnerable to rising sea levels. Published by Elsevier Ltd. on behalf of COSPAR.

  2. Effects of vestibular training on motion sickness, nystagmus, and subjective vertical.

    PubMed

    Clément, Gilles; Deguine, Olivier; Bourg, Mathieu; Pavy-LeTraon, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Pitch head-and-trunk movements during constant velocity rotation are a provocative vestibular stimulus that produces vertigo and nausea. When exposed to this stimulus repeatedly, motion sickness symptoms diminish as the subjects habituate. Acetylleucine is a drug that is used to treat acute vestibular vertigo. In this study, we wanted to ascertain whether this drug (a) lessened motion sickness or delayed habituation; (b) accelerated the recovery following habituation; and (c) whether changes in the subjective vertical accompanied habituation. Twenty subjects were administered acetylleucine or placebo in a double-blind study during a five-day vestibular training. Horizontal vestibulo-ocular reflex, optokinetic nystagmus, smooth pursuit, and subjective visual vertical were evaluated before, during, and up to two months after the vestibular training. Based on Graybiel's diagnostic criteria, motion sickness decreased steadily in each vestibular training session, and there was no difference between the scores in the acetylleucine and placebo groups. Post-rotatory nystagmus peak velocity and time constant also declined in both groups at the same rate. Thus, acetylleucine neither reduced the nausea associated with this provocative stimulus, nor hastened the acquisition or retention of vestibular habituation of motion sickness and nystagmus. There was no difference in optokinetic nystagmus and smooth pursuit between the acetylleucine and placebo groups. However, subjects showed larger error in the subjective visual vertical after habituation, which indicates that spatial orientation is also affected by vestibular training.

  3. The NASA Ames Research Center one- and two-dimensional stratospheric models. Part 1: The one-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Whitten, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    A one-dimensional model of stratospheric trace constituents is described in detail. Specifically, the numerical solution of the species continuity equations, including a technique for treating the stiff differential equations representing the chemical kinetic terms, and an appropriate method for simulating the diurnal variations of the species concentrations, are discussed. A specialized treatment of atmospheric photodissociation rates is outlined in the text. The choice of a vertical eddy diffusivity profile and its success in predicting the vertical tracer distributions (carbon 14, methane, and nitrous oxide) are also discussed.

  4. Vertical air motions derived from a descending radiosonde using a lightweight hard ball as the parachute

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, H.; Zhu, Y.; Zhang, J.; Xuan, Y.

    2013-09-01

    Knowledge of vertical air motions in the atmosphere is important for meteorological and climate studies due to its impact on clouds, precipitation and the vertical transport of air masses, heat, momentum, and composition. It is among the most difficult quantities to measure because of its small magnitude. In this study, a descending radiosonde technique has been developed to detect the vertical wind speed (VW) in the atmosphere. The system is composed of a radiosonde and a 0.5-m diameter hard ball made of plastic foam that acts as a parachute. The radiosonde hangs under the hard ball by a string which is then cut when the instrument is elevated into the upper troposphere by a balloon. The VW is derived from the difference between the observed radiosonde descent rate and the calculated radiosonde descent rate in still air based on fluid dynamics. Deduction of the appropriate drag coefficient for the radiosonde is facilitated by the symmetrical shape of the parachute. An intensive radiosonde launch experiment was held in northern China during the summer seasons of 2010 to 2012. This study uses radiosonde data collected during the campaign to retrieve the vertical air velocity within the radiosonde altitude-detecting range. In general, the VW ranges from -1 to 1 m s-1. Strong vertical air motion (~2 m s-1) is seen in a few radiosonde measurements. Although considerable uncertainties exist in measuring weak vertical air motions, a case study shows that there is reasonable agreement between retrievals of VW in the lower atmosphere from the radiosonde and a wind profiler radar located at the launch site.

  5. Sensitivity of a mesoscale model to initial specification of relative humidity, liquid water and vertical motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalb, M. W.; Perkey, D. J.

    1985-01-01

    The influence of synoptic scale initial conditions on the accuracy of mesoscale precipitation modeling is investigated. Attention is focused on the relative importance of the water vapor, cloud water, rain water, and vertical motion, with the analysis carried out using the Limited Area Mesoscale Prediction System (LAMPS). The fully moist primitive equation model has 15 levels and a terrain-following sigma coordinate system. A K-theory approach was implemented to model the planetary boundary layer. A total of 15 sensitivity simulations were run to investigate the effects of the synoptic initial conditions of the four atmospheric variables. The absence of synoptic cloud and rain water amounts in the initialization caused a 2 hr delay in the onset of precipitation. The delay was increased if synoptic-scale vertical motion was used instead of mesoscale values. Both the delays and a choice of a smoothed moisture field resulted in underestimations of the total rainfall.

  6. First Frequency-Domain Interferometry Observations of Large-Scale Vertical Motion in the Atmosphere.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschinski, Andreas; Chilson, Phillip B.; Kern, Stefan; Nielinger, Jost; Schmidt, Gerhard; Prenosil, Thomas

    1999-05-01

    ) VHF FDI observations, and (iii) the NWPM output, the authors present first evidence that, under ideal conditions, VHF FDI can be used to directly monitor large-scale vertical motion.

  7. Vertical metaphor with motion and judgment: a valenced congruency effect with fluency.

    PubMed

    Freddi, Sébastien; Cretenet, Joël; Dru, Vincent

    2014-09-01

    Following metaphorical theories of affect, several research studies have shown that the spatial cues along a vertical dimension are useful in qualifying emotional experience (HAPPINESS is UP, SADNESS is DOWN). Three experiments were conducted to examine the role of vertical motion in affective judgment. They showed that positive stimuli moving UPWARD were evaluated more positively than those moving DOWNWARD, whereas negative stimuli moving DOWNWARD were evaluated as less negative than those moving UPWARD. They showed a valenced congruency effect, but an alternative hypothesis in terms of MORE is UP and LESS is DOWN was also examined. Finally, fluency mechanisms were investigated to confirm that relationships between affect and verticality were in accordance with a valenced congruency effect.

  8. The Formation of Solid Particles from their Gas-Phase Molecular Precursors in Cosmic Environments with NASA Ames' COSmIC Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salama, Farid

    2014-01-01

    We present and discuss the unique characteristics and capabilities of the laboratory facility, COSmIC, that was developed at NASA Ames to generate, process and analyze interstellar, circumstellar and planetary analogs in the laboratory. COSmIC stands for Cosmic Simulation Chamber and is dedicated to the study of molecules and ions under the low temperature and high vacuum conditions that are required to simulate interstellar, circumstellar and planetary physical environments in space. COSmIC integrates a variety of state-of-the-art instruments that allow forming, processing and monitoring simulated space conditions for planetary, circumstellar and interstellar materials in the laboratory. COSmIC is composed of a Pulsed Discharge Nozzle (PDN) expansion that generates a free jet supersonic expansion coupled to two ultrahigh-sensitivity, complementary in situ diagnostics: a Cavity Ring Down Spectroscopy (CRDS) system for photonic detection and a Reflectron Time-Of-Flight Mass Spectrometer (ReTOF-MS) for mass detection. Recent, unique, laboratory astrophysics results that were obtained using the capabilities of COSmIC will be discussed, in particular the progress that have been achieved in monitoring in the laboratory the formation of solid gains from their gas-phase molecular precursors in environments as varied as stellar/circumstellar outflow and planetary atmospheres. Plans for future, next generation, laboratory experiments on cosmic molecules and grains in the growing field of laboratory astrophysics will also be addressed as well as the implications of these studies for current and upcoming space missions.

  9. NASA Ames DEVELOP Interns Collaborate with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project to Monitor and Study Restoration Efforts using NASA's Satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newcomer, Michelle E.; Kuss, Amber Jean; Nguyen, Andrew; Schmidt, Cynthia L.

    2012-01-01

    In the past, natural tidal marshes in the south bay were segmented by levees and converted into ponds for use in salt production. In an effort to provide habitat for migratory birds and other native plants and animals, as well as to rebuild natural capital, the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) is focused on restoring a portion of the over 15,000 acres of wetlands in California's South San Francisco Bay. The process of restoration begins when a levee is breached; the bay water and sediment flow into the ponds and eventually restore natural tidal marshes. Since the spring of 2010 the NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) DEVELOP student internship program has collaborated with the South Bay Salt Pond Restoration Project (SBSPRP) to study the effects of these restoration efforts and to provide valuable information to assist in habitat management and ecological forecasting. All of the studies were based on remote sensing techniques -- NASA's area of expertise in the field of Earth Science, and used various analytical techniques such as predictive modeling, flora and fauna classification, and spectral detection, to name a few. Each study was conducted by a team of aspiring scientists as a part of the DEVELOP program at Ames.

  10. Aeroacoustic Characterization of the NASA Ames Experimental Aero-Physics Branch 32- by 48-Inch Subsonic Wind Tunnel with a 24-Element Phased Microphone Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Costanza, Bryan T.; Horne, William C.; Schery, S. D.; Babb, Alex T.

    2011-01-01

    The Aero-Physics Branch at NASA Ames Research Center utilizes a 32- by 48-inch subsonic wind tunnel for aerodynamics research. The feasibility of acquiring acoustic measurements with a phased microphone array was recently explored. Acoustic characterization of the wind tunnel was carried out with a floor-mounted 24-element array and two ceiling-mounted speakers. The minimum speaker level for accurate level measurement was evaluated for various tunnel speeds up to a Mach number of 0.15 and streamwise speaker locations. A variety of post-processing procedures, including conventional beamforming and deconvolutional processing such as TIDY, were used. The speaker measurements, with and without flow, were used to compare actual versus simulated in-flow speaker calibrations. Data for wind-off speaker sound and wind-on tunnel background noise were found valuable for predicting sound levels for which the speakers were detectable when the wind was on. Speaker sources were detectable 2 - 10 dB below the peak background noise level with conventional data processing. The effectiveness of background noise cross-spectral matrix subtraction was assessed and found to improve the detectability of test sound sources by approximately 10 dB over a wide frequency range.

  11. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Limaye, Ashutosh S.; Molthan, Andrew L.; Srikishen, Jayanthi

    2010-01-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the "infrastructure as a service" concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  12. Phase 4 static tests of the J-97 powered, external augmentor V/STOL model at the NASA, Ames Research Center, November 1983

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garland, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    A large-scale, ejector-lift V/STOL Model, powered by a J-97 engine, was tested at the NASA Ames Research Center Outdoor Aerodynamics Research Facility. The model incorporated the external augmentor concept developed by DHC. Since the first test at Ames in 1979, the fuselage augmentor nozzle array has been redesigned with a larger pitch and notched nozzles instead of plain slot nozzles. Thrust augmentation of the ejector as measured at Ames Research Center was lower than that measured in the DHC laboratory. It is believed that this difference is due to the high temperature of the primary jet flow as compared to the DHC blown-down rig. An ejector-lift/vectored thrust configuration was also included in the recent tests. This is an arrangement where the fuselage augmentor is shortened in the chordwise direction and the extra thrust is generated with a vectorable, ventral nozzle. In free air the shortened fuselage augmentor produced the same augmentation as the long augmentor. In ground proximity, at a height of 27 in, and with zero pitch angle, a negative ground effect was measured equal to 6.5 percent of the free-air lift.

  13. Experimental Investigations of the NASA Common Research Model in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and NASA Ames 11-Ft Transonic Wind Tunnel (Invited)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rivers, S. M.; Dittberner, Ashley

    2011-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations of the NASA Common Research Model have been conducted in the NASA Langley National Transonic Facility and the NASA Ames 11-ft wind tunnel. Data have been obtained at chord Reynolds numbers of 5 million for five different configurations at both wind tunnels. Force and moment, surface pressure and surface flow visualization data were obtained in both facilities but only the force and moment data are presented herein. Nacelle/pylon, tail effects and tunnel to tunnel variations have been assessed. The data from both wind tunnels show that an addition of a nacelle/pylon gave an increase in drag, decrease in lift and a less nose down pitching moment around the design lift condition of 0.5 and that the tail effects also follow the expected trends. Also, all of the data shown fall within the 2-sigma limits for repeatability. The tunnel to tunnel differences are negligible for lift and pitching moment, while the drag shows a difference of less than ten counts for all of the configurations. These differences in drag may be due to the variation in the sting mounting systems at the two tunnels.

  14. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5 foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat transfer data for the 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5, and 5.0 million.

  15. Phase-linking and the perceived motion during off-vertical axis rotation

    PubMed Central

    Wood, Scott J.; McCollum, Gin

    2010-01-01

    Human off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) in the dark typically produces perceived motion about a cone, the amplitude of which changes as a function of frequency. This perception is commonly attributed to the fact that both the OVAR and the conical motion have a gravity vector that rotates about the subject. Little-known, however, is that this rotating-gravity explanation for perceived conical motion is inconsistent with basic observations about self-motion perception: (a) that the perceived vertical moves toward alignment with the gravito-inertial acceleration (GIA) and (b) that perceived translation arises from perceived linear acceleration, as derived from the portion of the GIA not associated with gravity. Mathematically proved in this article is the fact that during OVAR these properties imply mismatched phase of perceived tilt and translation, in contrast to the common perception of matched phases which correspond to conical motion with pivot at the bottom. This result demonstrates that an additional perceptual rule is required to explain perception in OVAR. This study investigates, both analytically and computationally, the phase relationship between tilt and translation at different stimulus rates—slow (45°/s) and fast (180°/s), and the three-dimensional shape of predicted perceived motion, under different sets of hypotheses about self-motion perception. We propose that for human motion perception, there is a phase-linking of tilt and translation movements to construct a perception of one’s overall motion path. Alternative hypotheses to achieve the phase match were tested with three-dimensional computational models, comparing the output with published experimental reports. The best fit with experimental data was the hypothesis that the phase of perceived translation was linked to perceived tilt, while the perceived tilt was determined by the GIA. This hypothesis successfully predicted the bottom-pivot cone commonly reported and a reduced sense of tilt

  16. Effects of simulator motion and visual characteristics on rotorcraft handling qualities evaluations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, David G.; Hart, Daniel C.

    1993-01-01

    The pilot's perceptions of aircraft handling qualities are influenced by a combination of the aircraft dynamics, the task, and the environment under which the evaluation is performed. When the evaluation is performed in a groundbased simulator, the characteristics of the simulation facility also come into play. Two studies were conducted on NASA Ames Research Center's Vertical Motion Simulator to determine the effects of simulator characteristics on perceived handling qualities. Most evaluations were conducted with a baseline set of rotorcraft dynamics, using a simple transfer-function model of an uncoupled helicopter, under different conditions of visual time delays and motion command washout filters. Differences in pilot opinion were found as the visual and motion parameters were changed, reflecting a change in the pilots' perceptions of handling qualities, rather than changes in the aircraft model itself. The results indicate a need for tailoring the motion washout dynamics to suit the task. Visual-delay data are inconclusive but suggest that it may be better to allow some time delay in the visual path to minimize the mismatch between visual and motion, rather than eliminate the visual delay entirely through lead compensation.

  17. Examining the Magnetic Field Strength and the Horizontal and Vertical Motions in an Emerging Active Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chia-Hsien; Chen, Yu-Che

    2016-03-01

    Earlier observational studies have used the time evolution of emerging magnetic flux regions at the photosphere to infer their subsurface structures, assuming that the flux structure does not change significantly over the near-surface layer. In this study, we test the validity of this assumption by comparing the horizontal and vertical motions of an emerging active region. The two motions would be correlated if the emerging structure is rigid. The selected active region (AR) NOAA 11645 is not embedded in detectable preexisting magnetic field. The observed horizontal motion is quantified by the separation of the two AR polarities and the width of the region. The vertical motion is derived from the magnetic buoyancy theory. Our results show that the separation of the polarities is fastest at the beginning with a velocity of {≈ }4 Mm hr^{-1} and decreases to ≤ 1 Mm hr^{-1} after the main growing phase of flux emergence. The derived thick flux-tube buoyant velocity is between 1 and 3 Mm hr^{-1}, while the thin flux-tube approximation results in an unreasonably high buoyant velocity, consistent with the expectation that the approximation is inappropriate at the surface layer. The observed horizontal motion is not found to directly correlate with either the magnetic field strength or the derived buoyant velocities. However, the percentage of the horizontally oriented fields and the temporal derivatives of the field strength and the buoyant velocity show some positive correlations with the separation velocity. The results of this study imply that the assumption that the emerging active region is the cross section of a rising flux tube whose structure can be considered rigid as it rises through the near-surface layer should be taken with caution.

  18. Constraining the vertical surface motions of the Hampshire Basin, south England During the Cenozoic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Philip; England, Richard; Zalasiewicz, Jan

    2016-04-01

    The potential effect of rising sea level on the UK has received considerable attention in recent years. However, the ongoing long-term changes in surface topography of the UK driven by regional tectonics and the mechanisms responsible are not fully understood. It is thought that glacial loading/unloading is the primary influence. However, this is inconsistent with present-day vertical surface motions recorded from Continuous Global Positioning Stations (CGPS) across the UK. The lateral variations in the present day motions are too complex to be explained by glacial isostatic rebound. We are investigating the hypothesis that the vertical motions of SE England also reflect the long term tectonic history by backstripping the Cenozoic geological record. So far the Paleogene stratigraphic record of the Hampshire basin in southern England has been investigated and using a series of deep boreholes that reach the chalk basement, a 2-D backstripping method has been applied. Subsidence analysis of cliff sections and boreholes reveal the Hampshire Basin was tectonically subsiding at a steady rate from 56.5Ma and any major periods of uplift and denudation to the present day state must have occurred from the mid Oligocene onwards. At this time the northern and western regions of the UK were believed to be uplifting as evidenced by heavy mineral transport directionns and sediment drainage patterns. A rapid increase in tectonic subsidence from 42Ma recorded by the three Isle of Wight sections in close proximity to an existing Variscan fault, thought to reactivate as a thrust during the Cenozoic, suggests a compressional stress regime in this region. The stress pattern observed from the tectonic subsidence data and evidence from drainage patterns supports a model in which the UK was uplifting in the north and west while the south east was subsiding. As this pattern is similar to the present day vertical surface motions and pre-dates glaciation, we propose glacial unloading as a

  19. Motion Adaptive Vertical Handoff in Cellular/WLAN Heterogeneous Wireless Network

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Lin; Xu, Yubin; Fu, Yunhai

    2014-01-01

    In heterogeneous wireless network, vertical handoff plays an important role for guaranteeing quality of service and overall performance of network. Conventional vertical handoff trigger schemes are mostly developed from horizontal handoff in homogeneous cellular network. Basically, they can be summarized as hysteresis-based and dwelling-timer-based algorithms, which are reliable on avoiding unnecessary handoff caused by the terminals dwelling at the edge of WLAN coverage. However, the coverage of WLAN is much smaller compared with cellular network, while the motion types of terminals can be various in a typical outdoor scenario. As a result, traditional algorithms are less effective in avoiding unnecessary handoff triggered by vehicle-borne terminals with various speeds. Besides that, hysteresis and dwelling-timer thresholds usually need to be modified to satisfy different channel environments. For solving this problem, a vertical handoff algorithm based on Q-learning is proposed in this paper. Q-learning can provide the decider with self-adaptive ability for handling the terminals' handoff requests with different motion types and channel conditions. Meanwhile, Neural Fuzzy Inference System (NFIS) is embedded to retain a continuous perception of the state space. Simulation results verify that the proposed algorithm can achieve lower unnecessary handoff probability compared with the other two conventional algorithms. PMID:24741347

  20. High-Resolution Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998). Part 1; The Organization of Vertical Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Pu, Zhaoxia

    2003-01-01

    Hurricanes are well known for their strong winds and heavy rainfall, particularly in the intense rainband (eyewall) surrounding the calmer eye of the storm. In some hurricanes, the rainfall is distributed evenly around the eye so that it has a donut shape on radar images. In other cases, the rainfall is concentrated on one side of the eyewall and nearly absent on the other side and is said to be asymmetric. This study examines how the vertical air motions that produce the rainfall are distributed within the eyewall of an asymmetric hurricane and the factors that cause this pattern of rainfall. We use a sophisticated numerical forecast model to simulate Hurricane Bonnie, which occurred in late August of 1998 during a special NASA field experiment designed to study hurricanes. The simulation results suggest that vertical wind shear (a rapid change in wind speed or direction with height) caused the asymmetric rainfall and vertical air motion patterns by tilting the hurricane vortex and favoring upward air motions in the direction of tilt. Although the rainfall in the hurricane eyewall may surround more than half of the eye, the updrafts that produce the rainfall are concentrated in very small-scale, intense updraft cores that occupy only about 10% of the eyewall area. The model simulation suggests that the timing and location of individual updraft cores are controlled by intense, small-scale vortices (regions of rapidly swirling flow) in the eyewall and that the updrafts form when the vortices encounter low-level air moving into the eyewall.

  1. Effect of dry large-scale vertical motions on initial MJO convective onset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Powell, Scott W.; Houze, Robert A.

    2015-05-01

    Anomalies of eastward propagating large-scale vertical motion with ~30 day variability at Addu City, Maldives, move into the Indian Ocean from the west and are implicated in Madden-Julian Oscillation (MJO) convective onset. Using ground-based radar and large-scale forcing data derived from a sounding array, typical profiles of environmental heating, moisture sink, vertical motion, moisture advection, and Eulerian moisture tendency are computed for periods prior to those during which deep convection is prevalent and those during which moderately deep cumulonimbi do not form into deep clouds. Convection with 3-7 km tops is ubiquitous but present in greater numbers when tropospheric moistening occurs below 600 hPa. Vertical eddy convergence of moisture in shallow to moderately deep clouds is likely responsible for moistening during a 3-7 day long transition period between suppressed and active MJO conditions, although moistening via evaporation of cloud condensate detrained into the environment of such clouds may also be important. Reduction in large-scale subsidence, associated with a vertical velocity structure that travels with a dry eastward propagating zonal wavenumbers 1-1.5 structure in zonal wind, drives a steepening of the lapse rate below 700 hPa, which supports an increase in moderately deep moist convection. As the moderately deep cumulonimbi moisten the lower troposphere, more deep convection develops, which itself moistens the upper troposphere. Reduction in large-scale subsidence associated with the eastward propagating feature reinforces the upper tropospheric moistening, helping to then rapidly make the environment conducive to formation of large stratiform precipitation regions, whose heating is critical for MJO maintenance.

  2. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallice, A.; Wienhold, F. G.; Hoyle, C. R.; Immler, F.; Peter, T.

    2011-06-01

    A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ~30-35 km altitude) is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI) campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s-1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s-1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study) in the orographically unperturbed mid-latitude middle troposphere.

  3. Constraining MOND using the vertical motion of stars in the solar neighbourhood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margalit, Ben; Shaviv, Nir J.

    2016-02-01

    Stars with a different vertical motion relative to the Galactic disc have a different average acceleration. According to modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) theories, they should therefore have a different average orbital velocity while revolving around the Milky Way. We show that this property can be used to constrain MOND theories by studying stars in the local neighbourhood. With the Hipparcos (Perryman et al. 1997) data set we can only place marginal constraints. However, the forthcoming Gaia (Perryman et al. 2001) catalogue with its significantly fainter cutoff should allow placing a stringent constraint.

  4. Aeroacoustic Study of a 26%-Scale Semispan Model of a Boeing 777 Wing in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horne, W. Clifton; Burnside, Nathan J.; Soderman, Paul T.; Jaeger, Stephen M.; Reinero, Bryan R.; James, Kevin D.; Arledge, Thomas K.

    2004-01-01

    An acoustic and aerodynamic study was made of a 26%-scale unpowered Boeing 777 aircraft semispan model in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel for the purpose of identifying and attenuating airframe noise sources. Simulated approach and landing configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.12 and 0.24. Cruise configurations were evaluated at Mach numbers between 0.24 and 0.33. The research team used two Ames phased-microphone arrays, a large fixed array and a small traversing array, mounted under the wing to locate and compare various noise sources in the wing high-lift system and landing gear. Numerous model modifications and noise alleviation devices were evaluated. Simultaneous with acoustic measurements, aerodynamic forces were recorded to document aircraft conditions and any performance changes caused by the geometric modifications. Numerous airframe noise sources were identified that might be important factors in the approach and landing noise of the full-scale aircraft. Several noise-control devices were applied to each noise source. The devices were chosen to manipulate and control, if possible, the flow around the various tips and through the various gaps of the high-lift system so as to minimize the noise generation. Fences, fairings, tip extensions, cove fillers, vortex generators, hole coverings, and boundary-layer trips were tested. In many cases, the noise-control devices eliminated noise from some sources at specific frequencies. When scaled to full-scale third-octave bands, typical noise reductions ranged from 1 to 10 dB without significant aerodynamic performance loss.

  5. The Mars Dust Cycle: Investigating the Effects of Radiatively Active Water Ice Clouds on Surface Stresses and Dust Lifting Potential with the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kahre, Melinda A.; Hollingsworth, Jeffery

    2012-01-01

    The dust cycle is a critically important component of Mars' current climate system. Dust is present in the atmosphere of Mars year-round but the dust loading varies with season in a generally repeatable manner. Dust has a significant influence on the thermal structure of the atmosphere and thus greatly affects atmospheric circulation. The dust cycle is the most difficult of the three climate cycles (CO2, water, and dust) to model realistically with general circulation models. Until recently, numerical modeling investigations of the dust cycle have typically not included the effects of couplings to the water cycle through cloud formation. In the Martian atmosphere, dust particles likely provide the seed nuclei for heterogeneous nucleation of water ice clouds. As ice coats atmospheric dust grains, the newly formed cloud particles exhibit different physical and radiative characteristics. Thus, the coupling between the dust and water cycles likely affects the distributions of dust, water vapor and water ice, and thus atmospheric heating and cooling and the resulting circulations. We use the NASA Ames Mars GCM to investigate the effects of radiatively active water ice clouds on surface stress and the potential for dust lifting. The model includes a state-of-the-art water ice cloud microphysics package and a radiative transfer scheme that accounts for the radiative effects of CO2 gas, dust, and water ice clouds. We focus on simulations that are radiatively forced by a prescribed dust map, and we compare simulations that do and do not include radiatively active clouds. Preliminary results suggest that the magnitude and spatial patterns of surface stress (and thus dust lifting potential) are substantial influenced by the radiative effects of water ice clouds.

  6. Proposed Use of the NASA Ames Nebula Cloud Computing Platform for Numerical Weather Prediction and the Distribution of High Resolution Satellite Imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Limaye, A.; Molthan, A.

    2010-12-01

    The development of the Nebula Cloud Computing Platform at NASA Ames Research Center provides an open-source solution for the deployment of scalable computing and storage capabilities relevant to the execution of real-time weather forecasts and the distribution of high resolution satellite data to the operational weather community. Two projects at Marshall Space Flight Center may benefit from use of the Nebula system. The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center facilitates the use of unique NASA satellite data and research capabilities in the operational weather community by providing datasets relevant to numerical weather prediction, and satellite data sets useful in weather analysis. SERVIR provides satellite data products for decision support, emphasizing environmental threats such as wildfires, floods, landslides, and other hazards, with interests in numerical weather prediction in support of disaster response. The Weather Research and Forecast (WRF) model Environmental Modeling System (WRF-EMS) has been configured for Nebula cloud computing use via the creation of a disk image and deployment of repeated instances. Given the available infrastructure within Nebula and the “infrastructure as a service” concept, the system appears well-suited for the rapid deployment of additional forecast models over different domains, in response to real-time research applications or disaster response. Future investigations into Nebula capabilities will focus on the development of a web mapping server and load balancing configuration to support the distribution of high resolution satellite data sets to users within the National Weather Service and international partners of SERVIR.

  7. Forward velocity effects on fan noise and the suppression characteristics of advanced inlets as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. T.

    1980-05-01

    Forward velocity effects on the forward radiated fan noise and on the suppression characteristics of three advanced inlets relative to a baseline cylindrical inlet were measured in the NASA Ames Research Center 40 x 80 foot Wind Tunnel. A modified JT15D turbofan engine in a quiet nacelle was the source of fan noise; the advanced inlets were a Conventional Takeoff/Landing (CTOL) hybrid inlet, a Short Takeoff/Landing (STOL) hybrid inlet, and a treated deflector inlet. Also measured were the static to flight effects on the fan noise of canting the baseline inlet 4 deg downward to simulate typical wing mounted turbofan engines. The CTOL hybrid inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 18 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a CF6 size engine while the STOL hybrid inlet suppressed the low tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB on a 61 m (200 ft) sideline scaled to a OCSEE size engine. The deflector inlet suppressed the high tip speed fan noise as much as 13 PNdB at 61 m (200 ft) overhead scaled to a CF6 size engine. No significant changes in fan noise suppression for the CTOL and STOL hybrid inlets occurred for forward velocity changes above 21 m/s (68 ft/s) or for angle of attack changes up to 15 deg. However, changes in both forward velocity and angle of attack changed the deflector inlet noise unpredictably due to the asymmetry of the inlet flow field into the fan.

  8. Full-scale S-76 rotor performance and loads at low speeds in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel. Vol. 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinoda, Patrick M.

    1996-01-01

    A full-scale helicopter rotor test was conducted in the NASA Ames 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel with a four-bladed S-76 rotor system. Rotor performance and loads data were obtained over a wide range of rotor shaft angles-of-attack and thrust conditions at tunnel speeds ranging from 0 to 100 kt. The primary objectives of this test were (1) to acquire forward flight rotor performance and loads data for comparison with analytical results; (2) to acquire S-76 forward flight rotor performance data in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel to compare with existing full-scale 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel test data that were acquired in 1977; (3) to evaluate the acoustic capability of the 80- by 120- Foot Wind Tunnel for acquiring blade vortex interaction (BVI) noise in the low speed range and compare BVI noise with in-flight test data; and (4) to evaluate the capability of the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel test section as a hover facility. The secondary objectives were (1) to evaluate rotor inflow and wake effects (variations in tunnel speed, shaft angle, and thrust condition) on wind tunnel test section wall and floor pressures; (2) to establish the criteria for the definition of flow breakdown (condition where wall corrections are no longer valid) for this size rotor and wind tunnel cross-sectional area; and (3) to evaluate the wide-field shadowgraph technique for visualizing full-scale rotor wakes. This data base of rotor performance and loads can be used for analytical and experimental comparison studies for full-scale, four-bladed, fully articulated rotor systems. Rotor performance and structural loads data are presented in this report.

  9. Effect of rolling motion on critical heat flux for subcooled flow boiling in vertical tube

    SciTech Connect

    Hwang, J. S.; Park, I. U.; Park, M. Y.; Park, G. C.

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents defining characteristics of the critical heat flux (CHF) for the boiling of R-134a in vertical tube operation under rolling motion in marine reactor. It is important to predict CHF of marine reactor having the rolling motion in order to increase the safety of the reactor. Marine Reactor Moving Simulator (MARMS) tests are conducted to measure the critical heat flux using R-134a flowing upward in a uniformly heated vertical tube under rolling motion. MARMS was rotated by motor and mechanical power transmission gear. The CHF tests were performed in a 9.5 mm I.D. test section with heated length of 1 m. Mass fluxes range from 285 to 1300 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1}, inlet subcooling from 3 to 38 deg. C and outlet pressures from 13 to 24 bar. Amplitudes of rolling range from 15 to 40 degrees and periods from 6 to 12 sec. To convert the test conditions of CHF test using R-134a in water, Katto's fluid-to-fluid modeling was used in present investigation. A CHF correlation is presented which accounts for the effects of pressure, mass flux, inlet subcooling and rolling angle over all conditions tested. Unlike existing transient CHF experiments, CHF ratio of certain mass flux and pressure are different in rolling motion. For the mass fluxes below 500 kg m{sup -2}s{sup -1} at 13, 16 (region of relative low mass flux), CHF ratio was decreased but was increased above that mass flux (region of relative high mass flux). Moreover, CHF tend to enhance in entire mass flux at 24 bar. (authors)

  10. An eliminating method of motion-induced vertical parallax for time-division 3D display technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Liyuan; Hou, Chunping

    2015-10-01

    A time difference between the left image and right image of the time-division 3D display makes a person perceive alternating vertical parallax when an object is moving vertically on a fixed depth plane, which causes the left image and right image perceived do not match and makes people more prone to visual fatigue. This mismatch cannot eliminate simply rely on the precise synchronous control of the left image and right image. Based on the principle of time-division 3D display technology and human visual system characteristics, this paper establishes a model of the true vertical motion velocity in reality and vertical motion velocity on the screen, and calculates the amount of the vertical parallax caused by vertical motion, and then puts forward a motion compensation method to eliminate the vertical parallax. Finally, subjective experiments are carried out to analyze how the time difference affects the stereo visual comfort by comparing the comfort values of the stereo image sequences before and after compensating using the eliminating method. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed method is reasonable and efficient.

  11. Simulated self-motion in a visual gravity field: sensitivity to vertical and horizontal heading in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Pauwels, Karl; Macaluso, Emiliano; Orban, Guy A; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Multiple visual signals are relevant to perception of heading direction. While the role of optic flow and depth cues has been studied extensively, little is known about the visual effects of gravity on heading perception. We used fMRI to investigate the contribution of gravity-related visual cues on the processing of vertical versus horizontal apparent self-motion. Participants experienced virtual roller-coaster rides in different scenarios, at constant speed or 1g-acceleration/deceleration. Imaging results showed that vertical self-motion coherent with gravity engaged the posterior insula and other brain regions that have been previously associated with vertical object motion under gravity. This selective pattern of activation was also found in a second experiment that included rectilinear motion in tunnels, whose direction was cued by the preceding open-air curves only. We argue that the posterior insula might perform high-order computations on visual motion patterns, combining different sensory cues and prior information about the effects of gravity. Medial-temporal regions including para-hippocampus and hippocampus were more activated by horizontal motion, preferably at constant speed, consistent with a role in inertial navigation. Overall, the results suggest partially distinct neural representations of the cardinal axes of self-motion (horizontal and vertical). PMID:23321153

  12. Simulated self-motion in a visual gravity field: sensitivity to vertical and horizontal heading in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Pauwels, Karl; Macaluso, Emiliano; Orban, Guy A; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2013-05-01

    Multiple visual signals are relevant to perception of heading direction. While the role of optic flow and depth cues has been studied extensively, little is known about the visual effects of gravity on heading perception. We used fMRI to investigate the contribution of gravity-related visual cues on the processing of vertical versus horizontal apparent self-motion. Participants experienced virtual roller-coaster rides in different scenarios, at constant speed or 1g-acceleration/deceleration. Imaging results showed that vertical self-motion coherent with gravity engaged the posterior insula and other brain regions that have been previously associated with vertical object motion under gravity. This selective pattern of activation was also found in a second experiment that included rectilinear motion in tunnels, whose direction was cued by the preceding open-air curves only. We argue that the posterior insula might perform high-order computations on visual motion patterns, combining different sensory cues and prior information about the effects of gravity. Medial-temporal regions including para-hippocampus and hippocampus were more activated by horizontal motion, preferably at constant speed, consistent with a role in inertial navigation. Overall, the results suggest partially distinct neural representations of the cardinal axes of self-motion (horizontal and vertical).

  13. An investigation of the vertical wavenumber and frequency spectra of gravity wave motions in the lower stratosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fritts, David C.; Chou, Hua-Guo

    1987-01-01

    The vertical and oblique velocities of atmospheric motions in the lower stratosphere were analyzed using data obtained on February 1-5, 1986, from the Poker Flat, Alaska, MST radar; two beams of orthogonal polarization were directed vertically, and four oblique beams at 7 deg off-vertical were directed at azimuths of 64, 154, 244, and 334 deg from north. Results indicate that the majority of the energy at gravity wave periods is associated with inertia-gravity wave motions having an upward direction of propagation and dominant vertical wavelengths near 2 km. The results of vertical wavenumber spectra support the saturation hypothesis of Dewan and Good (1986) and Smith et al. (1987), suggesting that saturation processes act to control spectral amplitudes at large wavenumbers.

  14. Modification of Eye Movements and Motion Perception during Off-Vertical Axis Rotation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, S. J.; Reschke, M. F.; Denise, P.; CLement, G.

    2006-01-01

    Constant velocity Off-Vertical Axis Rotation (OVAR) imposes a continuously varying orientation of the head and body relative to gravity. The ensuing ocular reflexes include modulation of both torsional and horizontal eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the lateral plane, and modulation of vertical and vergence eye movements as a function of the varying linear acceleration along the sagittal plane. Previous studies have demonstrated that tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses, as well as motion perception, vary as a function of stimulus frequency during OVAR. The purpose of this study is to examine normative OVAR responses in healthy human subjects, and examine adaptive changes in astronauts following short duration space flight at low (0.125 Hz) and high (0.5 Hz) frequencies. Data was obtained on 24 normative subjects (14 M, 10 F) and 14 (13 M, 1F) astronaut subjects. To date, astronauts have participated in 3 preflight sessions (n=14) and on R+0/1 (n=7), R+2 (n= 13) and R+4 (n= 13) days after landing. Subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 20 deg off-vertical at constant rates of 45 and 180 deg/s, corresponding to 0.125 and 0.5 Hz. Binocular responses were obtained with video-oculography. Perceived motion was evaluated using verbal reports and a two-axis joystick (pitch and roll tilt) mounted on top of a two-axis linear stage (anterior-posterior and medial-lateral translation). Eye responses were obtained in ten of the normative subjects with the head and trunk aligned, and then with the head turned relative to the trunk 40 deg to the right or left of center. Sinusoidal curve fits were used to derive amplitude, phase and bias of the responses over several cycles at each stimulus frequency. Eye responses during 0.125 Hz OVAR were dominated by modulation of torsional and vertical eye position, compensatory for tilt relative to gravity. While there is a bias horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV), the

  15. UHTC Research at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia M.

    2011-01-01

    For enhanced aerodynamic performance. Materials for sharp leading edges can be reusable but need different properties because of geometry and very high temperatures. Require materials with significantly higher temperature capabilities, but for short duration. Current shuttle RCC leading edge materials: T approx. 1650 C. Materials for vehicles with sharp leading edges: T>2000 C. >% Figure depicts: High Temperature at Tip and Steep Temperature Gradient. Passive cooling is simplest option to manage the intense heating on sharp leading edges.

  16. The relationship between large-scale vertical motion, highly reflective cloud, and sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmermann, Peter H.; Newell, Reginald E.; Selkirk, Henry B.

    1988-01-01

    Vertical motion fields at 850 mbar over the tropical Pacific region are calculated from the 1963-1973 mean wind fields for 4 months of the year and for October 1972, the peak month in the 1972-1973 El Nino event. These vertical motion fields are derived using the projective separation technique, which has the unique property of separating vertical motion into components due to meridional wind convergence and zonal wind convergence. This separation permits investigation of the response of the Hadley and Walker circulations to annual and interannual variation of the sea surface temperature in the tropical Pacific. The large-scale features of the computed vertical motion fields are in agreement with those of highly reflective clouds, which indicate the locations of deep convection. Examination of the annual cycle of the vertical motion and its components shows no strong variation of the Walker circulation with the east-west gradient of sea surface temperature. On the other hand, a strong correlation is found between meridional overturning in the eastern Pacific and the local equatorial sea surface temperature: during El Nino events, the eastern and central Pacific contribution to the Hadley circulation tends to increase.

  17. Investigating the asymmetry of Mars' South Polar Cap using the NASA Ames Mars General Circulation Model with a CO2 cloud microphysics scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dequaire, J. M.; Kahre, M. A.; Haberle, R. M.; Hollingsworth, J. L.

    2013-12-01

    One of the most intriguing and least understood climate phenomena on Mars is the existence of a high albedo perennial south polar CO2 ice cap that is offset from the pole in the western hemisphere (SPRC). Colaprete et al. (2005) hypothesize that since the process by which CO2 surface frost accumulates (i.e., precipitation or direct vapor deposition) affects the albedo of the ice, the atmosphere can play a role in the stability and asymmetry of the cap. They show that the basins of Hellas and Argyre force a stationary wave resulting in a colder western hemisphere in which atmospheric CO2 condensation and precipitation is favored. Because precipitated CO2 is brighter than directly deposited CO2, they suggest that this topography driven atmospheric circulation maintains the asymmetry of the southern ice cap. However, Colaprete et al (2005) do not explicitly model the albedo of the south cap to demonstrate the viability of their hypothesis. We build on their study with a version of the NASA Ames GCM that includes a newly incorporated CO2 cloud microphysics scheme. Simulated results compare well to observed temperatures, pressures, cap recession rates and cloud patterns (mesospheric and polar night clouds). Although mesospheric and polar night clouds are thoroughly documented in the literature, the model predicts a third type of cloud to form close to the surface of the subliming ice caps, which has not been observed. As hypothesized by Colaprete et al. (2005), we find that the zonally asymmetric topography forces a stationary wave in the atmosphere resulting in an asymmetric cloud cover over the south pole during fall and winter and enhanced snowfall over a region encompassing the SPRC. These positive results open to further studies including a mesospheric simulation to refine the horizontal grid around the SPRC as well as the implementation of an ice albedo scheme dependent both on the amount and size of aerosols falling onto the cap during fall and winter (snow

  18. Biological Visualization, Imaging and Simulation(Bio-VIS) at NASA Ames Research Center: Developing New Software and Technology for Astronaut Training and Biology Research in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    The Bio- Visualization, Imaging and Simulation (BioVIS) Technology Center at NASA's Ames Research Center is dedicated to developing and applying advanced visualization, computation and simulation technologies to support NASA Space Life Sciences research and the objectives of the Fundamental Biology Program. Research ranges from high resolution 3D cell imaging and structure analysis, virtual environment simulation of fine sensory-motor tasks, computational neuroscience and biophysics to biomedical/clinical applications. Computer simulation research focuses on the development of advanced computational tools for astronaut training and education. Virtual Reality (VR) and Virtual Environment (VE) simulation systems have become important training tools in many fields from flight simulation to, more recently, surgical simulation. The type and quality of training provided by these computer-based tools ranges widely, but the value of real-time VE computer simulation as a method of preparing individuals for real-world tasks is well established. Astronauts routinely use VE systems for various training tasks, including Space Shuttle landings, robot arm manipulations and extravehicular activities (space walks). Currently, there are no VE systems to train astronauts for basic and applied research experiments which are an important part of many missions. The Virtual Glovebox (VGX) is a prototype VE system for real-time physically-based simulation of the Life Sciences Glovebox where astronauts will perform many complex tasks supporting research experiments aboard the International Space Station. The VGX consists of a physical display system utilizing duel LCD projectors and circular polarization to produce a desktop-sized 3D virtual workspace. Physically-based modeling tools (Arachi Inc.) provide real-time collision detection, rigid body dynamics, physical properties and force-based controls for objects. The human-computer interface consists of two magnetic tracking devices

  19. Validating Above-cloud Aerosol Optical Depth Retrieved from MODIS using NASA Ames Airborne Sun-Tracking Photometric and Spectrometric (AATS and 4STAR) Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jethva, H. T.; Torres, O.; Remer, L. A.; Redemann, J.; Dunagan, S. E.; Livingston, J. M.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M. S.; Segal-Rosenhaimer, M.

    2014-12-01

    Absorbing aerosols produced from biomass burning and dust outbreaks are often found to overlay the lower level cloud decks as evident in the satellite images. In contrast to the cloud-free atmosphere, in which aerosols generally tend to cool the atmosphere, the presence of absorbing aerosols above cloud poses greater potential of exerting positive radiative effects (warming) whose magnitude directly depends on the aerosol loading above cloud, optical properties of clouds and aerosols, and cloud fraction. In recent years, development of algorithms that exploit satellite-based passive measurements of ultraviolet (UV), visible, and polarized light as well as lidar-based active measurements constitute a major breakthrough in the field of remote sensing of aerosols. While the unprecedented quantitative information on aerosol loading above cloud is now available from NASA's A-train sensors, a greater question remains ahead: How to validate the satellite retrievals of above-cloud aerosols (ACA)? Direct measurements of ACA such as carried out by the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS) and Spectrometer for Sky-Scanning, Sun-Tracking Atmospheric Research (4STAR) can be of immense help in validating ACA retrievals. In this study, we validate the ACA optical depth retrieved using the 'color ratio' (CR) method applied to the MODIS cloudy-sky reflectance by using the airborne AATS and 4STAR measurements. A thorough search of the historic AATS-4STAR database collected during different field campaigns revealed five events where biomass burning, dust, and wildfire-emitted aerosols were found to overlay lower level cloud decks observed during SAFARI-2000, ACE-ASIA 2001, and SEAC4RS-2013, respectively. The co-located satellite-airborne measurements revealed a good agreement (root-mean-square-error<0.1 for Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) at 500 nm) with most matchups falling within the estimated uncertainties in the MODIS retrievals (-10% to +50%). An extensive validation of

  20. Modeling the ascent of sounding balloons: derivation of the vertical air motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallice, A.; Wienhold, F. G.; Hoyle, C. R.; Immler, F.; Peter, T.

    2011-10-01

    A new model to describe the ascent of sounding balloons in the troposphere and lower stratosphere (up to ∼30-35 km altitude) is presented. Contrary to previous models, detailed account is taken of both the variation of the drag coefficient with altitude and the heat imbalance between the balloon and the atmosphere. To compensate for the lack of data on the drag coefficient of sounding balloons, a reference curve for the relationship between drag coefficient and Reynolds number is derived from a dataset of flights launched during the Lindenberg Upper Air Methods Intercomparisons (LUAMI) campaign. The transfer of heat from the surrounding air into the balloon is accounted for by solving the radial heat diffusion equation inside the balloon. In its present state, the model does not account for solar radiation, i.e. it is only able to describe the ascent of balloons during the night. It could however be adapted to also represent daytime soundings, with solar radiation modeled as a diffusive process. The potential applications of the model include the forecast of the trajectory of sounding balloons, which can be used to increase the accuracy of the match technique, and the derivation of the air vertical velocity. The latter is obtained by subtracting the ascent rate of the balloon in still air calculated by the model from the actual ascent rate. This technique is shown to provide an approximation for the vertical air motion with an uncertainty error of 0.5 m s-1 in the troposphere and 0.2 m s-1 in the stratosphere. An example of extraction of the air vertical velocity is provided in this paper. We show that the air vertical velocities derived from the balloon soundings in this paper are in general agreement with small-scale atmospheric velocity fluctuations related to gravity waves, mechanical turbulence, or other small-scale air motions measured during the SUCCESS campaign (Subsonic Aircraft: Contrail and Cloud Effects Special Study) in the orographically

  1. Results of heat transfer tests of an 0.0175-scale space shuttle vehicle model 22 OTS in the NASA-Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IH3), volume 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, T. F.; Lockman, W. K.

    1975-01-01

    Heat-transfer data for the 0.0175-scale Space Shuttle Vehicle 3 are presented. Interference heating effects were investigated by a model build-up technique of Orbiter alone, tank alone, second, and first stage configurations. The test program was conducted in the NASA-Ames 3.5-Foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 5.3 for nominal free-stream Reynolds number per foot values of 1.5 x 1,000,000 and 5.0 x 1,000,000.

  2. Retrievals of Vertical Air Motion from the HIAPER Cloud Radar during CSET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwartz, M. C.; Ghate, V. P.; Vivekanandan, J.; Tsai, P.; Ellis, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    the ocean surface echoes, together with aircraft motion data, will be used to ameliorate the radar beam broadening due to aircraft motion. After accounting for the aircraft motion we will explore techniques to retrieve the vertical air motion and cloud microphysical variables from the radar Doppler spectrum.

  3. Probabilistic seismic hazard assessment for the effect of vertical ground motions on seismic response of highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Zeynep

    Typically, the vertical component of the ground motion is not considered explicitly in seismic design of bridges, but in some cases the vertical component can have a significant effect on the structural response. The key question of when the vertical component should be incorporated in design is answered by the probabilistic seismic hazard assessment study incorporating the probabilistic seismic demand models and ground motion models. Nonlinear simulation models with varying configurations of an existing bridge in California were considered in the analytical study. The simulation models were subjected to the set of selected ground motions in two stages: at first, only horizontal components of the motion were applied; while in the second stage the structures were subjected to both horizontal and vertical components applied simultaneously and the ground motions that produced the largest adverse effects on the bridge system were identified. Moment demand in the mid-span and at the support of the longitudinal girder and the axial force demand in the column are found to be significantly affected by the vertical excitations. These response parameters can be modeled using simple ground motion parameters such as horizontal spectral acceleration and vertical spectral acceleration within 5% to 30% error margin depending on the type of the parameter and the period of the structure. For a complete hazard assessment, both of these ground motion parameters explaining the structural behavior should also be modeled. For the horizontal spectral acceleration, Abrahamson and Silva (2008) model was used within many available standard model. A new NGA vertical ground motion model consistent with the horizontal model was constructed. These models are combined in a vector probabilistic seismic hazard analyses. Series of hazard curves developed and presented for different locations in Bay Area for soil site conditions to provide a roadmap for the prediction of these features for future

  4. Aeroelastic equations of motion of a Darrieus vertical-axis wind-turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kvaternik, R. G.

    1979-01-01

    The second-degree nonlinear aeroelastic equations of motion for a slender, flexible, nonuniform, Darrieus vertical-axis wind turbine blade which is undergoing combined flatwise bending, edgewise bending, torsion, and extension are developed using Hamilton's principle. The blade aerodynamic loading is obtained from strip theory based on a quasi-steady approximation of two-dimensional incompressible unsteady airfoil theory. The derivation of the equations has its basis in the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity and the resulting equations are consistent with the small deformation approximation in which the elongations and shears are negligible compared to unity. These equations are suitable for studying vibrations, static and dynamic aeroelastic instabilities, and dynamic response. Several possible methods of solution of the equations, which have periodic coefficients, are discussed.

  5. CFD simulation of vertical linear motion mixing in anaerobic digester tanks.

    PubMed

    Meroney, Robert N; Sheker, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the mixing characteristics of a small circular anaerobic digester tank (diameter 6 m) equipped sequentially with 13 different plunger type vertical linear motion mixers and two different type internal draft-tube mixers. Rates of mixing of step injection of tracers were calculated from which active volume (AV) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) could be calculated. Washout characteristics were compared to analytic formulae to estimate any presence of partial mixing, dead volume, short-circuiting, or piston flow. Active volumes were also estimated based on tank regions that exceeded minimum velocity criteria. The mixers were ranked based on an ad hoc criteria related to the ratio of AV to unit power (UP) or AV/UP. The best plunger mixers were found to behave about the same as the conventional draft-tube mixers of similar UP.

  6. Coastal sea level projections with improved accounting for vertical land motion

    PubMed Central

    Han, Guoqi; Ma, Zhimin; Chen, Nan; Yang, Jingsong; Chen, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Regional and coastal mean sea level projections in the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change (IPCC) Fifth Assessment Report (AR5) account only for vertical land motion (VLM) associated with glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA), which may significantly under- or over-estimate sea level rise. Here we adjust AR5-like regional projections with the VLM from Global Positioning Satellite (GPS) measurements and/or from a combination of altimetry and tide-gauge data, which include both GIA and non-GIA VLM. Our results at selected tide-gauge locations on the North American and East Asian coasts show drastically different projections with and without non-GIA VLM being accounted for. The present study points to the importance of correcting IPCC AR5 coastal projections for the non-GIA VLM in making adaptation decisions. PMID:26526287

  7. Modeling of steady motion and vertical-plane dynamics of a tunnel hull

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, Christopher S.; Matveev, Konstantin I.

    2014-06-01

    High-speed marine vehicles can take advantage of aerodynamically supported platforms or air wings to increase maximum speed or transportation efficiency. However, this also results in increased complexity of boat dynamics, especially in the presence of waves and wind gusts. In this study, a mathematical model based on the fully unsteady aerodynamic extreme-ground-effect theory and the hydrodynamic added-mass strip theory is applied for simulating vertical-plane motions of a tunnel hull in a disturbed environment, as well as determining its steady states in calm conditions. Calculated responses of the boat to wind gusts and surface waves are demonstrated. The present model can be used as a supplementary method for preliminary estimations of performance of aerodynamically assisted marine craft.

  8. CFD simulation of vertical linear motion mixing in anaerobic digester tanks.

    PubMed

    Meroney, Robert N; Sheker, Robert E

    2014-09-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) was used to simulate the mixing characteristics of a small circular anaerobic digester tank (diameter 6 m) equipped sequentially with 13 different plunger type vertical linear motion mixers and two different type internal draft-tube mixers. Rates of mixing of step injection of tracers were calculated from which active volume (AV) and hydraulic retention time (HRT) could be calculated. Washout characteristics were compared to analytic formulae to estimate any presence of partial mixing, dead volume, short-circuiting, or piston flow. Active volumes were also estimated based on tank regions that exceeded minimum velocity criteria. The mixers were ranked based on an ad hoc criteria related to the ratio of AV to unit power (UP) or AV/UP. The best plunger mixers were found to behave about the same as the conventional draft-tube mixers of similar UP. PMID:25327022

  9. Asymmetric Eyewall Vertical Motion in a High-Resolution Simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Montgomery, Michael T.; Pu, Zhao-Xia

    2004-01-01

    Reasor et al. (2004) examined the tilting of a vortex by shear and found that a damping mechanism intrinsic to the dry adiabatic dynamics suppresses departures from an upright state. This realignment occurs through projection of the tilt asymmetry onto two types of vortex Rossby waves: sheared vortex Rossby waves, in which the radial shear of the swirling flow axisymmetrizes tilt asymmetries, and a quasi-mode, or discrete, vortex Rossby wave that, in the absence of damping, causes precession of the upper vortex until it realigns with the lower one (thereafter undergoing repeated cycles of tilting and realignment). With damping, the vortex achieves a downshear-left equilibrium tilt. This paper examines the role of a damped quasi-mode in producing asymmetric vertical motions in a high-resolution simulation of Hurricane Bonnie (1998).

  10. Excitation of Intra-bunch Vertical Motion in the SPS - Implications for Feedback Control of Ecloud and TMCI Instabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cesaratto, J.M.; Fox, J.D.; Pivi, M.T.; Rivetta, C.H.; Turgut, O.; Uemura, S.; Hofle, W.; Wehrle, U.; /CERN

    2012-06-01

    Electron cloud (ecloud) and transverse mode coupled-bunch instabilities (TMCI) limit the bunch intensity in the CERN SPS. This paper presents experimental measurements in the SPS of single-bunch motion driven by a GHz bandwidth vertical excitation system. The final goal is to quantify the change in internal bunch dynamics as instability thresholds are approached, and quantify the frequencies of internal modes as ecloud effects become significant. Initially, we have been able to drive the beam and view its motion. We show the excitation of barycentric, head-tail and higher vertical modes at different bunch intensities. The beam motion is analyzed in the time domain, via animated presentations of the sampled vertical signals, and in the frequency domain, via spectrograms showing the modal frequencies vs. time. The demonstration of the excitation of selected internal modes is a significant step in the development of the feedback control techniques.

  11. Evaluation of Vertical Motion Contributions Towards Tropical Cyclone Rapid Intensification Under Varying Wind Shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnos, D. S.; Nesbitt, S. W.

    2013-12-01

    Tropical cyclone (TC) intensity prediction remains one of the primary challenges facing the meteorological community despite its dependence upon the secondary circulation being well established. Recent attention has focused upon the region residing within the radius of maximum wind due to its increased inertial stability, where heating is more efficient to develop the TC warm core. Here a method to objectively identify the 3-D evolution of the radius of maximum wind to act as an analysis region is utilized with Weather Research and Forecasting model simulations of rapid intensification episodes for two Atlantic basin tropical cyclones under low (Hurricane Ike 2008) and high (Hurricane Earl 2010) wind shear. The TC simulations are utilized to compare and contrast vertical motion and diabatic heating field evolutions relative to timing of rapid intensification. Further, a method to quantify three-dimensional individual updraft contributions relative to the maximum height by each updraft feature is used as a proxy for precipitation regimes (e.g. shallow cumulus, cumulus congestus, deep convection, and convective bursts). Quantified for each precipitation regime are vertical fluxes of mass, water vapor, cloud particles, and hydrometeors as they are intrinsically linked to diabatic heating and resultant magnitude of the ascending branch of the TC secondary circulation. The perspective yielded by each of these simulations enhances our understanding of TC intensification while also helping guide potential observing platform strategies and real-time forecasting applications.

  12. Vorticity and Vertical Motions Diagnosed from Satellite Deep-Layer Temperatures. Revised

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spencer, Roy W.; Lapenta, William M.; Robertson, Franklin R.

    1994-01-01

    Spatial fields of satellite-measured deep-layer temperatures are examined in the context of quasigeostrophic theory. It is found that midtropospheric geostrophic vorticity and quasigeostrophic vertical motions can be diagnosed from microwave temperature measurements of only two deep layers. The lower- ( 1000-400 hPa) and upper- (400-50 hPa) layer temperatures are estimated from limb-corrected TIROS-N Microwave Sounding Units (MSU) channel 2 and 3 data, spatial fields of which can be used to estimate the midtropospheric thermal wind and geostrophic vorticity fields. Together with Trenberth's simplification of the quasigeostrophic omega equation, these two quantities can be then used to estimate the geostrophic vorticity advection by the thermal wind, which is related to the quasigeostrophic vertical velocity in the midtroposphere. Critical to the technique is the observation that geostrophic vorticity fields calculated from the channel 3 temperature features are very similar to those calculated from traditional, 'bottom-up' integrated height fields from radiosonde data. This suggests a lack of cyclone-scale height features near the top of the channel 3 weighting function, making the channel 3 cyclone-scale 'thickness' features approximately the same as height features near the bottom of the weighting function. Thus, the MSU data provide observational validation of the LID (level of insignificant dynamics) assumption of Hirshberg and Fritsch.

  13. Vortex shedding from vertical axis wind turbine blades under linear motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Reeve; McKeon, Beverley

    2014-11-01

    A NACA 0018 airfoil was pitched and surged sinusoidally in in a mean free stream flow at Rec = 100 , 000 to simulate the flow over vertical axis wind turbine (VAWT) blades. Angle of attack variations between α = +/-30° and velocity variation of Umax/-Umin Umean = . 80 at a reduced frequency k =Ωc/2U∞ = . 12 result in strong dynamic stall on the blade. Multiple flow regimes occur during the airfoil motion resulting in vortex shedding over a large range of frequencies. A model of the phase averaged (based on airfoil angle of attack and velocity) flow developed using dynamic mode decomposition highlights the evolution of the leading edge or dynamic stall vortex at the airfoil frequency. Instantaneous results show vortex shedding at frequencies up to 100 times higher than the frequency of the pitch/surge motion and smeared out by the phase averaging process. The implications for forcing on the blade (and associated wind turbine) are described. This research is funded by the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation through Grant GBMF #2645 to the California Institute of Technology.

  14. Evaluation of the added mass for a spheroid-type unmanned underwater vehicle by vertical planar motion mechanism test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Seong-Keon; Joung, Tae-Hwan; Cheon, Se-Jong; Jang, Taek-Soo; Lee, Jeong-Hee

    2011-09-01

    This paper shows added mass and inertia can be acquired from the pure heaving motion and pure pitching motion respectively. A Vertical Planar Motion Mechanism (VPMM) test for the spheroid-type Unmanned Underwater Vehicle (UUV) was compared with a theoretical calculation and Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) analysis in this paper. The VPMM test has been carried out at a towing tank with specially manufactured equipment. The linear equations of motion on the vertical plane were considered for theoretical calculation, and CFD results were obtained by commercial CFD package. The VPMM test results show good agreement with theoretical calculations and the CFD results, so that the applicability of the VPMM equipment for an underwater vehicle can be verified with a sufficient accuracy.

  15. Effect of vertical ground motion on earthquake-induced derailment of railway vehicles over simply-supported bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Zhibin; Pei, Shiling; Li, Xiaozhen; Liu, Hongyan; Qiang, Shizhong

    2016-11-01

    The running safety of railway vehicles on bridges can be negatively affected by earthquake events. This phenomenon has traditionally been investigated with only the lateral ground excitation component considered. This paper presented results from a numerical investigation on the contribution of vertical ground motion component to the derailment of vehicles on simply-supported bridges. A full nonlinear wheel-rail contact model was used in the investigation together with the Hertzian contact theory and nonlinear creepage theory, which allows the wheel to jump vertically and separate from the rail. The wheel-rail relative displacement was used as the criterion for derailment events. A total of 18 ground motion records were used in the analysis to account for the uncertainty of ground motions. The results showed that inclusion of vertical ground motion will likely increase the chance of derailment. It is recommended to include vertical ground motion component in earthquake induced derailment analysis to ensure conservative estimations. The derailment event on bridges was found to be more closely related to the deck acceleration rather than the ground acceleration.

  16. Use of Geomatic Techniques to Evaluate Flooding from the February, 1998 Extreme Storm and Sea Level Rise at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkendall, W. G.; Mills, W. B.; Roy, S.; Costa-Cabral, M.; Milesi, C.

    2013-12-01

    NASA Ames Research Center (ARC), located on the San Francisco Bay, is highly vulnerable to flooding, and to sea level rise (SLR). This fact was driven home in the winter of 1998 when, in combination with a sea level 50 cm higher than the previous neap tide, the February Extreme Storm inundated ARC with over 8 cm of rain in a 24 hour period. In total 26 cm of rain fell during the month of February, with 14 cm during the period of the Extreme Storm from February 3rd to February 9th. The ARC campus and surrounding areas were severely flooded leading to significant damage to the local infrastructure. To assess the potential impact of future storm events to the ARC campus, the February 1998 Extreme Storm was evaluated using several remote sensing and geomatic techniques. Supervised classification and change detection of multispectral Landsat 5 (TM) imagery from January 17 and February 18, 1998 was performed in order to evaluate the extent of flooding after the storm. Both images were recorded at low tide with water levels less than the MLLW value when referenced to the tidal station datum. Significantly more area is classified as water in the February image than in the January image. However, change detection analysis underestimates total flood water coverage due to the lag between the end of the Extreme storm and the available Landsat scene epoch. Ground classification of a publicly available Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) point cloud was performed, and a high resolution 1-m digital elevation model (DEM) of the ARC campus was generated and hydro-flattened to provide a topographic reference for geospatial analysis. Feature extraction of buildings from the LiDAR point cloud was performed to provide a high resolution 3D model of the ARC campus. The LiDAR DEM was incorporated into FEMA's natural hazard risk assessment and loss estimation software package Hazus-MH 2.1 to generate a flood depth grid. This flood depth grid estimates the extent of flooding due to the

  17. GPS monitoring of vertical ground motion in northern Ardenne Eifel: five campaigns (1999 2003) of the HARD project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demoulin, A.; Campbell, J.; Wulf, A. De.; Muls, A.; Arnould, R.; Görres, B.; Fischer, D.; Kötter, T.; Brondeel, M.; Damme, D. Van.; Jacqmotte, J. M.

    2005-09-01

    We present the HARD project of GPS monitoring of vertical ground motion in NE Ardenne and Eifel (western Europe). Its main purposes are to get a better insight into the present-day rates of vertical ground motion in intraplate settings and to identify the various causes of these motions. Since 1999, we have carried out yearly campaigns of simultaneous GPS measurements at 12 sites situated so as to sample the different tectonic subunits of the study area and especially to record potential displacements across the seismogenic Hockai fault zone. Five campaigns (1999 2003) have been processed currently. Key issues of the data processing with the Gamit software are discussed and first results are presented. Though temporally consistent in many cases, the obtained vertical motion rates are spatially highly variable. They are also much too high (several mm/year) to support a tectonic interpretation, and a long-term influence of groundwater level variations is proposed to account for the observed motions. This influence should be distinguished from seasonal variations and from inter-survey variations linked to the varying degree of soil and subsoil drying off during the successive spring surveys.

  18. Determination of horizontal and vertical design spectra based on ground motion records at Lali tunnel, Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moradpouri, F.; Mojarab, M.

    2012-08-01

    Most acceleration diagrams show high levels of unpredictability, as a result, it is the best to avoid using diagrams of earthquake acceleration spectra, even if the diagrams recorded at the site in question. In order to design earthquake resistant structures, we, instead, suggest constructing a design spectrum using a set of spectra that have common characteristics to the recorded acceleration diagrams at a particular site and smoothing the associated data. In this study, we conducted a time history analysis and determined a design spectrum for the region near the Lali tunnel in Southwestern Iran. We selected 13 specific ground motion records from the rock site to construct the design spectrum. To process the data, we first applied a base-line correction and then calculated the signal-to-noise ratio ( R SN) for each record. Next, we calculated the Fourier amplitude spectra of the acceleration pertaining to the signal window (1), and the Fourier amplitude spectra of the associated noise (2). After dividing each spectra by the square root of the selected window interval, they were divided by each other (1 divided by 2), in order to obtain the R SN ratio (filtering was also applied). In addition, all data were normalized to the peak ground acceleration (PGA). Next, the normalized vertical and horizontal responses and mean response spectrum (50%) and the mean plus-one standard deviation (84%) were calculated for all the selected ground motion records at 5% damping. Finally, the mean design spectrum and the mean plus-one standard deviation were plotted for the spectrums. The equation of the mean and the above-mean design spectrum at the Lali tunnel site are also provided, along with our observed conclusions.

  19. Layer-wise attribution of vertical motion and the influence of potential-vorticity anomalies on synoptic development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, M. A. G.; Thorpe, A. J.; Browning, K. A.

    2003-04-01

    A methodology is presented for attributing vertical motion to potential vorticity (PV) in a explicit manner using the quasi-geostrophic omega equation. The methodology is then used to determine the contribution individual PV anomalies make to the synoptic development. It is shown how the total vertical motion may be decomposed into self-generating and interaction terms. The former correspond to vertical motion that arises from one PV region alone, whilst each of the interaction terms represent vertical motion due to the interaction of two different regions of PV. The method is applied to a number of cyclones studied in the Fronts and Atlantic Storm-Tracks Experiment in order to determine the dynamical role of individual PV regions in cyclogenesis. For purposes of comparison, cyclones were chosen to be representative of the types (A, B and C) of an extended Petterssen-Smebye scheme devised by Deveson, Browning and Hewson. In terms of our new PV method, the Type A and B cyclones exhibit only subtle differences, with the upper-level layer of PV playing a larger role in the case of the Type B cyclone. A much larger difference is apparent between the Type A and B cyclones on the one hand, and the Type C cyclone on the other: in the Type C cyclone, the upper-level PV self-generating term plays an important role, whereas in the Type A and B cases the influence of the upper-level PV is largely restricted to the interaction terms. In all of the cases, the vertical motion attributable to the interaction between the low-level PV and boundary thermal gradient was found to be large. Hence, from the viewpoint of instantaneous attribution, we conclude that the low-level PV is always important.

  20. Cenozoic vertical motions in the Moray Firth Basin associated with initiation of the Iceland Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, L. M.; Turner, J.; Jones, S. M.; White, N. J.

    2005-10-01

    It is likely that the Iceland mantle plume generated transient uplift across the North Atlantic region when it initiated in earliest Cenozoic time. However, transient uplift recorded in sedimentary basins fringing the region can be overprinted by the effects of permanent uplift. Identifying and quantifying transient uplift can only be achieved in areas which have a well-constrained stratigraphic record and across which the relative importance of permanent and transient uplift varies (e.g., the Moray Firth Basin, North Sea). By analyzing the subsidence of 50 boreholes from the Moray Firth Basin (MFB), residual vertical motions unrelated to rifting have been isolated. Transient uplift of 180-425 m occurred during Paleocene times. The western MFB has also been affected by permanent Cenozoic uplift, with denudation decreasing from 1.3 ± 0.1 km in the west of the basin to zero denudation east of 1°W. Dynamic support above the Iceland Plume led to transient uplift of the entire MFB in early Paleocene times, peaking in latest Paleocene times. In early Eocene times the effect of the plume waned, and subsidence occurred. Paleocene permanent uplift of the NW British Isles is generally accepted to have been due to magmatic underplating of the crust emplaced during the British Tertiary Igneous Province (61-58.5 Ma). The cause of Neogene uplift events is poorly understood, but it could also be associated with the Iceland Plume.

  1. Revisiting global mean sea level changes from tide gauge records corrected for vertical land motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dangendorf, Sönke; Marcos, Marta

    2016-04-01

    Observational evidence of global/regional mean sea level (GMSL/RMSL) over the 20th century is restricted to a spatially and temporally heterogeneously distributed set of tide gauges along the coast, whose measurements are impacted by vertical land motion (VLM) of the Earth's crust. Here we revisit estimates of 20th century RMSL and GMSL using an area weighting virtual station approach applied to a novel set of VLM corrected tide gauges from six coherently varying oceanic regions. We test our approach in a realistic ocean reanalysis, where the "true" modeled GMSL is a priori known. We find that the performance in reconstructing RMSL and GMSL is strongly influenced by the available tide gauges leading to unavoidable biases in the late 19th and early 20th century. While in regions such as the Pacific Ocean spatially coherent large-scale climate signals, as the Pacific Decadal Oscillation, allow for relatively accurate estimates of the low-frequency variability, in regions such as the South Atlantic the poor availability of tide gauge records hampers sophisticated estimates of RMSL. These uncertainties directly transmit into GMSL estimates. A further bias of roughly 0.2 mm/yr is introduced when not accounting for the area weights of regions for which the virtual stations are representative. However, from ~1920 onwards, the available stations allow us to capture the low frequency variability and trends in GMSL.

  2. Vertical motions in Northern Victoria Land inferred from GPS: A comparison with a glacial isostatic adjustment model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mancini, F.; Negusini, M.; Zanutta, A.; Capra, A.

    2007-01-01

    Following the densification of GPS permanent and episodic trackers in Antarctica, geodetic observations are playing an increasing role in geodynamics research and the study of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA). The improvement in geodetic measurements accuracy suggests their use in constraining GIA models. It is essential to have a deeper knowledge on the sensitivity of GPS data to motionsrelated to long-term ice mass changes and the present-day mass imbalance of the ice sheets. In order to investigate the geodynamic phenomena in Northern Victoria Land (NVL), GPS geodetic observations were made during the last decade within the VLNDEF (Victoria Land Network for Deformation control) project. The processed data provided a picture of the motions occurring in NVL with a high level of accuracy and depicts, for the whole period, a well defined pattern of vertical motion. The comparison between GPS-derived vertical displacementsand GIA is addressed, showing a good degree of agreement and highlighting the future use of geodetic GPS measurements as constraints in GIA models. In spite of this agreement, the sensitivity of GPS vertical rates to non-GIA vertical motions has to be carefully evaluated.

  3. Self-Motion and Depth Estimation from Image Sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John

    1999-01-01

    An image-based version of a computational model of human self-motion perception (developed in collaboration with Dr. Leland S. Stone at NASA Ames Research Center) has been generated and tested. The research included in the grant proposal sought to extend the utility of the self-motion model so that it could be used for explaining and predicting human performance in a greater variety of aerospace applications. The model can now be tested with video input sequences (including computer generated imagery) which enables simulation of human self-motion estimation in a variety of applied settings.

  4. Processing of targets in smooth or apparent motion along the vertical in the human brain: an fMRI study.

    PubMed

    Maffei, Vincenzo; Macaluso, Emiliano; Indovina, Iole; Orban, Guy; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2010-01-01

    Neural substrates for processing constant speed visual motion have been extensively studied. Less is known about the brain activity patterns when the target speed changes continuously, for instance under the influence of gravity. Using functional MRI (fMRI), here we compared brain responses to accelerating/decelerating targets with the responses to constant speed targets. The target could move along the vertical under gravity (1g), under reversed gravity (-1g), or at constant speed (0g). In the first experiment, subjects observed targets moving in smooth motion and responded to a GO signal delivered at a random time after target arrival. As expected, we found that the timing of the motor responses did not depend significantly on the specific motion law. Therefore brain activity in the contrast between different motion laws was not related to motor timing responses. Average BOLD signals were significantly greater for 1g targets than either 0g or -1g targets in a distributed network including bilateral insulae, left lingual gyrus, and brain stem. Moreover, in these regions, the mean activity decreased monotonically from 1g to 0g and to -1g. In the second experiment, subjects intercepted 1g, 0g, and -1g targets either in smooth motion (RM) or in long-range apparent motion (LAM). We found that the sites in the right insula and left lingual gyrus, which were selectively engaged by 1g targets in the first experiment, were also significantly more active during 1g trials than during -1g trials both in RM and LAM. The activity in 0g trials was again intermediate between that in 1g trials and that in -1g trials. Therefore in these regions the global activity modulation with the law of vertical motion appears to hold for both RM and LAM. Instead, a region in the inferior parietal lobule showed a preference for visual gravitational motion only in LAM but not RM. PMID:19889846

  5. Eye movements and motion perception induced by off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) at small angles of tilt after spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clement, G.; Darlot, C.; Petropoulos, A.; Berthoz, A.

    1995-01-01

    The nystagmus and motion perception of two astronauts were recorded during Earth-vertical axis rotation and during off-vertical axis rotation (OVAR) before and after 7 days of spaceflight. Postflight, the peak velocity and duration of per- and postrotatory nystagmus during velocity steps about the Earth-vertical axis were the same as preflight values. During OVAR at constant velocity (45/s, tilt angles successively 5, 10, and 15 degrees), the mean horizontal slow-phase eye velocity (bias), produced by the 'velocity storage mechanism' in the vestibular system, and the peak-to-peak amplitude (modulation) in horizontal eye velocity and position, generated from the output of otolith afferents, were also the same before as after flight. There were, however, changes in the vertical eve position and in the perceived body motion during OVAR. The angle of the perceived body path described as a cone was larger in both astronauts postflight. One astronaut experienced either a large cone angle with its axis upright, or a smaller cone angle with its axis tilted backwards, accompanied by an upward vertical eye drift. These results suggest an increase in the sensitivity of the otolithic system after spaceflight and a longer period of readaptation to Earth's gravity for otolith-induced responses than for canal-induced responses. Our data support the hypothesis that just after spaceflight the CNS generally interprets changes in the otolith signals to be due to translation rather than to tilt.

  6. Modeling Visual, Vestibular and Oculomotor Interactions in Self-Motion Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrone, John

    1997-01-01

    A computational model of human self-motion perception has been developed in collaboration with Dr. Leland S. Stone at NASA Ames Research Center. The research included in the grant proposal sought to extend the utility of this model so that it could be used for explaining and predicting human performance in a greater variety of aerospace applications. This extension has been achieved along with physiological validation of the basic operation of the model.

  7. Assessing the impact of vertical land motion on twentieth century global mean sea level estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamlington, B. D.; Thompson, P.; Hammond, W. C.; Blewitt, G.; Ray, R. D.

    2016-07-01

    Near-global and continuous measurements from satellite altimetry have provided accurate estimates of global mean sea level in the past two decades. Extending these estimates further into the past is a challenge using the historical tide gauge records. Not only is sampling nonuniform in both space and time, but tide gauges are also affected by vertical land motion (VLM) that creates a relative sea level change not representative of ocean variability. To allow for comparisons to the satellite altimetry estimated global mean sea level (GMSL), typically the tide gauges are corrected using glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) models. This approach, however, does not correct other sources of VLM that remain in the tide gauge record. Here we compare Global Positioning System (GPS) VLM estimates at the tide gauge locations to VLM estimates from GIA models, and assess the influence of non-GIA-related VLM on GMSL estimates. We find that the tide gauges, on average, are experiencing positive VLM (i.e., uplift) after removing the known effect of GIA, resulting in an increase of 0.24 ± 0.08 mm yr-1 in GMSL trend estimates from 1900 to present when using GPS-based corrections. While this result is likely dependent on the subset of tide gauges used and the actual corrections used, it does suggest that non-GIA VLM plays a significant role in twentieth century estimates of GMSL. Given the relatively short GPS records used to obtain these VLM estimates, we also estimate the uncertainty in the GMSL trend that results from limited knowledge of non-GIA-related VLM.

  8. Benchmarking the completely renormalised equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approaches for vertical excitation energies

    SciTech Connect

    Piecuch, Piotr; Hansen, Jared A.; Ajala, Adeayo O.

    2015-09-15

    When vertical energies are excited for a comprehensive test set of about 150 singlet excited states of 28 medium-sized organic molecules computed using two variants of the completely renormalised (CR) equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster (CC) method with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples, abbreviated as δ-CR-EOMCCSD(T), and the analogous two variants of the newer, left-eigenstate δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3) approach are benchmarked against the previously published CASPT2, CC3, and EOMCCSDT-3 results, as well as the suggested theoretical best estimate (TBE) values. The δ-CR-EOMCC approaches are also used to identify and characterise about 50 additional excited states, including several states having substantial two-electron excitation components, which have not been found in the previous work and which can be used in future benchmark studies. We demonstrated that the non-iterative triples corrections to the EOMCCSD excitation energies defining the relatively inexpensive, single-reference, black-box δ-CR-EOMCC approaches provide significant improvements in the EOMCCSD data, while closely matching the results of the iterative and considerably more expensive CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations and their CASPT2 and TBE counterparts. It is also shown that the δ-CR-EOMCC methods, especially δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3), are capable of bringing the results of the CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations to a closer agreement with the CASPT2 and TBE data, demonstrating the utility of the cost-effective δ-CR-EOMCC methods in applications involving molecular electronic spectra. Finally, we show that there may exist a relationship between the magnitude of the triples corrections defining δ-CR-EOMCC approaches and the reduced excitation level diagnostic resulting from EOMCCSD.

  9. Benchmarking the completely renormalised equation-of-motion coupled-cluster approaches for vertical excitation energies

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Piecuch, Piotr; Hansen, Jared A.; Ajala, Adeayo O.

    2015-09-15

    When vertical energies are excited for a comprehensive test set of about 150 singlet excited states of 28 medium-sized organic molecules computed using two variants of the completely renormalised (CR) equation-of-motion (EOM) coupled-cluster (CC) method with singles, doubles, and non-iterative triples, abbreviated as δ-CR-EOMCCSD(T), and the analogous two variants of the newer, left-eigenstate δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3) approach are benchmarked against the previously published CASPT2, CC3, and EOMCCSDT-3 results, as well as the suggested theoretical best estimate (TBE) values. The δ-CR-EOMCC approaches are also used to identify and characterise about 50 additional excited states, including several states having substantial two-electron excitation components, whichmore » have not been found in the previous work and which can be used in future benchmark studies. We demonstrated that the non-iterative triples corrections to the EOMCCSD excitation energies defining the relatively inexpensive, single-reference, black-box δ-CR-EOMCC approaches provide significant improvements in the EOMCCSD data, while closely matching the results of the iterative and considerably more expensive CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations and their CASPT2 and TBE counterparts. It is also shown that the δ-CR-EOMCC methods, especially δ-CR-EOMCC(2,3), are capable of bringing the results of the CC3 and EOMCCSDT-3 calculations to a closer agreement with the CASPT2 and TBE data, demonstrating the utility of the cost-effective δ-CR-EOMCC methods in applications involving molecular electronic spectra. Finally, we show that there may exist a relationship between the magnitude of the triples corrections defining δ-CR-EOMCC approaches and the reduced excitation level diagnostic resulting from EOMCCSD.« less

  10. Flight effects on noise generated by the JT8D-17 engine in a quiet nacelle and a conventional nacelle as measured in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strout, F. G.

    1976-01-01

    A JT8D-17 turbofan engine was tested in the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to determine flight effects on jet and fan noise. Baseline, quiet nacelle with 20-lobe ejector/suppressor, and internal mixer configurations were tested over a range of engine power settings and tunnel velocities. Flight effects derived from the 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel test are compared with 727/JT8D flight test data and with model data obtained in a smaller wind tunnel. Procedures are defined for measuring noise data in a wind tunnel relatively near the sources and analyzing the results to obtain far-field flight effects. Wind tunnel and 727 flight test noise results compare favorably for both the baseline and quiet nacelle configurations. Two reports are provided, including a comprehensive version with extensive test results and analysis and the subject summary version that emphasizes data analysis and program finding.

  11. Comparison of acoustic data from a 102 mm conic nozzle as measured in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Mckie, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cooperative program between the Royal Aircraft Establishment (RAE), England, and the NASA Ames Research Center was initiated to compare acoustic measurements made in the RAE 24-foot wind tunnel and in the Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel. The acoustic measurements were made in both facilities using the same 102 mm conical nozzle supplied by the RAE. The nozzle was tested by each organization using its respective jet test rig. The mounting hardware and nozzle exit conditions were matched as closely as possible. The data from each wind tunnel were independently analyzed by the respective organization. The results from these tests show good agreement. In both facilities, interference with acoustic measurement is evident at angles in the forward quadrant.

  12. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    PubMed Central

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-01-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002–2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world’s first climate change “refugees.” We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future. PMID:21795605

  13. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C.; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002-2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world's first climate change "refugees." We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future.

  14. Influence of vertical motions on maintaining the nitrate balance in the Black Sea based on numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubryakova, E. A.; Korotaev, G. K.

    2016-01-01

    The upwelling of deep water associated with the influence of cyclonic wind curl and the difference in the buoyancy of the inflows in the lower and upper water layers is observed in the central part of the Black Sea. The resulting vertical water motions contribute to the transport of ammonium to the upper boundary of the anaerobic zone. In the suboxic zone, ammonium is converted to nitrate via nitrite as a result of the nitrification, and thus it can supply the nitrocline in the water basin. Within the framework of this paper we discuss the effectiveness of this mechanism on the basis of the numerical simulation. The calculations were performed using a one-dimensional physical-biogeochemical model for the upper 600-m sea water layer, which takes into account seasonal variations in atmospheric parameters and vertical motions. The model describes the biological and redox processes in the suboxic zone. We have estimated the contribution of different constituents into the balance of nitrogen compounds in the euphotic water layer. It is shown that ammonium nitrogen coming from the deep water due to vertical water motion plays a significant role in maintaining the balance of nitrates in the central part of the Black Sea.

  15. Comparing the role of absolute sea-level rise and vertical tectonic motions in coastal flooding, Torres Islands (Vanuatu).

    PubMed

    Ballu, Valérie; Bouin, Marie-Noëlle; Siméoni, Patricia; Crawford, Wayne C; Calmant, Stephane; Boré, Jean-Michel; Kanas, Tony; Pelletier, Bernard

    2011-08-01

    Since the late 1990s, rising sea levels around the Torres Islands (north Vanuatu, southwest Pacific) have caused strong local and international concern. In 2002-2004, a village was displaced due to increasing sea incursions, and in 2005 a United Nations Environment Programme press release referred to the displaced village as perhaps the world's first climate change "refugees." We show here that vertical motions of the Torres Islands themselves dominate the apparent sea-level rise observed on the islands. From 1997 to 2009, the absolute sea level rose by 150 + /-20 mm. But GPS data reveal that the islands subsided by 117 + /-30 mm over the same time period, almost doubling the apparent gradual sea-level rise. Moreover, large earthquakes that occurred just before and after this period caused several hundreds of mm of sudden vertical motion, generating larger apparent sea-level changes than those observed during the entire intervening period. Our results show that vertical ground motions must be accounted for when evaluating sea-level change hazards in active tectonic regions. These data are needed to help communities and governments understand environmental changes and make the best decisions for their future.

  16. Cenozoic vertical motions of the western continental margin of Peninsular India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Fred; Hoggard, Mark; White, Nicky

    2016-04-01

    flexural wavelengths; considerably shorter than required for a purely flexural driving mechanism. Instead, the ˜1 km amplitude, ˜2000 km wavelength and long-timescale (˜25 Ma) growth of the western Indian margin topographic anomaly are diagnostic of dynamic topography. This implication is confirmed by the excellent spatial correlation between upper mantle shear wave anomalies and residual depth measurements. The western Indian margin is one of several elevated passive margins that abut regions of anomalously elevated ocean floor, suggesting that mantle-derived vertical motions may be the major control on modern-day margin topography.

  17. A Numerical Study of Hurricane Erin (2001). Part II; Shear and the Organization of Eyewall Vertical Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Braun, Scott A.; Wu, Liguang

    2006-01-01

    A high-resolution numerical simulation of Hurricane Erin (2001) is used to examine the organization of vertical motion in the eyewall and how that organization responds to a large and rapid increase in the environmental vertical wind shear and subsequent decrease in shear. During the early intensification period, prior to the onset of significant shear, the upward motion in the eyewall was concentrated in small-scale convective updrafts that formed in association with regions of concentrated vorticity (herein termed mesovortices) with no preferred formation region in the eyewall. Asymmetric flow within the eye was weak. As the shear increased, an azimuthal wavenumber 1 asymmetry in storm structure developed with updrafts tending to form on the downshear to downshear-left side of the eyewall. Continued intensification of the shear led to increasing wavenumber 1 asymmetry, large vortex tilt, and a change in eyewall structure and vertical motion organization. During this time, the eyewall structure was dominated by a vortex couplet with a cyclonic (anticyclonic) vortex on the downtilt-left (downtilt-right) side of the eyewall and strong asymmetric flow across the eye that led to strong mixing of eyewall vorticity into the eye. Upward motion was concentrated over an azimuthally broader region on the downtilt side of the eyewall, upstream of the cyclonic vortex, where low-level environmental inflow converged with the asymmetric outflow from the eye. As the shear diminished, the vortex tilt and wavenumber 1 asymmetry decreased, while the organization of updrafts trended back toward that seen during the weak shear period.

  18. Approximate Formula for the Vertical Asymptote of Projectile Motion in Midair

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chudinov, Peter Sergey

    2010-01-01

    The classic problem of the motion of a point mass (projectile) thrown at an angle to the horizon is reviewed. The air drag force is taken into account with the drag factor assumed to be constant. An analytical approach is used for the investigation. An approximate formula is obtained for one of the characteristics of the motion--the vertical…

  19. Study of the Motion of a Vertically Falling Sphere in a Viscous Fluid

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, A. A.; Caramelo, L.; Andrade, M. A. P. M.

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims at contributing to a better understanding of the motion of spherical particles in viscous fluids. The classical problem of spheres falling through viscous fluids for small Reynolds numbers was solved taking into account the effects of added mass. The analytical solution for the motion of a falling sphere, from the beginning to the…

  20. Vertical GPS ground motion rates in the Euro-Mediterranean region: new evidence of vertical velocity gradients at different spatial scales along the Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serpelloni, E.; Faccenna, C.; Spada, G.; Dong, D.; Williams, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    We use 2.5 to 14 years long position time-series from ~1000 continuous GPS stations to study vertical ground motions in the Euro-Mediterranean region and provide a first synoptic view of the vertical velocity field along the broad Nubia-Eurasia plate boundary. By estimating and removing common mode errors in position time-series from the results of a principal component analysis, we obtain a significant gain in the signal-to-noise ratio of the displacements data. Following the results of a maximum likelihood estimation analysis, which gives a mean spectral index ~-0.7, we adopt a power-law + white noise stochastic model in estimating the final vertical rates, and find 95% of the velocities within ×2 mm/yr in the study area, with uncertainties from filtered time-series ~40% smaller than from the unfiltered ones. We evaluate the contribute of the glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) signal to the vertical velocity budget using two different global models, characterized by distinct rheological layering of the Earth's mantle and different descriptions of the time-history of the mass of continental ice sheets since the Last Glacial Maximum. The analysis carried out allows us to highlight, for the first time, the presence of statistically significant, and spatially coherent, velocity gradients where a higher density of stations is available. We find undulations of the vertical velocity field occurring at different spatial scales both in regions characterized by tectonic activity, like eastern Alps, Apennines and eastern Mediterranean, and regions characterized by low to null tectonic activity, like central Iberia and western Alps. Correcting the observed velocities for GIA, although the two models used predict different GIA velocities and patterns, doesn't change significantly the velocity gradients. A correlation between smooth vertical velocities and topographic features is apparent in many sectors of the study area. GIA and weathering processes cannot completely

  1. Vertical Motions of the Hawaiian Islands during the last 400 ka and their Implications for Plate-Plume Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Watts, A. B.

    2001-12-01

    Radiometric dating on drowned coral reefs and sub-aerial lavas including those from the Hilo scientific drilling hole [e.g., Lipman and Moore, 1996] indicates that Hawaii has subsided for ~1.2 km in the last 450 ka. Studies by Grigg and Jones [1997] of elevated coral deposits on Lanai and Molokai, which are located ~250 km from Hawaii, indicate up to ~60-80 meters uplift in the last 300 ka for these islands. Similar studies show that Oahu which is ~340 km from Hawaii has experienced smaller amount of uplift during approximately the same period. The observed patterns of vertical motions have been attributed to the flexural effects of loading of Hawaii on an elastic plate overlying an inviscid substratum. Such a model, however, is time-invariant and does not take into account any changes that may occur in the subsidence and uplift history during loading. We have therefore formulated a viscoelastic model to investigate the vertical motion induced by the loading of Hawaii. The viscosity structure is determined from thermal age and a Newtonian flow law with activation energy 120 KJ/mol and reference viscosity 1020 Pa s [Watts and Zhong, 2000]. A feature of the model is that at the time-scales appropriate to loading at Hawaii a significant portion of the lithosphere with viscosity greater than 1022 Pa s may still support stresses, which results in a larger apparent elastic thickness than has been deduced from flexural loading studies. Our studies show that while a viscoelastic model with a variable loading history can explain the subsidence at Hawaii, it fails to account for the uplift that is observed at Lanai and Molokai. One possibility is that these islands have been influenced by dynamic uplift due to an ascending plume beneath Hawaii. Our 3-D convection calculations show that the 10 cm/year motion of the Pacific plate causes the topography induced by a plume to peak "downstream" of Hawaii in the region of Lanai and Molokai. The vertical motion of the Hawaiian

  2. Atmospheric Test Models and Numerical Experiments for the Simulation of the Global Distribution of Weather Data Transponders II. Vertical Transponder Motion Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, A.; Errico, R.M.

    1999-11-29

    The vertical motion of constant density atmospheric balloons has been considered via an equation of motion for the vertical displacement of a balloon, due to vertical air motion, which can be numerically solved for balloon positions. Initial calculations are made for a constant density atmosphere. Various vertical wind models with relatively large amplitudes are applied to the model to determine how tightly the balloons are coupled to the reference level and the time scale for the balloons to change to the wind driven reference altitude. A surface launch of a balloon to a 6 km reference altitude is modeled using a detailed atmospheric pressure-density-temperature profile in the equation of motion. The results show the balloons to be relatively tightly coupled ({approx} 50-100 m) to the reference altitude.

  3. Vertical Motions of the Hawaiian Islands during the last 400 ka and their Implications for Plate-Plume Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S. J.; Watts, A. B.

    2001-11-01

    Radiometric dating on drowned coral reefs and sub-aerial lavas indicates that Hawaii has subsided for ~1.2 km in the last 450 ka. Studies of elevated coral deposits on Lanai and Molokai, which are located ~250 km from Hawaii, indicate ~60-80 meters uplift in the last 300 ka for these islands. These observations have been attributed to the flexural effects of loading of Hawaii. We have formulated a viscoelastic model to investigate the vertical motion induced by the loading of Hawaii. The viscosity structure is determined from thermal age and a Newtonian flow law with activation energy 120 KJ/mol and reference viscosity 10^20 Pa s [Watts and Zhong, 2000]. Our studies show that while a viscoelastic model can explain the subsidence at Hawaii, it fails to account for the uplift at Lanai and Molokai. One possibility is that these islands have been influenced by dynamic uplift due to an ascending plume beneath Hawaii. Our 3-D convection calculations show that the 10 cm/year motion of the Pacific plate causes the topography induced by a plume to peak "downstream" of Hawaii in the region of Lanai and Molokai. The vertical motion of the Hawaiian islands is, therefore, a consequence of the interaction between load-induced deformation and mantle dynamics.

  4. The key role of vertical land motions in coastal sea level variations: A global synthesis of multisatellite altimetry, tide gauge data and GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Julia; Allemand, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    This study aims to quantify the vertical motions driving the decadal coastline mobility and their uncertainty at global scale. Multisatellite altimetry is combined with tide gauges and Global Positioning System (GPS) observations to evaluate the marine and crustal components of relative sea level variations. Vertical land motions and sea level variations are estimated simultaneously over the past 20 years for a network of 886 ground stations, with accuracies better than 1.7 mm/yr. The ALTIGAPS database present significant interest both by its technical characteristics (global coverage, larger number of sites, longer period of observation, improved accuracy) and by the novelty of the applications empowered. ALTIGAPS offers the opportunity to look independently into the recent dynamic processes affecting the ocean and the interior of the Earth. Here, the role of vertical land motions in relative sea level variations is explored to better understand the natural hazards associated with sea level rise in coastal areas. Global evidence for the local variability in vertical land motions is provided, which may either amplify or attenuate the apparent rise of the sea at the coast. A set of 182 potential vulnerable localities are identified by large coastal subsidence (>1.5 mm/yr) which increases by several times the effects of climate-induced sea level rise. For coastal management purposes, both marine (absolute sea level variations) and crustal (vertical land motions) components of vertical coastal motions (relative sea level variations) should therefore be accounted for.

  5. An experimental study of gas-liquid slug flow in vertical and inclined tubes using high speed motion analyzer

    SciTech Connect

    Xia, G.; Zhou, F.; Hu, M.

    1996-12-31

    Experimental investigation was carried out for gas-liquid slug flow in vertical and inclined tubes. The non-invasive measurements of the gas-liquid slug flow were taken by using the EKTAPRO 1000 High Speed Motion Analyzer. The present paper has obtained the information on the velocity of the Taylor bubble, the size distribution of the dispersed bubbles in the liquid slugs and some characteristics of the liquid film around the Taylor bubble. The experimental results are in good agreement with the available data.

  6. Rolling Motion of a Ball Spinning About a Near-Vertical Axis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2012-01-01

    A ball that is projected forward without spin on a horizontal surface will slide for a short distance before it starts rolling. Sliding friction acts to decrease the translation speed v and it acts to increase the rotation speed ω. When v = Rω, where R is the ball radius, the ball will start rolling and the friction force drops almost to zero since the contact point at the bottom of the ball comes to rest on the surface. The coefficient of rolling friction is much smaller than that for sliding friction. A different situation arises if the ball is projected forward while it is spinning about a vertical or near vertical axis. The latter situation arises in many ball sports. It arises if a player attempts to curve a ball down a bowling alley, or when a billiards player imparts sidespin or "English" to a ball,2 and it can arise in golf if a player strikes a ball with a putter at a point well away from the middle of the putter head. The situation also arises in the game of curling,3 although in that case the object that is projected is a cylindrical rock rather than a spherical ball, and it arises in tennis when a ball lands on the court spinning about a near vertical axis, as it does in both a slice serve and a kick serve. In a slice serve, the axis is almost vertical. In a kick serve, the axis is tilted about 30 degrees away from the vertical in order to increase the amount of topspin.4

  7. Sea level differences between Topex/Poseidon altimetry and tide gauges: observed trends and vertical land motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lombard, A.; Dominh, K.; Cazenave, A.; Calmant, S.; Cretaux, J.

    2002-12-01

    Nine year-long (1993-2001) sea level difference time series have been constructed by comparing sea level recorded by tide gauges and Topex/Poseidon altimetry. Although the primary goal of such an analysis is to define a sub network of good quality tide gauges for calibration of satellite altimetry systems, in particular Jason-1. The difference time series displaying large positive or negative trends may give evidence of vertical land motion at the tide gauge site. We have analyzed 98 tide gauge records from the UHSLC. Among them, 42 sites mainly located on open ocean islands, give very good agreement (better than 2 mm/year) with Topex/Poseidon-derived sea level trends. 22 other sites, mainly located along the continental coastlines of the Pacific Ocean, present sea level trends differing by more than 5 mm/year with Topex/Poseidon. Many of these sites are located in active tectonic areas (either in the vicinity of subduction zones or in active volcanic areas), where vertical land motions (either transient or long-term) are expected. For example, this is the case at Kushimoto, Ofunato, Kushiro (Japan), Kodiak Island and Yakutat (Alaska), La Libertad, Callao, Caldera (western south America), and Rabaul (western Pacific). When possible, we compare these observed trends in sea level differences with GPS and/or DORIS observations.

  8. Anticipating the effects of visual gravity during simulated self-motion: estimates of time-to-passage along vertical and horizontal paths.

    PubMed

    Indovina, Iole; Maffei, Vincenzo; Lacquaniti, Francesco

    2013-09-01

    By simulating self-motion on a virtual rollercoaster, we investigated whether acceleration cued by the optic flow affected the estimate of time-to-passage (TTP) to a target. In particular, we studied the role of a visual acceleration (1 g = 9.8 m/s(2)) simulating the effects of gravity in the scene, by manipulating motion law (accelerated or decelerated at 1 g, constant speed) and motion orientation (vertical, horizontal). Thus, 1-g-accelerated motion in the downward direction or decelerated motion in the upward direction was congruent with the effects of visual gravity. We found that acceleration (positive or negative) is taken into account but is overestimated in module in the calculation of TTP, independently of orientation. In addition, participants signaled TTP earlier when the rollercoaster accelerated downward at 1 g (as during free fall), with respect to when the same acceleration occurred along the horizontal orientation. This time shift indicates an influence of the orientation relative to visual gravity on response timing that could be attributed to the anticipation of the effects of visual gravity on self-motion along the vertical, but not the horizontal orientation. Finally, precision in TTP estimates was higher during vertical fall than when traveling at constant speed along the vertical orientation, consistent with a higher noise in TTP estimates when the motion violates gravity constraints.

  9. Flight effects on noise by the JT8D engine with inverted primary/fan flow as measured in the NASA-Ames 40 by 80 foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strout, F. G.

    1978-01-01

    A JT8D-17R engine with inverted primary and fan flows was tested under static conditions as well as in the NASA Ames 40 by 80 Foot Wind Tunnel to determine static and flight noise characteristics, and flow profile of a large scale engine. Test and analysis techniques developed by a previous model and JT8D engine test program were used to determine the in-flight noise. The engine with inverted flow was tested with a conical nozzle and with a plug nozzle, 20 lobe nozzle, and an acoustic shield. Wind tunnel results show that forward velocity causes significant reduction in peak PNL suppression relative to uninverted flow. The loss of EPNL suppression is relatively modest. The in-flight peak PNL suppression of the inverter with conical nozzle was 2.5 PNdb relative to a static value of 5.5 PNdb. The corresponding EPNL suppression was 4.0 EPNdb for flight and 5.0 EPNdb for static operation. The highest in-flight EPNL suppression was 7.5 EPNdb obtained by the inverter with 20 lobe nozzle and acoustic shield. When compared with the JT8D engine with internal mixer, the inverted flow configuration provides more EPNL suppression under both static and flight conditions.

  10. Wind tunnel tests of the 0.010-scale space shuttle integrated vehicle (model 52-QT) in the NASA/Ames 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (IA18)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esparza, V.; Chee, E.; Stone, J.; Mellenthin, J. A.

    1975-01-01

    Experimental aerodynamic investigations were conducted in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel on an 0.010-scale model of the space shuttle integrated vehicle consisting of an orbiter and external tank. The basic hypersonic stability characteristics of the orbiter attached rigidly to the external tank and the basic hypersonic stability characteristics of external tank alone simulating RTLS abort conditions were evaluated. The integrated vehicle was tested at angles of attack from- 8 deg through +30 deg and angles of sideslip of- 8 deg through +8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg, and +4 deg. A maximum angle of attack range of +15 deg through +40 deg was obtained for this configuration, at Mach number 7.3, for one run only. External tank alone testing was conducted at angles of attack from +8 deg through -30 deg and angles of sideslip of -8 deg at fixed angles of attack of -4 deg, 0 deg and +4 deg. Six-component force data and static base pressures were recorded during the test.

  11. Transient motion of a confined stratified fluid induced simultaneously by sidewall thermal loading and vertical throughflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jun Sang; Hyun, Jae Min

    2002-01-01

    An analytical study is made of the transient adjustment process of an initially stationary, stably stratified fluid in a square container. The boundary walls are highly conducting. The overall Rayleigh number Ra is large. Flow is initiated by the simultaneous switch-on of a temperature increase ([delta]T) at the vertical wall and a forced vertical throughflow (Ra[minus sign]1/4[delta]w) at the horizontal walls. The principal characteristics are found by employing the matched asymptotic expansion method. The flow field is divided into the inviscid interior, vertical boundary layers and horizontal boundary layers and analyses are conducted for each region. The horizontal boundary layers are shown to be of double-layered structure, and explicit solutions are secured for these layers. Evolutionary patterns of velocity and temperature in the whole flow domain are illustrated. Both opposing ([delta]w/[delta]T > 0) and cooperating ([delta]w/[delta]T < 0) configurations are considered. The flow character in the opposing configuration can be classified into (a) a forced-convection dominant mode ([delta]w/[delta]T > 1/ [surd radical]2), (b) a buoyancy-convection-dominant mode (0 < [delta]w/[delta]T < 1/[surd radical]2), and (c) a static mode ([delta]w/[delta]T [approximate] 1/[surd radical]2). Global evolutionary processes are depicted, and physical rationalizations are provided.

  12. Results of a jet plume effects test on Rockwell International integrated space shuttle vehicle using a vehicle 5 configuration 0.02-scale model (88-OTS) in the 11 by 11 foot leg of the NASA/Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (IA19), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1975-01-01

    Results are presented of jet plume effects test IA19 using a vehicle 5 configuration integrated space shuttle vehicle 0.02-scale model in the NASA/Ames Research Center 11 x 11-foot leg of the unitary plan wind tunnel. The jet plume power effects on the integrated vehicle static pressure distribution were determined along with elevon, main propulsion system nozzle, and solid rocket booster nozzle effectiveness and elevon hinge moments.

  13. Theoretical calculations of the pressure, forces, and moments at supersonic speeds due to various lateral motions acting on thin isolated vertical tails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Bobbitt, Percy J

    1956-01-01

    Velocity potentials, pressure, distributions, and stability derivatives are derived by use of supersonic linearized theory for families of thin isolated vertical tails performing steady rolling, steady yawing, and constant-lateral-acceleration motions. Vertical-tail families (half-delta and rectangular plan forms) are considered for a broad Mach number range. Also considered are the vertical tail with arbitrary sweepback and taper ratio at Mach numbers for which both the leading edge and trailing edge of the tail are supersonic and the triangular vertical tail with a subsonic leading edge and a supersonic trailing edge. Expressions for potentials, pressures, and stability derivatives are tabulated.

  14. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Lebedev, V. A.; Bogacz, S. A.

    2010-10-21

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterezations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is descrabed by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances.more » In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. In addition, considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev’s vertex-to-plane adapter.« less

  15. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V. A.; Bogacz, S. A.

    2010-10-21

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterezations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is descrabed by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances. In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. In addition, considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev’s vertex-to-plane adapter.

  16. Betatron motion with coupling of horizontal and vertical degrees of freedom

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedev, V.A.; Bogacz, S.A.; /Jefferson Lab

    2010-09-01

    Presently, there are two most frequently used parameterizations of linear x-y coupled motion used in the accelerator physics. They are the Edwards-Teng and Mais-Ripken parameterizations. The article is devoted to an analysis of close relationship between the two representations, thus adding a clarity to their physical meaning. It also discusses the relationship between the eigen-vectors, the beta-functions, second order moments and the bilinear form representing the particle ellipsoid in the 4D phase space. Then, it consideres a further development of Mais-Ripken parameteresation where the particle motion is described by 10 parameters: four beta-functions, four alpha-functions and two betatron phase advances. In comparison with Edwards-Teng parameterization the chosen parametrization has an advantage that it works equally well for analysis of coupled betatron motion in circular accelerators and in transfer lines. Considered relationship between second order moments, eigen-vectors and beta-functions can be useful in interpreting tracking results and experimental data. As an example, the developed formalizm is applied to the FNAL electron cooler and Derbenev's vertex-to-plane adapter.

  17. THE VERTICAL MOTIONS OF MONO-ABUNDANCE SUB-POPULATIONS IN THE MILKY WAY DISK

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Rix, Hans-Walter; Hogg, David W.; Zhang, Lan; Beers, Timothy C.; Lee, Young Sun

    2012-08-20

    We present the vertical kinematics of stars in the Milky Way's stellar disk inferred from Sloan Digital Sky Survey/Sloan Extension for Galactic Understanding and Exploration (SDSS/SEGUE) G-dwarf data, deriving the vertical velocity dispersion, {sigma}{sub z}, as a function of vertical height |z| and Galactocentric radius R for a set of 'mono-abundance' sub-populations of stars with very similar elemental abundances [{alpha}/Fe] and [Fe/H]. We find that all mono-abundance components exhibit nearly isothermal kinematics in |z|, and a slow outward decrease of the vertical velocity dispersion: {sigma}{sub z}(z, R | [{alpha}/Fe], [Fe/H]) Almost-Equal-To {sigma}{sub z}([{alpha}/Fe], [Fe/H]) Multiplication-Sign exp (- (R - R{sub 0})/7 kpc). The characteristic velocity dispersions of these components vary from {approx}15 km s{sup -1} for chemically young, metal-rich stars with solar [{alpha}/Fe], to {approx}> 50 km s{sup -1} for metal-poor stars that are strongly [{alpha}/Fe]-enhanced, and hence presumably very old. The mean {sigma}{sub z} gradient (d{sigma}{sub z}/dz) away from the mid-plane is only 0.3 {+-} 0.2 km s{sup -1} kpc{sup -1}. This kinematic simplicity of the mono-abundance components mirrors their geometric simplicity; we have recently found their density distribution to be simple exponentials in both the z- and R-directions. We find a continuum of vertical kinetic temperatures ({proportional_to}{sigma}{sup 2}{sub z}) as a function of ([{alpha}/Fe], [Fe/H]), which contribute to the total stellar surface-mass density approximately as {Sigma}{sub R{sub 0}}({sigma}{sup 2}{sub z}){proportional_to} exp(-{sigma}{sup 2}{sub z}). This and the existence of isothermal mono-abundance populations with intermediate dispersions (30-40 km s{sup -1}) reject the notion of a thin-thick-disk dichotomy. This continuum of disk components, ranging from old, 'hot', and centrally concentrated ones to younger, cooler, and radially extended ones, argues against models where the thicker

  18. Contribution of vertical land motions to coastal sea level variations: a global synthesis of multisatellite altimetry, tide gauge and GPS measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfeffer, Julia; Allemand, Pascal

    2016-04-01

    Coastal sea level variations result from a complex mix of climatic, oceanic and geodynamical processes driven by natural and anthropogenic constraints. Combining data from multiple sources is one solution to identify particular processes and progress towards a better understanding of the sea level variations and the assessment of their impacts at coast. Here, we present a global database merging multisatellite altimetry with tide gauges and Global Positioning System (GPS) measurements. Vertical land motions and sea level variations are estimated simultaneously for a network of 886 ground stations with median errors lower than 1 mm/yr. The contribution of vertical land motions to relative sea level variations is explored to better understand the natural hazards associated with sea level rise in coastal areas. Worldwide, vertical land motions dominate 30 % of observed coastal trends. The role of the crust is highly heterogeneous: it can amplify, restrict or counter the effects of climate-induced sea level change. A set of 182 potential vulnerable localities are identified by large coastal subsidence which increases by several times the effects of sea level rise. Though regional behaviours exist, principally caused by GIA (Glacial Isostatic Adjustment), the local variability in vertical land motion prevails. An accurate determination of the vertical motions observed at the coast is fundamental to understand the local processes which contribute to sea level rise, to appraise its impacts on coastal populations and make future predictions.

  19. Modeling direction discrimination thresholds for yaw rotations around an earth-vertical axis for arbitrary motion profiles.

    PubMed

    Soyka, Florian; Giordano, Paolo Robuffo; Barnett-Cowan, Michael; Bülthoff, Heinrich H

    2012-07-01

    Understanding the dynamics of vestibular perception is important, for example, for improving the realism of motion simulation and virtual reality environments or for diagnosing patients suffering from vestibular problems. Previous research has found a dependence of direction discrimination thresholds for rotational motions on the period length (inverse frequency) of a transient (single cycle) sinusoidal acceleration stimulus. However, self-motion is seldom purely sinusoidal, and up to now, no models have been proposed that take into account non-sinusoidal stimuli for rotational motions. In this work, the influence of both the period length and the specific time course of an inertial stimulus is investigated. Thresholds for three acceleration profile shapes (triangular, sinusoidal, and trapezoidal) were measured for three period lengths (0.3, 1.4, and 6.7 s) in ten participants. A two-alternative forced-choice discrimination task was used where participants had to judge if a yaw rotation around an earth-vertical axis was leftward or rightward. The peak velocity of the stimulus was varied, and the threshold was defined as the stimulus yielding 75 % correct answers. In accordance with previous research, thresholds decreased with shortening period length (from ~2 deg/s for 6.7 s to ~0.8 deg/s for 0.3 s). The peak velocity was the determining factor for discrimination: Different profiles with the same period length have similar velocity thresholds. These measurements were used to fit a novel model based on a description of the firing rate of semi-circular canal neurons. In accordance with previous research, the estimates of the model parameters suggest that velocity storage does not influence perceptual thresholds.

  20. Vertical motions of the Puerto Rico Trench and Puerto Rico and their cause

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ten Brink, U.

    2005-01-01

    The Puerto Rico trench exhibits great water depth, an extremely low gravity anomaly, and a tilted carbonate platform between (reconstructed) elevations of +1300 m and -4000 m. I argue that these features are manifestations of large vertical movements of a segment of the Puerto Rico trench, its forearc, and the island of Puerto Rico that took place 3.3 m.y. ago over a time period as short as 14-40 kyr. I explain these vertical movements by a sudden increase in the slab's descent angle that caused the trench to subside and the island to rise. The increased dip could have been caused by shearing or even by a complete tear of the descending North American slab, although the exact nature of this deformation is unknown. The rapid (14-40 kyr) and uniform tilt along a 250 km long section of the trench is compatible with scales of mantle flow and plate bending. The proposed shear zone or tear is inferred from seismic, morphological, and gravity observations to start at the trench at 64.5??W and trend southwestwardly toward eastern Puerto Rico. The tensile stresses necessary to deform or tear the slab could have been generated by increased curvature of the trench following a counterclockwise rotation of the upper plate and by the subduction of a large seamount.

  1. Ageostrophic winds and vertical motion fields accompanying upper level jet streak propagation during the Red River Valley tornado outbreak

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, J. T.; Squires, M. F.

    1982-01-01

    Preliminary results are shown relating the ageostrophic wind field, through the terms of a semigeostrophic wind equation (assuming adiabatic conditions and the geostrophic momentum approximation) to both air parcel trajectories and their vertical motion fields computed from the parcels' displacement on isentropic surfaces, with respect to pressure. The analysis of results considers both upper-level (324 K) ageostrophic fields and low-level (304 K) fields. Preliminary results tend to support Uccellini and Johnson's (1979) hypothesis concerning upper-level-jet/low-level-jet (ULJ/LLJ) coupling in the exit region of the ULJ. Future plans are described briefly for research intended to clarify the mechanism behind ULJ streak propagation, LLJ development and their relationship to the initiation of severe convection.

  2. A mathematical model for Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing (VATOL) aircraft simulation. Volume 3: User's manual for VATOL simulation program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fortenbaugh, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    Instructions for using Vertical Attitude Takeoff and Landing Aircraft Simulation (VATLAS), the digital simulation program for application to vertical attitude takeoff and landing (VATOL) aircraft developed for installation on the NASA Ames CDC 7600 computer system are described. The framework for VATLAS is the Off-Line Simulation (OLSIM) routine. The OLSIM routine provides a flexible framework and standardized modules which facilitate the development of off-line aircraft simulations. OLSIM runs under the control of VTOLTH, the main program, which calls the proper modules for executing user specified options. These options include trim, stability derivative calculation, time history generation, and various input-output options.

  3. Fallspeeds and Vertical Air Motions in Stratiform Rain Derived from ER-2 Doppler Radar Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymsfield, G. M.; Tian, L.

    2000-01-01

    The Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) conducted several intensive field validation campaigns for improved understanding of Tropical precipitation systems. Two of the campaigns (TEFLUN in Florida and Texas, and LBA in Brazil) utilized: the NASA ER-2 high-altitude (20 km) remote sensing aircraft instrumented with the ER-2 Doppler Radar (EDOP), the University of North Dakota Citation microphysics aircraft, and the NCAR S-POL polarization radar. This paper focuses on EDOP-derived fallspeeds and vertical velocities in the rain regions of two stratiform cases (5 September 1998 along the east coast of Florida, and 17 February 1999 in Amazonia in Brazil). These cases were sampled in situ microphysically by the Citation and reported elsewhere in this meeting; the main emphasis of this paper will be on the airborne radar measurements and inferences from them.

  4. Changes in plate motion and vertical movements along passive continental margins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Cobbold, P. R.; Chalmers, J. A.; Green, P. F.; Bonow, J. M.

    2012-04-01

    The origin of the forces that produce elevated, passive continental margins (EPCMs) has been a hot topic in geoscience for many years. Studies of individual margins have led to models, which explain high elevations by invoking specific conditions for each margin in question. We have studied the uplift history of several margins and have found some striking coincidences between episodes of uplift and changes in plate motion. In the Campanian, Eocene and Miocene, pronounced events of uplift and erosion affected not only SE Brazil (Cobbold et al., 2001), but also NE Brazil and SW Africa (Japsen et al., 2012a). The uplift phases in Brazil also coincided with three main phases of Andean orogeny (Cobbold et al., 2001, 2007). These phases, Peruvian (90-75 Ma), Incaic (50-40 Ma), and Quechuan (25-0 Ma), were also periods of relatively rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America (Pardo-Casas and Molnar, 1987). Because Campanian uplift in Brazil coincides, not only with rapid convergence at the Andean margin of South America, but also with a decline in Atlantic spreading rate, we suggest that all these uplift events have a common cause, which is lateral resistance to plate motion (Japsen et al., 2012a). Because the uplift phases in South America and Africa are common to the margins of two diverging plates, we also suggest that the driving forces can transmit across the spreading axis, probably at great depth, e.g. in the asthenosphere (Japsen et al., 2012a). Similarly, a phase of uplift and erosion at the Eocene-Oligocene transition (c. 35 Ma), which affected margins around the North Atlantic, correlates with a major plate reorganization there (Japsen et al., 2012b). Passive continental margins clearly formed as a result of extension. Despite this, the World Stress Map shows that, where data exist, all EPCMs are today under compression. We maintain that folds, reverse faults, reactivated normal faults and strike-slip faults that are typical of EPCMs are a result

  5. ARM - Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E): Multi-Frequency Profilers, Vertical Air Motion (williams-vertair)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Williams, Christopher; Jensen, Mike

    2012-11-06

    This data was collected by the NOAA 449-MHz and 2.8-GHz profilers in support of the Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA sponsored Mid-latitude Continental Convective Cloud Experiment (MC3E). The profiling radars were deployed in Northern Oklahoma at the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Mission (ARM) Southern Great Plans (SGP) Central Facility from 22 April through 6 June 2011. NOAA deployed three instruments: a Parsivel disdrometer, a 2.8-GHz profiler, and a 449-MHz profiler. The parasivel provided surface estimates of the raindrop size distribution and is the reference used to absolutely calibrate the 2.8 GHz profiler. The 2.8-GHz profiler provided unattenuated reflectivity profiles of the precipitation. The 449-MHz profiler provided estimates of the vertical air motion during precipitation from near the surface to just below the freezing level. By using the combination of 2.8-GHz and 449-MHz profiler observations, vertical profiles of raindrop size distributions can be retrieved. The profilers are often reference by their frequency band: the 2.8-GHz profiler operates in the S-band and the 449-MHz profiler operates in the UHF band. The raw observations are available as well as calibrated spectra and moments. This document describes how the instruments were deployed, how the data was collected, and the format of the archived data.

  6. RESIDENCE TIMES OF PARTICLES IN DIFFUSIVE PROTOPLANETARY DISK ENVIRONMENTS. I. VERTICAL MOTIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Ciesla, F. J.

    2010-11-01

    The chemical and physical evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks are determined by the types of environments they are exposed to and their residence times within each environment. Here, a method for calculating representative paths of materials in diffusive protoplanetary disks is developed and applied to understanding how the vertical trajectories that particles take impact their overall evolution. The methods are general enough to be applied to disks with uniform diffusivity, the so-called constant-{alpha} cases, and disks with a spatially varying diffusivity, such as expected in 'layered-disks'. The average long-term dynamical evolution of small particles and gaseous molecules is independent of the specific form of the diffusivity in that they spend comparable fractions of their lifetimes at different heights in the disk. However, the paths that individual particles and molecules take depend strongly on the form of the diffusivity leading to a different range of behavior of particles in terms of deviations from the mean. As temperatures, gas densities, chemical abundances, and photon fluxes will vary with height in protoplanetary disks, the different paths taken by primitive materials will lead to differences in their chemical and physical evolution. Examples of differences in gas phase chemistry and photochemistry are explored here. The methods outlined here provide a powerful tool that can be integrated with chemical models to understand the formation and evolution of primitive materials in protoplanetary disks on timescales of 10{sup 5}-10{sup 6} years.

  7. A future geodetic monitoring system for vertical land motion in the Perth basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filmer, Mick; Featherstone, Will; Morgan, Linda; Schenk, Andreas

    2013-04-01

    Vertical land movement (VLM) affects many regions around the world and can have various causes, such as tectonics, glacial isostatic adjustment and resource extraction. Geodetic monitoring systems are employed in different configurations to identify VLM to provide knowledge for hazard mapping, risk assessment and land planning. We describe results from historical geodetic observations, and efforts to establish a monitoring system in the Western Australian city of Perth, which is subject to VLM, most probably caused by groundwater extraction over the past ~100 years. The most direct evidence of VLM in Perth is provided by two continuously operating GNSS (CGNSS) stations HIL1 (from 1997) and PERT (from 1992). However, these stations provide estimates only at discrete locations. In addition, the data from HIL1 is subject to frequent equipment changes and PERT ceased operation in early 2012. The CGNSS VLM rates reach ~-6 mm/yr, but are not linear over time and appear to be highly correlated with the rates of groundwater extraction. Limited sequences of interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) images are available over short periods between 1992-2009, and although these suggest spatially variable VLM rates reaching -5 mm/yr at some locations, the uncertainty from the small number of images suggest that these results should be treated cautiously. If it remains necessary to extract groundwater for Perth (possibly at increased rates), an ongoing monitoring programme is needed. This should be based on combined GNSS, InSAR and levelling observation programmes. Historical levelling data from the early 1970s is currently being extracted from hardcopy archives into digital file format for analysis and adjustment. These data will be used to establish an original reference network for later geodetic observations comprising repeat levelling campaigns connected to periodic GNSS campaigns and CGNSS stations, but most importantly, a regular and structured acquisition of In

  8. Some Studies in Large-Scale Surface Fluxes and Vertical Motions Associated with Land falling Hurricane Katrina over the Gulf of Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, S. R.

    2010-12-01

    We investigated the possible relationship between the large- scale heat fluxes and intensity change associated with the landfall of Hurricane Katrina. After reaching the category 5 intensity on August 28th , 2005 over the central Gulf of Mexico, Katrina weekend to category 3 before making landfall (August 29th , 2005) on the Louisiana coast with the maximum sustained winds of over 110 knots. We also examined the vertical motions associated with the intensity change of the hurricane. The data on Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE), sea level pressure and wind speed were obtained from the Atmospheric Soundings, and NOAA National Hurricane Center (NHC), respectively for the period August 24 to September 3, 2005. We developed an empirical model and a C++ program to calculate surface potential temperatures and heat fluxes using the above data. We also computed vertical motions using CAPE values. The study showed that the large-scale heat fluxes reached maximum (7960W/m2) with the central pressure 905mb. The Convective Available Potential Energy and the vertical motions peaked 3-5 days before landfall. The large atmospheric vertical motions associated with the land falling hurricane Katrina produced severe weather including thunderstorms and tornadoes.

  9. Fluid motions and compositional gradients produced by crystallization or melting at vertical boundaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turner, J. Stewart; Gustafson, Lewis B.

    1981-12-01

    The results of a continuing series of laboratory experiments, designed to model the fluid motions which accompany crystallization, are both described and related in a preliminary way to prototype flows in magma chambers. Previous experiments have demonstrated the importance of compositional inhomogeneity, produced by crystallization and melting in a thermal gradient and coupled with double-diffusive effects, in driving convective flows which result in thermal and compositional stratification in an originally homogeneous fluid. The present experiments examine effects produced in tanks cooled at the side, by the upward flow of a less dense boundary layer depleted in the crystallizing component as crystals grow on the side wall. These processes are examined in simple two and three component aqueous systems (H 2O-Na 2CO 3, H 2O-Na 2CO 3-K 2CO 3, H 2O-CuSO 4-Na 2SO 4) with one and two crystallizing phases. In each of these systems, an initially downward flow of a cooled boundary layer against the side wall is reversed as crystallization commences and depletes the boundary layer in the crystallizing component. Accumulation of this cooler but lighter depleted fluid at the top of the chamber produces thermal and compositional layering by a "filling box" mechanism, partly modified by interchange between the boundary layer and the convecting layers outside. When more than one component is present in the solution, the crystallization process produces a differentiated fluid column, i.e. one with compositional gradients which are different for each of the components. The compositional and thermal distributions within the fluid change with time, but finally appear to reach a steady state. These distributions are the integrated result of compositional changes produced by crystallization from a thin boundary layer, a small proportion of the bulk fluid which evolves in composition and temperature independently of the bulk fluid, in a manner controlled by the dynamics of the system

  10. Vertical motions in Thailand after the 2004 Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake from GPS observations and its geophysical modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Satirapod, C.; Trisirisatayawong, I.; Fleitout, L.; Garaud, J. D.; Simons, W. J. F.

    2013-04-01

    Following previous findings from ongoing GPS research in Thailand since 2004 we continue to exploit the GPS technique to monitor and model land motions induced by the Sumatra-Andaman Earthquake. Our latest results show that up to the end of 2010, Thailand has been co-seismically displaced and is subsequently undergoing a post-seismic horizontal deformation with total displacements (co-seismic plus post-seismic) ranging from 10.5 to 74.7 cm. We observed the largest horizontal displacements in the southern part of Thailand and moderate and small displacements in the central and northern parts. In addition to horizontal displacements throughout Thailand, continuous GPS measurements show that large parts of Thailand are subsiding at rates up to 1 cm/yr. It is the first time that such vertical post-seismic deformations at large distances (650-1500 km away from the Earthquake's epicentre) have been recorded. We have investigated the physical processes leading to the observed subsidence. While after-slip on the subduction interface induces negligible or even slightly positive vertical motions, relaxation in the asthenosphere is associated with a sizable subsidence. Predictions from a 3D finite element model feature an asthenosphere with an effective viscosity of the order of 3 \\midast 1018 Pas, fit the horizontal post-seismic data and the observed subsidence well. This model is then used to predict the subsidence over the whole seismic cycle. The subsidence should go on with a diminishing rate through the next two decades and its final magnitude should not exceed 10 cm in the Bangkok area.The post-seismic subsidence makes it difficult to identify other geophysical signals, particularly sea level rise, when observed from tide gauge data and thus there is a need for reliable estimation of subsidence velocities. This phenomenon may also worsen coastal erosion and flooding from sea water and so cause a considerable impact on the socio-economic development of coastal and low

  11. Present-day Surface Deformation and Vertical Motion In The Central Alborz (iran) From GPS and Absolute Gravity Measurements.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masson, F.; Sedighi, M.; Hinderer, J.; Bayer, R.; Nilforoushan, F.; Luck, J.-M.; Vernant, P.; Chéry, J.

    The present tectonic of Iran results from the north-south convergence between Eura- sia and Arabia, with a rate of about 3 cm/year. The deformation of Iran is concen- trated in major belts along the south-western border (Zagros), the southern shore of the Caspian Sea (Alborz) and along the north-east border (Kopet-Dag). The Alborz range is an east-west mountain range which accommodates about 1 cm/year of short- ening between the Central Iranian Desert and the south Caspian Sea. The main tec- tonic structures are generally overthrusting range-parallel faults northward dipping in the south (North Tehran fault, Mosha fault) and southward dipping in the north (Amir fault, North Border fault). The compressive tectonic in the Alborz range is certainly accommodated by large vertical motions along the major faults. To study the defor- mation (horizontal and vertical movement) we have installed and measured a GPS network of 14 sites crossing the Alborz range east of Tehran. The GPS network is measured during campaigns performed each year. In order to well constrained the ver- tical deformation of the southern border of the Alborz, we have performed colocated GPS and absolute gravity measurements in 3 sites, one near the Mosha fault (Abali), one in the frontal thrust area of Tehran and one in the stable central Iranian block (Chesmeh-Sour). After two measures (2000 and 2001), some interesting preliminary results will be shown. The observed gravity variation for one year (Sept. 2000 - Sept. 2001) is -3.0 mgal +-2.6 mgal (Abali), -24.2 mgal +-4.8 mgal (Tehran) and +4.7 mgal +-2.3 mgal (Chesmeh-Sour). These results could be explained respectively by a tec- tonic uplift of about 10 mm/year in the Alborz, water pumping in the Tehran area and (unexplained) subsidence at Chesmeh-Sour. These results will be compared to the first estimation of the deformation obtained by GPS (horizontal repeatability < 3 mm and vertical repeatability < 5 mm).

  12. The IBM PC at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peredo, James P.

    1988-01-01

    Like many large companies, Ames relies very much on its computing power to get work done. And, like many other large companies, finding the IBM PC a reliable tool, Ames uses it for many of the same types of functions as other companies. Presentation and clarification needs demand much of graphics packages. Programming and text editing needs require simpler, more-powerful packages. The storage space needed by NASA's scientists and users for the monumental amounts of data that Ames needs to keep demand the best database packages that are large and easy to use. Availability to the Micom Switching Network combines the powers of the IBM PC with the capabilities of other computers and mainframes and allows users to communicate electronically. These four primary capabilities of the PC are vital to the needs of NASA's users and help to continue and support the vast amounts of work done by the NASA employees.

  13. NASA Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research briefs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The Ames Fluid Mechanics Laboratory research program is presented in a series of research briefs. Nineteen projects covering aeronautical fluid mechanics and related areas are discussed and augmented with the publication and presentation output of the Branch for the period 1990-1993.

  14. NASA-Ames workload research program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra

    1988-01-01

    Research has been underway for several years to develop valid and reliable measures and predictors of workload as a function of operator state, task requirements, and system resources. Although the initial focus of this research was on aeronautics, the underlying principles and methodologies are equally applicable to space, and provide a set of tools that NASA and its contractors can use to evaluate design alternatives from the perspective of the astronauts. Objectives and approach of the research program are described, as well as the resources used in conducting research and the conceptual framework around which the program evolved. Next, standardized tasks are described, in addition to predictive models and assessment techniques and their application to the space program. Finally, some of the operational applications of these tasks and measures are reviewed.

  15. Results of an investigation to determine local flow characteristics at the air data probe locations using an 0.030-scale model (45-0) of the space shuttle vehicle orbiter configuration 140A/B (modified) in the NASA Ames Research Center unitary plan wind tunnel (OA161, A, B, C), volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nichols, M. E.

    1976-01-01

    Results are presented of wind tunnel test 0A161 of a 0.030-scale model 45-0 of the configuration 140A/B (modified) space shuttle vehicle orbiter in the NASA Ames Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel facilities. The purpose of this test was to determine local total and static pressure environments for the air data probe locations and relative effectiveness of alternate flight-test probe configurations. Testing was done in the Mach number range from 0.30 to 3.5. Angle of attack was varied from -8 to 25 degrees while sideslip varied between -8 and 8 degrees.

  16. Results of a M = 5.3 heat transfer test of the integrated vehicle using phase-change paint techniques on the 0.0175-scale model 56-OTS in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marroquin, J.

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation was performed in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot Hypersonic Wind Tunnel to obtain supersonic heat-distribution data in areas between the orbiter and external tank using phase-change paint techniques. The tests used Novamide SSV Model 56-OTS in the first and second-stage ascent configurations. Data were obtained at a nominal Mach number of 5.3 and a Reynolds number per foot of 5 x 10 to the 6th power with angles of attack of 0 deg, +/- 5 deg, and sideslip angles of 0 deg and +/- 5 deg.

  17. Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brand, Judith, Ed.

    2002-01-01

    This issue of Exploratorium Magazine focuses on the topic of motion. Contents include: (1) "First Word" (Zach Tobias); (2) "Cosmic Collisions" (Robert Irion); (3) "The Mobile Cell" (Karen E. Kalumuck); (4) "The Paths of Paths" (Steven Vogel); (5) "Fragments" (Pearl Tesler); (6) "Moving Pictures" (Amy Snyder); (7) "Plants on the Go" (Katharine…

  18. The development of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in relation to convection activity and synoptic systems in AVE 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. G.; Scoggins, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Data from the Fourth Atmospheric Variability Experiment were used to investigate conditions/factors responsible for the development (local time rate-of-change) of convective instability, wind shear, and vertical motion in areas with varying degrees of convective activity. AVE IV sounding data were taken at 3 or 6 h intervals during a 36 h period on 24-25 April 1975 over approximately the eastern half of the United States. An error analysis was performed for each variable studied.

  19. Performance Enhancement of a Full-Scale Vertical Tail Model Equipped with Active Flow Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Edward A.; Lacy, Douglas; Lin, John C.; Andino, Marlyn Y.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Graff, Emilio; Wygnanski, Israel J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes wind tunnel test results from a joint NASA/Boeing research effort to advance active flow control (AFC) technology to enhance aerodynamic efficiency. A full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail model equipped with sweeping jet actuators was tested at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel (40x80) at NASA Ames Research Center. The model was tested at a nominal airspeed of 100 knots and across rudder deflections and sideslip angles that covered the vertical tail flight envelope. A successful demonstration of AFC-enhanced vertical tail technology was achieved. A 31- actuator configuration significantly increased side force (by greater than 20%) at a maximum rudder deflection of 30deg. The successful demonstration of this application has cleared the way for a flight demonstration on the Boeing 757 ecoDemonstrator in 2015.

  20. Averaging Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V) Spectral Ratios of Earthquake Motions for Velocity Inversions Based on Diffuse Field Theory for Plane Waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsushima, S.; Sanchez-Sesma, F. J.; Kawase, H.

    2010-12-01

    In this work we explore the application of diffuse field concepts to analyze strong motion records at a site in which site effects can be described using a one dimensional (1D) model. For this case we derived a corollary of Claerbout (1968) result for 1D layered medium. We found that the imaginary part of Green function at the free surface is proportional to the square of the absolute value of the corresponding transfer function for a plane, vertically incident wave with unit amplitude. Average strong ground motion in a "sufficiently" flat layered site will be statistically equivalent. We may conceive the illumination as produced by incident plane waves. They represent the most important part of earthquake ground motions. Their associated motions, being multiple scattered, are formed of waves that sample significant portions of the considered area. This is a distinctive feature of earthquake motions, for which the excited domain is large, basically from the source to the receiver. For a set of incoming plane waves (of P, SV, and SH types) with varying azimuths and incidence angles we assume that the ground motion will be spatially homogeneous in a statistical sense. In other words, the average of normalized ground motion spectral densities will depend only on depth. Therefore, we can apply a 1D description of wave propagation for a diffuse (average) field of ground motions. To prove the above hypothesis for H/V ratios of earthquake ground motions, we first show a comparison of averaged synthetics of 1D underground structures with a corresponding simple theoretical prediction from 1D transfer functions. After summing up a few hundreds of synthetics with different angles of incidences, azimuths, and polarizations, we can obtain identical H/V ratios that the simple theory of diffuse field predicts. Then we show several examples of H/V ratios for actual seismic motions observed in Japan. We found that the earthquake H/V ratios are quite stable (and converging rapidly

  1. Human otolith-ocular reflexes during off-vertical axis rotation: effect of frequency on tilt-translation ambiguity and motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wood, Scott J.; Paloski, W. H. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine how the modulation of tilt and translation otolith-ocular responses during constant velocity off-vertical axis rotation varies as a function of stimulus frequency. Eighteen human subjects were rotated in darkness about their longitudinal axis 30 degrees off-vertical at stimulus frequencies between 0.05 and 0.8 Hz. The modulation of torsion decreased while the modulation of horizontal slow phase velocity (SPV) increased with increasing frequency. It is inferred that the ambiguity of otolith afferent information is greatest in the frequency region where tilt (torsion) and translational (horizontal SPV) otolith-ocular responses crossover. It is postulated that the previously demonstrated peak in motion sickness susceptibility during linear accelerations around 0.3 Hz is the result of frequency segregation of ambiguous otolith information being inadequate to distinguish between tilt and translation.

  2. A Model for Earth's Mantle Dynamic History for The Last 500 Ma and Its Implications for Continental Vertical Motions and Geomagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, S.; Olson, P.; Zhang, N.

    2012-12-01

    evolution of the surface and CMB heat fluxes and continental vertical motions since the Paleozoic. The predicted vertical motion histories for the Slave and Kaapvaal cratons are consistent with those inferred from thermochronology studies. The predicted CMB heat fluxes were used as time-dependent boundary conditions for geodynamo simulations. And the geodynamo modelling shows that the time-dependent CMB heat fluxes may explain to the first order the frequencies of geomagnetic polarity reversals (e.g., superchrons).

  3. Theoretical Calculations of the Pressures, Forces, and Moments Due to Various Lateral Motions Acting on Tapered Sweptback Vertical Tails with Supersonic Leading and Trailing Edges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Margolis, Kenneth; Elliott, Miriam H.

    1960-01-01

    Based on expressions for the linearized velocity potentials and pressure distributions given in NACA Technical Report 1268, formulas for the span load distribution, forces, and moments are derived for families of thin isolated vertical tails with arbitrary aspect ratio, taper ratio, and sweepback performing the motions constant sideslip, steady rolling, steady yawing, and constant lateral acceleration. The range of Mach number considered corresponds, in general, to the condition that the tail leading and trailing edges are supersonic. To supplement the analytical results, design-type charts are presented which enable rapid estimation of the forces and moments (expressed as stability derivatives) for given combinations of geometry parameters and Mach number.

  4. Improving Estimates of Vertical Motion Over the Past Century Along the Pacific Coast of the U.S. Using Tide Gauges and Repeated Leveling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgette, R. J.; Weldon, R. J.

    2013-12-01

    Historic to modern observations of relative sea level at tide gauges and relative vertical positions of benchmarks from differential leveling provide a rich dataset for constraining crustal uplift and subsidence. These terrestrial techniques offer independent estimates of rates of vertical motion that provide a precise and important complement to estimates derived from space-based geodetic methods. Inter-site variations in rates of relative sea level change provide highly precise estimates of relative vertical crustal motion over spatial scales where rates of geocentric sea level rise are constant or nearly so. Absolute rates of uplift can be obtained with an estimate of sea level rise in a geocentric reference frame. Along the west coast of the U.S., there are tide gauges with records long enough (> 60 yr) to obtain < 0.5 mm/yr precision (considering time-correlated noise) spaced approximately 100-200 km along the coast. Repeated leveling (generally from the 1920s to 1980s) along highway routes provides estimates of rates of vertical position change along a network of benchmarks that are denser than most current GNSS networks. Our analysis along the western U.S. suggests that many of the first order leveling lines are precise at the expected level. However, in some areas, first order lines show discrepancies at levels much higher than that expected from random error. Such systematic errors may be identified and corrected along routes with multiple epochs of precise leveling with tide gauges on each end, or in areas of relatively short (< 100 km) closed loops. In this contribution we will show our analysis methodology for combining leveling and sea level data to yield estimates of absolute uplift rates and associated uncertainties. Based on our experiences applying this technique over much of the route between the Canadian and Mexican borders of the western U.S., we will assess the accuracy of these terrestrial techniques and compare available spaceborne estimates

  5. Perception of self motion during and after passive rotation of the body around an earth-vertical axis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, N; Zaher, N; Shaikh, A G; Lasker, A G; Zee, D S; Tarnutzer, A A

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the perception of self-rotation using constant-velocity chair rotations. Subjects signalled self motion during three independent tasks (1) by pushing a button when rotation was first sensed, when velocity reached a peak, when velocity began to decrease, and when velocity reached zero, (2) by rotating a disc to match the perceived motion of the body, or (3) by changing the static position of the dial such that a bigger change in its position correlated with a larger perceived velocity. All three tasks gave a consistent quantitative measure of perceived angular velocity. We found a delay in the time at which peak velocity of self-rotation was perceived (2-5 s) relative to the beginning or to the end of chair rotation. In addition the decay of the perception of self-rotation was preceded by a sensed constant-velocity interval or plateau (9-14 s). This delay in the rise of self-motion perception, and the plateau for the maximum perceived velocity, contrasts with the rapid rise and the immediate decay of the angular vestibuloocular reflex (aVOR). This difference suggests that the sensory signal from the semicircular canals undergoes additional neural processing, beyond the contribution of the velocity-storage mechanism of the aVOR, to compute the percept of self-motion.

  6. The thickness history of the northern sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet: an assessment of glacial isostatic adjustment models, sea-level measurements, and vertical land motion rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, K. M.; James, T. S.; Henton, J. A.; Dyke, A.

    2014-12-01

    The fit of glacial isostatic adjustment (GIA) model predictions to 24 relative sea-level histories and an additional 18 present-day GPS-measured vertical land motion rates constrains the thickness and volume history of the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet. The predictions of the best-fit GIA model indicate respective peak ice thicknesses west and east of Hudson Bay of 3.4-3.6 km and approximately 4 km. These values represent, respectively, a large decrease, and a moderate increase, to the load thickness compared to ICE-5G. This result is generally consistent with other GIA studies focussing on space-geodetic constraints. The large reduction to the ice load west of Hudson Bay also reduces the vertical mantle response along the margins of the load centre, which improves the fit to relative sea-level data from the southern Canadian Arctic Archipelago. The fit of GIA model predictions to relative sea-level data from the Baffin Sector of the Laurentide Ice Sheet indicate peak ice thicknesses there of 1.2-1.3 km, a modest reduction compared to ICE-5G. On Baffin Island, the modelled elastic crustal response of the Earth to present-day ice mass changes is large. Accounting for this effect improves the agreement between GPS measurements of vertical crustal motion and the GIA model predictions. However, work is needed to incorporate more detailed observations and modelling of present-day changes to glaciers and ice caps. Overall, the fit to the data is most strongly improved in the region west of Hudson Bay (the χ2 RSL misfit is reduced by a factor of ~4) although the entire revised reconstruction for the central and northern Laurentide Ice Sheet provides an improved fit to both the regional RSL data (the cumulative χ2 misfit is reduced by a factor of >2) and the GPS data (the RMS misfit is reduced by a factor of 9).

  7. Present-Day Crustal Vertical Motion Around the Ordos Block Constrained by Precise Leveling and GPS Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Ming; Wang, Qingliang; Cui, Duxin; Liu, Liwei; Zhou, Lin

    2016-09-01

    Precise leveling data observed in the period of 1970-2014 around the Ordos block were collected and processed to estimate present-day crustal vertical movement. Vertical rates of 6 GPS sites were employed as a priori constraints to define the reference frame. The velocity field shows that the interior of the Ordos block moves upward at a rate of 3 mm/a as a stable block. With respect to the central Ordos, the grabens and rifts around the Ordos block are undergoing subsidence, while the northeastern and southwestern Ordos uplift at the average rates of 2 and 1 mm/a, respectively. To the southeastern margin of the Ordos block, the Weihe and southern Shanxi grabens are subsiding at the rates of 4-6 mm/a. The subsidence of the Shanxi graben indicates that the graben is experiencing extensional movement on a long timescale. To the northwestern margin of the Ordos block, the Hetao and Yinchuan rifts are subsiding at the rates of 2-3 mm/a. A 2-D buried faulting model is used to infer the normal or reverse dip-slip rates. Our solution shows that most of the normal slip rates along the faults in the grabens and rifts are ~2 mm/a.

  8. Analysis of fluid motion and heat transport on magnetohydrodynamic boundary layer past a vertical power law stretching sheet with hydrodynamic and thermal slip effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alkahtani, Badr; Abel, M. Subhas; Aly, Emad H.

    2015-12-01

    The present model is committed to the study of MHD boundary layer flow and heat transfer past a nonlinear vertically stretching porous stretching sheet with the effects of hydrodynamic and thermal slip. The boundary value problem, consisting of boundary layer equations of motion and heat transfer, which are nonlinear partial differential equations are transformed into nonlinear ordinary differential equations, with the aid of similarity transformation. This problem has been solved, using Runge Kutta fourth order method with shooting technique. The effects of various physical parameters, such as, stretching parameter m, magnetic parameter M, porosity parameter fw, buoyancy parameter λ, Prandtl number Pr, Eckert number Ec, hydrodynamic slip parameter γ, and thermal slip parameter δ, on flow and heat transfer characteristics, are computed and represented graphically.

  9. Climatology of Vertical Air Motion During Rainfall in Niamey, Niger and Black Forest, Germany using an Innovative Cloud Radar Retrieval Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luke, E. P.; Giangrande, S. E.; Kollias, P.

    2008-12-01

    In recent years, the DOE Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program has deployed its ARM Mobile Facility (AMF) to collect continuous measurements in several climatologically distinct locations, including a year-long stay in Niamey, Niger and eight months in Germany's Black Forest. The AMF includes a vertically pointing 95 GHz cloud radar, a tool of choice for profiling non-precipitating clouds at high spatial and temporal resolutions, but commonly considered poorly suited to the quantitative study of precipitation, due in large part to attenuation. However, an innovative technique first explored by Lhermitte in the late 1980s, and subsequently by others, sidesteps much of the quantitative uncertainty imposed by attenuation by exploiting non-Rayleigh resonance effects of scattering from raindrops at 95 GHz. Given a modest range of suitable drop sizes, non-Rayleigh resonances appear as distinct peaks and valleys in Doppler spectra, which once identified, can be directly mapped to known drop sizes by Mie theory. Although attenuation in rain at 95 GHz is substantial, key to the technique is that all non-Rayleigh peaks and valleys in a given Doppler spectrum are affected equally, preserving their relative positions and magnitudes (barring feature extinction). Vertical air motion is retrieved very accurately by taking the difference between the measured Doppler velocity of a resonance feature (usually the first valley) and the known terminal velocity of its associated drop size. We have achieved promising retrieval accuracies at spatial and temporal resolutions of 30 meters and 2 seconds. Here we present lessons learned when the retrieval technique is automated and applied to measurements taken in rain over the full durations of the Niamey and Black Forest AMF deployments, comparing vertical air velocity patterns of monsoonal precipitation over the African desert with those of the orographically influenced precipitation in Germany's mountains.

  10. Results of investigations on an 0.015-scale 140A/B configuration of the Rockwell International space shuttle orbiter (model 49-O) in the NASA/Ames Research Center 3.5-foot hypersonic wind tunnel (OA36)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Milam, M. D.; Gillins, R. L.; Cleary, J. W.

    1974-01-01

    The results of wind tunnel tests of the 140A/B configuration components are reported for the fuselage, canopy, elevons, bodyflaps, pods, engine nozzles, rudder, vertical tail, and wing. The test facility, and data reduction procedures are described. Test results for each component are graphed, and tabulated source data are included.

  11. Depth-dependent Vertical-to-Horizontal (V/H) Ratios of Free-Field Ground Motion Response Spectra for Deeply Embedded Nuclear Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Wei X.; Braverman J.; Miranda, M.; Rosario, M.E.; Costantino, C.J.

    2015-02-25

    This report documents the results of a study to determine the depth-dependent V/H ratios of ground motion response spectra in the free field. The V/H ratios reported herein were developed from a worldwide database of surface and downhole acceleration recordings obtained from 45 vertical array stations. This database was specifically compiled for this project, and includes information from a diversity of active tectonic regions (California, Alaska, Taiwan, Japan), site conditions (rock to soft soil), ground motion intensity levels (PGAs between 0.01 g and 0.50 g), magnitudes (between ML 2.78 and JMA 8.1), epicentral distances (between 3.2 km and 812 km), and source depths (between 1.2 km and 112 km), as well as sensors at surface and at a wide range of depths relevant to the project. To study the significance of the depth effect, V/H ratios from all the records were sorted into a number of depth bins relevant to the project, and statistics (average, standard deviation, coefficient of variation, 16th, 50th, and 84th percentiles) of the V/H ratios within each bin were computed. Similar analyses were repeated, controlling for different site conditions, ground motion intensity levels, array locations, and source depths, to study their relative effect on the V/H ratios. Our findings confirm the importance of the depth effect on the V/H ratios. The research findings in this report can be used to provide guidance on the significance of the depth effect, and the extent to which this effect should be considered in the seismic design of deeply embedded SMR structures and NPP structures in general.

  12. On the motion of bubbles in vertical tubes of arbitrary cross-sections: some complements to the Dumitrescu Taylor problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clanet, Christophe; Héraud, Pierre; Searby, Geoffrey

    2004-11-01

    We first study the rising velocity U_b of long bubbles in vertical tubes of different cross-sections, under the acceleration due to gravity g. The vessel being initially filled with a liquid of kinematic viscosity nu, it is known that for cylindrical tubes of radius R, high-Reynolds-number bubbles (Re {equiv} U_{b}R/nu {≫} 1) are characterized by {Newton's law} U_{b} {~} sqrt{gR} and low-Reynolds-number bubbles by {Stokes' law} U_{b} {~} gR(2/nu) . We show experimentally that these results can be generalized for vessels of ‘arbitrary’ cross-section (rectangles, regular polygons, toroidal tubes). The high-Reynolds-number domain is shown to be characterized by U_{b} {=} (8pi)(-1/2) sqrt{gP}, and the low-Reynolds-number range by U_{b} {≈} 0.012 gS/nu, where P and S respectively stand for the wetted perimeter and the area of the normal cross-section of the tube. We derive an analytical justification of these results, using the rectangular geometry. Finally, the problem of long bubble propagation in an unsteady acceleration field is analysed. The theory is compared to existing data.

  13. Stretch-shortening cycle characteristics during vertical jumps carried out with small and large range of motion.

    PubMed

    Kopper, Bence; Csende, Zsolt; Trzaskoma, Lukasz; Tihanyi, József

    2014-04-01

    In the present study we investigated kinematical characteristics of the knee and ankle extensors to estimate the length change properties of the contractile and the passive elements in countermovement jumps (CMJ) and drop jumps (DJ) performed with small (40°) and large (80°) range of joint motion (SRM and LRM). At SRM the accelerations at maximal muscle lengths compared with the last phase of joint flexion were greater for the gastrocnemius and the soleus (124.9% and 79.4%) and also were greater than at the beginning of joint extension, while no difference was measured at LRM. The differences suggest that at LRM the length change of the serial passive elements from the end of joint flexion to the beginning of joint extension is minimal and simultaneously the length change of the contractile elements is significant, but at SRM - especially in the plantar flexors - the length change of the contractile elements is minimal while in the passive elements significant. It can be presumed that for SRM at the end of joint flexion significant elastic energy is stored and at the beginning of joint extension reused, while for LRM elastic energy storage is not dominant.

  14. Geodynamic Drivers of Vertical Crustal Motion: Integrating Paleoaltimetry with Basin Development in the Central Andean Plateau of Southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundell, K. E., II; Saylor, J. E.; Lapen, T. J.; Villarreal, D. P.; Styron, R. H.; Horton, B. K.; Cardenas, J.

    2015-12-01

    Determining the spatial and temporal relationships between surface uplift, tectonic subsidence, and exhumation during periods of oblique crustal shortening is essential to discriminating geodynamic processes controlling formation of high topography in the central Andes. Although subsidence analysis is now a standard tool, paleoelevation estimation remains a challenging task, as estimates based on proxy data can be complicated by uncertainties in the relative controls of tectonics and climate. We therefore adopt an approach of combining established tools of subsidence analysis and detrital geochronology with emerging methods of volcanic glass paleoaltimetry, which enables us to explore a broad range of viable interpretations to understand the development of intermontane basins and their relationship to the development of the central Andean plateau. We investigated a suite of temporally overlapping and spatially separate Cenozoic basins spanning the east-west extent of the central Andean plateau in southern Peru. These basins contain an exceptional record of the vertical movements of this region. We calculate sediment accumulation and subsidence rates through decompaction of measured stratigraphic sections, and reconstruct past environmental conditions based on the stable isotopic composition of ancient waters preserved in hydrated volcanic glass. These data and published records of crustal shortening and exhumation show that although paleoaltimetry data in the study areas may be interpreted in various ways, they are best explained by multiple geodynamic processes driving (i) Eocene-early Miocene development of high topography in the Western Cordillera, then (ii) a pulsed middle Miocene-present building of the central Andean plateau from west to east, consistent with global climate changes as well as regional climate shifts driven by topographic development of the Andean orogen.

  15. THE VERTICAL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albert, Stephen L.; Spencer, Jeffrey B.

    1994-01-01

    'THE VERTICAL' computer keyboard is designed to address critical factors which contribute to Repetitive Motion Injuries (RMI) (including Carpal Tunnel Syndrome) in association with computer keyboard usage. This keyboard splits the standard QWERTY design into two halves and positions each half 90 degrees from the desk. In order to access a computer correctly. 'THE VERTICAL' requires users to position their bodies in optimal alignment with the keyboard. The orthopaedically neutral forearm position (with hands palms-in and thumbs-up) reduces nerve compression in the forearm. The vertically arranged keypad halves ameliorate onset occurrence of keyboard-associated RMI. By utilizing visually-reference mirrored mylar surfaces adjustable to the user's eye, the user is able to readily reference any key indicia (reversed) just as they would on a conventional keyboard. Transverse adjustability substantially reduces cumulative musculoskeletal discomfort in the shoulders. 'THE VERTICAL' eliminates the need for an exterior mouse by offering a convenient finger-accessible curser control while the hands remain in the vertically neutral position. The potential commercial application for 'THE VERTICAL' is enormous since the product can effect every person who uses a computer anywhere in the world. Employers and their insurance carriers are spending hundreds of millions of dollars per year as a result of RMI. This keyboard will reduce the risk.

  16. Static and wind tunnel near-field/far-field jet noise measurements from model scale single-flow base line and suppressor nozzles. Summary report. [conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40by 80-foot wind tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeck, C. L.

    1977-01-01

    A test program was conducted in the Boeing large anechoic test chamber and the NASA-Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel to study the near- and far-field jet noise characteristics of six baseline and suppressor nozzles. Static and wind-on noise source locations were determined. A technique for extrapolating near field jet noise measurements into the far field was established. It was determined if flight effects measured in the near field are the same as those in the far field. The flight effects on the jet noise levels of the baseline and suppressor nozzles were determined. Test models included a 15.24-cm round convergent nozzle, an annular nozzle with and without ejector, a 20-lobe nozzle with and without ejector, and a 57-tube nozzle with lined ejector. The static free-field test in the anechoic chamber covered nozzle pressure ratios from 1.44 to 2.25 and jet velocities from 412 to 594 m/s at a total temperature of 844 K. The wind tunnel flight effects test repeated these nozzle test conditions with ambient velocities of 0 to 92 m/s.

  17. Observations of vertical tidal motions of a floating iceberg in front of Shirase Glacier, East Antarctica, using a geodetic-mode GPS buoy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoyama, Yuichi; Kim, Tae-Hee; Doi, Koichiro; Hayakawa, Hideaki; Higashi, Toshihiro; Ohsono, Shingo; Shibuya, Kazuo

    2016-06-01

    A dual-frequency GPS receiver was deployed on a floating iceberg downstream of the calving front of Shirase Glacier, East Antarctica, on 28 December 2011 for utilizing as floating buoy. The three-dimensional position of the buoy was obtained by GPS every 30 s with a 4-5-cm precision for ca. 25 days. The height uncertainty of the 1-h averaged vertical position was ∼0.5 cm, even considering the uncertainties of un-modeled ocean loading effects. The daily evolution of north-south (NS), east-west (EW), and up-down (UD) motions shows periodic UD variations sometimes attaining an amplitude of 1 m. Observed amplitudes of tidal harmonics of major constituents were 88%-93% (O1) and 85%-88% (M2) of values observed in the global ocean tide models FES2004 and TPXO-8 Atlas. The basal melting rate of the iceberg is estimated to be ∼0.6 m/day, based on a firn densification model and using a quasi-linear sinking rate of the iceberg surface. The 30-s sampling frequency geodetic-mode GPS buoy helps to reveal ice-ocean dynamics around the calving front of Antarctic glaciers.

  18. Stratigraphic Record of Vertical Crustal Motions in the Past 2-3 Ma Along the Southern San Andreas Fault, Mecca Hills, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNabb, J. C.; Dorsey, R. J.

    2012-12-01

    Sedimentary rocks exposed on the NE margin of Coachella Valley in the Mecca Hills, southern California, record vertical crustal motions along the San Andreas and associated strike-slip faults. A complex history of subsidence, transport, deposition, and uplift can be interpreted from mapping and measuring of sedimentary rocks, analysis of sedimentary lithofacies, and determination of transport directions from clast imbrications and cross-bedding. The 330 m-thick Mecca Fm rests non-conformably on Pre-Cambrian and Cretaceous crystalline rocks SW of the Painted Canyon Fault (PCF), and is not present NE of the PCF. The Mecca Fm is likely late Pliocene or early Pleistocene in age (Boley et al., 1994), and consists of red boulder conglomerate with imbricated clasts showing SSE to WSW paleoflow. It fines up into pebbly sandstone and is gradationally overlain by the lower member of the Palm Spring Formation (PSF). The PSF is likely younger than 2.0-2.6 Ma based on paleomagnetic studies (Boley et al., 1994) and older than the 0.74-Ma Thermal Canyon Ash high in the section (Rymer, 1989). The lower PSF is 340 m thick, with overall SE paleoflow and 3 lithofacies: (1) laterally extensive fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (2) plutonic-clast conglomerate; and (3) a thin lacustrine limestone unit that correlates across the PCF. The contact between the lower and upper members of the PSF changes from a conformable contact in a small area of the central Mecca Hills to an angular unconformity over a much larger area. The upper PSF is ~650 m thick (similar thickness across the PCF), displays overall transport to the SSE (with local exceptions), and has at least 7 lithofacies: (1) alluvial-fan pebbly sandstone and conglomerate; (2) fluvial sandstone and siltstone; (3) fluvial sandstone with conspicuous arkosic composition; (4) marginal-lacustrine bedded siltstone and sandstone; (5) eolian dune sandstone (6) lacustrine laminated siltstone and mudstone; and (7) local red conglomerate. The

  19. Low Cloud Type over the Ocean from Surface Observations. Part III: Relationship to Vertical Motion and the Regional Surface Synoptic Environment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Joel R.; Klein, Stephen A.

    2000-01-01

    Composite large-scale dynamical fields contemporaneous with low cloud types observed at midlatitude Ocean Weather Station (OWS) C and eastern subtropical OWS N are used to establish representative relationships between low cloud type and the synoptic environment. The composites are constructed by averaging meteorological observations of surface wind and sea level pressure from volunteering observing ships (VOS) and analyses of sea level pressure, 1000-mb wind, and 700-mb pressure vertical velocity from the National Centers for Environmental Prediction-National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCEP-NCAR) reanalysis project on those dates and times of day when a particular low cloud type was reported at the OWS.VOS and NCEP results for OWS C during summer show that bad-weather stratus occurs with strong convergence and ascent slightly ahead of a surface low center and trough. Cumulus-under-stratocumulus and moderate and large cumulus occur with divergence and subsidence in the cold sector of an extratropical cyclone. Both sky-obscuring fog and no-low-cloud typically occur with southwesterly flow from regions of warmer sea surface temperature and differ primarily according to slight surface convergence and stronger warm advection in the case of sky-obscuring fog or surface divergence and weaker warm advection in the case of no-low-cloud. Fair-weather stratus and ordinary stratocumulus are associated with a mixture of meteorological conditions, but differ with respect to vertical motion in the environment. Fair-weather stratus occurs most commonly in the presence of slight convergence and ascent, while stratocumulus often occurs in the presence of divergence and subsidence.Surface divergence and estimated subsidence at the top of the boundary layer are calculated from VOS observations. At both OWS C and OWS N during summer and winter these values are large for ordinary stratocumulus, less for cumulus-under-stratocumulus, and least (and sometimes slightly negative) for

  20. Vertical drop test of a transport fuselage section located aft of the wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fasanella, E. L.; Alfaro-Bou, E.

    1986-01-01

    A 12-foot long Boeing 707 aft fuselage section with a tapering cross section was drop tested at the NASA Langley Research Center to measure structural, seat, and occupant response to vertical crash laods and to provide data for nonlinear finite element modeling. This was the final test in a series of three different transport fuselage sections tested under identical conditions. The test parameters at impact were: 20 ft/s velocity, and zero pitch, roll, and yaw. In addition, the test was an operational shock test of the data acquisition system used for the Controlled Impact Demonstration (CID) of a remotely piloted Boeing 720 that was crash tested at NASA Ames Dryden Flight Research Facility on December 1, 1984. Post-test measurements of the crush showed that the front of the section (with larger diameter) crushed vertically approximately 14 inches while the rear crushed 18 inches. Analysis of the data traces indicate the maximum peak normal (vertical) accelerations at the bottom of the frames were approximately 109 G at body station 1040 and 64 G at body station 1120. The peak floor acceleration varied from 14 G near the wall to 25 G near the center where high frequency oscillations of the floor were evident. The peak anthropomorphic dummy pelvis normal (vertical) acceleration was 19 G's.

  1. Development of computational fluid dynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Inouye, M.

    1984-01-01

    Ames Research Center has the lead role among NASA centers to conduct research in computational fluid dynamics. The past, the present, and the future prospects in this field are reviewed. Past accomplishments include pioneering computer simulations of fluid dynamics problems that have made computers valuable in complementing wind tunnels for aerodynamic research. The present facilities include the most powerful computers built in the United States. Three examples of viscous flow simulations are presented: an afterbody with an exhaust plume, a blunt fin mounted on a flat plate, and the Space Shuttle. The future prospects include implementation of the Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation Processing System that will provide the capability for solving the viscous flow field around an aircraft in a matter of minutes.

  2. Optical information processing at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Bualat, Maria G.; Cho, Young C.; Downie, John D.; Gary, Charles K.; Ma, Paul W.; Ozcan, Meric; Pryor, Anna H.; Spirkovska, Lilly

    1993-01-01

    The combination of analog optical processors with digital electronic systems offers the potential of tera-OPS computational performance, while often requiring less power and weight relative to all-digital systems. NASA is working to develop and demonstrate optical processing techniques for on-board, real time science and mission applications. Current research areas and applications under investigation include optical matrix processing for space structure vibration control and the analysis of Space Shuttle Main Engine plume spectra, optical correlation-based autonomous vision for robotic vehicles, analog computation for robotic path planning, free-space optical interconnections for information transfer within digital electronic computers, and multiplexed arrays of fiber optic interferometric sensors for acoustic and vibration measurements.

  3. Technology transfer in the NASA Ames Advanced Life Support Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connell, Kathleen; Schlater, Nelson; Bilardo, Vincent; Masson, Paul

    1992-01-01

    This paper summarizes a representative set of technology transfer activities which are currently underway in the Advanced Life Support Division of the Ames Research Center. Five specific NASA-funded research or technology development projects are synopsized that are resulting in transfer of technology in one or more of four main 'arenas:' (1) intra-NASA, (2) intra-Federal, (3) NASA - aerospace industry, and (4) aerospace industry - broader economy. Each project is summarized as a case history, specific issues are identified, and recommendations are formulated based on the lessons learned as a result of each project.

  4. Second Annual NASA Ames Space Science and Astrobiology Jamboree

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotson, Jessie

    2014-01-01

    The Space Science and Astrobiology Division's researchers are pursuing investigations in a variety of fields, including exoplanets, planetary science, astrobiology, and astrophysics. In addition division personnel support a wide variety of NASA missions. With a wide variety of interesting research going on, distributed among the three branches in at least 5 buildings, it can be difficult to stay abreast of what one's fellow researchers are doing. Our goal in organizing this symposium is to facilitate communication and collaboration among the scientist within the division and to give center management and other ARC researchers and Engineers an opportunity to see what scientific missions work is being done in the division.

  5. Automatic speech recognition research at NASA-Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coler, Clayton R.; Plummer, Robert P.; Huff, Edward M.; Hitchcock, Myron H.

    1977-01-01

    A trainable acoustic pattern recognizer manufactured by Scope Electronics is presented. The voice command system VCS encodes speech by sampling 16 bandpass filters with center frequencies in the range from 200 to 5000 Hz. Variations in speaking rate are compensated for by a compression algorithm that subdivides each utterance into eight subintervals in such a way that the amount of spectral change within each subinterval is the same. The recorded filter values within each subinterval are then reduced to a 15-bit representation, giving a 120-bit encoding for each utterance. The VCS incorporates a simple recognition algorithm that utilizes five training samples of each word in a vocabulary of up to 24 words. The recognition rate of approximately 85 percent correct for untrained speakers and 94 percent correct for trained speakers was not considered adequate for flight systems use. Therefore, the built-in recognition algorithm was disabled, and the VCS was modified to transmit 120-bit encodings to an external computer for recognition.

  6. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP) is described. This program is designed to provide engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students. The students from this work study program which features trips, lectures, written reports, and job experience describe their individual work with their mentors.

  7. NASA Ames Develops Woven Thermal Protection System (TPS)

    NASA Video Gallery

    The Woven Thermal Protection System (WTPS) project explores an innovative way to design, develop and manufacture a family of ablative TPS materials using weaving technology and testing them in the ...

  8. NASA-Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1983-01-01

    The function of SHARP is to recognize high school juniors who have demonstrated unusually high promise for sucess in mathemtics and science. Twenty academically talented students who will be seniors in high school in September were chosen to participate in SHARP 83. Mentors were selected to provide students with first-hand experiences in a research and development environment in order that each student might try out his or her tentative professional career choice. Some special features of SHARP included field trips to private industries doing similar and related research, special lectures on topics of research here at ARC, individual and group counseling sessions, written research papers and oral reports, and primarily the opportunity to be exposed to the present frontiers in space exploration and research. The long-range goal of SHARP is to contribute to the future recruitment of needed scientists and engineers. This final report is summary of all the phases of the planning and implemenation of the 1983 Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP).

  9. On-board Science Understanding: NASA Ames' Efforts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roush, Ted L.; Cheeseman, Peter; Gulick, Virginia; Wolf, David; Gazis, Paul; Benedix, Gretchen; Buntine, Wray; Glymour, Clark; Pedersen, Liam; Ruzon, Mark

    1998-01-01

    In the near future NASA intends to explore various regions of our solar system using robotic devices such as rovers, spacecraft, airplanes, and/or balloons. Such platforms will likely carry imaging devices, and a variety of analytical instruments intended to evaluate the chemical and mineralogical nature of the environment(s) that they encounter. Historically, mission operations have involved: (1) return of scientific data from the craft; (2) evaluation of the data by space scientists; (3) recommendations of the scientists regarding future mission activity; (4) commands for achieving these activities being transmitted to the craft; and (5) the activity being undertaken. This cycle is then repeated for the duration of the mission with command opportunities once or perhaps twice per day. In a rapidly changing environment, such as might be encountered by a rover traversing hundreds of meters a day or a spacecraft encountering an asteroid, this historical cycle is not amenable to rapid long range traverses, discovery of novelty, or rapid response to any unexpected situations. In addition to real-time response issues, the nature of imaging and/or spectroscopic devices are such that tremendous data volumes can be acquired, for example during a traverse. However, such data volumes can rapidly exceed on-board memory capabilities prior to the ability to transmit it to Earth. Additionally, the necessary communication band-widths are restrictive enough so that only a small portion of these data can actually be returned to Earth. Such scenarios clearly require the enabling of some crucial decisions to be made on-board by these robotic explorers. These decisions transcend the electromechanical control, health, and navigation issues associated with robotic operations. Instead they focus upon a long term goal of automating scientific discovery based upon data returned by sensors of the robot craft. Such an approach would eventually enable it to understand what is interesting because the data deviates from expectations generated by current theories/models of planetary processes that could have resulted in the observed data. Such interesting data and/or conclusions can then be selectively transmitted to Earth thus reducing memory and communications demands.

  10. Thermal protection materials at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasky, Daniel J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics addressed are: (1) Space Exploration Initiative (SEI); (2) Aeroassist Flight Experiment (AFE); (3) Mars Environmental Survey (MESUR); (4) National Aero-space Plan (NASP); (5) Pegasus and Pegasus/SWERVE Hypersonic Testing; and (6) Personnel Launch System TPS evaluation.

  11. A decade of aeroacoustic research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitz, Frederic H.; Mosher, M.; Kitaplioglu, Cahit; Cross, J.; Chang, I.

    1988-01-01

    The rotorcraft aeroacoustic research accomplishments of the past decade at Ames Research Center are reviewed. These include an extensive sequence of flight, ground, and wind tunnel tests that have utilized the facilities to guide and pioneer theoretical research. Many of these experiments were of benchmark quality. The experiments were used to isolate the inadequacies of linear theory in high-speed impulsive noise research, have led to the development of theoretical approaches, and have guided the emerging discipline of computational fluid dynamics to rotorcraft aeroacoustic problems.

  12. Record Of Both Tectonic Related Vertical Motions and Global Sea Level Rise by Marine Terraces along an Active Arc Volcano. Example of Basse-Terre, Lesser Antilles (French West-Indies).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabre, M.; Moysan, M.; Graindorge, D.; Jean-Frederic, L.; Philippon, M. M.; Marcaillou, B.; Léticée, J. L.

    2015-12-01

    Volcano-tectonic history of the Caribbean plate provides direct insight onto the dynamic of the North American Plate westward subduction. Basse-Terre Island is a volcanic chain that belongs to the Lesser Antilles active volcanic arc with a southward decreasing age of volcanism from 3 Ma to present day.We investigate records of vertical motion along Basse-Terre through a morphostructural analysis of the Pleistocene-Holocene shallow-water carbonate platforms and associated terraces that surround Basse-Terre Island. This study is based on new high-resolution bathymetric and dense seismic data acquired during the GEOTREF oceanographic survey (2015, February). Our bathymetric and topographic Digital Terrain Model together with the "Litto3D" Lidar data (IGN/SHOM) images the island topography and the platform bathymetry to a depth of 200m with horizontal and vertical resolutions of 5m and ~cm respectively. This detailed study highlights the morphostructure of terraces built during the last transgression in order to identify and quantify their vertical motions. We analyze inherited morphology and structures of the forearc that affect the platform to discuss effects of the regional tectonics context. A particular emphasis is put on the influence of the NW-SE arc parallel transtensive Montserrat-Bouillante fault system onto the platform geometry. At last, the distribution of Basse-Terre terraces is compared with terraces distribution around other Lesser Antilles island and the Bahamas stable margin platform. We aim at discriminating the influence of the Pleistocene global sea-level rise from the one of tectonic vertical deformations.

  13. Vertical tail buffeting of fighter aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, B. H. K.

    2000-04-01

    Vertical tail buffeting at high angles of attack is a phenomenon associated with the impact of vortical flows generated by the aircraft on the fins. This poses a serious problem for both single- and twin-tail fighter aircraft from the point of view of combat maneuverability and structural integrity. The research activities to understand the flow physics with an aim to alleviate buffet loads were quite intense during the period from the late 1970s to the early 1990s. Most of the investigations were carried out on the F/A-18 mainly because of two international programs involving countries that operate the F/A-18 in their air force. This review begins with a description of the water tunnel experiments showing some flow visualization results of the leading-edge extension (LEX) burst vortical flows. Wind tunnel studies on a 1/9 scale F/A-18 model in Australia, a 1/6.65 scale model in the United Kingdom, a 6% scale model in Canada, 12%, 16% and full-scale models in the United States are summarized. Scale effects can be deduced from the various sub- and full-scale models tested. Flight test results conducted on the High Alpha Research Vehicle in the United States and on an instrumented CF-18 test aircraft in Canada are presented. The accuracy of analytical methods utilizing wind tunnel data to predict buffet loads at flight conditions is discussed. The use of CFD to compute vertical fin buffeting is challenging and requires a large amount of computing power. A brief exposure to the methodology is given and results from the only available computational case study carried out by NASA Ames are compared with wind tunnel and flight test data. A short introduction to statistical non-stationary effects is given. Hysteresis effect of the LEX vortex burst on the buffet loads is discussed, and a statistical non-stationary buffet prediction method is outlined. This review provides a useful reference to the results collected from the High Alpha Technology Program, The Technical

  14. ostglacial rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald .

    1996-01-01

    I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan, 1995] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier, 1995].

  15. Vertical distribution of ozone and the variation of tropopause heights based on ozonesonde and satellite observations. [Contract title: Internal Wave Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hung, R. J.; Liu, J. M.

    1986-01-01

    The distribution of atmospheric ozone is nonuniform both in space and time. Local ozone concentration vary with altitude, latitude, longitude, and season. Two year ozonesonde data, January 1981 to December 1982, observed at four Canadian stations and 2.5 year backscattered ultraviolet experiment data on the Nimbus-4 satellite, April 1970 to August 1972, observed over five American stations were used to study the relationship between the total ozone, vertical height distribution of the ozone mixing ratio, vertical height distribution of half total ozone, and the local tropopause height. The results show that there is a postive correlation between total ozone in Dobson Units and the tropopause height in terms of atmospheric pressure. This result suggests that local intrusion of the statosphere into the troposphere, or the local decreasing of tropopause height could occur if there is a local increasing of total ozone. A comparison of the vertical height distribution of the ozone mixing ratio, the modified pressure height of half total ozone and the tropopause height shows that the pressure height of an ozone mixing ratio of 0.3 micrograms/g, and the modified pressure height of half total ozone are very well correlated with the tropopause pressure height.

  16. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  17. Micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Abraham P.; Sommargren, Gary E.; McConaghy, Charles F.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    1999-10-19

    A micromachined vertical actuator utilizing a levitational force, such as in electrostatic comb drives, provides vertical actuation that is relatively linear in actuation for control, and can be readily combined with parallel plate capacitive position sensing for position control. The micromachined electrostatic vertical actuator provides accurate movement in the sub-micron to micron ranges which is desirable in the phase modulation instrument, such as optical phase shifting. For example, compact, inexpensive, and position controllable micromirrors utilizing an electrostatic vertical actuator can replace the large, expensive, and difficult-to-maintain piezoelectric actuators. A thirty pound piezoelectric actuator with corner cube reflectors, as utilized in a phase shifting diffraction interferometer can be replaced with a micromirror and a lens. For any very precise and small amplitudes of motion` micromachined electrostatic actuation may be used because it is the most compact in size, with low power consumption and has more straightforward sensing and control options.

  18. Flow Separation Control on A Full-Scale Vertical Tail Model Using Sweeping Jet Actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andino, Marlyn Y.; Lin, John C.; Washburn, Anthony E.; Whalen, Edward A.; Graff, Emilio C.; Wygnanski, Israel J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes test results of a joint NASA/Boeing research effort to advance Active Flow Control (AFC) technology to enhance aerodynamic efficiency. A full-scale Boeing 757 vertical tail model equipped with sweeping jets AFC was tested at the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel at NASA Ames Research Center. The flow separation control optimization was performed at 100 knots, a maximum rudder deflection of 30deg, and sideslip angles of 0deg and -7.5deg. Greater than 20% increments in side force were achieved at the two sideslip angles with a 31-actuator AFC configuration. Flow physics and flow separation control associated with the AFC are presented in detail. AFC caused significant increases in suction pressure on the actuator side and associated side force enhancement. The momentum coefficient (C sub mu) is shown to be a useful parameter to use for scaling-up sweeping jet AFC from sub-scale tests to full-scale applications. Reducing the number of actuators at a constant total C(sub mu) of approximately 0.5% and tripling the actuator spacing did not significantly affect the flow separation control effectiveness.

  19. Line-of-sight determination in real-time simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kull, Frederick G., Jr.; Fought, Donald E.

    1993-01-01

    This paper describes the selection of a method for determining line-of-sight in real-time simulations for the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) facility. Five different combinations of terrain representation and line-of-sight determination algorithms were tested. A gridpost terrain format, in conjunction with a Digital Differential Analyzer algorithm, was found to best meet the simulation criteria of high speed, low storage requirements, and accuracy.

  20. Motion-Based System Identification and Fault Detection and Isolation Technologies for Thruster Controlled Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Edward; Sutter, David W.; Berkovitz, Dustin; Betts, Bradley J.; Kong, Edmund; delMundo, Rommel; Lages, Christopher R.; Mah, Robert W.; Papasin, Richard

    2003-01-01

    By analyzing the motions of a thruster-controlled spacecraft, it is possible to provide on-line (1) thruster fault detection and isolation (FDI), and (2) vehicle mass- and thruster-property identification (ID). Technologies developed recently at NASA Ames have significantly improved the speed and accuracy of these ID and FDI capabilities, making them feasible for application to a broad class of spacecraft. Since these technologies use existing sensors, the improved system robustness and performance that comes with the thruster fault tolerance and system ID can be achieved through a software-only implementation. This contrasts with the added cost, mass, and hardware complexity commonly required by FDI. Originally developed in partnership with NASA - Johnson Space Center to provide thruster FDI capability for the X-38 during re-entry, these technologies are most recently being applied to the MIT SPHERES experimental spacecraft to fly on the International Space Station in 2004. The model-based FDI uses a maximum-likelihood calculation at its core, while the ID is based upon recursive least squares estimation. Flight test results from the SPHERES implementation, as flown aboard the NASA KC-1 35A 0-g simulator aircraft in November 2003 are presented.

  1. A Harmonic Motion Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gluck, P.; Krakower, Zeev

    2010-01-01

    We present a unit comprising theory, simulation and experiment for a body oscillating on a vertical spring, in which the simultaneous use of a force probe and an ultrasonic range finder enables one to explore quantitatively and understand many aspects of simple and damped harmonic motions. (Contains 14 figures.)

  2. Physics and the Vertical Jump

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Offenbacher, Elmer L.

    1970-01-01

    The physics of vertical jumping is described as an interesting illustration for motivating students in a general physics course to master the kinematics and dynamics of one dimensional motion. The author suggests that mastery of the physical principles of the jump may promote understanding of certain biological phenomena, aspects of physical…

  3. The Results of a Simulator Study to Determine the Effects on Pilot Performance of Two Different Motion Cueing Algorithms and Various Delays, Compensated and Uncompensated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guo, Li-Wen; Cardullo, Frank M.; Telban, Robert J.; Houck, Jacob A.; Kelly, Lon C.

    2003-01-01

    A study was conducted employing the Visual Motion Simulator (VMS) at the NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. This study compared two motion cueing algorithms, the NASA adaptive algorithm and a new optimal control based algorithm. Also, the study included the effects of transport delays and the compensation thereof. The delay compensation algorithm employed is one developed by Richard McFarland at NASA Ames Research Center. This paper reports on the analyses of the results of analyzing the experimental data collected from preliminary simulation tests. This series of tests was conducted to evaluate the protocols and the methodology of data analysis in preparation for more comprehensive tests which will be conducted during the spring of 2003. Therefore only three pilots were used. Nevertheless some useful results were obtained. The experimental conditions involved three maneuvers; a straight-in approach with a rotating wind vector, an offset approach with turbulence and gust, and a takeoff with and without an engine failure shortly after liftoff. For each of the maneuvers the two motion conditions were combined with four delay conditions (0, 50, 100 & 200ms), with and without compensation.

  4. Motion Sickness

    MedlinePlus

    ... people traveling by car, train, airplanes and especially boats. Motion sickness can start suddenly, with a queasy ... motion sickness. For example, down below on a boat, your inner ear senses motion, but your eyes ...

  5. Vertical Mass, Momentum, Moisture, and Heat Fluxes in Hurricanes above 10 km during CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfister, Leonhard; Bui, Paul; Herman, Robert; Dean-Day, Jon; Hipskind, R. Stephen (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The third and fourth NASA Convection and Moisture Experiments (CAMEX-3 and CAMEX-4) during the Atlantic hurricane seasons of 1998 and 2001, respectively, have yielded comprehensive multi-aircraft datasets using, both remote and in-situ instrumentation. Among these are high-frequency in-situ measurements of vertical wind, horizontal wind, temperature, and water vapor, made from NASA's DC-8 aircraft in the upper portions of the hurricane (typically above 10 km). Wind and temperature measurements were made at 20 hz by the NASA/Ames Meteorological Measurement System, while water vapor was measured at 1 hz by the NASA/JPL Laser Hygrometer. Fluxes of heat, momentum, and moisture at these levels are important, since modeling studies have shown that ice processes, which are dominant at temperatures below -40C (where the DC-8 flies) are important for hurricane intensification. Also, there are indications from satellite studies that latent heat release at DC-8 levels is significant, perhaps a third of those in the mid-troposphere. Preliminary results show that typical updrafts in the eyewall region are comparable to or higher than previous observations of tropical convection, with several instances of updraft magnitudes of 15 meters per second (the maximum observed was 21 meters per second). They also show significant supersaturations (10-20% or more) in the updrafts, which would enhance the latent heat release at the upper levels of the hurricane. This paper will examine the magnitude and distribution of small and mesoscale vertical fluxes of mass, momentum, moisture, and heat. The goal is to examine the role of these fluxes in the overall budgets of the respective quantities in the upper portions of the hurricane.

  6. Visual motion detection sensitivity is enhanced by an orthogonal motion aftereffect.

    PubMed

    Takemura, Hiromasa; Murakami, Ikuya

    2010-09-09

    A recent study (H. Takemura & I. Murakami, 2010) showed enhancement of motion detection sensitivity by an orthogonal induced motion, suggesting that a weak motion component can combine with an orthogonal motion component to generate stronger oblique motion perception. Here we examined how an orthogonal motion aftereffect (MAE) affects motion detection sensitivity. After adaptation to vertical motion, a Gabor patch barely moving leftward or rightward was presented. As a result of an interaction between horizontal physical motion and a vertical MAE, subjects perceived the stimulus as moving obliquely. Subjects were asked to judge the horizontal direction of motion irrespective of the vertical MAE. The performance was enhanced when the Gabor patch was perceived as moving obliquely as the result of a weak MAE. The enhancement effect depended on the strength of the MAE for each subject rather than on the temporal frequency of the adapting stimulus. These results suggest that weak motion information that is hard to detect can interact with orthogonal adaptation and yield stronger oblique motion perception, making directional judgment easier. Moreover, the present results indicate that the enhancement effect of orthogonal motion involves general motion integration mechanisms rather than a specific mechanism only applicable to a particular type of illusory motion.

  7. NASA-Navy Telemedicine: Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises for Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acromite, Michael T.; Cowings, Patricia; Toscano, William; Davis, Carl; Porter, Henry O.

    2010-01-01

    Airsickness is the most significant medical condition affecting naval aviation training. A 2001 study showed that airsickness was reported in 81% of naval aviation students and was associated with 82% of below average flight scores. The cost to a single training air-wing was over $150,000 annually for fuel and maintenance costs alone. Resistent cases are sent to the Naval Aerospace Medical Institute (NAMI) for evaluation and desensitization in the self-paced airsickness desensitization (SPAD) program. This approach is 75% successful, but can take up to 8 weeks at a significant travel cost. NASA Ames Research Center's Autogenic Feedback Training Exercises (AFTE) uses physiological and biofeedback training for motion sickness prevention. It has a remote capability that has been used from Moffett Field, CA to Atlanta, GA . AFTE is administered in twelve (30-minute) training sessions. The success rate for the NASA AFTE program has been over 85%. Methods: Implementation Phases: Phase I: Transfer NASA AFTE to NAMI; NASA will remotely train aviation students at NAMI. Phase II: NAMI-centered AFTE application with NASA oversight. Phase III: NAMI-centered AFTE to remotely train at various Navy sites. Phase IV: NAMI to offer Tri-service application and examine research opportunities. Results: 1. Use available telemedicine connectivity between NAMI and NASA. 2. Save over $2,000 per student trained. 3. Reduce aviation training attrition. 4. Provide standardization of multi-location motion sickness training. 5. Future tri-service initiatives. 6. Data to NASA and Navy for QA and research opportunities.

  8. Apparatus for Teaching Physics: A Versatile Projectile Motion Board.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prigo, Robert B.; Korda, Anthony

    1984-01-01

    Describes the design and use of a projectile motion apparatus to illustrate a variety of projective motion results typically discussed in an introductory course. They include independence of horizontal (constant speed) and vertical (constant acceleration) motions, parabolic path shape, and other types of motion. (JN)

  9. Plate motion

    SciTech Connect

    Gordon, R.G. )

    1991-01-01

    The motion of tectonic plates on the earth is characterized in a critical review of U.S. research from the period 1987-1990. Topics addressed include the NUVEL-1 global model of current plate motions, diffuse plate boundaries and the oceanic lithosphere, the relation between plate motions and distributed deformations, accelerations and the steadiness of plate motions, the distribution of current Pacific-North America motion across western North America and its margin, plate reconstructions and their uncertainties, hotspots, and plate dynamics. A comprehensive bibliography is provided. 126 refs.

  10. Vertical vibration analysis for elevator compensating sheave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watanabe, Seiji; Okawa, Takeya; Nakazawa, Daisuke; Fukui, Daiki

    2013-07-01

    Most elevators applied to tall buildings include compensating ropes to satisfy the balanced rope tension between the car and the counter weight. The compensating ropes receive tension by the compensating sheave, which is installed at the bottom space of the elevator shaft. The compensating sheave is only suspended by the compensating ropes, therefore, the sheave can move vertically while the car is traveling. This paper shows the elevator dynamic model to evaluate the vertical motion of the compensating sheave. Especially, behavior in emergency cases, such as brake activation and buffer strike, was investigated to evaluate the maximum upward motion of the sheave. The simulation results were validated by experiments and the most influenced factor for the sheave vertical motion was clarified.

  11. Human visual and vestibular heading perception in the vertical planes.

    PubMed

    Crane, Benjamin T

    2014-02-01

    Heading estimation has not previously been reported in the vertical planes. This is a potentially interesting issue because although distribution of neuronal direction sensitivities is near uniform for vertical headings, there is an overrepresentation of otolith organs sensitive to motion in the horizontal relative to the vertical plane. Furthermore, thresholds of horizontal motion perception are considerably lower than those of vertical motion which has the potential to bias heading perception. The current data from 14 human subjects (age 19 to 67) measured heading estimation in response to vestibular motion of 14 cm (28 cm/s) over a 360° of headings at 5° intervals. An analogous visual motion was tested in separate trials. In this study, earth and head vertical/horizontal were always aligned. Results demonstrated that the horizontal component of heading was overestimated relative to the vertical component for vestibular heading stimuli in the coronal (skew) and sagittal (elevation) planes. For visual headings, the bias was much smaller and in the opposite direction such that the vertical component of heading was overestimated. Subjects older than 50 had significantly worse precision and larger biases relative to that of younger subjects for the vestibular conditions, although visual heading estimates were similar. A vector addition model was fit to the data which explains the observed heading biases by the known distribution of otolith organs in humans. The greatly decreased precision with age is explained by the model with decreases in end organ numbers, and relatively greater loss of otoliths that are sensitive to vertical motion.

  12. Models for extracting vertical crustal movements from leveling data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holdahl, S. H.

    1978-01-01

    Various adjustment strategies are being used in North America to obtain vertical crustal movements from repeated leveling. The more successful models utilize polynomials or multiquadric analysis to describe elevation change with a velocity surface. Other features permit determination of nonlinear motions, motions associated with earthquakes or episodes, and vertical motions of blocks where boundaries are prespecified. The preferred models for estimating crustal motions permit the use of detached segments of releveling to govern the shape of a velocity surface and allow for input from nonleveling sources such as tide gages and paired lake gages. Some models for extracting vertical crustal movements from releveling data are also excellent for adjusting leveling networks, and permit mixing old and new data in areas exhibiting vertical motion. The new adjustment techniques are more general than older static models and will undoubtedly be used routinely in the future as the constitution of level networks becomes mainly relevelings.

  13. Coriolis effects and motion sickness modelling.

    PubMed

    Bles, W

    1998-11-15

    Coriolis effects are notorious in relation to disorientation and motion sickness in aircrew. A review is provided of experimental data on these Coriolis effects, including the modulatory effects of adding visual or somatosensory rotatory motion information. A vector analysis of the consequences of head movements during somatosensory, visual and/or vestibular rotatory motion stimulation revealed that the more the sensed angular velocity vector after the head movements is aligned with the gravitoinertial force vector, the less nauseating effects are experienced. It is demonstrated that this is a special case of the subjective vertical conflict theory on motion sickness that assumes that motion sickness may be provoked if a discrepancy is detected between the subjective vertical and the sensed vertical as determined on the basis of incoming sensory information.

  14. Does a motion base prevent simulator sickness?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharkey, Thomas J.; Mccauley, Michael E.

    1992-01-01

    The use of high-fidelity motion cues to reduce the discrepancy between visually implied motion and actual motion is tested experimentally using the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS). Ten pilot subjects use the VMS to fly simulated S-turns and sawtooths which generate a high incidence of motion sickness. The subjects fly the maneuvers on separate days both with and without use of a motion base provided by the VMS, and data are collected regarding symptoms, dark focus, and postural equilibrium. The motion-base condition is shown to be practically irrelevant with respect to the incidence and severity of motion sickness. It is suggested that the data-collection procedure cannot detect differences in sickness levels, and the false cues of the motion condition are theorized to have an adverse impact approximately equivalent to the absence of cues in a fixed-base condition.

  15. Motion sickness.

    PubMed

    Golding, J F

    2016-01-01

    Over 2000 years ago the Greek physician Hippocrates wrote, "sailing on the sea proves that motion disorders the body." Indeed, the word "nausea" derives from the Greek root word naus, hence "nautical," meaning a ship. The primary signs and symptoms of motion sickness are nausea and vomiting. Motion sickness can be provoked by a wide variety of transport environments, including land, sea, air, and space. The recent introduction of new visual technologies may expose more of the population to visually induced motion sickness. This chapter describes the signs and symptoms of motion sickness and different types of provocative stimuli. The "how" of motion sickness (i.e., the mechanism) is generally accepted to involve sensory conflict, for which the evidence is reviewed. New observations concern the identification of putative "sensory conflict" neurons and the underlying brain mechanisms. But what reason or purpose does motion sickness serve, if any? This is the "why" of motion sickness, which is analyzed from both evolutionary and nonfunctional maladaptive theoretic perspectives. Individual differences in susceptibility are great in the normal population and predictors are reviewed. Motion sickness susceptibility also varies dramatically between special groups of patients, including those with different types of vestibular disease and in migraineurs. Finally, the efficacy and relative advantages and disadvantages of various behavioral and pharmacologic countermeasures are evaluated. PMID:27638085

  16. Brownian motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavenda, B. H.

    1985-02-01

    Brownian motion, the doubly random motion of small particles suspended in a liquid due to molecular collisions, and its implications and applications in the history of modern science are discussed. Topics examined include probabilistic phenomena, the kinetic theory of gases, Einstein's atomic theory of Brownian motion, particle displacement, diffusion measurements, the determination of the mass of the atom and of Avogadro's number, the statistical mechanics of thermodynamics, nonequilibrium systems, Langevin's equation of motion, time-reversed evolution, mathematical analogies, and applications in economics and radio navigation. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  17. Rotation of vertically oriented objects during earthquakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinzen, Klaus-G.

    2012-10-01

    Vertically oriented objects, such as tombstones, monuments, columns, and stone lanterns, are often observed to shift and rotate during earthquake ground motion. Such observations are usually limited to the mesoseismal zone. Whether near-field rotational ground motion components are necessary in addition to pure translational movements to explain the observed rotations is an open question. We summarize rotation data from seven earthquakes between 1925 and 2009 and perform analog and numeric rotation testing with vertically oriented objects. The free-rocking motion of a marble block on a sliding table is disturbed by a pulse in the direction orthogonal to the rocking motion. When the impulse is sufficiently strong and occurs at the `right' moment, it induces significant rotation of the block. Numeric experiments of a free-rocking block show that the initiation of vertical block rotation by a cycloidal acceleration pulse applied orthogonal to the rocking axis depends on the amplitude of the pulse and its phase relation to the rocking cycle. Rotation occurs when the pulse acceleration exceeds the threshold necessary to provoke rocking of a resting block, and the rocking block approaches its equilibrium position. Experiments with blocks subjected to full 3D strong motion signals measured during the 2009 L'Aquila earthquake confirm the observations from the tests with analytic ground motions. Significant differences in the rotational behavior of a monolithic block and two stacked blocks exist.

  18. Boundary Avoidance Tracking for Instigating Pilot Induced Oscillations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craun, Robert W.; Acosta, Diana M.; Beard, Steven D.; Hardy, Gordon H.; Leonard, Michael W.; Weinstein, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In order to advance research in the area of pilot induced oscillations, a reliable method to create PIOs in a simulated environment is necessary. Using a boundary avoidance tracking task, researchers performing an evaluation of control systems were able to create PIO events in 42% of cases using a nominal aircraft, and 91% of cases using an aircraft with reduced actuator rate limits. The simulator evaluation took place in the NASA Ames Vertical Motion Simulator, a high-fidelity motion-based simulation facility.

  19. Segmental and Kinetic Contributions in Vertical Jumps Performed with and without an Arm Swing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltner, Michael E.; Bishop, Elijah J.; Perez, Cassandra M.

    2004-01-01

    To determine the contributions of the motions of the body segments to the vertical ground reaction force ([F.sub.z]), the joint torques produced by the leg muscles, and the time course of vertical velocity generation during a vertical jump, 15 men were videotaped performing countermovement vertical jumps from a force plate with and without an arm…

  20. Human comfort response to dominant random motions in longitudinal modes of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of random vertical and longitudinal accelerations and pitching velocity passenger ride comfort responses were examined on the NASA Langley Visual Motion Simulator. Effects of power spectral density shape were studied for motions where the peak was between 0 and 2 Hz. The subjective rating data and the physical motion data obtained are presented without interpretation or detailed analysis. There existed motions in all other degrees of freedom as well as the particular pair of longitudinal airplane motions studied. These unwanted motions, caused by the characteristics of the simulator may have introduced some interactive effects on passenger responses.

  1. Overview of CTAS Research and Development at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edwards, Thomas A.

    2004-01-01

    This presentation will be a standard briefing package to be given at a variety of research laboratories in Europe in conjunction with site visits. The talk will include a brief overview of the history of CTAS, a summary of the development process and facilities, and will then highlight recent accomplishments and developments. These include Free Flight Phase One deployments, Free Flight Phase Two planned deployments, and recent results from research on tools in development, such as Active FAST and Direct-To. The material for the presentation will be drawn entirely from previously published material.

  2. The NASA-AMES Research Center Stratospheric Aerosol Model. 1. Physical Processes and Computational Analogs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Toon, O. B.; Whitten, R. C.; Kiang, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A time-dependent one-dimensional model of the stratospheric sulfate aerosol layer is presented. In constructing the model, a wide range of basic physical and chemical processes are incorporated in order to avoid predetermining or biasing the model predictions. The simulation, which extends from the surface to an altitude of 58 km, includes the troposphere as a source of gases and condensation nuclei and as a sink for aerosol droplets. The size distribution of aerosol particles is resolved into 25 categories with particle radii increasing geometrically from 0.01 to 2.56 microns such that particle volume doubles between categories.

  3. Modernization and Activation of the NASA Ames 11- by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.

    2000-01-01

    The Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Automation systems were installed in all three UPWT tunnel legs and the Auxiliaries facility. Major improvements were made to the four control rooms, model support systems, main drive motors, and main drive speed control. Pressure vessel repairs and refurbishment to the electrical distribution system were also completed. Significant changes were made to improve test section flow quality in the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg. After the completion of the construction phase of the project, acceptance and checkout testing was performed to demonstrate the capabilities of the modernized facility. A pneumatic test of the tunnel circuit was performed to verify the structural integrity of the pressure vessel before wind-on operations. Test section turbulence, flow angularity, and acoustic parameters were measured throughout the tunnel envelope to determine the effects of the tunnel flow quality improvements. The new control system processes were thoroughly checked during wind-off and wind-on operations. Manual subsystem modes and automated supervisory modes of tunnel operation were validated. The aerodynamic and structural performance of both the new composite compressor rotor blades and the old aluminum rotor blades was measured. The entire subsonic and supersonic envelope of the 11-by 11-Foot Transonic leg was defined up to the maximum total pressure.

  4. The Life Sciences program at the NASA Ames Research Center - An overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vernikos-Danellis, Joan; Sharp, Joseph C.

    1989-01-01

    The research projects planned for the Life Sciences program have a goal of answering basic questions concerning the nature of life itself and its evolution in the universe from basic elements, as well as the search for extraterrestrial intelligence. The program also includes studies of the evolution and development of life on the planet earth, and the global changes occurring today that affect life on the earth. The paper describes the simulation models developed to study the effects of space, the flight projects of the program, and the biomedical program, which currently focuses on the physiological changes in the human body that are associated with space flights and the interactions among these changes.

  5. NASA Ames Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program: 1986 research papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, Patricia

    1988-01-01

    Engineering enrollments are rising in universities; however the graduate engineering shortage continues. Particularly, women and minorities will be underrepresented for many years. As one means of solving this shortage, Federal agencies facing future scientific and technological challenges were asked to participate in the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). This program was created to provide an engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students at an age when they could still make career and education decisions. The SHARP program is designed for high school juniors who are U.S. citizens, are 16 years old, and who have very high promise in math and science through outstanding academic performance in high school. Students who are accepted into this summer program will earn as they learn by working 8 hr days in a 5-day work week. Reports from SHARP students are presented.

  6. Status of Regenerative Life Support Research and Technology Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kliss, Mark; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1998-01-01

    1. Provide Advanced Life Support technologies that significantly reduce life cycle costs, improve operational performance, promote self-sufficiency, and minimize expenditure of resources for missions of long duration. 2. Develop and apply methods of systems analysis and engineering to guide investments in technology, resolve and integrate competing needs, and guide evolution of advanced life support systems. 3. Resolve issues of hypogravity performance through space flight research and evaluation. 4. Ensure timely transfer of new life support technologies to missions. 5. Transfer technologies to private sectors for national benefit.

  7. The NASA-Ames Research Center stratospheric aerosol model. 2. Sensitivity studies and comparison with observatories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toon, O. B.; Turco, R. P.; Hamill, P.; Kiang, C. S.; Whitten, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    Sensitivity tests were performed on a one-dimensional, physical-chemical model of the unperturbed stratospheric aerosols, and model calculations were compared with observations. The tests and comparisons suggest that coagulation controls the particle number mixing ratio, although the number of condensation nuclei at the tropopause and the diffusion coefficient at high altitudes are also important. The sulfur gas source strength and the aerosol residence time are much more important than the supply of condensation nuclei in establishing mass and large particle concentrations. The particle size is also controlled mainly by gas supply and residence time. In situ observations of the aerosols and laboratory measurements of aerosols, parameters that can provide further information about the physics and chemistry of the stratosphere and the aerosols found there are provided.

  8. Merging Intelligent Systems Technologies with CFD Analysis Strategies: Prototype Development at NASA Ames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, David E.; Brooks, Walt F. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    A collaborative team of researchers from fields of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD), fluid physics, computer architectures, and computer science and knowledge engineering have begun work on a prototype system that addresses several of industry's concerns in using NASA-developed CFD codes as part of the design cycle. A major problem exists in the application of CFD technologies within the aeronautics design cycle due primarily to misunderstandings in the ranges of applicability of the various solver codes or turbulence models. Features that arise during the CFD solution process need to be discriminated and recognized as actual flow features with physical support in the geometry and flow conditions of the problem being solved, or as numerical or non-physical errors arising from mis-application of solver code and its parameters, gridding strategies, or discretization. interpolations. The fundamental concept is to develop an intelligent computational system that can accept the engineer's definition of the problem and construct an optimal CFD solution. To do this requires capturing both the knowledge of how to apply the various CFD tools and how to adapt the application of those tools to flow structures as they evolve during the flow simulation. Embedded within this adaptive system approach is the additional desire to automatically identify and quantify the quality of resolution of the pertinent flow structures, be they genuine or error-induced, and then to adjust the solution strategy accordingly. This paper discusses the status of that prototyping effort.

  9. Tools for 3D scientific visualization in computational aerodynamics at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bancroft, Gordon; Plessel, Todd; Merritt, Fergus; Watson, Val

    1989-01-01

    Hardware, software, and techniques used by the Fluid Dynamics Division (NASA) for performing visualization of computational aerodynamics, which can be applied to the visualization of flow fields from computer simulations of fluid dynamics about the Space Shuttle, are discussed. Three visualization techniques applied, post-processing, tracking, and steering, are described, as well as the post-processing software packages used, PLOT3D, SURF (Surface Modeller), GAS (Graphical Animation System), and FAST (Flow Analysis software Toolkit). Using post-processing methods a flow simulation was executed on a supercomputer and, after the simulation was complete, the results were processed for viewing. It is shown that the high-resolution, high-performance three-dimensional workstation combined with specially developed display and animation software provides a good tool for analyzing flow field solutions obtained from supercomputers.

  10. Global Biology: An Interdisciplinary Scientific Research Program at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, James G.; Colin, Lawrence

    1984-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  11. Global biology - An interdisciplinary scientific research program at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, J. G.; Colin, L.

    1983-01-01

    NASA has initiated new effort in Global Biology, the primary focus of which is to understand biogeochemical cycles. As part of this effort, an interdisciplinary team of scientists has formed at Ames Research Center to investigate the cycling of sulfur in the marine coastal zone and to study the cycling of nitrogen in terrestrial ecosystems. Both studies will use remotely sensed data, coupled with ground-based research, to identify and measure the transfer of major and minor biologically produced gases between these ecosystems and global reservoirs.

  12. NASA Ames summary high school apprenticeship research program, 1983 research papers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Powell, P.

    1984-01-01

    Engineering enrollments are rising in universities; however, the graduate engineer shortage continues. Particularly, women and minorities will be underrepresented for years to come. As one means of solving this shortage, Federal agencies facing future scientific and technological challenges were asked to participate in the Summer High School Apprenticeship Research Program (SHARP). This program was created 4 years ago to provide an engineering experience for gifted female and minority high school students at an age when they could still make career and education decisions. The SHARP Program is designed for high school juniors (women and minorities) who are U.S. citizens, are 16 years old, and who have unusually high promise in mathematics and science through outstanding academic performance in high school. Students who are accepted into this summer program will earn as they learn by working 8 hours a day in a 5-day work week. This work-study program features weekly field trips, lectures and written reports, and job experience related to the student's career interests.

  13. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The space shuttle orbiter experiments program is responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The infrared imagery of shuttle (IRIS), catalytic surface effects, and tile gap heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The software required to process the flight data which support these experiments is described. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques provide information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third shuttle mission.

  14. Proceedings of the 1985 NASA Ames Research Center's Ground-Effects Workshop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, Kerry (Editor)

    1987-01-01

    The purpose of the workshop was to discuss the current technology base for aerodynamic ground effects and to establish directions for further research of advanced, high performance aircraft designs, particularly those concepts utilizing powered lift systems; e.g., V/STOL, ASTOVL, and STOL aircraft. Fourteen papers were presented in the following areas: suckdown and fountain effects in hover; STOL ground vortex and hot gas ingestion; and vortex lift and jet flaps in ground effect. These subject areas were chosen with regard to current activities in the field of aircraft ground effects research.

  15. Recent Developments in Gun Operating Techniques at the NASA Ames Ballistic Ranges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, D. W.; Miller, R. J.

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes recent developments in gun operating techniques at the Ames ballistic range complex. This range complex has been in operation since the early 1960s. Behavior of sabots during separation and projectile-target impact phenomena have long been observed by means of short-duration flash X-rays: new versions allow operation in the lower-energy ("soft") X-ray range and have been found to be more effective than the earlier designs. The dynamics of sabot separation is investigated in some depth from X-ray photographs of sabots launched in the Ames 1.0 in and 1.5 in guns; the sabot separation dynamics appears to be in reasonably good agreement with standard aerodynamic theory. Certain sabot packages appear to suffer no erosion or plastic deformation on traversing the gun barrel, contrary to what would be expected. Gun erosion data from the Ames 0.5 in, 1.0 in, and 1.5 in guns is examined in detail and can be correlated with a particular non- dimensionalized powder mass parameter. The gun erosion increases very rapidly as this parameter is increased. Representative shapes of eroded gun barrels are given. Guided by a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) code, the operating conditions of the Ames 0.5 in and 1.5 in guns were modified. These changes involved: (1) reduction in the piston mass, powder mass and hydrogen fill pressure and (2) reduction in pump tube volume, while maintaining hydrogen mass. These changes resulted in muzzle velocity increases of 0.5-0.8 km/sec, achieved simultaneously with 30-50 percent reductions in gun erosion.

  16. NASA Ames potential flow analysis (POTFAN) geometry program (POTGEM), version 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Medan, R. T.; Bullock, R. B.

    1976-01-01

    A computer program known as POTGEM is reported which has been developed as an independent segment of a three-dimensional linearized, potential flow analysis system and which is used to generate a panel point description of arbitrary, three-dimensional bodies from convenient engineering descriptions consisting of equations and/or tables. Due to the independent, modular nature of the program, it may be used to generate corner points for other computer programs.

  17. Report on the 2011 and 2012 NASA Ames Research Center (ARC) / Alaska State Cargo Airship Workshops

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hochstettler, Ronald

    2012-01-01

    This presentation will summarize the Cargo Airships for Northern Operations workshop that was held August 24-25, 2011. This workshop co-sponsored by NASA ARC and the Alaska State Department of Transportation was initiated by interest from Alaska Lt. Governor Mead Treadwell for assistance in investigating the potential benefits of proposed cargo airships for the Alaskan economy and societal needs. The workshop provided a brief background on the technology and operational aspects of conventional airships and hybrids followed by presentations on issues affecting cargo airship operations such as weather management, insurance, regulations, crew duty/rest rules, and available support infrastructures. Speakers representing potential cargo airship users from Alaskan State and commercial organizations presented the needs they felt could be met by cargo airship services. Presenters from Canadian private and military interests also detailed applications and missions that cargo airships could provide to remote regions of Canada. Cost drivers of cargo airship operations were also addressed and tools for modeling and analyzing operational factors and costs affecting cargo airship operations were discussed. Four breakout sessions were held which allowed workshop participants to contribute inputs to four topic areas: Business Approaches and Strategies (financing incentives public/private partnerships etc) for Airship Development and Operation, Design, Development, Production Challenges, and Possible Solutions, Regulatory, Certification, Legal, and Insurance Issues, and Operational Issues, Customer Requirements, and Airship Requirements. A follow on to the 2011 cargo airship workshop is being planned for July 31 August 2, 2012. A status update on this second workshop will also be presented.

  18. Rotorcraft research testing in the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warmbrodt, W.; Smith, C. A.; Johnson, W.

    1985-01-01

    The unique capabilities of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamics Complex (NFAC) for testing rotorcraft systems are described. The test facilities include the 40- by 80-Foot Wind Tunnel, the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel, and the Outdoor Aerodynamic Research Facility. The Ames 7- by 10-Foot Subsonic Wind Tunnel is also used in support of the rotor research programs conducted in the NFAC. Detailed descriptions of each of the facilities, with an emphasis on helicopter rotor test capability, are presented. The special purpose rotor test equipment used in conducting helicopter research is reviewed. Test rigs to operate full-scale helicopter main rotors, helicopter tail rotors, and tilting prop-rotors are available, as well as full-scale and small-scale rotor systems for use in various research programs. The test procedures used in conducting rotor experiments are discussed together with representative data obtained from previous test programs. Specific examples are given for rotor performance, loads, acoustics, system interactions, dynamic and aeroelastic stability, and advanced technology and prototype demonstration models.

  19. Supersonic Retropropulsion Experimental Results from the NASA Ames 9- x 7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berry, Scott A.; Rhode, Matthew N.; Edquist, Karl T.

    2012-01-01

    Supersonic retropropulsion was experimentally examined in the Ames Research Center 9x7-Foot Supersonic Wind Tunnel at Mach 1.8 and 2.4. The experimental model, previously designed for and tested in the Langley Research Center Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at Mach 2.4, 3.5 and 4.6, was a 5-in diameter 70-deg sphere-cone forebody with a 9.55-in long cylindrical aftbody. The forebody was designed to accommodate up to four 4:1 area ratio nozzles, one on the model centerline and the other three on the half radius spaced 120-deg apart. Surface pressure and flow visualization were the primary measurements, including high-speed data to investigate the dynamics of the interactions between the bow and nozzle shocks. Three blowing configurations were tested with thrust coefficients up to 10 and angles of attack up to 20-deg. Preliminary results and observations from the test are provided

  20. A summary of rotorcraft handling qualities research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, R. T.

    1984-01-01

    The objectives of the rotorcraft handling qualities research program at Ames Research Center are twofold: (1) to develop basic handling qualities design criteria to permit cost effective design decisions to be made for helicopters, and (2) to obtain basic handling qualities data for certification of new rotorcraft configurations. The research on the helicopter handling qualities criteria has focused primarily on military nap-of-the-earth (NOE) terrain flying missions, which are flown in day visual meteorological conditions (VMC) and instrument meteorological conditions (IMC), or at night. The Army has recently placed a great deal of emphasis on terrain flying tactics in order to survive and effectively complete the missions in modern and future combat environments. Unfortunately, the existing Military Specification MIL-H 8501A which is a 1961 update of a 1951 document, does not address the handling qualities requirements for terrain flying. The research effort is therefore aimed at filling the void and is being conducted jointly with the Army Aeromechanics Laboratory at Ames. The research on rotorcraft airworthiness standards with respect to flying qualities requirements was conducted to collaboration with the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA).

  1. Supporting flight data analysis for Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, M. J.; Budnick, M. P.; Yang, L.; Chiasson, M. P.

    1983-01-01

    The Space Shuttle Orbiter Experiments program in responsible for collecting flight data to extend the research and technology base for future aerospace vehicle design. The Infrared Imagery of Shuttle (IRIS), Catalytic Surface Effects, and Tile Gap Heating experiments sponsored by Ames Research Center are part of this program. The paper describes the software required to process the flight data which support these experiments. In addition, data analysis techniques, developed in support of the IRIS experiment, are discussed. Using the flight data base, the techniques have provided information useful in analyzing and correcting problems with the experiment, and in interpreting the IRIS image obtained during the entry of the third Shuttle mission.

  2. Exobiology in Earth orbit: The results of science workshops held at NASA, Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Defrees, D. (Editor); Brownlee, D. (Editor); Tarter, J. (Editor); Usher, D. (Editor); Irvine, W. (Editor); Klein, H. (Editor)

    1989-01-01

    The Workshops on Exobiology in Earth Orbit were held to explore concepts for orbital experiments of exobiological interest and make recommendations on which classes of experiments should be carried out. Various observational and experimental opportunities in Earth orbit are described including those associated with the Space Shuttle laboratories, spacecraft deployed from the Space Shuttle and expendable launch vehicles, the Space Station, and lunar bases. Specific science issues and technology needs are summarized. Finally, a list of recommended experiments in the areas of observational exobiology, cosmic dust collection, and in situ experiments is presented.

  3. Near Earth Object Spacecraft Study at NASA Ames: The 2008 UARC Small Spacecraft Summer Study Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asphaug, Erik

    We know less of the origin, evolution, and geophysical behavior of NEOs than we know of the Moon or Mars, despite their petrologic representation in many thousands of meteorites. Obtaining more detailed knowledge of NEOs is also of considerable pragmatic importance. These bodies, mostly asteroids, some comets are the most valuable resource in space, possessing raw materials for fabrication and oxygen extraction, volatiles for propulsion, and agricultural soils and water. They also constitute a much-publicized hazard. Action of any kind begins with a basic scientific understanding, and the next step is a campaign of inexpensive spacecraft missions, explored in depth during this training program. The underlying theme is found in NASA Strategic Sub-goal 3C: Advance scientific knowledge of the origin and history of the solar system and the hazards and resources present as humans explore space. The NEOSS students will be present at this poster.

  4. Prototype Ge:Ga detectors for the NASA-Ames cooled grating spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Houck, J. R.

    1981-07-01

    The detectors were fabricated from a Ge:Ga wafer from Eagle-Pitcher with a room temperature resistivity of approx. 12ohms cm. The wafer is approximately 2 inches in diameter and 0.061 inches thick. The contact material was ion implanted with Boron using 10 to the 14th power ions/sq cm at 25 Kev and 2 x10 to the 14th power ions/sq cm at 50 Kev. The crystal was then sputter-cleaned and metallized first with sputtered Ti and then sputter Au. In addition to the usual infrared measurements of responsivity and noise, measurements were made of the detectors' response to ionizing radiation.

  5. Atmosphere of Freedom: Sixty Years at the NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bugos, Glenn E.; Launius, Roger (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Throughout Ames History, four themes prevail: a commitment to hiring the best people; cutting-edge research tools; project management that gets things done faster, better and cheaper; and outstanding research efforts that serve the scientific professions and the nation. More than any other NASA Center, Ames remains shaped by its origins in the NACA (National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics). Not that its missions remain the same. Sure, Ames still houses the world's greatest collection of wind tunnels and simulation facilities, its aerodynamicists remain among the best in the world, and pilots and engineers still come for advice on how to build better aircraft. But that is increasingly part of Ames' past. Ames people have embraced two other missions for its future. First, intelligent systems and information science will help NASA use new tools in supercomputing, networking, telepresence and robotics. Second, astrobiology will explore lore the prospects for life on Earth and beyond. Both new missions leverage Ames long-standing expertise in computation and in the life sciences, as well as its relations with the computing and biotechnology firms working in the Silicon Valley community that has sprung up around the Center. Rather than the NACA missions, it is the NACA culture that still permeates Ames. The Ames way of research management privileges the scientists and engineers working in the laboratories. They work in an atmosphere of freedom, laced with the expectation of integrity and responsibility. Ames researchers are free to define their research goals and define how they contribute to the national good. They are expected to keep their fingers on the pulse of their disciplines, to be ambitious yet frugal in organizing their efforts, and to always test their theories in the laboratory or in the field. Ames' leadership ranks, traditionally, are cultivated within this scientific community. Rather than manage and supervise these researchers, Ames leadership merely guided them, represents them to NASA headquarters and the world outside, then steps out of the way before they get run over.

  6. Review of Full-Scale F/A-18 Research at NASA Ames Research Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Lawrence E.; Schmitz, Fredric H. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    Results of flow visualization and tail buffett studies conducted on a full-scale production F/A-18 fighter aircraft in the 80- by 120-Foot Wind Tunnel of the National Full-Scale Aerodynamic Complex are presented. Test conditions range between 20 degrees and 40 degrees angle of attack, 16 degrees and -16 degrees side-slip angle, and up to a Mach number of 0.15 (corresponding to a Reynolds number of 12.3 x 10(exp 6) based on mean aerodynamic chord). Flow visualization results include both surface and off-surface techniques that examine forebody, canopy, leading-edge extension, and wing flow fields. Unsteady pressures measured at 96 locations on the port tail fin are used to determine the effect of a removable leading-edge extension fence on tail buffet loads at high angle of attack. Analyses and comparisons include tail fin bending moment and wave velocities on the tail surface. Repeatability and scaling issues are assessed through comparison with measurements from previous full-scale tests and several small-scales tests.

  7. Quality assurance software inspections at NASA Ames: Metrics for feedback and modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wenneson, G.

    1985-01-01

    Software inspections are a set of formal technical review procedures held at selected key points during software development in order to find defects in software documents--is described in terms of history, participants, tools, procedures, statistics, and database analysis.

  8. Ambiguity in Tactile Apparent Motion Perception

    PubMed Central

    Liaci, Emanuela; Bach, Michael; Tebartz van Elst, Ludger; Heinrich, Sven P.; Kornmeier, Jürgen

    2016-01-01

    Background In von Schiller’s Stroboscopic Alternative Motion (SAM) stimulus two visually presented diagonal dot pairs, located on the corners of an imaginary rectangle, alternate with each other and induce either horizontal, vertical or, rarely, rotational motion percepts. SAM motion perception can be described by a psychometric function of the dot aspect ratio (“AR”, i.e. the relation between vertical and horizontal dot distances). Further, with equal horizontal and vertical dot distances (AR = 1) perception is biased towards vertical motion. In a series of five experiments, we presented tactile SAM versions and studied the role of AR and of different reference frames for the perception of tactile apparent motion. Methods We presented tactile SAM stimuli and varied the ARs, while participants reported the perceived motion directions. Pairs of vibration stimulators were attached to the participants’ forearms and stimulator distances were varied within and between forearms. We compared straight and rotated forearm conditions with each other in order to disentangle the roles of exogenous and endogenous reference frames. Results Increasing the tactile SAM’s AR biased perception towards vertical motion, but the effect was weak compared to the visual modality. We found no horizontal disambiguation, even for very small tactile ARs. A forearm rotation by 90° kept the vertical bias, even though it was now coupled with small ARs. A 45° rotation condition with crossed forearms, however, evoked a strong horizontal motion bias. Discussion Existing approaches to explain the visual SAM bias fail to explain the current tactile results. Particularly puzzling is the strong horizontal bias in the crossed-forearm conditions. In the case of tactile apparent motion, there seem to be no fixed priority rule for perceptual disambiguation. Rather the weighting of available evidence seems to depend on the degree of stimulus ambiguity, the current situation and on the perceptual

  9. Steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots

    DOEpatents

    Spletzer, Barry L.; Fischer, Gary J.; Feddema, John T.

    2001-01-01

    The present invention provides a steerable vertical to horizontal energy transducer for mobile robots that less complex and requires less power than two degree of freedom tilt mechanisms. The present invention comprises an end effector that, when mounted with a hopping actuator, translates along axis (typically vertical) actuation into combined vertical and horizontal motion. The end effector, or foot, mounts with an end of the actuator that moves toward the support surface (typically a floor or the earth). The foot is shaped so that the first contact with the support surface is off the axis of the actuator. Off-axis contact with the support surface generates an on-axis force (typically resulting in vertical motion) and a moment orthogonal to the axis. The moment initiates a horizontal tumbling motion, and tilts the actuator so that its axis is oriented with a horizontal component and continued actuation generates both vertical and horizontal force.

  10. Laser tracking for vertical control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dunn, Peter; Torrence, Mark; Pavlis, Erricos; Kolenkiewicz, Ron; Smith, David

    1993-01-01

    The Global Laser Tracking Network has provided LAGEOS ranging data of high accuracy since the first MERIT campaign in late 1983 and we can now resolve centimeter-level three dimensional positions of participating observatories at monthly intervals. In this analysis, the station height estimates have been considered separately from the horizontal components, and can be determined by the strongest stations with a formal standard error of 2 mm using eight years of continuous observations. The rate of change in the vertical can be resolved to a few mm/year, which is at the expected level of several geophysical effects. In comparing the behavior of the stations to that predicted by recent models of post-glacial rebound, we find no correlation in this very small effect. Particular attention must be applied to data and survey quality control when measuring the vertical component, and the survey observations are critical components of the geodynamic results. Seasonal patterns are observed in the heights of most stations, and the possibility of secular motion at the level of several millimeters per year cannot be excluded. Any such motion must be considered in the interpretation of horizontal inter-site measurements, and can help to identify mechanisms which can cause variations which occur linearly with time, seasonally, or abruptly.

  11. Motion words selectively modulate direction discrimination sensitivity for threshold motion

    PubMed Central

    Pavan, Andrea; Skujevskis, Māris; Baggio, Giosuè

    2013-01-01

    Can speech selectively modulate the sensitivity of a sensory system so that, in the presence of a suitable linguistic context, the discrimination of certain perceptual features becomes more or less likely? In this study, participants heard upward or downward motion words followed by a single visual field of random dots moving upwards or downwards. The time interval between the onsets of the auditory and the visual stimuli was varied parametrically. Motion direction could be either discriminable (suprathreshold motion) or non-discriminable (threshold motion). Participants had to judge whether the dots were moving upward or downward. Results show a double dissociation between discrimination sensitivity (d′) and reaction times depending on whether vertical motion was above or at threshold. With suprathreshold motion, responses were faster for congruent directions of words and dots, but sensitivity was equal across conditions. With threshold motion, sensitivity was higher for congruent directions of words and dots, but responses were equally fast across conditions. The observed differences in sensitivity and response times were largest when the dots appeared 450 ms after word onset, that is, consistently with electrophysiology, at the time the up/down semantics of the word had become available. These data suggest that word meanings can alter the balance between signal and noise within the visual system and affect the perception of low-level sensory features. PMID:23596407

  12. Dissociated Vertical Deviation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Eye Terms Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Dissociated Vertical Deviation En Español Read in Chinese What is Dissociated Vertical Deviation (DVD)? DVD is ...

  13. The Vertical File.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Czopek, Vanessa

    The process of establishing the vertical file for a new branch library is traced; suggestions for making the vertical file a better resource are offered; and guidelines covering the general objective, responsibility for selection and maintenance, principles of selection, and scope of the collection for vertical files are presented. A four-item…

  14. Objective Motion Cueing Criteria Investigation Based on Three Flight Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaal, Petrus M. T.; Schroeder, Jeffery A.; Chung, William W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper intends to help establish fidelity criteria to accompany the simulator motion system diagnostic test specified by the International Civil Aviation Organization. Twelve air- line transport pilots flew three tasks in the NASA Vertical Motion Simulator under four different motion conditions. The experiment used three different hexapod motion configurations, each with a different tradeoff between motion filter gain and break frequency, and one large motion configuration that utilized as much of the simulator's motion space as possible. The motion condition significantly affected: 1) pilot motion fidelity ratings, and sink rate and lateral deviation at touchdown for the approach and landing task, 2) pilot motion fidelity ratings, roll deviations, maximum pitch rate, and number of stick shaker activations in the stall task, and 3) heading deviation after an engine failure in the takeoff task. Significant differences in pilot-vehicle performance were used to define initial objective motion cueing criteria boundaries. These initial fidelity boundaries show promise but need refinement.

  15. Vertical bounce of two vertically aligned balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cross, Rod

    2007-11-01

    When a tennis ball rests on top of a basketball and both drop to the floor together, the tennis ball is projected vertically at high speed. A mass-spring model of the impact, as well as air track data, suggest that the tennis ball should be projected at relatively low speed. Measurements of the forces on each ball and the bounce of vertically aligned superballs are used to resolve the discrepancy.

  16. What's Motion Sickness?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes What's Motion Sickness? KidsHealth > For Kids > What's Motion Sickness? Print ... motion sickness might get even worse. continue Avoiding Motion Sickness To avoid motion sickness: Put your best ...

  17. Validity and reliability of visual ratings of the vertical jump.

    PubMed

    Knudson, D

    1999-10-01

    The validity and reliability of visual estimates of the kinematics of the vertical jump as would be common in qualitative analysis of human movement was studied. Sagittal plane videotapes of 12 females performing vertical jumps were rated on two occasions by three samples of subjects: 6 basketball coaches, 10 kinesiology students, and 5 kinesiology professors. Visual ratings were compared to values quantified by biomechanical analysis using the Peak Performance Technologies system. Assistant collegiate basketball coaches were unable to rate discrete body angles in the vertical jump accurately or consistently. Six of 10 college student raters could accurately and consistently rate over-all range of motion. Since only one of the kinesiology professors could accurately and consistently rate range of motion compared to the majority of the students, professional experience did not affect the ability to rate range of motion in the vertical jump in these subjects.

  18. Vertical axis wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Seki, K.; Shimizu, Y.

    1981-01-27

    Wind turbines are largely divided into vertical axis wind turbines and propeller (Horizontal axis) wind turbines. The present invention discloses a vertical axis high speed wind turbine provided with a starting and braking control system. This vertical axis wind turbine is formed by having blades of a proper airfoil fitted to respective supporting arms provided radially from a vertical rotary axis by keeping the blade span-wise direction in parallel with the axis and being provided with a low speed control windmill in which the radial position of each operating piece varies with a centrifugal force produced by the rotation of the vertical rotary axis.

  19. Vertical axis wind turbines

    DOEpatents

    Krivcov, Vladimir; Krivospitski, Vladimir; Maksimov, Vasili; Halstead, Richard; Grahov, Jurij

    2011-03-08

    A vertical axis wind turbine is described. The wind turbine can include a top ring, a middle ring and a lower ring, wherein a plurality of vertical airfoils are disposed between the rings. For example, three vertical airfoils can be attached between the upper ring and the middle ring. In addition, three more vertical airfoils can be attached between the lower ring and the middle ring. When wind contacts the vertically arranged airfoils the rings begin to spin. By connecting the rings to a center pole which spins an alternator, electricity can be generated from wind.

  20. Brownian Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lavenda, Bernard H.

    1985-01-01

    Explains the phenomenon of Brownian motion, which serves as a mathematical model for random processes. Topics addressed include kinetic theory, Einstein's theory, particle displacement, and others. Points out that observations of the random course of a particle suspended in fluid led to the first accurate measurement of atomic mass. (DH)

  1. Project CARDS technical information record: parametric and sensitivity analysis and determination of response spectra for horizontal, vertical and rotational motion of a radioactive material shipping package relative to the motion of its support (railcar). Part 2. Continuation of CARDS-TIR-80-3 (Preliminary)

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, S.R.

    1980-11-26

    The generation of the response spectra was coupled to a parametric and sensitivity analysis. Support accelerations and tiedown forces are presented as functions of time. The parametric analysis found that the horizontal acceleration of the support and the MAR (max absolute relative) horizontal acceleration are relatively insensitive, while the corresponding vertical accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 4 of the 13 parameters, and the corresponding rotational accelerations are highly sensitive to changes in 8 of the 13 parameters. The tiedown forces are moderately sensitive to changes in 3 of the parameters. (DLC)

  2. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.; Ferrare, R. A.; Browell, E. V.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the "effective" aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  3. Retrieving the Vertical Structure of the Effective Aerosol Complex Index of Refraction from a Combination of Aerosol in Situ and Remote Sensing Measurements During TARFOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redemann, J.; Turco, R. P.; Liou, K. N.; Russell, P. B.; Bergstrom, R. W.; Schmid, B.; Livingston, J. M.; Hobbs, P. V.; Hartley, W. S.; Ismail, S.

    2000-01-01

    The largest uncertainty in estimates of the effects of atmospheric aerosols on climate stems from uncertainties in the determination of their microphysical properties, including the aerosol complex index of refraction, which in turn determines their optical properties. A novel technique is used to estimate the aerosol complex index of refraction in distinct vertical layers from a combination of aerosol in situ size distribution and remote sensing measurements during the Tropospheric Aerosol Radiative Forcing Observational Experiment (TARFOX). In particular, aerosol backscatter measurements using the NASA Langley LASE (Lidar Atmospheric Sensing Experiment) instrument and in situ aerosol size distribution data are utilized to derive vertical profiles of the 'effective' aerosol complex index of refraction at 815 nm (i.e., the refractive index that would provide the same backscatter signal in a forward calculation on the basis of the measured in situ particle size distributions for homogeneous, spherical aerosols). A sensitivity study shows that this method yields small errors in the retrieved aerosol refractive indices, provided the errors in the lidar derived aerosol backscatter are less than 30% and random in nature. Absolute errors in the estimated aerosol refractive indices are generally less than 0.04 for the real part and can be as much as 0.042 for the imaginary part in the case of a 30% error in the lidar-derived aerosol backscatter. The measurements of aerosol optical depth from the NASA Ames Airborne Tracking Sunphotometer (AATS-6) are successfully incorporated into the new technique and help constrain the retrieved aerosol refractive indices. An application of the technique to two TARFOX case studies yields the occurrence of vertical layers of distinct aerosol refractive indices. Values of the estimated complex aerosol refractive index range from 1.33 to 1.45 for the real part and 0.001 to 0.008 for the imaginary part. The methodology devised in this study

  4. Derivation of vertical air velocity from conventional Radiosonde ascents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manguttathil Gopalakrishnan, Manoj; Mohanakumar, Kesavapillai; Samson, Titu; Kottayil, Ajil; Varadarajan, Rakesh; Rebello, Rejoy

    2016-07-01

    In this work, we devise a method to estimate air vertical velocity from ascending radiosondes similar to that described in published results, but with certain differences in deriving the balloon parameters and the drag coefficient, while not considering explicitly the heat exchange between the balloon and the environment. We basically decompose the observed balloon ascent rate into vertical velocity in still air due to buoyancy force and that due to vertical air motion. The first part is computed from basic hydrodynamical principles and the vertical velocity is derived as the difference between observed ascent rate and the estimated still air vertical velocity. The derived values agree reasonably well (r=0.66) with vertical velocities observed with a collocated wind profiler radar, and the sources of uncertainties are discussed. Since vertical velocity is a difficult quantity to measure directly without expensive methods, derivation of the same from the conventional radiosonde ascents could be of great importance to the meteorological communities.

  5. Analytic solution for vertical launch into orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boltz, Frederick W.

    1989-01-01

    An approximate analytic solution is presented for the motion and heating of nonlifting spacecraft launched vertically for ascending flight through the atmosphere into earth orbit. The solution is based on Chapman's Z-function transformation of the equations of motion with the assumption of an exponential atmosphere. The transformed equations have been modified to include the effects of thrusting with mass loss. It is assumed that the vehicle negotiates a gravity turn during ascent so that the thrust vector is aligned in the flight-path direction. Numerical results are presented to document the analytic solution and provide evidence of the useful information generated by it.

  6. [Motion sickness].

    PubMed

    Taillemite, J P; Devaulx, P; Bousquet, F

    1997-01-01

    Motion sickness is a general term covering sea-sickness, car-sickness, air-sickness, and space-sickness. Symptoms can occur when a person is exposed to unfamiliar movement whether real or simulated. Despite progress in the technology and comfort of modern transportation (planes, boats, and overland vehicles), a great number of travelers still experience motion sickness. Bouts are characterized by an initial phase of mild discomfort followed by neurologic and gastro-intestinal manifestations. The delay in onset depends on specific circumstances and individual susceptibility. Attacks are precipitated by conflicting sensory, visual, and vestibular signals but the underlying mechanism is unclear. Most medications used for prevention and treatment (e.g. anticholinergics and antihistamines) induce unwanted sedation. Furthermore no one drug is completely effective or preventive under all conditions.

  7. Signatures of Currency Vertices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holme, Petter

    2009-03-01

    Many real-world networks have broad degree distributions. For some systems, this means that the functional significance of the vertices is also broadly distributed, in other cases the vertices are equally significant, but in different ways. One example of the latter case is metabolic networks, where the high-degree vertices — the currency metabolites — supply the molecular groups to the low-degree metabolites, and the latter are responsible for the higher-order biological function, of vital importance to the organism. In this paper, we propose a generalization of currency metabolites to currency vertices. We investigate the network structural characteristics of such systems, both in model networks and in some empirical systems. In addition to metabolic networks, we find that a network of music collaborations and a network of e-mail exchange could be described by a division of the vertices into currency vertices and others.

  8. Activities at the Lunar and Planetary Institute

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Scientific and administrative activities are summarized. The status of the NASA-Ames vertical gun is reported. The organization and role of NASA's Research and Analysis Program in space and Earth sciences are described.

  9. Offset vertical radar profiling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Witten, A.; Lane, J.

    2003-01-01

    Diffraction tomography imaging was applied to VRP data acquired by vertically moving a receiving antenna in a number of wells. This procedure simulated a vertical downhole receiver array. Similarly, a transmitting antenna was sequentially moved along a series of radial lines extending outward from the receiver wells. This provided a sequence of multistatic data sets and, from each data set, a two-dimensional vertical cross-sectional image of spatial variations in wave speed was reconstructed.

  10. Vertical Axis Wind Turbine

    2002-04-01

    Blade fatigue life is an important element in determining the economic viability of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT). VAWT-SAL Vertical Axis Wind Turbine- Stochastic Aerodynamic Loads Ver 3.2 numerically simulates the stochastic (random0 aerodynamic loads of the Vertical-Axis Wind Turbine (VAWT) created by the atomspheric turbulence. The program takes into account the rotor geometry, operating conditions, and assumed turbulence properties.

  11. Visual and motion cueing in helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, Richard S.

    1986-01-01

    The visual cues presented in the simulator are compared with those of flight in an attempt to identify deficiencies. For the low-amplitude maneuvering tasks normally associated with the hover mode, the unique motion capabilities of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at Ames Research Center permit nearly a full representation of vehicle motion. Especially appreciated in these tasks are the vertical-acceleration responses to collective control. For larger-amplitude maneuvering, motion fidelity must suffer diminution through direct attenuation through high-pass filtering washout of the computer cockpit accelerations or both. Experiments were conducted in an attempt to determine the effects of these distortions on pilot performance of height-control tasks.

  12. The Development of Children's Understanding of Speed Change: A Contributing Factor towards Commonsense Theories of Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hast, Michael; Howe, Christine

    2013-01-01

    Previous research indicates children reason in different ways about horizontal motion and motion in fall. At the same time, their understanding of motion down inclines appears to result from an interaction between horizontal and vertical motion understanding. However, this interaction is still poorly understood. Understanding of speed change may…

  13. Tilts in strong ground motion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.

    2006-01-01

    Most instruments used in seismological practice to record ground motion are pendulum seismographs, velocigraphs, or accelerographs. In most cases it is assumed that seismic instruments are only sensitive to the translational motion of the instrument's base. In this study the full equation of pendulum motion, including the inputs of rotations and tilts, is considered. It is shown that tilting the accelerograph's base can severely impact its response to the ground motion. The method of tilt evaluation using uncorrected strong-motion accelerograms was first suggested by Graizer (1989), and later tested in several laboratory experiments with different strong-motion instruments. The method is based on the difference in the tilt sensitivity of the horizontal and vertical pendulums. The method was applied to many of the strongest records of the Mw 6.7 Northridge earthquake of 1994. Examples are shown when relatively large tilts of up to a few degrees occurred during strong earthquake ground motion. Residual tilt extracted from the strong-motion record at the Pacoima Dam-Upper Left Abutment reached 3.1?? in N45??E direction, and was a result of local earthquake-induced tilting due to high-amplitude shaking. This value is in agreement with the residual tilt measured by using electronic level a few days after the earthquake. The method was applied to the building records from the Northridge earthquake. According to the estimates, residual tilt reached 2.6?? on the ground floor of the 12-story Hotel in Ventura. Processing of most of the strongest records of the Northridge earthquake shows that tilts, if happened, were within the error of the method, or less than about 0.5??.

  14. Vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.S.

    1980-04-08

    A vertical axis windmill is described which involves a rotatable central vertical shaft having horizontal arms pivotally supporting three sails that are free to function in the wind like the main sail on a sail boat, and means for disabling the sails to allow the windmill to be stopped in a blowing wind.

  15. View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of turbine showing gears which turned the motion of the vertical turbine shafts to the horizontal for distribution to the mill and increased the speed. - Harmony Manufacturing Company, Mill Number 3, 100 North Mohawk Street, Cohoes, Albany County, NY

  16. Extending the Analysis of One-Dimensional Motion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canderle, Luis H.

    1999-01-01

    Proposes that introductory physics courses extend the analysis of one-dimensional motion to a more sophisticated level. Gives four experimental setups and graphical analysis of the distance, velocity, and acceleration in the vertical and horizontal directions. (WRM)

  17. Vertical Motions at the Edges of the Icelandic Plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoonman, Charlotte; White, Nicky; Luckett, Richard

    2015-04-01

    The Icelandic mantle plume, a major convective upwelling, has had a profound effect on the evolution of the North Atlantic region over the last 62 Myrs. Recent body and surface wave tomographic studies show that the planform of the Icelandic Plume is not circular but highly irregular, with fingers of anomalously slow mantle extending beneath the lithosphere of the British Isles and Norway. In these regions, analysis of receiver functions indicates that crustal isostasy does not completely account for present-day topographic elevation, which suggests the presence of a significant component of dynamic support. This study investigates the crustal and mantle structure above these asthenospheric fingers in order to develop an understanding of the interaction between convective processes and their topographic expression at the surface. Large teleseismic earthquakes recorded on a network of broadband, three component seismometers deployed throughout the British Isles are being used to construct receiver functions. Through forward and inverse modelling of these receiver functions, as well as joint inversion of the receiver functions and Rayleigh wave group dispersion data, the velocity structure of the crust and mantle underneath each station is determined. Preliminary results show that anomalously thin crust occurs beneath Northwest Scotland, directly above an asthenospheric finger. Further work will attempt to image the top of the anomalously hot asthenospheric finger and to extend the project into other parts of the North Atlantic Ocean, constraining the spatial distribution of any dynamic topography.

  18. Motion Simulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    MOOG, Inc. supplies hydraulic actuators for the Space Shuttle. When MOOG learned NASA was interested in electric actuators for possible future use, the company designed them with assistance from Marshall Space Flight Center. They also decided to pursue the system's commercial potential. This led to partnership with InterActive Simulation, Inc. for production of cabin flight simulators for museums, expositions, etc. The resulting products, the Magic Motion Simulator 30 Series, are the first electric powered simulators. Movements are computer-guided, including free fall to heighten the sense of moving through space. A projection system provides visual effects, and the 11 speakers of a digital laser based sound system add to the realism. The electric actuators are easier to install, have lower operating costs, noise, heat and staff requirements. The U.S. Space & Rocket Center and several other organizations have purchased the simulators.

  19. Relation of motion sickness susceptibility to vestibular and behavioral measures of orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterka, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    The objective is to determine the relationship of motion sickness susceptibility to vestibulo-ocular reflexes (VOR), motion perception, and behavioral utilization of sensory orientation cues for the control of postural equilibrium. The work is focused on reflexes and motion perception associated with pitch and roll movements that stimulate the vertical semicircular canals and otolith organs of the inner ear. This work is relevant to the space motion sickness problem since 0 g related sensory conflicts between vertical canal and otolith motion cues are a likely cause of space motion sickness.

  20. Helicopter Flight Simulation Motion Platform Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Jeffery Allyn

    1999-01-01

    To determine motion fidelity requirements, a series of piloted simulations was performed. Several key results were found. First, lateral and vertical translational platform cues had significant effects on fidelity. Their presence improved performance and reduced pilot workload. Second, yaw and roll rotational platform cues were not as important as the translational platform cues. In particular, the yaw rotational motion platform cue did not appear at all useful in improving performance or reducing workload. Third, when the lateral translational platform cue was combined with visual yaw rotational cues, pilots believed the platform was rotating when it was not. Thus, simulator systems can be made more efficient by proper combination of platform and visual cues. Fourth, motion fidelity specifications were revised that now provide simulator users with a better prediction of motion fidelity based upon the frequency responses of their motion control laws. Fifth, vertical platform motion affected pilot estimates of steady-state altitude during altitude repositioning. Finally, the combined results led to a general method for configuring helicopter motion systems and for developing simulator tasks that more likely represent actual flight. The overall results can serve as a guide to future simulator designers and to today's operators.

  1. Isentropic Analysis of Convective Motions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pauluis, Olivier M.; Mrowiec, Agnieszka A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper analyzes the convective mass transport by sorting air parcels in terms of their equivalent potential temperature to determine an isentropic streamfunction. By averaging the vertical mass flux at a constant value of the equivalent potential temperature, one can compute an isentropic mass transport that filters out reversible oscillatory motions such as gravity waves. This novel approach emphasizes the fact that the vertical energy and entropy transports by convection are due to the combination of ascending air parcels with high energy and entropy and subsiding air parcels with lower energy and entropy. Such conditional averaging can be extended to other dynamic and thermodynamic variables such as vertical velocity, temperature, or relative humidity to obtain a comprehensive description of convective motions. It is also shown how this approach can be used to determine the mean diabatic tendencies from the three-dimensional dynamic and thermodynamic fields. A two-stream approximation that partitions the isentropic circulation into a mean updraft and a mean downdraft is also introduced. This offers a straightforward way to identify the mean properties of rising and subsiding air parcels. The results from the two-stream approximation are compared with two other definitions of the cloud mass flux. It is argued that the isentropic analysis offers a robust definition of the convective mass transport that is not tainted by the need to arbitrarily distinguish between convection and its environment, and that separates the irreversible convective overturning fromoscillations associated with gravity waves.

  2. 1993 Technical Paper Contest for Women. Gear Up 2000: Women in Motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orans, Robin (Editor); Duckett, Sophie (Editor); White, Susan (Editor)

    1994-01-01

    The NASA Ames Research Center Advisory Committee for Women (ACW) sponsored the second ACW Technical paper Contest for Ames women in order to increase the visibility of, and to encourage writing for publication by Ames women scientists, engineers, and technicians. The topics of the contest paper mirrored in the topics of the 1993 Society for Women Engineers (SWE) National Convention, which included technological, workplace, global, and family issues.

  3. The vertical fingerprint of earthquake cycle loading in southern California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howell, Samuel; Smith-Konter, Bridget; Frazer, Neil; Tong, Xiaopeng; Sandwell, David

    2016-08-01

    The San Andreas Fault System, one of the best-studied transform plate boundaries on Earth, is well known for its complex network of locked faults that slowly deform the crust in response to large-scale plate motions. Horizontal interseismic motions of the fault system are largely predictable, but vertical motions arising from tectonic sources remain enigmatic. Here we show that when carefully treated for spatial consistency, global positioning system-derived vertical velocities expose a small-amplitude (+/-2 mm yr-1), but spatially considerable (200 km), coherent pattern of uplift and subsidence straddling the fault system in southern California. We employ the statistical method of model selection to isolate this vertical velocity field from non-tectonic signals that induce velocity variations in both magnitude and direction across small distances (less than tens of kilometres; ref. ), and find remarkable agreement with the sense of vertical motions predicted by physical earthquake cycle models spanning the past few centuries. We suggest that these motions reveal the subtle, but identifiable, tectonic fingerprint of far-field flexure due to more than 300 years of fault locking and creeping depth variability. Understanding this critical component of interseismic deformation at a complex strike-slip plate boundary will better constrain regional mechanics and crustal rheology, improving the quantification of seismic hazards in southern California and beyond.

  4. Kinematic analysis of human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wada, Yuhei; Yamashita, Hiroyuki; Nishimura, Tetsu; Itoh, Masaru; Watanabe, Naoki; Yanagi, Shigeru

    1997-03-01

    The knowledge of analyzing a human motion can contribute to the treatment and the prevention of sports injuries or the investigation of welfare equipment. It is important to know the human motion by not only the medical field but the mechanical knowledge. The mechanical knowledge is expected to prevent the sports injuries or to design such as an artificial equipment. Here, we suggest a basic procedure to analyze a human motion from the view of the dynamical knowledge. Although the human body is composed of a lot of element and joint, if the slight movement on the joint such as dislocation and distortion is neglected, the human body can be replaced by a mechanical links system. On this assumption, we analyze an actual simple human motion. We take a picture of a simple arm motion from video cameras. And at the same time, we directly measure the vertical acceleration of the hand by an accelerometer. From the video image, we get the vertical acceleration of the hand with assuming the arm as two-links system. On the process of resolving the vertical acceleration of the hand, we introduce the Fourier series for filtering. Finally, we confirm the propriety of our suggested procedure by comparing the calculated acceleration of hand with the directly measured acceleration.

  5. Second Annual Transformative Vertical Flight Concepts Workshop: Enabling New Flight Concepts Through Novel Propulsion and Energy Architectures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dudley, Michael R. (Editor); Duffy, Michael; Hirschberg, Michael; Moore, Mark; German, Brian; Goodrich, Ken; Gunnarson, Tom; Petermaier,Korbinian; Stoll, Alex; Fredericks, Bill; Gibson, Andy; Newman, Aron; Ouellette, Richard; Antcliff, Kevin; Sinkula, Michael; Buettner-Garrett, Josh; Ricci, Mike; Keogh, Rory; Moser, Tim; Borer, Nick; Rizzi, Steve; Lighter, Gwen

    2015-01-01

    On August 3rd and 4th, 2015, a workshop was held at the NASA Ames Research Center, located at the Moffett Federal Airfield in California to explore the aviation communities interest in Transformative Vertical Flight (TVF) Concepts. The Workshop was sponsored by the AHS International (AHS), the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), and hosted by the NASA Aeronautics Research Institute (NARI). This second annual workshop built on the success and enthusiasm generated by the first TVF Workshop held in Washington, DC in August of 2014. The previous Workshop identified the existence of a multi-disciplinary community interested in this topic and established a consensus among the participants that opportunities to establish further collaborations in this area are warranted. The desire to conduct a series of annual workshops augmented by online virtual technical seminars to strengthen the TVF community and continue planning for advocacy and collaboration was a direct outcome of the first Workshop. The second Workshop organizers focused on four desired action-oriented outcomes. The first was to establish and document common stakeholder needs and areas of potential collaborations. This includes advocacy strategies to encourage the future success of unconventional vertiport capable flight concept solutions that are enabled by emerging technologies. The second was to assemble a community that can collaborate on new conceptual design and analysis tools to permit novel configuration paths with far greater multi-disciplinary coupling (i.e., aero-propulsive-control) to be investigated. The third was to establish a community to develop and deploy regulatory guidelines. This community would have the potential to initiate formation of an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) F44 Committee Subgroup for the development of consensus-based certification standards for General Aviation scale vertiport

  6. Auditory motion affects visual biological motion processing.

    PubMed

    Brooks, A; van der Zwan, R; Billard, A; Petreska, B; Clarke, S; Blanke, O

    2007-02-01

    The processing of biological motion is a critical, everyday task performed with remarkable efficiency by human sensory systems. Interest in this ability has focused to a large extent on biological motion processing in the visual modality (see, for example, Cutting, J. E., Moore, C., & Morrison, R. (1988). Masking the motions of human gait. Perception and Psychophysics, 44(4), 339-347). In naturalistic settings, however, it is often the case that biological motion is defined by input to more than one sensory modality. For this reason, here in a series of experiments we investigate behavioural correlates of multisensory, in particular audiovisual, integration in the processing of biological motion cues. More specifically, using a new psychophysical paradigm we investigate the effect of suprathreshold auditory motion on perceptions of visually defined biological motion. Unlike data from previous studies investigating audiovisual integration in linear motion processing [Meyer, G. F. & Wuerger, S. M. (2001). Cross-modal integration of auditory and visual motion signals. Neuroreport, 12(11), 2557-2560; Wuerger, S. M., Hofbauer, M., & Meyer, G. F. (2003). The integration of auditory and motion signals at threshold. Perception and Psychophysics, 65(8), 1188-1196; Alais, D. & Burr, D. (2004). No direction-specific bimodal facilitation for audiovisual motion detection. Cognitive Brain Research, 19, 185-194], we report the existence of direction-selective effects: relative to control (stationary) auditory conditions, auditory motion in the same direction as the visually defined biological motion target increased its detectability, whereas auditory motion in the opposite direction had the inverse effect. Our data suggest these effects do not arise through general shifts in visuo-spatial attention, but instead are a consequence of motion-sensitive, direction-tuned integration mechanisms that are, if not unique to biological visual motion, at least not common to all types of

  7. Diffusion weighted vertical gradient and spin echo.

    PubMed

    Engström, Mathias; Bammer, Roland; Skare, Stefan

    2012-12-01

    In this work, diffusion weighting and parallel imaging is combined with a vertical gradient and spin echo data readout. This sequence was implemented and evaluated on healthy volunteers using a 1.5 and a 3 T whole-body MR system. As the vertical gradient and spin echo trajectory enables a higher k-space velocity in the phase-encoding direction than single-shot echo planar imaging, the geometrical distortions are reduced. When combined with parallel imaging such as generalized autocalibrating partially parallel acquisition, the geometric distortions are reduced even further, while also keeping the minimum echo time reasonably low. However, this combination of a diffusion preparation and multiple refocusing pulses during the vertical gradient and spin echo readout, generally violates the Carr-Purcell-Meiboom-Gill condition, which leads to interferences between echo pathways. To suppress the stimulated echo pathway, refocusing pulses with a sharper slice profiles and an odd/even crusher variation scheme were implemented and evaluated. Being a single-shot acquisition technique, the reconstructed images are robust to rigid-body head motion and spatially varying brain motion, both of which are common sources of artifacts in diffusion MRI.

  8. GRMPY surface ground motion measurements in Area 16

    SciTech Connect

    Deupree, R.G.

    1995-09-01

    The GRMPY surface ground motion data collection system was fielded on two shallowly buried high explosive tests in Area 16 at the Nevada Tests Site. Excellent data were collected on both tests and on two very small high explosive calibration tests conducted prior to the main tests. The data superficially resemble surface ground motion data for nuclear weapons tests, but there are differences. The most obvious is the rate of decline in peak vertical velocity with horizontal distance. Less obvious is the ratio of the surface ground zero peak vertical acceleration to the surface ground zero peak vertical velocity. The ramifications of these features as tools for on-site verification are explored.

  9. Projectile Motion Gets the Hose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goff, John Eric; Liyanage, Chinthaka

    2011-10-01

    Students take a weekly quiz in our introductory physics course. During the week in which material focused on projectile motion, we not-so-subtly suggested what problem the students would see on the quiz. The quiz problem was an almost exact replica of a homework problem we worked through in the class preceding the quiz. The goal of the problem is to find the launch speed if the final horizontal and vertical positions and launch angle are given. Figure 1 shows a schematic of the trajectory.

  10. Impact of Vertical Wind Shear on Tropical Cyclone Rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cecil, Dan; Marchok, Tim

    2014-01-01

    While tropical cyclone rainfall has a large axisymmetric component, previous observational and theoretical studies have shown that environmental vertical wind shear leads to an asymmetric component of the vertical motion and precipitation fields. Composites consistently depict a precipitation enhancement downshear and also cyclonically downwind from the downshear direction. For consistence with much of the literature and with Northern Hemisphere observations, this is subsequently referred to as "Downshear-Left". Stronger shear magnitudes are associated with greater amplitude precipitation asymmetries. Recent work has reinforced the prior findings, and explored details of the response of the precipitation and kinematic fields to environmental vertical wind shear. Much of this research has focused on tropical cyclones away from land, to limit the influence of other processes that might distort the signal related to vertical wind shear. Recent evidence does suggest vertical wind shear can also play a major role in precipitation asymmetries during and after landfall.

  11. Particle motion in crystalline beams

    SciTech Connect

    Haffmans, A.F.; Maletic, D.; Ruggiero, A.G.

    1994-04-20

    Studying the possibility of storing a low emittance (or ``cooled``) beam of charged particles in a storage ring, the authors are faced with the effect of space charge by which particles are repelled and influence each others` motion. The correct evaluation of the space-charge effects is important to determine the attainment and properties of Crystalline Beams, a phase transition which intense beams of ions can undergo when cooling is applied. In this report they derive the equations of motion of a particle moving under the action of external resorting forces generated by the magnets of the storage ring, and of the electromagnetic fields generated by the other particles. The motion in every direction is investigated: in the longitudinal, as well as vertical and horizontal direction. The external forces are assumed to be linear with the particle displacement from the reference orbit. The space-charge forces are comparable in magnitude to the external focusing forces. The equations of motion so derived are then used to determine confinement and stability conditions for the attainment of Crystalline Beams, using transfer matrices.

  12. Self Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A. (Principal Investigator)

    1991-01-01

    The studies conducted in this research project examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  13. Project Plan for Vertical Lift Machine

    SciTech Connect

    Ellsworth, G F

    2002-08-05

    This document describes the Project Plan for the development and manufacture of a Vertical Lift Machine. It is assumed by this project plan that the Vertical Lift Machine will be developed, designed, manufactured, and tested by a qualified vendor. LLNL will retain review and approval authority for each step given in this project plan. The Vertical Lift Machine is a single linear axis positioning device capable of lifting objects vertically at controlled rates and positioning them repeatedly at predetermined heights, in relation to other objects suspended from above, for high neutron multiplication experiments. Operation of the machine during the experiments is done remotely. The lift mechanism shall accommodate various platforms (tables) that support the objects to be raised. A frame will support additional subassemblies from above such that the lower subassembly can be raised close to and/or interface with those above. The structure must be stiff and motion of the table linear such that radial alignment is maintained (e.g. concentricity). The safe position for the Vertical Lift Machine is the lift mechanism fully retracted with the subassemblies fully separated. The machine shall reside in this position when not in use. It must return to this safe condition from any position upon failure of power sources, open safety interlocks, or operator initiated SCRAM. The Vertical Lift Machine shall have the capability of return to the safe position with no externally applied power. The Vertical Lift Machine shall have dual operator interfaces, one near the machine and another located in a remote control room. Conventional single key, key-lock switching shall be implemented to lock out the control interface not in use. The interface at the machine will be used for testing and ''dry running'' experimental setup(s) with inert subassemblies (i.e. Setup Mode). The remote interface shall provide full control and data recording capability (i.e. Assembly Mode). The control system

  14. Vortex Formation in Vertically Stratified Protoplanetary Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stewart, Glen R.

    2013-10-01

    A central problem of planet formation is how to form large planetesimals in a turbulent protoplanetary disk. Recent work suggests that MRI turbulence would excite such large velocities that the planetesimals would collisionally fragment rather than grow. The structure of chondritic meteorites indicates a gentle nebular environment where chondrules are sorted by size and cemented together rapidly. Although it is well established that anticyclones can concentrate particles that are weakly coupled to the gas in protoplanetary disks, the conditions required for the formation and long-time stability of anticyclones in a vertically stratified disk are still highly uncertain. Fully three dimensional fluid dynamic simulations of protoplanetary disks are computationally expensive when one requires a computational domain that is large compared to the vertical scale height of the disk. An alternative simulation approach is to use potential temperature as the vertical coordinate so that the equations of motion resemble the shallow water equations (Dowling et al. 1998). We have therefore modified a multilayer shallow water simulation code to model the formation of vortices in a vertically stratified protoplanetary disk with a radial entropy gradient. Vertical stratification of the disk is modeled by using multiple layers, where each layer has a different constant value of the entropy. By forcing a slope in the interfaces between the layers, we impose a radial entropy gradient in the disk. Radiative heating and cooling causes vertical mass exchange between adjacent constant entropy layers according to a Newton cooling formula. We find that the formation of anticyclones is robust, and that these vortices actively excite density waves, which in turn, transport angular momentum through the disk. Our simulations therefore yield new insights on how the dusty dead zones of protoplanetary disks can transport angular momentum through the disk by purely hydrodynamic processes. Support

  15. Self-Motion Perception and Motion Sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert A.

    1991-01-01

    Motion sickness typically is considered a bothersome artifact of exposure to passive motion in vehicles of conveyance. This condition seldom has significant impact on the health of individuals because it is of brief duration, it usually can be prevented by simply avoiding the eliciting condition and, when the conditions that produce it are unavoidable, sickness dissipates with continued exposure. The studies conducted examined several aspects of motion sickness in animal models. A principle objective of these studies was to investigate the neuroanatomy that is important in motion sickness with the objectives of examining both the utility of putative models and defining neural mechanisms that are important in motion sickness.

  16. Seismic design technology for breeder reactor structures. Volume 1. Special topics in earthquake ground motion

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, D.P.

    1983-04-01

    This report is divided into twelve chapters: seismic hazard analysis procedures, statistical and probabilistic considerations, vertical ground motion characteristics, vertical ground response spectrum shapes, effects of inclined rock strata on site response, correlation of ground response spectra with intensity, intensity attenuation relationships, peak ground acceleration in the very mean field, statistical analysis of response spectral amplitudes, contributions of body and surface waves, evaluation of ground motion characteristics, and design earthquake motions. (DLC)

  17. The Vertical Profile of Ocean Mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, R. M.; Nikurashin, M.; McDougall, T. J.; Mashayek, A.

    2014-12-01

    The upwelling of bottom waters through density surfaces in the deep ocean is not possible unless the sloping nature of the sea floor is taken into account. The bottom--intensified mixing arising from interaction of internal tides and geostrophic motions with bottom topography implies that mixing is a decreasing function of height in the deep ocean. This would further imply that the diapycnal motion in the deep ocean is downward, not upwards as is required by continuity. This conundrum regarding ocean mixing and upwelling in the deep ocean will be resolved by appealing to the fact that the ocean does not have vertical side walls. Implications of the conundrum for the representation of ocean mixing in climate models will be discussed.

  18. Vertical shaft windmill

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grana, D. C.; Inge, S. V., Jr. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  19. Vertical axis windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Zheug, Y.K.

    1984-03-06

    A vertical axis windmill has a blade pivotally connected to a rotatable support structure on an axis passing through its center of gravity which is arranged to lie forward of its aerodynamic center whereby the blade automatically swings outwardly and inwardly when moving on the windward and leeward sides respectively of the axis of rotation of said support means.

  20. Vertical shaft windmill

    SciTech Connect

    Grana, D.C.; Inge, S.V. Jr.

    1983-11-15

    A vertical shaft has several equally spaced blades mounted thereon. Each blade consists of an inboard section and an outboard section skew hinged to the inboard section. The inboard sections automatically adjust their positions with respect to the fixed inboard sections with changes in velocity of the wind. This windmill design automatically governs the maximum rotational speed of shaft.

  1. Aiding Vertical Guidance Understanding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feary, Michael; McCrobie, Daniel; Alkin, Martin; Sherry, Lance; Polson, Peter; Palmer, Everett; McQuinn, Noreen

    1998-01-01

    A two-part study was conducted to evaluate modern flight deck automation and interfaces. In the first part, a survey was performed to validate the existence of automation surprises with current pilots. Results indicated that pilots were often surprised by the behavior of the automation. There were several surprises that were reported more frequently than others. An experimental study was then performed to evaluate (1) the reduction of automation surprises through training specifically for the vertical guidance logic, and (2) a new display that describes the flight guidance in terms of aircraft behaviors instead of control modes. The study was performed in a simulator that was used to run a complete flight with actual airline pilots. Three groups were used to evaluate the guidance display and training. In the training, condition, participants went through a training program for vertical guidance before flying the simulation. In the display condition, participants ran through the same training program and then flew the experimental scenario with the new Guidance-Flight Mode Annunciator (G-FMA). Results showed improved pilot performance when given training specifically for the vertical guidance logic and greater improvements when given the training and the new G-FMA. Using actual behavior of the avionics to design pilot training and FMA is feasible, and when the automated vertical guidance mode of the Flight Management System is engaged, the display of the guidance mode and targets yields improved pilot performance.

  2. Ocular tracking responses to background motion gated by feature-based attention.

    PubMed

    Souto, David; Kerzel, Dirk

    2014-09-01

    Involuntary ocular tracking responses to background motion offer a window on the dynamics of motion computations. In contrast to spatial attention, we know little about the role of feature-based attention in determining this ocular response. To probe feature-based effects of background motion on involuntary eye movements, we presented human observers with a balanced background perturbation. Two clouds of dots moved in opposite vertical directions while observers tracked a target moving in horizontal direction. Additionally, they had to discriminate a change in the direction of motion (±10° from vertical) of one of the clouds. A vertical ocular following response occurred in response to the motion of the attended cloud. When motion selection was based on motion direction and color of the dots, the peak velocity of the tracking response was 30% of the tracking response elicited in a single task with only one direction of background motion. In two other experiments, we tested the effect of the perturbation when motion selection was based on color, by having motion direction vary unpredictably, or on motion direction alone. Although the gain of pursuit in the horizontal direction was significantly reduced in all experiments, indicating a trade-off between perceptual and oculomotor tasks, ocular responses to perturbations were only observed when selection was based on both motion direction and color. It appears that selection by motion direction can only be effective for driving ocular tracking when the relevant elements can be segregated before motion onset.

  3. Vertical velocity-CCN correlations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hudson, J. G.; Noble, S. R.

    2013-12-01

    The realization that smaller cloud droplets evaporate more readily (Xue and Feingold 2006; Jiang et al. 2002) gives rise to an anti-indirect aerosol effect (IAE); less cloudiness with pollution. The greater latent heat exchange of the greater evaporation in more polluted clouds adds TKE and buoyancy gradients that can enhance vertical velocity (W), mixing and entrainment (Zhao and Austin 2005). Stronger W can increase horizontal motions, which can further enhance droplet evaporation, which further enhances latent heat exchange and vertical motions, thus, positive feedback. This could also include latent heat released during condensation (Lee and Feingold 2010), which is more rapid for the greater surface areas of the smaller more numerous droplets. These theories imply a positive relationship between within-cloud W variations; i.e., standard deviation of W (σw) and CCN concentration (NCCN) rather than W and NCCN. This implies greater turbulence in polluted clouds, which could possibly counteract the reduction of cloudiness of anti-IAE. During two stratus cloud projects, 50 cloud penetrations in 9 MASE flights and 34 cloud penetrations in 13 POST flights, within-cloud σw-NCCN showed correlation coefficients (R) of 0.50 and 0.39. Panel a shows similar within-cloud σw-NCCN R in all altitude bands for 17 RICO flights in small cumulus clouds. R for W-NCCN showed similar values but only at low altitudes. Out-of-cloud σw-NCCN showed similar high values except at the highest altitudes. Within-cloud σw showed higher R than within-cloud W with droplet concentrations (Nc), especially at higher altitudes. Panel b for 13 ICE-T cumulus cloud flights in the same location as RICO but during the opposite season, however, showed σw and W uncorrelated with NCCN at all altitudes; and W and σw correlated with Nc only at the highest altitudes. On the other hand, out-of-cloud σw was correlated with NCCN at all altitudes with R similar to the corresponding R of the other projects

  4. Effect of tilt on strong motion data processing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graizer, V.M.

    2005-01-01

    In the near-field of an earthquake the effects of the rotational components of ground motion may not be negligible compared to the effects of translational motions. Analyses of the equations of motion of horizontal and vertical pendulums show that horizontal sensors are sensitive not only to translational motion but also to tilts. Ignoring this tilt sensitivity may produce unreliable results, especially in calculations of permanent displacements and long-period calculations. In contrast to horizontal sensors, vertical sensors do not have these limitations, since they are less sensitive to tilts. In general, only six-component systems measuring rotations and accelerations, or three-component systems similar to systems used in inertial navigation assuring purely translational motion of accelerometers can be used to calculate residual displacements. ?? 2004 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Visual and motion cueing in helicopter simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bray, R. S.

    1985-01-01

    Early experience in fixed-cockpit simulators, with limited field of view, demonstrated the basic difficulties of simulating helicopter flight at the level of subjective fidelity required for confident evaluation of vehicle characteristics. More recent programs, utilizing large-amplitude cockpit motion and a multiwindow visual-simulation system have received a much higher degree of pilot acceptance. However, none of these simulations has presented critical visual-flight tasks that have been accepted by the pilots as the full equivalent of flight. In this paper, the visual cues presented in the simulator are compared with those of flight in an attempt to identify deficiencies that contribute significantly to these assessments. For the low-amplitude maneuvering tasks normally associated with the hover mode, the unique motion capabilities of the Vertical Motion Simulator (VMS) at Ames Research Center permit nearly a full representation of vehicle motion. Especially appreciated in these tasks are the vertical-acceleration responses to collective control. For larger-amplitude maneuvering, motion fidelity must suffer diminution through direct attenuation through high-pass filtering washout of the computer cockpit accelerations or both. Experiments were conducted in an attempt to determine the effects of these distortions on pilot performance of height-control tasks.

  6. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; Steel, Fiona

    2011-03-01

    We study jamming of low aspect-ratio cylindrical Delrin grains in a vertical channel. Grain heights are less than their diameter so the grains resemble antacid tablets, coins, or poker chips. These grains are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section where the channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. Grains are sometimes observed to form jams, stable structures supported by the channel walls with no support beneath them. The probability of jam occurrence and the strength or robustness of a jam is effected by grain and channel sizes. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability and jam strength in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories. Supported by an Undergraduate Research Grant from Penn State Erie, The Behrend College.

  7. Jamming in Vertical Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baxter, G. William; McCausland, Jeffrey; Steel, Fiona

    2010-03-01

    We experimentally study jamming of cylindrical grains in a vertical channel. The grains have a low aspect-ratio (height/diameter < 1) so their shape is like antacid tablets or poker chips. They are allowed to fall through a vertical channel with a square cross section. The channel width is greater than the diameter of a grain and constant throughout the length of the channel with no obstructions or constrictions. It is observed that grains sometimes jam in this apparatus. In a jam, grains form a stable structure from one side of the channel to the other with nothing beneath them. Jams may be strong enough to support additional grains above. The probability of a jam occurring is a function of the grain height and diameter. We will present experimental measurements of the jamming probability in this system and discuss the relationship of these results to other experiments and theories.

  8. Modelling resonances of the standing body exposed to vertical whole-body vibration: Effects of posture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subashi, G. H. M. J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Griffin, M. J.

    2008-10-01

    Lumped parameter mathematical models representing anatomical parts of the human body have been developed to represent body motions associated with resonances of the vertical apparent mass and the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass of the human body standing in five different postures: 'upright', 'lordotic', 'anterior lean', 'knees bent', and 'knees more bent'. The inertial and geometric parameters of the models were determined from published anthropometric data. Stiffness and damping parameters were obtained by comparing model responses with experimental data obtained previously. The principal resonance of the vertical apparent mass, and the first peak in the fore-and-aft cross-axis apparent mass, of the standing body in an upright posture (at 5-6 Hz) corresponded to vertical motion of the viscera in phase with the vertical motion of the entire body due to deformation of the tissues at the soles of the feet, with pitch motion of the pelvis out of phase with pitch motion of the upper body above the pelvis. Upward motion of the body was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the pelvis. Changing the posture of the upper body had minor effects on the mode associated with the principal resonances of the apparent mass and cross-axis apparent mass, but the mode changed significantly with bending of the legs. In legs-bent postures, the principal resonance (at about 3 Hz) was attributed to bending of the legs coupled with pitch motion of the pelvis in phase with pitch motion of the upper body. In this mode, extension of the legs was in phase with the forward pitch motion of the upper body and the upward vertical motion of the viscera.

  9. On the vertical structure of damped steady circulation in the tropics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geisler, J. E.; Stevens, D. E.

    1982-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the vertical structure of steady motion in a dissipative tropical atmosphere forced by steady isolated diabatic heating. Vertical modes appropriate to the problem are obtained, and the forcing is projected onto these modes. With the use of an analytic expression obtained by Gill (1980) for the horizontal structure, these modes are summed to obtain the amplitude and the vertical structure of the response in the region to the east of the heating.

  10. Tree STEM Reconstruction Using Vertical Fisheye Images: a Preliminary Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berveglieri, A.; Tommaselli, A. M. G.

    2016-06-01

    A preliminary study was conducted to assess a tree stem reconstruction technique with panoramic images taken with fisheye lenses. The concept is similar to the Structure from Motion (SfM) technique, but the acquisition and data preparation rely on fisheye cameras to generate a vertical image sequence with height variations of the camera station. Each vertical image is rectified to four vertical planes, producing horizontal lateral views. The stems in the lateral view are rectified to the same scale in the image sequence to facilitate image matching. Using bundle adjustment, the stems are reconstructed, enabling later measurement and extraction of several attributes. The 3D reconstruction was performed with the proposed technique and compared with SfM. The preliminary results showed that the stems were correctly reconstructed by using the lateral virtual images generated from the vertical fisheye images and with the advantage of using fewer images and taken from one single station.

  11. Topographic Structure from Motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fonstad, M. A.; Dietrich, J. T.; Courville, B. C.; Jensen, J.; Carbonneau, P.

    2011-12-01

    horizontal and vertical precision in the centimeter range, and with very low capital and labor costs and low expertise levels. Advanced structure from motion software (such as Bundler and OpenSynther) are currently under development and should increase the density of topographic points rivaling those of terrestrial laser scanning when using images shot from low altitude platforms such as helikites, poles, remote-controlled aircraft and rotocraft, and low-flying manned aircraft. Clearly, the development of this set of inexpensive and low-required-expertise tools has the potential to fundamentally shift the production of digital fluvial topography from a capital-intensive enterprise of a low number of researchers to a low-cost exercise of many river researchers.

  12. Comparison of aircraft noise measured in flight test and in the NASA Ames 40- by 80-foot wind tunnel.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Atencio, A., Jr.; Soderman, P. T.

    1973-01-01

    A method to determine free-field aircraft noise spectra from wind-tunnel measurements has been developed. The crux of the method is the correction for reverberations. Calibrated loud speakers are used to simulate model sound sources in the wind tunnel. Corrections based on the difference between the direct and reverberant field levels are applied to wind-tunnel data for a wide range of aircraft noise sources. To establish the validity of the correction method, two research aircraft - one propeller-driven (YOV-10A) and one turbojet-powered (XV-5B) - were flown in free field and then tested in the wind tunnel. Corrected noise spectra from the two environments agree closely.

  13. Mars atmospheric dynamics as simulated by the NASA AMES General Circulation Model. I - The zonal-mean circulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haberle, R. M.; Pollack, J. B.; Barnes, J. R.; Zurek, R. W.; Leovy, C. B.; Murphy, J. R.; Lee, H.; Schaeffer, J.

    1993-02-01

    The characteristics of the zonal-mean circulation and how it responds to seasonal variations and dust loading are described. This circulation is the main momentum-containing component of the general circulation, and it plays a dominant role in the budgets of heat and momentum. It is shown that in many ways the zonal-mean circulation on Mars, at least as simulated by the model, is similar to that on earth, having Hadley and Ferrel cells and high-altitude jet streams. However, the Martian systems tend to be deeper, more intense, and much more variable with season. Furthermore, the radiative effects of suspended dust particles, even in small amounts, have a major influence on the general circulation.

  14. Results of a long-term study of vapor intrusion at four large buildings at the NASA Ames Research Center.

    PubMed

    Brenner, David

    2010-06-01

    Most of the published empirical data on indoor air concentrations resulting from vapor intrusion of contaminants from underlying groundwater are for residential structures. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Research Park site, located in Moffett Field, CA, and comprised of 213 acres, is being planned for redevelopment as a collaborative research and educational campus with associated facilities. Groundwater contaminated with hydrocarbon and halogenated hydrocarbon volatile organic compounds (VOCs) is the primary environmental medium of concern at the site. Over a 15-month period, approximately 1000 indoor, outdoor ambient, and outdoor ambient background samples were collected from four buildings designated as historical landmarks using Summa canisters and analyzed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency TO-15 selective ion mode. Both 24-hr and sequential 8-hr samples were collected. Comparison of daily sampling results relative to daily background results indicates that the measured trichloroethylene (TCE) concentrations were primarily due to the subsurface vapor intrusion pathway, although there is likely some contribution due to infiltration of TCE from the outdoor ambient background concentrations. Analysis of the cis-1,2-dichloroethylene concentrations relative to TCE concentrations with respect to indoor air concentrations and the background air support this hypothesis; however, this indicates that relative contributions of the vapor intrusion and infiltration pathways vary with each building. Indoor TCE concentrations were also compared with indoor benzene and background benzene concentrations. These data indicate significant correlation between background benzene concentrations and the concentration of benzene in the indoor air, indicating benzene was present in the indoor air primarily through infiltration of outdoor air into the indoor space. By comparison, measured TCE indoor air concentrations showed a significantly different relationship to background concentrations. Analysis of the results show that indoor air samples can be used to definitively define the source of the TCE present in the indoor air space of large industrial buildings.

  15. Optimizing Facility Configurations and Operating Conditions for Improved Performance in the NASA Ames 24 Inch Shock Tube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bogdanoff, David W.; Cruden, Brett A.

    2016-01-01

    The Ames Electric Arc Shock Tube (EAST) is a shock tube wherein the driver gas can be heated by an electric arc discharge. The electrical energy is stored in a 1.2 MJ capacitor bank. Four inch and 24 inch diameter driven tubes are available. The facility is described and the need for testing in the 24 inch tube to better simulate low density NASA mission profiles is discussed. Three test entries, 53, 53B and 59, are discussed. Tests are done with air or Mars gas (95.7% CO2/2.7% N2/1.6% Ar) at pressures of 0.01 to 0.14 Torr. Velocities spanned 6.3-9.2 km/s, with a nominal center of 7 km/s. Many facility configurations are studied in an effort to improve data quality. Various driver and driven tube configurations and the use of a buffer section between the driver and the driven tube are studied. Diagnostics include test times, time histories of the shock light pulses and tilts of the shock wave off the plane normal to the tube axis. The report will detail the results of the various trials, give the best configuration/operating conditions found to date and provide recommendations for further improvements. Finally, diaphragm performance is discussed.

  16. AI at Ames: Artificial Intelligence research and application at NASA Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, February 1985

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrews, Alison E. (Editor)

    1985-01-01

    Charts are given that illustrate function versus domain for artificial intelligence (AI) applications and interests and research area versus project number for AI research. A list is given of project titles with associated project numbers and page numbers. Also, project descriptions, including title, participants, and status are given.

  17. Results from the EPL monkey-pod flight experiments conducted aboard the NASA/Ames CV-990, May 1976

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1976-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general space craft sources.

  18. The NASA Ames Research Center one- and two-dimensional stratospheric models. Part 2: The two-dimensional model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitten, R. C.; Borucki, W. J.; Watson, V. R.; Shimazaki, T.; Woodward, H. T.; Riegel, C. A.; Capone, L. A.; Becker, T.

    1977-01-01

    The two-dimensional model of stratospheric constituents is presented in detail. The derivation of pertinent transport parameters and the numerical solution of the species continuity equations, including a technique for treating the stiff differential equations that represent the chemical kinetic terms, and appropriate methods for simulating the diurnal variations of the solar zenith angle and species concentrations are discussed. Predicted distributions of tracer constituents (ozone, carbon 14, nitric acid) are compared with observed distributions.

  19. Parameter identification studies on the NASA/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckavitt, Thomas P., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The results of an aircraft parameters identification study conducted on the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Ames Research Center Advanced Concepts Flight Simulator (ACFS) in conjunction with the Navy-NASA Joint Institute of Aeronautics are given. The ACFS is a commercial airline simulator with a design based on future technology. The simulator is used as a laboratory for human factors research and engineering as applied to the commercial airline industry. Parametric areas examined were engine pressure ratio (EPR), optimum long range cruise Mach number, flap reference speed, and critical take-off speeds. Results were compared with corresponding parameters of the Boeing 757 and 767 aircraft. This comparison identified two areas where improvements can be made: (1) low maximum lift coefficients (on the order of 20-25 percent less than those of a 757); and (2) low optimum cruise Mach numbers. Recommendations were made to those anticipated with the application of future technologies.

  20. Revalidation of the NASA Ames 11-by 11-Foot Transonic Wind Tunnel with a Commercial Airplane Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kmak, Frank J.; Hudgins, M.; Hergert, D.; George, Michael W. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The 11-By 11-Foot Transonic leg of the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel (UPWT) was modernized to improve tunnel performance, capability, productivity, and reliability. Wind tunnel tests to demonstrate the readiness of the tunnel for a return to production operations included an Integrated Systems Test (IST), calibration tests, and airplane validation tests. One of the two validation tests was a 0.037-scale Boeing 777 model that was previously tested in the 11-By 11-Foot tunnel in 1991. The objective of the validation tests was to compare pre-modernization and post-modernization results from the same airplane model in order to substantiate the operational readiness of the facility. Evaluation of within-test, test-to-test, and tunnel-to-tunnel data repeatability were made to study the effects of the tunnel modifications. Tunnel productivity was also evaluated to determine the readiness of the facility for production operations. The operation of the facility, including model installation, tunnel operations, and the performance of tunnel systems, was observed and facility deficiency findings generated. The data repeatability studies and tunnel-to-tunnel comparisons demonstrated outstanding data repeatability and a high overall level of data quality. Despite some operational and facility problems, the validation test was successful in demonstrating the readiness of the facility to perform production airplane wind tunnel%, tests.

  1. Development of a High Resolution Weather Forecast Model for Mesoamerica Using the NASA Ames Code I Private Cloud Computing Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Molthan, Andrew; Case, Jonathan; Venner, Jason; Moreno-Madrinan, Max J.; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Two projects at NASA Marshall Space Flight Center have collaborated to develop a high resolution weather forecast model for Mesoamerica: The NASA Short-term Prediction Research and Transition (SPoRT) Center, which integrates unique NASA satellite and weather forecast modeling capabilities into the operational weather forecasting community. NASA's SERVIR Program, which integrates satellite observations, ground-based data, and forecast models to improve disaster response in Central America, the Caribbean, Africa, and the Himalayas.

  2. Results from the EPL monkey-pod experiment conducted as part of the 1974 NASA/Ames shuttle CVT-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rahlmann, D. F.; Kodama, A. M.; Mains, R. C.; Pace, N.

    1974-01-01

    The participation of the Environmental Physiology Laboratory (EPL) in the general purpose laboratory concept verification test 3 is documented. The EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment was designed to incorporate a 10-12 kg, pig tailed monkey, Macaca nemestrina, into the pod and measure the physiological responses of the animal continuously. Four major elements comprise the EPL Monkey-Pod Experiment System: (1) a fiberglass pod containing the instrumented monkey plus feeder and watering devices, (2) an inner console containing the SKYLAB mass spectrometer with its associated valving and electronic controls, sensing, control and monitoring units for lower body negative pressure, feeder activity, waterer activity, temperatures, and gas metabolism calibration, (3) an umbilical complex comprising gas flow lines and electrical cabling between the inner and outer console and (4) an outer console in principle representing the experiment support to be provided from general spacecraft sources.

  3. User-Independent Motion State Recognition Using Smartphone Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Fuqiang; Kealy, Allison; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Shang, Jianga

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of locomotion activities (e.g., walking, running, still) is important for a wide range of applications like indoor positioning, navigation, location-based services, and health monitoring. Recently, there has been a growing interest in activity recognition using accelerometer data. However, when utilizing only acceleration-based features, it is difficult to differentiate varying vertical motion states from horizontal motion states especially when conducting user-independent classification. In this paper, we also make use of the newly emerging barometer built in modern smartphones, and propose a novel feature called pressure derivative from the barometer readings for user motion state recognition, which is proven to be effective for distinguishing vertical motion states and does not depend on specific users’ data. Seven types of motion states are defined and six commonly-used classifiers are compared. In addition, we utilize the motion state history and the characteristics of people’s motion to improve the classification accuracies of those classifiers. Experimental results show that by using the historical information and human’s motion characteristics, we can achieve user-independent motion state classification with an accuracy of up to 90.7%. In addition, we analyze the influence of the window size and smartphone pose on the accuracy. PMID:26690163

  4. User-Independent Motion State Recognition Using Smartphone Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fuqiang; Kealy, Allison; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Shang, Jianga

    2015-01-01

    The recognition of locomotion activities (e.g., walking, running, still) is important for a wide range of applications like indoor positioning, navigation, location-based services, and health monitoring. Recently, there has been a growing interest in activity recognition using accelerometer data. However, when utilizing only acceleration-based features, it is difficult to differentiate varying vertical motion states from horizontal motion states especially when conducting user-independent classification. In this paper, we also make use of the newly emerging barometer built in modern smartphones, and propose a novel feature called pressure derivative from the barometer readings for user motion state recognition, which is proven to be effective for distinguishing vertical motion states and does not depend on specific users' data. Seven types of motion states are defined and six commonly-used classifiers are compared. In addition, we utilize the motion state history and the characteristics of people's motion to improve the classification accuracies of those classifiers. Experimental results show that by using the historical information and human's motion characteristics, we can achieve user-independent motion state classification with an accuracy of up to 90.7%. In addition, we analyze the influence of the window size and smartphone pose on the accuracy. PMID:26690163

  5. User-Independent Motion State Recognition Using Smartphone Sensors.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fuqiang; Kealy, Allison; Khoshelham, Kourosh; Shang, Jianga

    2015-12-04

    The recognition of locomotion activities (e.g., walking, running, still) is important for a wide range of applications like indoor positioning, navigation, location-based services, and health monitoring. Recently, there has been a growing interest in activity recognition using accelerometer data. However, when utilizing only acceleration-based features, it is difficult to differentiate varying vertical motion states from horizontal motion states especially when conducting user-independent classification. In this paper, we also make use of the newly emerging barometer built in modern smartphones, and propose a novel feature called pressure derivative from the barometer readings for user motion state recognition, which is proven to be effective for distinguishing vertical motion states and does not depend on specific users' data. Seven types of motion states are defined and six commonly-used classifiers are compared. In addition, we utilize the motion state history and the characteristics of people's motion to improve the classification accuracies of those classifiers. Experimental results show that by using the historical information and human's motion characteristics, we can achieve user-independent motion state classification with an accuracy of up to 90.7%. In addition, we analyze the influence of the window size and smartphone pose on the accuracy.

  6. Changes in plasma vasopressin during motion sickness in cats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fox, Robert; Keil, L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Thomsen, D.; Dictor, M.; Chee, O.

    1991-01-01

    Changes in levels of plasma vasopressin (AVP) and cortisol (C) have been shown to be correlated with motion sickness and nausea in man. As part of the research aimed at validation of the cat as an appropriate animal model for motion sickness research, levels of these hormones were investigated in the cat during motion sickness elicited by vertical linear acceleration of approximately 0.6 Hz and 1 +/- 0.6 G. In Study 1, 15 cats previously screened for susceptibility to motion sickness were prepared with indwelling jugular catheters to permit withdrawl of blood with minimal disruption of the stimulus and minimum stress to the animal. AVP and C were measured in blood samples obtained during exposure to vertical linear acceleration and during control sessions in which the animals were placed in the stationary apparatus. 10 min and 1 min prior to duration; 1, 5, 10, and 20 min after start of motion. Total duration of exposure to motion was 20 min. The data indicate that both AVP and C are elevated during exposure to motion if emesis occurs. AVP reaches maximum levels during or about the same time as emesis, while C increases gradually throughout the period of vertical acceleration. In Study 2, four cats were prepared with indwelling catheters and AVP was measured in blood withdrawn during exposure to the vertical linear acceleration. A single pre-motion sample consisting of three samples drawn 5 min prior to motion onset. Two series of samples consisting of three samples drawn at 3-min intervals were obtained during motion. The first series was initiated at emesis, and the second 25 min after emesis. Results show that levels of circulating AVP were elevated (2 to 27 times the control and pre-motion levels) in the samples taken during emesis and decreased, but remained 1 to 6 times above the pre-motion or control levels within 25 min. The results of these two studies indicate that AVP is elevated during motion-produced emesis than is C. These findings are in general

  7. Characteristics of F/A-18 vertical tail buffeting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheta, E. F.; Huttsell, L. J.

    2003-03-01

    A time-accurate computational analysis of vertical tail buffeting of full F/A-18 aircraft is conducted at typical flight conditions to identify the buffet characteristics of fighter aircraft. The F/A-18 aircraft is pitched at wide range of high angles of attack at Mach number of 0.243 and Reynolds number of 11 millions. Strong coupling between the fluid and structure is considered in this investigation. Strong coupling occurs when the inertial effect of the motion of the vertical tail is fed back into the flow field. The aerodynamic flow field around the F/A-18 aircraft is computed using the Reynolds-averaged full Navier-Stokes equations. The dynamical structural response of the vertical tail is predicted using direct finite-element analysis. The interface between the fluid and structure is applied using conservative and consistent interfacing methodology. The motion of the computational grid due to the deflection of the vertical tail is computed using transfinite interpolation module. The investigation revealed that the vertical tail is subject to bending and torsional responses, mainly in the first modes of vibrations. The buffet loads increase significantly as the onset of vortex breakdown moves upstream of the vertical tails. The inboard surface of the vertical tail has more significant contribution in the buffet excitation than the outboard surface. In addition, the pressure on the outboard surface of the vertical tail is less sensitive to the angle of attack than the pressure on the inboard surface. The buffet excitation peaks shift to lower frequency as the angle of attack increases. The computational results are compared, and they are in close agreement, with several flight and experimental data.

  8. Postglacial Rebound from VLBI Geodesy: On Establishing Vertical Reference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Argus, Donald F.

    1996-01-01

    Difficulty in establishing a reference frame fixed to the earth's interior complicates the measurement of the vertical (radial) motions of the surface. I propose that a useful reference frame for vertical motions is that found by minimizing differences between vertical motions observed with VLBI [Ma and Ryan] and predictions from postglacial rebound predictions [Peltier]. The optimal translation of the geocenter is 1.7mm/year toward 36degN, 111degE when determined from the motions of 10 VLBI sites. This translation gives a better fit of observations to predictions than does the VLBI reference frame used by Ma and Ryan, but the improvement is statistically insignificant. The root mean square of differences decreases 20% to 0.73 mm/yr and the correlation coefficient increases from 0.76 to 0.87. Postglacial rebound is evident in the uplift of points in Sweden and Ontario that were beneath the ancient ice sheets of Fennoscandia and Canada, and in the subsidence of points in the northeastern U.S., Germany, and Alaska that were around the periphery of the ancient ice sheets.

  9. 'Endurance' Untouched (vertical)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This navigation camera mosaic, created from images taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity on sols 115 and 116 (May 21 and 22, 2004) provides a dramatic view of 'Endurance Crater.' The rover engineering team carefully plotted the safest path into the football field-sized crater, eventually easing the rover down the slopes around sol 130 (June 12, 2004). To the upper left of the crater sits the rover's protective heatshield, which sheltered Opportunity as it passed through the martian atmosphere. The 360-degree view is presented in a vertical projection, with geometric and radiometric seam correction.

  10. Essay on Gyroscopic Motions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tea, Peter L., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Explains gyroscopic motions to college freshman or high school seniors who have learned about centripetal acceleration and the transformations of a couple. Contains several figures showing the direction of forces and motion. (YP)

  11. Vertical wind turbine

    SciTech Connect

    Danson, D.P.

    1988-08-16

    This patent describes a wind driven turbine of the vertical axis type comprising: (a) a support base; (b) a generally vertical column rotatably mounted to the support base; (c) upper and lower support means respectively mounted on the column for rotation therewith; wind driven blades connected between the upper and lower support means for rotation about the column and each blade being individually rotatable about a blade axis extending longitudinally through the blade to vary a blade angle of attach thereof relative to wind velocity during rotation about the column; and (e) control means for variably adjusting angles of attack of each blade to incident wind, the control means including a connecting rod means having drive means for rotating each blade about the associated blade axis in response to radial movement of the connecting rod means and control shaft pivotally mounted within the column and having a first shaft portion connected to the connecting rod means and a second shaft portion radially offset from the first shaft portion and pivotally connected to radially displace the first portion and thereby the connecting rod means to vary the blade angles of attack during rotation about the column.

  12. Objects in Motion

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Damonte, Kathleen

    2004-01-01

    One thing scientists study is how objects move. A famous scientist named Sir Isaac Newton (1642-1727) spent a lot of time observing objects in motion and came up with three laws that describe how things move. This explanation only deals with the first of his three laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion says that moving objects will continue…

  13. Effects of motion control footwear on running: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Roy T H; Wong, Michael Y M; Ng, Gabriel Y F

    2011-09-01

    Excessive foot pronation is a risk factor of running injuries and motion control footwear is designed to control foot pronation. With the movement transfer between foot pronation and tibial rotation, motion control footwear may not only be confined to controlling foot pronation. In view of the controversies in the literature on effectiveness of motion control footwear, this paper reviewed the efficacy of motion control footwear functions as reported in the literature. Eligible studies were identified from seven electronic databases. Two independent authors extracted the data and assessed the methodological qualities using the Jadad Scale. A total of 14 quasi randomised controlled trials were included. Even though the included studies were rated as "low quality" according to the Jadad Scale, the data were pooled and analysed. Results revealed that motion control footwear was effective in reducing the amount of foot pronation and the peak vertical impact during landing. There is no evidence that suggests motion control footwear for controlling kinematics of the proximal segments.

  14. The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, Meryl L.; Daunton, Nancy G.; Fox, Robert A.

    1990-01-01

    The susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness was investigated using test conditions that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness in squirrel monkeys. Ten male rhesus monkeys and ten male Bolivian squirrel monkeys were rotated in the vertical axis at 150 deg/s for a maximum duration of 45 min. Each animal was tested in two conditions, continuous rotation and intermittent rotation. None of the rhesus monkeys vomited during the motion tests but all of the squirrel monkeys did. Differences were observed between the species in the amount of activity that occurred during motion test, with the squirrel monkeys being significantly more active than the rhesus monkeys. These results, while substantiating anecdotal reports of the resistance of rhesus monkeys to motion sickness, should be interpreted with caution because of the documented differences that exist between various species with regard to stimuli that are provocative for eliciting motion sickness.

  15. Passenger comfort response times as a function of aircraft motion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rinalducci, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    The relationship between a passenger's response time of changes in level of comfort experienced as a function of aircraft motion was examined. The aircraft used in this investigation was capable of providing a wide range of vertical and transverse accelerations by means of direct lift flap control surfaces and side force generator surfaces in addition to normal control surfaces. Response times to changes in comfort were recorded along with the passenger's rating of comfort on a five point scale. In addition, a number of aircraft motion variables including vertical and transverse accelerations were also recorded. Results indicate some relationship between human comfort response times to reaction time data.

  16. Is the Solar System's Galactic Motion Imprinted in the Phanerozoic Climate?

    PubMed Central

    Shaviv, Nir J.; Prokoph, Andreas; Veizer, Ján

    2014-01-01

    A new δ18O Phanerozoic database, based on 24,000 low-Mg calcitic fossil shells, yields a prominent 32 Ma oscillation with a secondary 175 Ma frequency modulation. The periodicities and phases of these oscillations are consistent with parameters postulated for the vertical motion of the solar system across the galactic plane, modulated by the radial epicyclic motion. We propose therefore that the galactic motion left an imprint on the terrestrial climate record. Based on its vertical motion, the effective average galactic density encountered by the solar system is . This suggests the presence of a disk dark matter component. PMID:25141775

  17. Coexistence of bounded and unbounded motions in a bouncing ball model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marò, Stefano

    2013-05-01

    We consider the model describing the vertical motion of a ball falling with constant acceleration on a wall and elastically reflected. The wall is supposed to move in the vertical direction according to a given periodic function f. We apply the Aubry-Mather theory to the generating function in order to prove the existence of bounded motions with prescribed mean time between the bounces. As the existence of unbounded motions is known, it is possible to find a class of functions f that allow both bounded and unbounded motions.

  18. Localised Plate Motion on Venus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghail, R. C.

    1996-03-01

    The volcanic and tectonic features observed in Dali Vinculum, Parga Vinculum and Imdr Regio are concentrated at long, narrow, curvilinear zones, with relatively minor volcanism and tectonism between these zones. These zones, whilst more diffuse than terrestrial plate boundaries, nevertheless define the margins of tectonic plates. In contrast to Earth, however, it appears that venusian plates are neither created nor destroyed by lateral motion. Rather, plates are thinned and intruded at vincula plate boundaries, vertically accreted by small-scale intra-plate (planitia) volcanism and perhaps destroyed by delamination of thickened crust in tesserae and montane regions such as Thetis Regio and Ishtar Terra. The diversity in age both between and within these three areas together with the evidence for infrequent, small scale resurfacing in the planitiae are difficult to reconcile with a non-uniformitarian geological process.

  19. SGP and TWP (Manus) Ice Cloud Vertical Velocities

    DOE Data Explorer

    Kalesse, Heike

    2013-06-27

    Daily netcdf-files of ice-cloud dynamics observed at the ARM sites at SGP (Jan1997-Dec2010) and Manus (Jul1999-Dec2010). The files include variables at different time resolution (10s, 20min, 1hr). Profiles of radar reflectivity factor (dbz), Doppler velocity (vel) as well as retrieved vertical air motion (V_air) and reflectivity-weighted particle terminal fall velocity (V_ter) are given at 10s, 20min and 1hr resolution. Retrieved V_air and V_ter follow radar notation, so positive values indicate downward motion. Lower level clouds are removed, however a multi-layer flag is included.

  20. Vertical-angle control system in the LLMC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Binhua; Yang, Lei; Tie, Qiongxian; Mao, Wei

    2000-10-01

    A control system of the vertical angle transmission used in the Lower Latitude Meridian Circle (LLMC) is described in this paper. The transmission system can change the zenith distance of the tube quickly and precisely. It works in three modes: fast motion, slow motion and lock mode. The fast motion mode and the slow motion mode are that the tube of the instrument is driven by a fast motion stepper motor and a slow motion one separately. The lock mode is running for lock mechanism that is driven by a lock stepper motor. These three motors are controlled together by a single chip microcontroller, which is controlled in turn by a host personal computer. The slow motion mechanism and its rotational step angle are fully discussed because the mechanism is not used before. Then the hardware structure of this control system based on a microcontroller is described. Control process of the system is introduced during a normal observation, which is divided into eleven steps. All the steps are programmed in our control software in C++ and/or in ASM. The C++ control program is set up in the host PC, while the ASM control program is in the microcontroller system. Structures and functions of these rprograms are presented. Some details and skills for programming are discussed in the paper too.