Science.gov

Sample records for nasal continuous positive

  1. Mouth leak with nasal continuous positive airway pressure increases nasal airway resistance.

    PubMed

    Richards, G N; Cistulli, P A; Ungar, R G; Berthon-Jones, M; Sullivan, C E

    1996-07-01

    Nasal congestion, dry nose and throat, and sore throat affect approximately 40% of patients using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). The mechanisms causing nasal symptoms are unclear, but mouth leaks causing high unidirectional nasal airflow may be important. We conducted a study to investigate the effects of mouth leak and the influence of humidification on nasal resistance in normal subjects. Nasal resistance was measured with posterior rhinomanometry in six normal subjects who deliberately produced a mouth leak for 10 min while using nasal CPAP. Nasal resistance was measured regularly for 20 min after the challenge. A series of tests were performed using air at differing temperatures and humidities. There was no change in nasal resistance when subjects breathed through their noses while on CPAP, but a mouth leak caused a large increase in resistance (at a flow of 0.5 L/s) from a baseline mean of 2.21 cm H2O/L/s to a maximum mean of 7.52 cm H2O/L/s at 1 min after the challenge. Use of a cold passover humidifier caused little change in the response (maximum mean: 8.27 cm H2O/L/s), but a hot water bath humidifier greatly attenuated the magnitude (maximum mean: 4.02 cm H2O/L/s) and duration of the response. Mouth leak with nasal CPAP leads to high unidirectional nasal airflow, which causes a large increase in nasal resistance. This response can be largely prevented by fully humidifying the inspired air.

  2. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Strategies with Bubble Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Not All Bubbling Is the Same: The Seattle Positive Airway Pressure System.

    PubMed

    Welty, Stephen E

    2016-12-01

    Premature neonates are predisposed to complications, including bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). BPD is associated with long-term pulmonary and neurodevelopmental consequences. Noninvasive respiratory support with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has been recommended strongly by the American Academy of Pediatrics. However, CPAP implementation has shown at least a 50% failure rate. Enhancing nasal CPAP effectiveness may decrease the need for mechanical ventilation and reduce the incidence of BPD. Bubble nasal CPAP is better than nasal CPAP using mechanical devices and the bubbling provides air exchange in distal respiratory units. The Seattle PAP system reduces parameters that assess work of breathing.

  3. Effect of Nasal Obstruction on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment: Computational Fluid Dynamics Analyses

    PubMed Central

    Wakayama, Tadashi; Suzuki, Masaaki; Tanuma, Tadashi

    2016-01-01

    Objective Nasal obstruction is a common problem in continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and limits treatment compliance. The purpose of this study is to model the effects of nasal obstruction on airflow parameters under CPAP using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), and to clarify quantitatively the relation between airflow velocity and pressure loss coefficient in subjects with and without nasal obstruction. Methods We conducted an observational cross-sectional study of 16 Japanese adult subjects, of whom 9 had nasal obstruction and 7 did not (control group). Three-dimensional reconstructed models of the nasal cavity and nasopharynx with a CPAP mask fitted to the nostrils were created from each subject’s CT scans. The digital models were meshed with tetrahedral cells and stereolithography formats were created. CPAP airflow simulations were conducted using CFD software. Airflow streamlines and velocity contours in the nasal cavities and nasopharynx were compared between groups. Simulation models were confirmed to agree with actual measurements of nasal flow rate and with pressure and flow rate in the CPAP machine. Results Under 10 cmH2O CPAP, average maximum airflow velocity during inspiration was 17.6 ± 5.6 m/s in the nasal obstruction group but only 11.8 ± 1.4 m/s in the control group. The average pressure drop in the nasopharynx relative to inlet static pressure was 2.44 ± 1.41 cmH2O in the nasal obstruction group but only 1.17 ± 0.29 cmH2O in the control group. The nasal obstruction and control groups were clearly separated by a velocity threshold of 13.5 m/s, and pressure loss coefficient threshold of approximately 10.0. In contrast, there was no significant difference in expiratory pressure in the nasopharynx between the groups. Conclusion This is the first CFD analysis of the effect of nasal obstruction on CPAP treatment. A strong correlation between the inspiratory pressure loss coefficient and maximum airflow

  4. Influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm newborns receiving continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Brunherotti, Marisa Afonso Andrade; Martinez, Francisco Eulógio

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To evaluate the influence of body position on the displacement of nasal prongs in preterm infants. Methods: This prospective, randomized, crossover study enrolled infants born at a mean gestational age of 29.7±2 weeks, birth weight of 1353±280g and 2.9±2.2 days of life, submitted to continuous positive airway pressure by nasal prongs. The main outcome was the number of times that the nasal prongs were displaced following infant positioning in the following body positions: prone, right lateral, left lateral, and supine, according to a pre-established random order. Moreover, cardiorespiratory variables (respiratory rate, heart rate, and oxygen saturation) were evaluated for each body position. Data for each position were collected every 10 min, over a period of 60 min. An occurrence was defined when the nasal prongs were displaced from the nostrils after 3 min in the desired position, requiring intervention of the examiner. Results: Among the 16 studied infants, the occurrence of nasal prong displacement was only observed in the prone position (9 infants - 56.2%) and in the left lateral position (2 infants - 12.5%). The number of times that the prongs were displaced was 11 in the prone position (7 within the first 10min) and 2 in the left lateral position (1 within the first 10min). No clinically significant changes were observed in the cardiorespiratory variables. Conclusions: Maintenance of the nasal prongs to provide adequate noninvasive respiratory support was harder in the prone position. PMID:26116326

  5. Effects of nasal mask leak and heated humidification on nasal mucosa in the therapy with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP).

    PubMed

    Fischer, Yvonne; Keck, Tilman; Leiacker, Richard; Rozsasi, Ajnacska; Rettinger, Gerhard; Gruen, Philipp M

    2008-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the objective short-term influence of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) therapy, nasal mask leak (NML) and heated humidifiers (HH) to nasal conditioning of spontaneously breathing subjects. This was a prospective, non-randomized, non-blinded day-time study. Eighteen healthy subjects were enrolled in the study. All subjects received nCPAP therapy for 60 min in three different conditions successively: (1) nCPAP without humidification, (2) nCPAP with a defined leakage of nasal mask (slashed circle 28.3 mm2) and (3) nCPAP with HH. Nasal humidity and temperature were measured in the anterior turbinate area using a miniaturized thermocouple and a relative humidity sensor. The measurements were accomplished at the beginning of therapy, after 60, 120 and 180 min. Absolute humidity (aH) in the anterior turbinate area decreased significantly (p = 0.0075) from 17.41 +/- 3.81 mg/l (baseline) to 15.27 +/- 2.21 mg/l (nCPAP alone). With attachment of a NML, aH decreased from 15.27 mg/l not significantly (p = 0.058) to 13.77 +/- 2.28 mg/l (nCPAP and NML) compared to nCPAP alone. After addition of heated humidification to nCPAP, aH increased again from 13.77 mg/l significantly (p = 0.042) to 15.29 +/- 3.51 mg/l (nCPAP and HH) compared to aH (nCPAP+NML). No difference was found between aH (nCPAP and HH) and aH (nCPAP alone). Airway temperature did not change significantly after application of nCPAP alone, nCPAP and NML, and nCPAP and HH. These data indicate that nCPAP therapy with NML tends to have more remarkable reduction of the nasal humidity than nCPAP therapy without NML. nCPAP with heated humidifier is able to compensate the dehydration effects induced by nCPAP therapy with NML by increasing the aH at the anterior turbinate area to the levels observed during breathing with nCPAP alone.

  6. Effects of Heated Humidification and Topical Steroids on Compliance, Nasal Symptoms, and Quality of Life in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome Using Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Ryan, Silke; Doherty, Liam S.; Nolan, Geraldine M.; McNicholas, Walter T.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Nasal side effects are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) starting on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. We tested the hypothesis that heated humidification or nasal topical steroids improve compliance, nasal side effects and quality of life in this patient group. Methods: 125 patients with the established diagnosis of OSAS (apnea/hypopnea index ≥ 10/h), who tolerated CPAP via a nasal mask, and who had a successful CPAP titration were randomized to 4 weeks of dry CPAP, humidified CPAP or CPAP with additional topical nasal steroid application (fluticasone, GlaxoWellcome). Groups were similar in all demographic variables and in frequency of nasal symptoms at baseline. Outcome measures were objective compliance, quality of life (short form 36), subjective sleepiness (Epworth Sleepiness Scale score) and nasal symptoms such as runny, dry or blocked nose, sneezing and headaches; all variables assessed using a validated questionnaire and by direct interview. Results: There was no difference in compliance between groups after 4 weeks (dry: 5.21 ± 1.66 h/night, fluticasone: 5.66 ± 1.68, humidifier: 5.21 ± 1.84; p = 0.444). Quality of life and subjective sleepiness improved in all groups, but there were no differences in the extent of improvement. Nasal Symptoms were less frequently reported in the humidifier group (28%) than in the remaining groups (dry: 70%, fluticasone: 53%, p = 0.002). However, the addition of fluticasone resulted in increased frequency of sneezing. Conclusion: The addition of a humidifier, but not nasal steroids decreases the frequency of nasal symptoms in unselected OSAS patients initiating CPAP therapy; however compliance and quality of life remain unaltered. Citation: Ryan S; Doherty LS; Nolan GM; McNicholas WT. Effects of heated humidification and topical steroids on compliance, nasal symptoms, and quality of life in patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome using nasal

  7. Mandibular Advancement Device as a Comparable Treatment to Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Positional Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Takaesu, Yoshikazu; Tsuiki, Satoru; Kobayashi, Mina; Komada, Yoko; Nakayama, Hideaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Positional obstructive sleep apnea (P-OSA) is a clinically common phenotype of OSA, which can be treated effectively with mandibular advancement devices (MADs). We hypothesized that the efficacy of an MAD is comparable to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in P-OSA patients. Methods: Among patients diagnosed with OSA at a single sleep center from January 2008 to May 2014, male subjects with moderate OSA were recruited and stringently categorized as having P-OSA when the ratio of their lateral apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) to supine AHI was ≤ 0.5, their lateral sleep time was > 60 minutes, and their lateral REM sleep time was longer than 10 minutes. Treatment efficacy was compared between P-OSA subjects with an MAD (n = 34) and those with nCPAP (n = 34) after matching for age, body-mass index, and baseline AHI. Results: There were no significant differences in baseline AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 20.6 ± 3.9/h: 21.3 ± 1.7/h, p = 0.35) or in follow-up AHI (MAD: nCPAP = 4.7 ± 3.5/h: 3.4 ± 3.7/h, p = 0.12) between the 2 treatment groups, and hence MADs lowered the AHI to the same extent as nCPAP. Conclusions: These findings suggest that an MAD is as efficacious as nCPAP for P-OSA patients. MAD treatment for this specific phenotype may be a promising patient-tailored and first-line approach to OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1079. Citation: Takaesu Y, Tsuiki S, Kobayashi M, Komada Y, Nakayama H, Inoue Y. Mandibular advancement device as a comparable treatment to nasal continuous positive airway pressure for positional obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(8):1113–1119. PMID:27250814

  8. Nasal pillows as an alternative interface in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome initiating continuous positive airway pressure therapy.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Silke; Garvey, John F; Swan, Valerie; Behan, Renata; McNicholas, Walter T

    2011-06-01

    Side-effects directly due to the nasal mask are common in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) commencing continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). Recently, nasal pillows have been designed to overcome these issues. Limited evidence exists of the benefits and effectiveness of these devices. Twenty-one patients (19 male, 49±10years) with the established diagnosis of OSAS [apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI): 52±22] and who had a successful CPAP titration were commenced on CPAP therapy (10±2cmH2O), and randomized to 4weeks of a nasal pillow (P) and a standard nasal mask (M) in a crossover design. Outcome measures were objective compliance, AHI, quality of life, Epworth Sleepiness Score (ESS) and CPAP side-effects. There was no difference in compliance (M versus P: 5.1±1.9h versus 5.0±1.7h; P=0.701) and AHI (2.6±2.7 versus 3.0±2.9; P=0.509). Quality of life and ESS improved with CPAP, but there was no difference in the extent of improvement between both devices. Usage of nasal pillows resulted in less reported pressure on the face and more subjects found the nasal pillow the more comfortable device. However, there was no clear overall preference for either device at the end of the study (mask=57%, pillow=43%; P=0.513). The applied CPAP pressure did not correlate with compliance, AHI and ESS. Furthermore, no differences in outcome parameters were noted comparing groups with CPAP pressure <10 and ≥10cm H(2) O. Nasal pillows are equally effective in CPAP therapy, but do not generally lead to improved compliance.

  9. Effect of ethanol on the efficacy of nasal continuous positive airway pressure as a treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Berry, R B; Desa, M M; Light, R W

    1991-02-01

    The effect of ethanol ingestion on the efficacy of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nasal CPAP) as a treatment for the obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) syndrome was studied in ten obese male subjects undergoing this therapy. On the first night of polysomnography, the lowest level of CPAP that maintained airway patency was determined (critical level). On the second (control) night (C), subjects slept the entire night on this level of CPAP. On the third night (E), subjects ingested either 1.5 ml/kg (part A, N = 6) or 2.0 ml/kg (part B, N = 4) of 50 percent ethanol (100 proof vodka) over one half-hour starting 1 h before bedtime. A serum ethanol level was obtained at bedtime (part A: 63.7 +/- 17.3 mg/dl; part B: 108.6 +/- 20.6 mg/dl), and subjects were monitored on the critical level of CPAP. Comparison of nights C and E for parts A + B showed no difference in total sleep time (TST) or the amount of different sleep stages as an absolute time or a percentage of TST except that there was more stage 2 (as a percent of TST) on E nights. The apnea + hypopnea index and C and E nights did not differ and was quite low (3.6 +/- 3.7/h vs 1.9 +/- 2.7/h). Similarly, ethanol ingestion did not increase the number of desaturations to at or below 90 and 85 percent, or lower the mean arterial oxygen saturation in NREM or REM sleep. Analysis of parts A and B separately also showed no differences with respect to the apnea + hypopnea index or the number of desaturations on control and ethanol nights. We conclude that acute moderate ethanol ingestion does not decrease the efficacy of an optimum level of nasal CPAP.

  10. Sleep-related breathing disorders. 5. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Grunstein, R R

    1995-10-01

    CPAP should be considered the first line of treatment in patients with moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnoea. In our centre in Sydney this generally means patients with more than 20 apnoea/hypopnoeas per hour with repeated dips in oxyhaemoglobin saturation and usually some symptomatology. Despite this first line role of nasal CPAP, recent objective studies question whether earlier enthusiastic reports on adherence to CPAP are correct. The role of technical innovations in new CPAP machines in improving usage remains to be tested. The "drop out" rate from physician selection for a CPAP trial to highly compliant user is certainly more than 50% of patients. What happens to these patients? Data from some studies suggest that surgical treatments are used, at least in the USA, but in all probability many of these patients remain untreated. The challenge in the next decade is either to improve CPAP devices to increase usage in this group or to develop other treatment options. The role of intensive inhospital "acclimatisation" to CPAP also has yet to be objectively tested. It is unclear whether "intelligent" CPAP will make huge inroads in increasing the number of patients who accept CPAP trials, prescriptions, or compliance. It will have minimal impact on patients with mask problems or claustrophobia or those who feel that CPAP is inconvenient. There is a high likelihood that it will reduce technologist workload during CPAP titration studies. "Intelligent" CPAP may help to reduce total overnight mouth leakage and therefore reduce nasal side effects. The current expense of developing such devices will mean that they are unlikely to supersede much cheaper standard "one pressure" CPAP machines in the next few years.

  11. Efficacy of Home Single-Channel Nasal Pressure for Recommending Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment in Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Masa, Juan F.; Duran-Cantolla, Joaquin; Capote, Francisco; Cabello, Marta; Abad, Jorge; Garcia-Rio, Francisco; Ferrer, Antoni; Fortuna, Ana M.; Gonzalez-Mangado, Nicolas; de la Peña, Monica; Aizpuru, Felipe; Barbe, Ferran; Montserrat, Jose M.; Larrateguy, Luis D.; de Castro, Jorge Rey; Garcia-Ledesma, Estefania; Corral, Jaime; Martin-Vicente, Maria J.; Martinez-Null, Cristina; Egea, Carlos; Cancelo, Laura; García-Díaz, Emilio; Carmona-Bernal, Carmen; Sánchez-Armengol, Ángeles; Mayos, Merche; Miralda, Rosa M; Troncoso, Maria F.; Gonzalez, Monica; Martinez-Martinez, Marian; Cantalejo, Olga; Piérola, Javier; Vigil, Laura; Embid, Cristina; del Mar Centelles, Mireia; Prieto, Teresa Ramírez; Rojo, Blas; Lores, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Unlike other prevalent diseases, obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) has no simple tool for diagnosis and therapeutic decision-making in primary healthcare. Home single-channel nasal pressure (HNP) may be an alternative to polysomnography for diagnosis but its use in therapeutic decisions has yet to be explored. Objectives: To ascertain whether an automatically scored HNP apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), used alone to recommend continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment, agrees with decisions made by a specialist using polysomnography and several clinical variables. Methods: Patients referred by primary care physicians for OSA suspicion underwent randomized polysomnography and HNP. We analyzed the total sample and both more and less symptomatic subgroups for Bland and Altman plots to explore AHI agreement; receiver operating characteristic curves to establish area under the curve (AUC) measurements for CPAP recommendation; and therapeutic decision efficacy for several HNP AHI cutoff points. Results: Of the 787 randomized patients, 35 (4%) were lost, 378 (48%) formed the more symptomatic and 374 (48%) the less symptomatic subgroups. AHI bias and agreement limits were 5.8 ± 39.6 for the total sample, 5.3 ± 38.7 for the more symptomatic, and 6 ± 40.2 for the less symptomatic subgroups. The AUC were 0.826 for the total sample, 0.903 for the more symptomatic, and 0.772 for the less symptomatic subgroups. In the more symptomatic subgroup, 70% of patients could be correctly treated with CPAP. Conclusion: Automatic home single-channel nasal pressure scoring can correctly recommend CPAP treatment in most of more symptomatic patients with OSA suspicion. Our results suggest that this device may be an interesting tool in initial OSA management for primary care physicians, although future studies in a primary care setting are necessary. Clinical Trials Information: Clinicaltrial.gov identifier: NCT01347398. Citation: Masa JF, Duran-Cantolla J, Capote F, Cabello

  12. Effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure and oxygen supplementation on norepinephrine kinetics and cardiovascular responses in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Mills, Paul J; Kennedy, Brian P; Loredo, Jose S; Dimsdale, Joel E; Ziegler, Michael G

    2006-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is characterized by noradrenergic activation. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the treatment of choice and has been shown to effectively reduce elevated norepinephrine (NE) levels. This study examined whether the reduction in NE after CPAP is due to an increase in NE clearance and/or a decrease of NE release rate. Fifty CPAP-naive OSA patients with an apnea-hypopnea index >15 were studied. NE clearance and release rates, circulating NE levels, urinary NE excretion, and blood pressure and heart rate were determined before and after 14 days of CPAP, placebo CPAP (CPAP administered at ineffective pressure), or oxygen supplementation. CPAP led to a significant increase in NE clearance (P < or = 0.01), as well as decreases in plasma NE levels (P < or = 0.018) and daytime (P < 0.001) and nighttime (P < 0.05) NE excretion. NE release rate was unchanged with treatment. Systolic (P < or = 0.013) and diastolic (P < or = 0.026) blood pressure and heart rate (P < or = 0.014) were decreased in response to CPAP but not in response to oxygen or placebo CPAP treatment. Posttreatment systolic blood pressure was best predicted by pretreatment systolic blood pressure and posttreatment NE clearance and release rate (P < 0.01). The findings indicate that one of the mechanisms through which CPAP reduces NE levels is through an increase in the clearance of NE from the circulation.

  13. Effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure during sleep on 24-hour blood pressure in obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Wilcox, I; Grunstein, R R; Hedner, J A; Doyle, J; Collins, F L; Fletcher, P J; Kelly, D T; Sullivan, C E

    1993-09-01

    Ambulatory blood pressure (BP) was measured noninvasively (Oxford Medilog ABP) at 15-minute intervals for 24 hours before and after 8 weeks of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in 19 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We included both normotensive and hypertensive patients, but hypertensives were studied after withdrawal of antihypertensive drugs. Ambulatory BP before and after treatment was compared using patients as their own controls. Treatment with nCPAP was successfully established in 14 of the 19 patients (74%). Blood pressure fell significantly in patients who were successfully treated: 24-hour mean BP (systolic/diastolic) decreased from 141 +/- 18/89 +/- 11 mm Hg to 134 +/- 19/85 +/- 13 mm Hg (p < 0.05). The reduction in 24-hour mean systolic BP occurred during both day and night, but a significant fall in mean diastolic BP was only observed during the day. The mean blood pressure fell in both normotensive and hypertensive patients. Patients who were inadequately treated with nCPAP had no reduction in mean 24-hour BP. Effective treatment of sleep apnea with nCPAP was associated with a significant fall in both systolic and diastolic BP independent of changes in body weight or alcohol consumption, suggesting that sleep apnea was an independent factor contributing to elevated nighttime and daytime BP in these patients.

  14. Long-term effects of treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure on lung function in patients with overlap syndrome.

    PubMed

    de Miguel, Javier; Cabello, Jorge; Sánchez-Alarcos, José M F; Alvarez-Sala, Rudolfo; Espinós, Domingo; Alvarez-Sala, José L

    2002-03-01

    We assessed the effects of chronic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on lung function in a series of unselected patients with overlap syndrome, and we determined whether there were differences in the response induced by CPAP between hypercapnic (PaCO2 > or =45 mm Hg) and eucapnic patients with overlap syndrome. The study population included 55 unselected patients (48 men, mean age of 58.5 +/- 10.5 years) with a concurrent diagnosis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) who had been referred to the Department of Pulmonology of our hospital over 2 consecutive years and in whom work-up studies resulted in the prescription of nasal CPAP therapy. An apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) greater than or equal to 10 in the cardiorespiratory polygraphy was required for the diagnosis of OSAHS. A forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) less than 80% and FEV1-forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 70% of the reference values were required for the diagnosis of COPD. Control lung function studies and arterial blood gas measurements were performed at 6 and 18 months of CPAP therapy. These patients with overlap syndrome accounted for 28.5% of all patients with OSAHS treated with CPAP during the study period. The mean AHI was 37.3 +/- 26.1 and the mean CPAP level 7.3 +/- 1.3 cm H2O. Thirty-three patients were hypercapnic (PaCO2 > or = 45 mm Hg) and 22 eucapnic. The hypercapnic group had higher AHI value (44.3 +/- 26.9) than the eucapnic group (28.6 +/- 21.9) (P < 0.05). After 6 months of CPAP therapy, there were statistically significant increases in PaO2, FEV1, and FVC, accompanied by significant decreases in PaCO2, serum bicarbonate levels, and alveolar-arterial oxygen difference. Response of overlap syndrome patients to CPAP therapy was superior in the hypercapnic group, particularly in relation to improvement of arterial blood gases. However, statistically significant differences in all

  15. A randomised control study comparing the Infant Flow Driver with nasal continuous positive airway pressure in preterm infants

    PubMed Central

    Mazzella, M; Bellini, C; Calevo, M; Campone, F; Massocco, D; Mezzano, P; Zullino, E; Scopesi, F; Arioni, C; Bonacci, W; Serra, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To compare the effectiveness of the Infant Flow Driver (IFD) with single prong nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) in preterm neonates affected by respiratory distress syndrome.
DESIGN—Randomised controlled study.
PATIENTS—Between September 1997 and March 1999, 36 preterm infants who were eligible for CPAP treatment were randomly selected for either nCPAP or IFD and studied prospectively for changes in oxygen requirement and/or respiratory rate. The requirement for mechanical ventilation, complications of treatment, and effects on mid-term outcome were also evaluated.
RESULTS—Use of the IFD had a significantly beneficial effect on both oxygen requirement and respiratory rate (p < 0.0001) when compared with nCPAP. Moreover, O2 requirement and respiratory rate were significantly decreased by four hours (p < 0.001 and p < 0.03 respectively). The probability of remaining supplementary oxygen free over the first 48 hours of treatment was significantly higher in patients treated with the IFD than with nCPAP (p < 0.02). IFD treated patients had a higher success (weaning) rate (94% v 72%) and shorter duration of treatment (49.3 (31) v 56 (29.7) hours respectively; mean (SD)), although the difference was not significant.
CONCLUSIONS—IFD appears to be a feasible device for managing respiratory distress syndrome in preterm infants, and benefits may be had with regard to oxygen requirement and respiratory rate when compared with nCPAP. The trend towards reduced requirement for mechanical ventilation, shorter clinical recovery time, and shorter duration of treatment requires further evaluation in a multicentre randomised clinical trial.

 PMID:11517199

  16. Elective nasal continuous positive airway pressure to support respiration after prolonged ventilation in infants after congenital cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Hemang; Mishra, Amit; Thosani, Rajesh; Acharya, Himanshu; Shah, Ritesh; Surti, Jigar; Sarvaia, Alpesh

    2017-01-01

    Background: We sought to compare the effectiveness of oxygen (O2) treatment administered by an O2 mask and nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) in infants after congenital cardiac surgery. Methods: In this retrospective observational study, 54 infants undergoing corrective cardiac surgery were enrolled. According to the anesthesiologist's preference, the patients ventilated for more than 48 h were either put on NCPAP or O2 mask immediately after extubation. From pre-extubation to 24 h after treatment, arterial blood gas and hemodynamic data were measured. Results: After 24 h of NCPAP institution, the patients showed a significant improvement in oxygenation compared to O2 mask group. Respiratory rate (per minute) decreased from 31.67 ± 4.55 to 24.31 ± 3.69 (P < 0.0001), PO2 (mmHg) increased from 112.12 ± 22.83 to 185.74 ± 14.81 (P < 0.0001), and PCO2 (mmHg) decreased from 42.88 ± 5.01 to 37.00 ± 7.22 (P < 0.0076) in patients on NCPAP. In this group, mean pediatric cardiac surgical Intensive Care Unit (PCSICU) stay was 4.72 ± 1.60 days, with only 2 (11.11%) patients requiring re-intubation. Conclusion: NCPAP can be used safely and effectively in infants undergoing congenital cardiac surgery to improve oxygenation/ventilation. It also reduces the work of breathing, PCSICU stay, and may reduce the likelihood of re-intubation. PMID:28163425

  17. Acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure on 24-hour blood pressure and catecholamines in patients with obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Minemura, H; Akashiba, T; Yamamoto, H; Akahoshi, T; Kosaka, N; Horie, T

    1998-12-01

    To assess the acute effects of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on the 24-hour blood pressure and the secretion of catecholamines in urine and plasma, we investigated the changes in the 24-hour blood pressure and urinary and plasma concentrations of epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) in 26 men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with and without nasal CPAP. Nasal CPAP resulted in significant decreases in the daytime diastolic pressure (from 86 +/-16 mmHg to 83+/-12 mmHg), the nighttime diastolic pressure (from 81+/-12 mmHg to 77+/-9 mmHg) and the nighttime systolic pressures (from 125+/-15 mmHg to 120+/-10 mmHg). There was no significant difference between patients with and without CPAP in the daytime or nighttime urinary E level, but patients who received CPAP showed a significant decrease in daytime urinary NE level (from 156+/-112 microg/14h to 119+/-101 microg/14h) and nighttime urinary NE level (from 143+/-91 microg/10h to 112+/-65 microg/10h). The morning plasma level of NE also decreased (from 371+/-181 pg/ml to 273 +/-148 pg/ml) in patients who received nasal CPAP (p<0.02), but the plasma level of E remained unchanged. There were no correlations between PSG parameters and the reductions in blood pressure and the catecholamine levels induced by nasal CPAP. These findings suggest that OSA contributes, at least in part, to the development of systemic hypertension by increasing sympathetic nervous activity.

  18. Choosing an Oronasal Mask to Deliver Continuous Positive Airway Pressure May Cause More Upper Airway Obstruction or Lead to Higher Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements than a Nasal Mask in Some Patients: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Justin R.; Aiyappan, Vinod; Mercer, Jeremy; Catcheside, Peter G.; Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; McEvoy, R. Doug; Antic, Nick

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: The choice of mask interface used with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy can affect the control of upper airway obstruction (UAO) in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). We describe a case series of four patients with paradoxical worsening of UAO with an oronasal mask and the effect of changing to a nasal mask. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed the case histories of 4 patients and recorded patient demographics, in-laboratory and ambulatory CPAP titration data, CPAP therapy data, type of mask interface used and potential confounding factors. Results: The 4 cases (mean ± SD: age = 59 ± 16 y; BMI = 30.5 ± 4.5 kg/m2) had a high residual apnoea-hypopnea index (AHI) (43 ± 14.2 events/h) and high CPAP pressure requirements (14.9 ± 6.6 cmH2O) with an oronasal mask. Changing to a nasal mask allowed adequate control of UAO with a significant reduction in the average residual AHI (3.1 ± 1.5 events/h). In two of the four cases, it was demonstrated that control of UAO was obtained at a much lower CPAP pressure compared to the oronasal mask (Case one = 17.5 cmH2O vs 12cmH2O; Case two = 17.9 cmH2O vs 7.8 cmH2O). Other potential confounding factors were unchanged. There are various physiological observations that may explain these findings but it is uncertain which individuals are susceptible to these mechanisms. Conclusions: If patients have OSA incompletely controlled by CPAP with evidence of residual UAO and/or are requiring surprisingly high CPAP pressure to control OSA with an oronasal mask, the choice of mask should be reviewed and consideration be given to a trial of a nasal mask. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. Citation: Ng JR, Aiyappan V, Mercer J, Catcheside PG, Chai-Coetzer CL, McEvoy RD, Antic N. Choosing an oronasal mask to deliver continuous positive airway pressure may cause more upper airway obstruction or lead to higher continuous positive airway pressure requirements than a nasal

  19. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jeonghee; Park, Kyuhee; Lee, Eun Hee; Choi, Byung Min

    2017-04-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [-1.90-36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress.

  20. Humidified High Flow Nasal Cannula versus Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure as an Initial Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants with Respiratory Distress: a Randomized, Controlled Non-Inferiority Trial

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Heated, humidified, high-flow nasal cannula (HHFNC) is frequently used as a noninvasive respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress. But there are limited studies that compares HHFNC with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) only as the initial treatment of respiratory distress in preterm infants immediately after birth. The aim of this study is to assess the effectiveness and safety of HHFNC compared to nCPAP for the initial treatment of preterm infants with respiratory distress. Preterm infants at between 30 and 35 weeks of gestational age were randomized to HHFNC or nCPAP when they showed respiratory distress in less than 24 hours of age postnatally. Preterm infants who needed invasive respiratory supports were excluded. Primary outcome was the incidence of treatment failure (defined as need for the intubation or mechanical ventilation). Eighty-five infants were analyzed. Sixteen of 42 infants randomized to HHFNC showed treatment failure compared to 9 of 43 infants using nCPAP (Risk difference 17.17 [−1.90–36.23]; P = 0.099). In terms of the reason for treatment failure, the frequency of hypoxia was significantly higher in the HHFNC group than in the nCPAP group (P = 0.020). There was no difference between the 2 groups in terms of respiratory and clinical outcomes and complications. Although HHFNC is safe compared to nCPAP, it is not certain that HHFNC is effective compared to nCPAP non-inferiorly as an initial respiratory support in preterm infants with respiratory distress. PMID:28244292

  1. The Effects of Massage with Coconut and Sunflower Oils on Oxygen Saturation of Premature Infants with Respiratory Distress Syndrome Treated With Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Valizadeh, Sousan; Hosseini, Mohammad Bagher; Asghari Jafarabadi, Mohammad; Ajoodanian, Najmeh

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Nowadays particular emphasis is placed on the developmental aspects of premature infants care. Massage therapy is one of the best-known methods of caring. Due to the minimal touch policy in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs), massaging is not usually performed on premature infants. However, there is not sufficient evidence to support the claim that newborn infants with complex medical conditions should not be massaged. This study aimed to determine the effects of massage with coconut and sunflower oils on oxygen saturation of infants with respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) treated with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). Methods: This was a randomized controlled trial on 90 newborns who were admitted to Alzahra Hospital (Tabriz, Iran). The infants were divided into control and massage therapy groups (massage with coconut and sunflower oils). Data was collected using a hospital documentation form. A 15-minute daily massage was performed for 3 days. Respiratory rate (RR), fraction of inspired oxygen (FiO2) and oxygen saturation were measured 5 minutes before the massage, 3 times during the massage, and 5 minutes after the massage. The collected data was analyzed using a mixed model. Results: In comparison to coconut oil and control groups, mean oxygen saturation of sunflower oil group was improved. In addition, the coconut massage group showed lower oxygen saturation than the control group but was all values were within the normal range. Although massage decreased oxygen saturation, there was no need to increase FiO2. Conclusion: Massage therapy can provide developmental care for infants treated with NCPAP. PMID:25276695

  2. In vivo efficacy of heated and non-heated humidifiers during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP)-therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Wiest, G H; Fuchs, F S; Brueckl, W M; Nusko, G; Harsch, I A; Hahn, E G; Ficker, J H

    2000-04-01

    Upper airway dryness is a frequent side-effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy (nCPAP) in obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). In this situation, heated or non-heated passover humidifiers are often added to the nCPAP-therapy. The efficacy of these two modes in terms of increasing the absolute humidity of the inspired air in vivo has so far not been established. The present investigation was therefore designed to compare various heated and non-heated passover humidifiers in terms of the their ability to increase the absolute humidity in the inspired air during nCPAP. In six healthy test individuals, nCPAP-therapy at pressures of 5 mbar and 10 mbar was simulated, and the relative humidity and temperature of the air within the tube at the junction between CPAP tube and mask were measured. In each test person, measurements were carried out both with and without the two heated (HC 100, Fischer&Paykel Inc., New Zealand and HumidAire, ResMed Ltd., Australia) and two non-heated (Oasis and Humidifier, both from Respironics Inc., U.S.A.) passover humidifiers under steady-state conditions. The absolute humidity was calculated from the relative humidity and temperature measurements. The mean (SD) absolute humidity (gm(-3)) in the steady-state was significantly (P<0.05 higher with each of the humidifiers than that calculated when no humidifier was used. The relevant figures were as follows: no humidifier: 10(-2) (1.8) gm(-3) (at 5 mbar)/9.8 (1.8) gm(-3) (at 10 mbar); Humidifier: 16.4 (0.97)/15.6 (1.26); Oasis: 17.3 (0.97)/ 16.7 (0.93); HC100: 26.5 (1.40)/26.2 (1.23); HumidAire: 31.8 (2.50)/30.9 (2.64). The mean increase in absolute humidity (in gm(-3)) with the aid of the heated humidifiers was 16.3 (5 mbar) gm(-3)/16.4 (10 mbar) gm(-3) with HC100 and 21.6/21.1 with HumidAire, and in both cases was clearly and significantly (P=0.028) higher in comparison with the non-heated humidifiers--6.2/5.8 with Humidifier and 7.2/6.9 with Oasis. In terms of the absolute

  3. In vitro validation and clinical testing of an indirect calorimetry system for ventilated preterm infants that is unaffected by endotracheal tube leaks and can be used during nasal continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Bauer, K; Ketteler, J; Laurenz, M; Versmold, H

    2001-03-01

    Energy expenditure measurements in ventilated preterm infants are difficult because indirect calorimetry underestimates energy expenditure during gas leaks around uncuffed endotracheal tubes routinely used in preterm infants or during nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). We, therefore, developed a breath collector that simultaneously sampled expired air expelled at the ventilator outlet and escaping via the tube leak from the infant's mouth and nose. Our breath collector was combined with a proprietary calorimeter (Deltatrac II). In vitro validation was done by methanol burning (VO(2), 13.8 mL/min; VCO(2), 9.2 mL/min) during intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with two commonly used ventilators (Sechrist IV-100B and Infant Star). Measurement error was determined at different ventilator flows, peak inspiratory pressures of 12-24 cm H(2)O, and during a complete tube leak. The mean measurement error with both ventilators was low (VO(2) +/- 3 %, VCO(2) +/- 2 %) even during a complete tube leak and did not increase with peak inspiratory pressure. The system response time was 2 min. In vivo measurements at the bedside were performed in 25 preterm infants (body weight, 537-1402 g). Energy expenditure during IPPV was 40 +/- 9 kcal/kg per day and 46 +/- 15 kcal/kg per day during nasal CPAP. The tube leak in the preterm infants studied during IPPV was 0 to 47 %, and during nasal CPAP 84 to 97 %. In conclusion, indirect calorimetry performed with our breath collector was accurate during IPPV and nasal CPAP and was unaffected by tube leaks.

  4. A multicentre, randomised controlled, non-inferiority trial, comparing high flow therapy with nasal continuous positive airway pressure as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress (the HIPSTER trial): study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Donath, Susan M; Davis, Peter G

    2015-01-01

    Introduction High flow (HF) therapy is an increasingly popular mode of non-invasive respiratory support for preterm infants. While there is now evidence to support the use of HF to reduce extubation failure, there have been no appropriately designed and powered studies to assess the use of HF as primary respiratory support soon after birth. Our hypothesis is that HF is non-inferior to the standard treatment—nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP)— as primary respiratory support for preterm infants. Methods and analysis The HIPSTER trial is an unblinded, international, multicentre, randomised, non-inferiority trial. Eligible infants are preterm infants of 28–36+6 weeks’ gestational age (GA) who require primary non-invasive respiratory support for respiratory distress in the first 24 h of life. Infants are randomised to treatment with either HF or NCPAP. The primary outcome is treatment failure within 72 h after randomisation, as determined by objective oxygenation, blood gas, and apnoea criteria, or the need for urgent intubation and mechanical ventilation. Secondary outcomes include the incidence of intubation, pneumothorax, bronchopulmonary dysplasia, nasal trauma, costs associated with hospital care and parental stress. With a specified non-inferiority margin of 10%, using a two-sided 95% CI and 90% power, the study requires 375 infants per group (total 750 infants). Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval has been granted by the relevant human research ethics committees at The Royal Women's Hospital (13/12), The Royal Children's Hospital (33144A), The Mercy Hospital for Women (R13/34), and the South-Eastern Norway Regional Health Authority (2013/1657). The trial is currently recruiting at 9 centres in Australia and Norway. The trial results will be published in peer-reviewed international journals, and presented at national and international conferences. Trial registration number Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry ID: ACTRN

  5. Oral appliance therapy versus nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: a randomized, placebo-controlled trial on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems.

    PubMed

    Nikolopoulou, Maria; Byraki, Anna; Ahlberg, Jari; Heymans, Martijn W; Hamburger, H L; De Lange, Jan; Lobbezoo, Frank; Aarab, Ghizlane

    2017-03-10

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is associated with several sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Therefore, the aim of this study was to compare the effects of a mandibular advancement device (MAD) with those of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. In this randomized placebo-controlled trial sixty-four OSAS patients (52.0± 9.6 years) were randomly assigned to an MAD, nCPAP or an intra-oral placebo appliance in a parallel design. All participants filled out the validated Dutch Sleep Disorders Questionnaire (SDQ) twice: one before treatment and one after six months of treatment. With 88 questions, thirteen scales were constructed, representing common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems. Linear mixed model analyses were performed to study differences between the groups for the different SDQ scales over time. The MAD group showed significant improvements over time in symptoms corresponding with "insomnia", "excessive daytime sleepiness", "psychiatric sleep disorder", "periodic limb movements", "sleep apnea", "sleep paralysis", "daytime dysfunction", "hypnagogic hallucinations/dreaming", "restless sleep", "negative conditioning", and "automatic behaviour" (range of P values: 0.000-0.014). These improvements in symptoms were, however, not significantly different from the improvements in symptoms observed in the nCPAP and placebo groups (range of P values: 0.090-0.897). It can be concluded that there is no significant difference between MAD and nCPAP in their positive effects on self-reported symptoms of common sleep disorders and sleep-related problems in mild and moderate OSAS patients. These beneficial effects may be a result of placebo effects. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  6. Infant flow biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP- NCPAP) vs. infant flow NCPAP for the facilitation of extubation in infants' ≤ 1,250 grams: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The use of mechanical ventilation is associated with lung injury in preterm infants and therefore the goal is to avoid or minimize its use. To date there is very little consensus on what is considered the "best non-invasive ventilation mode" to be used post-extubation. The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure (BP-NCPAP) vs. NCPAP in facilitating sustained extubation in infants ≤ 1,250 grams. Methods We performed a randomized controlled trial of BP-NCPAP vs. NCPAP in infants ≤ 1,250 grams extubated for the first time following mechanical ventilation since birth. Infants were extubated using preset criteria or at the discretion of the attending neonatologist. The primary outcome was the incidence of sustained extubation for 7 days. Secondary outcomes included incidence of adverse events and short-term neonatal outcomes. Results Sixty-seven infants received BP-NCPAP and 69 NCPAP. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The trial was stopped early due to increased use of non-invasive ventilation from birth, falling short of our calculated sample size of 141 infants per group. The incidence of sustained extubation was not statistically different between the BP-NCPAP vs. NCPAP group (67% vs. 58%, P = 0.27). The incidence of adverse events and short-term neonatal outcomes were similar between the two groups (P > 0.05) except for retinopathy of prematurity which was noted to be higher (P = 0.02) in the BP-NCPAP group. Conclusions Biphasic NCPAP may be used to assist in weaning from mechanical ventilation. The effectiveness and safety of BP-NCPAP compared to NCPAP needs to be confirmed in a large multi-center trial as our study conclusions are limited by inadequate sample size. Clinical Trials Registration # NCT00308789 Source of support Grant # 06-06, Physicians Services Incorporated Foundation, Toronto, Canada. Summit technologies Inc. provided additional NCPAP

  7. Inhibitory Effect of Nasal Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Gastroesophageal Reflux

    PubMed Central

    Cantin, Danny; Djeddi, Djamal; Carrière, Vincent; Samson, Nathalie; Nault, Stéphanie; Jia, Wan Lu; Beck, Jennifer; Praud, Jean-Paul

    2016-01-01

    Non-invasive intermittent positive pressure ventilation can lead to esophageal insufflations and in turn to gastric distension. The fact that the latter induces transient relaxation of the lower esophageal sphincter implies that it may increase gastroesophageal refluxes. We previously reported that nasal Pressure Support Ventilation (nPSV), contrary to nasal Neurally-Adjusted Ventilatory Assist (nNAVA), triggers active inspiratory laryngeal closure. This suggests that esophageal insufflations are more frequent in nPSV than in nNAVA. The objectives of the present study were to test the hypotheses that: i) gastroesophageal refluxes are increased during nPSV compared to both control condition and nNAVA; ii) esophageal insufflations occur more frequently during nPSV than nNAVA. Polysomnographic recordings and esophageal multichannel intraluminal impedance pHmetry were performed in nine chronically instrumented newborn lambs to study gastroesophageal refluxes, esophageal insufflations, states of alertness, laryngeal closure and respiration. Recordings were repeated without sedation in control condition, nPSV (15/4 cmH2O) and nNAVA (~ 15/4 cmH2O). The number of gastroesophageal refluxes recorded over six hours, expressed as median (interquartile range), decreased during both nPSV (1 (0, 3)) and nNAVA [1 (0, 3)] compared to control condition (5 (3, 10)), (p < 0.05). Meanwhile, the esophageal insufflation index did not differ between nPSV (40 (11, 61) h-1) and nNAVA (10 (9, 56) h-1) (p = 0.8). In conclusion, nPSV and nNAVA similarly inhibit gastroesophageal refluxes in healthy newborn lambs at pressures that do not lead to gastric distension. In addition, the occurrence of esophageal insufflations is not significantly different between nPSV and nNAVA. The strong inhibitory effect of nIPPV on gastroesophageal refluxes appears identical to that reported with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26785264

  8. The Emergence of an Unmarkedness Effect in Mandarin Speech Errors: Nasals in a Coda Position

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, Hsiu-ling

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to explore how the markedness effect shapes Mandarin slips of the tongue with respect to nasals in syllable-final positions. Data were collected via natural speech and elicitation tasks from 35 participants' reading of 346 test items. Three hundred and eight slips in Mandarin from natural data and 360 slips from elicited data were…

  9. Comparison of the Upper Airway Dynamics of Oronasal and Nasal Masks with Positive Airway Pressure Treatment using cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ebben, Matthew R.; Milrad, Sara; Dyke, Jonathan P.; Phillips, C. Douglas; Krieger, Ana C.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose It is known that oronasal masks are not as effective at opening the upper airway compared to nasal only continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) masks in patients with sleep disordered breathing. However, the physiological mechanism for this difference in efficacy is not known; although, it has been hypothesized to involve the retroglossal and/or retropalatal region of the upper airway. The objective of this study was to investigate differences in retroglossal and retropalatal anterior-posterior space with the use of oronasal vs. nasal CPAP masks using real-time cine Magnetic Resonance Imaging (cMRI). Methods 10-Subjects (8-men, 2-women) with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) were given cMRI with both nasal and oronasal CPAP masks. Each subject was imaged with each interface at pressures of 5, 10 and 15 cm of H2O, while in the supine position along the sagittal plane. Results The oronasal mask produced significantly less airway opening in the retropalatal region of the upper airway compared to the nasal mask interface. During exhalation, mask style had a significant effect on anterior-posterior distance p=0.016. No differences were found in the retroglossal region between mask styles. Conclusions Our study confirmed previous findings showing differences in treatment efficacy between oronasal and nasal mask styles. We have shown anatomic evidence that the nasal mask is more effective in opening the upper airway compared to the oronasal mask in the retropalatal region. PMID:25924934

  10. The emergence of an unmarkedness effect in Mandarin speech errors: nasals in a coda position.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Hsiu-ling

    2011-09-01

    This study aims to explore how the markedness effect shapes Mandarin slips of the tongue with respect to nasals in syllable-final positions. Data were collected via natural speech and elicitation tasks from 35 participants' reading of 346 test items. Three hundred and eight slips in Mandarin from natural data and 360 slips from elicited data were investigated. This study shows that there exists a strong preference for unmarked coronal nasals over marked dorsal nasals in the syllable-final position in both spontaneous and elicited Mandarin slips. This tendency toward the unmarked [n] reveals that the influence of the unmarkedness effect is present in the coda position in Mandarin slips. Interestingly, this tendency is inconsistent with that found in a previous study by Wan of Mandarin slips in the onset position, which shows a tendency for coronals to be replaced by other sounds. This suggests an onset-coda distinction occurring in Mandarin speech errors, which implies that the markedness effect works differently in distinct syllable positions. More precisely, the unmarkedness effect emerges in the coda position in Mandarin slips, leading to the occurrence of unmarked segments, whereas it submerges in the onset position, resulting in marked segments.

  11. Nasal Expiratory Positive Airway Pressure Devices (Provent) for OSA: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Riaz, Muhammad; Certal, Victor; Nigam, Gaurav; Abdullatif, Jose; Zaghi, Soroush; Kushida, Clete A.; Camacho, Macario

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To quantify the effectiveness of nasal expiratory positive airway pressure (nasal EPAP) devices or Provent as treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods. PubMed and six other databases were searched through November 15, 2015, without language limitations. Results. Eighteen studies (920 patients) were included. Pre- and post-nasal EPAP means ± standard deviations (M ± SD) for apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) in 345 patients decreased from 27.32 ± 22.24 to 12.78 ± 16.89 events/hr (relative reduction = 53.2%). Random effects modeling mean difference (MD) was −14.78 events/hr [95% CI −19.12, −10.45], p value < 0.00001. Oxygen desaturation index (ODI) in 247 patients decreased from 21.2 ± 19.3 to 12.4 ± 14.1 events/hr (relative reduction = 41.5%, p value < 0.00001). Lowest oxygen saturation (LSAT) M ± SD improved in 146 patients from 83.2 ± 6.8% to 86.2 ± 11.1%, MD 3 oxygen saturation points [95% CI 0.57, 5.63]. Epworth Sleepiness Scale (ESS) M ± SD improved (359 patients) from 9.9 ± 5.3 to 7.4 ± 5.0, MD −2.5 [95% CI −3.2, −1.8], p value < 0.0001. Conclusion. Nasal EPAP (Provent) reduced AHI by 53.2%, ODI by 41.5% and improved LSAT by 3 oxygen saturation points. Generally, there were no clear characteristics (demographic factors, medical history, and/or physical exam finding) that predicted favorable response to these devices. However, limited evidence suggests that high nasal resistance could be associated with treatment failure. Additional studies are needed to identify demographic and polysomnographic characteristics that would predict therapeutic success with nasal EPAP (Provent). PMID:26798519

  12. [Continuous positive airways pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnoea].

    PubMed

    Antone, E; Gilbert, M; Bironneau, V; Meurice, J C

    2015-04-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) still remains the most frequently used and the most efficient treatment for obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. However, its efficiency is conditioned by healthcare quality depending on many factors such as medical specificities of the patients as well as the severity of sleep-related breathing disorders. In order to optimize CPAP efficiency, it is necessary to be aware of the functional abilities of the different devices, and to perform a close monitoring of the patients, particularly during the first weeks of treatment, by maximally using the data provided by the CPAP apparatus. Some questions remain unsolved, such as the impact of nasal CPAP on glucose metabolism or cardiovascular prognosis. Furthermore, the strategy of CPAP use should be improved according to future results of studies dedicated to the interest of home telemonitoring and taking into account the validated mode of CPAP initiation.

  13. Positive Behavior Support: Sustainability and Continuous Regeneration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Kent; Turri, Mary G.

    2014-01-01

    Because of its widespread adoption and implementation (in over 13,000 schools in the US; Center on Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports, 2010), there has been increasing attention to how School-wide Positive Behavior Support (SWPBS) systems can be sustained. Sustained implementation can be defined as "continued use of an…

  14. Repercussions of Surgically Assisted Maxillary Expansion on Nose Width and Position of Septum and Inferior Nasal Conchae

    PubMed Central

    Landim, Fabrício Souza; Freitas, George Borba; Malouf, Andreana Braga; Studart, Liana P. Carvalho; Rocha, Nelson Studart; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; Caubi, Antônio Figueiredo; Filho, José Rodrigues Laureano; Oliveira e Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess the clinical and radiographic repercussions of surgically assisted maxillary expansion on the septum, nasal cavity and nasal conchae. The sample was made up of 15 patients with skeletal maturity (9 females and 6 males between 16 and 45 years of age) and maxillary transverse deficiency. Assessments were performed through anterior rhinoscopy and frontal cephalometric radiographs on three occasions: (T0) preoperative period, (T1) locking of the expander and (T2) six months following the locking procedure. An increase was observed in the basal portion of the pyriform aperture and distances between the lateral wall of the basal portion of the pyriform aperture and the septum. The radiographic exam revealed that the nasal septum did not undergo any statistically significant change in its position. Moreover, no significant changes in the position of the nasal septum or nasal conchae were detected throughout the three evaluation times. The results suggest that surgically assisted maxillary expansion is capable of widening the basal portion of the pyriform aperture, with little repercussion on the anterior position of the nasal septum and inferior nasal conchae. PMID:22135612

  15. Nasal Anatomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... ARS HOME ANATOMY Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ... ANATOMY > Nasal Anatomy Nasal Anatomy Sinus Anatomy Nasal Physiology Nasal Endoscopy Skull Base Anatomy Virtual Anatomy Disclosure ...

  16. Kinect based real-time position calibration for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jingfan; Yang, Jian; Chu, Yakui; Ma, Shaodong; Wang, Yongtian

    2016-03-01

    Unanticipated, reactive motion of the patient during skull based tumor resective surgery is the source of the consequence that the nasal endoscopic tracking system is compelled to be recalibrated. To accommodate the calibration process with patient's movement, this paper developed a Kinect based Real-time positional calibration method for nasal endoscopic surgical navigation system. In this method, a Kinect scanner was employed as the acquisition part of the point cloud volumetric reconstruction of the patient's head during surgery. Then, a convex hull based registration algorithm aligned the real-time image of the patient head with a model built upon the CT scans performed in the preoperative preparation to dynamically calibrate the tracking system if a movement was detected. Experimental results confirmed the robustness of the proposed method, presenting a total tracking error within 1 mm under the circumstance of relatively violent motions. These results point out the tracking accuracy can be retained stably and the potential to expedite the calibration of the tracking system against strong interfering conditions, demonstrating high suitability for a wide range of surgical applications.

  17. Use of Biphasic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Premature Infant with Cleft Lip–Cleft Palate

    PubMed Central

    George, Lovya; Jain, Sunil K.

    2015-01-01

    Preterm infants (PIs) often require respiratory support due to surfactant deficiency. Early weaning from mechanical ventilation to noninvasive respiratory support decreases ventilation-associated irreversible lung damage. This wean is particularly challenging in PIs with cleft lip and cleft palate due to anatomical difficulties encountered in maintaining an adequate seal for positive pressure ventilation. PI with a cleft lip and palate often fail noninvasive respiratory support and require continued intubation and mechanical ventilation. We are presenting the first case report of a PI with cleft lip and palate who was managed by biphasic nasal continuous positive airway pressure. PMID:26495158

  18. [Long-term effects of home mechanical ventilation with positive pressure using a nasal mask].

    PubMed

    Escarrabill, J; Estopà, R; Robert, D; Casolivé, V; Manresa, F

    1991-10-05

    Home mechanical ventilation (HMV) is an efficient alternative in the treatment of patients with chronic respiratory failure secondary to restrictive mechanical disorders (neuromuscular disease, such as Duchenne's disease, thorax deformities due to kyphoscoliosis or tuberculosis sequelae). The case of a patient with severe kyphoscoliosis in the phase of chronic respiratory failure (PaO2 34 mmHg and PaCO2 61 mmHg, breathing ambient air) is presented in which, following the failure of negative pressure mechanical ventilation ("poncho"), positive pressure ventilation was tested with a silicon made-to-measure nasal mask as the access via. Adaptation to HMV was good with the patient using the ventilation nightly. Following 12 months of treatment the patient is able to carry out everyday activities and arterial gasometry breathing ambient air is PaO2 77 mmHg and PaCO2 43 mmHg.

  19. When continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) fails

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Jagdeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly prevalent, particularly in the context of the obesity epidemic, and is associated with a significant social, health and economic impact. The gold standard of treatment for moderate to severe OSA is continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). However compliance rates can be low. Methodology to improve patient tolerance to CPAP alongside with alternative, non-surgical and surgical, management strategies are discussed. All patients that fail CPAP therapy would benefit from formal upper airway evaluation by the otolaryngologist to identify any obvious causes and consider site-specific surgical therapies. Patient selection is integral to ensuring successful outcomes. A multidisciplinary team is needed to manage these patients. PMID:27867577

  20. Bubble continuous positive airway pressure in a human immunodeficiency virus-infected infant

    PubMed Central

    McCollum, E. D.; Smith, A.; Golitko, C. L.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY World Health Organization-classified very severe pneumonia due to Pneumocystis jirovecii infection is recognized as a life-threatening condition in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected infants. We recount the use of nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (BCPAP) in an HIV-infected African infant with very severe pneumonia and treatment failure due to suspected infection with P. jirovecii. We also examine the potential implications of BCPAP use in resource-poor settings with a high case index of acute respiratory failure due to HIV-related pneumonia, but limited access to mechanical ventilation. PMID:21396221

  1. High Altitude, Continuous Positive Airway Pressure, and Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Subjective Observations and Objective Data

    PubMed Central

    Malhotra, Atul; Schwartz, Eli

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Ginosar, Yehuda, Atul Malhotra, and Eli Schwartz. High altitude, continuous positive airway pressure, and obstructive sleep apnea: Subjective observations and objective data. High Alt Med Biol 14:186–189, 2013.—We report observations made by one of the authors who ascended to the Thorang La pass (5416 m) in the Nepal Himalaya in October 2010, despite moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea. We report the first recorded use of nasal CPAP to treat high altitude pulmonary edema (progressively severe dyspnea at rest and severe orthopnea, with tachycardia and tachypnea) that occurred at 4400 meters, when snow and darkness made safe evacuation difficult. We also present objective longitudinal data of the effects of altitude on auto-adjusting CPAP delivered via a portable nasal CPAP device, and on the apnea hypopnea index measured during sleep while using the device. OSA may be a risk factor for the development of high altitude pulmonary edema and we suggest that a nasal CPAP device located in high altitude trekking stations may provide an additional or alternative treatment option for managing high altitude pulmonary edema until evacuation is possible. PMID:23795742

  2. Nasal polyps

    MedlinePlus

    ... get rid of nasal polyps. Nasal steroid sprays shrink polyps. They help clear blocked nasal passages and ... is stopped. Corticosteroid pills or liquid may also shrink polyps, and can reduce swelling and nasal congestion. ...

  3. Measuring Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Keeler, Jarrod; Most, Sam P

    2016-08-01

    The nose and the nasal airway is highly complex with intricate 3-dimensional anatomy, with multiple functions in respiration and filtration of the respired air. Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a complex problem with no clearly defined "gold-standard" in measurement. There are 3 tools for the measurement of NAO: patient-derived measurements, physician-observed measurements, and objective measurements. We continue to work towards finding a link between subjective and objective nasal obstruction. The field of evaluation and surgical treatment for NAO has grown tremendously in the past 4-5 decades and will continue to grow as we learn more about the pathophysiology and treatment of nasal obstruction.

  4. Nasal Physiology

    MedlinePlus

    ... nasal mucosa can help adjust the humidity and temperature of the air before it reaches the lungs. ... area of the nasal mucosa helps regulate the temperature and humidity of inspired air. The nasal cycle ...

  5. Graded exposure therapy for addressing claustrophobic reactions to continuous positive airway pressure: a case series report.

    PubMed

    Means, Melanie K; Edinger, Jack D

    2007-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is a safe, effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea, and yet many patients develop claustrophobic reactions to the CPAP nasal mask and cannot tolerate this treatment. We examined the efficacy of a graded in-vivo exposure therapy for enhancing CPAP adherence using a retrospective, case series design. Objective CPAP adherence data were obtained on clinical patients who attended 1 or more sessions of exposure therapy with a behavioral sleep psychologist. Compared to pre-treatment, patients used CPAP significantly longer after exposure therapy. No predictors of treatment response were identified. CPAP exposure therapy may be beneficial in some cases; however, further research is needed to determine types of patients most likely to benefit from this therapy.

  6. The continuity of the output entropy of positive maps

    SciTech Connect

    Shirokov, Maxim E

    2011-10-31

    Global and local continuity conditions for the output von Neumann entropy for positive maps between Banach spaces of trace-class operators in separable Hilbert spaces are obtained. Special attention is paid to completely positive maps: infinite dimensional quantum channels and operations. It is shown that as a result of some specific properties of the von Neumann entropy (as a function on the set of density operators) several results on the output entropy of positive maps can be obtained, which cannot be derived from the general properties of entropy type functions. In particular, it is proved that global continuity of the output entropy of a positive map follows from its finiteness. A characterization of positive linear maps preserving continuity of the entropy (in the following sense: continuity of the entropy on an arbitrary subset of input operators implies continuity of the output entropy on this subset) is obtained. A connection between the local continuity properties of two completely positive complementary maps is considered. Bibliography: 21 titles.

  7. Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K.

    2015-01-01

    The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the Family Stress Model and the Family Resilience Framework. The study included 220 generation one (G1) parents, their target youth (generation two: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target’s child (generation three: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively related to both G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting which, in turn, was associated with G3 positive behavior to G2. For both G1 and G2, parental positivity mediated the association between economic hardship and positive parenting. G2 economic hardship was indirectly related to G3 positive behavior through G2 parental positivity and positive parenting. An important finding is that the intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity, and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 to G2. Results suggest that even in times of economic adversity, parental positivity and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 parents to their G2 youth during adulthood. Such continuity seems to influence the positive behavior of the G3 children. PMID:26371448

  8. Intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting: The association with child behavior.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Shinyoung; Neppl, Tricia K

    2016-02-01

    The current study examined intergenerational continuity in economic hardship, parental positivity, and positive parenting across generations based on both the family stress model (FSM) and the family resilience framework. The study included 220 generation 1 (G1) parents, their target youth (generation 2: G2) who participated from adolescence through adulthood, and the target's child (generation 3: G3). Assessments included observational and self-report measures. Results indicated that G1 economic hardship negatively influenced both G1 positivity and G1 positive parenting. Similarly, G2 economic hardship was negatively related to both G2 positivity and G2 positive parenting, which in turn was associated with G3 positive behavior to G2. For both G1 and G2, parental positivity mediated the association between economic hardship and positive parenting. G2 economic hardship was indirectly related to G3 positive behavior through G2 parental positivity and positive parenting. An important finding is that the intergenerational continuity of economic hardship, positivity, and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 to G2. Results suggest that even in times of economic adversity, parental positivity and positive parenting were transmitted from G1 parents to their G2 youth during adulthood. Such continuity seems to influence the positive behavior of the G3 children.

  9. Sleep and neuromuscular disease: bilevel positive airway pressure by nasal mask as a treatment for sleep disordered breathing in patients with neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Guilleminault, C.; Philip, P.; Robinson, A.

    1998-01-01

    their masks. Three patients with myotonic dystrophy presented continued daytime somnolence despite apparent adequate treatment of their sleep disordered breathing. This required the addition of stimulant medication to their regimen. During this time three additional subjects had to be switched to nasal mask intermittent positive pressure ventilation delivered by traditional volume cycled home ventilator (volume controlled NIPPV).
CONCLUSIONS—Bilevel positive airway pressure delivered by nasal mask may be used successfully to treat sleep disordered breathing associated with neuromuscular disease. This device can be employed to assist nocturnal ventilation by either the spontaneous or timed mode. In the United States it is less expensive and easier to institute than volume controlled NIPPV and may be as efficacious as this mode if close surveillance and regular re-evaluation of the patient's status is maintained.

 PMID:9703177

  10. Continuously-Variable Positive-Mesh Power Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, J. L.

    1982-01-01

    Proposed transmission with continuously-variable speed ratio couples two mechanical trigonometric-function generators. Transmission is expected to handle higher loads than conventional variable-pulley drives; and, unlike variable pulley, positive traction through entire drive train with no reliance on friction to transmit power. Able to vary speed continuously through zero and into reverse. Possible applications in instrumentation where drive-train slippage cannot be tolerated.

  11. Continuous Morse-Smale flows with three equilibrium positions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuzhoma, E. V.; Medvedev, V. S.

    2016-05-01

    Continuous Morse-Smale flows on closed manifolds whose nonwandering set consists of three equilibrium positions are considered. Necessary and sufficient conditions for topological equivalence of such flows are obtained and the topological structure of the underlying manifolds is described. Bibliography: 36 titles.

  12. Midfacial and Dental Changes Associated with Nasal Positive Airway Pressure in Children with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Craniofacial Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Soleil D.; Kapadia, Hitesh; Greenlee, Geoff; Chen, Maida L.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Nasal positive airway pressure (nPAP) for treatment of pediatric obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a widespread therapy that currently lacks longitudinal data describing how mask pressure impacts the developing facial skeleton. This retrospective cohort study compared midfacial growth in pediatric patients with underlying craniofacial conditions diagnosed with OSA who were compliant vs. noncompliant with nPAP therapy, and explored correlations between demographic, medical, and sleep variables with annual rate of facial change. Methods: Records from Seattle Children's Hospital's Craniofacial Center and Sleep Disorders Center were reviewed to identify patients prescribed nPAP for OSA with serial cephalographic images obtained during routine clinical care for concomitant craniofacial diagnosis. Lateral cephalometric analysis was used to determine mean annual change in midfacial structures from T1 (pre-nPAP) to T2 (post-nPAP) in compliant vs. noncompliant subjects. Compliance was indicated by nPAP usage of > 20 h/week for > 6 months. Results: 50 subjects were compliant with nPAP therapy (mean age 10.42 years) for an average of 2.57 years, and 50 subjects were noncompliant (mean age 8.53 years). Compliant subjects experienced negative mean annual change (retrusion) of the midface compared to forward growth seen in noncompliant subjects (SNA: −0.57° vs. 0.56°), counterclockwise rotation of palatal plane (SN-PP: −1.15° vs. 0.09°), and upper incisor flaring (U1-SN: 2.41° vs. −0.51°). Conclusions: Pressure to the midface from compliant nPAP use may alter normal facial growth. Cephalometric findings indicate a greater need for collaboration between sleep medicine physicians and orthodontists to monitor midfacial growth during nPAP treatment. Citation: Roberts SD, Kapadia H, Greenlee G, Chen ML. Midfacial and dental changes associated with nasal positive airway pressure in children with obstructive sleep apnea and craniofacial conditions. J Clin

  13. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  14. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A nasal... nasal airflow. The device decreases airway resistance and increases nasal airflow. The external...

  15. Nasal Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... the way to your throat as you breathe. Cancer of the nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is ... be like those of infections. Doctors diagnose nasal cancer with imaging tests, lighted tube-like instruments that ...

  16. Routine nasal packing follwoing nasal surgery-Is it necessary?

    PubMed

    Basha, S I; Gupta, D; Kaluskar, S K

    2005-01-01

    The practice of routine nasal packing after nasal surgery is usually customary and not evidence based. Post operative complications, while uncoumon, are sometimes pack related. A retrospective analysis of 110 patients who underwent a variety of nasal operations was performed to determine the incidence of complications when nasal packs were not routinely inserted 9 cases (8.2%) [6 out of these were revision surgeries] needed nasal packing for haemostasis at the end of surgery. 4 cases (3.6%) required to be packed in the immediate post operative period. One patient who required nasal packing developed a unilateral adhesion. No patient developed septal hematoma. The need for routine nasal packing is not supported. Packing should be indicated where there continuous bleeding at.

  17. GPS and odometer data fusion for outdoor robots continuous positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pozo-Ruz, Ana; Garcia-Perez, Lia; Garcia-Alegre, Maria C.; Guinea, Domingo; Ribeiro, Angela; Sandoval, Francisco

    2002-02-01

    Present work describes an approximation to obtain the best estimation of the position of the outdoor robot ROJO, a low cost lawnmower to perform unmanned precision agriculture task such are the spraying of pesticides in horticulture. For continuous location of ROJO, two redundant sensors have been installed onboard: a DGPS submetric precision model and an odometric system. DGPS system will allow an absolute positioning of the vehicle in the field, but GPS failures in the reception of the signals due to obstacles and electrical and meteorological disturbance, lead us to the integration of the odometric system. Thus, a robust odometer based upon magnetic strip sensors has been designed and integrated in the vehicle. These sensors continuosly deliver the position of the vehicle relative to its initial position, complementing the DGPS blindness periods. They give an approximated location of the vehicle in the field that can be in turn conveniently updated and corrected by the DGPS. Thus, to provided the best estimation, a fusion algorithm has been proposed and proved, wherein the best estimation is calculated as the maximum value of the join probability function obtained from both position estimation of the onboard sensors. Some results are presented to show the performance of the proposed sensor fusion technique.

  18. [A patient with both cocaine-induced nasal septum destruction and antibodies against anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA); potential confusion with Wegener's disease].

    PubMed

    Scheenstra, R J; van Buren, M; Koopman, J P

    2007-10-27

    A 37-year-old male cocaine user presented with continual, sanguinolent nasal obstruction and persistant pain following a nasal operation one year ago. Examination showed crustae, granulations and exposed septal cartilage in the right nasal passage in addition to a considerable septal deviation to the left. No other physical abnormalities were found. A biopsy of the nasal mucosa showed acute necrotic inflammation. The serological examination revealed markedly elevated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies (ANCA) titres with positive reactions against proteinase-3, indicating Wegener's disease. Additional testing also showed a positive ANCA reaction for human neutrophil elastase, which made cocaine use a more plausible cause for the nasal abnormalities than Wegener's disease. Treatment consisted of nasal flushing with saline and, for a short period, a nasal tampon with hydrocortisone-oxytetracycline-polymyxin B ointment. However, the patient did, ultimately, develop a septal perforation. Cocaine-induced nasal abnormalities can imitate symptoms that may fit Wegener's disease, including relevant serological ANCA findings.

  19. Comparison of Efficacy and Tolerance of Automatic Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Devices With the Optimum Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Tommi, George; Aronow, Wilbert S; Sheehan, John C; McCleay, Matthew T; Meyers, Patrick G

    Patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were randomly placed on automatic continuous positive airway pressure (ACPAP) for 2 hours followed by manual titration for the rest of the night. One hundred sixty-one patients entered the study, with at least 50 patients titrated with each of 3 ACPAP devices. The optimum continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was defined as the lowest pressure with an apnea-hypoxia index of ≤5/hr, which ranged from 4 cm to 18 cm. Success with ACPAP was approximately 60%-80% when the optimum CPAP was 4-6 cm but fell to below 30% if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm (P = 0.001). Average ACPAP ranged from 2 to 10 cm below the optimum level if the optimum CPAP was ≥8 cm. Patients who responded to a low CPAP but deteriorated on higher pressures failed to respond to any of the automatic devices. We recommend that CPAP titration be performed manually before initiation of ACPAP in patients with obstructive sleep apnea. The basal pressure for ACPAP should be the optimum pressure obtained by manual titration. Limits on the upper level of ACPAP may be necessary for patients who deteriorate on higher positive pressures.

  20. Upper Airway Variation and Frequent Alcohol Consumption Can Affect Compliance With Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jong In; Kim, Hyo Yeol; Hong, Sang Duk; Ryu, Gwanghui; Kim, Su Jin; Lee, Kyung Eun; Dhong, Hun-Jong; Chung, Seung-Kyu

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Compliance with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment remains a primary concern for improving treatment outcomes of obstructive sleep apnea. There are few studies that have considered the role of upper airway anatomy on the compliance with CPAP. We hypothesized that upper airway anatomy would influence the compliance with CPAP. Methods One hundred out of 161 consecutive patients were enrolled in this study. The following possible determinants were tested against CPAP use: demographic and anthropometric data, minimal cross-sectional area on acoustic rhinometry, cephalometric and polysomnographic data, questionnaires of Epworth sleepiness scale and Beck depression index, and histories of previous upper airway surgery, degree of nasal obstruction, daily cigarette consumption, and weekly frequency of alcohol intake. Results Univariate analysis showed that histories of previous upper airway surgery and less frequent alcohol consumption, and longer mandibular plane-hyoid length (MP-H) on cephalometry were associated with longer average daily CPAP use. After adjustment for the confounding factors with multiple linear regression analysis, alcohol consumption and MP-H were still associated with the compliance with CPAP significantly. Conclusion To improve compliance with CPAP, careful evaluations of upper airway problems and life style are important before initiating CPAP. PMID:27334512

  1. Interstitial radiation therapy for early-stage nasal vestibule cancer: A continuing quest for optimal tumor control and cosmesis

    SciTech Connect

    Levendag, Peter C. . E-mail: p.levendag@erasmusmc.nl; Nijdam, Wideke M.; Moolenburgh, Sanne E. van; Tan, Lisa; Noever, Inge R.T.T.; Rooy, Peter van; Mureau, Marc; Jansen, Peter P.; Munte, Kai; Hofer, Stefan O.P.

    2006-09-01

    Introduction: This article reports on the effectiveness, cosmetic outcome, and costs of interstitial high-dose-rate (HDR) brachytherapy for early-stage cancer of the nasal vestibule (NV) proper and/or columella high-dose-rate (HDR). Methods and Materials: Tumor control, survival, cosmetic outcome, functional results, and costs were established in 64 T1/T2N0 nasal vestibule cancers treated from 1991-2005 by fractionated interstitial radiation therapy (IRT) only. Total dose is 44 Gy: 2 fractions of 3 Gy per day, 6-hour interval, first and last fraction 4 Gy. Cosmesis is noted in the chart by the medical doctor during follow-up, by the patient (visual analog scale), and by a panel. Finally, full hospital costs are computed. Results: A local relapse-free survival rate of 92% at 5 years was obtained. Four local failures were observed; all four patients were salvaged. The neck was not treated electively; no neck recurrence in follow-up was seen. Excellent cosmetic and functional results were observed. With 10 days admission for full treatment, hospital costs amounted to Euro 5772 ($7044). Conclusion: Excellent tumor control, cosmesis, and function of nasal airway passage can be achieved when HDR-IRT for T1/T2N0 NV cancers is used. For the more advanced cancers (Wang classification: T3 tumor stage), we elect to treat by local excision followed by a reconstructive procedure. The costs, admission to hospital inclusive, for treatment by HDR-IRT amounts to Euro 5772 ($7044 US). This contrasts substantially with the full hospital costs when NV cancers are treated by plastic reconstructive surgery, being on average threefold as expensive.

  2. Nasal carriage of multi-drug resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in children in Tripoli-Libya.

    PubMed

    Al-haddad, Omaima H; Zorgani, Abdulaziz; Ghenghesh, Khalifa Sifaw

    2014-04-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonized children are at an increased risk of developing infections than methicillin-sensitive S. aureus colonized children. Nasal specimens from inpatient children, mothers of inpatient children, healthcare workers, and outpatient children at Tripoli Children Hospital (TCH) were examined for MRSA by chromogenic MRSA ID medium. Susceptibility of MRSA isolates to antibiotics was determined by the disc diffusion method. The nasal carriage rate of MRSA among inpatient children (8.3%, 24 of 289), their mothers (11%, 22 of 200), and healthcare workers (12.4%, 22 of 178) was significantly higher than among outpatient children (2.2%, 2 of 91) (P < 0.05, P < 0.02, and P < 0.006, respectively). Of the examined MRSA isolates (N = 35) 10 (28.6%) were positive for Panton-Valentine leucocidin genes by polymerase chain reaction. Multidrug resistance was found in 24.3% (17 of 70) of MRSA isolates. Nasal carriage of multidrug-resistant Panton-Valentine leucocidin-positive MRSA is not uncommon among inpatient children and their mothers in Tripoli.

  3. Continuing Education Workshops in Bioinformatics Positively Impact Research and Careers.

    PubMed

    Brazas, Michelle D; Ouellette, B F Francis

    2016-06-01

    Bioinformatics.ca has been hosting continuing education programs in introductory and advanced bioinformatics topics in Canada since 1999 and has trained more than 2,000 participants to date. These workshops have been adapted over the years to keep pace with advances in both science and technology as well as the changing landscape in available learning modalities and the bioinformatics training needs of our audience. Post-workshop surveys have been a mandatory component of each workshop and are used to ensure appropriate adjustments are made to workshops to maximize learning. However, neither bioinformatics.ca nor others offering similar training programs have explored the long-term impact of bioinformatics continuing education training. Bioinformatics.ca recently initiated a look back on the impact its workshops have had on the career trajectories, research outcomes, publications, and collaborations of its participants. Using an anonymous online survey, bioinformatics.ca analyzed responses from those surveyed and discovered its workshops have had a positive impact on collaborations, research, publications, and career progression.

  4. Nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Gerald A.

    1969-01-01

    A review of 313 cases of nasal polyposis indicates that there is a high incidence of recurrence in this disease. Other nasal pathology affects a significant number of these patients. Simple surgical removal of the polypi by a transnasal route is the common mode of treatment. PMID:4187956

  5. Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis in a goat.

    PubMed

    do Carmo, P M S; Portela, R A; de Oliveira-Filho, J C; Dantas, A F M; Simões, S V D; Garino, F; Riet-Correa, F

    2014-01-01

    Nasal and cutaneous aspergillosis is reported in an adult goat. The clinical signs were severe respiratory distress due to partial nasal obstruction, bilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge, skin nodules on the ears and dorsal nasal region and focal depigmentation of the ventral commissure of the right nostril. At necropsy examination, sagittal sectioning of the head revealed a yellow irregular mass extending from the nasal vestibule to the frontal portion of the nasal cavity. Microscopically, there was pyogranulomatous rhinitis and dermatitis, with numerous intralesional periodic acid-Schiff-positive fungal hyphae morphologically suggestive of Aspergillus spp. Aspergillus niger was isolated by microbiological examination.

  6. Gel pillow designed specifically for obstructive sleep apnea treatment with continuous positive airway pressure

    PubMed Central

    Salvaggio, Adriana; Lo Bue, Anna; Isidoro, Serena Iacono; Romano, Salvatore; Marrone, Oreste; Insalaco, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To determine whether the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts designed to accommodate a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) mask and reduce head temperature improves the efficacy of and adherence to auto-CPAP therapy. Methods: Twenty-three consecutive CPAP-naïve patients with obstructive sleep apnea were enrolled in the study. Patients were given an auto-CPAP machine with an appropriate CPAP mask and were instructed to use CPAP for 15 nights. They were instructed to sleep with their own pillow (the control pillow) from nights 1 to 5 and with either a foam pillow or a gel pillow, both of which had side cutouts, for 5 consecutive nights each, in random order. After night 15, auto-CPAP machine data were downloaded and patients rated their satisfaction with each pillow on a visual analog scale. Results: Twenty-two patients completed the protocol. The pressures administered, residual apnea-hypopnea index, air leaks, and mean duration of CPAP use did not differ among the periods during which each pillow was used. Patients were significantly more satisfied with the gel pillow than with the control pillow and the foam pillow (p = 0.022 and p = 0.004, respectively), their level of satisfaction with the gel pillow correlating significantly with excessive daytime sleepiness (r2 = 0.19; p = 0.0443). Conclusions: Among obstructive sleep apnea patients treated with nasal CPAP, the use of a gel pillow with side cutouts appears to have no impact on treatment effectiveness. Nevertheless, such patients seem to prefer a gel pillow over other types of pillows. PMID:27812636

  7. Positioning Continuing Education Computer Programs for the Corporate Market.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tilney, Ceil

    1993-01-01

    Summarizes the findings of the market assessment phase of Bellevue Community College's evaluation of its continuing education computer training program. Indicates that marketing efforts must stress program quality and software training to help overcome strong antiacademic client sentiment. (MGB)

  8. Impact of the type of mask on the effectiveness of and adherence to continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Rafaela Garcia Santos de; Piccin, Vivien Schmeling; Nascimento, Juliana Araújo; Viana, Fernanda Madeiro Leite; Genta, Pedro Rodrigues; Lorenzi-Filho, Geraldo

    2014-01-01

    Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Although CPAP was originally applied with a nasal mask, various interfaces are currently available. This study reviews theoretical concepts and questions the premise that all types of interfaces produce similar results. We revised the evidence in the literature about the impact that the type of CPAP interface has on the effectiveness of and adherence to OSA treatment. We searched the PubMed database using the search terms "CPAP", "mask", and "obstructive sleep apnea". Although we identified 91 studies, only 12 described the impact of the type of CPAP interface on treatment effectiveness (n = 6) or adherence (n = 6). Despite conflicting results, we found no consistent evidence that nasal pillows and oral masks alter OSA treatment effectiveness or adherence. In contrast, most studies showed that oronasal masks are less effective and are more often associated with lower adherence and higher CPAP abandonment than are nasal masks. We concluded that oronasal masks can compromise CPAP OSA treatment adherence and effectiveness. Further studies are needed in order to understand the exact mechanisms involved in this effect.

  9. Impact of Randomization, Clinic Visits, and Medical and Psychiatric Cormorbidities on Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Adherence in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Budhiraja, Rohit; Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Walsh, James K.; Simon, Richard D.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Quan, Stuart F.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: To evaluate factors associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in the Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) cohort. Methods: The data from a prospective 6-mo multicenter randomized controlled trial with 558 subjects randomized to active CPAP and 547 to sham CPAP were analyzed to assess adherence to CPAP during first 2 mo (early period) and during months 5-6 (late period). Results: Participants randomized to active CPAP had higher hours of nightly adherence compared to the sham CPAP group at both 2 (4.9 ± 2.0 h versus 4.07 ± 2.14 h, p < 0.001) and 6 mo (4.70 ± 2.08 h versus 3.41 ± 2.19 h, p < 0.001). Those assigned to sham CPAP were more likely to correctly identify their treatment group (70.0% versus 55.2%, p < 0.001). Irrespective of treatment group assignment, those who believed they were receiving active CPAP had higher hours of adherence than those who thought they were in the sham CPAP group at both 2 mo (4.91 ± 2.01 versus 4.17 ± 2.17, p < 0.001) and 6 mo (4.65 ± 2.10 versus 3.65 ± 2.22, p < 0.001). Among those randomized to active CPAP, older age was significantly related to CPAP use > 4 h per night. Presence of cardiovascular disorders was associated with higher hours of CPAP use, whereas presence of anxiety was associated with a trend toward lower hours of CPAP use. Presence of nasal congestion was associated with a decrease in mean daily CPAP use between the early and the late adherence period. The adherence during the week prior to a clinic visit was higher than the average adherence during the 2-mo period prior to the visit. Conclusions: Randomization to active therapy, belief that one is in the active treatment group, older age, and possibly presence of cardiovascular disorders are positively linked to CPAP adherence. Nasal congestion and anxiety are negatively associated with CPAP adherence. CPAP nightly usage increases as clinic

  10. Positioning a University Outreach Center: Strategies for Support and Continuation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skivington, Kristen D.

    1998-01-01

    Argues that a strong case can be made for supporting outreach as a value-added function in a university. Specific strategies for positioning outreach within the university by developing a power base are outlined. The case of the University of Michigan-Flint is offered as an example of this approach. Seven lessons learned in the process are noted.…

  11. Effects of Nasal Port Area on Perception of Nasality and Measures of Nasalance Based on Computational Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Bunton, Kate

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to extend previously published modeling work examining the relation between nasal port opening, measures of nasalance, and perceptual ratings of nasality by experienced listeners for three simulated English corner vowels, /i/, /u/, and /ɑ/. Design Samples were generated using a computational model that allowed for exact control of nasal port size and direct measures of nasalance. Perceptual ratings were obtained using a paired stimulus presentation. Participants Four experienced listeners. Main Outcome Measures Nasalance and perceptual ratings of nasality. Results Findings indicate that perceptual ratings of nasality and nasalance increased for samples generated with nasal port areas up to and including 0.16 cm2 but plateaued in samples generated with larger nasal port areas. No vowel differences were noted for perceptual ratings. Conclusions This work extends previously published work by including nasal port areas representative of those reported in the literature for clinical populations, however, continued work using samples with varied phonetic context, and varying suprasegmental and temporal characteristics are needed. PMID:24437587

  12. Oronasal Masks Require a Higher Pressure than Nasal and Nasal Pillow Masks for the Treatment of Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Sheetal; Joosten, Simon; Turton, Anthony; Edwards, Bradley A.; Landry, Shane; Mansfield, Darren R.; Hamilton, Garun S.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Oronasal masks are frequently used for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The aim of this study was to (1) determine if CPAP requirements are higher for oronasal masks compared to nasal mask interfaces and (2) assess whether polysomnography and patient characteristics differed among mask preference groups. Methods: Retrospective analysis of all CPAP implementation polysomnograms between July 2013 and June 2014. Prescribed CPAP level, polysomnography results and patient data were compared according to mask type (n = 358). Results: Oronasal masks were used in 46%, nasal masks in 35% and nasal pillow masks in 19%. There was no difference according to mask type for baseline apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), body mass index (BMI), waist or neck circumference. CPAP level was higher for oronasal masks, 12 (10–15.5) cm H2O compared to nasal pillow masks, 11 (8–12.5) cm H2O and nasal masks, 10 (8–12) cm H2O, p < 0.0001 (Median [interquartile range]). Oronasal mask type, AHI, age, and BMI were independent predictors of a higher CPAP pressure (p < 0.0005, adjusted R2 = 0.26.). For patients with CPAP ≥ 15 cm H2O, there was an odds ratio of 4.5 (95% CI 2.5–8.0) for having an oronasal compared to a nasal or nasal pillow mask. Residual median AHI was higher for oronasal masks (11.3 events/h) than for nasal masks (6.4 events/h) and nasal pillows (6.7 events/h), p < 0.001. Conclusions: Compared to nasal mask types, oronasal masks are associated with higher CPAP pressures (particularly pressures ≥ 15 cm H2O) and a higher residual AHI. Further evaluation with a randomized control trial is required to definitively establish the effect of mask type on pressure requirements. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 1209. Citation: Deshpande S, Joosten S, Turton A, Edwards BA, Landry S, Mansfield DR, Hamilton GS. Oronasal masks require a higher pressure than nasal and

  13. Does post septoplasty nasal packing reduce complications?

    PubMed

    Naghibzadeh, Bijan; Peyvandi, Ali Asghar; Naghibzadeh, Ghazal

    2011-01-01

    The main issues in nasal surgery are to stabilize the nose in the good position after surgery and preserve the cartilages and bones in the favorable situation and reduce the risk of deviation recurrence. Also it is necessary to avoid the synechia formation, nasal valve narrowing, hematoma and bleeding. Due to the above mentioned problems and in order to solve and minimize them nasal packing, nasal splint and nasal mold have been advised. Patients for whom the nasal packing used may faced to some problems like naso-pulmonary reflex, intractable pain, sleep disorder, post operation infection and very dangerous complication like toxic shock syndrome. We have two groups of patients and three surgeons (one of the surgeons used post operative nasal packing in his patients and the two others surgeons did not).Complications and morbidities were compared in these two groups. Comparing the two groups showed that the rate of complication and morbidities between these two groups were same and the differences were not valuable, except the pain and discomfort post operatively and at the time of its removal. Nasal packing has several risks for the patients while its effects are not studied. Septoplasty can be safely performed without postoperative nasal packing. Nasal packing had no main findings that compensated its usage. Septal suture is one of the procedures that can be used as alternative method to nasal packing. Therefore the nasal packing after septoplasty should be reserved for the patients with increased risk of bleeding.

  14. Post Septorhinoplasty Custom-Made Unilateral Nasal Stent for Nasal Cleft Deformity

    PubMed Central

    Rathee, Manu; Bhoria, Mohaneesh; Boora, Priyanka

    2015-01-01

    Context: Nasal cleft deformity is a complicated problem. Utilization of nasal stent in post septorhinoplastyaims at establishing and maintaining airway patency, tissue position, and reduces tissue contracture after surgery. Case Report: A 16-year-old female patient presented with history of surgical reconstruction of congenital cleft lip and cleft palate with secondary septorhinoplasty of nasal cleft deformity. Patient was referred for nasal stent 1 week after septorhinoplasty. This case report provides a novel technique for fabrication of esthetic nasal stent after postseptorhinoplasty for secondary cleft nose deformity correction. Conclusion: This case report presents a simple, convenient technique for nasal stent fabrication for prevention of restenosis for cleft nose deformity post secondary septorhinoplasty. Provision of nasal stent allows breathing, maintains esthetics, comfort, nasal patency, and contour with minimal discomfort. PMID:25789253

  15. Nasal mucosal biopsy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Results Mean Cancer Infections, such as tuberculosis Necrotizing granuloma , a type of tumor Nasal polyps Nasal tumors ... Granulomatosis with polyangiitis Juvenile angiofibroma Nasal polyps Necrotizing granuloma Tumor Review Date 4/11/2015 Updated by: ...

  16. Post-Nasal Drip

    MedlinePlus

    ... Find an ENT Doctor Near You Post-Nasal Drip Post-Nasal Drip Patient Health Information News media ... guaifenesin (Humibid®, Robitussin®) may also thin secretions. Nasal irrigations may alleviate thickened secretions. These can be performed ...

  17. The Effect of Nasal Obstruction after Different Nasal Surgeries Using Acoustic Rhinometry and Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation Scale

    PubMed Central

    Kahraman, Erkan; Cil, Yakup; Incesulu, Armagan

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND The efficiency of nasal surgeries can be determined by objective or subjective methods. We have assessed the effect of nasal obstruction after different nasal surgeries using Acoustic Rhinometry (AR) and Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE) Scale. METHODS Between May 2011 and May 2012, 40 young adult patients and 10 healthy volunteers as control group who referred to Otorhinolaryngology Clinic in Eskisehir Military Hospital due to nasal obstruction were enrolled. Depending on operation, patients were divided into four equal groups. Group 1: Septoplasty, Group 2: Septoplasty with sprader graft, Group 3: Septorinoplasty and Group 4: Septorhinoplasty with spreader graft. The patients completed NOSE scale, 1 week before and 1 month after the surgery and AR measurements. RESULTS There were a significant improvement in mean NOSE scores of patients and statistical difference was found between pre and post-operational values for each group. There was a statistically significant change of the mean minimal cross section areas (MCA) of the deviated side of nasal passages measured by AR between pre and postoperative period. CONCLUSION In patients with nasal obstruction, functional nasal surgeries which were performed after appropriate medical examination and with right operation methods had a positive impact on quality of life and patient satisfaction. We observed that nasal findings were correlated with NOSE scores and MCA values. So, we suggest that NOSE scale and AR to be used for evaluation of the efficiency of functional nasal surgeries. PMID:27853686

  18. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  19. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  20. 21 CFR 874.3900 - Nasal dilator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal dilator. 874.3900 Section 874.3900 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Prosthetic Devices § 874.3900 Nasal dilator. (a) Identification. A...

  1. Bilateral cleft lip nasal deformity

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Arun Kumar; Nandini, R.

    2009-01-01

    Bilateral cleft lip nose deformity is a multi-factorial and complex deformity which tends to aggravate with growth of the child, if not attended surgically. The goals of primary bilateral cleft lip nose surgery are, closure of the nasal floor and sill, lengthening of the columella, repositioning of the alar base, achieving nasal tip projection, repositioning of the lower lateral cartilages, and reorienting the nares from horizontal to oblique position. The multiplicity of procedures in the literature for correction of this deformity alludes to the fact that no single procedure is entirely effective. The timing for surgical intervention and its extent varies considerably. Early surgery on cartilage may adversely affect growth and development; at the same time, allowing the cartilage to grow in an abnormal position and contributing to aggravation of deformity. Some surgeons advocate correction of deformity at an early age. However, others like the cartilages to grow and mature before going in for surgery. With peer pressure also becoming an important consideration during the teens, the current trend is towards early intervention. There is no unanimity in the extent of nasal dissection to be done at the time of primary lip repair. While many perform limited nasal dissection for the fear of growth retardation, others opt for full cartilage correction at the time of primary surgery itself. The value of naso-alveolar moulding (NAM) too is not universally accepted and has now more opponents than proponents. Also most centres in the developing world have neither the personnel nor the facilities for the same. The secondary cleft nasal deformity is variable and is affected by the extent of the original abnormality, any prior surgeries performed and alteration due to nasal growth. This article reviews the currently popular methods for correction of nasal deformity associated with bilateral cleft lip, it's management both at the time of cleft lip repair and also secondarily

  2. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Existing Users: Self-Efficacy Enhances the Association between Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Dzierzewski, Joseph M.; Wallace, Douglas M.; Wohlgemuth, William K.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is a common sleep disorder associated with a myriad of sequelae. OSAHS is effectively treated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, fewer than 50% of patients are compliant with their CPAP therapy prescriptions. The current study sought to explore an integrated, biopsychological approach to CPAP adherence among experienced CPAP users. Methods: We performed a retrospective, cross-sectional analysis of a cohort of veterans with a diagnosis of OSAHS (n = 191) who were prescribed CPAP therapy and returned for adherence download at the Miami VA Sleep Clinic. The relationships between biomedical characteristics (e.g., CPAP pressure, self-reported sleepiness, and change in sleep efficiency) and psychological factors (e.g., self-efficacy beliefs and psychological diagnoses) and objectively measured CPAP use were examined to determine whether psychological factors moderated the relationships between biomedical characteristics and CPAP adherence. Results: Hierarchical regression analyses predicting CPAP adherence (adjusting for time since CPAP prescription, age, education, prescribed CPAP pressure, daytime sleepiness, changes in sleep efficiency with CPAP, and psychiatric conditions) revealed the following: (1) CPAP self-efficacy and CPAP pressure were positively related to adherence, and (2) CPAP self-efficacy moderates the relationship between CPAP pressure and CPAP adherence. Conclusions: There was no relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence in individuals with low self-efficacy beliefs. However, for individuals with high self-efficacy beliefs, there was a significant positive relationship between CPAP pressure and adherence. Self-efficacy beliefs appear to be a prime target for focused interventions aimed at improving CPAP adherence among those individuals with higher pressure prescriptions. Citation: Dzierzewski JM, Wallace DM, Wohlgemuth WK. Adherence to continuous

  3. Quilting sutures for nasal septum.

    PubMed

    Hari, C; Marnane, C; Wormald, P J

    2008-05-01

    Suturing of the nasal septum after septal surgery is a commonly performed procedure designed to prevent complications such as septal haematoma and bleeding. It is also useful for closing any inadvertent tears of the septal mucosa and providing additional support for the cartilage pieces retained in septoplasty. In addition, the suture can be placed through the middle turbinates, stabilising them during the healing process. Placing knots for interrupted sutures in the posterior and middle part of the nasal septum can be technically difficult. We describe a continuous suturing technique for approximating the mucosal flaps following septal surgery.

  4. Oxidative stress mediated arterial dysfunction in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Several studies suggest an increase of oxidative stress and a reduction of endothelial function in obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS). We assessed the association between OSAS, endothelial dysfunction and oxidative stress. Further aim was to evaluate the effect of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) on oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction. Methods We studied 138 consecutive patients with heavy snoring and possible OSAS. Patients underwent unattended overnight home polysomnography. Ten patients with severe OSAS were revaluated after 6 months of nCPAP therapy. To assess oxidative stress in vivo, we measured urinary 8-iso-PGF2α and serum levels of soluble NOX2-derived peptide (sNOX2-dp). Serum levels of nitrite/nitrate (NOx) were also determined. Flow-mediated brachial artery dilation (FMD) was measured to asses endothelial function. Results Patients with severe OSAS had higher urinary 8-iso-PGF2α (p<0.001) and serum NOX2 and lower NOx. A negative association was observed between FMD and OSA severity. Apnea/hypopnea index was significantly correlated with the indices of central obesity and with urinary 8-isoprostanes (r=0.298, p<0.001). The metabolic syndrome (t=-4.63, p<0.001) and urinary 8-isoprostanes (t=-2.02, p<0.05) were the only independent predictors of FMD. After 6-months nCPAP treatment, a significant decrease of serum NOX2, (p<0.005) and urinary 8-iso-PGF2α (p<0.01) was observed, while serum NOx showed only a minor increase. A statistically significant increase of FMD was observed (from 3.6% to 7.0%). Conclusions The results of our study indicate that patients with OSAS and cardiometabolic comorbidities have increased oxidative stress and arterial dysfunction that are partially reversed by nCPAP treatment. PMID:22824065

  5. Deprojecting the nasal profile.

    PubMed

    Papel, I D; Mabrie, D C

    1999-02-01

    The nose is the most prominent aesthetic feature of the facial profile. Nasal length, tip rotation, and tip projection are integral aspects in analysis of the nasal profile. In most rhinoplasties the surgeon has the difficult task of increasing or maintaining tip projection of an underprojected or normally projected nasal tip. Less commonly, the rhinoplastic surgeon is presented with an overprojected nasal tip, and efforts are focused on deprojecting the nasal profile. In this article, the authors present a discussion of the overprojected tip, elucidating strategies of analysis, etiologies, and management of the nasal profile and give clinical examples.

  6. Nasal Injuries in Sports.

    PubMed

    Marston, Alexander P; O'Brien, Erin K; Hamilton, Grant S

    2017-04-01

    Nasal trauma is a common consequence of athletic competition. The nasal bones are the most commonly fractured facial bone and are particularly at risk during sports participation. Acute management of trauma to the nose includes thorough evaluation of all injuries and may require immediate management for repair of facial lacerations, epistaxis control, or septal hematoma drainage. Nasal fractures can often be addressed with closed reduction techniques; however, in the setting of complex nasal trauma, an open approach may be indicated. Using appropriate treatment techniques, posttraumatic nasal sequelae can be minimized; most patients report satisfactory long-term nasal form and function.

  7. Tension pneumocephalus induced by high-flow nasal cannula ventilation in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Iglesias-Deus, Alicia; Pérez-Muñuzuri, Alejandro; López-Suárez, Olalla; Crespo, Pilar; Couce, Maria-Luz

    2017-03-01

    The use of high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy as respiratory support for preterm infants has increased rapidly worldwide. The evidence available for the use of HFNC is as an alternative to nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and in particular to prevent postextubation failure. We report a case of tension pneumocephalus in a preterm infant as a complication during HFNC ventilation. Significant neurological impairment was detected and support was eventually withdrawn. Few cases of pneumocephalus as a complication of positive airway pressure have been reported in the neonatal period, and they all have been related to CPAP. This report reinforces the need to be aware of this rare but possible complication during HFNC therapy, as timely diagnosis and treatment can prevent neurological sequelae. We also stress the importance of paying close attention to flow rate, nasal cannula size and insertion, and mouth position, and of regularly checking insertion depth.

  8. Triamcinolone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies. Triamcinolone nasal spray should not ... germs.Triamcinolone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever and allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  9. Flunisolide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. Flunisolide nasal spray should not ... germs.Flunisolide nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  10. Saline nasal washes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a neti pot, squeeze bottle, or rubber nasal bulb at your drug store. You can also buy ... infection. Always clean the neti pot or nasal bulb with distilled, boiled, or filtered water after every ...

  11. Nasal corticosteroid sprays

    MedlinePlus

    ... or concerns about your symptoms Trouble using the medicine Alternative Names Steroid nasal sprays; Allergies - nasal corticosteroid sprays References American Academy of ... of Medicine, Division of Allergy, Immunology, and Rheumatology, Georgetown University ...

  12. Nasal septal hematoma

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001292.htm Nasal septal hematoma To use the sharing features on this page, ... heal. References Chegar BE, Tatum SA III. Nasal fractures. In: Flint PW, Haughey BH, Lund VJ, et ...

  13. Nasal Harmony in Aguaruna.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moon, Gui-Sun

    A discussion of the nasal harmony of Aguaruna, a language of the Jivaroan family in South America, approaches the subject from the viewpoint of generative phonology. This theory of phonology proposes an underlying nasal consonant, later deleted, that accounts for vowel nasalization. Complex rules that suppose a complex system of vowel and…

  14. Nasal septal hematoma.

    PubMed

    Ginsburg, C M

    1998-04-01

    Nasal septal hematoma is a rare but potentially serious complication of nasal trauma. Proper management consists of early recognition, prompt surgical evacuation of the hematoma, and antimicrobial therapy if a secondary nasal septal abscess is suspected. Clindamycin is recommended as initial therapy until the results of cultures and susceptibility studies are available.

  15. Nasal computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Ned F

    2006-05-01

    Chronic nasal disease is often a challenge to diagnose. Computed tomography greatly enhances the ability to diagnose chronic nasal disease in dogs and cats. Nasal computed tomography provides detailed information regarding the extent of disease, accurate discrimination of neoplastic versus nonneoplastic diseases, and identification of areas of the nose to examine rhinoscopically and suspicious regions to target for biopsy.

  16. Continuous non-invasive monitoring improves blood pressure stability in upright position: randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Benes, Jan; Simanova, Alena; Tovarnicka, Tereza; Sevcikova, Silvie; Kletecka, Jakub; Zatloukal, Jan; Pradl, Richard; Chytra, Ivan; Kasal, Eduard

    2015-02-01

    Intermittent blood pressure (BP) monitoring is the standard-of-care during low and intermediate risk anaesthesia, yet it could lead to delayed recognition of BP fluctuations. Perioperative hypotension is known to be associated with postoperative complications. Continuous, non-invasive methods for BP monitoring have been developed recently. We have tested a novel non-invasive, continuous monitor (using the volume clamp method) to assist with maintaining BP in safe ranges for patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. Forty adult patients undergoing thyroid gland surgery in an upright position were included in this prospective randomised controlled trial. Patients were equally allocated to the group with continuous monitoring of BP using the CNAP® Monitor and to the control group managed using an intermittent oscillometric BP cuff. The absolute and proportional time spent outside the range of ±20% of the target BP along with other hemodynamic and clinical parameters were evaluated. The continuous monitoring decreased the anaesthesia time spent below -20% pressure range [absolute: 12 min (4-20) vs. 27 min (16-34); p=0.001; relative to procedure length: 14% (7-20) vs. 33.5% (17.5-53); p=0.003]. No significant differences were observed in postoperative morbidity or in hospital length of stay. Continuous non-invasive BP monitoring via the CNAP® Monitor allows for better BP management in patients undergoing surgery in a beach chair position. In our randomised trial the time spent in hypotension was significantly shorter using continuous monitoring.

  17. Acute Effects of Continuous Positive Air way Pressure on Pulse Pressure in Chronic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Quintão, Mônica; Chermont, Sérgio; Marchese, Luana; Brandão, Lúcia; Bernardez, Sabrina Pereira; Mesquita, Evandro Tinoco; Rocha, Nazareth de Novaes; Nóbrega, Antônio Claudio L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with heart failure (HF) have left ventricular dysfunction and reduced mean arterial pressure (MAP). Increased adrenergic drive causes vasoconstriction and vessel resistance maintaining MAP, while increasing peripheral vascular resistance and conduit vessel stiffness. Increased pulse pressure (PP) reflects a complex interaction of the heart with the arterial and venous systems. Increased PP is an important risk marker in patients with chronic HF (CHF). Non-invasive ventilation (NIV) has been used for acute decompensated HF, to improve congestion and ventilation through both respiratory and hemodynamic effects. However, none of these studies have reported the effect of NIV on PP. Objective The objective of this study was to determine the acute effects of NIV with CPAP on PP in outpatients with CHF. Methods Following a double-blind, randomized, cross-over, and placebo-controlled protocol, twenty three patients with CHF (17 males; 60 ± 11 years; BMI 29 ± 5 kg/cm2, NYHA class II, III) underwent CPAP via nasal mask for 30 min in a recumbent position. Mask pressure was 6 cmH2O, whereas placebo was fixed at 0-1 cmH2O. PP and other non invasive hemodynamics variables were assessed before, during and after placebo and CPAP mode. Results CPAP decreased resting heart rate (Pre: 72 ± 9; vs. Post 5 min: 67 ± 10 bpm; p < 0.01) and MAP (CPAP: 87 ± 11; vs. control 96 ± 11 mmHg; p < 0.05 post 5 min). CPAP decreased PP (CPAP: 47 ± 20 pre to 38 ± 19 mmHg post; vs. control: 42 ± 12 mmHg, pre to 41 ± 18 post p < 0.05 post 5 min). Conclusion NIV with CPAP decreased pulse pressure in patients with stable CHF. Future clinical trials should investigate whether this effect is associated with improved clinical outcome. PMID:24676373

  18. Nasal foreign body removal in children.

    PubMed

    Kiger, James R; Brenkert, Timothy E; Losek, Joseph D

    2008-11-01

    Nasal foreign bodies in children are often managed in the pediatric emergency department. The child is usually between 2 and 4 years old, and the foreign body is most commonly a plastic toy or bead. Nasal foreign bodies are removed by a number of techniques. Positive-pressure expulsion is accomplished by orally applied pressure via a parent's mouth or an Ambu bag or by nasally applied pressure via a catheter or an oxygen source. The object can be washed out with nasally applied saline. Direct mechanical extraction is possible with a variety of tools, including forceps, hooks, or balloon-tipped catheters. Each method carries its own risks and benefits. Serious complications of nasal foreign bodies include posterior dislodgement and aspiration, trauma caused by the object itself or removal attempts, infection, and choanal stenosis. Magnets and button batteries require emergent removal as they carry the risk of septal perforation or necrosis, which may develop within a relatively short time.

  19. Absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gheondea, Aurelian; Kavruk, Ali Şamil

    2009-02-01

    Motivated by applicability to quantum operations, quantum information, and quantum probability, we investigate the notion of absolute continuity for operator valued completely positive maps on C∗-algebras, previously introduced by Parthasarathy [in Athens Conference on Applied Probability and Time Series Analysis I (Springer-Verlag, Berlin, 1996), pp. 34-54]. We obtain an intrinsic definition of absolute continuity, we show that the Lebesgue decomposition defined by Parthasarathy is the maximal one among all other Lebesgue-type decompositions and that this maximal Lebesgue decomposition does not depend on the jointly dominating completely positive map, we obtain more flexible formulas for calculating the maximal Lebesgue decomposition, and we point out the nonuniqueness of the Lebesgue decomposition as well as a sufficient condition for uniqueness. In addition, we consider Radon-Nikodym derivatives for absolutely continuous completely positive maps that, in general, are unbounded positive self-adjoint operators affiliated to a certain von Neumann algebra, and we obtain a spectral approximation by bounded Radon-Nikodym derivatives. An application to the existence of the infimum of two completely positive maps is indicated, and formulas in terms of Choi's matrices for the Lebesgue decomposition of completely positive maps in matrix algebras are obtained.

  20. Upper airway obstruction during midazolam sedation: modification by nasal CPAP.

    PubMed

    Nozaki-Taguchi, N; Isono, S; Nishino, T; Numai, T; Taguchi, N

    1995-08-01

    We examined the depressant effect of midazolam on respiration in 21 healthy women undergoing lower abdominal surgery with spinal anaesthesia. Airway gas flow, airway pressure, and the sound of snoring were recorded together with arterial oxygen saturation (SpO2). After spinal anaesthesia was established, subjects were deeply sedated with pentazocine 15 mg followed by incremental doses of midazolam 1 mg i.v. up to 0.1 mg.kg-1. When SpO2 decreased to < 90% or snoring and/or apnoea was observed, continuous positive airway pressure applied through the nose (nasal CPAP) was increased until the respiratory deterioration was reversed. While one patient remained free of respiratory events, the other 20 patients were successfully treated with nasal CPAP restoring normal SpO2 (95.5 +/- 1.7%) without snoring. Stepwise reduction of nasal CPAP determined the minimally effective CPAP to prevent snoring to be 5.1 +/- 2.1 cm H2O. Further reduction of nasal CPAP induced snoring in 15 patients and obstructive apnoea in five patients with the latter accompanied by a severe reduction of SpO2 (87.4 +/- 6.1%). Patients with apnoea were older than those who snored (P < 0.05. We conclude that upper airway obstruction contributes considerably to decreases in SpO2 during midazolam sedation for spinal anaesthesia.

  1. Motivational Interviewing (MINT) Improves Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) Acceptance and Adherence: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Sara; Smith, Simon S.; Oei, Tian P. S.; Douglas, James

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy for obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is poor. We assessed the effectiveness of a motivational interviewing intervention (motivational interview nurse therapy [MINT]) in addition to best practice standard care to improve acceptance and adherence to CPAP therapy in people with…

  2. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning. PMID:27608019

  3. Continuous Indoor Positioning Fusing WiFi, Smartphone Sensors and Landmarks.

    PubMed

    Deng, Zhi-An; Wang, Guofeng; Qin, Danyang; Na, Zhenyu; Cui, Yang; Chen, Juan

    2016-09-05

    To exploit the complementary strengths of WiFi positioning, pedestrian dead reckoning (PDR), and landmarks, we propose a novel fusion approach based on an extended Kalman filter (EKF). For WiFi positioning, unlike previous fusion approaches setting measurement noise parameters empirically, we deploy a kernel density estimation-based model to adaptively measure the related measurement noise statistics. Furthermore, a trusted area of WiFi positioning defined by fusion results of previous step and WiFi signal outlier detection are exploited to reduce computational cost and improve WiFi positioning accuracy. For PDR, we integrate a gyroscope, an accelerometer, and a magnetometer to determine the user heading based on another EKF model. To reduce accumulation error of PDR and enable continuous indoor positioning, not only the positioning results but also the heading estimations are recalibrated by indoor landmarks. Experimental results in a realistic indoor environment show that the proposed fusion approach achieves substantial positioning accuracy improvement than individual positioning approaches including PDR and WiFi positioning.

  4. Efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on 5-year survival in patients with ischaemic stroke and obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Parra, Olga; Sánchez-Armengol, Ángeles; Capote, Francisco; Bonnin, Marc; Arboix, Adrià; Campos-Rodríguez, Francisco; Pérez-Ronchel, José; Durán-Cantolla, Joaquín; Martínez-Null, Cristina; de la Peña, Mónica; Jiménez, Maria Carmen; Masa, Fernando; Casadon, Ignacio; Alonso, Maria Luz; Macarrón, José L

    2015-02-01

    The main purpose of the present analysis is to assess the influence of introducing early nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP) treatment on cardiovascular recurrences and mortality in patients with a first-ever ischaemic stroke and moderate-severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) ≥20 events h(-1) during a 5-year follow-up. Patients received conventional treatment for stroke and were assigned randomly to the nCPAP group (n = 71) or the control group (n = 69). Cardiovascular events and mortality were registered for all patients. Survival and cardiovascular event-free survival analysis were performed after 5-year follow-up using the Kaplan-Meier test. Patients in the nCPAP group had significantly higher cardiovascular survival than the control group (100 versus 89.9%, log-rank test 5.887; P = 0.015) However, and also despite a positive tendency, there were no significant differences in the cardiovascular event-free survival at 68 months between the nCPAP and control groups (89.5 versus 75.4%, log-rank test 3.565; P = 0.059). Early nCPAP therapy has a positive effect on long-term survival in ischaemic stroke patients and moderate-severe OSA.

  5. Septal suturing following nasal septoplasty, a valid alternative for nasal packing?

    PubMed

    Lemmens, W; Lemkens, P

    2001-01-01

    Septal suturing following nasal septoplasty, a valid alternative for nasal packing? After septal surgery most surgeons still routinely perform nasal packing since this is generally recommended. The aims of packing are numerous: haemostasis, prevention of haematoma, increase septal flap apposition, closure of dead space and prevention of displacement of the replaced cartilage. However, nasal packing is not an innocuous procedure and may lead to cardiovascular changes, continued bleeding, nasal injury, hypoxia, foreign body reaction or infection. The major disadvantage of nasal packing is patient discomfort--usually necessitating hospital stay--and the need to administer antibiotics. Therefore alternatives were sought. Sessions, Lee and Vukovic conceived and reported in the eighties forms of continuous septal suturing, but are not widely used. A similar technique of septal suturing after nasal septoplasty without nasal packing was used in 226 consecutive surgical procedures and reviewed retrospectively. Complications like postoperative episodes of bleeding, infections, septal haematomas, septal perforations or synechia were not noted. On one patient a recurrence of the septal deviation occurred. Patients reported almost no discomfort. Moreover, the septal surgery procedure could be carried out on a day-surgery basis. Readmission of a patient was never necessary. Based on these observations the septal suturing technique is a valid alternative to intranasal packing following septal surgery.

  6. Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains based on position distribution model of ant colony foraging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liqiang; Dai, Yuntao; Gao, Jinyu

    2014-01-01

    Ant colony optimization algorithm for continuous domains is a major research direction for ant colony optimization algorithm. In this paper, we propose a distribution model of ant colony foraging, through analysis of the relationship between the position distribution and food source in the process of ant colony foraging. We design a continuous domain optimization algorithm based on the model and give the form of solution for the algorithm, the distribution model of pheromone, the update rules of ant colony position, and the processing method of constraint condition. Algorithm performance against a set of test trials was unconstrained optimization test functions and a set of optimization test functions, and test results of other algorithms are compared and analyzed to verify the correctness and effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  7. [Nasal breath recovery and rhinoplasty in cleft lip and palate patient with unilateral choanal atresia].

    PubMed

    Chkadua, T Z; Ivanova, M D; Daminov, R O; Brusova, L A; Savvateeva, D M

    2016-01-01

    The paper presents the analysis of clinical case of endoscopic nasal breath restoration and elimination of the secondary cleft lip nasal deformity in 27 years old patient with unilateral choanal atresia and secondary nasal deformity after rhinocheiloplasty. Preoperative examination revealed the absence of nasal breathing on collateral side due to complete bone choanal atresia. Surgical treatment included endoscopic choanal repair, elimination of the secondary nasal deformity, septoplasty, conchotomy and lateroposition of the inferior conchae. The treatment resulted in nasal breath restoration and elimination of nasal deformity. Long-term follow-up at 1 and 12 months post-operatively proved stable positive aesthetic and functional results.

  8. Definability of semifields of continuous positive functions by the lattices of their subalgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sidorov, V. V.

    2016-09-01

    We consider the lattice {A}(U(X)) of subalgebras of a semifield U(X) of continuous positive functions on an arbitrary topological space X and its sublattice {A}_1(U(X)) of subalgebras with unity. The main result of the paper is the proof of the definability of any semifield U(X) both by the lattice {A}(U(X)) and by its sublattice {A}_1(U(X)). Bibliography: 12 titles.

  9. [Nasal fractures in adults].

    PubMed

    Sjöstedt, Sannia; Larsen, Christian Grønhøj; Bilde, Anders; von Buchwald, Christian

    2016-03-07

    The risk of complications warrants treatment of most dislocated nasal fractures. Other injuries including other facial fractures and septal haematoma must be treated if present at the initial presentation. The usual treatment for a simple nasal fracture is closed reduction in local anaesthesia after five to seven days. Complicated cases require open reduction in general anaesthesia. Later revision of the deviated nose may become necessary in patients suffering from complications such as persistent nasal stenosis and/or deformity.

  10. The effect of short-term withdrawal from continuous positive airway pressure therapy on sympathetic activity and markers of vascular inflammation in subjects with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Craig L; Yang, Qiao; Williams, Andrew; Roth, Michael; Yee, Brendon J; Hedner, Jan A; Berend, Norbert; Grunstein, Ronald R

    2007-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is commonly associated with cardiovascular disease and sympathetic activation. However, it is unclear whether this association is independent of obesity and to what extent treatment with nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) alleviates the vascular inflammation that underpins cardiovascular disease. We therefore evaluated whether short-term withdrawal from CPAP therapy in subjects with moderate-severe OSA would result in increased levels of sympathetic activity and circulating inflammatory cytokines independent of weight. Vascular inflammatory markers (hsCRP, hsIL-6 and hsTNF-alpha) were assessed in 20 subjects after one and seven nights of withdrawal from CPAP together with the hypoxia-responsive angiogenic marker VEGF and urinary catecholamines. Compared with baseline on CPAP, withdrawal from therapy resulted in an immediate return of OSA with an increase in RDI to 26.7 +/- 5.2 and 39.0 +/- 5.9 events per hour after one and seven nights without CPAP, respectively (both P < 0.0001). This was accompanied by a concomitant rise in daytime urinary noradrenaline (P < 0.0001) after seven nights CPAP withdrawal that was positively associated with the severity of hypoxaemia. In contrast, withdrawal from CPAP therapy was not accompanied by any change in measured cytokines or VEGF (all P > 0.1). In conclusion, 1 week of CPAP withdrawal was associated with a return of OSA and a marked increase in sympathetic activity without a concomitant elevation of vascular inflammatory markers.

  11. The supernumerary nasal tooth.

    PubMed

    Kirmeier, R; Truschnegg, A; Payer, M; Malyk, J; Daghighi, S; Jakse, N

    2009-11-01

    Teeth exceeding the normal dental complement that have erupted into the nasal cavity are a rare pathological entity. This case report describes a female patient with recurrent complaints and fetid discharge from the left nasal cavity. The suspected clinical diagnosis of a supernumerary nasal tooth was confirmed by computed tomography. After endoscopic removal, the tooth was examined using X-ray microtomography and thin-section preparations; these findings are presented for the first time. A literature search identified 25 supernumerary nasal teeth in 23 patients.

  12. Effect of a heated humidifier during continuous positive airway pressure delivered by a helmet

    PubMed Central

    Chiumello, Davide; Chierichetti, Monica; Tallarini, Federica; Cozzi, Paola; Cressoni, Massimo; Polli, Federico; Colombo, Riccardo; Castelli, Antonio; Gattinoni, Luciano

    2008-01-01

    Introduction The helmet may be an effective interface for the delivery of noninvasive positive pressure ventilation. The high internal gas volume of the helmet can act as a 'mixing chamber', in which the humidity of the patient's expired alveolar gases increases the humidity of the dry medical gases, thus avoiding the need for active humidification. We evaluated the temperature and humidity of respiratory gases inside the helmet, with and without a heated humidifier, during continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) delivered with a helmet. Methods Nine patients with acute respiratory failure (arterial oxygen tension/fractional inspired oxygen ratio 209 ± 52 mmHg) and 10 healthy individuals were subjected to CPAP. The CPAP was delivered either through a mechanical ventilator or by continuous low (40 l/min) or high flow (80 l/min). Humidity was measured inside the helmet using a capacitive hygrometer. The level of patient comfort was evaluated using a continuous scale. Results In patients with acute respiratory failure, the heated humidifier significantly increased the absolute humidity from 18.4 ± 5.5 mgH2O/l to 34.1 ± 2.8 mgH2O/l during ventilator CPAP, from 11.4 ± 4.8 mgH2O/l to 33.9 ± 1.9 mgH2O/l during continuous low-flow CPAP, and from 6.4 ± 1.8 mgH2O/l to 24.2 ± 5.4 mgH2O/l during continuous high-flow CPAP. Without the heated humidifier, the absolute humidity was significantly higher with ventilator CPAP than with continuous low-flow and high-flow CPAP. The level of comfort was similar for all the three modes of ventilation and with or without the heated humidifier. The findings in healthy individuals were similar to those in the patients with acute respiratory failure. Conclusion The fresh gas flowing through the helmet with continuous flow CPAP systems limited the possibility to increase the humidity. We suggest that a heated humidifier should be employed with continuous flow CPAP systems. PMID:18426561

  13. Toxicology of the nasal passages

    SciTech Connect

    Barrow, C.S.

    1986-01-01

    Contents of this work include: Comparative Anatomy and Function of the Nasal Passages; Light Microscopic Examination of the Rat Nasal Passages: Preparation and Morphologic Features; Histopathology of Acute and Subacute Nasal Toxicity; Pathology of Chronic Nasal Toxic Responses Including Cancer; Responses of the Nasal Mucociliary Apparatus to Airborne Irritants; Effects of Chemical Exposure on Olfaction in Humans, Possible Consequences of Cytochrome P-450-Dependent Monooxygenases in Nasal Tissues.

  14. Discrete and continuous fractional persistence problems - the positivity property and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cresson, Jacky; Szafrańska, Anna

    2017-03-01

    In this article, we study the continuous and discrete fractional persistence problem which looks for the persistence of properties of a given classical (α = 1) differential equation in the fractional case (here using fractional Caputo's derivatives) and the numerical scheme which are associated (here with discrete Grünwald-Letnikov derivatives). Our main concerns are positivity, order preserving ,equilibrium points and stability of these points. We formulate explicit conditions under which a fractional system preserves positivity. We deduce also sufficient conditions to ensure order preserving. We deduce from these results a fractional persistence theorem which ensures that positivity, order preserving, equilibrium points and stability is preserved under a Caputo fractional embedding of a given differential equation. At the discrete level, the problem is more complicated. Following a strategy initiated by R. Mickens dealing with non local approximations, we define a non standard finite difference scheme for fractional differential equations based on discrete Grünwald-Letnikov derivatives, which preserves positivity unconditionally on the discretization increment. We deduce a discrete version of the fractional persistence theorem for what concerns positivity and equilibrium points. We then apply our results to study a fractional prey-predator model introduced by Javidi et al.

  15. Linear motor drive system for continuous-path closed-loop position control of an object

    DOEpatents

    Barkman, William E.

    1980-01-01

    A precision numerical controlled servo-positioning system is provided for continuous closed-loop position control of a machine slide or platform driven by a linear-induction motor. The system utilizes filtered velocity feedback to provide system stability required to operate with a system gain of 100 inches/minute/0.001 inch of following error. The filtered velocity feedback signal is derived from the position output signals of a laser interferometer utilized to monitor the movement of the slide. Air-bearing slides mounted to a stable support are utilized to minimize friction and small irregularities in the slideway which would tend to introduce positioning errors. A microprocessor is programmed to read command and feedback information and converts this information into the system following error signal. This error signal is summed with the negative filtered velocity feedback signal at the input of a servo amplifier whose output serves as the drive power signal to the linear motor position control coil.

  16. Parametric positioning of a continuous crystal PET detector with depth of interaction decoding.

    PubMed

    Ling, T; Burnett, T H; Lewellen, T K; Miyaoka, R S

    2008-04-07

    Here we demonstrate a parametric positioning method on a continuous crystal detector. Three different models for the light distribution were tested. Diagnosis of the residues showed that the parametric model fits the experimental data better than Gaussian and Cauchy models in our particular experimental setup. Based on the correlation between the spread and the peak value of the light distribution model with the depth of interaction (DOI), we were able to estimate the three-dimensional position of a scintillation event. On our continuous miniature crystal element (cMiCE) detector module with 8 mm thick LYSO crystal, the intrinsic spatial resolution is 1.06 mm at the center and 1.27 mm at the corner using a maximum-likelihood estimation (MLE) method and the parametric model. The DOI resolution (full width at half maximum) is estimated to be approximately 3.24 mm. The positioning method using the parametric model outperformed the Gaussian and Cauchy models, in both MLE and weighted least-squares (WLS) fitting methods. The key feature of this technique is that it requires very little calibration of the detector, but still retains high resolution and high sensitivity.

  17. Nasality in Taiwanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pan, Ho-hsien

    2004-01-01

    This study used perceptual and articulatory data to investigate a language specific phonemic inventory, and allophonic rules for homorganic initial voiced stops versus homorganic nasal stops, and oral versus nasal vowels in Taiwanese. Four experiments were conducted: concept formation, gating, and two airflow studies. Results of a first nasal…

  18. Lining in nasal reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haack, Sebastian; Fischer, Helmut; Gubisch, Wolfgang

    2014-06-01

    Restoring nasal lining is one of the essential parts during reconstruction of full-thickness defects of the nose. Without a sufficient nasal lining the whole reconstruction will fail. Nasal lining has to sufficiently cover the shaping subsurface framework. But in addition, lining must not compromise or even block nasal ventilation. This article demonstrates different possibilities of lining reconstruction. The use of composite grafts for small rim defects is described. The limits and technical components for application of skin grafts are discussed. Then the advantages and limitations of endonasal, perinasal, and hingeover flaps are demonstrated. Strategies to restore lining with one or two forehead flaps are presented. Finally, the possibilities and technical aspects to reconstruct nasal lining with a forearm flap are demonstrated. Technical details are explained by intraoperative pictures. Clinical cases are shown to illustrate the different approaches and should help to understand the process of decision making. It is concluded that although the lining cannot be seen after reconstruction of the cover it remains one of the key components for nasal reconstruction. When dealing with full-thickness nasal defects, there is no way to avoid learning how to restore nasal lining.

  19. Anterior rhinomanometry in nasal allergen challenges.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, M B; Carlos, A G

    1998-11-01

    Even simple and relatively safe provocation procedures like nasal allergen challenges, should aim to allow detection of positivity with the less possible discomfort to the patient. The objective of this work was to evaluate if the use of rhinomanometric measurements during nasal provocation procedures could allow a decrease in the total administered allergen dose, causing less symptoms to the patients but without increasing the number of false-negatives, comparatively to clinical scores or nasal peak-flow measurements. Our results showed that performing rhinomanometric measurements during nasal HDM challenge procedures can lead in many patients to a reduction in the total dose of allergen administered during the challenge, without loss of sensitivity or specificity. This allergen dose reduction translates in less time consumed during the provocation and less patients' discomfort.

  20. Management of severe obstructive sleep apnea using mandibular advancement devices with auto continuous positive airway pressures

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Rashmi; Dubey, Abhishek; Kant, Surya; Singh, Balendra Pratap

    2015-01-01

    The use of continuous positive airway pressures (CPAP) is considered standard treatment of moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Treatment of the disease poses a great challenge not only for its diagnostic purpose but also for its treatment part. In about 29-83% of the patients, treatment is difficult because of non-compliance resulting due to high pressures, air leaks and other related issues. In such situations, alternative methods of treatment need to be looked for so as to ascertain better management. Mandibular advancement devices along with CPAP may show better treatment outcome in specific situations. PMID:25814802

  1. Single-point position and transition defects in continuous time quantum walks

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z. J.; Wang, J. B.

    2015-01-01

    We present a detailed analysis of continuous time quantum walks (CTQW) with both position and transition defects defined at a single point in the line. Analytical solutions of both traveling waves and bound states are obtained, which provide valuable insight into the dynamics of CTQW. The number of bound states is found to be critically dependent on the defect parameters, and the localized probability peaks can be readily obtained by projecting the state vector of CTQW on to these bound states. The interference between two bound states are also observed in the case of a transition defect. The spreading of CTQW probability over the line can be finely tuned by varying the position and transition defect parameters, offering the possibility of precision quantum control of the system. PMID:26323855

  2. [Nasal allergenic provocation test].

    PubMed

    Becerril Angeles, M H; Pérez López, A; Azuara Pliego, E

    2000-01-01

    This is a method to evaluate both specific sensitivity to allergens in the nasal mucosa, IgE-mediated hypersensitivity, and antiinflammatory and antiallergic drugs efficacy, whose objectives are for research in diagnosis and treatment. The method is based in allergen extracts delivery in the nasal mucosa and the post-challenge measurement of rhinitis symptoms, vasoactive mediators release quantification and nasal obstruction degree evaluated by rhinomanometry. Nasal allergen challenge is a procedure of diagnostic and therapeutic evaluation usefulness, that must be performed in selected patients, in adequate facilities, by experts physicians, with standardised allergen dosages, in an specific nasal area, with objective measurements (rhinomanometry, mediators and secretions of the allergic response) and symptoms scoring that allow get reliable results in patients with allergic rhinitis under study.

  3. Continuous and Discrete Space Particle Filters for Predictions in Acoustic Positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Will; Kim, Surrey; Kouritzin, Michael A.

    2002-12-01

    Predicting the future state of a random dynamic signal based on corrupted, distorted, and partial observations is vital for proper real-time control of a system that includes time delay. Motivated by problems from Acoustic Positioning Research Inc., we consider the continual automated illumination of an object moving within a bounded domain, which requires object location prediction due to inherent mechanical and physical time lags associated with robotic lighting. Quality computational predictions demand high fidelity models for the coupled moving object signal and observation equipment pair. In our current problem, the signal represents the vector position, orientation, and velocity of a stage performer. Acoustic observations are formed by timing ultrasonic waves traveling from four perimeter speakers to a microphone attached to the performer. The goal is to schedule lighting movements that are coordinated with the performer by anticipating his/her future position based upon these observations using filtering theory. Particle system based methods have experienced rapid development and have become an essential technique of contemporary filtering strategies. Hitherto, researchers have largely focused on continuous state particle filters, ranging from traditional weighted particle filters to adaptive refining particle filters, readily able to perform path-space estimation and prediction. Herein, we compare the performance of a state-of-the-art refining particle filter to that of a novel discrete-space particle filter on the acoustic positioning problem. By discrete space particle filter we mean a Markov chain that counts particles in discretized cells of the signal state space in order to form an approximated unnormalized distribution of the signal state. For both filters mentioned above, we will examine issues like the mean time to localize a signal, the fidelity of filter estimates at various signal to noise ratios, computational costs, and the effect of signal

  4. Uptake and continuous use of copper intrauterine device in a cohort of HIV-positive women.

    PubMed

    Landolt, Nadia Kancheva; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Teeratakulpisarn, Nipat; Kriengsinyot, Rosalin; Ahluwalia, Jennisa; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Chaithongwongwatthana, Surasith; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2013-01-01

    Copper intrauterine device (IUD) is not commonly used in many countries, though it provides effective reversible contraception with no or minimal primary systemic side effects. We assessed its uptake and continuation of use among HIV-positive Thai women. Sixty-six of 322 women of reproductive age, whom we approached for the study, met the eligibility criteria. Sterilization (62%) was the main reason for failure to enroll. Twenty-nine of them (44%) underwent IUD insertion. Considering condom use sufficient for pregnancy prevention (12%) was the main reason among eligible women for the refusal to participate in the study. At six months, 54% of enrolled participants reported one or more side effects such as increased menstrual flow (43%), spotting (21%) and dysmenorrhea (11%). The continuation rate of IUD use was high (93%), in spite of the persistent non-systemic side effects. The study showed that copper IUD could be an acceptable contraceptive choice for Thai HIV-positive women. Easy access to the method in a setting linked with the HIV service, and education on IUD risks and benefits is needed to promote the use of IUD in addition to condoms as an effective contraceptive option in HIV-infected women.

  5. A High-Value, Low-Cost Bubble Continuous Positive Airway Pressure System for Low-Resource Settings: Technical Assessment and Initial Case Reports

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jocelyn; Machen, Heather; Kawaza, Kondwani; Mwanza, Zondiwe; Iniguez, Suzanne; Lang, Hans; Gest, Alfred; Kennedy, Neil; Miros, Robert; Richards-Kortum, Rebecca; Molyneux, Elizabeth; Oden, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Acute respiratory infections are the leading cause of global child mortality. In the developing world, nasal oxygen therapy is often the only treatment option for babies who are suffering from respiratory distress. Without the added pressure of bubble Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (bCPAP) which helps maintain alveoli open, babies struggle to breathe and can suffer serious complications, and frequently death. A stand-alone bCPAP device can cost $6,000, too expensive for most developing world hospitals. Here, we describe the design and technical evaluation of a new, rugged bCPAP system that can be made in small volume for a cost-of-goods of approximately $350. Moreover, because of its simple design—consumer-grade pumps, medical tubing, and regulators—it requires only the simple replacement of a <$1 diaphragm approximately every 2 years for maintenance. The low-cost bCPAP device delivers pressure and flow equivalent to those of a reference bCPAP system used in the developed world. We describe the initial clinical cases of a child with bronchiolitis and a neonate with respiratory distress who were treated successfully with the new bCPAP device. PMID:23372661

  6. Similarity and Enhancement: Nasality from Moroccan Arabic Pharyngeals and Nasals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zellou, Georgia Eve

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies of the articulation, acoustics, and perception of nasal and pharyngeal consonants and adjacent vowels were conducted to investigate nasality in Moroccan Arabic (MA). The status of nasality in MA is described as coarticulatorily complex, where two phoneme types (pharyngeal segments and nasal segments) yield similar…

  7. Comparison of Nasal Acceleration and Nasalance across Vowels

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorp, Elias B.; Virnik, Boris T.; Stepp, Cara E.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine the performance of normalized nasal acceleration (NNA) relative to nasalance as estimates of nasalized versus nonnasalized vowel and sentence productions. Method: Participants were 18 healthy speakers of American English. NNA was measured using a custom sensor, and nasalance was measured using…

  8. Continuous positive airway pressure treatment for acute mountain sickness at 4240 m in the Nepal Himalaya.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Pamela L; Johnson, Claire C; Poudyal, Prasanta; Regmi, Nirajan; Walmsley, Megan A; Basnyat, Buddha

    2013-09-01

    Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is very common at altitudes above 2500 m. There are few treatment options in the field where electricity availability is limited, and medical assistance or oxygen is unavailable or difficult to access. Positive airway pressure has been used to treat AMS at 3800 m. We hypothesized that continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) could be used under field conditions powered by small rechargeable batteries. Methods Part 1. 5 subjects trekked to 3500 m from 2800 m in one day and slept there for one night, ascending in the late afternoon to 3840 m, where they slept using CPAP 6-7 cm via mask. The next morning they descended to 3500 m, spent the day there, ascended in late afternoon to 3840 m, and slept the night without CPAP. Continuous overnight oximetry was recorded and the Lake Louise questionnaire for AMS administered both mornings. Methods Part 2. 14 trekkers with symptoms of AMS were recruited at 4240 m. All took acetazolamide. The Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, oximetry recorded, and CPAP 6-7 cm was applied for 10-15 min. CPAP was used overnight and oximetry recorded continuously. In the morning the Lake Louise questionnaire was administered, and oximetry recorded for 10-15 min. The equipment used in both parts was heated, humidified Respironics RemStar® machines powered by Novuscell™ rechargeable lithium ion batteries. Oximetry was recorded using Embletta™ PDS. Results Part 1. CPAP improved overnight Sao2 and eliminated AMS symptoms in the one subject who developed AMS. CPAP was used for 7-9 h and the machines operated for >8 h using the battery. Results Part 2. CPAP use improved Sao2 when used for 10-15 min at the time of recruitment and overnight CPAP use resulted in significantly reduced AMS symptoms. Conclusion. CPAP with rechargeable battery may be a useful treatment option for trekkers and climbers who develop AMS.

  9. Impact of Treatment with Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP) on Weight in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Quan, Stuart F.; Budhiraja, Rohit; Clarke, Denise P.; Goodwin, James L.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Simon, Richard D.; Smith, Terry W.; Walsh, James K.; Kushida, Clete A.

    2013-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight change in persons with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blinded sham-controlled multicenter clinical trial conducted at 5 sites in the United States. Of 1,105 participants with an apnea hypopnea index ≥ 10 events/ hour initially randomized, 812 had body weight measured at baseline and after 6 months of study. Intervention: CPAP or Sham CPAP. Measurements: Body weight, height, hours of CPAP or Sham CPAP use, Epworth Sleepiness Scale score. Results: Participants randomized to CPAP gained 0.35 ± 5.01 kg, whereas those on Sham CPAP lost 0.70 ± 4.03 kg (mean ± SD, p = 0.001). Amount of weight gain with CPAP was related to hours of device adherence, with each hour per night of use predicting a 0.42 kg increase in weight. This association was not noted in the Sham CPAP group. CPAP participants who used their device ≥ 4 h per night on ≥ 70% of nights gained the most weight over 6 months in comparison to non-adherent CPAP participants (1.0 ± 5.3 vs. -0.3 ± 5.0 kg, p = 0.014). Conclusions: OSA patients using CPAP may gain a modest amount of weight with the greatest weight gain found in those most compliant with CPAP. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 995. Citation: Quan SF; Budhiraja R; Clarke DP; Goodwin JL; Gottlieb DJ; Nichols DA; Simon RD; Smith TW; Walsh JK; Kushida CA. Impact of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on weight in obstructive sleep apnea. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(10):989-993. PMID:24127141

  10. A New Animal Model of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Responding to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Neuzeret, Pierre-Charles; Gormand, Frédéric; Reix, Philippe; Parrot, Sandrine; Sastre, Jean-Pierre; Buda, Colette; Guidon, Gérard; Sakai, Kazuya; Lin, Jian-Sheng

    2011-01-01

    Study Objectives: An improved animal model of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is needed for the development of effective pharmacotherapies. In humans, flexion of the neck and a supine position, two main pathogenic factors during human sleep, are associated with substantially greater OSA severity. We postulated that these two factors might generate OSA in animals. Design: We developed a restraining device for conditioning to investigate the effect of the combination of 2 body positions—prone (P) or supine (S)—and 2 head positions—with the neck flexed at right angles to the body (90°) or in extension in line with the body (180°)—during sleep in 6 cats. Polysomnography was performed twice on each cat in each of the 4 sleeping positions—P180, S180, P90, or S90. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment was then investigated in 2 cats under the most pathogenic condition. Setting: NA. Patients or Participants: NA. Interventions: NA. Measurements and Results: Positions P180 and, S90 resulted, respectively, in the lowest and highest apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) (3 ± 1 vs 25 ± 2, P < 0.001), while P90 (18 ± 3, P < 0.001) and S180 (13 ± 5, P < 0.01) gave intermediate values. In position S90, an increase in slow wave sleep stage 1 (28% ± 3% vs 22% ± 3%, P < 0.05) and a decrease in REM sleep (10% ± 2% vs 18% ± 2%, P < 0.001) were also observed. CPAP resulted in a reduction in the AHI (8 ± 1 vs 27 ± 3, P < 0.01), with the added benefit of sleep consolidation. Conclusion: By mimicking human pathogenic sleep conditions, we have developed a new reversible animal model of OSA. Citation: Neuzeret PC; Gormand F; Reix P; Parrot S; Sastre JP; Buda C; Guidon G; Sakai K; Lin JS. A new animal model of obstructive sleep apnea responding to continuous positive airway pressure. SLEEP 2011;34(4):541-548. PMID:21461333

  11. Automatic detection of position and depth of potential UXO using continuous wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billings, Stephen D.; Herrmann, Felix J.

    2003-09-01

    Inversion algorithms for UXO discrimination using magnetometery have recently been used to achieve very low False Alarm Rates, with 100% recovery of detected ordnance. When there are many UXO and/or when the UXO are at significantly different depths, manual estimation of the initial position and scale for each item, is a laborious and time-consuming process. In this paper, we utilize the multi-resolution properties of wavelets to automatically estimate both the position and scale of dipole peaks. The Automated Wavelet Detection (AWD) algorithm that we develop consists of four-stages: (i) maxima and minima in the data are followed across multiple scales as we zoom with a continuous wavelet transform; (ii) the decay of the amplitude of each peak with scale is used to estimate the depth to source; (iii) adjacent maxima and minima of comparable depth are joined together to form dipole anomalies; and (iv) the relative positions and amplitudes of the extrema, along with their depths, are used to estimate a dipole model. We demonstrate the application of the AWD algorithm to three datasets with different characteristics. In each case, the method rapidly located the majority of dipole anomalies and produced accurate estimates of dipole parameters.

  12. Patient experience with mupirocin or povidone-iodine nasal decolonization.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Jed; Hutzler, Lorraine; Cuff, Germaine; Rosenberg, Andrew; Phillips, Michael; Bosco, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Led by the federal government, the payers of health care are enacting policies designed to base provider reimbursement on the quality of care they render. This study evaluated and compared patient experiences and satisfaction with nasal decolonization with either nasal povidone-iodine (PI) or nasal mupirocin ointment (MO). A total of 1903 patients were randomized to undergo preoperative nasal decolonization with either nasal MO or PI solution. All randomized patients were also given 2% chlorhexidine gluconate topical wipes. Patients were interviewed prior to discharge to assess adverse events and patient experience with their assigned preoperative antiseptic protocol. Of the 1903 randomized patients, 1679 (88.1%) were interviewed prior to discharge. Of patients receiving PI, 3.4% reported an unpleasant or very unpleasant experience, compared with 38.8% of those using nasal MO (P<.0001). Sixty-seven percent of patients using nasal MO believed it to be somewhat or very helpful in reducing surgical site infections, compared with 71% of patients receiving PI (P>.05). Being recruited as an active participant in surgical site infection prevention was a positive experience for 87.2% of MO patients and 86.3% of PI patients (P=.652). Those assigned to receive PI solution preoperatively reported significantly fewer adverse events than the nasal MO group (P<.01). Preoperative nasal decolonization with either nasal PI or MO was considered somewhat or very helpful by more than two-thirds of patients.

  13. Positioning Continuing Education: Boundaries and Intersections between the Domains Continuing Education, Knowledge Translation, Patient Safety and Quality Improvement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kitto, Simon; Bell, Mary; Peller, Jennifer; Sargeant, Joan; Etchells, Edward; Reeves, Scott; Silver, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    Public and professional concern about health care quality, safety and efficiency is growing. Continuing education, knowledge translation, patient safety and quality improvement have made concerted efforts to address these issues. However, a coordinated and integrated effort across these domains is lacking. This article explores and discusses the…

  14. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  15. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  16. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  17. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  18. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section 874.5800 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint....

  19. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section 874.5550 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator....

  20. Efficiency of cold passover and heated humidification under continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Randerath, W J; Meier, J; Genger, H; Domanski, U; Rühle, K H

    2002-07-01

    Cold passover and heated humidifiers are employed for the prevention of side-effects associated with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. However, to date, it has not been possible to separately measure the humidity of inspired and expired air. The aim of this study was to compare the relative humidity of the inspired air and the water loss during respiration between cold passover and heated humidifiers under CPAP. Humidity and temperature were determined separately for the respiratory phases, without humidification, with cold passover and heated humidifiers in 10 healthy subjects. Humidity was measured with a capacitive hygrometer, temperature with a "Type K" thermosensor, and impedance of the total respiratory system with impulse oscillometry. The relative humidity (rH) of the inspired air (mean+/-SD) increased significantly from 24.0+/-9.1%, rH (34.8+/-1.0 degrees C, no humidifier) to 34.5+/-10.1%, rH (34.6+/-1.0 degrees C) under cold humidification, and to 53.9+/-13.2% rH (35.0+/-1.1 degrees C) under heated humidification. With heated humidification, water loss was reduced by 38% compared to cold humidification. The impedance increased from 5.7+/-1.8 cmH2O x L x s(-1) (no humidifier) to 6.7+/-1.8 cmH2O x L x s(-1) (heated humidifier). The authors conclude that the use of a heated humidifier during continuous positive airway pressure appreciably increases the relative humidity of the inspired air and reduces the water loss during respiration.

  1. Nasal septal trauma in children.

    PubMed

    Olsen, K D; Carpenter, R J; Kern, E B

    1979-07-01

    If the septal component of a nasal injury is adequately managed, usually the entire nasal injury will be well managed. Major or minor nasal trauma can cause cartilage fracture, deviation, dislocation, hematoma, or abscess formation, and the various associated sequelae, some of them life-threatening. A negative x-ray report should never be used as a substitute for a complete intranasal examination in any child with nasal trauma. Any nasal abnormality should be referred for immediate evaluation and treatment.

  2. Development of the cetacean nasal skull.

    PubMed

    Klima, M

    1999-01-01

    The adaptation of cetaceans to aquatic life habits is reflected, in their nasal region, in three marked changes from the original relations found in land mammals. These changes include (1) the loss of the sense of smell, (2) translocation of the nostrils from the tip of the rostrum to the vertex of the head, and (3) elongation of the anterior head to form a rostrum protruding far towards anterior. The morphogenetic processes taking place during embryogenesis of the nasal skull play a decisive part in the development of all these changes. The lateral parts of the embryonic nasal capsule, encompassing the nasal passages, change their position from horizontal to vertical. At the same time, the structures of the original nasal floor (the solum nasi) are shifted in front of the nasal passages towards the rostrum. The structures of the original nasal roof (the tectum nasi) and of the nasal side wall (the paries nasi) are translocated behind the nasal passages towards the neurocranium. The medial nasal septum (the septum nasi) mostly loses its connection to the nasal passages and is produced into a point protruding far towards anterior. The transformed embryonic nasal skull of the Cetacea can be divided into three sections: 1. The median structures. These include the cartilaginous structures, viz., the rostrum nasi, the septum interorbitale and the spina mesethmoidalis, which are accompanied by the dermal bones, the vomer and the praemaxillare. In adult cetaceans the rostrum nasi is mostly preserved as a robust cartilage of the skull, which may possibly serve as a sound transmitting structure of the sonar system, or it may be responsible for the sensing of water streams and vibrations. 2. The posterior side wall structures. These include the following cartilaginous structures that are mostly heavily reduced or mutually fused: the cupula nasi anterior, the tectum nasi, the lamina cribrosa, the paries nasi, the commissura orbitonasalis, the cupula nasi posterior, the

  3. Budesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused by an allergy to ... germs.Budesonide nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  4. Fluticasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... itchy nose and itchy, watery eyes caused by hay fever or other allergies (caused by an allergy to ... germs.Fluticasone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  5. Mometasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... sneezing, runny, stuffy, or itchy nose caused by hay fever or other allergies. It is also used to ... using mometasone nasal spray to prevent or relieve hay fever or allergy symptoms, it is usually sprayed in ...

  6. Beclomethasone Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... runny, stuffy, or itchy nose (rhinitis) caused by hay fever, other allergies, or vasomotor (nonallergic) rhinitis. It is ... germs.Beclomethasone nasal spray controls the symptoms of hay fever or allergies but does not cure these conditions. ...

  7. Nasal Wash Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... months or if it becomes discolored. Cleaning the Bulb Syringe (dropper, syringe or nasal spray bottle) After ... may be several times a day), fill the bulb syringe with water (described above), swish the water ...

  8. Nasal packing and stenting

    PubMed Central

    Weber, Rainer K.

    2011-01-01

    Nasal packs are indispensable in ENT practice. This study reviews current indications, effectiveness and risks of nasal packs and stents. In endoscopic surgery, nasal packs should always have smooth surfaces to minimize mucosal damage, improve wound healing and increase patient comfort. Functional endoscopic endonasal sinus surgery allows the use of modern nasal packs, since pressure is no longer required. So called hemostatic/resorbable materials are a first step in this direction. However, they may lead to adhesions and foreign body reactions in mucosal membranes. Simple occlusion is an effective method for creating a moist milieu for improved wound healing and avoiding dryness. Stenting of the frontal sinus is recommended if surgery fails to produce a wide, physiologically shaped drainage path that is sufficiently covered by intact tissue. PMID:22073095

  9. Nasal fracture (image)

    MedlinePlus

    A nasal fracture is a break in the bone over the ridge of the nose. It usually results from a blunt ... and is one of the most common facial fracture. Symptoms of a broken nose include pain, blood ...

  10. Chapter 6: Nasal polyps.

    PubMed

    Settipane, Russell A; Peters, Anju T; Chiu, Alexander G

    2013-01-01

    Nasal polyps occur in 1-4% of the population, usually occurring in the setting of an underlying local or systemic disease. The most common associated condition is chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS). A high prevalence of nasal polyps is also seen in allergic fungal rhinosinusitis, aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease, Churg-Strauss syndrome, and cystic fibrosis. In the setting of CRS, nasal polyps are not likely to be cured by either medical or surgical therapy; however, control is generally attainable. The best medical evidence supports the use of intranasal corticosteroids for maintenance therapy and short courses of oral corticosteroids for exacerbations. The evidence for short- and long-term antibiotics is much less robust. For patients with symptomatic nasal polyposis nonresponsive to medical therapies, functional endoscopic sinus surgery provides an adjunctive therapeutic option.

  11. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-09-20

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro's principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18" is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes.

  12. Modeling and Implementation of Multi-Position Non-Continuous Rotation Gyroscope North Finder

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Jun; Wang, Zhiqian; Shen, Chengwu; Kuijper, Arjan; Wen, Zhuoman; Liu, Shaojin

    2016-01-01

    Even when the Global Positioning System (GPS) signal is blocked, a rate gyroscope (gyro) north finder is capable of providing the required azimuth reference information to a certain extent. In order to measure the azimuth between the observer and the north direction very accurately, we propose a multi-position non-continuous rotation gyro north finding scheme. Our new generalized mathematical model analyzes the elements that affect the azimuth measurement precision and can thus provide high precision azimuth reference information. Based on the gyro’s principle of detecting a projection of the earth rotation rate on its sensitive axis and the proposed north finding scheme, we are able to deduct an accurate mathematical model of the gyro outputs against azimuth with the gyro and shaft misalignments. Combining the gyro outputs model and the theory of propagation of uncertainty, some approaches to optimize north finding are provided, including reducing the gyro bias error, constraining the gyro random error, increasing the number of rotation points, improving rotation angle measurement precision, decreasing the gyro and the shaft misalignment angles. According them, a north finder setup is built and the azimuth uncertainty of 18” is obtained. This paper provides systematic theory for analyzing the details of the gyro north finder scheme from simulation to implementation. The proposed theory can guide both applied researchers in academia and advanced practitioners in industry for designing high precision robust north finder based on different types of rate gyroscopes. PMID:27657067

  13. Combination of constant-flow and continuous positive-pressure ventilation in canine pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Sznajder, J I; Becker, C J; Crawford, G P; Wood, L D

    1989-08-01

    Constant-flow ventilation (CFV) maintains alveolar ventilation without tidal excursion in dogs with normal lungs, but this ventilatory mode requires high CFV and bronchoscopic guidance for effective subcarinal placement of two inflow catheters. We designed a circuit that combines CFV with continuous positive-pressure ventilation (CPPV; CFV-CPPV), which negates the need for bronchoscopic positioning of CFV cannula, and tested this system in seven dogs having oleic acid-induced pulmonary edema. Addition of positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP, 10 cmH2O) reduced venous admixture from 44 +/- 17 to 10.4 +/- 5.4% and kept arterial CO2 tension (PaCO2) normal. With the innovative CFV-CPPV circuit at the same PEEP and respiratory rate (RR), we were able to reduce tidal volume (VT) from 437 +/- 28 to 184 +/- 18 ml (P less than 0.001) and elastic end-inspiratory pressures (PEI) from 25.6 +/- 4.6 to 17.7 +/- 2.8 cmH2O (P less than 0.001) without adverse effects on cardiac output or pulmonary exchange of O2 or CO2; indeed, PaCO2 remained at 35 +/- 4 Torr even though CFV was delivered above the carina and at lower (1.6 l.kg-1.min-1) flows than usually required to maintain eucapnia during CFV alone. At the same PEEP and RR, reduction of VT in the CPPV mode without CFV resulted in CO2 retention (PaCO2 59 +/- 8 Torr). We conclude that CFV-CPPV allows CFV to effectively mix alveolar and dead spaces by a small bulk flow bypassing the zone of increased resistance to gas mixing, thereby allowing reduction of the CFV rate, VT, and PEI for adequate gas exchange.

  14. Pathophysiology of nasal congestion

    PubMed Central

    Naclerio, Robert M; Bachert, Claus; Baraniuk, James N

    2010-01-01

    Nasal congestion is a common symptom in rhinitis (both allergic and nonallergic), rhinosinusitis and nasal polyposis. Congestion can also be caused by physical obstruction of nasal passages and/or modulation of sensory perception. Mucosal inflammation underlies many of the specific and interrelated factors that contribute to nasal congestion, as well as other symptoms of both allergic rhinitis and rhinosinusitis. A wide range of biologically active agents (eg, histamine, tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukins, cell adhesion molecules) and cell types contribute to inflammation, which can manifest as venous engorgement, increased nasal secretions and tissue swelling/edema, ultimately leading to impaired airflow and the sensation of nasal congestion. Inflammation-induced changes in the properties of sensory afferents (eg, expression of peptides and receptors) that innervate the nose can also contribute to altered sensory perception, which may result in a subjective feeling of congestion. Increased understanding of the mechanisms underlying inflammation can facilitate improved treatment selection and the development of new therapies for congestion. PMID:20463823

  15. Titanium Mesh Nasal Repair without Nasal Lining.

    PubMed

    Zenga, Joseph; Kao, Katherine; Chen, Collin; Gross, Jennifer; Hahn, Samuel; Chi, John J; Branham, Gregory H

    2017-02-01

    The objective of this study was to describe outcomes for patients who underwent titanium mesh reconstruction of full-thickness nasal defects without internal lining repair. This is a retrospective cohort study. Patients with through-and-through nasal defects were identified at a single academic institution between 2008 and 2016. Nasal reconstruction was performed with either titanium mesh and external skin reconstruction without repair of the intranasal lining or traditional three-layer closure. Five patients underwent titanium mesh reconstruction and 11 underwent traditional three-layer repair. Median follow-up was 11 months (range, 2-66 months). The only significant difference between groups was older age in patients undergoing titanium reconstruction (mean, 81 vs. 63 years; difference of 18; 95% confidence interval [CI], 4-32 years). Defect extent including overall size and structures removed was similar between groups (p > 0.05). Paramedian forehead flap was the most common external reconstruction in both groups (100% for titanium mesh and 73% for three-layer closure). Time under anesthesia was significantly shorter for titanium mesh reconstruction (median, 119 vs. 314 minutes; difference of 195; 95% CI, 45-237). Estimated blood loss and length of hospital stay were similar between groups (p > 0.05). Complication rates were substantial although not significantly different, 40 and 36% in titanium and three-layer reconstruction, respectively (p > 0.05). All patients with complications after titanium reconstruction had prior or postoperative radiotherapy. Titanium mesh reconstruction of through-and-through nasal defects can successfully be performed without reconstruction of the intranasal lining, significantly decreasing operative times. This reconstructive technique may not be suitable for patients who undergo radiotherapy.

  16. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function and 24-h blood pressure profile in obese men with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Carneiro, Gláucia; Togeiro, Sônia Maria; Hayashi, Lílian F; Ribeiro-Filho, Fernando Flexa; Ribeiro, Artur Beltrame; Tufik, Sérgio; Zanella, Maria Teresa

    2008-08-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) increases the risk of cardiovascular events. Sympathetic nervous system and hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activation may be the mechanism of this relationship. The aim of this study was to evaluate HPA axis and ambulatory blood pressure monitoring in obese men with and without OSAS and to determine whether nasal continuous positive airway pressure therapy (nCPAP) influenced responses. Twenty-four-hour ambulatory blood pressure monitoring and overnight cortisol suppression test with 0.25 mg of dexamethasone were performed in 16 obese men with OSAS and 13 obese men controls. Nine men with severe apnea were reevaluated 3 mo after nCPAP therapy. Body mass index and blood pressure of OSAS patients and obese controls were similar. In OSAS patients, the percentage of fall in systolic blood pressure at night (P = 0.027) and salivary cortisol suppression postdexamethasone (P = 0.038) were lower, whereas heart rate (P = 0.022) was higher compared with obese controls. After nCPAP therapy, patients showed a reduction in heart rate (P = 0.036) and a greater cortisol suppression after dexamethasone (P = 0.001). No difference in arterial blood pressure (P = 0.183) was observed after 3 mo of nCPAP therapy. Improvement in cortisol suppression was positively correlated with an improvement in apnea-hypopnea index during nCPAP therapy (r = 0.799, P = 0.010). In conclusion, men with OSAS present increased postdexamethasone cortisol levels and heart rate, which were recovered by nCPAP.

  17. Does personality play a role in continuous positive airway pressure compliance?

    PubMed Central

    Maschauer, Emily L.; Fairley, Donna M.

    2017-01-01

    Key points Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence is low among individuals with obstructive sleep apnoea. Type D personality and high scores on the depression and hypochondriasis scales on the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory (MMPI) have been identified as factors contributing to non-compliance with CPAP. Further research into personality type may assist in understanding why some people adhere to CPAP, while others fail. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is a condition characterised by repetitive, intermittent partial or complete collapse/obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is highly efficacious in treating OSA but its effectiveness is limited due to suboptimal acceptance and adherence rates, with as many as 50% of OSA patients discontinuing CPAP treatment within the first year. Until recently, research has focused on examining mechanistic and demographic factors that could explain nonadherence (e.g. age, sex, race and education level) with limited applicability in a prospective or clinical manner. More recent research has focused on personality factors or types of patients with OSA who comply and do not comply with CPAP adherence in an attempt to enhance the accuracy of predicting treatment compliance. Type D personality has been found to be prevalent in one third of patients with OSA. The presence of Type D personality increases noncompliance and poor treatment outcomes due to negative affectivity, social inhibition, unhealthy lifestyle, and a reluctance to consult and/or follow medical advice. Conversely, individuals who are more likely to adhere to CPAP treatment tend to have a high internal locus of control and high self-efficacy, self-refer for treatment, and have active coping skills. By assessing personality and coping skills, the clinician may gain insight into the likelihood of a patient’s adherence to treatment. If the patient displays potential risk factors for CPAP

  18. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Stroke Rehabilitation: A Pilot Randomized Sham-Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Khot, Sandeep P.; Davis, Arielle P.; Crane, Deborah A.; Tanzi, Patricia M.; Li Lue, Denise; Claflin, Edward S.; Becker, Kyra J.; Longstreth, W.T.; Watson, Nathaniel F.; Billings, Martha E.

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) predicts poor functional outcome after stroke and increases the risk for recurrent stroke. Less is known about continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on stroke recovery. Methods: In a pilot randomized, double-blind, sham-controlled trial, adult stroke rehabilitation patients were assigned to auto-titrating or sham CPAP without diagnostic testing for OSA. Change in Functional Independence Measure (FIM), a measure of disability, was assessed between rehabilitation admission and discharge. Results: Over 18 months, 40 patients were enrolled and 10 withdrew from the study: 7 from active and 3 from sham CPAP (p > 0.10). For the remaining 30 patients, median duration of CPAP use was 14 days. Average CPAP use was 3.7 h/night, with at least 4 h nightly use among 15 patients. Adherence was not influenced by treatment assignment or stroke severity. In intention-to-treat analyses (n = 40), the median change in FIM favored active CPAP over sham but did not reach statistical significance (34 versus 26, p = 0.25), except for the cognitive component (6 versus 2.5, p = 0.04). The on-treatment analyses (n = 30) yielded similar results (total FIM: 32 versus 26, p = 0.11; cognitive FIM: 6 versus 2, p = 0.06). Conclusions: A sham-controlled CPAP trial among stroke rehabilitation patients was feasible in terms of recruitment, treatment without diagnostic testing and adequate blinding—though was limited by study retention and CPAP adherence. Despite these limitations, a trend towards a benefit of CPAP on recovery was evident. Tolerance and adherence must be improved before the full benefits of CPAP on recovery can be assessed in larger trials. Citation: Khot SP, Davis AP, Crane DA, Tanzi PM, Li Lue D, Claflin ES, Becker KJ, Longstreth WT, Watson NF, Billings ME. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: a pilot randomized sham-controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(7):1019–1026. PMID

  19. Overnight Motor Skill Learning Outcomes in Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Shane; O'Driscoll, Denise M.; Hamilton, Garun S.; Conduit, Russell

    2016-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in alleviating known impairments in the overnight consolidation of motor skill learning in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Methods: Twenty-five patients with untreated moderate-severe OSA, 13 first-night CPAP users, 17 compliant CPAP users, and 14 healthy control patients were trained on a motor sequence learning task (Sequential Finger Tapping Task, SFTT) and were subsequently tested prior to and after polysomnographic recorded sleep. Measures of subjective sleepiness (Karolinska Sleepiness Scale) and sustained attention (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were also completed before and after sleep. Results: Typical analyses of overnight improvement on the SFTT show significantly greater overnight gains in motor task speed in controls (+11.6 ± 4.7%, p = 0.007) and compliant CPAP users (+8.9 ± 4.3%, p = 0.008) compared to patients with OSA (−4.86 ± 4.5%). Additional analyses suggest that these improvements in motor performance occurred prior to the sleep episode, as all groups significantly improved (15% to 22%) over a 10-min presleep rest period. Thereafter, performance in all groups significantly deteriorated over sleep (6% to 16%) with trends toward patients with OSA showing greater losses in performance compared to control patients and compliant CPAP users. No between-group differences in subjective sleepiness and sustained attention were found presleep and postsleep. Conclusions: The current data suggest impairments in overnight motor learning in patients with OSA may be a combination of deficient stabilization of memory over a sleep episode as well as increased vulnerability to time on task fatigue effects. Compliant CPAP usage possibly offsets both of these impediments to learning outcomes by improving both sleep quality and subsequent daytime function. Citation: Landry S, O'Driscoll DM, Hamilton GS, Conduit R. Overnight motor skill learning

  20. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Breathlessness in Obese Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Sichang; Bastianpillai, Johan; Ratneswaran, Culadeeban; Pengo, Martino F.; Luo, Yuanming; Jolley, Caroline J.; Moxham, John; Steier, Joerg

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is an effective treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, long-term compliance with CPAP is limited. We tested the hypothesis that CPAP levels routinely used during sleep increase neural respiratory drive (NRD) and breathlessness, which may discourage compliance. Methods: This was an observational physiological cohort study in a respiratory physiology and sleep unit, University Hospital. Patients with a body mass index (BMI) > 25 kg/m2 and confirmed OSA were studied supine and awake on CPAP (4–20 cm H2O, increments of 2 cm H2O/3 min). We measured NRD during awake CPAP titration in obese subjects to quantify the response to the load of the respiratory system and compared it to the CPAP used for nocturnal treatment, with the modified Borg Scale (mBorg) for dyspnea recorded (from 0 to 10 points, with higher numbers indicating more breathlessness). Results: Fifteen patients (age 48 ± 10 years, 12 male, BMI 38.9 ± 5.8 kg/m2) with OSA (AHI 32.2 ± 21.1/h, 95th percentile of CPAP 14.1 ± 3.8 cm H2O) were studied and NRD (electromyogram of the parasternal intercostals, EMGpara; EMG of the external oblique, EMGabdomen) was recorded (awake, supine). Awake, EMGpara declined from baseline to 70.2% ± 17.1% when CPAP of 10.7 ± 3.4 cm H2O (P = 0.026) was applied. Further increase in CPAP led to a rise in EMGpara and increased breathlessness (P = 0.02). CPAP compliance (nights used) correlated negatively with mBorg scores (r = −0.738, P = 0.006). Conclusions: Awake, the respiratory system is maximally offloaded with lower than therapeutic CPAP levels in obese patients with OSA. Levels of NRD observed at effective CPAP levels while asleep are associated with breathlessness which may limit long-term CPAP compliance. Citation: Xiao S, Bastianpillai J, Ratneswaran C, Pengo MF, Luo Y, Jolley CJ, Moxham J, Steier J. Continuous positive airway pressure and breathlessness in obese patients with obstructive

  1. An Indoor Continuous Positioning Algorithm on the Move by Fusing Sensors and Wi-Fi on Smartphones.

    PubMed

    Li, Huaiyu; Chen, Xiuwan; Jing, Guifei; Wang, Yuan; Cao, Yanfeng; Li, Fei; Zhang, Xinlong; Xiao, Han

    2015-12-11

    Wi-Fi indoor positioning algorithms experience large positioning error and low stability when continuously positioning terminals that are on the move. This paper proposes a novel indoor continuous positioning algorithm that is on the move, fusing sensors and Wi-Fi on smartphones. The main innovative points include an improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm and a novel positioning fusion algorithm named the Trust Chain Positioning Fusion (TCPF) algorithm. The improved Wi-Fi positioning algorithm was designed based on the properties of Wi-Fi signals on the move, which are found in a novel "quasi-dynamic" Wi-Fi signal experiment. The TCPF algorithm is proposed to realize the "process-level" fusion of Wi-Fi and Pedestrians Dead Reckoning (PDR) positioning, including three parts: trusted point determination, trust state and positioning fusion algorithm. An experiment is carried out for verification in a typical indoor environment, and the average positioning error on the move is 1.36 m, a decrease of 28.8% compared to an existing algorithm. The results show that the proposed algorithm can effectively reduce the influence caused by the unstable Wi-Fi signals, and improve the accuracy and stability of indoor continuous positioning on the move.

  2. Lung Volume and Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Requirements in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Heinzer, Raphael C.; Stanchina, Michael L.; Malhotra, Atul; Fogel, Robert B.; Patel, Sanjay R.; Jordan, Amy S.; Schory, Karen; White, David P.

    2005-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that lung volume during wakefulness influences upper airway size and resistance, particularly in patients with sleep apnea. We sought to determine the influence of lung volume on the level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) required to prevent flow limitation during non-REM sleep in subjects with sleep apnea. Seventeen subjects (apnea–hypopnea index, 42.6 ± 6.2 [SEM]) were studied during stable non-REM sleep in a rigid head-out shell equipped with a positive/negative pressure attachment for manipulation of extrathoracic pressure. An epiglottic pressure catheter plus a mask/pneumotachometer were used to assess flow limitation. When lung volume was increased by 1,035 ± 22 ml, the CPAP level could be decreased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 4.8 ± 0.7 cm H2O (p < 0.001) without flow limitation. The decreased CPAP at the same negative extrathoracic pressure yielded a final lung volume increase of 421 ± 36 ml above the initial value. Conversely, when lung volume was reduced by 732 ± 74 ml (n = 8), the CPAP level had to be increased from 11.9 ± 0.7 to 17.1 ± 1.0 cm H2O (p < 0.001) to prevent flow limitation, with a final lung volume decrease of 567 ± 78 ml. These results demonstrate that relatively small changes in lung volume have an important effect on the upper airway in subjects with sleep apnea during non-REM sleep. PMID:15817803

  3. Perceptual Processing of Mandarin Nasals by L1 and L2 Mandarin Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lai, Yi-hsiu

    2012-01-01

    Nasals are cross-linguistically susceptible to change, especially in the syllable final position. Acoustic reports on Mandarin nasal production have recently shown that the syllable-final distinction is frequently dropped. Few studies, however, have addressed the issue of perceptual processing in Mandarin nasals for L1 and L2 speakers of Mandarin…

  4. Respiratory support with heated humidified high flow nasal cannula in preterm infants.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Ga Won

    2016-10-01

    The incidence of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) has not decreased over the last decade. The most important way to decrease BPD is by weaning the patient from the ventilator as soon as possible in order to reduce ventilator-induced lung injury that underlies BPD, and by using a noninvasive ventilator (NIV). Use of a heated, humidified, high flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC), which is the most recently introduced NIV mode for respiratory support in preterm infants, is rapidly increasing in many neonatal intensive care units due to the technical ease of use without sealing, and the attending physician's preference compared to other NIV modes. A number of studies have shown that nasal breakdown and neonatal complications were lower when using a HHHFNC than when using nasal continuous positive airway pressure (nCPAP), or nasal intermittent positive pressure ventilation. The rates of extubation failure during respiratory support were not different between patients who used HHHFNC and nCPAP. However, data from the use of HHHFNC as the initial respiratory support "after birth", particularly in extremely preterm infants, are lacking. Although the HHHFNC is efficacious and safe, large randomized controlled trials are needed before the HHHFNC can be considered an NIV standard, particularly for extremely preterm infants.

  5. Otic Barotrauma Resulting from Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Justin P.; Hildrew, Douglas M.; Lawlor, Claire M.; Guittard, Jesse A.; Worley, N. Knight

    2016-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a growing problem affecting millions of people in the United States. The prevalence of OSA has risen drastically in the past few decades concurrently with the increasing prevalence of obesity. Subsequently, there has been an ever-increasing rise in the use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) devices. While using CPAP devices may lead to many adverse effects, the majority of these effects are described as relatively benign. Case Report: We describe the detailed clinical course and outcome for a patient with otic barotrauma as a result of excessive self-titration of CPAP therapy in an in-home setting. We also discuss the pathophysiology of otic barotrauma and present a review of current literature on the topic. Conclusion: While the benefits of CPAP are clear, we must take into account the rare but possible effects on ear structure and function. Many studies describe an increase in middle ear pressure with the use of CPAP, but few describe the effects of this increased pressure on the middle ear, such as the otic barotrauma described in this case. Given the increased prevalence of OSA, it is important to understand the risks associated with CPAP therapy. PMID:27303224

  6. The effect of continuous positive airway pressure on metabolic variables in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea.

    PubMed

    Schlatzer, Christian; Schwarz, Esther I; Kohler, Malcolm

    2014-02-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is increasingly considered as a risk factor for metabolic disturbances, such as diabetes mellitus or dyslipidaemia. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy, the standard treatment for patients with OSA, may improve various metabolic variables, such as insulin sensitivity, glucose metabolism, lipids, fat distribution and adipokines. Several observational and uncontrolled clinical studies claim an improvement of these metabolic variables through the use of CPAP. However, there is only a limited number of clinical randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the effect of CPAP on metabolic variables. In this review, we summarise and discuss non-randomised studies and RCTs evaluating the effect of CPAP on metabolic variables in patients with OSA. In summary, the currently available body of evidence does not support a clinically important effect of CPAP treatment on any of the investigated metabolic variables. However, some investigators found small, but statistically significant changes in some metabolic variables, thus beneficial effects of CPAP treatment in selected patient cohorts cannot be excluded. To answer this question, more data from RCTs with well-defined study populations are warranted.

  7. Controlled trial of continuous positive airway pressure given by face mask for hyaline membrane disease.

    PubMed Central

    Allen, L P; Reynolds, E R; Rivers, R P; Le Souëf, P M; Wimberley, P D

    1977-01-01

    A controlled trial of elective intervention with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was performed on 24 infants with hyaline membrane disease whose arterial oxygen tension (Pao2) fell below 8kPa (60 mmHg) while they were breathing a fractional inspired oxygen concentration (F1O2) greater than 0.60. A face mask was used to apply the CPAP. The progress of the 12 infants who were treated on entry to the trial was compared with that of 12 infants who were treated later. All 12 infants in the early-intervention group and 8 infants in the late-intervention group survived. When CPAP was started, Pao2 increased and the early-treated infants breathed high concentrations of oxygen for a shorter period than the late-treated infants. The 4 infants in the early-intervention group who required mechanical ventilation needed lower mean airway pressures to achieve satisfactory gas exchange than the 7 ventilated infants in the late-intervention group. We conclude that a Pao2 less than 8 kPa while breathing an F1o2 greater than 0.60 is an adequate indication for giving CPAP in hyaline membrane disease, and that early intervention with CPAP allows infants who go on to require mechanical ventilation to be ventilated at lower pressures. PMID:326199

  8. Tobacco industry litigation position on addiction: continued dependence on past views.

    PubMed

    Henningfield, Jack E; Rose, Christine A; Zeller, Mitch

    2006-12-01

    This paper reviews the tobacco industry's litigation strategy for addressing the addiction issue through trial testimony by its experts, and opening and closing statements by its lawyers. Despite the fact that several companies now claim to accept, in varying degrees, the conclusions of the Surgeon General concerning tobacco addiction, the tobacco industry litigation strategy pertaining to addiction is essentially unchanged since that of the early 1980s when the issue emerged as crucial. The industry uses its experts and the process of cross-examination of plaintiff's experts to imply that the addictiveness of tobacco and nicotine are more comparable to substances such as caffeine, chocolate, and even milk, than to heroin, cocaine and alcohol. Furthermore, the tobacco industry contends that the definition of addiction has now become so broadened as to include carrots and caffeine and hence that any concurrence that smoking is addictive, does not imply that cigarettes are addictive to the standards that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are addictive. Finally, the industry has continuously asserted that tobacco users assumed the risks of tobacco since they understood that quitting could be difficult when they began to use, and moreover, that the main barrier to cessation is lack of desire or motivation to quit and not physical addiction. These positions have been maintained through the 2004-2005 US Government litigation that was ongoing as the time of this writing.

  9. Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment for Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Implications for Future Interventions

    PubMed Central

    Weaver, Terri E.; Sawyer, Amy M.

    2010-01-01

    Adherence to continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is a critical problem with adherence rates ranging from 30–60%. Poor adherence to CPAP is widely recognized as a significant limiting factor in treating OSA, reducing the overall effectiveness of the treatment and leaving many OSA patients at heightened risk for comorbid conditions, impaired function and quality of life. The extant literature examining adherence to CPAP provides critical insight to measuring adherence outcomes, defining optimal adherence levels, and predicting CPAP adherence. This research has revealed salient factors that are associated with or predict CPAP adherence and may guide the development of interventions to promote CPAP adherence. Over the past 10 years, intervention studies to promote CPAP adherence have incorporated a multitude of strategies including education, support, cognitive behavioral approaches, and mixed strategies. This review of the current state of science of CPAP adherence will (1) synthesize the extant literature with regard to measuring, defining, and predicting CPAP adherence, (2) review published intervention studies aimed at promoting CPAP adherence, and (3) suggest directions for future empiric study of adherence to CPAP that will have implications for translational science. Our current understanding of CPAP adherence suggests that adherence is a multi-factorial, complex clinical problem that requires similarly designed approaches to effectively address poor CPAP adherence in the OSA population. PMID:20308750

  10. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device Time to Procurement in a Disadvantaged Population.

    PubMed

    DelRosso, Lourdes M; Hoque, Romy; Chesson, Andrew L

    2015-01-01

    Introduction. The management of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in patients who cannot afford a continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device is challenging. In this study we compare time to CPAP procurement in three groups of patients diagnosed with OSA: uninsured subsidized by a humanitarian grant (Group 1), uninsured unsubsidized (Group 2), and those with Medicare or Medicaid (Group 3). We evaluate follow-up and adherence in Group 1. We hypothesize that additional factors, rather than just the ability to obtain CPAP, may uniquely affect follow-up and adherence in uninsured patients. Methods. 30 patients were in Groups 1 and 2, respectively. 12 patients were in Group 3. Time of CPAP procurement from OSA diagnosis to CPAP initiation was assessed in all groups. CPAP adherence data was collected for Group 1 patients at 1, 3, 6, and 9 months. Results. There were no significant differences between groups in gender, age, body mass index, or apnea hypopnea index. The mean time to procurement in Group 1 was shorter compared to Group 2 but not significant. Compared to both Group 1 and Group 2, Group 3 patients had significantly shorter times to device procurement. Conclusion. Time to procurement of CPAP was significantly shorter in those with Medicaid/Medicare insurance compared to the uninsured.

  11. Tobacco industry litigation position on addiction: continued dependence on past views

    PubMed Central

    Henningfield, Jack E; Rose, Christine A; Zeller, Mitch

    2006-01-01

    This paper reviews the tobacco industry's litigation strategy for addressing the addiction issue through trial testimony by its experts, and opening and closing statements by its lawyers. Despite the fact that several companies now claim to accept, in varying degrees, the conclusions of the Surgeon General concerning tobacco addiction, the tobacco industry litigation strategy pertaining to addiction is essentially unchanged since that of the early 1980s when the issue emerged as crucial. The industry uses its experts and the process of cross‐examination of plaintiff's experts to imply that the addictiveness of tobacco and nicotine are more comparable to substances such as caffeine, chocolate, and even milk, than to heroin, cocaine and alcohol. Furthermore, the tobacco industry contends that the definition of addiction has now become so broadened as to include carrots and caffeine and hence that any concurrence that smoking is addictive, does not imply that cigarettes are addictive to the standards that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are addictive. Finally, the industry has continuously asserted that tobacco users assumed the risks of tobacco since they understood that quitting could be difficult when they began to use, and moreover, that the main barrier to cessation is lack of desire or motivation to quit and not physical addiction. These positions have been maintained through the 2004–2005 US Government litigation that was ongoing as the time of this writing. PMID:17130621

  12. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy balance regulation: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Ari

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is both a cause and a possible consequence of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), as OSA seems to affect parameters involved in energy balance regulation, including food intake, hormonal regulation of hunger/satiety, energy metabolism and physical activity. It is known that weight loss improves OSA, yet it remains unclear why continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) often results in weight gain. The goal of this systematic review is to explore if and how CPAP affects the behaviour and/or metabolism involved in regulating energy balance. CPAP appears to correct for a hormonal profile characterised by abnormally high leptin and ghrelin levels in OSA, by reducing the circulating levels of each. This is expected to reduce excess food intake. However, reliable measures of food intake are lacking, and not yet sufficient to make conclusions. Although studies are limited and inconsistent, CPAP may alter energy metabolism, with reports of reductions in resting metabolic rate or sleeping metabolic rate. CPAP appears to not have an appreciable effect on altering physical activity levels. More work is needed to characterise how CPAP affects energy balance regulation. It is clear that promoting CPAP in conjunction with other weight loss approaches should be used to encourage optimal outcomes in OSA patients. PMID:27824596

  13. Alternative methods of titrating continuous positive airway pressure: a large multicenter study.

    PubMed

    Masa, Juan F; Jiménez, Antonio; Durán, Joaquín; Capote, Francisco; Monasterio, Carmen; Mayos, Mercedes; Terán, Joaquín; Hernández, Lourdes; Barbé, Ferrán; Maimó, Andrés; Rubio, Manuela; Montserrat, José M

    2004-12-01

    Standard practice for continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment in sleep apnea and hypopnea syndrome (SAHS) requires pressure titration during attended laboratory polysomnography. However, polysomnographic titration is expensive and time-consuming. The aim of this study was to ascertain, in a large sample of CPAP-naive patients, whether CPAP titration performed by an unattended domiciliary autoadjusted CPAP device or with a predicted formula was as effective as CPAP titration performed by full polysomnography. The main outcomes were the apnea-hypopnea index and the subjective daytime sleepiness. We included 360 patients with SAHS requiring CPAP treatment. Patients were randomly allocated into three groups: standard, autoadjusted, and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment. The follow-up period was 12 weeks. With CPAP treatment, the improvement in subjective sleepiness and apnea-hypopnea index was very similar in the three groups. There were no differences in the objective compliance of CPAP treatment and in the dropout rate of the three groups at the end of the follow-up. Autoadjusted titration at home and predicted formula titration with domiciliary adjustment can replace standard titration. These procedures could lead to considerable savings in cost and to significant reductions in the waiting list.

  14. Chondrosarcoma of the nasal septum

    PubMed Central

    Bahgat, Mohammed; Bahgat, Yassin; Bahgat, Ahmed; Elwany, Yasmine

    2012-01-01

    Chondrosarcoma of the nasal septum is a rare malignancy. When it occurs, early diagnosis is difficult because patients generally present with common, non-specific sinonasal complaints. This is the report of a 62-year-old woman who presented with a 1-month history of nasal obstruction, headache and anosmia. Nasal endoscopy showed a nasal mass obstructing both nasal cavities not separable from the septum. A wedge biopsy of the nasal mass was taken. Histopathology was suggestive of chondrosarcoma. The tumour was removed by an endoscopic approach. The clinical presentation, diagnosis and treatment of this case as well as a review of the literature are discussed. PMID:22669930

  15. Triclosan promotes Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization.

    PubMed

    Syed, Adnan K; Ghosh, Sudeshna; Love, Nancy G; Boles, Blaise R

    2014-04-08

    The biocide triclosan is used in many personal care products, including toothpastes, soaps, clothing, and medical equipment. Consequently, it is present as a contaminant in the environment and has been detected in some human fluids, including serum, urine, and milk. Staphylococcus aureus is an opportunistic pathogen that colonizes the noses and throats of approximately 30% of the population. Colonization with S. aureus is known to be a risk factor for several types of infection. Here we demonstrate that triclosan is commonly found in the nasal secretions of healthy adults and the presence of triclosan trends positively with nasal colonization by S. aureus. We demonstrate that triclosan can promote the binding of S. aureus to host proteins such as collagen, fibronectin, and keratin, as well as inanimate surfaces such as plastic and glass. Lastly, triclosan-exposed rats are more susceptible to nasal colonization with S. aureus. These data reveal a novel factor that influences the ability of S. aureus to bind surfaces and alters S. aureus nasal colonization. IMPORTANCE Triclosan has been used as a biocide for over 40 years, but the broader effects that it has on the human microbiome have not been investigated. We demonstrate that triclosan is present in nasal secretions of a large portion of a test population and its presence correlates with Staphylococcus aureus nasal colonization. Triclosan also promotes the binding of S. aureus to human proteins and increases the susceptibility of rats to nasal colonization by S. aureus. These findings are significant because S. aureus colonization is a known risk factor for the development of several types of infections. Our data demonstrate the unintended consequences of unregulated triclosan use and contribute to the growing body of research demonstrating inadvertent effects of triclosan on the environment and human health.

  16. Continuous positive airway pressure for bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward; a feasibility study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is commonly used to relieve respiratory distress in infants with bronchiolitis, but has mostly been studied in an intensive care setting. Our prime aim was to evaluate the feasibility of CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis in a general paediatric ward, and secondary to assess capillary PCO2 (cPCO2) levels before and during treatment. Methods From May 1st 2008 to April 30th 2012, infants with bronchiolitis at Stavanger University Hospital were treated with CPAP in a general paediatric ward, but could be referred to an intensive care unit (ICU) when needed, according to in-house guidelines. Levels of cPCO2 were prospectively registered before the start of CPAP and at approximately 4, 12, 24 and 48 hours of treatment as long as CPAP was given. We had a continuous updating program for the nurses and physicians caring for the infants with CPAP. The study was population based. Results 672 infants (3.4%) were hospitalized with bronchiolitis. CPAP was initiated in 53 infants (0.3%; 7.9% of infants with bronchiolitis), and was well tolerated in all but three infants. 46 infants were included in the study, the majority of these (n = 33) were treated in the general ward only. These infants had lower cPCO2 before treatment (8.0; 7.7, 8.6)(median; quartiles) than those treated at the ICU (n = 13) (9.3;8.5, 9.9) (p < 0.001). The level of cPCO2 was significantly reduced after 4 h in both groups; 1.1 kPa (paediatric ward) (p < 0.001) and 1.3 kPa (ICU) (p = 0.002). Two infants on the ICU did not respond to CPAP (increasing cPCO2 and severe apnoe) and were given mechanical ventilation, otherwise no side effects were observed in either group treated with CPAP. Conclusion Treatment with CPAP for infants with bronchiolitis may be feasible in a general paediatric ward, providing sufficient staffing and training, and the possibility of referral to an ICU when needed. PMID:24886569

  17. Prevalence of multidrug-resistant, coagulase-positive Staphylococcus aureus in nasal carriage, food, wastewater and paper currency in Jalandhar city (north-western), an Indian state of Punjab.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Harsh; Palaha, Rajdeep; Kaur, Navreet; Ratnakar, Wankhede Swapnil; Sodi, Aakanksha; Kaur, Manmeet; Katiyar, Richa; Sharma, Mamta; Kaur, Charanpreet; Kumar, Virendra

    2015-01-01

    Development of multidrug-resistant pattern in the bacterial community is a major threat to the society. Staphylococcus aureus is perhaps the pathogen of the greatest concern because of its inherent virulence, its ability to cause a diverse array of life-threatening situations and capacity to adapt to different environmental conditions. The aims of this study is to investigate the multidrug-resistant pattern of the coagulase-positive S. aureus isolated from nasal carriage, food, paper currency and wastewater samples. We had also studied the multiple antibiotic resistance index and in vitro production of β-lactamase. The study had found out 130 coagulase-positive S. aureus strains isolated from total of 595 samples such as anterior nares of preschool children (195), hospital nurses (100), drivers (76), food (86), wastewater (3) and paper currency (135) (Indian rupee). The biotypes pattern were as follows; A > D > B > C> UT. Multiple antibiotic resistance (MAR) value clearly defines the multidrug-resistant pattern of the S. aureus among different sources. Statistical analysis (one-way ANOVA) of results obtained indicated that the difference in the antibiotic resistance observed in the 130 bacterial isolates against the 23 different antibiotics used in this study was statically significant (p < 0.01).

  18. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-06-16

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection.

  19. Nasal commensal Staphylococcus epidermidis counteracts influenza virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui-Wen; Liu, Pei-Feng; Liu, Yu-Tsueng; Kuo, Sherwin; Zhang, Xing-Quan; Schooley, Robert T.; Rohde, Holger; Gallo, Richard L.; Huang, Chun-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Several microbes, including Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis), a Gram-positive bacterium, live inside the human nasal cavity as commensals. The role of these nasal commensals in host innate immunity is largely unknown, although bacterial interference in the nasal microbiome may promote ecological competition between commensal bacteria and pathogenic species. We demonstrate here that S. epidermidis culture supernatants significantly suppressed the infectivity of various influenza viruses. Using high-performance liquid chromatography together with mass spectrometry, we identified a giant extracellular matrix-binding protein (Embp) as the major component involved in the anti-influenza effect of S. epidermidis. This anti-influenza activity was abrogated when Embp was mutated, confirming that Embp is essential for S. epidermidis activity against viral infection. We also showed that both S. epidermidis bacterial particles and Embp can directly bind to influenza virus. Furthermore, the injection of a recombinant Embp fragment containing a fibronectin-binding domain into embryonated eggs increased the survival rate of virus-infected chicken embryos. For an in vivo challenge study, prior Embp intranasal inoculation in chickens suppressed the viral titres and induced the expression of antiviral cytokines in the nasal tissues. These results suggest that S. epidermidis in the nasal cavity may serve as a defence mechanism against influenza virus infection. PMID:27306590

  20. Obstructive sleep apnoea in the elderly: role of continuous positive airway pressure treatment.

    PubMed

    Martínez-García, Miguel Ángel; Chiner, Eusebi; Hernández, Luis; Cortes, Jose Pascual; Catalán, Pablo; Ponce, Silvia; Diaz, Jose Ramón; Pastor, Ester; Vigil, Laura; Carmona, Carmen; Montserrat, Josep Maria; Aizpuru, Felipe; Lloberes, Patricia; Mayos, Mercedes; Selma, Maria José; Cifuentes, Jose Fernando; Muñoz, Alvaro

    2015-07-01

    Almost all the information about the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) comes from clinical trials involving only middle-aged patients. The objective of this study was to assess the effect of CPAP treatment in elderly patients with severe OSA on clinical, quality-of-life and neurocognitive spheres. We performed an open-label, randomised, multicentre clinical trial in a consecutive clinical cohort of 224 elderly (≥70 years old) patients with confirmed severe OSA (apnoea-hypopnea index ≥30) randomised to receive CPAP (n=115) or no CPAP (n=109) for 3 months. A sleep study was performed by either full polysomnography or respiratory polygraphy. CPAP titration was performed by an autoCPAP device. The primary endpoint was quality of life (Quebec Sleep Questionnaire) and secondary endpoints included sleep-related symptoms, presence of anxiety/depression, office-based blood pressure and some neurocognitive tests. The mean±sd age was 75.5±3.9 years. The CPAP group achieved a greater improvement in all quality-of-life domains (p<0.001; effect size: 0.41-0.98), sleep-related symptoms (p<0.001; effect size 0.31-0.91) as well as anxiety (p=0.016; effect size 0.51) and depression (p<0.001; effect size: 0.28) indexes and some neurocognitive tests (digit symbol test (p=0.047; effect size: 0.20) and Trail Making Test A (p=0.029; effect size: 0.44)) in an intention-to-treat analysis. In conclusion, CPAP treatment resulted in an improvement in quality of life, sleep-related symptoms, anxiety and depression indexes and some neurocognitive aspects in elderly people with severe OSA.

  1. Randomised controlled crossover trial of humidified continuous positive airway pressure in mild obstructive sleep apnoea

    PubMed Central

    Marshall, N; Neill, A; Campbell, A; Sheppard, D

    2005-01-01

    Background: It is unclear whether continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP), the treatment of choice for severe obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), is effective at improving outcomes in mild OSA. Methods: To help define the role of humidified CPAP in mild OSA, a randomised crossover study was undertaken of patients with an apnoea hypopnoea index (AHI) of 5–30/hour. Subjective sleepiness, objective wakefulness, mood, reaction time, and quality of life were measured at baseline, after 3 weeks treatment with humidified CPAP and 3 weeks sham CPAP (2 week washout). Results: Twenty nine of 31 enrolled patients (age 25–67 years, seven women, mean (SD) body mass index 31.5 (6) kg/m2) completed the protocol. Humidified CPAP improved polysomnographic indices of OSA and Epworth Sleepiness Scale (2.4 points (95% CI 0.6 to 4.2)). Objective wakefulness (modified maintenance of wakefulness test) showed a trend towards improvement (5.2 minutes (95% CI –0.6 to 11)). Mood (Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), quality of life (SF 36, Functional Outcomes of Sleep Questionnaire), and reaction times (Psychomotor Vigilance Task) were not improved more than sham CPAP. Compliance with humidified and sham CPAP both averaged 4.9 hours/night. Placebo effects were evident in many outcomes and there was no clear treatment preference. Conclusions: Humidified CPAP improves subjective sleepiness and possibly objective wakefulness but not reaction times, quality of life, or mood. These results do not support the routine use of CPAP in all patients with mild OSA, but offers some support for the trialling of CPAP in those with severe sleepiness. PMID:15860720

  2. Effects of Use of a Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Device on Glaucoma

    PubMed Central

    Ulusoy, Seckin; Erden, Meltem; Dinc, Mehmet Emre; Yavuz, Nurdogan; Caglar, Erdem; Dalgic, Abdullah; Erdogan, Coskun

    2015-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of glaucoma in obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) and to determine the efficacy of the equipment used in the treatment of this disease. Material/Methods In this cross-sectional study, 38 patients with OSAS used the continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) device (Group 1) and 32 patients with OSAS refused CPAP device (Group 2). Thirty-six patients did not have OSAS (Group 3). Results Patient age, gender, height, weight, and neck circumference did not differ among groups (p>0.05); and the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) and respiratory disturbance index (RDI) values did not differ between Groups 1 and 2 (p>0.05). Vision and pachymetric values did not differ among groups (p>0.05). The IOP was significantly higher in Group 2 than in Group 1 (p<0.05) but did not differ between Groups 1 and 3 (p>0.05). The fundus C/D ratio was significantly higher (p<0.05) in Group 2 than in the other groups but did not differ between Groups 1 and 3 (p>0.05). In Group 1, 2, and 3, 5.2%, 12.5%, and 0%, respectively, of patients had glaucoma. Conclusions OSAS should be considered a significant risk factor for glaucoma. Eye tests may help to identify individuals with undiagnosed OSAS, and such testing of patients with diagnosed OSAS may allow early detection of glaucoma and referral of such patients for CPAP therapy to prevent development of complications. PMID:26547930

  3. Nasalance in Cochlear Implantees

    PubMed Central

    Sreedevi, N; Lepcha, Anjali; Mathew, John

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Speech intelligibility is severely affected in children with congenital profound hearing loss. Hypernasality is a problem commonly encountered in their speech. Auditory information received from cochlear implants is expected to be far superior to that from hearing aids. Our study aimed at comparing the percentages of nasality in the speech of the cochlear implantees with hearing aid users and also with children with normal hearing. Methods Three groups of subjects took part in the study. Groups I and II comprised 12 children each, in the age range of 4-10 years, with prelingual bilateral profound hearing loss, using multichannel cochlear implants and digital hearing aids respectively. Both groups had received at least one year of speech therapy intervention since cochlear implant surgery and hearing aid fitting respectively. The third group consisted of age-matched and sex-matched children with normal hearing. The subjects were asked to say a sentence which consisted of only oral sounds and no nasal sounds ("Buy baby a bib"). The nasalance score as a percentage was calculated. Results Statistical analysis revealed that the children using hearing aids showed a high percentage of nasalance in their speech. The cochlear implantees showed a lower percentage of nasalance compared to children using hearing aids, but did not match with their normal hearing peers. Conclusion The quality of speech of the cochlear implantees was superior to that of the hearing aid users, but did not match with the normal controls. The study suggests that acoustic variables still exist after cochlear implantation in children, with hearing impairments at deviant levels, which needs attention. Further research needs to be carried out to explore the effect of the age at implantation as a variable in reducing nasality in the speech and attaining normative values in cochlear implantees, and also between unilateral versus bilateral implantees. PMID:26330912

  4. Nasal spray flu vaccine (image)

    MedlinePlus

    The flu vaccine can also be administered as a nasal spray instead of the usual injection method. It can be ... the recombinant influenza vaccine (RIV). The nasal spray flu vaccine (live attenuated influenza vaccine or LAIV) should not ...

  5. Nasal reconstruction after epithelioma.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Camps, S

    2001-01-01

    In this paper we present our procedure for the treatment, histopathological diagnosis, and resection of skin cancer in the nasal pyramid and its subsequent reconstruction. Because we are dealing with the most important anatomical feature of the face our goal is an aesthetic reconstruction [2,4] according to the anatomical subunits criterion of Burget [3]. First, a histopathological diagnosis is made to determine the nature of the tumor. Then, we proceed with the resection according to the Mohs Micrographic Surgery [1,5,7]. Then we begin with the first step of the nasal reconstruction.

  6. Diastolic function and functional capacity after a single session of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with compensated heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Bussoni, Marjory Fernanda; Guirado, Gabriel Negretti; Matsubara, Luiz Shiguero; Roscani, Meliza Goi; Polegato, Bertha Furlan; Minamoto, Suzana Tanni; Bazan, Silméia Garcia Zanati; Matsubara, Beatriz Bojikian

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The effects of acute continuous positive airway pressure therapy on left ventricular diastolic function and functional capacity in patients with compensated systolic heart failure remain unclear. METHODS: This randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial included 43 patients with heart failure and a left ventricular ejection fraction <0.50 who were in functional classes I-III according to the New York Heart Association criteria. Twenty-three patients were assigned to continuous positive airway pressure therapy (10 cmH2O), while 20 patients received placebo with null pressure for 30 minutes. All patients underwent a 6-minute walk test (6MWT) and Doppler echocardiography before and immediately after intervention. Clinicaltrials.gov: NCT01088854. RESULTS: The groups had similar clinical and echocardiographic baseline variables. Variation in the diastolic function index (e′) after intervention was associated with differences in the distance walked in both groups. However, in the continuous positive airway pressure group, this difference was greater (continuous positive airway pressure group: Δ6MWT = 9.44+16.05×Δe′, p = 0.002; sham group: Δ6MWT = 7.49+5.38×Δe′; p = 0.015). There was a statistically significant interaction between e′ index variation and continuous positive airway pressure for the improvement of functional capacity (p = 0.020). CONCLUSIONS: Continuous positive airway pressure does not acurately change the echocardiographic indexes of left ventricle systolic or diastolic function in patients with compensated systolic heart failure. However, 30-minute continuous positive airway pressure therapy appears to have an effect on left ventricular diastolic function by increasing functional capacity. PMID:24838902

  7. Large rhinolith causing nasal obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Dincer Kose, Onur; Kose, Taha Emre; Erdem, Mehmet Ali; Cankaya, Abdulkadir Burak

    2015-01-01

    Rhinoliths are calcified masses located in the nasal cavity and may cause symptoms such as nasal obstruction, fetid odour and facial pain. They are usually diagnosed incidentally on radiographic examinations or depending on the symptoms. In this paper we report a 27-year-old Caucasian woman with a calcified mass in the right nasal cavity causing nasal obstruction, anosmia and facial pain. The calcified mass was removed by endonasal approach. PMID:25759270

  8. Nasalance Norms in Greek Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okalidou, Areti; Karathanasi, Asimina; Grigoraki, Eleni

    2011-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to derive nasalance norms for monolingual Greek speakers, to examine nasalance scores as a function of gender and to draw cross-linguistic comparisons based on normative data. Participants read aloud a corpus of linguistic material, consisting of (1) a nasal text, an oral text and a balanced text; (2) a set of nasal…

  9. Nasal obstruction and human communication.

    PubMed

    Malinoff, R; Moreno, C

    1989-04-01

    Nasal obstruction may cause a variety of communication disorders, particularly in children. The effects of nasal obstruction on hearing, speech, language, and voice are examined. Methods for assessing the effects of nasal obstruction are delineated, and recommendations for therapeutic interventions are described.

  10. Learning from Public Television and the Web: Positioning Continuing Education as a Knowledge Portal.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vedro, Steven R.

    1999-01-01

    Digital convergence--the merging of television and computing--challenges localized monopolies of public television and continuing education. Continuing educators can reposition themselves in the electronic marketplace by serving as an educational portal, bringing their strengths of "brand recognition," local customer base, and access to…

  11. Cost-effectiveness of Out-of-Hospital Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Acute Respiratory Failure

    PubMed Central

    Thokala, Praveen; Goodacre, Steve; Ward, Matt; Penn-Ashman, Jerry; Perkins, Gavin D.

    2015-01-01

    Study objective We determine the cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) compared with standard care for adults presenting to emergency medical services with acute respiratory failure. Methods We developed an economic model using a United Kingdom health care system perspective to compare the costs and health outcomes of out-of-hospital CPAP to standard care (inhospital noninvasive ventilation) when applied to a hypothetical cohort of patients with acute respiratory failure. The model assigned each patient a probability of intubation or death, depending on the patient’s characteristics and whether he or she had out-of-hospital CPAP or standard care. The patients who survived accrued lifetime quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) and health care costs according to their age and sex. Costs were accrued through intervention and hospital treatment costs, which depended on patient outcomes. All results were converted into US dollars, using the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development purchasing power parities rates. Results Out-of-hospital CPAP was more effective than standard care but was also more expensive, with an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio of £20,514 per QALY ($29,720/QALY) and a 49.5% probability of being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold. The probability of out-of-hospital CPAP’s being cost-effective at the £20,000 per QALY ($29,000/QALY) threshold depended on the incidence of eligible patients and varied from 35.4% when a low estimate of incidence was used to 93.8% with a high estimate. Variation in the incidence of eligible patients also had a marked influence on the expected value of sample information for a future randomized trial. Conclusion The cost-effectiveness of out-of-hospital CPAP is uncertain. The incidence of patients eligible for out-of-hospital CPAP appears to be the key determinant of cost-effectiveness. PMID:25737210

  12. Cromolyn Sodium Nasal Solution

    MedlinePlus

    Cromolyn comes as a solution to use with a special nasal applicator. It usually is inhaled three to six times a day to prevent allergy ... first time, read the instructions provided with the solution. Ask your doctor, pharmacist, or respiratory therapist to ...

  13. Ciclesonide Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Wash the dust cap and applicator with warm water. Dry and replace the applicator and press down and release the pump one time or until you see a fine spray. Replace the dust cap. Do not use pins or other sharp objects in the tiny spray hole on the nasal applicator to remove the blockage. ...

  14. Oxymetazoline Nasal Spray

    MedlinePlus

    ... Rinse the tip of the dispenser with hot water or wipe it clean after you use it.Follow the directions for using the nasal spray that appear on the package label. If you are using a product that comes in a pump dispenser, press down on the rim several times ...

  15. Measuring and Characterizing the Human Nasal Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Kahana-Zweig, Roni; Geva-Sagiv, Maya; Weissbrod, Aharon; Secundo, Lavi; Soroker, Nachum; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Nasal airflow is greater in one nostril than in the other because of transient asymmetric nasal passage obstruction by erectile tissue. The extent of obstruction alternates across nostrils with periodicity referred to as the nasal cycle. The nasal cycle is related to autonomic arousal and is indicative of asymmetry in brain function. Moreover, alterations in nasal cycle periodicity have been linked to various diseases. There is therefore need for a tool allowing continuous accurate measurement and recording of airflow in each nostril separately. Here we provide detailed instructions for constructing such a tool at minimal cost and effort. We demonstrate application of the tool in 33 right-handed healthy subjects, and derive several statistical measures for nasal cycle characterization. Using these measures applied to 24-hour recordings we observed that: 1: subjects spent slightly longer in left over right nostril dominance (left = 2.63 ± 0.89 hours, right = 2.17 ± 0.89 hours, t(32) = 2.07, p < 0.05), 2: cycle duration was shorter in wake than in sleep (wake = 2.02 ± 1.7 hours, sleep = 4.5 ± 1.7 hours, (t(30) = 5.73, p < 0.0001). 3: slower breathing was associated with a more powerful cycle (the extent of difference across nostrils) (r = 0.4, p < 0.0001), and 4: the cycle was influenced by body posture such that lying on one side was associated with greater flow in the contralateral nostril (p < 0.002). Finally, we provide evidence for an airflow cycle in each nostril alone. These results provide characterization of an easily obtained measure that may have diagnostic implications for neurological disease and cognitive state. PMID:27711189

  16. Measuring and Characterizing the Human Nasal Cycle.

    PubMed

    Kahana-Zweig, Roni; Geva-Sagiv, Maya; Weissbrod, Aharon; Secundo, Lavi; Soroker, Nachum; Sobel, Noam

    2016-01-01

    Nasal airflow is greater in one nostril than in the other because of transient asymmetric nasal passage obstruction by erectile tissue. The extent of obstruction alternates across nostrils with periodicity referred to as the nasal cycle. The nasal cycle is related to autonomic arousal and is indicative of asymmetry in brain function. Moreover, alterations in nasal cycle periodicity have been linked to various diseases. There is therefore need for a tool allowing continuous accurate measurement and recording of airflow in each nostril separately. Here we provide detailed instructions for constructing such a tool at minimal cost and effort. We demonstrate application of the tool in 33 right-handed healthy subjects, and derive several statistical measures for nasal cycle characterization. Using these measures applied to 24-hour recordings we observed that: 1: subjects spent slightly longer in left over right nostril dominance (left = 2.63 ± 0.89 hours, right = 2.17 ± 0.89 hours, t(32) = 2.07, p < 0.05), 2: cycle duration was shorter in wake than in sleep (wake = 2.02 ± 1.7 hours, sleep = 4.5 ± 1.7 hours, (t(30) = 5.73, p < 0.0001). 3: slower breathing was associated with a more powerful cycle (the extent of difference across nostrils) (r = 0.4, p < 0.0001), and 4: the cycle was influenced by body posture such that lying on one side was associated with greater flow in the contralateral nostril (p < 0.002). Finally, we provide evidence for an airflow cycle in each nostril alone. These results provide characterization of an easily obtained measure that may have diagnostic implications for neurological disease and cognitive state.

  17. The Effect of the Treatment with Heated Humidified High-Flow Nasal Cannula on Neonatal Respiratory Distress Syndrome in China: A Single-Center Experience

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ge; Huang, Xiao-qiu; Zhao, Hui-hui; Jin, Guo-Xing

    2017-01-01

    Background. Noninvasive respiratory support is considered the optimal method of providing assistance to preterm babies with breathing problems, including nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP) and humidified high flow nasal cannula (HHHFNC). The evidence of the efficacy and safety of HHHFNC used as the primary respiratory support for respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) is insufficient in low- and middle-income countries. Objective. To investigate the effect of heated humidified high flow nasal cannula on neonatal respiratory distress syndrome compared with nasal continuous positive airway pressure. Methods. An observational cross-sectional study was performed at a tertiary neonatal intensive care unit in suburban Wenzhou, China, in the period between January 2014 and December 2015. Results. A total of 128 infants were enrolled in the study: 65 in the HHHFNC group and 63 in the NCPAP group. The respiratory support with HHHFNC was similar to that with NCPAP with regard to the primary outcome. There is no significant difference between two groups in secondary outcomes. Comparing with NCPAP group, the incidence of nasal damage was lower in HHHFNC group. Conclusions. HHHFNC is an effective and well-tolerated strategy as the primary treatment of mild to moderate RDS in preterm infants older than 28 weeks of GA. PMID:28167860

  18. Correlation between Objective and Subjective Assessment of Nasal Patency

    PubMed Central

    Mozzanica, Francesco; Gera, Roberto; Bulgheroni, Chiara; Ambrogi, Federico; Schindler, Antonio; Ottaviani, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: This study was performed to evaluate the correlation between the objective and subjective sensation of nasal patency, assessed through a validated questionnaire, the Italian version of the NOSE scale, and the rhinomanometric results in a large cohort of patients complaining about nasal obstruction. Materials and Methods: Data was obtained from a total of 233 adult patients, (123 males, 110 females, with a mean age of 43.7 years) with a diagnosis of septal deviation and complaining about nasal obstruction. Anterior active rhinomanometry was used for objective assessment, while the I-NOSE scale and a visual analog scale (VAS) were used for subjective evaluation. Results: Positive correlations between I-NOSE scores and VAS and rhinomanometric results were found. The higher correlation was demonstrated between the HUNR (higher unilateral nasal resistance) parameter of rhinomanometry and the second item of the I-NOSE scale (Nasal blockage or obstruction). No significant correlation was found between the fourth item of the I-NOSE (Trouble sleeping) and the VAS score. The VAS score appeared mildly, but still significantly, correlated with the HUNR parameter of rhinomanometry. Conclusion: The correlation between the subjective sensation of nasal patency and the rhinomanometric data proved to be significant. No correlation between subjective sensation of trouble sleeping and rhinomanometric assessment was found. In counselling with patients complaining of nasal obstruction trouble in sleeping should not be considered as a symptom related to nasal obstruction. PMID:27738607

  19. Lgr5 regulates the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan-Qiang; Li, Peng; Zhang, Feng-Qin; Sun, Shao-Jun; Cao, Yin-Guang

    2016-12-09

    Nasal respiratory epithelium is a ciliated pseudostratified columnar epithelium. The cellular components of nasal respiratory epithelium include ciliated cells, goblet cells, and basal cells. Until now, our knowledge in the development of nasal respiratory epithelium is still limited and the cellular mechanism of regeneration is still elusive. In this study, we found that adult stem cell marker leucine-rich repeat-containing G-protein coupled receptor 5 (Lgr5) is expressed in the mice nasal respiratory epithelium. Both immunostaining and lineage tracing analysis indicated Lgr5 positive cells in the nasal respiratory epithelium are proliferative stem/progenitor cells. Using the Rosa-Tdtomato and Rosa26-DTR mice, we elucidated that Lgr5(+) cells participate in the regeneration of lesioned nasal respiratory epithelium, and this group of cells is necessary in the process of epithelium recovery. Using the in vitro culture system, we observed the formation of spheres from Lgr5(+) cells and these spheres have the capacity to generate other types of cells. Above all, this study reported a group of previously unidentified progenitor/stem cells in nasal respiratory epithelium, unveiling the potential cellular mechanism in nasal respiratory epithelium regeneration.

  20. Cosmetic Concerns Related to the Posttraumatic Nose without Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Farrior, Edward H; Eisler, Lindsay S

    2015-06-01

    Because of its prominent position on the facial skeleton, the nose is commonly injured. Though significant trauma can result in nasal obstruction, there is also considerable concern for potential cosmetic deformity. Repairing traumatic deformities is complex and can involve all aspects of the nose, including the bony and cartilaginous framework as well as the soft tissue envelope. Trauma can result in deflection, asymmetry, and deformity of the bony nasal dorsum, midvault, and nasal tip. Any serious nasal trauma places patients at risk for complications that may include nasal septal hematoma, septal perforation, and possible cerebral spinal fluid leak. Unrecognized or untreated septal hematomas can result in cartilaginous septal necrosis followed by saddle nose deformity. Though damage to structural scaffolding is often the cause of cosmetic deformity following nasal trauma, the nasal soft tissue envelope is also commonly affected. This can result in lacerations, avulsions, and traumatic tattooing. The following will discuss the evaluation, diagnosis, and management of these cosmetic concerns relating to nasal trauma.

  1. [Post-traumatic aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery. A rarity following blunt trauma].

    PubMed

    Schuldt, T

    2010-12-01

    We report the case of a 69-year-old male patient who appeared in our clinic with persistent swelling on the right middle nasal bridge of 3 months' standing following blunt trauma. On physical examination the swelling was pulsatile and a flow was identified on color Doppler sonography. MRT of the head demonstrated an aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery. We treated the aneurysm in an open surgical procedure under local anaesthesia. Due to the superficial position of this artery, open injuries are common after blunt nasal trauma. Some cases of aneurysm of the temporal artery have been described. Aneurysm of the dorsal nasal artery is a rare result of nasal trauma.

  2. Positive Affect Relevant to Epistemic Curiosity to Reflect Continuance Intention to Join a Hands-On Making Contest

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hong, Jon-Chao; Hwang, Ming-Yueh; Szeto, Elson; Tai, Kai-Hsin; Tsai, Chi-Ruei

    2016-01-01

    Hands-on making (e.g., "Maker") has become prevalent in current educational settings. To understand the role that students' epistemic curiosity plays in hands-on making contests, this study explored its correlation to students' positive affect and continuance intention to participate in a hands-on making contest called…

  3. Nasal reconstruction with articulated irradiated rib cartilage

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, C.S.; Cook, T.A.; Guida, R.A. )

    1991-03-01

    Nasal structural reconstruction is a formidable task in cases where there is loss of support to both the nasal dorsum and tip. A multitude of surgical approaches and materials have been used for the correction of the saddle-nose deformity with varying degrees of success. Articulated irradiated rib cartilage inserted through an external rhinoplasty approach was used to reconstruct nasal deformities in 18 patients over a 6-year period. Simultaneous use of a midline forehead flap to reconstruct the overlying soft tissue was required in four cases. Follow-up ranged from 1 to 6 years (mean, 2.8 years). Results were rewarding in most cases with marked improvement in nasal support and airway. Revision and/or replacement secondary to trauma or warping of the graft was required in four cases. None of the patients exhibited infection, extrusion, or noticeable resorption. A description of the surgical technique, review of all the cases, and recommendation for continued use of this graft material are discussed.

  4. Control system to reduce the effects of friction in drive trains of continuous-path-positioning systems. [Patent application

    DOEpatents

    Green, W.L.

    1980-12-01

    An improved continuous-path-positioning servo-control system is provided for reducing the effects of friction arising at very low cutting speeds in the drive trains of numerically controlled cutting machines, and the like. The improvement comprises a feed forward network for altering the gain of the servo-control loop at low positioning velocities to prevent stick-slip movement of the cutting tool holder being positioned by the control system. The feed forward network shunts conventional lag-compensators in the control loop, or loops, so that the error signal used for positioning varies linearly when the value is small, but being limited for larger values. Thus, at higher positioning speeds there is little effect of the added component upon the control being achieved.

  5. Geoscience Australia Continuous Global Positioning System (CGPS) Station Field Campaign Report

    SciTech Connect

    Ruddick, R.; Twilley, B.

    2016-03-01

    This station formed part of the Australian Regional GPS Network (ARGN) and South Pacific Regional GPS Network (SPRGN), which is a network of continuous GPS stations operating within Australia and its Territories (including Antarctica) and the Pacific. These networks support a number of different science applications including maintenance of the Geospatial Reference Frame, both national and international, continental and tectonic plate motions, sea level rise, and global warming.

  6. Recodifications of Academic Positions and Reiterations of Desire: Change but Continuity in Gendered Subjectivities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lapping, Claudia

    2006-01-01

    This article argues that the analysis of changes in the social position of women needs to distinguish between levels of social practice and psychic subjectification. The argument draws on Lacan's conception of the relationship between subjectivity, desire and sexual difference to describe gendered aspects of subjectivity embedded within the…

  7. The European positional paper on rhinosinusitis and nasal polyps: has the introduction of guidance on the management of sinus disease affected uptake of surgery and acute admissions for sinusitis?

    PubMed

    Cosway, Ben; Tomkinson, Alun; Owens, David

    2013-03-01

    Rhinosinusitis is a common condition with adults experiencing 2-5 episodes per year. The European Positional Paper on Rhinosinusitis and Nasal Polyps (EP3OS) published in 2005 and updated in 2007 provided evidence-based guidelines on the management of sinus disease promoting a conservative approach to treatment. This study examines the effect of EP3OS on sinus surgery uptake and acute admissions for sinusitis in England and Wales. A retrospective study using the national electronic health databases of England (Hospital Episodes Statistics, HES online) and Wales (Patient Episodes Database of Wales, PEDW) was undertaken from 2000 to 2010 using the OPCS-4 codes E12-E17 (sinus surgery) and ICD10 code J01 (acute admission for sinusitis). Data were analysed for effect following the introduction of the EP3OS in 2005 using linear regression and Chi squared analysis. 116,370 sinus procedures and 10,916 acute admissions for sinusitis were made during the study period. No significant decrease in sinus surgery procedures occurred following the introduction of the EP3OS as may have been expected (p > 0.05), although subgroup analysis suggested a significant increase in Wales (p < 0.05). In addition, significant increases in acute admissions for sinusitis were observed following the introduction of EP3OS (p < 0.05). However, subgroup analysis suggested this was not the case in Wales (p > 0.05). The EP3OS appears to have had little impact on the rates of sinus surgery but more conservative approaches to managing of sinus disease may have led to an increase in acute admissions. Further research is required to investigate whether changes in practice were adopted.

  8. Some acoustic features of nasal and nasalized vowels: a target for vowel nasalization.

    PubMed

    Feng, G; Castelli, E

    1996-06-01

    In order to characterize acoustic properties of nasal and nasalized vowels, these sounds will be considered as a dynamic trend from an oral configuration toward an [n]-like configuration. The latter can be viewed as a target for vowel nasalization. This target corresponds to the pharyngonasal tract and it can be modeled, with some simplifications, by a single tract without any parallel paths. Thus the first two resonance frequencies (at about 300 and 1000 Hz) characterize this target well. A series of measurements has been carried out in order to describe the acoustic characteristics of the target. Measured transfer functions confirm the resonator nature of the low-frequency peak. The introduction of such a target allows the conception of the nasal vowels as a trend beginning with a simple configuration, which is terminated in the same manner, so allowing the complex nasal phenomena to be bounded. A complete study of pole-zero evolutions for the nasalization of the 11 French vowels is presented. It allows the proposition of a common strategy for the nasalization of all vowels, so a true nasal vowel can be placed in this nasalization frame. The measured transfer functions for several French nasal vowels are also given.

  9. Is a Bioprosthetic Valve in the Aortic Position Desirable with a Continuous Flow LVAD?

    PubMed

    Doi, Atsuo; Marasco, Silvana F; McGiffin, David C

    2015-05-01

    Commissural fusion of the native aortic valve in a patient with a continuous flow left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is a known phenomenon. This may result in aortic insufficiency (AI) leading to symptomatic heart failure. In patients with AI at the time of LVAD implantation, repairing, or replacing the aortic valve is advisable. We describe a patient who had a severe dilated cardiomyopathy and moderate AI who underwent implantation of an LVAD and aortic valve replacement with a bioprosthesis that subsequently developed commissural fusion which was found at the time of heart transplantation. This case highlights the conundrum of the management of AI in patients requiring LVAD support.

  10. Continuous wavelength tunable laser source with optimum positioning of pivot axis for grating

    DOEpatents

    Pushkarsky, Michael; Amone, David F.

    2010-06-08

    A laser source (10) for generating a continuously wavelength tunable light (12) includes a gain media (16), an optical output coupler (36F), a cavity collimator (38A), a diffraction grating (30), a grating beam (54), and a beam attacher (56). The diffraction grating (30) is spaced apart from the cavity collimator (38A) and the grating (30) cooperates with the optical output coupler (36F) to define an external cavity (32). The grating (30) includes a grating face surface (42A) that is in a grating plane (42B). The beam attacher (56) retains the grating beam (54) and allows the grating beam (54) and the grating (30) to effectively pivot about a pivot axis (33) that is located approximately at an intersection of a pivot plane (50) and the grating plane (42B). As provided herein, the diffraction grating (30) can be pivoted about the unique pivot axis (33) to move the diffraction grating (30) relative to the gain media (16) to continuously tune the lasing frequency of the external cavity (32) and the wavelength of the output light (12) so that the output light (12) is mode hop free.

  11. Positioning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conone, Ruth M.

    The key to positioning is the creation of a clear benefit image in the consumer's mind. One positioning strategy is creating in the prospect's mind a position that takes into consideration the company's or agency's strengths and weaknesses as well as those of its competitors. Another strategy is to gain entry into a position ladder owned by…

  12. Craniofacial Deviations in the Children With Nasal Obstruction.

    PubMed

    Ant, Ayca; Kemaloglu, Yusuf Kemal; Yilmaz, Metin; Dilci, Alper

    2017-01-20

    Nasal obstruction mainly caused by adenoid hypertrophy in children affects the craniofacial growth and development process, and the craniofacial deviations and/or differences reported in the children are very similar to those in the adults with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS). The authors aimed to look for relationships of the linear craniofacial dimensions in the children suffering from nasal obstruction with age, degree of clinical nasal obstruction score (CNOS), and relative size of the adenoid mass within the nasopharynx in their study.Fifty-five children suffering from nasal obstruction were retrospectively enrolled, and clinical data was used to calculate CNOS. On the lateral cephalometric radiographies, 9 linear variables were measured and adenoidal-nasopharyngeal ratio (ANR) was calculated.The data presented that, not CNOS, but ANR shown decrease by age, while many skeletal variables with exception of the nasopharyngeal and adenoidal postero-anterior dimensions were increased by age. Further, it was found that while CNOS were negatively correlated with the anterior cranial base length, anterior-superior facial height, and maxillary depth, ANR disclosed significant correlation only with the anteriorsuperior facial height. The authors' results support that nasal obstruction in the children was related not only to the adenoidal hypertrophy. Although relative size of the adenoidal mass in relation to the nasopharynx decreased by age, nasal obstruction was still present. Further, these results support that craniofacial deviations and/or differences in the children with nasal obstruction is similar to the adult OSAS patients. Smaller dimensions related to the naso-maxillary complex in the children with more severe nasal obstruction appear to be continuous by age. Hence, it could be said that narrow naso-maxillary complex could contribute to proceed nasal obstruction by age, which may contribute to OSAS in the adults.

  13. Concordance of nasal and diabetic foot ulcer staphylococcal colonization

    PubMed Central

    Haleem, Ambar; Schultz, Jonathan S.; Heilmann, Kristopher P.; Dohrn, Cassie L.; Diekema, Daniel J.; Gardner, Sue E.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus (SA) is an important risk factor for surgical site infections. The goal of this study was to investigate the concordance between nasal and diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) SA carriage. Methods 79 subjects with DFUs were assessed for nasal and DFU colonization with SA, including Methicillin-resistant-SA (MRSA). Results Twenty-five (31.6%) subjects had nares colonization with SA; 29 (36.7%) had DFU colonization with SA. Seven (8.8%) subjects had nares colonization with MRSA and 7 (8.8%) had DFU colonization with MRSA. Ulcer duration was associated with MRSA presence (p=0.01). Sensitivity and specificity of positive nasal SA colonization with positive DFU colonization were 41 and 74%. Conclusions We found substantial discordance between SA strains colonizing DFU and the nasal cavity. The poor positive predictive values for SA isolation in a DFU based on nasal carriage suggests SA colonization of a DFU by endogenous SA strains cannot be assumed. PMID:24560808

  14. Continuous lateral gradients in film morphology for position sensitive detection and organic solar cell optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campoy-Quiles, M.; Randon, V.; Mróz, M. M.; Jarzaguet, M.; Garriga, M.; Cabanillas-González, J.

    2013-07-01

    We present a method to fabricate binary organic donor and acceptor blends exhibiting a controlled lateral gradient in morphology. Upon combining photometry, ellipsometry and Xray maps together with photoinduced absorption measurements, we show how the gradual exposure to solvent vapor results in a varying degree of polymer crystallinity for the polythiophene/soluble fullerene system along one direction. These morphologically graded samples are characterized by a spectral photoresponse that depends on the specific location in the area of the device where the light beam impinges, a property that stands as proof-of-concept for position sensitive detection. Moreover, we demonstrate that the development of graded morphologies is an effective one-step method which allows for fast performance optimization of organic solar cells. Finally, the appropriateness of eight different solvents for morphology control via vapor annealing is evaluated in a time-effective way using the advanced method, which helps to identify boiling point and solubility as the key processing parameters.

  15. Nasal septum injury in preterm infants using nasal prongs 1

    PubMed Central

    Bonfim, Suely de Fátima Santos Freire; de Vasconcelos, Maria Gorete Lucena; de Sousa, Nayara Francisca Cabral; da Silva, Daiana Vieira Câmara; Leal, Luciana Pedrosa

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to assess the incidence and risk factors associated with nasal septum injury in premature infants using reused and new nasal prongs. METHOD: the study was a cohort from an open therapeutic intervention. The sample included 70 infants with a gestational age inferior to 37 weeks, who used nasal prongs and were hospitalized at the neonatal service of a hospital in Recife-PE, in the Northeast of Brazil. The data were collected in patient files through the assessment of the application of the device and of the nasal septum. Multinomial Logistic Regression and Survival analyses were applied. RESULTS: the incidence of nasal injury corresponded to 62.9%. In the multiple analysis, only the length of the infant's treatment was a determinant factor for the occurrence and severity of the injuries. CONCLUSION: the type of nasal prong does not serve as a risk factor for the nasal injury. The high incidence of nasal injury indicates the need to adapt the nursing care with emphasis on prevention. PMID:25493679

  16. Comparison between Perceptual Assessments of Nasality and Nasalance Scores

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunnegard, Karin; Lohmander, Anette; van Doorn, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Background: There are different reports of the usefulness of the Nasometer[TM] as a complement to listening, often as correlation calculations between listening and nasalance measurements. Differences between findings have been attributed to listener experience and types of speech stimuli. Aims: To compare nasalance scores from the Nasometer with…

  17. Objective Measure of Nasal Air Emission Using Nasal Accelerometry

    PubMed Central

    Cler, Meredith J.; Lien, Yu-An S.; Braden, Maia N.; Mittelman, Talia; Downing, Kerri

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This article describes the development and initial validation of an objective measure of nasal air emission (NAE) using nasal accelerometry. Method Nasal acceleration and nasal airflow signals were simultaneously recorded while an expert speech language pathologist modeled NAEs at a variety of severity levels. In addition, microphone and nasal accelerometer signals were collected during the production of /pɑpɑpɑpɑ/ speech utterances by 25 children with and without cleft palate. Fourteen inexperienced raters listened to the microphone signals from the pediatric speakers and rated the samples for the severity of NAE using direct magnitude estimation. Mean listener ratings were compared to a novel quantitative measurement of NAE derived from the nasal acceleration signals. Results Correlation between the nasal acceleration energy measure and the measured nasal airflow was high (r = .87). Correlation between the measure and auditory-perceptual ratings was moderate (r = .49). Conclusion The measure presented here is quantitative and noninvasive, and the required hardware is inexpensive ($150). Future studies will include speakers with a wider range of NAE severity and etiology, including cleft palate, hearing impairment, or dysarthria. Further development will also involve validation of the measure against airflow measures across subjects. PMID:27618145

  18. Investigation of the vascular reaction of the nasal mucosa in cosmonauts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yakovleva, I. Y.; Baranova, V. P.

    1982-01-01

    Rhinopneumometric examinations in 3 positions of the body were undertaken in 36 cosmonauts aged 25 to 45 years, 14 of whom participated in space flights of various lengths. The nasal vascular response standards were defined in persons of the group examined. A subjective characteristic of the nasal vascular, reactions arising during the flight is provided. Examinations of 14 people were performed before and after the space flight. The rise of intranasal resistance in the horizontal body position permits forecasting different degrees of nasal breathing disturbances during a period of acute adaptation to weightlessness owing to vasomotor alterations of the nasal mucous membrane.

  19. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Improves Sleep and Daytime Sleepiness in Patients with Parkinson Disease and Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Neikrug, Ariel B.; Liu, Lianqi; Avanzino, Julie A.; Maglione, Jeanne E.; Natarajan, Loki; Bradley, Lenette; Maugeri, Alex; Corey-Bloom, Jody; Palmer, Barton W.; Loredo, Jose S.; Ancoli-Israel, Sonia

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), common in Parkinson disease (PD), contributes to sleep disturbances and daytime sleepiness. We assessed the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on OSA, sleep, and daytime sleepiness in patients with PD. Design: This was a randomized placebo-controlled, crossover design. Patients with PD and OSA were randomized into 6 w of therapeutic treatment or 3 w of placebo followed by 3 w of therapeutic treatment. Patients were evaluated by polysomnography (PSG) and multiple sleep latency test (MSLT) pretreatment (baseline), after 3 w, and after 6 w of CPAP treatment. Analyses included mixed models, paired analysis, and within-group analyses comparing 3 w to 6 w of treatment. Setting: Sleep laboratory. Participants: Thirty-eight patients with PD (mean age = 67.2 ± 9.2 y; 12 females). Intervention: Continuous positive airway pressure. Measurements: PSG outcome measures: sleep efficiency, %sleep stages (N1, N2, N3, R), arousal index, apnea-hypopnea index (AHI), and % time oxygen saturation < 90% (%time SaO2 < 90%). MSLT outcome measures: mean sleep-onset latency (MSL). Results: There were significant group-by-time interactions for AHI (P < 0.001), % time SaO2 < 90% (P = 0.02), %N2 (P = 0.015) and %N3 (P = 0.014). Subjects receiving therapeutic CPAP showed significant decrease in AHI, %time SaO2 < 90%, %N2, and significant increase in %N3 indicating effectiveness of CPAP in the treatment of OSA, improvement in nighttime oxygenation, and in deepening sleep. The paired sample analyses revealed that 3 w of therapeutic treatment resulted in significant decreases in arousal index (t = 3.4, P = 0.002). All improvements after 3 w were maintained at 6 w. Finally, 3 w of therapeutic CPAP also resulted in overall decreases in daytime sleepiness (P = 0.011). Conclusions: Therapeutic continuous positive airway pressure versus placebo was effective in reducing apnea events, improving oxygen saturation, and deepening sleep in

  20. Managing the distinctiveness of phonemic nasal vowels: articulatory evidence from Hindi.

    PubMed

    Shosted, Ryan; Carignan, Christopher; Rong, Panying

    2012-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that fine articulatory adjustments are made by speakers to reinforce and sometimes counteract the acoustic consequences of nasality. However, it is difficult to attribute the acoustic changes in nasal vowel spectra to either oral cavity configuration or to velopharyngeal opening (VPO). This paper takes the position that it is possible to disambiguate the effects of VPO and oropharyngeal configuration on the acoustic output of the vocal tract by studying the position and movement of the tongue and lips during the production of oral and nasal vowels. This paper uses simultaneously collected articulatory, acoustic, and nasal airflow data during the production of all oral and phonemically nasal vowels in Hindi (four speakers) to understand the consequences of the movements of oral articulators on the spectra of nasal vowels. For Hindi nasal vowels, the tongue body is generally lowered for back vowels, fronted for low vowels, and raised for front vowels (with respect to their oral congeners). These movements are generally supported by accompanying changes in the vowel spectra. In Hindi, the lowering of back nasal vowels may have originally served to enhance the acoustic salience of nasality, but has since engendered a nasal vowel chain shift.

  1. Same Noses, Different Nasalance Scores: Data from Normal Subjects and Cleft Palate Speakers for Three Systems for Nasalance Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences.…

  2. Nasal symptoms and clinical findings in adult patients treated for unilateral cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Morén, Staffan; Mani, Maria; Lundberg, Kristina; Holmström, Mats

    2013-10-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate self-experienced nasal symptoms among adults treated for UCLP and the association to clinical findings, and to evaluate whether palate closure in one-stage or two-stages affected the symptoms or clinical findings. All people with UCLP born between 1960-1987, treated at Uppsala University Hospital, were considered for participation in this cross-sectional population study with long-term follow-up. Eighty-three patients (76% participation rate) participated, a mean of 37 years after the first operation. Fifty-two patients were treated with one-stage palate closure and 31 with two-stage palate closure. An age-matched group of 67 non-cleft controls completed the same study protocol, which included a questionnaire regarding nasal symptoms, nasal inspection, anterior rhinoscopy, and nasal endoscopy. Patients reported a higher frequency of nasal symptoms compared with the control group, e.g., nasal obstruction (81% compared with 60%) and mouth breathing (20% compared with 5%). Patients also rated their nasal symptoms as having a more negative impact on their daily life and physical activities than controls. Nasal examination revealed higher frequencies of nasal deformities among patients. No positive correlation was found between nasal symptoms and severity of findings at nasal examination. No differences were identified between patients treated with one-stage and two-stage palate closure regarding symptoms or nasal findings. Adult patients treated for UCLP suffer from more nasal symptoms than controls. However, symptoms are not associated with findings at clinical nasal examination or method of palate closure.

  3. Use of Nasal Bubble CPAP in Children with Hypoxemic Clinical Pneumonia—Report from a Resource Limited Set-Up

    PubMed Central

    KiranBabu, HB; Singhi, Sunit; Nallasamy, Karthi

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Nasal bubble continuous positive airway pressure (bCPAP) is preferred in developing economies for easy applicability and low cost. Because its use in older children is unexplored, we sought to evaluate its utility in hypoxemic clinical pneumonia. Methods: Of 330 children (1 month–12 years) with clinical pneumonia enrolled prospectively over 1 year, those with increased work of breathing and/or SpO2 <92% received bCPAP delivered via an underwater ‘T' tube through nasal prongs. Proportion requiring intubation despite bCPAP constituted primary outcome. Incidence of complications, duration of bCPAP and emergency stay were secondary outcomes. Results: Oxygen was initiated by nasal prongs (NPO2) in 204 (61.8%), and by bCPAP in 110 (33.3%). Sixteen (4.8%) were intubated at the outset. Fifty-three (25.9%) on NPO2 were shifted to bCPAP for worsening distress and hypoxemia. Only three (1.8%) from bCPAP group required intubation, of which one died. Failure rate and complications were negligent. The median emergency stay was 4 days. Conclusions: Nasal bCPAP was safe and effective in children with hypoxemic clinical pneumonia. PMID:26428195

  4. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Neurocognitive Function in Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES)

    PubMed Central

    Kushida, Clete A.; Nichols, Deborah A.; Holmes, Tyson H.; Quan, Stuart F.; Walsh, James K.; Gottlieb, Daniel J.; Simon, Richard D.; Guilleminault, Christian; White, David P.; Goodwin, James L.; Schweitzer, Paula K.; Leary, Eileen B.; Hyde, Pamela R.; Hirshkowitz, Max; Green, Sylvan; McEvoy, Linda K.; Chan, Cynthia; Gevins, Alan; Kay, Gary G.; Bloch, Daniel A.; Crabtree, Tami; Dement, William C.

    2012-01-01

    Study Objective: To determine the neurocognitive effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy on patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design, Setting, and Participants: The Apnea Positive Pressure Long-term Efficacy Study (APPLES) was a 6-month, randomized, double-blind, 2-arm, sham-controlled, multicenter trial conducted at 5 U.S. university, hospital, or private practices. Of 1,516 participants enrolled, 1,105 were randomized, and 1,098 participants diagnosed with OSA contributed to the analysis of the primary outcome measures. Intervention: Active or sham CPAP Measurements: Three neurocognitive variables, each representing a neurocognitive domain: Pathfinder Number Test-Total Time (attention and psychomotor function [A/P]), Buschke Selective Reminding Test-Sum Recall (learning and memory [L/M]), and Sustained Working Memory Test-Overall Mid-Day Score (executive and frontal-lobe function [E/F]) Results: The primary neurocognitive analyses showed a difference between groups for only the E/F variable at the 2 month CPAP visit, but no difference at the 6 month CPAP visit or for the A/P or L/M variables at either the 2 or 6 month visits. When stratified by measures of OSA severity (AHI or oxygen saturation parameters), the primary E/F variable and one secondary E/F neurocognitive variable revealed transient differences between study arms for those with the most severe OSA. Participants in the active CPAP group had a significantly greater ability to remain awake whether measured subjectively by the Epworth Sleepiness Scale or objectively by the maintenance of wakefulness test. Conclusions: CPAP treatment improved both subjectively and objectively measured sleepiness, especially in individuals with severe OSA (AHI > 30). CPAP use resulted in mild, transient improvement in the most sensitive measures of executive and frontal-lobe function for those with severe disease, which suggests the existence of a complex OSA-neurocognitive relationship

  5. Usefulness of House Dust Mite Nasal Provocation Test in Asthma

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Soo-Jeong; Won, Joo-Min; Park, Myeong-Soo

    2017-01-01

    Purpose We previously reported that the skin prick test was sensitive and the serum specific immunoglobulin E test was specific for predicting positive airway responses to house dust mites (HDMs) in patients with asthma. Because the nose and bronchus are one airway, the nasal provocation test would be more specific for predicting the bronchial responses to HDM than the skin test. Methods The allergy skin prick test and nasal and bronchial provocation tests using HDM (Dermatophagoides farinae) were performed in 41 young men (age, 19–28 years) who wanted military certification for asthma. The nasal responses to HDM was scored according to the severity of rhinorrhea, sneezing, and nose itching. Results The prevalence of a positive skin prick test to HDM did not significantly differ between patients with (n=24) and without (n=17) an early airway reaction (EAR; 79.2% vs 70.6%, P=0.534). However, the prevalence of a positive nasal test was significantly higher in the airway responders than in the others (37.5% vs 0%, P=0.005). The concordance of a positive response to the nasal test (κ=0.332, P=0.004) but not to the skin prick test (κ=0.091, P=0.529) was significant with an EAR. The diagnostic sensitivity of the nasal test (37.5%) was lower than that of the skin prick test (79.2%), but the specificity was higher (100% vs 29.4%). Conclusions The skin prick test is more sensitive, whereas the nasal test is more specific and accurate, for predicting an EAR to HDM in patients with asthma. PMID:28102060

  6. Nasal highflow improves ventilation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Bräunlich, Jens; Köhler, Marcus; Wirtz, Hubert

    2016-01-01

    Background Nasal highflow (NHF) provides a warmed and humidified air stream up to 60 L/min. Recent data demonstrated a positive effect in patients with acute hypoxemic respiratory failure, especially when caused by pneumonia. Preliminary data show a decrease in hypercapnia in patients with COPD. Therefore, NHF should be evaluated as a new ventilatory support device. This study was conducted to assess the impact of different flow rates on ventilatory parameters in patients with COPD. Materials and methods This interventional clinical study was performed with patients suffering from severe COPD. The aim was to characterize flow-dependent changes in mean airway pressure, breathing volumes, breathing frequency, and decrease in partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Mean airway pressure was measured in the nasopharyngeal space (19 patients). To evaluate breathing volumes, we used a polysomnographic device (18 patients). All patients received 20 L/min, 30 L/min, 40 L/min, and 50 L/min and – to illustrate the effects – nasal continuous positive airway pressure and nasal bilevel positive airway pressure. Capillary blood gas analyses were performed in 54 patients with hypercapnic COPD before and two hours after the use of NHF. We compared the extent of decrease in pCO2 when using 20 L/min and 30 L/min. Additionally, comfort and dyspnea during the use of NHF were surveyed. Results NHF resulted in a minor flow dependent increase in mean airway pressure. Tidal volume increased, and breathing rate decreased. The calculated minute volume decreased under NHF breathing. In spite of this fact, hypercapnia decreased with increasing flow (20 L/min vs 30 L/min). Additionally, an improvement in dyspnea was observed. The rapid shallow breathing index shows a decrease when using NHF. Conclusion NHF leads to a flow-dependent reduction in pCO2. This is most likely achieved by a washout of the respiratory tract and a functional reduction in dead space. In summary, NHF enhances effectiveness of

  7. Established vascular effects of continuous positive airway pressure therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea—an update

    PubMed Central

    Wons, Annette Marie

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this review was to summarize the current data from randomised controlled trials (RCTs) on vascular effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA). There is good evidence from RCTs that CPAP lowers blood pressure (BP) to a clinically significant amount. The effect seems to be dependent on the hours of nightly CPAP usage. Data from RCTs have also proven a beneficial effect of CPAP on measures of vascular function such as endothelial function and arterial stiffness. However, there is still a lack of evidence from RCTs proving that CPAP reduces vascular events and mortality. PMID:26101649

  8. Symmetric flux continuous positive definite approximation of the elliptic full tensor pressure equation in local conservative form

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, M.G.

    1995-12-31

    A classical finite volume scheme well known in computational aerodynamics for solving the Transonic full potential equation is imported into reservoir simulation and applied to the full tensor pressure equation. Cell vertex discretization is shown to be a natural framework for approximation. With permeability placed at the cell centers and potential at the vertices (cell corner points), of the grid the scheme is flux continuous and locally conservative. Analysis is presented which proves that the resulting discrete matrix is symmetric positive definite provided the full permeability tensor is symmetric elliptic. The discrete matrix is also diagonally dominant subject to a sufficient elliptically condition. For a diagonal anisotropic tensor the discrete matrix is always symmetric positive definite and the scheme is up to 4th order accurate. A cell centered version of the scheme is indicated.

  9. Treatment of nasal inflammation decreases the ability of subjects with asthma to condition inspired air.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Jayant M; Assanasen, Paraya; Baroody, Fuad M; Naureckas, Edward; Solway, Julian; Naclerio, Robert M

    2004-10-15

    We previously showed that individuals with seasonal allergy have a reduced ability to condition air, which was improved by nasal inflammation. We also showed that subjects with asthma have a reduced ability to condition air. Because individuals with asthma usually have inflammation in the nose, we hypothesized that treatment with an intranasal steroid would reduce nasal inflammation and further decrease nasal conditioning capacity. We performed a randomized, double blind, placebo-controlled, 2-way crossover study on 20 subjects with asthma comparing the effect of treatment with intranasal budesonide for 2 weeks on nasal conditioning. Treatment with budesonide caused no significant effect on nasal conditioning as compared with placebo. When we evaluated the subgroup of nonsmoking subjects, budesonide caused a significant reduction in nasal conditioning. We speculate that nasal inflammation in nonsmoking individuals with asthma increases the conditioning capacity and reducing it with an intranasal steroid worsens the ability of the nose to condition air. In addition, smoking causes an increase in nasal conditioning capacity by non-steroid-dependent factors. These observations help us understand the pathophysiology of nasal conditioning, but do not negate the positive clinical benefits of budesonide on treating nasal inflammation.

  10. L1 (English) to L2 (French) Transfer: The Question of Nasalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrott, Carl L.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to answer the following questions: (1) Do transfer and developmental errors decrease or increase during informal and formal tasks? (2) What nasal vowels present greater markedness for L2 French learners? and (3) Using recall as the dependent variable, will French nasals continue to be produced over a time…

  11. The Relationship between Nasalance and Nasality in Children with Cleft Palate.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watterson, Thomas; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This study correlated measures of nasalance computed by the Nasometer with listener judgments of nasality of speech passages spoken by 25 children with craniofacial disorders. Results showed a significant correlation between nasalance and nasality only when nasal consonants were not included in the passage spoken. (Author/DB)

  12. P16-positive continuous minimal deviation adenocarcinoma and gastric type adenocarcinoma in a patient with Peutz-Jeghers syndrome.

    PubMed

    Peng, Wei-Xia; Kure, Shoko; Ishino, Kousuke; Kurose, Keisuke; Yoneyama, Koichi; Wada, Ryuichi; Naito, Zenya

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) in a 33-year-old female patient with synchronous uterine cervical minimal deviation adenocarcinoma (MDA) and gastric type adenocarcinoma (GTA). The patient was diagnosed with PJS at the age of 10. At the time of consultation, she complained of watery discharge. Magnetic resonance imaging of the pelvis showed a poorly circumscribed mass in the uterine cervix. Histologically, both MDA and GTA components, as well as their transitional area, were observed. Both components were diffusely positive for MUC6, CK7 and, robustly, for p16. Moreover, the components were negative for ER, PgR and CEA, while HIK1083 and CK20 positive cells were found focally. Ki-67 labeling index in the MDA component was 5% while that in the GTA component was 50%. This case of GTA accompanied by MDA in a patient with PJS is distinct from the single previously-reported comparable case of which we are aware, with respect to the overexpression of p16 protein, an event considered rare in these tumors, and the continuity between the MDA and GTA components. This continuity favors the hypothesis that GTA arises from the dedifferentiation of MDA.

  13. [The influence of nasal flow aerodynamics on the nasal physiology].

    PubMed

    Betlejewski, Stanisław; Betlejewski, Andrzej

    2008-01-01

    The ability of the human nose to warm and humidify the respiratory air is important to maintaining the internal environment of the lungs, since ambient air is conditioned to nearly alveolar conditions (body temperature and fully saturated with water vapour) upon reaching the nasopharynx. Because of very short time of the inspiratory phase duration, as well as expiratory phase, only the rich vascularization of the nasal mucosa and specific organization of the submucosal vessels are not able to assure such effective physiological activity. Therefore the type of airflow during the respiration is essential to understanding the functional possibilities of the nasal mucosa. Most studies have investigated the airflow only in steady-flow conditions, where the laminar flow was observed. Anatomically accurate physical models of real nasal cavities and particle image velocimetry allow evaluation of the entire flow field in the nasal cavity. In these investigations a partially turbulent flow was observed even at low air velocities in most part of the nasal cavity. From a physiological perspective, a turbulent flow would seem sensible, since it enhances contact between air and the mucosal layer. By doing so, the nasal physiological functions - humidification, cleaning and warming are optimized.

  14. Continuous Monitoring and Intrafraction Target Position Correction During Treatment Improves Target Coverage for Patients Undergoing SBRT Prostate Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lovelock, D. Michael; Messineo, Alessandra P.; Cox, Brett W.; Kollmeier, Marisa A.; Zelefsky, Michael J.

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To compare the potential benefits of continuous monitoring of prostate position and intervention (CMI) using 2-mm displacement thresholds during stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) treatment to those of a conventional image-guided procedure involving single localization prior to treatment. Methods and Materials: Eighty-nine patients accrued to a prostate SBRT dose escalation protocol were implanted with radiofrequency transponder beacons. The planning target volume (PTV) margin was 5 mm in all directions, except for 3 mm in the posterior direction. The prostate was kept within 2 mm of its planned position by the therapists halting dose delivery and, if necessary, correcting the couch position. We computed the number, type, and time required for interventions and where the prostate would have been during dose delivery had there been, instead, a single image-guided setup procedure prior to each treatment. Distributions of prostate displacements were computed as a function of time. Results: After the initial setup, 1.7 interventions per fraction were required, with a concomitant increase in time for dose delivery of approximately 65 seconds. Small systematic drifts in prostate position in the posterior and inferior directions were observed in the study patients. Without CMI, intrafractional motion would have resulted in approximately 10% of patients having a delivered dose that did not meet our clinical coverage requirement, that is, a PTV D95 of >90%. The posterior PTV margin required for 95% of the dose to be delivered with the target positioned within the PTV was computed as a function of time. The margin necessary was found to increase by 2 mm every 5 minutes, starting from the time of the imaging procedure. Conclusions: CMI using a tight 2-mm displacement threshold was not only feasible but was found to deliver superior PTV coverage compared with the conventional image-guided procedure in the SBRT setting.

  15. Long-Term Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Treatment on Sexuality in Female Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Marian; Kristensen, Ellids; Berg, Søren; Midgren, Bengt

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Results from a previous study showed that sexuality was negatively affected in females with untreated obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Data are sparse on the long-term effects of nocturnal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment on sexual difficulties and sexual distress in female patients with OSA. Aim The aim of the present study was to investigate the effects after 1 year of CPAP treatment on sexual difficulties, sexual distress, and manifest sexual dysfunction in female patients with OSA. The effect of CPAP on life satisfaction was also investigated. Methods Fifty-four therapy-compliant, female patients (age 22–71) received a survey before and after 1 year of nocturnal CPAP treatment. The questions on this survey were drawn from three self-administered questionnaires: two on sexuality and one on life satisfaction. The results were compared with a population sample. The Epworth Sleepiness Scale was used for assessment of daytime sleepiness. Main Outcome Measures The Female Sexual Function Index, Female Sexual Distress Scale, Manifest Female Sexual Dysfunction, four questions from Life Satisfaction 11, and the Epworth Sleepiness Scale were all used to measure outcome. Results In total, 44 patients responded to the survey (81% response rate). The results were a significant, positive change in manifest female sexual dysfunction, but no significant changes in isolated sexual difficulties or sexual distress. Daytime sleepiness significantly decreased after 1 year. The results from the Life Satisfaction 11 questionnaire remained unchanged after 1 year. Conclusions After 1 year of CPAP treatment, female patients with OSA reported reduced manifest sexual dysfunction. However, it cannot be concluded if this result is due to CPAP treatment alone. Furthermore, reduced daytime tiredness was found in the surveyed population. CPAP treatment, per se, does not seem to affect partner relationships. Petersen M, Kristensen E, Berg S, and Midgren B. Long

  16. Impact of a New Nasal Pillows Mask on Patients' Acceptance, Compliance, and Willingness to Remain on CPAP Therapy.

    PubMed

    Wimms, Alison; Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Ziegenbein, Claus; Jennings, Laura; Woehrle, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) masks are a key factor in patient compliance. This program assessed the performance of a new nasal pillows mask (NPM) on a variety of new and established obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients using CPAP therapy. Methods. Five programs were developed to assess the new NPM [AirFit P10, ResMed] on naïve patients; patients established on another NPM; patients using a nasal mask; patients with low CPAP compliance; and patients who wished to stop using CPAP therapy. Results. A total of 212 patients were included. In naïve patients, CPAP usage after 3 months was 5.9 ± 1.7 hours/night, compared with the control group at 4.6 ± 2.4 hours/night (p < 0.05). In patients established on another NPM, usage improved to 7.4 ± 1.1 hours/night versus 6.7 ± 1.4 (p = 0.001). 78% of nasal mask users wished to continue using the new NPM. Low compliance patients improved with an average of 0.87 hours/night (p = 0.001) when using the new NPM. In patients at the point of quitting CPAP, 60% continued with therapy using the new NPM. Conclusion. The new NPM mask performed well in a variety of clinical groups of OSA patients receiving CPAP therapy and shows that technical advances in CPAP masks can improve patient compliance.

  17. Impact of a New Nasal Pillows Mask on Patients' Acceptance, Compliance, and Willingness to Remain on CPAP Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ketheeswaran, Sahisha; Jennings, Laura; Woehrle, Holger

    2016-01-01

    Aim. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) masks are a key factor in patient compliance. This program assessed the performance of a new nasal pillows mask (NPM) on a variety of new and established obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients using CPAP therapy. Methods. Five programs were developed to assess the new NPM [AirFit P10, ResMed] on naïve patients; patients established on another NPM; patients using a nasal mask; patients with low CPAP compliance; and patients who wished to stop using CPAP therapy. Results. A total of 212 patients were included. In naïve patients, CPAP usage after 3 months was 5.9 ± 1.7 hours/night, compared with the control group at 4.6 ± 2.4 hours/night (p < 0.05). In patients established on another NPM, usage improved to 7.4 ± 1.1 hours/night versus 6.7 ± 1.4 (p = 0.001). 78% of nasal mask users wished to continue using the new NPM. Low compliance patients improved with an average of 0.87 hours/night (p = 0.001) when using the new NPM. In patients at the point of quitting CPAP, 60% continued with therapy using the new NPM. Conclusion. The new NPM mask performed well in a variety of clinical groups of OSA patients receiving CPAP therapy and shows that technical advances in CPAP masks can improve patient compliance. PMID:27648308

  18. Complications of Nasal Bone Fractures.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Yeom, Seung Han; Hwang, Suk Hyun

    2017-01-27

    The aim of this study was to perform a systematic review of the treatment of nasal bone fractures. The search terms ("nasal bone fracture" AND complication) and ("nasal bone fracture" AND [anosmia OR olfaction OR olfactory nerve OR smell]) and (anosmia AND ["nasal preparation" OR "nasal antiseptics"]) were used to search PubMed and SCOPUS. Of the 500 titles, 40 full papers were reviewed. One paper was excluded, and 3 mined papers were added. Ultimately, 12 papers were analyzed. The overall deformity rate was 10.4% ± 4.8%. No significant differences were found between patients who underwent closed reduction (14.7% ± 7.3%) and those who underwent open reduction (9.4% ± 4.4%), between those who underwent local anesthesia (5.8% ± 4.5%), and those who underwent general anesthesia (8.8% ± 3.8%), or between those who received timely treatment (5.7%) and those whose treatment was delayed (9.0%). Septal deviation occurred in 10.0% of patients as a sequela of nasal bone fracture. The nasal obstruction rate was 10.5% ± 5.3%. Fewer patients of nasal obstruction occurred in the open reduction patients (6.9% ± 4.4%) than in the closed reduction patients (15.2%). One patient of epiphora and 1 patient of diplopia were reportedAmong the 77 patients with nasal bone fractures, 29 (37.7% ± 11.3%) complained of olfactory disturbances. No significant associations were found between the type of fracture and the presence of olfactory disturbances. It is recommended for providers to explain to patients that approximately one-tenth of nasal bone fractures exhibit deformity, septal deviation, or nasal obstruction after surgery. Surgeons should take considerable care to avoid the olfactory mucosa during reduction surgery.

  19. Cleft Nasal Deformity and Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Kaufman, Yoav; Buchanan, Edward P.; Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Stal, Samuel

    2012-01-01

    The cleft nasal deformity is a complex challenge in plastic surgery involving the skin, cartilage, mucosa, and skeletal platform. Ever since Blair and Brown first described the intricacies of the cleft pathology in 1931, the appropriate approach has been extensively debated in the literature with respect to timing, technique, and extent of surgical intervention. In this article, the authors review the literature and summarize the various modalities for achieving a successful rhinoplasty in the patient with a cleft nasal deformity. PMID:24179452

  20. Nasal High-Flow Therapy for Primary Respiratory Support in Preterm Infants.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Calum T; Owen, Louise S; Manley, Brett J; Frøisland, Dag H; Donath, Susan M; Dalziel, Kim M; Pritchard, Margo A; Cartwright, David W; Collins, Clare L; Malhotra, Atul; Davis, Peter G

    2016-09-22

    Background Treatment with nasal high-flow therapy has efficacy similar to that of nasal continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) when used as postextubation support in neonates. The efficacy of high-flow therapy as the primary means of respiratory support for preterm infants with respiratory distress has not been proved. Methods In this international, multicenter, randomized, noninferiority trial, we assigned 564 preterm infants (gestational age, ≥28 weeks 0 days) with early respiratory distress who had not received surfactant replacement to treatment with either nasal high-flow therapy or nasal CPAP. The primary outcome was treatment failure within 72 hours after randomization. Noninferiority was determined by calculating the absolute difference in the risk of the primary outcome; the chosen margin of noninferiority was 10 percentage points. Infants in whom high-flow therapy failed could receive rescue CPAP; infants in whom CPAP failed were intubated and mechanically ventilated. Results Trial recruitment stopped early at the recommendation of the independent data and safety monitoring committee because of a significant difference in the primary outcome between treatment groups. Treatment failure occurred in 71 of 278 infants (25.5%) in the high-flow group and in 38 of 286 infants (13.3%) in the CPAP group (risk difference, 12.3 percentage points; 95% confidence interval [CI], 5.8 to 18.7; P<0.001). The rate of intubation within 72 hours did not differ significantly between the high-flow and CPAP groups (15.5% and 11.5%, respectively; risk difference, 3.9 percentage points; 95% CI, -1.7 to 9.6; P=0.17), nor did the rate of adverse events. Conclusions When used as primary support for preterm infants with respiratory distress, high-flow therapy resulted in a significantly higher rate of treatment failure than did CPAP. (Funded by the National Health and Medical Research Council and others; Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry number, ACTRN

  1. Flow through the nasal cavity of the spiny dogfish, Squalus acanthias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Timm-Davis, L. L.; Fish, F. E.

    2015-12-01

    The nasal cavity of spiny dogfish is a blind capsule with no internal connection to the oral cavity. Water is envisioned to flow through the cavity in a smooth, continuous flow pattern; however, this assumption is based on previous descriptions of the morphology of the olfactory cavity. No experimentation on the flow through the internal nasal cavity has been reported. Morphology of the head of the spiny dogfish ( Squalus acanthias) does not suggest a close external connection between the oral and nasal systems. However, dye visualization showed that there was flow through the nasal apparatus and from the excurrent nostril to the mouth when respiratory flows were simulated. The hydrodynamic flow through the nasal cavity was observed from flow tank experiments. The dorsum of the nasal cavity of shark heads from dead animals was exposed by dissection and a glass plate was glued over of the exposed cavity. When the head was placed in a flow, dye was observed to be drawn passively into the cavity showing a complex, three-dimensional hydrodynamic flow. Dye entered the incurrent nostril, flowed through the nasal lamellae, crossed over and under the nasal valve, and circulated around the nasal valve before exiting the excurrent nostril. When the nasal valve was removed, the dye became stagnant and back flowed out through the incurrent nostril. The single nasal valve has a hydrodynamic function that organizes a coherent flow of water through the cavity without disruption. The results suggest that the morphology of the nasal apparatus in concert with respiratory flow and ambient flows from active swimming can be used to draw water through the olfactory cavity of the shark.

  2. Effects of 12 Months Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Sympathetic Activity Related Brainstem Function and Structure in Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Luke A.; Fatouleh, Rania H.; Lundblad, Linda C.; McKenzie, David K.; Macefield, Vaughan G.

    2016-01-01

    Muscle sympathetic nerve activity (MSNA) is greatly elevated in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) during normoxic daytime wakefulness. Increased MSNA is a precursor to hypertension and elevated cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. However, the mechanisms underlying the high MSNA in OSA are not well understood. In this study we used concurrent microneurography and magnetic resonance imaging to explore MSNA-related brainstem activity changes and anatomical changes in 15 control and 15 OSA subjects before and after 6 and 12 months of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. We found that following 6 and 12 months of CPAP treatment, resting MSNA levels were significantly reduced in individuals with OSA. Furthermore, this MSNA reduction was associated with restoration of MSNA-related brainstem activity and structural changes in the medullary raphe, rostral ventrolateral medulla, dorsolateral pons, and ventral midbrain. This restoration occurred after 6 months of CPAP treatment and was maintained following 12 months CPAP. These findings show that continual CPAP treatment is an effective long-term treatment for elevated MSNA likely due to its effects on restoring brainstem structure and function. PMID:27013952

  3. 21 CFR 341.20 - Nasal decongestant active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal decongestant active ingredients. 341.20 Section 341.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  4. 21 CFR 341.20 - Nasal decongestant active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal decongestant active ingredients. 341.20 Section 341.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  5. 21 CFR 341.20 - Nasal decongestant active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal decongestant active ingredients. 341.20 Section 341.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  6. 21 CFR 341.20 - Nasal decongestant active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal decongestant active ingredients. 341.20 Section 341.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  7. 21 CFR 341.20 - Nasal decongestant active ingredients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 5 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal decongestant active ingredients. 341.20 Section 341.20 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) DRUGS FOR HUMAN USE COLD, COUGH, ALLERGY, BRONCHODILATOR, AND ANTIASTHMATIC DRUG PRODUCTS...

  8. Hypoxia Increases Epithelial Permeability in Human Nasal Epithelia

    PubMed Central

    Min, Hyun Jin; Kim, Tae Hoon; Yoon, Joo-Heon

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The nasal mucosa is the first site to encounter pathogens, and it forms continuous barriers to various stimuli. This barrier function is very important in the innate defense mechanism. Additionally, inflammation of the nasal sinus is known to be a hypoxic condition. Here, we studied the effect of hypoxia on barrier function in normal human nasal epithelial (NHNE) cells. Materials and Methods The expression levels of various junction complex proteins were assessed in hypoxia-stimulated NHNE cells and human nasal mucosal tissues. We performed real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis, western blotting, and immunofluorescence assays to examine differences in the mRNA and protein expression of ZO-1, a tight junction protein, and E-cadherin in NHNE cells. Moreover, we evaluated the trans-epithelial resistance (TER) of NHNE cells under hypoxic conditions to check for changes in permeability. The expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin was measured in human nasal mucosa samples by western blotting. Results Hypoxia time-dependently decreased the expression of ZO-1 and E-cadherin at the gene and protein levels. In addition, hypoxia decreased the TER of NHNE cells, which indicates increased permeability. Human nasal mucosa samples, which are supposed to be hypoxic, showed significantly decreased levels of ZO-1 and E-cadherin expression compared with control. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that hypoxia altered the expression of junction complex molecules and increased epithelial permeability in human nasal epithelia. This suggests that hypoxia causes barrier dysfunction. Furthermore, it may be associated with innate immune dysfunction after encountering pathogens. PMID:25837192

  9. Polysomnographic predictors of persistent continuous positive airway pressure adherence in patients with moderate and severe obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yung-Fu; Hang, Liang-Wen; Huang, Chun-Sen; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Chung, Wei-Sheng

    2015-02-01

    Extensive use of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has positive clinical benefits for most patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). However, patient adherence is a major limiting factor to the effectiveness of CPAP treatment. This study determined the potential and quantifiable factors affecting the willingness of patients with OSA to undertake CPAP treatment by comparing the polysomnographic parameters recorded during diagnosis and titration. Patients with moderate and severe OSA who attended diagnostic polysomnography (PSG) and CPAP titration at the sleep center of China Medical University Hospital (CMUH) were included in the study. A total of 312 patients were divided into persistent users and nonusers of CPAP according to their use of in-home CPAP following titration and a 7-day CPAP trial. Multivariate logistic regression analyses were used to define the potential polysomnographic predictors of persistent CPAP adherence, and odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated. Most patients were men older than 50 years who were overweight or obese. Among the patients, 146 (46.8%) became persistent CPAP users. A 10% improvement of oxygen desaturation index (ODI) and a 10% increment in deep sleep percentage increased the chance of persistent CPAP use 1.18-fold and 1.07-fold, respectively. In addition, the improved ODI and deep sleep during CPAP titration increased the chance of persistent CPAP user. The polysomnographic parameters obtained from diagnosis and during titration can facilitate the prediction of persistent CPAP use.

  10. Model-based correction of the influence of body position on continuous segmental and hand-to-foot bioimpedance measurements.

    PubMed

    Medrano, Guillermo; Eitner, Frank; Walter, Marian; Leonhardt, Steffen

    2010-06-01

    Bioimpedance spectroscopy (BIS) is suitable for continuous monitoring of body water content. The combination of body posture and time is a well-known source of error, which limits the accuracy and therapeutic validity of BIS measurements. This study evaluates a model-based correction as a possible solution. For this purpose, an 11-cylinder model representing body impedance distribution is used. Each cylinder contains a nonlinear two-pool model to describe fluid redistribution due to changing body position and its influence on segmental and hand-to-foot (HF) bioimpedance measurements. A model-based correction of segmental (thigh) and HF measurements (Xitron Hydra 4200) in nine healthy human subjects (following a sequence of 7 min supine, 20 min standing, 40 min supine) has been evaluated. The model-based compensation algorithm represents a compromise between accuracy and simplicity, and reduces the influence of changes in body position on the measured extracellular resistance and extracellular fluid by up to 75 and 70%, respectively.

  11. The impact of continuously-variable dose rate VMAT on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Boylan, Christopher; McWilliam, Alan; Johnstone, Emily; Rowbottom, Carl

    2012-11-06

    A recent control system update for Elekta linear accelerators includes the ability to deliver volumetric-modulated arc therapy (VMAT) with continuously variable dose rate (CVDR), rather than a number of fixed binned dose rates (BDR). The capacity to select from a larger range of dose rates allows the linac to maintain higher gantry speeds, resulting in faster, smoother deliveries. The purpose of this study is to investigate two components of CVDR delivery - the increase in average dose rate and gantry speed, and a determination of their effects on beam stability, MLC positioning, and overall plan dosimetry. Initially, ten VMAT plans (5 prostate, 5head and neck) were delivered to a Delta4 dosimetric phantom using both the BDR and CVDR systems. The plans were found to be dosimetrically robust using both delivery methods, although CVDR was observed to give higher gamma pass rates at the 2%/2 mm gamma level for prostates (p < 0.01). For the dual arc head-and-neck plans, CVDR delivery resulted in improved pass rates at all gamma levels (2%/2 mm to 4%/4 mm) for individual arc verifications (p < 0.01), but gave similar results to BDR when both arcs were combined. To investigate the impact of increased gantry speed on MLC positioning, a dynamic leaf-tracking tool was developed using the electronic portal imaging device (EPID). Comparing the detected MLC positions to those expected from the plan, CVDR was observed to result in a larger mean error compared to BDR (0.13 cm and 0.06 cm, respectively, p < 0.01). The EPID images were also used to monitor beam stability during delivery. It was found that the CVDR deliveries had a lower standard deviation of the gun-target (GT) and transverse (AB) profiles (p < 0.01). This study has determined that CVDR may offer a dosimetric advantage for VMAT plans. While the higher gantry speed of CVDR appears to increase deviations in MLC positioning, the relative effect on dosimetry is lower than the positive impact of a flatter and more

  12. Ultrasonography in the diagnosis of nasal bone fractures: a comparison with conventional radiography and computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, In Sook; Lee, Jung-Hoon; Woo, Chang-Ki; Kim, Hak Jin; Sol, Yu Li; Song, Jong Woon; Cho, Kyu-Sup

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate and compare the diagnostic efficacy of ultrasonography (US) with radiography and multi-detector computed tomography (CT) for the detection of nasal bone fractures. Forty-one patients with a nasal bone fracture who underwent prospective US examinations were included. Plain radiographs and CT images were obtained on the day of trauma. For US examinations, radiologist used a linear array transducer (L17-5 MHz) in 24 patients and hockey-stick probe (L15-7 MHz) in 17. The bony component of the nose was divided into three parts (right and left lateral nasal walls, and midline of nasal bone). Fracture detection by three modalities was subjected to analysis. Furthermore, findings made by each modality were compared with intraoperative findings. Nasal bone fractures were located in the right lateral wall (n = 28), midline of nasal bone (n = 31), or left lateral wall (n = 31). For right and left lateral nasal walls, CT had greater sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, and better agreed with intraoperative findings. However, for midline fractures of nasal bone, US had higher specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value than CT. Although two US evaluations showed good agreements at all three sites, US findings obtained by the hockey-stick probe showed closer agreement with intraoperative findings for both lateral nasal wall and midline of nasal bone. Although CT showed higher sensitivity and specificity than US or radiography, US found to be helpful for evaluating the midline of nasal bone. Furthermore, for US examinations of the nasal bone, a smaller probe and higher frequency may be required.

  13. Nasal septal and premaxillary developmental integration: implications for facial reduction in Homo.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan E; Franciscus, Robert G; Marshall, Steven D; Southard, Thomas E; Nieves, Mary Ann

    2011-01-01

    The influence of the chondrocranium in craniofacial development and its role in the reduction of facial size and projection in the genus Homo is incompletely understood. As one component of the chondrocranium, the nasal septum has been argued to play a significant role in human midfacial growth, particularly with respect to its interaction with the premaxilla during prenatal and early postnatal development. Thus, understanding the precise role of nasal septal growth on the facial skeleton is potentially informative with respect to the evolutionary change in craniofacial form. In this study, we assessed the integrative effects of the nasal septum and premaxilla by experimentally reducing facial length in Sus scrofa via circummaxillary suture fixation. Following from the nasal septal-traction model, we tested the following hypotheses: (1) facial growth restriction produces no change in nasal septum length; and (2) restriction of facial length produces compensatory premaxillary growth due to continued nasal septal growth. With respect to hypothesis 1, we found no significant differences in septum length (using the vomer as a proxy) in our experimental (n = 10), control (n = 9) and surgical sham (n = 9) trial groups. With respect to hypothesis 2, the experimental group exhibited a significant increase in premaxilla length. Our hypotheses were further supported by multivariate geometric morphometric analysis and support an integrative relationship between the nasal septum and premaxilla. Thus, continued assessment of the growth and integration of the nasal septum and premaxilla is potentially informative regarding the complex developmental mechanisms that underlie facial reduction in genus Homo evolution.

  14. Nasal Bridles for Securing Nasoenteric Tubes: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Bechtold, Matthew L.; Nguyen, Douglas L.; Palmer, Lena B.; Kiraly, Laszlo N.; Martindale, Robert G.; McClave, Stephen A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasoenteric feeding tubes may easily become dislodged due to patient mental status, transfers, or positional changes. Nasal bridles were introduced to provide a better, more reliable system to secure these tubes. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of nasal bridles compared with the traditional method of adhesive tape alone in securing enteral feeding tubes. Materials and Methods Multiple databases were searched (October 2013). All studies that evaluated the use of nasal bridles in adult patients were included in the analysis. Meta-analysis for the outcomes from use of a nasal bridle vs the more traditional method of adhesive tape alone for securing nasoenteric tubes was analyzed by calculating pooled estimates of dislodgement, skin complications, and sinusitis. Statistical analysis was performed using RevMan 5.1. Results Six studies (n = 594) met the inclusion criteria. Use of a nasal bridle for securing enteral tubes resulted in a statistically significant reduction in tube dislodgement compared with traditional adhesive tape alone (odds ratio [OR], 0.16; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.10–0.27; P < .01). The use of nasal bridles was associated with a higher rate of skin complications compared with traditional adhesive tape (OR, 4.27; 95% CI, 1.79–10.23; P < .01). Incidence of sinusitis was no different between the 2 groups (OR, 0.26; 95% CI, 0.03–2.28; P = .22). Conclusion Nasal bridles appear to be more effective at securing nasoenteric tubes and preventing dislodgement than traditional use of tape alone. PMID:25606648

  15. Investigation on the nasal airflow characteristics of anterior nasal cavity stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, T.; Chen, D.; Wang, P.H.; Chen, J.; Deng, J.

    2016-01-01

    We used a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model to study the inspiratory airflow profiles of patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis who underwent curative surgery, by comparing pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics. Twenty patients with severe anterior nasal cavity stenosis, including one case of bilateral stenosis, underwent computed tomography (CT) scans for CFD modelling. The pre- and postoperative airflow characteristics of the nasal cavity were simulated and analyzed. The narrowest area of the nasal cavity in all 20 patients was located within the nasal valve area, and the mean cross-sectional area increased from 0.39 cm2 preoperative to 0.78 cm2 postoperative (P<0.01). Meanwhile, the mean airflow velocity in the nasal valve area decreased from 6.19 m/s to 2.88 m/s (P<0.01). Surgical restoration of the nasal symmetry in the bilateral nasal cavity reduced nasal resistance in the narrow sides from 0.24 Pa.s/mL to 0.11 Pa.s/mL (P<0.01). Numerical simulation of the nasal cavity in patients with anterior nasal cavity stenosis revealed structural changes and the resultant patterns of nasal airflow. Surgery achieved balanced bilateral nasal ventilation and decreased nasal resistance in the narrow region of the nasal cavity. The correction of nasal valve stenosis is not only indispensable for reducing nasal resistance, but also the key to obtain satisfactory curative effect. PMID:27533764

  16. Sleep Apnea Related Risk of Motor Vehicle Accidents is Reduced by Continuous Positive Airway Pressure: Swedish Traffic Accident Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Karimi, Mahssa; Hedner, Jan; Häbel, Henrike; Nerman, Olle; Grote, Ludger

    2015-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of motor vehicle accidents (MVAs). The rate of MVAs in patients suspected of having OSA was determined and the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was investigated. Design: MVA rate in patients referred for OSA was compared to the rate in the general population using data from the Swedish Traffic Accident Registry (STRADA), stratified for age and calendar year. The risk factors for MVAs, using demographic and polygraphy data, and MVA rate before and after CPAP were evaluated in the patient group. Setting: Clinical sleep laboratory and population based control (n = 635,786). Patients: There were 1,478 patients, male sex 70.4%, mean age 53.6 (12.8) y. Interventions: CPAP. Measurements and Results: The number of accidents (n = 74) among patients was compared with the expected number (n = 30) from a control population (STRADA). An increased MVA risk ratio of 2.45 was found among patients compared with controls (P < 0.001). Estimated excess accident risk was most prominent in the elderly patients (65–80 y, seven versus two MVAs). In patients, driving distance (km/y), EDS (Epworth Sleepiness score ≥ 16), short habitual sleep time (≤ 5 h/night), and use of hypnotics were associated with increased MVA risk (odds ratios 1.2, 2.1, 2.7 and 2.1, all P ≤ 0.03). CPAP use ≥ 4 h/night was associated with a reduction of MVA incidence (7.6 to 2.5 accidents/1,000 drivers/y). Conclusions: The motor vehicle accident risk in this large cohort of unselected patients with obstructive sleep apnea suggests a need for accurate tools to identify individuals at risk. Sleep apnea severity (e.g., apnea-hypopnea index) failed to identify patients at risk. Citation: Karimi M, Hedner J, Häbel H, Nerman O, Grote L. Sleep apnea related risk of motor vehicle accidents is reduced by continuous positive airway pressure: Swedish traffic accident registry data. SLEEP 2015;38(3):341–349. PMID

  17. Shape of the human nasal cavity promotes retronasal smell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trastour, Sophie; Melchionna, Simone; Mishra, Shruti; Zwicker, David; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Kaxiras, Efthimios; Brenner, Michael P.

    2015-11-01

    Humans are exceptionally good at perceiving the flavor of food. Flavor includes sensory input from taste receptors but is dominated by olfactory (smell) receptors. To smell food while eating, odors must be transported to the nasal cavity during exhalation. Olfactory performance of this retronasal route depends, among other factors, on the position of the olfactory receptors and the shape of the nasal cavity. One biological hypothesis is that the derived configuration of the human nasal cavity has resulted in a greater capacity for retronasal smell, hence enhanced flavor perception. We here study the air flow and resulting odor deposition as a function of the nasal geometry and the parameters of exhalation. We perform computational fluid dynamics simulations in realistic geometries obtained from CT scans of humans. Using the resulting flow fields, we then study the deposition of tracer particles in the nasal cavity. Additionally, we derive scaling laws for the odor deposition rate as a function of flow parameters and geometry using boundary layer theory. These results allow us to assess which changes in the evolution of the human nose led to significant improvements of retronasal smell.

  18. Myoepithelioma of the Nasal Septum: A Rare Case of Extrasalivary Gland Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Camurugy, Tatiane Costa; Ribeiro, Thiago Cavalcante; Costa, Nara Nunes Barbosa; Azevedo, Amanda Canário Andrade; Vinhaes, Eriko Soares de Azevedo; de Andrade, Nilvano Alves

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. The myoepithelioma is a rare benign tumor, most frequently found in the salivary glands. The extrasalivary gland involvement is even rarer and few cases involving the nasal cavity have been reported in the literature. Case Report. MES, a 54-year-old woman, complaining of progressive nasal obstruction and mild epistaxis through the right nostril which had developed 1 year previously. Computed tomography scan showed tumor with heterogeneous contrast enhancement occupying the right nasal cavity, moving contralaterally in the nasal septum. Excisional biopsy was performed through endoscopic surgery of the mass that was inserted at the nasal septum. Pathological and immunohistochemical exams concluded myoepithelioma. Discussion. The main symptoms of nasal myoepitheliomas are nasal obstruction and epistaxis. Immunohistochemistry is necessary to confirm the diagnosis, typically positive for cytokeratin and S-100, calponin, smooth muscle actin, myosin, vimentin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), and carcinoembryonic antigen. The main marker for myoepithelioma is the S-100 protein. In our case, it was positive for cytokeratin, S-100, calponin, actin smooth muscle, and GFAP. In all cases reported in the literature surgical treatment was performed and the recurrence was associated with incomplete tumor resection. Final Comments. The myoepithelioma is a rare differential diagnosis of nasal tumors and its treatment is the total lesion excision. PMID:28168074

  19. Nasal Reflexes: Implications for Exercise, Breathing, and Sex

    PubMed Central

    Baraniuk, James N.; Merck, Samantha J.

    2014-01-01

    Nasal patency, with both congestion and decongestion, is affected in a wide variety of reflexes. Stimuli that lead to nasal reflexes include exercise, alterations of body position, pressure, and temperature, neurological syndromes, and dentists. As anticipated, the vagal and trigeminal systems are closely integrated through nasobronchial and bronchonasal reflexes. However, perhaps of greater pathophysiological importance are the naso-hypopharyngea-laryngeal reflexes that become aggravated during sinusitis. None other than Sigmund Freud saw deeply beyond the facial adornment and recognized the deeper sexual tensions that can regulate nasal functions and psychoanalytical status. Wine, women and song are linked with airflow through the nose, the nose, that by any other name would still smell as sweetly. PMID:18417057

  20. Nasal mucociliary clearance after radiation therapy.

    PubMed

    Stringer, S P; Stiles, W; Slattery, W H; Krumerman, J; Parsons, J T; Mendenhall, W M; Cassisi, N J

    1995-04-01

    Irradiation has been demonstrated to cause decreased mucociliary clearance in animal models. We sought to verify this effect clinically by using the saccharin transport test to evaluate nasal mucociliary clearance in 9 patients previously treated with radiation therapy to the nasal cavity. The patients also completed a questionnaire examining the prevalence of nasal symptoms before and after radiation therapy. Patients who received radiation therapy had no clearance of saccharin from the nasal cavity at a minimum of 20 minutes. The controls had a median clearance time of 5 minutes. The patients noted a higher prevalence of nasal congestion, drainage, and facial pain after radiation therapy. This study demonstrates that radiation therapy to the nasal cavity causes a decrease in nasal mucociliary clearance. This alteration should be considered when selecting therapy for malignancies in the nasal area.

  1. Nasal trauma: Primary reconstruction with open rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Konstantinidis, I; Malliari, H; Metaxas, S

    2011-01-01

    Due to the prominent location of the nose, the most common facial traumas are nasal injuries. Although nasal traumas usually require staged intervention at a later period of time, in selected cases, primary reconstruction can be effective. A 20-year-old man who was referred from the emergency department with nasal trauma is presented. He reported a fall after feeling unsteady, which caused a direct nasal injury. Clinical examination revealed septal fracture with obstruction of the left nasal cavity and deformity of the nasal pyramid (inverted V deformity). The patient also had a complete dissection of the columella skin. Epistaxis was self-limited, and an open rhinoplasty procedure was decided because the trauma occurred 1 h before admission and there was no significant edema. Surgical intervention included septal reconstruction combined with restoration of the nasal pyramid and columella. One month later, the patient had patent nasal airways, and he was satisfied with the aesthetic result. PMID:22942663

  2. Unexpected positive and negative effects of continuing inbreeding in one of the world's most inbred wild animals.

    PubMed

    Weiser, Emily L; Grueber, Catherine E; Kennedy, Euan S; Jamieson, Ian G

    2016-01-01

    Inbreeding depression, the reduced fitness of offspring of related individuals, is a central theme in evolutionary biology. Inbreeding effects are influenced by the genetic makeup of a population, which is driven by any history of genetic bottlenecks and genetic drift. The Chatham Island black robin represents a case of extreme inbreeding following two severe population bottlenecks. We tested whether inbreeding measured by a 20-year pedigree predicted variation in fitness among individuals, despite the high mean level of inbreeding and low genetic diversity in this species. We found that paternal and maternal inbreeding reduced fledgling survival and individual inbreeding reduced juvenile survival, indicating that inbreeding depression affects even this highly inbred population. Close inbreeding also reduced survival for fledglings with less-inbred mothers, but unexpectedly improved survival for fledglings with highly inbred mothers. This counterintuitive interaction could not be explained by various potentially confounding variables. We propose a genetic mechanism, whereby a highly inbred chick with a highly inbred parent inherits a "proven" genotype and thus experiences a fitness advantage, which could explain the interaction. The positive and negative effects we found emphasize that continuing inbreeding can have important effects on individual fitness, even in populations that are already highly inbred.

  3. Airway dynamics in COPD patients by within-breath impedance tracking: effects of continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Lorx, András; Czövek, Dorottya; Gingl, Zoltán; Makan, Gergely; Radics, Bence; Bartusek, Dóra; Szigeti, Szabolcs; Gál, János; Losonczy, György; Sly, Peter D; Hantos, Zoltán

    2017-02-01

    Tracking of the within-breath changes of respiratory mechanics using the forced oscillation technique may provide outcomes that characterise the dynamic behaviour of the airways during normal breathing.We measured respiratory resistance (Rrs) and reactance (Xrs) at 8 Hz in 55 chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients and 20 healthy controls, and evaluated Rrs and Xrs as functions of gas flow (V') and volume (V) during normal breathing cycles. In 12 COPD patients, additional measurements were made at continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) levels of 4, 8, 14 and 20 hPa.The Rrs and Xrsversus V' and V relationships displayed a variety of loop patterns, allowing characterisation of physiological and pathological processes. The main outcomes emerging from the within-breath analysis were the Xrsversus V loop area (AXV) quantifying expiratory flow limitation, and the tidal change in Xrs during inspiration (ΔXI) reflecting alteration in lung inhomogeneity in COPD. With increasing CPAP, AXV and ΔXI approached the normal ranges, although with a large variability between individuals, whereas mean Rrs remained unchanged.Within-breath tracking of Rrs and Xrs allows an improved assessment of expiratory flow limitation and functional inhomogeneity in COPD; thereby it may help identify the physiological phenotypes of COPD and determine the optimal level of respiratory support.

  4. Sleep apnoea and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in men and women: effects of continuous positive airway pressure.

    PubMed

    Kritikou, Ilia; Basta, Maria; Vgontzas, Alexandros N; Pejovic, Slobodanka; Fernandez-Mendoza, Julio; Liao, Duanping; Bixler, Edward O; Gaines, Jordan; Chrousos, George P

    2016-02-01

    Previous findings on the association of obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis are inconsistent, partly due to the confounding effect of obesity and infrequent sampling. Our goal was to examine whether in a relatively nonobese population, OSA is associated with elevated cortisol levels and to assess the effects of a 2-month placebo-controlled continuous positive airway pressure (sham-CPAP) use.72 subjects (35 middle-aged males and post-menopausal females with OSA, and 37 male and female controls) were studied in the sleep laboratory for four nights. 24-h blood sampling was performed every hour on the fourth day and night in the sleep laboratory at baseline, after sham-CPAP and after CPAP treatment.In both apnoeic men and women, OSA was associated with significantly higher 24-h cortisol levels compared with controls, whereas CPAP lowered cortisol levels significantly, close to those of controls.These results suggest that OSA in nonobese men and slightly obese women is associated with HPA axis activation, similar albeit stronger compared with obese individuals with sleep apnoea. Short-term CPAP use decreased cortisol levels significantly compared with baseline, indicating that CPAP may have a protective effect against comorbidities frequently associated with chronic activation of the HPA axis, e.g. hypertension.

  5. Default network response to a working memory challenge after withdrawal of continuous positive airway pressure treatment for obstructive sleep apnea.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Lawrence H; Jerskey, Beth A; Aloia, Mark S

    2010-06-01

    Lower working memory performance and altered brain activity have been reported in studies of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. However, little is known about the effect of treatment of OSA on brain function, particularly effects on default network processing. We previously reported increased brain response to a working memory challenge in active regions and decreased response in relatively deactivated a priori regions of interest (ROIs) following withdrawal of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. This follow-up analysis was conducted to examine the effects of CPAP withdrawal on default network processing using empirically defined ROIs analyses (i.e., in ROIs exhibiting significant deactivation in the sample). Ten OSA patients performed a 2-Back working memory task during functional magnetic resonance imaging in two separate conditions, following regular CPAP use, and after two nights of CPAP withdrawal. Eleven clusters of significant 2-Back-related deactivation consistent with the default network were identified and further examined for CPAP withdrawal effects. Significant further deactivation relative to the treatment adherent baseline was observed in the majority of these ROIs during the withdrawal condition. The magnitude of deactivation during withdrawal was significantly associated with better working memory performance in the posterior cingulate and right postcentral gyrus, and greater sleepiness in the left and right medial frontal gyrus. Results suggest that default network functions are further suspended as a result of a shifting of attention towards a more difficult active task in the context of lowered attentional capacity related to sleepiness.

  6. Nasal septal cyst--a case report.

    PubMed

    Chiang, C H; Juan, K H; Kuo, W R; Tai, C F; Wu, J R

    1996-04-01

    The usual complications of submucous resection of the nasal septum (SMR) are septal hematoma, infection, hemorrhage, septal perforation, and nasal deformity. We present a case of nasal septal cyst which may be a rare complication of SMR. Entrapment of free nasal mucosal remnants or inward folding of incised septal mucosa is thought to be the cause. The patient underwent deroofment of the left cystic wall by lateral rhinotomy. There was no recurrence after one year.

  7. Extramedullary plasmacytoma of the nasal sinus cavities.

    PubMed

    Lomeo, Paul E; McDonald, John E; Finneman, Judith; Shoreline

    2007-01-01

    This is case report of extramedullary plasmacytoma occurring in the nasal cavity. These are unusual tumors especially in the nasal area. Patients present mainly with nasal symptoms on the same side of the tumors. The treatment consists of surgery resection, or, radiation, or both. There is a fifty percent survival rate in five years.

  8. Histological and anatomical structure of the nasal cavity of Bama minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jingjing; Dai, Lei; Yu, Qinghua; Yang, Qian

    2017-01-01

    Objective The nasal mucosa is equipped with abundant lymphatic tissues, serving as the first line of defense against invasion by microorganisms. In this study, we characterized the features of the nasal mucosa of Bama minipigs (Sus scrofa domestica) via histological analysis. Methods Five cross sections (I, II, III, IV, and V) were obtained from the distal end of the nasal cavity toward the pharynx (along the cavity axis) and examined. Specifically, CD3+ T cells, immunoglobulin A (IgA)+ cells, and M cells were detected by immunohistochemistry, while dendritic cells (DCs) were detected by immunofluorescence. The distribution of goblet cells was determined by periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) staining. Results The nasal cavity of Bama minipigs can be divided into three parts: the regio vestibularis (I, II), regio respiratoria (III, IV), and regio olfactoria (V). Lymphoid tissue was present at random locations in the nasal cavity. Abundant lymphoid tissue was located in the roof of the nasopharyngeal meatus and was continuous with the lymphoid tissue of the pharynx. The distribution of CD3+ T cells, IgA+ cells, M cells, and DCs increased distally in the nasal cavity. Conclusions The present work comprises a histological study of the nasal cavity of Bama minipigs, and will be beneficial for understanding the mechanisms of immunity in these animals after nasal vaccination. PMID:28339502

  9. The Correlation Between End-Tidal Carbon Dioxide Measured by Capnoxygen (Trade Mark) Mask and Nasal Cannula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    obtained by a CO2 sampling port inserted in a thin catheter in different locations between the hypopharynx and nasopharynx when compared to a nasal...dioxide (CO2) sampling device through a prong in an oxygen (O2) nasal cannula. In this study, a single-use medium concentration O2 face mask designed to...nasal cannula sampling port in 13 normal healthy volunteers. There was a positive correlation between the ETCO2 of both devices with and without the

  10. Nasal filters in prevention of seasonal rhinitis induced by allergenic pollen grains. Open clinical study.

    PubMed

    D'Amato, G; Liccardi, G; Salzillo, A; Russo, M; Narciso, P; Allegra, L

    2012-04-01

    Nasal filters (Sanispira) might represent a novel approach in preventing exacerbations of symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis by reducing pollen access to nasal cavities. Female and male voluntary patients between the ages of 18 and 64 years living in Naples area and affected by allergic rhinitis were recruited in an open clinical study. All were allergic to Parietaria pollen as assessed by skin-prick and/or RAST test with or without associated sensitization to other pollens such as Gramineae and Olea europaea. A pollen count was also carried out from 10th April until 30th of June 2011. The results of our study show positive statistical differences between the scores of common nasal symptoms and the reduced use of antihistaminic drugs in patients using nasal filters in comparison to non users. Nasal filters constitute a useful mean to reduce symptoms of seasonal allergic rhinitis in patients suffering from pollen allergy.

  11. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Airway Inflammation and Oxidative Stress in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Tichanon, Promsrisuk; Sopida, Santamit; Orapin, Pasurivong; Watchara, Boonsawat; Banjamas, Intarapoka

    2016-01-01

    Background. Airway inflammation and oxidative stress may be linked in obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients. We determined the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in reducing fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels in OSA patients. Methods. Thirteen patients with OSA and 13 normal controls were recruited. FeNO and MDA levels were measured in the controls and in OSA patients before and after three months of CPAP therapy. Results. FeNO and MDA levels were higher in the patients compared to the age and gender matched controls (FeNO: 25.9 ± 5.0 versus 17.5 ± 5.9 ppb, P < 0.001; MDA: 14.6 ± 7.8 versus 2.1 ± 0.3 μmol/L, P < 0.001). FeNO and MDA levels were lower post-CPAP compared to pre-CPAP (FeNO: 25.9 ± 5.0 versus 17.0 ± 2.3 ppb, P < 0.001; MDA: 14.6 ± 7.8 versus 10.0 ± 6.4 μmol/L, P < 0.01). Apnea-hypopnea index (15.9 ± 6.6 versus 4.1 ± 2.1/h, P < 0.001) and mean arterial pressure (P < 0.01) decreased following CPAP treatment. Daytime mean SpO2 (P < 0.05) increased. Conclusion. Our study demonstrates that CPAP therapy yields clinical benefits by reducing upper airway inflammation and oxidative stress in OSA patients. PMID:27445526

  12. Obstructive sleep apnea in Type 2 diabetes and impact of continuous positive airway pressure therapy on glycemic control

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Javid Ahmad; Masoodi, Shariq Rashid; Shoib, Sheikh

    2017-01-01

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) are two interacting epidemics both with high prevalence and morbidity. Both epidemiologic and clinical studies suggest that the majority of patients with T2DM also have OSA and untreated OSA in these patients results in poor glycemic control leading to acceleration of diabetes-related complications. Objectives: To assess the prevalence and severity of OSA in T2DM patients and to assess the impact of OSA treatment on presenting symptoms and hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c). Methods: We performed polysomnography (PSG) studies and measured HbA1c in 62 consecutive patients with T2DM that were referred from various subspecialty clinics from July 2011 to August 2013. Results: In our 62 diabetic patients, 59 (95.2%) had abnormal PSG. Based on Apnea–Hypopnea Index (AHI) score, 3 (5.1%) patients had mild, 28 (47.5%) had moderate, and 28 (47.5%) had severe OSA. The mean AHI of diabetic patients was significantly more than nondiabetic patients, i.e., 25.7 versus 19.7 (P = 0.001). Variables that significantly correlated with the presence of OSA include age, gender, body mass index (BMI), hypertension, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease (P < 0.05); however, on logistic regression only BMI, hypertension, and nocturia correlated with OSA. Overall, 59% of diabetic patients showed improvement in their glycemic control as measured by HbA1c with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment. Significant, moderate, and mild categories of treatment response were respectively observed in 7%, 20%, and 32% of patients. Conclusion: Treatment of OSA with CPAP reduces HbA1c in a significant number of diabetics. PMID:28217508

  13. Factors involved in continuance of atazanavir-based regimens: Results from a cohort of HIV1-positive patients.

    PubMed

    Giacomelli, Andrea; Oreni, Letizia; Franzetti, Marco; Di Cristo, Valentina; Colella, Elisa; Ridolfo, Anna Lisa; Galli, Massimo; Rusconi, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    We evaluated predictive factors involved in durability and therapeutic failure of atazanavir (ATV)-based antiretroviral regimens with or without ritonavir (r) in real life setting. This retrospective study of HIV-1-positive patients evaluated the factors related to ATV continuance and the time-dependent probability of therapeutic failure (HIV-RNA >200 copies/mL and concomitant discontinuation of ATV). We also investigated the rate of therapeutic failure and the variations in total bilirubin levels from starting unboosted ATV-based regimens. The study involved 1030 patients: 183 treatment-naïve patients (17.8%) started ATV/r (17 subsequently switched to unboosted ATV); 653 (63.4%) switched to ATV/r from previous antiretroviral regimens (121 subsequently switched to unboosted ATV); and 194 (18.8%) switched to unboosted ATV from previous ATV-free regimens. The median ATV follow-up was 28 months (interquartile range 7-56). The risk of ATV discontinuation was significantly lower in patients switched to unboosted ATV from ATV/r (HR 0.45; p < 0.0001). The discontinuation of ATV correlated with female gender (HR 1.26; p = 0.035), use of a zidovudine/didanosine/stavudine containing backbone (HR 1.8; p = 0.004), and a baseline CD4+ cell counts of <200/μL (HR 1.54; p = 0.003), the last of which was also associated with a higher risk of therapeutic failure (HR 2.42; p = 0.001). Total bilirubin levels were significantly lower in the patients switching from ATV/r to unboosted ATV. Unboosted ATV-based therapies are safe and effective options in patients whose immuno-virological conditions are stable, and allow the long-term survival of ATV-containing regimens.

  14. Continuous positive airway pressure therapy in non-sleepy patients with obstructive sleep apnea: results of a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Dongmei; Luo, Jinmei; Qiao, Yixian

    2016-01-01

    Background Although continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) has become the first line of therapy for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), it remains controversial whether non-sleepy patients could benefit from CPAP treatment. Methods We searched the online databases Medline, Embase, the Cochrane library and the Cochrane Central Registry of Controlled Trials to select eligible control trials, including non-sleepy OSA patients and those patients treated by CPAP or either sham CPAP or no CPAP. Results Seven eligible studies (1,541 patients) were included. The pooled estimates of the mean changes after CPAP treatment for the systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were −0.51 mmHg (95% CI, −3.39 to 2.38 mmHg; P=0.73) and −0.92 mmHg (95% CI, −1.39 to −0.46 mmHg; P<0.001), respectively. CPAP should not improve subjective sleepiness in the minimally symptomatic OSA patients, as the change in the Epworth sleepiness scale (ESS) was −0.51 (95% CI, −1.68 to 0.67; P=0.397). However, CPAP can effectively reduce AHI or ODI by 15.57 events/h (95% CI, −29.32 to −1.82; P=0.026) compared to controls. However, the risk of cardiovascular events did not significantly decrease [odds ratio (OR), 0.80; 95% CI, 0.50 to 1.26; P=0.332] in the end. Conclusions CPAP treatment can reduce OSA severity in non-sleepy patients and minutely reduce the DBP, but CPAP seems to have no overall beneficial effects on subjective sleepiness, SBP, or cardiovascular risk. PMID:27867549

  15. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on energy intake in obstructive sleep apnea: A pilot sham-controlled study

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Ari; Kovtun, Kyle; St-Onge, Marie-Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is among the leading risk factors for obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). A reciprocal relationship between obesity and OSA has been proposed, which may be due to excessive food intake. We conducted a pilot study to test the effects of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on energy intake (EI) in OSA patients using a sham-controlled crossover design. In-laboratory total daily EI was assessed after 2 mo of active and sham CPAP. Four men were enrolled (age ± SEM: 51.8 ± 2.1 y; body mass index: 31.5 ± 1.5 kg/m2). All received active treatment first. Meals (breakfast, lunch, dinner, snack) were served in excess portions at fixed times and additional palatable snacks were freely available throughout the day. Total EI was lower after active (3744 ± 511 kcal/d) vs. sham (4030 ± 456 kcal/d) CPAP but this difference was not significant (p = 0.51) due to variability in the free snack intake. When only fixed eating occasions were considered, daily EI was significantly lower in the active (3105 ± 513 kcal/d) vs. sham (3559 ± 420 kcal/d) condition (p = 0.006). This small pilot and feasibility study is the first to utilize a sham-controlled design to investigate the effects of CPAP treatment on objective measures of EI. Findings suggest that CPAP may cause a reduction in fixed meal intake. In demonstrating feasibility of study methodology, our study also suggests a larger randomized sham-controlled trial be conducted to fully characterize the effects of CPAP treatment on EI and energy balance overall. PMID:27769851

  16. Nasal intubation: A comprehensive review

    PubMed Central

    Chauhan, Varun; Acharya, Gaurav

    2016-01-01

    Nasal intubation technique was first described in 1902 by Kuhn. The others pioneering the nasal intubation techniques were Macewen, Rosenberg, Meltzer and Auer, and Elsberg. It is the most common method used for giving anesthesia in oral surgeries as it provides a good field for surgeons to operate. The anatomy behind nasal intubation is necessary to know as it gives an idea about the pathway of the endotracheal tube and complications encountered during nasotracheal intubation. Various techniques can be used to intubate the patient by nasal route and all of them have their own associated complications which are discussed in this article. Various complications may arise while doing nasotracheal intubation but a thorough knowledge of the anatomy and physics behind the procedure can help reduce such complications and manage appropriately. It is important for an anesthesiologist to be well versed with the basics of nasotracheal intubation and advances in the techniques. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy and the advent of newer devices have abolished the negative effect of blindness of the procedure. PMID:27994382

  17. Clinical Implications of Nasal Septal Deformities

    PubMed Central

    Mladina, Ranko; Skitarelić, Neven; Poje, Gorazd; Šubarić, Marin

    2015-01-01

    The first attempts to systematize septal distortions have been given by Cottle who defined four groups of septal deformities: subluxation, large spurs, caudal deflection and tension septum. Fortunately, the variations of the septal deformities show a certain order, thus enabling more precise classification. Mladina was the first to make user-friendly classification of septal deformities in six basic types. He also described the seventh type, named “Passali deformity”, which presents individually, but is always a well-defined combination between some of the previous six types. Mladina types of septal deformities (SD) are divided in two main groups: so called “vertical” deformities (types 1, 2, 3 and 4), and “horizontal” ones (types 5 and 6). This classification was immediately well accepted by rhinologists worldwide and started to be cited from the very beginning. Since then it has been continuously cited increasingly more often, thus making Mladina classification a gold standard whenever clinical researches on nasal septum are concerned. More than forty clinical studies based on this classification have been performed to date. It is extremely important to make a strict distinction between the types of SD since all of them play some specific role in the nasal and general physiology in man. PMID:26167337

  18. Reshaping of the Anterior Nasal Spine: An Important Step in Rhinoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Boccieri, Armando; Pascali, Michele

    2016-01-01

    Background: The importance of analysis of the nasal spine should not be underestimated in the correct planning of rhinoplasty. Deformations in position with respect to the midline and/or in size are often present, and their correction to ensure harmony between the spine and the other components of the nasal pyramid constitutes a key step in rhinoplasty that can lead to excellent results. Methods: The study includes 160 patients who underwent surgical treatment of the anterior nasal spine with or without other techniques of nasal reshaping. Eighty-seven of these patients presented with hyperplasia of the nasal spine, 43 with hypoplasia, and 30 with deviation. A combination of deviation and hyperplasia was present in 15 cases. Results: No patients developed postoperative complications. Five patients who underwent anterior nasal spine reduction reported postoperative numbness in the premaxillary area, but sensitivity was fully regained within 4 months after surgery in these patients. All the patients reported postoperative improvement of nasal airflow. A total of 142 patients considered their postoperative aesthetic result as excellent and 18 as good. Conclusion: The simplicity of the surgical procedures performed on the nasal spine and the marked aesthetic improvements thus achieved suggest that greater attention should be paid to this anatomical region. PMID:27757343

  19. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics. PMID:26069968

  20. Detecting Nasal Vowels in Speech Interfaces Based on Surface Electromyography.

    PubMed

    Freitas, João; Teixeira, António; Silva, Samuel; Oliveira, Catarina; Dias, Miguel Sales

    2015-01-01

    Nasality is a very important characteristic of several languages, European Portuguese being one of them. This paper addresses the challenge of nasality detection in surface electromyography (EMG) based speech interfaces. We explore the existence of useful information about the velum movement and also assess if muscles deeper down in the face and neck region can be measured using surface electrodes, and the best electrode location to do so. The procedure we adopted uses Real-Time Magnetic Resonance Imaging (RT-MRI), collected from a set of speakers, providing a method to interpret EMG data. By ensuring compatible data recording conditions, and proper time alignment between the EMG and the RT-MRI data, we are able to accurately estimate the time when the velum moves and the type of movement when a nasal vowel occurs. The combination of these two sources revealed interesting and distinct characteristics in the EMG signal when a nasal vowel is uttered, which motivated a classification experiment. Overall results of this experiment provide evidence that it is possible to detect velum movement using sensors positioned below the ear, between mastoid process and the mandible, in the upper neck region. In a frame-based classification scenario, error rates as low as 32.5% for all speakers and 23.4% for the best speaker have been achieved, for nasal vowel detection. This outcome stands as an encouraging result, fostering the grounds for deeper exploration of the proposed approach as a promising route to the development of an EMG-based speech interface for languages with strong nasal characteristics.

  1. Oxytocin nasal spray in fibromyalgic patients.

    PubMed

    Mameli, S; Pisanu, G M; Sardo, S; Marchi, A; Pili, A; Carboni, M; Minerba, L; Trincas, G; Carta, M G; Melis, M R; Agabio, R

    2014-08-01

    Fibromyalgia is a pain disorder associated with frequent comorbid mood, anxiety, and sleep disorders. Despite the frequent use of a complex, poly-drug pharmacotherapy, treatment for fibromyalgia is of limited efficacy. Oxytocin has been reported to reduce the severity of pain, anxiety, and depression, and improve the quality of sleep, suggesting that it may be useful to treat fibromyalgia. To evaluate this hypothesis, 14 women affected by fibromyalgia and comorbid disorders, assuming a complex pharmacotherapy, were enrolled in a double-blind, crossover, randomized trial to receive oxytocin and placebo nasal spray daily for 3 weeks for each treatment. Order of treatment (placebo-oxytocin or oxytocin-placebo) was randomly assigned. Patients were visited once a week. At each visit, the following instruments were administered: an adverse drug reaction record card, Visual Analog Scale of Pain Intensity, Spielberger State Anxiety Inventory, Zung Self-rating Depression Scale, and SF-12. Women self-registered painkiller assumption, pain severity, and quality of sleep in a diary. Unlikely, oxytocin nasal spray (80 IU a day) did not induce positive therapeutic effects but resulted to be safe, devoid of toxicity, and easy to handle.

  2. A simple nasal anemometer for clinical purposes.

    PubMed

    Hutters, B; Brøndsted, K

    1992-01-01

    There is a need for clinical methods which give more direct information about the behaviour of the velopharyngeal mechanism in natural speech than do the examination methods normally applied to patients suffering from velopharyngeal insufficiency. One possibility is the recording of nasal airflow in order to detect nasal emission of air. The purpose of the present study is to examine the qualities and the characteristics of a simple and cheap nasal anemometer. As this type of flowmeter is considered less reliable than most other flowmeters, its limitations must be clearly understood and accounted for in drawing conclusions. Therefore, nasal airflow in speech obtained with this flowmeter is discussed in relation to nasal airflow obtained by the more reliable pneumotachograph and in relation to nasal airflow data found in the literature. The tests made here suggest that, at least for the type of speech material and measurements used in the present study, reliable nasal airflow data can be obtained by the anemometer.

  3. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for Motion Management in Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy to the Lung: A Controlled Pilot Study

    SciTech Connect

    Goldstein, Jeffrey D.; Lawrence, Yaacov R.; Appel, Sarit; Landau, Efrat; Ben-David, Merav A.; Rabin, Tatiana; Benayun, Maoz; Dubinski, Sergey; Weizman, Noam; Alezra, Dror; Gnessin, Hila; Goldstein, Adam M.; Baidun, Khader; Segel, Michael J.; Peled, Nir; Symon, Zvi

    2015-10-01

    Objective: To determine the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on tumor motion, lung volume, and dose to critical organs in patients receiving stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) for lung tumors. Methods and Materials: After institutional review board approval in December 2013, patients with primary or secondary lung tumors referred for SBRT underwent 4-dimensional computed tomographic simulation twice: with free breathing and with CPAP. Tumor excursion was calculated by subtracting the vector of the greatest dimension of the gross tumor volume (GTV) from the internal target volume (ITV). Volumetric and dosimetric determinations were compared with the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. CPAP was used during treatment if judged beneficial. Results: CPAP was tolerated well in 10 of the 11 patients enrolled. Ten patients with 18 lesions were evaluated. The use of CPAP decreased tumor excursion by 0.5 ± 0.8 cm, 0.4 ± 0.7 cm, and 0.6 ± 0.8 cm in the superior–inferior, right–left, and anterior–posterior planes, respectively (P≤.02). Relative to free breathing, the mean ITV reduction was 27% (95% confidence interval [CI] 16%-39%, P<.001). CPAP significantly augmented lung volume, with a mean absolute increase of 915 ± 432 cm{sup 3} and a relative increase of 32% (95% CI 21%-42%, P=.003), contributing to a 22% relative reduction (95% CI 13%-32%, P=.001) in mean lung dose. The use of CPAP was also associated with a relative reduction in mean heart dose by 29% (95% CI 23%-36%, P=.001). Conclusion: In this pilot study, CPAP significantly reduced lung tumor motion compared with free breathing. The smaller ITV, the planning target volume (PTV), and the increase in total lung volume associated with CPAP contributed to a reduction in lung and heart dose. CPAP was well tolerated, reproducible, and simple to implement in the treatment room and should be evaluated further as a novel strategy for motion management in radiation therapy.

  4. Erectile Dysfunction and Sexual Hormone Levels in Men With Obstructive Sleep Apnea: Efficacy of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Lin, Qi-Chang; Zeng, Hui-Qing; Jiang, Xing-Tang; Chen, Bo; Chen, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    In this study, the prevalence of erectile dysfunction (ED) and serum sexual hormone levels were evaluated in men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). In these patients, the efficacy of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) was determined. The 207 men (mean age 44.0 ± 11.1 years) enrolled in the study were stratified within four groups based on their apnea-hypopnea index score: simple snoring (n = 32), mild OSA (n = 29), moderate OSA (n = 38), and severe OSA (n = 108). The International Index of Erectile Dysfunction-5 (IIEF-5) score was obtained from each patient, and blood samples for the analysis of sexual hormones (prolactin, luteotropin, follicle-stimulating hormone, estradiol, progestin, and testosterone) were drawn in the morning after polysomnography. The IIEF-5 test and serum sexual hormone measurements were repeated after 3 months of CPAP treatment in 53 men with severe OSA. The prevalence of ED was 60.6 % in OSA patients overall and 72.2 % in those with severe OSA. Compared with the simple snoring group, patients with severe OSA had significantly lower testosterone levels (14.06 ± 5.62 vs. 17.02 ± 4.68, p = .018) and lower IIEF-5 scores (16.33 ± 6.50 vs. 24.09 ± 1.94, p = .001). The differences in the other sexual hormones between groups were not significant. After 3 months of CPAP treatment, there were no significant changes in sexual hormone levels, but the IIEF-5 score had improved significantly (18.21 ± 4.05 vs. 19.21 ± 3.86, p = .001). Severe OSA patients have low testosterone concentration and high ED prevalence. IIEF-5 scores increased significantly after CPAP treatment, but there was no effect on serum testosterone levels.

  5. Nasal manifestations of IgG4-related disease: A report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Ohno, Keiko; Matsuda, Yoko; Arai, Tomio; Kimura, Yurika

    2015-12-01

    IgG4-related disease (IgG4-RD) is a recently recognized clinical disease entity characterized by elevated serum IgG4, tumefaction, tissue infiltration of IgG4-positive plasma cells and fibrosis. IgG4-RD may occur, either synchronously or metachronously, in a variety of organs throughout the body. We describe herein two representative cases of the nasal manifestations of IgG4-RD, characterized by diffuse, crusty, erosive lesions on nasal mucosa. Oral steroid administration was effective in treating these nasal manifestations. We report a decrease in IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltrates in nasal mucosa biopsy specimens after steroid therapy, demonstrating that infiltration of IgG4-positive cells is reversible.

  6. Deviated nasal septum hinders intranasal sprays: A computer simulation study

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Cannon, Daniel; Pawar, Sachin S.; Rhee, John S.

    2013-01-01

    Background This study investigates how deviated nasal septum affects the quantity and distribution of spray particles, and examines the effects of inspiratory airflow and head position on particle transport. Methods Deposition of spray particles was analysed using a three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics model created from a computed tomography scan of a human nose with leftward septal deviation and a right inferior turbinate hypertrophy. Five simulations were conducted using Fluent™ software, with particle sizes ranging from 20-110μm, a spray speed of 3m/s, plume angle of 68°, and with steady state inspiratory airflow either present (15.7L/min) or absent at varying head positions. Results With inspiratory airflow present, posterior deposition on the obstructed side was approximately four times less than the contralateral side, regardless of head position, and was statistically significant (p<0.05). When airflow was absent, predicted deposition beyond the nasal valve on the left and right sides were between 16% and 69% lower and positively influenced by a dependent head position. Conclusions Simulations predicted that septal deviation significantly diminished drug delivery on the obstructed side. Furthermore, increased particle penetration was associated with presence of nasal airflow. Head position is an important factor in particle deposition patterns when inspiratory airflow is absent. PMID:22888490

  7. The Impact of the Nasal Trauma in Childhood on the Development of the Nose in Future

    PubMed Central

    Kopacheva-Barsova, Gabriela; Arsova, Slavica

    2016-01-01

    nasal trauma which was not treated on time or it was improperly treated. In 24 (58.54%) of these patients septoplasty was performed and in 17 (41.46%) was performed rhino septoplasty. CONCLUSION: Often, difficult septal deformations in children are followed with deformation of the nasal pyramid (rhino scoliosis, rhino lordosis). In those cases, we cannot solve septal pathology without nasal pyramid intervention in the same time and opposite. Clinical reports have not produced solid evidence for the statement that septal surgery has no negative effect on nasal growth or can serve for correcting abnormal growth. The functional and esthetic problems of the patient, however, mean a continuous stimulus for further clinical and experimental investigations. PMID:27703565

  8. The effect of mupirocin- and fusidic acid–nasal packings, placed after septoplasty, on the nasal bacterial profile

    PubMed Central

    Bilici, Suat; Yigit, Ozgur; Karatas, Aysel; Cimen, Cansu; Fincancı, Muzaffer; Gökduman, Ali Rıza

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effects, after septoplasty, of local antibiotic pomades as an alternative to prophylactic antibiotic use, which is a controversial matter among the otolaryngologists, on nasal flora and bacterial growth. Material and Method: Nasal packings placed after septoplasty surgery to provide septal stabilization and bleeding control pose a risk in terms of infection. In this study, 106 patients, who were examined by comparing mupirocin- and fusidic acid–soaked packings and antibiotic-free packings, were divided into three groups. Nasal cultures were obtained from each patient twice, before the surgery and on the second day immediately after the packings were removed, and the culture results were statistically compared. Results: In the mupirocin group (group 2), postoperative normal flora growth rate was significantly higher than in the fusidic acid group (group 3) and the antibiotic-free group (group 1) (p < 0.024). In the mupirocin group (group 2), the gram-positive growth rate in the postoperative period showed a significant decrease when compared when the preoperative period (p < 0.05) (5.7%). In the fusidic acid group (group 3), the postoperative gram-positive rate showed a significant decrease compared with the preoperative period (p < 0.05). In group 2, the postoperative methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus rate showed a significant decrease than in the preoperative period (2.9%) (p < 0.05). Similarly, in group 3, the postoperative methicillin-resistant S. aureus rate showed a significant decrease compared with that of the preoperative period (11.1%) (p < 0.05). Conclusion: Use of mupirocin- and fusidic acid–soaked nasal packings after septoplasty significantly decreased, especially, postoperative gram-positive bacterial growth in nasal cultures. Although systemic antibiotherapy was not administered, the lack of local and systemic infection findings was an important result that we obtained in terms of clinical use. Usage advantages of

  9. Deposition of inhaled wood dust in the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Tian, Z F; Inthavong, K; Tu, J Y

    2007-11-01

    Detailed deposition patterns of inhaled wood dust in an anatomically accurate nasal cavity were investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) techniques. Three wood dusts, pine dust, heavy oak dust, and light oak dust, with a particle size distribution generated by machining (Chung et al., 2000), were simulated at an inhalation flow rate of 10 L/min. It was found that the major particle deposition sites were the nasal valve region and anterior section of the middle turbinate. Wood dust depositing in these regions is physiologically removed much more slowly than in other regions. This leads to the surrounding layer of soft tissues being damaged by the deposited particles during continuous exposure to wood dust. Additionally, it was found that pine dust had a higher deposition efficiency in the nasal cavity than the two oak dusts, due to the fact that it comprises a higher proportion of larger sized particles. Therefore, this indicates that dusts with a large amount of fine particles, such as those generated by sanding, may penetrate the nasal cavity and travel further into the lung.

  10. Nasal septal haematoma in Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Chukuezi, A B

    1992-05-01

    A prospective study of 46 consecutive patients with nasal septal haematoma admitted at the General Hospital, Owerri, Nigeria over a five year period is presented. The disease was commoner in males than females. The majority of the cases (65.6 per cent) were of unknown cause and were therefore grouped as spontaneous haematoma while 30.4 per cent were due to trauma. Trauma was more common in patients below the age of 15 years while spontaneous haematoma was common in patients above that age. All the patients with septal haematoma represented 0.2 per cent of total attendances to the ENT clinic over the period. Most of the patients presented with severe and threatening symptoms necessitating intense aggressive management. All the patients were managed by surgical incision and drainage, four had marked nasal abnormalities. Three patients died from a brain abscess as a complication of infected haematoma.

  11. Smart Polymers in Nasal Drug Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Chonkar, Ankita; Nayak, Usha; Udupa, N.

    2015-01-01

    Nasal drug delivery has now been recognized as a promising route for drug delivery due to its capability of transporting a drug to systemic circulation and central nervous system. Though nasal mucosa offers improved bioavailability and quick onset of action of the drug, main disadvantage associated with nasal drug delivery is mucocilliary clearance due to which drug particles get cleared from the nose before complete absorption through nasal mucosa. Therefore, mucoadhesive polymeric approach can be successfully used to enhance the retention of the drug on nasal mucosal surface. Here, some of the aspects of the stimuli responsive polymers have been discussed which possess liquid state at the room temperature and in response to nasal temperature, pH and ions present in mucous, can undergo in situ gelation in nasal cavity. In this review, several temperature responsive, pH responsive and ion responsive polymers used in nasal delivery, their gelling mechanisms have been discussed. Smart polymers not only able to enhance the retention of the drug in nasal cavity but also provide controlled release, ease of administration, enhanced permeation of the drug and protection of the drug from mucosal enzymes. Thus smart polymeric approach can be effectively used for nasal delivery of peptide drugs, central nervous system dugs and hormones. PMID:26664051

  12. Contrastive and contextual vowel nasalization in Ottawa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klopfenstein, Marie

    2005-09-01

    Ottawa is a Central Algonquian language that possesses the recent innovation of contrastive vowel nasalization. Most phonetic studies done to date on contrastive vowel nasalization have investigated Indo-European languages; therefore, a study of Ottawa could prove to be a valuable addition to the literature. To this end, a percentage of nasalization (nasal airflow/oral + nasal airflow) was measured during target vowels produced by native Ottawa speakers using a Nasometer 6200-3. Nasalized vowels in the target word set were either contrastively or contextually nasalized: candidates for contextual nasalization were either regressive or perserverative in word-initial and word-final syllables. Subjects were asked to read words containing target vowels in a carrier sentence. Mean, minimum, and maximum nasalance were obtained for each target vowel across its full duration. Target vowels were compared across context (regressive or perseverative and word-initial or word-final). In addition, contexts were compared to determine whether a significant difference existed between contrastive and contextual nasalization. Results for Ottawa will be compared with results for vowels in similar contexts in other languages including Hindi, Breton, Bengali, and French.

  13. Unsteady flow in the nasal cavity with high flow therapy measured by stereoscopic PIV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spence, C. J. T.; Buchmann, N. A.; Jermy, M. C.

    2012-03-01

    Nasal high flow (NHF) cannulae are used to deliver heated and humidified air to patients at steady flows ranging from 5 to 50 l/min. In this study, the flow velocities in the nasal cavity across the complete respiratory cycle during natural breathing and with NHF has been mapped in vitro using time-resolved stereoscopic particle image velocimetry (SPIV). An anatomically accurate silicone resin model of a complete human nasal cavity was constructed using CT scan data and rapid prototyping. Physiological breathing waveforms were reproduced in vitro using Reynolds and Womersley number matching and a piston pump driven by a ball screw and stepper motor. The flow pattern in the nasal cavity with NHF was found to differ significantly from natural breathing. Velocities of 2.4 and 3.3 ms-1 occurred in the nasal valve during natural breathing at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively; however, on expiration, the maximum velocity of 3.8 ms-1 occurred in the nasopharynx. At a cannula flow rate of 30 l/min, maximal velocities of 13.6 and 16.5 ms-1 at peak expiration and inspiration, respectively, were both located in the cannula jet within the nasal valve. Results are presented that suggest the quasi-steady flow assumption is invalid in the nasal cavity during natural breathing; however, it was valid with NHF. Cannula flow has been found to continuously flush the nasopharyngeal dead space, which may enhance carbon dioxide removal and increase oxygen fraction.

  14. Nasal reconstruction using porous polyethylene implants.

    PubMed

    Romo, T; Sclafani, A P; Jacono, A A

    2000-01-01

    Nasal reconstruction presents a significant challenge to the facial plastic surgeon. The dual goals of reconstruction are restoration of the desired aesthetic nasal contour and an improved nasal airway. Autologous cartilage and bone are considered optimal grafting material, but their supply is often limited and harvesting entails additional morbidity. Many synthetic materials have been introduced in nasal reconstruction, but high infection and extrusion rates limited their use. Porous high density polyethylene implants present an alternative to autologous material as they allow for fibrovascular ingrowth, leading to stability of the implant and decreased rates of infection. Herein we describe the use of porous high density polyethylene implants for reconstruction of the platyrrhine nose and in revision rhinoplasty. The use of preformed nasal-dorsal tip and alar batten implants are described, as well as the use of columellar strut and premaxillary plumper implants. We believe that porous high density polyethylene implants provide a safe, desirable alternative in functional and aesthetic nasal reconstruction.

  15. Nasal dorsal augmentation with silicone implants.

    PubMed

    Erlich, Mark A; Parhiscar, Afshin

    2003-11-01

    Silicone rubber has been used safely and effectively for facial augmentation for nearly 5 decades in eastern Asia. We have used silicone rubber nasal implants in primary ethnic rhinoplasty and have found consistent and long-lasting results with low complication rates. Silicone dorsal nasal augmentation in primary rhinoplasty avoids donor site morbidity and implant resorption as seen with autogenous implants. Silicone nasal implants have a low extrusion and infection rate. In the appropriate patient with proper placement, silicone nasal implant is nearly the ideal implant material.

  16. Reconstruction of Small Soft Tissue Nasal Defects

    PubMed Central

    Wolfswinkel, Erik M.; Weathers, William M.; Cheng, David; Thornton, James F.

    2013-01-01

    Nasal defect repair has been one of the more challenging areas of reconstructive surgery due to the lack of uniform nasal skin thickness and complex contours. Currently, algorithms for medium to large nasal soft tissue defects have been well defined by various authors. Small defects, arbitrarily defined as 1 cm or less, still present significant challenges. In this article, the authors examine the options available to repair small soft tissue nasal defects and the appropriate situations in which each method is best suited. PMID:24872751

  17. Allergic and non-allergic rhinitis: relationship with nasal polyposis, asthma and family history.

    PubMed

    Gelardi, M; Iannuzzi, L; Tafuri, S; Passalacqua, G; Quaranta, N

    2014-02-01

    Rhinitis and rhinosinusitis (with/without polyposis), either allergic or non-allergic, represent a major medical problem. Their associated comorbidities and relationship with family history have so far been poorly investigated. We assessed these aspects in a large population of patients suffering from rhinosinusal diseases. Clinical history, nasal cytology, allergy testing and direct nasal examination were performed in all patients referred for rhinitis/rhinosinusitis. Fibre optic nasal endoscopy, CT scan and nasal challenge were used for diagnosis, when indicated. A total of 455 patients (60.7% male, age range 4-84 years) were studied; 108 (23.7%) had allergic rhinitis, 128 (28.1%) rhinosinusitis with polyposis, 107 (23.5%) non-allergic rhinitis (negative skin test); 112 patients had associated allergic and non-allergic rhinitis, the majority with eosinophilia. There was a significant association between non-allergic rhinitis and family history of nasal polyposis (OR = 4.45; 95%CI = 1.70-11.61; p = 0.0019), whereas this association was no longer present when allergic rhinitis was also included. Asthma was equally frequent in non-allergic and allergic rhinitis, but more frequent in patients with polyposis. Aspirin sensitivity was more frequent in nasal polyposis, independent of the allergic (p = 0.03) or non-allergic (p = 0.01) nature of rhinitis. Nasal polyposis is significantly associated with asthma and positive family history of asthma, partially independent of the allergic aetiology of rhinitis.

  18. Perception of Better Nasal Patency Correlates with Increased Mucosal Cooling after Surgery for Nasal Obstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Guilherme; Sullivan, Corbin; Frank-Ito, Dennis; Kimbell, Julia; Rhee, John

    2014-11-01

    Nasal airway obstruction (NAO) is a common health problem with 340,000 patients undergoing surgery annually in the United States. Traditionally, otolaryngologists have focused on airspace cross-sectional areas and nasal resistance to airflow as objective measures of nasal patency, but neither of these variables correlated consistently with patients' symptoms. Given that the sensation of nasal airflow is also associated with mucosal cooling (i.e., heat loss) during inspiration, we investigated the correlation between the sensation of nasal obstruction and mucosal cooling in 10 patients before and after NAO surgery. Three-dimensional models of the nasal anatomy were created based on pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulations were conducted to quantify nasal resistance and mucosal cooling. Patient-reported symptoms were measured by a visual analog scale and the Nasal Obstruction Symptom Evaluation (NOSE), a disease-specific quality of life questionnaire. Our results revealed that the subjective sensation of nasal obstruction correlated with both nasal resistance and heat loss, but the strongest correlation was between the NOSE score and the nasal surface area where heat flux exceeds 50 W /m2 . In conclusion, a significant post-operative increase in mucosal cooling correlates well with patients' perception of better nasal patency after NAO surgery.

  19. The effect of obstructive sleep apnea and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on stroke rehabilitation: rationale, design and methods of the TOROS study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea is a common sleep disorder in stroke patients. Obstructive sleep apnea is associated with stroke severity and poor functional outcome. Continuous positive airway pressure seems to improve functional recovery in stroke rehabilitation. To date, the effect of continuous positive airway pressure on cognitive functioning in stroke patients is not well established. The current study will investigate the effectiveness of continuous positive airway pressure on both cognitive and functional outcomes in stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea. Methods/Design A randomized controlled trial will be conducted on the neurorehabilitation unit of Heliomare, a rehabilitation center in the Netherlands. Seventy stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea will be randomly allocated to an intervention or control group (n = 2×35). The intervention will consist of four weeks of continuous positive airway pressure treatment. Patients allocated to the control group will receive four weeks of treatment as usual. Outcomes will be assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention and at two-month follow-up. In a supplementary study, these 70 patients with obstructive sleep apnea will be compared to 70 stroke patients without obstructive sleep apnea with respect to cognitive and functional status at rehabilitation admission. Additionally, the societal participation of both groups will be assessed at six months and one year after inclusion. Discussion This study will provide novel information on the effects of obstructive sleep apnea and its treatment with continuous positive airway pressure on rehabilitation outcomes after stroke. Trial registration Trial registration number: Dutch Trial Register NTR3412 PMID:24568360

  20. Health effects of obstructive sleep apnoea and the effectiveness of continuous positive airways pressure: a systematic review of the research evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, J.; Johns, R.; Watt, I.; Melville, A.; Sheldon, T.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine the research evidence for the health consequences of obstructive sleep apnoea and the effectiveness of continuous positive airways pressure. DESIGN: A systematic review of published research, studies being identified by searching Medline (1966-96), Embase (1974-96), and CINAHL (Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature) (1982-95); scanning citations; and consulting experts. Studies in all languages were considered which either investigated the association between obstructive sleep apnoea in adults and key health outcomes or evaluated the effectiveness of treatment of obstructive sleep apnoea with continuous positive airways pressure in adults. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Mortality, systematic hypertension, cardiac arrhythmias, ischaemic heart disease, left ventricular hypertrophy, pulmonary hypertension, stroke, vehicle accidents, measures of daytime sleepiness, and quality of life. RESULTS: 54 epidemiological studies examined the association between sleep apnoea and health related outcomes. Most were poorly designed and only weak or contradictory evidence was found of an association with cardiac arrhythmias, ischaemic heart disease, cardiac failure, systemic or pulmonary hypertension, and stroke. Evidence of a link with sleepiness and road traffic accidents was stronger but inconclusive. Only one small randomised controlled trial evaluated continuous positive airways pressure. Five non-randomised controlled trials and 38 uncontrolled trials were identified. Small changes in objectively measured daytime sleepiness were consistently found, but improvements in morbidity, mortality, and quality of life indicators were not adequately assessed. CONCLUSIONS: The relevance of sleep apnoea to public health has been exaggerated. The effectiveness of continuous positive airways pressure in improving health outcomes has been poorly evaluated. There is enough evidence suggesting benefit in reducing daytime sleepiness in some patients to warrant

  1. Analysis of the positivity of fractional standard and descriptor continuous-time linear systems by the use of Caputo-Fabrizio definition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaczorek, Tadeusz

    2016-09-01

    Using the Caputo-Fabrizio definition of fractional order derivative the positivity and asymptotic stability of the fractional standard and descriptor continuous-time linear systems are investigated. The solution to the matrix fractional differential state equations is derived. Necessary and sufficient conditions for the positivity and asymptotic stability of the fractional linear systems are established. Tests for checking of the asymptotic stability of the systems are given. The Weierstrass-Kronecker theorem on the decomposition of the regular pencil is extended to the fractional descriptor continuous-time linear systems described by the Caputo-Fabrizio derivative. A method for computing of the solution of the continuoustime systems is presented. Necessary and sufficient conditions for positivity and stability of the descriptor systems are established.

  2. [Accidental intracerebral penetration of a nasal hemostatic probe].

    PubMed

    Adam, J C; Mauchaufee, J C; Potard, G; L'Azou, D

    1999-04-01

    We report a case of inadvertent intracerebral introduction of a haemostatic device (Brighton tube) inserted into a nasal cavity for control of epistaxis in a patient with major craniofacial trauma. This complication remained unrecognized in the unconscious patient until the subsequent CT-scan control. In unconscious patients with a major facial trauma, intranasal haemostatic probes should be inserted under direct visual control by a ENT specialist and their position checked by digital palpation of the inflated cuffs behind the soft palate.

  3. A surgical view of the superior nasal turbinate: anatomical study.

    PubMed

    Orhan, Mustafa; Govsa, Figen; Saylam, Canan

    2010-06-01

    Differences of the superior nasal turbinate (SNT), presence of the supreme nasal turbinate (SpNT) and measurements of opening sphenoid sinus (OSS) are consistent anatomical landmarks that allow for safe entrances, such as posterior ethmoidectomy and sphenoid sinusotomy. The purpose of study was to investigate the anatomical details of the SNT for approaching the OSS on 20 specimens of adult cadavers under an operating microscope. The SNT and SpNT were localized more perpendicular than parallel to their axes. The SpNT structure was observed in 12 specimens (60%) and it was classified into three types. Type A SpNT was shortest of all turbinates (58.3%). In types B and C, SpNT was equal or larger than the SNT. These types were seen in 41.7% of specimens. In 11 specimens, posterior ethmoidal cells opened to supreme nasal meatus. In 7 specimens, there was one opening to supreme nasal meatus, while 2 openings were detected in 12 specimens, and 3 openings were seen in 1 specimen. All these openings belonged to posterior ethmoidal cells. To determine the position of the OSS, distances between some anatomical points were measured. In cases where the SpNT is present or the SpNT is bigger than the SNT, it is certain that a different method will be applied during the procedure in the nasal cavity. The SNT and the SpNT may easily be injured by unrecognized dissection in types B and C, leading to the disruption of its olfactory neuroepithelium and possibly to postoperative hyposmia.

  4. Tumours of the nasal cavity*

    PubMed Central

    Stünzi, H.; Hauser, B.

    1976-01-01

    Tumours of the nasal cavity are rare in domestic animals, most cases occurring in the dog. Epithelial tumours are the most common type in carnivores (dogs and cats). In general, the same types of tumour occur in domestic animals as occur in man. There was no significant predisposition for breed in dogs, but in both dogs and cats far more males than females were affected. Metastases occurred only rarely. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:1086156

  5. Neurilemmoma of lateral nasal wall.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Jyotsna Naresh; Gautam, Parul; Arora, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Neurilemmoma is a benign tumour of nerve sheath origin that can arise from myelinated nerve. The Head and neck is the most frequent site involved and other sites are scalp, face, oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, trachea and ear. Neurilemmoma usually occur as solitary lesions and in association with NF type 2. Malignant transformation is very rare. We report a case of 18 year old male presented with complaint of nasal obstruction and swelling in right side of nose. We discuss the clinical presentation, histologic features, and therapeutic options for such a rare benign lesion.

  6. Nasal cell micronuclei, cytology and clinical symptoms in stainless steel production workers exposed to chromium.

    PubMed

    Huvinen, Markku; Mäkitie, Antti; Järventaus, Hilkka; Wolff, Henrik; Stjernvall, Tuula; Hovi, Arja; Hirvonen, Ari; Ranta, Riikka; Nurminen, Markku; Norppa, Hannu

    2002-09-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether workers in stainless steel production with low exposure to various forms of chromium show an increase in micronucleated nasal cells or an excess of nasal symptoms or disease. Altogether, 48 workers employed in a stainless steel production chain were studied, 29 of them in the steel melting shop with exposure to hexavalent chromium (Cr(6+)), 14 in the sintering and crushing departments of the ferrochromium plant with exposure to trivalent chromium (Cr(3+)) and five in the mine with exposure to chromite ore (Cr(3+)). Thirty-nine workers from the cold rolling mill, with very low exposure to chromium, served as referents. All the subjects were never smokers with a minimum of 14 years employment in the same department. There were no significant differences between the exposure groups and the referents regarding the mean frequency of centromere-negative or centromere-positive micronuclei (studied by pancentromeric fluorescence in situ hybridization), nasal diseases and symptoms or mucociliary clearance of the nasal cavity. No statistically significant differences in the incidence of cell atypia or inflammatory cells were detected between the exposed workers and the reference group, except for an increase in lymphocytes among the chromite ore workers. Anterior rhinoscopy indicated slight inflammatory changes in nasal mucosa and secretion more often in the Cr(6+) and Cr(3+) groups than in the referents, the Cr(6+)-exposed workers showing more livid or oedemic epithelium. In conclusion, the stainless steel production workers, with low exposure to dusts or fumes containing hexavalent or trivalent chromium, did not show clinical changes in the nasal mucosa or an increase in nasal cell micronuclei or symptoms of nasal diseases, except for slight changes in the nasal epithelium and secretion.

  7. Subarachnoid space of the CNS, nasal mucosa, and lymphatic system.

    PubMed

    Jackson, R T; Tigges, J; Arnold, W

    1979-04-01

    We have briefly reviewed the literature pertaining to the movement of tracer molecules and infectious organisms within the olfactory nerve. There is a body of evidence indicating that tracers placed in the CSF will quickly move via the olfactory nerve to the nasal mucosa and then to the cervical lymph nodes. Organic and inorganic tracer materials and organisms as diverse as viruses, a bacillus, and an amoeba, when placed in the nasal cavity, have been shown to move from the nasal mucosa via the olfactory nerve to the olfactory bulb and the CSF. We think that a portion of the data on tracer movement is due to incorporation of tracer materials and organisms into the axoplasm of the olfactory neurons with subsequent anterograde or retrograde axoplasmic transport. However, some of the movement of tracers may occur within the olfactory perineural space. This space may be continuous with a subarachnoid extension that surrounds the olfactory nerve as it penetrates the cribriform plate. To our knowledge, no one has yet followed the perineural space to determine if it is continuous from olfactory receptor to olfactory bulb. The consideration of this space and its role is the main reason for this review.

  8. Continuation of trastuzumab beyond disease progression in HER2-positive metastatic gastric cancer: the MD Anderson experience

    PubMed Central

    Fahmawi, Yazan; Dahbour, Ibrahim; Tabash, Aziz; Rogers, Jane E.; Mares, Jeannette Elizabeth; Blum, Mariela A.; Estrella, Jeannelyn; Matamoros, Aurelio; Sagebiel, Tara; Devine, Catherine E.; Badgwell, Brian D.; Lin, Quan D.; Das, Prajnan; Ajani, Jaffer A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite the wide spread use of trastuzumab in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) overexpressing metastatic gastric cancer patients, its optimal duration of administration beyond first-line disease progression is unknown. In HER2 overexpressing metastatic breast cancer, trastuzumab continuation beyond first-line disease progression has shown improvement in time to progression (TTP) without an increased risk of treatment related toxicity. Methods HER2-overexpressing metastatic gastric cancer patients were identified from our database between January 2010 and December 2014. We retrospectively reviewed the medical records of 43 patients who received trastuzumab in combination with chemotherapy as first-line and continued trastuzumab beyond disease progression. Results Forty-three cases were identified, 27 males (62.8%), median age of the patients was 58 years. Thirty-five (81.4%) presented with stage 4 as their initial presentation. Eighty one percent had 3+ HER2 overexpression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) and 18% had 2+ HER2 overexpression confirmed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Thirteen (52%) were moderately differentiated, 16 (37.1%) were poorly differentiated. The most common sites of metastasis were liver 35 (81.4%) and lung 14 (32.5%). The most commonly used first-line regimen was oxaliplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), and trastuzumab in 22 (51.1%) patients. Twenty-five (58.1%) patients received irinotecan, 5-FU and trastuzumab in the second-line. Progression-free survival (PFS) was 5 months (95% CI: 4.01–5.99 months). Five patients are still alive and excluded from calculating the median overall survival (OS) which was 11 months (range, 5–53 months) for the remaining 20 subjects of this second-line group. Trastuzumab was not discontinued due to side effects in any of the study population. Conclusions In conclusion, this retrospective analysis suggests that continuation of trastuzumab beyond disease progression in

  9. Changes in nasal airflow and heat transfer correlate with symptom improvement after surgery for nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Kimbell, J S; Frank, D O; Laud, Purushottam; Garcia, G J M; Rhee, J S

    2013-10-18

    Surgeries to correct nasal airway obstruction (NAO) often have less than desirable outcomes, partly due to the absence of an objective tool to select the most appropriate surgical approach for each patient. Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models can be used to investigate nasal airflow, but variables need to be identified that can detect surgical changes and correlate with patient symptoms. CFD models were constructed from pre- and post-surgery computed tomography scans for 10 NAO patients showing no evidence of nasal cycling. Steady-state inspiratory airflow, nasal resistance, wall shear stress, and heat flux were computed for the main nasal cavity from nostrils to posterior nasal septum both bilaterally and unilaterally. Paired t-tests indicated that all CFD variables were significantly changed by surgery when calculated on the most obstructed side, and that airflow, nasal resistance, and heat flux were significantly changed bilaterally as well. Moderate linear correlations with patient-reported symptoms were found for airflow, heat flux, unilateral allocation of airflow, and unilateral nasal resistance as a fraction of bilateral nasal resistance when calculated on the most obstructed nasal side, suggesting that these variables may be useful for evaluating the efficacy of nasal surgery objectively. Similarity in the strengths of these correlations suggests that patient-reported symptoms may represent a constellation of effects and that these variables should be tracked concurrently during future virtual surgery planning.

  10. Nasal allergen challenge and mediators release.

    PubMed

    Carlos, A G; Carlos, M L; Ferreira, M B; Santos, A S; Santos, M C; Pedro, E

    1997-11-01

    Nasal allergen challenges, despite not reproducing exactly natural allergen exposure, are a very useful method to understand the complex cellular kinetics and cellular interactions that occur in allergic rhinitis. Cell-specific soluble mediator measurements can give useful diagnostic information. In this paper we present data concerning eosinophil cationic protein (ECP) and tryptase measurements after nasal allergen challenge.

  11. Transnasal microsurgical ethmoidectomy in nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bagatella, F; Mazzoni, A

    1980-03-01

    A technique of microsurgical ethmoidectomy by a nasal route was devised for and applied to the treatment of nasal polyposis. A description of the operative procedure and the results in 30 cases with a 3-5 years of follow-up are reported.

  12. New protocol for construction of eyeglasses-supported provisional nasal prosthesis using CAD/CAM techniques.

    PubMed

    Ciocca, Leonardo; Fantini, Massimiliano; De Crescenzio, Francesca; Persiani, Franco; Scotti, Roberto

    2010-01-01

    A new protocol for making an immediate provisional eyeglasses-supported nasal prosthesis is presented that uses laser scanning, computer-aided design/computer-aided manufacturing procedures, and rapid prototyping techniques, reducing time and costs while increasing the quality of the final product. With this protocol, the eyeglasses were digitized, and the relative position of the nasal prosthesis was planned and evaluated in a virtual environment without any try-in appointment. This innovative method saves time, reduces costs, and restores the patient's aesthetic appearance after a disfiguration caused by ablation of the nasal pyramid better than conventional restoration methods. Moreover, the digital model of the designed nasal epithesis can be used to develop a definitive prosthesis anchored to osseointegrated craniofacial implants.

  13. Assessment of nasalance and nasality in patients with a repaired cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Sinko, Klaus; Gruber, Maike; Jagsch, Reinhold; Roesner, Imme; Baumann, Arnulf; Wutzl, Arno; Denk-Linnert, Doris-Maria

    2017-03-15

    In patients with a repaired cleft palate, nasality is typically diagnosed by speech language pathologists. In addition, there are various instruments to objectively diagnose nasalance. To explore the potential of nasalance measurements after cleft palate repair by NasalView(®), we correlated perceptual nasality and instrumentally measured nasalance of eight speech items and determined the relationship between sensitivity and specificity of the nasalance measures by receiver-operating characteristics (ROC) analyses and AUC (area under the curve) computation for each single test item and specific item groups. We recruited patients with a primarily repaired cleft palate receiving speech therapy during follow-up. During a single day visit, perceptive and instrumental assessments were obtained in 36 patients and analyzed. The individual perceptual nasality was assigned to one of four categories; the corresponding instrumental nasalance measures for the eight specific speech items were expressed on a metric scale (1-100). With reference to the perceptual diagnoses, we observed 3 nasal and one oral test item with high sensitivity. However, the specificity of the nasality indicating measures was rather low. The four best speech items with the highest sensitivity provided scores ranging from 96.43 to 100%, while the averaged sensitivity of all eight items was below 90%. We conclude that perceptive evaluation of nasality remains state of the art. For clinical follow-up, instrumental nasalance assessment can objectively document subtle changes by analysis of four speech items only. Further studies are warranted to determine the applicability of instrumental nasalance measures in the clinical routine, using discriminative items only.

  14. Fabrication of a provisional nasal prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Evan B; Golden, Marjorie; Huryn, Joseph M

    2014-11-01

    A technique for making a provisional nasal prosthesis for interim use after the ablation of a midface tumor is described. The technique is especially useful for the re-creation of a nasal form in an expedient and cost-effective manner. A preoperative definitive cast, or moulage, of the patient that includes a nasal form is used to fabricate a vacuum form of the midface. The vacuum form is evaluated on the patient, the extension is adjusted, and an external adhesive knit liner is applied to give the appearance of a contoured nasal bandage. The provisional nasal prosthesis is attached with medical adhesive tape and removed daily by the patient. The prosthesis is easily replaced during the course of treatment and has been found to be functional and esthetically acceptable to those patients receiving care from the Dental Service at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center.

  15. Nasal Drug Delivery in Traditional Persian Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zarshenas, Mohammad Mehdi; Zargaran, Arman; Müller, Johannes; Mohagheghzadeh, Abdolali

    2013-01-01

    Background Over one hundred different pharmaceutical dosage forms have been recorded in literatures of Traditional Persian Medicine among which nasal forms are considerable. Objectives This study designed to derive the most often applied nasal dosage forms together with those brief clinical administrations. Materials and Methods In the current study remaining pharmaceutical manuscripts of Persia during 9th to 18th century AD have been studied and different dosage forms related to nasal application of herbal medicines and their therapeutic effects were derived. Results By searching through pharmaceutical manuscripts of medieval Persia, different nasal dosage forms involving eleven types related to three main groups are found. These types could be derived from powder, solution or liquid and gaseous forms. Gaseous form were classified into fumigation (Bakhoor), vapor bath (Enkebab), inhalation (Lakhlakheh), aroma agents (Ghalieh) and olfaction or smell (Shomoom). Nasal solutions were as drops (Ghatoor), nasal snuffing drops (Saoot) and liquid snuff formulations (Noshoogh). Powders were as nasal insufflation or snorting agents (Nofookh) and errhine or sternutator medicine (Otoos). Nasal forms were not applied only for local purposes. Rather systemic disorders and specially CNS complications were said to be a target for these dosage forms. Discussion While this novel type of drug delivery is known as a suitable substitute for oral and parenteral administration, it was well accepted and extensively mentioned in Persian medical and pharmaceutical manuscripts and other traditional systems of medicine as well. Accordingly, medieval pharmaceutical standpoints on nasal dosage forms could still be an interesting subject of study. Therefore, the current work can briefly show the pharmaceutical knowledge on nasal formulations in medieval Persia and clarify a part of history of traditional Persian pharmacy. PMID:24624204

  16. Functional nasal morphology of chimaerid fishes.

    PubMed

    Howard, Lauren E; Holmes, William M; Ferrando, Sara; Maclaine, James S; Kelsh, Robert N; Ramsey, Andrew; Abel, Richard L; Cox, Jonathan P L

    2013-09-01

    Holocephalans (chimaeras) are a group of marine fishes comprising three families: the Callorhinchidae (callorhinchid fishes), the Rhinochimaeridae (rhinochimaerid fishes) and the Chimaeridae (chimaerid fishes). We have used X-ray microcomputed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging to characterise in detail the nasal anatomy of three species of chimaerid fishes: Chimaera monstrosa, C. phantasma and Hydrolagus colliei. We have shown that the nasal chamber of these three species is linked to the external environment by an incurrent channel and to the oral cavity by an excurrent channel via an oral groove. A protrusion of variable morphology is present on the medial wall of the incurrent channel in all three species, but is absent in members of the two other holocephalan families that we inspected. A third nasal channel, the lateral channel, functionally connects the incurrent nostril to the oral cavity, by-passing the nasal chamber. From anatomical reconstructions, we have proposed a model for the circulation of water, and therefore the transport of odorant, in the chimaerid nasal region. In this model, water could flow through the nasal region via the nasal chamber or the lateral channel. In either case, the direction of flow could be reversed. Circulation through the entire nasal region is likely to be driven primarily by the respiratory pump. We have identified several anatomical features that may segregate, distribute, facilitate and regulate flow in the nasal region and have considered the consequences of flow reversal. The non-sensory cilia lining the olfactory sensory channels appear to be mucus-propelling, suggesting that these cilia have a common protective role in cartilaginous fishes (sharks, rays and chimaeras). The nasal region of chimaerid fishes shows at least two adaptations to a benthic lifestyle, and suggests good olfactory sensitivity, with secondary folding enhancing the hypothetical flat sensory surface area by up to 70%.

  17. Oxidative stress and quality of life in elderly patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome: are there differences after six months of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment?

    PubMed Central

    Yagihara, Fabiana; Lucchesi, Ligia Mendonça; D'Almeida, Vânia; de Mello, Marco Túlio; Tufik, Sergio; Bittencourt, Lia Rita Azeredo

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment on oxidative stress parameters and the quality of life of elderly patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. METHODS: In total, 30 obstructive sleep apnea syndrome patients and 27 subjects without obstructive sleep apnea syndrome were included in this study. Both groups underwent quality of life and oxidative stress evaluations at baseline and after six months. Polysomnography was performed in both groups at baseline and a second time in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome group after six months of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment. All of the variables were compared between the control and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome groups in this prospective case-control study. RESULTS: The baseline concentrations of the antioxidant enzyme catalase were higher in the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome group than the control group. After Continuous Positive Airway Pressure treatment, the obstructive sleep apnea syndrome group exhibited a reduction in the level of oxidative stress, as indicated by a decrease in the level of lipid peroxidation measured by the malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration [pre: 2.7 nmol malondialdehyde/mL (95% 1.6-3.7) vs. post: 1.3 nmol MDA/mL (0.7-1.9), p<0.01]. Additionally, improvements were observed in two domains covered by the SF-36 questionnaire: functional capacity [pre: 77.4 (69.2-85.5) vs. post: 83.4 (76.9-89.9), p = 0.002] and pain [pre: 65.4 (52.8-78.1) vs. post: 77.8 (67.2-88.3), p = 0.004]. CONCLUSION: Our study demonstrated that the use of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure to treat obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in elderly patients reduced oxidative stress and improved the quality of life. PMID:22760893

  18. Modified Activation Technique for Nasal Stent of Nasoalveolar Molding Appliance for Columellar Lengthening in Bilateral Cleft Lip/Palate.

    PubMed

    Patil, Pravinkumar G; Nimbalkar-Patil, Smita P

    2016-03-22

    Bilateral cleft lip/cleft palate is associated with nasal deformities typified by a short columella. The presurgical nasoalveolar molding (NAM) therapy approach includes reduction of the size of the intraoral alveolar cleft as well as positioning of the surrounding deformed soft tissues and cartilages. In a bilateral cleft patient, NAM, along with columellar elongation, eliminates the need for columellar lengthening surgery. Thus the frequent surgical intervention to achieve the desired esthetic results can be avoided. This article proposes a modified activation technique of the nasal stent for a NAM appliance for columellar lengthening in bilateral cleft lip/palate patients. The design highlights relining of the columellar portion of the nasal stent and the wire-bending of the nasal stent to achieve desirable results within the limited span of plasticity of the nasal cartilages. With this technique the vertical taping of the premaxilla to the oral plate can be avoided.

  19. Young women's attitudes toward continuous use of oral contraceptives: the effect of priming positive attitudes toward menstruation on women's willingness to suppress menstruation.

    PubMed

    Rose, Jennifer Gorman; Chrisler, Joan C; Couture, Samantha

    2008-08-01

    The present study investigated American women's attitudes toward menstrual suppression and the effect of priming attitudes toward menstruation on women's willingness to suppress menstruation. One hundred college women randomly were assigned to either a positive priming group or a negative priming group. The positive priming group first completed the menstrual joy questionnaire (MJQ) followed by a willingness to suppress menstruation (WSM) questionnaire, the beliefs and attitudes toward menstruation (BATM) questionnaire, the menstrual distress questionnaire (MDQ), and a demographic questionnaire. The negative priming group completed, in the following order: the MDQ, WSM, BATM, MJQ, and demographics. Priming affected women's reports of positive cycle-related changes on the MDQ, but not women's willingness to suppress menstruation. Higher scores on the MJQ, positive attitudes toward menstrual suppression, and previous oral contraceptive (OC) use were predictors of women's willingness to suppress menstruation. Women's primary source of information about menstrual suppression was "media," and their primary concern was "safety." Thus, researchers should continue to investigate the long-term effects of continuous OC use and to analyze information about menstrual suppression in the popular press.

  20. Predictors of Long-Term Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Cardiovascular Disease in the SAVE Study

    PubMed Central

    Chai-Coetzer, Ching Li; Luo, Yuan-Ming; Antic, Nick A.; Zhang, Xi-Long; Chen, Bao-Yuan; He, Quan-Ying; Heeley, Emma; Huang, Shao-Guang; Anderson, Craig; Zhong, Nan-Shan; McEvoy, R. Doug

    2013-01-01

    Study Objectives: To determine the clinical variables that best predict long- term continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) adherence among patients with cardiovascular disease who have obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Design: 12-mo prospective within-trial observational study. Setting: Centers in China, Australia, and New Zealand participating in the Sleep Apnea cardioVascular Endpoints (SAVE) study. Patients: There were 275 patients age 45-70 y with cardiovascular disease (i.e., previously documented transient ischemic attack, stroke, or coronary artery disease) and OSA (4% oxygen desaturation index (ODI) > 12) who were randomized into the CPAP arm of the SAVE trial prior to July 1, 2010. Methods: Age, sex, country of residence, type of cardiovascular disease, baseline ODI, severity of sleepiness, and Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS) scores plus CPAP side effects and adherence at 1 mo were entered in univariate analyses in an attempt to identify factors predictive of CPAP adherence at 12 mo. Variables with P < 0.2 were then included in a multivariate analysis using a linear mixed model with sites as a random effect and 12-mo CPAP use as the dependent outcome variable. Measurements and Results: CPAP adherence at 1, 6, and 12 mo was (mean ± standard deviation) 4.4 ± 2.0, 3.8 ± 2.3, and 3.3 ± 2.4 h/night, respectively. CPAP use at 1 mo (effect estimate ± standard error, 0.65 ± 0.07 per h increase, P < 0.001) and side effects at 1 mo (-0.24 ± 0.092 per additional side effect, P = 0.009) were the only independent predictors of 12- mo CPAP adherence. Conclusion: Continuous positive airway pressure use in patients with coexisting cardiovascular disease and moderate to severe obstructive sleep apnea decreases significantly over 12 months. This decline can be predicted by early patient experiences with continuous positive airway pressure (i.e., adherence and side effects at 1 month), raising the possibility that intensive early interventions could

  1. The Efficacy of Nasal Steroids in Treatment of Otitis Media with Effusion: A Comparative Study

    PubMed Central

    El-Anwar, Mohammad Waheed; Nofal, Ahmad Abdel-Fattah; Khazbak, Alaa Omar; Sayed, Ahmad Ebrahim El; Hassan, Mohammad Ramadan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Otitis media with effusion (OME) continues to be an important pediatric clinical problem, and more studies are needed to decide the proper treatment for it. Objective To assess the efficacy of nasal steroids in the management of OME by comparing its results with that of oral steroid and that of nasal saline spray as placebo. Methods This study was carried on 60 patients with OME who were divided into three groups: in group 1, 20 patients received mometasone furoate spray, one puff in each nostril daily, for 3 months; in group 2, 20 patients received oral prednisolone, 5 mg three times per day for the first 3 weeks; in group 3, 20 patients received nasal saline spray, one puff in each nostril daily for 3 months. Results A highly significant difference between systemic or topical (nasal spray) steroid therapy and saline nasal spray was detected (p < 0.001), and the difference between systemic and topical steroid was nonsignificant (p > 0.05). Conclusion Nasal steroid spray can be used as an effective treatment for OME, giving a significant result similar to systemic steroid. Further studies are needed to investigate its use for longer duration and in recurrent cases. PMID:26491474

  2. Polypoidal Lesions in the Nasal Cavity

    PubMed Central

    Kumari M.K., Kalpana; K.C., Mahadeva

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Nasal polyps are polypoidal masses arising from mucous membranes of nose and paranasal sinuses. They are overgrowths of the mucosa that frequently accompany allergic rhinitis. They are freely movable and nontender. Aims and Objectives: The purpose of this study was to study the histopathologic spectrum of polypoidal lesions of the nasal cavity. Materials and Methods: The study comprised of 100 consecutive cases of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity, received in the department of pathology. The age and sex of the patients were recorded. The tissues were routinely processed for histopathologic sections and stained with haematoxylin and eosin stains. Special stains like Periodic acid Schiff (PAS) was done wherever applicable. The cases were classified into neoplastic and nonneoplastic lesions. The neoplastic lesions were further classified according to WHO classification on histopathologic examination. Results: Analysis of 100 polypoidal lesions in the nose and paranasal sinuses with clinical diagnosis of nasal polyps, revealed 66 cases were nonneoplastic and 34 were neoplastic;17 (50%)were benign and 17(50%) were malignant. True nasal polyps both inflammatory and allergic together comprised 44 cases of the 100 polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity. Angiofibroma and inverted papilloma were the most frequent benign tumour accounting for 12/17(0.7%). The most common malignant tumour was anaplastic carcinoma 7/17(0.4%). Nonneoplastic and benign tumours were common in younger age groups whereas malignant tumours were most common in older males. Conclusion: The majority of polypoidal lesions in the nasal cavity are nonneoplastic. PMID:23905098

  3. Disorders of the nasal valve area

    PubMed Central

    Bloching, Marc Boris

    2008-01-01

    The nasal valve area is not a singular structure, but a complex three-dimensional construct consisting of several morphological structures. From the physiologic point of view, it is the place of maximum nasal flow resistance (“flow limiting segment”). Therefore, according to Poiseuille’s law, even minor constrictions of this area result in a clinically relevant impairment of nasal breathing for the patient. This narrow passage, also called “ostium internum nasi”, is formed by the mobile lateral nasal wall, the anterior septum with the swell body, the head of the inferior turbinate and the osseous piriform aperture. Within the framework of aetiology, static and dynamic disorders of the nasal valve area have to be distinguished since they result in different therapeutic measures. In the context of diagnosis, the exploration of the case history for assessing the patient’s extent of suffering and the clinical examination are very important. In addition to the presentation of the basics of disorders of the nasal valves, this paper focuses on the treatment of dynamic disorders that mainly constitute the more important therapeutic issue. In this context, we distinguish between stabilisation techniques through grafts or implants and stabilising suture techniques. Following a thorough analysis, the correction of static nasal valve disorders requires various plastic-reconstructive measures using transposition grafting and skin or composite grafts. PMID:22073083

  4. Phenotype and function of nasal dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Haekyung; Ruane, Darren; Law, Kenneth; Ho, Yan; Garg, Aakash; Rahman, Adeeb; Esterházy, Daria; Cheong, Cheolho; Goljo, Erden; Sikora, Andrew G.; Mucida, Daniel; Chen, Benjamin; Govindraj, Satish; Breton, Gaëlle; Mehandru, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Intranasal vaccination generates immunity across local, regional and distant sites. However, nasal dendritic cells (DC), pivotal for the induction of intranasal vaccine- induced immune responses, have not been studied in detail. Here, using a variety of parameters, we define nasal DCs in mice and humans. Distinct subsets of “classical” DCs, dependent on the transcription factor zbtb46 were identified in the murine nose. The murine nasal DCs were FLT3 ligand-responsive and displayed unique phenotypic and functional characteristics including the ability to present antigen, induce an allogeneic T cell response and migrate in response to LPS or live bacterial pathogens. Importantly, in a cohort of human volunteers, BDCA-1+ DCs were observed to be the dominant nasal DC population at steady state. During chronic inflammation, the frequency of both BDCA-1+ and BDCA-3hi DCs was reduced in the nasal tissue, associating the loss of these immune sentinels with chronic nasal inflammation. The present study is the first detailed description of the phenotypic, ontogenetic and functional properties of nasal DCs and will inform the design of preventative immunization strategies as well as therapeutic modalities against chronic rhinosinusitis. PMID:25669151

  5. Adjuncts to Improve Nasal Reconstruction Results.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Shayna Lee; Hurst, Eva A

    2017-02-01

    The final cosmetic appearance of nasal reconstruction scars is of paramount importance to both the patient and surgeon. Ideal postreconstruction nasal scars are flat and indistinguishable from surrounding skin. Unfortunately, even with meticulous surgical execution, nasal scars can occasionally be suboptimal. Abnormal fibroblast response can lead to hypertrophic nasal scars, and excessive angiogenesis may lead to telangiectasias or an erythematous scar. Imperfect surgical closure or poor postoperative management can lead to surgical outcomes with step-offs, depressions, suture marks, or dyspigmentation. Aesthetically unacceptable nasal scars can cause pruritus, tenderness, pain, sleep disturbance, and anxiety and depression in postsurgical patients. Fortunately, there are several minimally invasive or noninvasive techniques that allow for enhancement and improvement of cosmetic results with minimal risk and associated downtime. This article provides an overview of adjuncts to improve nasal reconstruction with a focus on techniques to be used in the postoperative period. Armed with an understanding of relevant available therapies, skillful surgeons may drastically improve the final cosmesis and outcome of nasal reconstruction scars.

  6. Canine and feline nasal neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Malinowski, Christine

    2006-05-01

    Dogs and cats of our society have outgrown their status as merely pets and are now considered our close companions and even family members. This shift in their roles has led to pet owners seeking improved preventative medicine for their four-legged friends. Subsequently, dogs and cats are living longer lives than ever before and developing more old-age-related diseases. One of the most devastating diseases of older animals is cancer. Once a veterinarian has detected cancer in a pet, pet owners seek advice on their next course of action. This article is intended to provide concise information regarding the diagnosis and treatment of intranasal tumors of the dog and cat. This article outlines the forms of nasal tumors that are the most common, the recommended imaging and biopsy techniques to diagnose the tumor, and the most appropriate treatments of them.

  7. Multiple diagnostic tests to identify cattle with Bovine viral diarrhea virus and duration of positive test results in persistently infected cattle.

    PubMed

    Fulton, Robert W; Hessman, Bill E; Ridpath, Julia F; Johnson, Bill J; Burge, Lurinda J; Kapil, Sanjay; Braziel, Barbara; Kautz, Kira; Reck, Amy

    2009-04-01

    Several tests for Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV) were applied to samples collected monthly from December 20, 2005, through November 27, 2006 (day 0 to day 342) from 12 persistently infected (PI) cattle with BVDV subtypes found in US cattle: BVDV-1a, BVDV-1b, and BVDV-2a. The samples included clotted blood for serum, nasal swabs, and fresh and formalin-fixed ear notches. The tests were as follows: titration of infectious virus in serum and nasal swabs; antigen-capture (AC) enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), or ACE, on serum, nasal swabs, and fresh ear notches; gel-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) testing of serum, nasal swabs, and fresh ear notches; immunohistochemical (IHC) testing of formalin-fixed ear notches; and serologic testing for BVDV antibodies in serum. Of the 12 animals starting the study, 3 died with mucosal disease. The ACE and IHC tests on ear notches had positive results throughout the study, as did the ACE and PCR tests on serum. There was detectable virus in nasal swabs from all the cattle throughout the study except for a few samples that were toxic to cell cultures. The serum had a virus titer > or = log(10) 1.60 in all samples from all the cattle except for 3 collections from 1 animal. Although there were several equivocal results, the PCR test most often had positive results. The BVDV antibodies were due to vaccination or exposure to heterologous strains and did not appear to interfere with any BVDV test. These findings illustrate that PI cattle may be identified by several tests, but differentiation of PI cattle from cattle with acute BVDV infection requires additional testing, especially of blood samples and nasal swabs positive on initial testing. Also, calves PI with BVDV are continual shedders of infectious virus, as shown by the infectivity of nasal swabs over the 11-mo study.

  8. IgG4-related disease with cavernous sinus and intra-orbital lesions diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Ruka; Yoshimura, Shunsuke; Motomura, Masakatsu; Tsujino, Akira; Hayashi, Tomayoshi; Hara, Minoru

    2016-09-29

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disease characterized by lesions with IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltration in the involved organs and a raised serum IgG4 level. We report a patient of 70-year-old male presented orbital inflammation of IgG4-related disease. The patient developed right eye pain, double vision, and reduced eye sight. MRI image revealed mild right ocular proptosis and swelling of right carvenous sinus, bilateral intraorbital extraocular muscles and right optic nerve. Right optic nerve showed ring-like enhancement. IgG4-related disease was suspected with increased serum IgG4 level of 355 mg/dl, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and prostate enlargement. Transbronchial lung biopsy and prostate needle biopsy were administered with negative results. The eye related symptoms resolved with time, but serum IgG4 continuously increased. IgG4-related disease was diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy, which showed IgG4 positive plasma cells within the inflammatory infiltrate. This report emphasizes the usefulness of nasal mucosa biopsy for the diagnosis of IgG4 related disease with lesions difficult to approach.

  9. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator. (a) Identification. A powered nasal irrigator is an AC-powered device intended to wash the nasal cavity by means of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section...

  10. 21 CFR 874.5550 - Powered nasal irrigator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5550 Powered nasal irrigator. (a) Identification. A powered nasal irrigator is an AC-powered device intended to wash the nasal cavity by means of a... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Powered nasal irrigator. 874.5550 Section...

  11. Pharmacology of Nasal Medications: An Update

    PubMed Central

    Martin, G. F.

    1988-01-01

    The author of this article reviews the pharmacology of nasal medication, focusing on the indications and side-effects. The newer group of non-sedating antihistamines proves to be a useful supplement to disodium cromoglycate and the traditional antihistamines in the treatment of allergic rhinitis. The topical steroids (flunisolide and beclomethasone dipropionate) did not produce a significant incidence of adrenal suppression, mucosal atrophy, or nasal candidiasis. The anticholinergic ipatropium bromide shows promise in the treatment of rhinorrhea. The author also reviews the use of decongestants and emollients and remarks on the factors that affect patient compliance when nasal medications are prescribed. PMID:20469495

  12. Microsurgery in nasal polyposis transnasal ethmoidectomy.

    PubMed

    Bagatella, F; Mazzoni, A

    1986-01-01

    Transnasal ethmoidectomy is a current treatment in selected cases of nasal polyposis, and with its complicated anatomy offers a proper opportunity for microsurgery. Ten years' experience of microsurgical ethmoidectomy in 155 patients with nasal polyposis is reported. The surgical anatomy of the ethmoid sinus is reviewed with attention to the requirements of the microsurgical approach, and the operative procedure is described. The microsurgical approach is discussed both as a part of the treatment of nasal polyposis and as a new development in rhinologic surgery. Advantages of the technique are the objective safety against risks of the ethmoid area and enhanced sense of security for the surgeon.

  13. Evaluation and Reduction of Nasal Trauma

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Brian P.; Downey, Cara R.; Stal, Samuel

    2010-01-01

    Nasal trauma plays a large and important role in the field of craniofacial trauma. The resulting aesthetic, structural, and functional sequelae associated with these injuries necessitate a thorough understanding of the topic. This includes an appreciation for the unique anatomic features of the region, the important aspects of the initial history and examination, nasal injury classification, and subsequent treatment timing and options. While a large body of literature has accumulated on the topic, the purpose of this article is to focus on both clinically relevant information and pearls of management. Additionally, age-specific concerns, secondary procedures, and nasal fracture grafting, will be addressed as well. PMID:22550458

  14. Perceptual processing of Mandarin nasals by L1 and L2 Mandarin speakers.

    PubMed

    Lai, Yi-Hsiu

    2012-08-01

    Nasals are cross-linguistically susceptible to change, especially in the syllable final position. Acoustic reports on Mandarin nasal production have recently shown that the syllable-final distinction is frequently dropped. Few studies, however, have addressed the issue of perceptual processing in Mandarin nasals for L1 and L2 speakers of Mandarin Chinese. The current paper addressed to what extent and in what directions L1 and L2 speakers of Mandarin differed in perceiving Mandarin nasals. Possible variables, including the linguistic backgrounds (i.e. L1 vs. L2 speakers of Mandarin Chinese), the vocalic contexts (i.e. [i, ə, a, y, ua, uə, ia]) and the phonetic settings (i.e. syllable-initial vs. syllable-final), were discussed. Asymmetrical findings in the current investigation indicated limitations of speech learning theories developed from European languages in the context of Mandarin nasals. A tri-dimensional model was thus suggested for interpreting the cognitive mechanism in Mandarin nasal perception.

  15. Cohort study of the seasonal effect on nasal carriage and the presence of Mycobacterium leprae in an endemic area in the general population.

    PubMed

    Lavania, M; Turankar, R P; Karri, S; Chaitanya, V S; Sengupta, U; Jadhav, R S

    2013-10-01

    Leprosy continues to be a significant health problem in certain pockets in developing countries. Better understanding of the transmission and source of the infection would help to decipher the transmission link, leading to control of the spread of the disease. The nose is considered to be a portal of entry, suggesting an aerial route for transmission through droplet infection. The evidence suggests that many individuals from endemic countries carry Mycobacterium leprae in their nasal cavities without having obvious symptoms of leprosy. The objective of the present study was to assess the presence of M. leprae on the nasal mucosa in the general population from a leprosy-endemic pocket. M. leprae detection was carried out using PCR targeting RLEP. Four hundred subjects from an area highly endemic for leprosy were included in the study and followed up during three different seasons--winter, summer, and monsoon--for evidence of nasal exposure to M. leprae. PCR positivity for M. leprae was observed in 29%, 21% and 31% of the samples collected in winter, summer and the monsoon season, respectively. Twenty-six individuals from the cohort showed amplification for M. leprae for all seasons. Our results are consistent with reports in the literature showing widespread exposure to M. leprae in the endemic community. The results also suggest possible association of the environmental conditions (climate) with the transmission pattern and levels of exposure to M. leprae. However, the present study indicated that the population from highly endemic pockets will have exposure to M. leprae irrespective of season.

  16. Nasal mass removal in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus).

    PubMed

    Bercier, Marjorie; Wynne, Janna; Klause, Stephen; Stadler, Cynthia K; Gorow, April; Pye, Geoffrey W

    2012-12-01

    Nasal masses in the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) are not uncommon and can be challenging to diagnose and treat. Differential diagnoses for nasal masses in the koala are cryptococcal granulomas, nasal polyps, nasal adenocarcinoma, and osteochondromatosis. This report describes successful surgical approaches for two adult koalas with nasal masses and includes photodocumentation and description of the anatomy of the koala nasal passages from the postmortem transverse sectioning of a normal koala head. Surgical removal of the nasal masses in these koalas resulted in a rapid resolution of clinical signs.

  17. Modified Quilting Sutures: ANew Technique for Hematoma and Abscess of Nasal Septum.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Shoaib; Ashfaq, Muhammed; Shabbir, Asad

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to analyze the results of a modified continuous quilting sutures technique in a series of patients presenting with hematoma and/or abscess of nasal septum (HANS). Only patients with a confirmed diagnosis of HANS without co-morbid conditions (which could predispose to a bleeding tendency), were selected. Following incision and drainage, nasal septal flaps were coapted by applying continuous quilting sutures only. The success rate of this technique in terms of recurrence requiring re-exploration and drainage was 100%. Quilting sutures were generally well tolerated with few complaints. Saddle deformity was the most obvious complication of HANS, seen with septal abscess. Quilting sutures can be considered as an alternative treatment option for HANS. The modified technique employed in this study demonstrated impressive results and avoided the morbidity of nasal packing with fewer complications.

  18. [Disturbances of nasal aerodynamics in patients with the curved nasal septum and the rationale for its surgical correction].

    PubMed

    Tulebaev, R K; Mustafin, A A; Zholdybaeva, Z T

    2011-01-01

    Serious disturbances of nasal aerodynamics contribute to the development of diseases of the broncho-pulmonary apparatus. The early recognition of ventilation problems in patients with the curved nasal septum is paramount for the efficacious prevention and treatment of respiratory complications. The authors describe principles of rhinosurgical correction of affected nasal aerodynamics in patients with the curved nasal septum.

  19. Perceiving nasal patency through mucosal cooling rather than air temperature or nasal resistance.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Kai; Blacker, Kara; Luo, Yuehao; Bryant, Bruce; Jiang, Jianbo

    2011-01-01

    Adequate perception of nasal airflow (i.e., nasal patency) is an important consideration for patients with nasal sinus diseases. The perception of a lack of nasal patency becomes the primary symptom that drives these patients to seek medical treatment. However, clinical assessment of nasal patency remains a challenge because we lack objective measurements that correlate well with what patients perceive. The current study examined factors that may influence perceived patency, including air temperature, humidity, mucosal cooling, nasal resistance, and trigeminal sensitivity. Forty-four healthy subjects rated nasal patency while sampling air from three facial exposure boxes that were ventilated with untreated room air, cold air, and dry air, respectively. In all conditions, air temperature and relative humidity inside each box were recorded with sensors connected to a computer. Nasal resistance and minimum airway cross-sectional area (MCA) were measured using rhinomanometry and acoustic rhinometry, respectively. General trigeminal sensitivity was assessed through lateralization thresholds to butanol. No significant correlation was found between perceived patency and nasal resistance or MCA. In contrast, air temperature, humidity, and butanol threshold combined significantly contributed to the ratings of patency, with mucosal cooling (heat loss) being the most heavily weighted predictor. Air humidity significantly influences perceived patency, suggesting that mucosal cooling rather than air temperature alone provides the trigeminal sensation that results in perception of patency. The dynamic cooling between the airstream and the mucosal wall may be quantified experimentally or computationally and could potentially lead to a new clinical evaluation tool.

  20. Effectiveness of applying continuous positive airway pressure in a patient with paradoxical vocal fold movement after endotracheal extubation: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Song, Keu La Me; Ko, Dong Chan; Pin, Jung Woo; Ryu, Kyong Ho; Kim, Hyun Soo

    2016-01-01

    Paradoxical vocal fold movement (PVFM) is an uncommon upper airway disorder defined as paradoxical adduction of the vocal folds during inspiration. The etiology and treatment of PVFM are unclear. The physician should manage this condition because of the possibility of near complete airway obstruction in severe case of PVFM. We report a case of successful airway management in a patient with PVFM by applying continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In this case, PVFM was detected after removing an endotracheal tube from a 67-year-old male who underwent excision of a laryngeal mass. The patient recovered without complications in 1 day with support by CPAP. PMID:26885309

  1. Effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction.

    PubMed

    Dávila, I; Sastre, J; Mullol, J; Montoro, J; Jáuregui, I; Ferrer, M; del Cuvillo, A; Bartra, J; Valero, A

    2011-01-01

    H1 antihistamines constitute one of the main references for the treatment of allergic rhinitis. Classically, these drugs have been considered effective in controlling sneezing, rhinorrhea and itching, though they have not been regarded as particularly effective in application to nasal obstruction. The most recent studies, involving second-generation H1 antihistamines (desloratadine, fexofenadine, levocetirizine, rupatadine), have shown these drugs to offer effects upon nasal obstruction significantly superior to those of placebo. The present review examines the effect of bilastine, a new, potent and highly specific H1 antihistamine without sedative effects or cardiac toxicity, upon nasal obstruction. The analysis of the data from the different clinical trials indicates that in patients with allergic rhinitis, the effect of bilastine upon nasal obstruction is superior to that of placebo and similar to that of other second-generation H1 antihistamines, manifesting within 24 hours after the start of treatment.

  2. Primary nasal tuberculosis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Nayar, Ravi C; Al Kaabi, Juma; Ghorpade, Kanchanmala

    2004-03-01

    During the past 2 decades, tuberculosis--both pulmonary and extrapulmonary--has re-emerged as a major health problem worldwide. Nasal tuberculosis--either primary or secondary to pulmonary tuberculosis or facial lupus--is rare, but it should be considered in the differential diagnosis of nasal granulomas. We describe a case of primary nasal tuberculosis in an adult male who presented with a polypoid lesion in one nasal cavity. The diagnosis was based on histopathology and the patient's successful response to antituberculous drug treatment. Given the rising incidence of tuberculosis, it is prudent that otolaryngologists remain cognizant of this infection as a potential cause of unusual lesions in the head and neck.

  3. Nasal Chondromesenchymal Hamartoma in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Finitsis, Stefanos; Giavroglou, Constantinos; Potsi, Stamatia; Constantinidis, Ioannis; Mpaltatzidis, Angelos; Rachovitsas, Dimitrios; Tzioufa, Valentini

    2009-05-15

    Nasal chondromesenchymal hamartoma (NCMH) is a benign tumor that was described in 1998. The occurrence of this lesion in the nasal cavity of infants and children is especially rare, with only 21 cases reported in the international literature. We report a 12-month-old boy with respiratory distress due to nasal obstruction. Computed tomographic scan and magnetic resonance imaging examination demonstrated a soft-tissue mass obstructing the left nasal cavity. Digital subtraction angiography and preoperative superselective embolization with microparticles were also performed. The tumor was completely resected surgically. Histopathology and immunohistochemical analyses of the tumor disclosed a NCMH. The imaging characteristics of the tumor are described and the radiology literature is reviewed.

  4. Study of Microorganism Growth Pattern in Nasal Pack of Patients Visiting the Department of ENT, Head and Neck Surgery.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, I; Pokharel, M; Dhakal, A; Amatya, R Cm; Madhup, S; Sherchan, J B

    2015-01-01

    Background Nasal packs are utilized nearly by otorhinolaryngologists for controlling epistaxis and post nasal procedures. Complications have been reported due to them; therefore the use of antibiotics is a common practice among otorhinolaryngologists. Objective To detect microbiological flora associated with nasal packing and find evidence to support the benefit of systemic antibiotics with it. Method A prospective, analytical study was conducted on 51 patients presenting to the Department of ENT, KUSMS from June to September 2015 who required nasal packing. Approval of the local Institutional review committee (IRC) was taken. The mid part of the pack was collected in a sterile bottle under aseptic technique and sent to microbiology department. Specimen collection, culture, identification tests were done according to the guidelines by American Society for Microbiology. Data were collected using the individual patient records and Microsoft Office Excel 2007. Statistical analysis was performed with SPSS 16.0. Result Among the 51 cultures; 33 (64.7%) were positive. In 18 (35.3%) cultures no organism was grown. Statistical analysis did not show significance between duration of pack kept with microbial growth (p=0.051) or the type of pack kept (p=0.212) .It showed significance with foul smell of the pack to the growth (p <0.001). Conclusion Microbiological flora was associated with nasal pack. Antibiotic soaked nasal packs have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with plain nasal packs. Nasal packs kept for less than 48 hours have lesser incidence of positive bacterial growth when compared with nasal packs kept for more than 48 hours. Therefore, administering systemic antibiotics in cases when we plan to keep the pack for longer duration is recommended.

  5. CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Clinical Trials High Blood Pressure National Center on Sleep Disorders Research Oxygen Therapy Respiratory Distress Syndrome Sleep Apnea ... This Content: Updated: December 9, 2016 Sleep Infographic Sleep Disorders & Insufficient Sleep: Improving Health through Research National Institutes ...

  6. Continuous Positive Airway Pressure (CPAP)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Otolaryngology–Head and Neck Surgery. Reproduction or republication strictly prohibited without prior written ... Copyright 2017. American Academy of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery 1650 Diagonal Rd Alexandria, VA 22314 tel (703) ...

  7. Open safety pin in the nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Sen, I; Sikder, B; Sinha, R; Paul, R

    2004-04-01

    Foreign bodies in the nasal cavity are common-day occurrences in Otolaryngologic practice. But an open safety pin in nose with it' s sharp end directed towards roof is a rare incidence, and available literature is silent about this presentation; it is probably, the first of it' s kind being reported. Two cases of safety pins inside the nasal cavity, one open and the other closed, have been presented here with a brief review of literature.

  8. Numerical simulation and nasal air-conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Keck, Tilman; Lindemann, Jörg

    2011-01-01

    Heating and humidification of the respiratory air are the main functions of the nasal airways in addition to cleansing and olfaction. Optimal nasal air conditioning is mandatory for an ideal pulmonary gas exchange in order to avoid desiccation and adhesion of the alveolar capillary bed. The complex three-dimensional anatomical structure of the nose makes it impossible to perform detailed in vivo studies on intranasal heating and humidification within the entire nasal airways applying various technical set-ups. The main problem of in vivo temperature and humidity measurements is a poor spatial and time resolution. Therefore, in vivo measurements are feasible only to a restricted extent, solely providing single temperature values as the complete nose is not entirely accessible. Therefore, data on the overall performance of the nose are only based on one single measurement within each nasal segment. In vivo measurements within the entire nose are not feasible. These serious technical issues concerning in vivo measurements led to a large number of numerical simulation projects in the last few years providing novel information about the complex functions of the nasal airways. In general, numerical simulations merely calculate predictions in a computational model, e.g. a realistic nose model, depending on the setting of the boundary conditions. Therefore, numerical simulations achieve only approximations of a possible real situation. The aim of this review is the synopsis of the technical expertise on the field of in vivo nasal air conditioning, the novel information of numerical simulations and the current state of knowledge on the influence of nasal and sinus surgery on nasal air conditioning. PMID:22073112

  9. Nasal manifestations in chromium industry workers.

    PubMed

    Aiyer, R G; Kumar, Gaurav

    2003-04-01

    People working in mines, plating factories, cement industries are mainly exposed to chrome substances, IIexavalent chromium has been implicated for its toxic effect on the nasal mucosa. Hereby we present a rare study of 28 patients who attended out patient department of Otorhinolaryngology at SSG Hospital, Baroda from a nearby chromium industry. This study aims to present various nasal manifestations of toxic effects of prolonged chromium exposure.

  10. Presurgical nasal moulding in a neonate with cleft lip

    PubMed Central

    Deshpande, Anshula; Shah, Dixit; Macwan, Chirag S

    2014-01-01

    The concept of presurgical nasoalveolar moulding (PNM) was developed to improve the aesthetic result of surgically corrected cleft lip. This paper presents the method of fabrication of PNM appliance and the case of a 30-day-old neonate with unilateral cleft lip in whom nasal moulding was performed. Treatment was initiated at 30 days and continued for 60 days after which the surgical correction of cleft lip was performed. Significant improvement in aesthetics and symmetry of the nose was achieved at the end of the treatment. PMID:24928928

  11. Metabolism of dopamine by the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    Chemuturi, Nagendra V; Donovan, Maureen D

    2006-11-01

    The nasal route of administration offers several advantages over oral and intravenous administration, including the ability to avoid hepatic first pass metabolism. Dopamine deficiency has been associated with several neurological disorders; it has been shown to have good systemic bioavailability and significant uptake into the CNS following intranasal administration. The purpose of these studies was to investigate the limiting role of mucosal metabolism of dopamine during nasal absorption. In vitro transport and initial rate studies were carried out using nasal mucosal explants to study dopamine permeability and metabolism. Dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) was the only metabolite detected. Monoamine oxidase (MAO), the enzyme responsible for DOPAC formation, was localized to the submucosal region of the nasal explants. The amount of DOPAC formed during the transport studies was less than 0.5% of the initial amount of dopamine placed into the system. Iproniazid, an MAO inhibitor, blocked DOPAC formation but had no effect on dopamine transport. The limited extent of dopamine metabolism compared to its mucosal transport demonstrates that nasal dopamine transport is not significantly reduced by mucosal metabolism and suggests that the nasal route may be promising for the efficient delivery of dopamine to the CNS.

  12. Hybrid Mesh for Nasal Airflow Studies

    PubMed Central

    Zubair, Mohammed; Abdullah, Mohammed Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin

    2013-01-01

    The accuracy of the numerical result is closely related to mesh density as well as its distribution. Mesh plays a very significant role in the outcome of numerical simulation. Many nasal airflow studies have employed unstructured mesh and more recently hybrid mesh scheme has been utilized considering the complexity of anatomical architecture. The objective of this study is to compare the results of hybrid mesh with unstructured mesh and study its effect on the flow parameters inside the nasal cavity. A three-dimensional nasal cavity model is reconstructed based on computed tomographic images of a healthy Malaysian adult nose. Navier-Stokes equation for steady airflow is solved numerically to examine inspiratory nasal flow. The pressure drop obtained using the unstructured computational grid is about 22.6 Pa for a flow rate of 20 L/min, whereas the hybrid mesh resulted in 17.8 Pa for the same flow rate. The maximum velocity obtained at the nasal valve using unstructured grid is 4.18 m/s and that with hybrid mesh is around 4.76 m/s. Hybrid mesh reported lower grid convergence index (GCI) than the unstructured mesh. Significant differences between unstructured mesh and hybrid mesh are determined highlighting the usefulness of hybrid mesh for nasal airflow studies. PMID:23983811

  13. Survey of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus and intestinal parasites among food handlers working at Gondar University, Northwest Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Food borne disease are major health problems in developing countries like Ethiopia. Food handlers with poor personal hygiene working in food establishments could be potential sources of disease due to pathogenic organisms. However; information on disease prevalence among food handlers working in University of Gondar cafeterias are very scarce. The aim of this study is to assess the prevalence of nasal carriage of Staphylococcus aureus, their drug resistance pattern and prevalence of intestinal parasites among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. Method A cross sectional study was conducted among food handlers working in University of Gondar student’s cafeterias. A pretested structured questionnaire was used for collecting data. Nasal swab and stool were investigated for S. aureus and intestinal parasites; respectively as per the standard of the laboratory methods. Results Among 200 food handlers, females comprised 171(85.5%). The majority (67.5%) of the food-handlers were young adults aged 18–39 years. One hundred ninety four (97%) of the food handlers were not certified as a food handler. Forty one (20.5%) food handlers were positive for nasal carriage of S. aureus, of these 4(9.8%) was resistant for methicilin. Giardia lamblia was the most prevalent parasites 22 (11%), followed by Ascaris lumbricoides 13(6.5%), Entamoeba histolytica 12 (6%), Strongyloides stercolaris (0.5), Taenia species 1(0.5%) and Schistosoma mansoni 1(0.5%). Conclusion The finding stressed that food handlers with different pathogenic micro organisms may pose significant risk on the consumers. Higher officials should implement food handler’s training on food safety, periodic medical checkup and continuous monitoring of personal hygiene of food handlers. PMID:23031414

  14. Extranodal natural killer/T-cell lymphoma, nasal-type.

    PubMed

    Chorianopoulos, Dimitrios; Samitas, Konstantinos; Vittorakis, Stylianos; Kiriazi, Vasiliki; Rondoyianni, Dimitra; Tsaousis, Georgios; Skoutelis, Athanasios

    2010-01-01

    A 51-year-old previously healthy man, an ex-smoker, was admitted to the authors' medical department with a 3-month history of dry cough; intermittent fever; painless, ulcerated cutaneous lesions over the trunk and limbs (Figure 1); and progressive weight loss. He was of Greek descent. His medical history was remarkable for nasal polyps, which were surgically removed 15 years earlier. Initially, he had been treated with antibiotics, without improvement. Several days before admission, chest radiography revealed pulmonary infiltrates in the left lower lobe. On admission, physical examination revealed a well-orientated man in mild distress, with inspiratory rhonchi at the lower part of the left lung and scattered erythematous nodules of variable size, some of which were ulcerated. Laboratory values were notable for leukopenia, 3.3 x 10(9)/L; total protein, 5.9 g/dL; globulin, 2.2 g/dL; serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase, 86 IU/L; serum glutamic pyruvic transaminase, 71 IU/L; and lactate dehydrogenase, 519 U/L. Computed tomograph (CT) of the chest showed multiple alveolar opacities bilaterally (Figure 2). Fiberoptic bronchoscopy did not reveal any important pathologic findings. Results of bronchial biopsy, cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage, washing, brushing, and sputum following bronchoscopy were negative. CT of the brai and sinonasal area revealed an abnormal low-density mass in the left nasal area. CT findings of the abdomen were negative, as were results of a bone marrow biopsy. There was no evidence of immunosuppression. The differential diagnosis, considering the evidence described, included granulomatous or infectious diseases, angiocentric lymphoproliferative lesions, and lymphomas. Biopsy of a skin lesion showed lymphoproliferative infiltration of the dermis with a follicular and angiocentric growth pattern and regional epidermal necrosis. Immunohistochemical stains showed that the tumor cell were positive for CD56 and CD3 (cytoplasmic positivity) and

  15. Integration and evaluation of a position sensor with continuous read-out for use with the Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling Gamma Ray Spectrometer system

    SciTech Connect

    Normann, R.A.; Lockwood, G.J.; Williams, C.V.; Selph, M.M.

    1998-02-01

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled waste retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling were compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples. The results show general agreement between the soil sampling and EMWD-GRS techniques for Cs-137. The EMWD-GRS system has been improved by the integration of an orientation sensor package for position sensing (PS) (EMWD-GRS/PS). This added feature gives the capability of calculating position, which is tied directly to EMWD-GRS sensor data obtained while drilling. The EMWD-GRS/PS system is described and the results of the field tests are presented.

  16. High-flow nasal cannula oxygen in adult patients: a narrative review.

    PubMed

    Sotello, David; Rivas, Marcella; Mulkey, Zachary; Nugent, Kenneth

    2015-02-01

    High-flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) is a relatively new therapeutic innovation being used in adults with severe respiratory disease. It delivers heated humidified oxygen through short nasal prongs and supplies much higher flow rates than traditional nasal cannula systems. These higher flows match patient flow demands better, reduce anatomic dead space and provide a slightly positive pressure in the upper airway. Randomized trials, nonrandomized prospective trials and case series using HFNC in adults were identified in the PubMed, Google Scholar and Cochrane databases for the period of June 1981 to December 2013. Fifteen studies meeting our inclusion criteria were analyzed; 5 were randomized controlled studies. These studies included 943 patients managed in intensive care units. Common clinical diagnoses included postoperative status, cancer and pneumonia. These studies demonstrated that HFNC provided better or comparable oxygenation when compared with conventional face masks and nasal cannulas. Side effects included epistaxis, nasal discomfort and dryness. No unexpected side effects were reported in the studies reviewed. Current studies demonstrate that HFNC can improve oxygenation adults with hypoxemic respiratory failure. In some patients, it is superior to traditional oxygen delivery systems and may obviate the need for positive pressure ventilation. More studies are needed to compare HFNC with noninvasive ventilation.

  17. Epistaxis and Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the nasal vestibule: is it a cause or consequence?

    PubMed

    Ulusoy, Seckin; Babaoglu, Gulcin; Catli, Tolgahan; San, Turhan; Cingi, Cemal

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between epistaxis and nasal colonization of Staphylococcus aureus in a population of patients with recurrent epistaxis. A total of 361 men and women were recruited, 245 patients with epistaxis (114 had crusting in the nasal vestibule; 131 did not) and 116 control subjects. A microbiology swab was taken from the anterior nasal cavity of each subject. Staphylococcus aureus was found to be more common in the epistaxis group when compared with the control group with a percentage of 31.8% and 4.3%, respectively (P < 0.05). There was no difference in the prevalence of S. aureus between the crust and non-crust groups (P > 0.05). When positive cultures were grouped and compared according to season, it was observed that the positive culture with epistaxis was much higher (44.82 %) in the autumn period. Staphylococcus aureus colonization in the nasal vestibule is more likely to be observed in individuals who have recurrent epistaxis than in those who do not have. It seems that this colonization may have a role in the etiology of epistaxis. However, with an altered medium of the nasal vestibule after each epistaxis period, it is also possible to speculate that this colonization is may be the consequence of epistaxis itself.

  18. Correlations of nasal responses to leukotriene D4 and histamine nasal provocation with quality of life in allergic rhinitis

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zheng; Xie, Yanqing; Guan, Weijie; Gao, Yi; Xia, Shu; Shi, Xu

    2016-01-01

    Background The symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) greatly affect the quality of life (QoL) in the patients with AR. The correlations of nasal response to leukotriene D4 (LTD4) and histamine nasal provocation with health related QoL in AR are not clear. Objective To evaluate the correlations of nasal response to LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge with QoL in AR. Methods Patients randomly underwent LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge tests, completed the rhinoconjunctivitis quality of life questionnaire (RQoLQ), and rating the symptom severity score (total symptom score 4, TSS4) in the previous week. The correlations between nasal challenge tests induced nasal responses and QoL in RQoLQ were analyzed. Results A total of 25 eligible AR patients enrolled and finished both LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge and completed the questionnaire of RQoLQ. Histamine nasal challenge induced sneezing, increased nasal resistant were correlated with most of the dimensions (general, practical, nasal, eye problems, and quality of sleep, p < 0.05), while LTD4 nasal challenge induced sneeze, increased nasal resistant only correlated with nasal and ocular problems. On the contrary, the severity of the sneeze assessed by TSS4, was not correlated with QoL, while the severity of rhinorrhea, congestion, and nasal pruritus were correlated with nasal and practical problems, and nasal congestion was also correlated with ocular problems (r = 0.60, p = 0.01). Conclusion LTD4 and histamine nasal challenge induced nasal responses were correlated with different clinical symptoms severity and QoL, which can be used as a good diagnosis and evaluation methods for the management of AR. PMID:27803885

  19. Integration and Evaluation of a Position Sensor with Continuous Read-Out for use with the Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling Gamma Ray Spectrometer System

    SciTech Connect

    Lockwood, G.J.; Normann, R.A.; Selph, M.M.; Williams, C.V.

    1999-02-22

    The Environmental Measurement-While-Drilling-Gamma Ray Spectrometer (EMWD-GRS) system represents an innovative blend of new and existing technology that provides real-time environmental and drill bit data during drilling operations. The EMWD-GRS technology was demonstrated at Savannah River Site (SRS) F-Area Retention Basin. The EMWD-GRS technology demonstration consisted of continuously monitoring for gamma-radiation-producing contamination while drilling two horizontal boreholes below the backfilled waste retention basin. These boreholes passed near previously sampled locations where concentrations of contaminant levels of cesium had been measured. Contaminant levels continuously recorded by the EMWD-GRS system during drilling were compared to contaminant levels previously determined through quantitative laboratory analysis of soil samples. The demonstration of the EMWD-GRS was a complete success. The results show general agreement between the soil sampling and EMWD-GRS techniques for CS-137. It was recognized that the EMWD-GRS tool would better satisfy our customers' needs if the instrument location could be continuously monitored. During the demonstration at SRS, an electromagnetic beacon with a walkover monitor (Subsite{reg_sign}) was used to measure bit location at depth. To use a beacon locator drilling must be stopped, thus it is normally only used when a new section of pipe was added. The location of contamination could only be estimated based on the position of the EMED-GRS package and the distance between locator beacon readings. A continuous location system that would allow us to know the location of each spectrum as it is obtained is needed.

  20. Enhanced release of IgE-dependent early phase mediators from nasal polyp tissue

    PubMed Central

    Patou, Joke; Holtappels, Gabriele; Affleck, Karen; Gevaert, Philippe; Perez-Novo, Claudina; Van Cauwenberge, Paul; Bachert, Claus

    2009-01-01

    Background The mast cell is a crucial effector cell in allergic rhinitis and other inflammatory diseases. During the acute allergic reaction preformed mediators such as histamine, but also de novo produced mediators such as leukotrienes (LTC4/D4/E4) and prostaglandins (PGD2) are released. Mast cells represent targets for therapeutic intervention, and thus a human ex-vivo model to stimulate mast cells taken from mucosal sites would be instrumental for drug intervention studies. We have aimed to activate mast cells within ex-vivo human nasal tissue by IgE/anti-IgE specific (ε chain specific) stimulations and in this respect to test the usability of nasal polyps versus inferior turbinates Methods Biopsy samples were collected from patients with nasal polyps and inferior turbinates from patients who underwent sinus or septal surgery. Tissue fragments were primed with IgE 1 μg/ml for 60 minutes and then stimulated for 30 minutes with tissue culture medium (negative control), anti-IgE 10 μg/ml, anti-IgE 30 μg/ml and ionomycin 10 μM (positive control). Histamine, leukotrienes and PGD2 were measured in supernatants. To help provide an understanding of the extent of the response, the number of tryptase and FcεRIα positive cells was evaluated by means of immunohistochemistry and the FcεRIα-chain was measured by means of quantitative PCR in the nasal polyp and inferior turbinate tissues. Finally, the correlation between IgE concentrations in the nasal tissue and the release of mediators was analysed. Results Stimulations with anti-IgE on IgE-primed nasal tissue fragments lead to a concentration-dependent release of histamine, leukotrienes and PGD2. The release of these early phase mediators was significantly higher in nasal polyps compared to inferior turbinates, although tryptase, FcεRIα positive cells and FcεRIα-chain transcripts were equally present in both groups. No correlation was found between baseline concentrations of IgE, and the release of histamine

  1. A Test for Creutzfeldt–Jakob Disease Using Nasal Brushings

    PubMed Central

    Orrú, Christina D.; Bongianni, Matilde; Tonoli, Giovanni; Ferrari, Sergio; Hughson, Andrew G.; Groveman, Bradley R.; Fiorini, Michele; Pocchiari, Maurizio; Monaco, Salvatore; Caughey, Byron; Zanusso, Gianluigi

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Definite diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease in living patients remains a challenge. A test that detects the specific marker for Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, the prion protein (PrPCJD), by means of real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QuIC) testing of cerebrospinal fluid has a sensitivity of 80 to 90% for the diagnosis of sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. We have assessed the accuracy of RT-QuIC analysis of nasal brushings from olfactory epithelium in diagnosing sporadic Creutzfeldt– Jakob disease in living patients. METHODS We collected olfactory epithelium brushings and cerebrospinal fluid samples from patients with and patients without sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease and tested them using RT-QuIC, an ultrasensitive, multiwell plate–based fluorescence assay involving PrPCJD-seeded polymerization of recombinant PrP into amyloid fibrils. RESULTS The RT-QuIC assays seeded with nasal brushings were positive in 30 of 31 patients with Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (15 of 15 with definite sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, 13 of 14 with probable sporadic Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, and 2 of 2 with inherited Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease) but were negative in 43 of 43 patients without Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease, indicating a sensitivity of 97% (95% confidence interval [CI], 82 to 100) and specificity of 100% (95% CI, 90 to 100) for the detection of Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease. By comparison, testing of cerebrospinal fluid samples from the same group of patients had a sensitivity of 77% (95% CI, 57 to 89) and a specificity of 100% (95% CI, 90 to 100). Nasal brushings elicited stronger and faster RT-QuIC responses than cerebrospinal fluid (P<0.001 for the between-group comparison of strength of response). Individual brushings contained approximately 105 to 107 prion seeds, at concentrations several logs10 greater than in cerebrospinal fluid. CONCLUSIONS In this preliminary study, RT-QuIC testing of olfactory epithelium samples

  2. Nasal and ocular amyloidosis in a 15-year-old horse.

    PubMed

    Østevik, Liv; Gunnes, Gjermund; de Souza, Gustavo A; Wien, Tale N; Sørby, Randi

    2014-08-27

    Localized nasal, conjunctival and corneal amyloidosis was diagnosed in a 15-year-old pony with nasal and conjunctival masses and severe dyspnoea. Multiple swellings had been evident in the nostrils for at least two years and had gradually increased in size before presentation due to dyspnoea and exercise intolerance. Surgical debulking of the masses was performed and histological examination revealed large amounts of extracellular, hyaline, eosinophilic, Congo red positive material in the lamina propria of the nasal mucosa. A tentative diagnosis of localized nasal amyloidosis was made. The treatment relieved the clinical signs, however, the nasal masses recurred and bilateral conjunctival, papillary masses developed. The horse was euthanized. Nodular nasal and papillary conjunctival masses consisting of rubbery, grey to yellow tissue were found at necropsy. At the limbus this tissue infiltrated and expanded the cornea. The masses consisted of amyloid and moderate infiltrates of T lymphocytes and B lymphocytes were present in the tissue. No predominance of either cell type was observed and no distinct neoplastic mass could be identified. Ultrastructural examination of the nasal mucosa and cornea confirmed the presence of abundant extracellular deposits of non-branching fibrils ranging from 9-11 nm in diameter consistent with amyloid. Immunohistochemistry of amyloid revealed no labelling for AA amyloid, and no peptides representing serum amyloid A (SAA) were detected by microscopic laser dissection and subsequent mass spectrometry. Peptides from immunoglobulin kappa-like light chains were detected and are suggestive of AL amyloidosis, however the results were inconclusive and a final identification of the amyloid protein could not be made.Nasal amyloidosis is a clinical entity of localized amyloid deposits in the horse. Localized amyloidosis involving the conjunctiva of the horse is previously described in only seven cases and the present case is the first case of

  3. Nasal glioma or nasal glial heterotopia? Morphological, immunohistochemical and ultrastructural study of two cases.

    PubMed

    Cerdá-Nicolás, M; Sanchez Fernandez de Sevilla, C; Lopez-Ginés, C; Peydro-Olaya, A; Llombart-Bosch, A

    2002-01-01

    The term nasal glioma has been used to describe a congenital benign tumor of the nasal region containing neural tissue. The nature of these lesions remains open to controversy, because of the different locations of the heterotopic neural tissue involved, the deficient development of the bony structures and the persistence or not of the structural relations with the central nervous system. More recent terms define these lesions as ectopic nervous tissue. A clinical, morphological, ultrastructural and immunohistochemical study is made of two cases of nasal glioma, one associated with agenesis of the corpus callosum. In this case, the mother had been treated with clomiphene. In such cases, morphological and immunohistochemical findings support that "nasal glioma" remain valid as a descriptive term defining a congenital benign tumor composed of heterotopic neural tissue within the nasal region and covered by skin, that may recur following incomplete surgical resection.

  4. Perforation of the nasal septum as the first sign of histoplasmosis associated with AIDS and review of published literature.

    PubMed

    Jaimes, Angel; Muvdi, Sandra; Alvarado, Zulma; Rodríguez, Gerzaín

    2013-08-01

    Disseminated histoplasmosis in South America is associated with AIDS in 70-90 % of cases. It is visceral and cutaneous, compromising the oral, pharynx, and laryngeal mucous membranes. The involvement of the nasal mucosa is unusual. Two patients with perforation of the nasal septum as the only sign of their disease were clinically and histopathologically diagnosed as leishmaniasis. The revision of the biopsies and the culture of nasal discharge secretions showed that the pathogens seen were not amastigotes but Histoplasma capsulatum. Other mycotic lesions were not detected, nor there was history of cutaneous leishmaniasis. The leishmanin skin test, available only for the male patient, was negative. The PCR and immunofluorescence antibody titers for Leishmania were negative in both patients. They were HIV positive; in the male, his CD4+ T cell count was 60/mm(3) and in the female 133/mm(3). The nasal ulcer was the only manifestation of histoplasmosis and the first of AIDS in both patients. The male patient recovered with amphotericin B and itraconazole treatment. The female has improved with itraconazole. Both patients received antiretroviral treatment. Nasal mucous membrane ulcers should include histoplasmosis among the differential diagnosis. In conclusion, two patients had perforation of their nasal septum as the only manifestation of histoplasmosis, a diagnosis confirmed by nasal mucosa biopsy and by culture of H. capsulatum, findings which demonstrated that both patients had AIDS.

  5. Non-traumatic nasal septal abscess in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Salam, Badar; Camilleri, Andrew

    2009-12-01

    Nasal septal abscess is an uncommon condition. Most commonly it is secondary to nasal trauma, which leads to haematoma, and subsequent abscess formation. There are other less common causes like sinusitis, dental infections and furunculosis. Non-traumatic nasal septal abscess has also been reported in immunocompromised individuals. We report a case of non-traumatic, spontaneous nasal septal abscess, in a healthy immunocompetent patient with no evidence of sinusitis or other localized infections. Using Medline and Google.co.uk search applications, there has been one previous report of such a condition. We stress the importance of excluding nasal septal abscess in patients presenting with nasal obstruction especially with signs of toxaemia.

  6. Same noses, different nasalance scores: data from normal subjects and cleft palate speakers for three systems for nasalance analysis.

    PubMed

    Bressmann, Tim; Klaiman, Paula; Fischbach, Simone

    2006-01-01

    Nasalance scores from the Nasometer, the NasalView and the OroNasal System were compared. The data was collected from 50 normal participants and 19 hypernasal patients with cleft palate. The Nasometer had the lowest nasalance scores for the non-nasal Zoo Passage and that the OroNasal System had the lowest nasalance scores for the Nasal Sentences. The nasalance distance was largest for the Nasometer and smallest for the OroNasal System. When the calculation was based on nasalance magnitudes, results for sensitivity ranged from 57.9% to 81.8% and results for specificity ranged from 62.0% to 76.0%. When the calculation was based on nasalance distances, results for sensitivity ranged from 84.2% to 100.0% and results for specificity ranged from 82.0% to 100.0%. Results suggest that nasalance scores from the three systems are not interchangeable. Diagnostic efficacy improved when the calculations were based on nasalance distances rather than magnitudes, but further research is warranted to corroborate these findings.

  7. Evaluation of the Nasal Surgical Questionnaire for Monitoring Results of Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Haye, Rolf; Tarangen, Magnus; Shiryaeva, Olga; Døsen, Liv Kari

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring the results of surgery is important. The otorhinolaryngology department of our hospital currently uses preoperative and postoperative versions of the Nasal Surgical Questionnaire (NSQ) for continuous evaluation of nasal septoplasty. In this study, 55 patients undergoing septoplasty answered the preoperative version twice to assess the NSQ's test-retest precision, and 75 patients answered the preoperative questionnaire before and the postoperative one 6 months after surgery to evaluate the NSQ's ability to detect change in symptoms following surgery. Both the pre- and postoperative versions of the NSQ use separate visual analogue scales (VAS) to assess nasal obstruction during the day, at night, and during exercise. Other nasal symptoms are graded as secondary outcomes using 4-point Likert scales. The mean VAS scores for the two preoperative obstruction ratings were not significantly different. The scores were significantly higher than in a normal population. There were also significant differences between preoperative and postoperative ratings. The mean pre- and postoperative scores at night for those who reported complete improvement were 66.1 and 8.4, substantial improvement 74.5 and 24.2, and no improvement 83.3 and 76.4. The NSQ reliably assesses nasal symptoms in patients and may be useful for both short and long term prospective studies of septoplasty. PMID:26612987

  8. Infection of Oligochaetes, Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Annelida: Oligochaeta), in the Nasal Cavity of a Chinese Man

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hongbin; Zhang, Zhenming; Huang, Guangping; Gu, Xiaolong; Wang, Chunmiao; Wang, Yan; Lu, Zhimin

    2017-01-01

    The infection by Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri Claparède, 1862 (Oligochaeta: Tubificinae) in humans is relatively uncommon. The present report is to describe an incidental human infection with oligochaetes in the nasal cavity of a Chinese man, a 25-year-old man residing in Zhangjiakou city, Hebei province, China presenting with nose bleed, severe itching, continuous sneezing, and rhinorrhea. A lot of oligochaete worms were found in the nasal discharge of the patient. The detected worms were identified as Limnodrilus hoffmeisteri (Annelida: Oligochaeta) based on morphological and molecular characteristics. This incidental L. hoffmeisteri nasal infection is the first case in China and indicates that oligochaete worms can be encountered in humans. PMID:28285510

  9. Nasonasal reflexes, the nasal cycle, and sneeze.

    PubMed

    Baraniuk, James N; Kim, Dennis

    2007-05-01

    The nasal mucosa is a complex tissue that interacts with its environment and effects local and systemic changes. Receptors in the nose receive signals from stimuli, and respond locally through afferent, nociceptive, type C neurons to elicit nasonasal reflex responses mediated via cholinergic neurons. This efferent limb leads to responses in the nose (eg, rhinorrhea, glandular hyperplasia, hypersecretion with mucosal swelling). Anticholinergic agents appear useful against this limb for symptomatic relief of a "runny nose." Chronic exposure to allergens can lead to hyperresponsiveness of the nasal mucosa. As a result, receptors upregulate specific ion channels to increase the sensitivity and potency of their reflex response. Nasal stimuli also affect distant parts of the body. Nerves in the sinus mucosa cause vasodilation; the lacrimal glands can be stimulated by nasal afferent triggers. Even the cardiopulmonary system can be affected via the trigeminal chemosensory system, where sensed irritants can lead to changes in tidal volume, respiratory rate, and blink frequency. The sneeze is an airway defense mechanism that removes irritants from the nasal epithelial surface. It is generally benign, but can lead to problems in certain circumstances. The afferent pathway involves histamine-mediated depolarization of H1 receptor-bearing type C trigeminal neurons and a complex coordination of reactions to effect a response.

  10. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive and Functional Outcome of Stroke Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Aaronson, Justine A.; Hofman, Winni F.; van Bennekom, Coen A.M.; van Bezeij, Tijs; van den Aardweg, Joost G.; Groet, Erny; Kylstra, Wytske A.; Schmand, Ben

    2016-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) in stroke patients is associated with worse functional and cognitive status during inpatient rehabilitation. We hypothesized that a four-week period of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment would improve cognitive and functional outcomes. Methods: We performed a randomized controlled trial in stroke patients admitted to a neurorehabilitation unit. Patients were assigned to rehabilitation treatment as usual (control group) or to CPAP treatment (CPAP group). Primary outcomes were cognitive status measured by neuropsychological examination, and functional status measured by two neurological scales and a measure of activities of daily living (ADL). Secondary measures included sleepiness, sleep quality, fatigue, and mood. Tests were performed at baseline and after the four-week intervention period. Results: We randomly assigned 20 patients to the CPAP group and 16 patients to the control group. The average CPAP compliance was 2.5 hours per night. Patients in the CPAP group showed significantly greater improvement in the cognitive domains of attention and executive functioning than the control group. CPAP compliance was associated with greater improvement in cognitive functioning. CPAP did not result in measurable improvement on measures of neurological status or ADL, or on any of the secondary measures. Conclusions: CPAP treatment improves cognitive functioning of stroke patients with OSA. Commentary: A commentary on this article appears in this issue on page 467. Citation: Aaronson JA, Hofman WF, van Bennekom CA, van Bezeij T, van den Aardweg JG, Groet E, Kylstra WA, Schmand B. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure on cognitive and functional outcome of stroke patients with obstructive sleep apnea: a randomized controlled trial. J Clin Sleep Med 2016;12(4):533–541. PMID:26888587

  11. What's New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ... About Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancers? What’s New in Nasal Cavity and Paranasal Sinus Cancer Research ...

  12. Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap for nasal lining in reconstruction of large full thickness lateral nasal defects.

    PubMed

    Rahpeyma, Amin; Khajehahmadi, Saeedeh

    2015-12-01

    Obviously, restoring the nasal lining is a great challenge in the reconstruction of nasal defects. Full thickness nasal defects usually require special flaps for reconstructing the nasal lining. Intranasal mucosal flaps, hinge over flaps, perinasal second flaps, folded or second forehead flaps and finally free flaps are examples that can be used for this purpose. Moreover, the case presented in this article expresses a new role for the superiorly based Facial Artery Musculomucosal (FAMM) flap in this topic. Furthermore, mucosal island variant of this flap is presented to reduce the tension on this flap while restoring the nasal lining in large full thickness nasal defect.

  13. The effects of injection modes on instantaneous particle deposition in a realistic human nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian; Gu, Xin; Wang, Mengmeng; Jian, Guanping; Wang, Simin; Zheng, Guoxi

    2017-03-01

    To understand the instantaneous particle deposition in nasal cavity, effects of two injection models on particle deposition characteristic were discussed in this paper. Based on a realistic human nasal cavity geometry obtained from CT scans, a comparison of deposition pattern in the nasal cavity between single injection and continuous injection was investigated through the Lagrangian approach. The instantaneous airflow field was simulated with the tidal volume of 159 and 318 mL by two sine wave curves at inlet. For the case of single injection, particles have finished deposition in the first half of inhalation, and a negative correlation between the tidal volumes and deposition can be observed when the particle diameter was larger than 10 µm. Moreover, particles were mainly deposited in the turbinate area that was beneficial for aerosol therapy. The inertial parameter was not suitable to predict the particle deposition in the case of single injection. With respect to continuous injection, a reduction in total deposition caused by the deceleration process of inhalation can be observed after 1.5 s. The deposition was closely associated with the time-varying flow field, and particles were mainly deposited in the anterior region and turbinate area. Besides, the particle deposition increased with the inertial parameter for continuous injection. The results indicated that the injection modes had an influence on both the total deposition and local deposition pattern in the nasal cavity. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Is Radiologic Evaluation Necessary to Find out Foreign Bodies in Nasal Cavity?

    PubMed

    Oh, Hoon; Min, Hyun Jin; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2016-01-01

    Although there were previous studies on the clinical aspects such as etiology, treatment modalities, studies regarding the necessity of radiologic evaluation for nasal foreign body were limited. The aim of this study is to evaluate the necessity and indication of radiologic evaluation for nasal foreign bodies. There are consecutive patients aged less than 10 years who presented with suspected foreign bodies in nasal cavity. We reviewed the patient's age and sex, including the methods of evaluation, management tools, and types of foreign bodies. There were 35 cases (11.4%) on whom radiographs were performed in the 24 uncooperative patients and 11 cooperative patients who were not identified with any foreign bodies via nasal endoscopy. Among them, only 4 cases had positive reports of foreign body and the others were normal radiologic findings. We suggest that the radiologic evaluation is always not necessary to find the location of nasal foreign bodies. It, however, should be performed in cases of negative findings of physical examination with anterior rhinoscopy or sinus endoscopy and unwitnessed foreign bodies to rule out metallic contents, especially button type battery.

  15. Nasal Administration of Cholera Toxin as a Mucosal Adjuvant Damages the Olfactory System in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Fukuyama, Yoshiko; Okada, Kazunari; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Kiyono, Hiroshi; Mori, Kensaku; Yuki, Yoshikazu

    2015-01-01

    Cholera toxin (CT) induces severe diarrhea in humans but acts as an adjuvant to enhance immune responses to vaccines when administered orally. Nasally administered CT also acts as an adjuvant, but CT and CT derivatives, including the B subunit of CT (CTB), are taken up from the olfactory epithelium and transported to the olfactory bulbs and therefore may be toxic to the central nervous system. To assess the toxicity, we investigated whether nasally administered CT or CT derivatives impair the olfactory system. In mice, nasal administration of CT, but not CTB or a non-toxic CT derivative, reduced the expression of olfactory marker protein (OMP) in the olfactory epithelium and olfactory bulbs and impaired odor responses, as determined with behavioral tests and optical imaging. Thus, nasally administered CT, like orally administered CT, is toxic and damages the olfactory system in mice. However, CTB and a non-toxic CT derivative, do not damage the olfactory system. The optical imaging we used here will be useful for assessing the safety of nasal vaccines and adjuvants during their development for human use and CT can be used as a positive control in this test. PMID:26422280

  16. Apoptosis and Ki-67 as predictive factors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas

    PubMed Central

    FU, Dah-Renn; KATO, Daiki; ENDO, Yoshifumi; KADOSAWA, Tsuyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Nasal lymphoma is the most common nasal tumor in cats and is generally a solitary and radiosensitive tumor. We retrospectively evaluated the response to radiation and survival time in relation to apoptosis and Ki-67 indices in feline nasal lymphomas treated with radiation therapy. The apoptotic and Ki-67 indices were evaluated with TUNEL and immunohistochemical staining in 30 biopsy tissues that were taken before any treatment. These two indices were compared, and differences between different treatment response groups were analyzed. The correlation between the median survival times (MST) and the indices was estimated using the Kaplan Meier method, and statistical differences between survival curves were analyzed using a log-rank method. With regard to apoptotic index, a statistical difference was observed between the samples taken from cats with complete response and stable disease (1.22% vs. 0.45%; P=0.045). The Ki-67 index in cats with both complete response and partial response was significantly higher than in cats with stable disease (44.4% and 39.6% vs. 16.3%; P<0.001 and P=0.008, respectively). The cats with a high level of apoptosis (>0.9%) nasal lymphoma were not significantly prolonged MSTs (P=0.202), however, high Ki-67-positive (>40%) cats experienced a statistically significant relationship with longer survival time (P=0.015). Our results indicate that spontaneous apoptotic and Ki-67 indices are strong predictors for response to radiation therapy in feline nasal lymphomas. PMID:27086717

  17. Heated Humidified High-Flow Nasal Oxygen in Adults: Mechanisms of Action and Clinical Implications.

    PubMed

    Spoletini, Giulia; Alotaibi, Mona; Blasi, Francesco; Hill, Nicholas S

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, nasal oxygen therapy has been delivered at low flows through nasal cannulae. In recent years, nasal cannulae designed to administer heated and humidified air/oxygen mixtures at high flows (up to 60 L/min) have been gaining popularity. These high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) systems enhance patient comfort and tolerance compared with traditional high-flow oxygenation systems, such as nasal masks and nonrebreathing systems. By delivering higher flow rates, HFNC systems are less apt than traditional oxygenation systems to permit entrainment of room air during patient inspiration. Combined with the flushing of expired air from the upper airway during expiration, these mechanisms assure more reliable delivery of high Fio2 levels. The flushing of upper airway dead space also improves ventilatory efficiency and reduces the work of breathing. HFNC also generates a positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP), which may counterbalance auto-PEEP, further reducing ventilator work; improve oxygenation; and provide back pressure to enhance airway patency during expiration, permitting more complete emptying. HFNC has been tried for multiple indications, including secretion retention, hypoxemic respiratory failure, and cardiogenic pulmonary edema, to counterbalance auto-PEEP in patients with COPD and as prophylactic therapy or treatment of respiratory failure postsurgery and postextubation. As of yet, very few high-quality studies have been published evaluating these indications, so recommendations regarding clinical applications of HFNC remain tentative.

  18. Nasal lift-nasal valve lift and nasal tip lift-preliminary results of a new technique using noninvasive self-retaining unidirectional nasal suspension with threads.

    PubMed

    Saban, Yves; Javier, De Benito; Massa, Michela

    2014-12-01

    In the context of nasal obstruction treatment, an alternative, no invasive technique is described. It consists in the suspension of the nasal valve or in the association of the suspension of the valve and rotation of the tip, through the placement of one or two absorbable threads, already known in aesthetic medicine. This technique allows to open the nasal valve and to correct the moderate closure of the nasolabial angle obtaining an immediate benefit of breathing. Functional improvement has been evaluated at regular intervals, that is, 1, 3, 6, and 12 months and then provided for every 6 months, through the use of a visual scale of 0/10 to 10/10. In our experience, the technique allows to obtain satisfactory results, avoiding more invasive techniques and postoperative recovery days.

  19. [Nasal mucosa in patients with diabetes mellitus].

    PubMed

    Müller, Maciej; Betlejewski, Stanisław

    2003-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is the most common endocrinologic disease all over the world. 150 million people suffer from this disease, in Poland about 2 million. The disease on the basis of the onset and pathophysiology may be divided into type I and type II. Pathophysiologic changes include diabetic microangiopathy, macroangiopathy and neuropathy. The most common presentations in head and neck are otitis externa, hypoacusis, vertigo, disequilibrium, xerostomia, dysphagia, fungal and recurrent infections. The changes in nasal mucosa are not very well known. Only few papers concerned the problem. The main complaints of patients regarding the nose are xeromycteria, hyposmia and various degree of decreased patency of the nose. Chronic atrophic rhinitis, septal perforation, ulceration of nasal mucosa, alar necrosis, symptoms of staphylococcal or fungal infection can be found during otolaryngologic examination. The treatment in this group of patients should consist of systemic therapy of diabetes mellitus and on the other hand focal therapy with the use of a solution to moisten the nasal mucosa.

  20. [Complications and sequelae after nasal trauma].

    PubMed

    Calderón, R; Miralles, G; Rodríguez Urcelay, P; Berenguer, B; González Meli, B; Enríquez de Salamanca, J; Cervera, J

    2007-04-01

    Septal haematoma after nasal trauma is a complication that can lead to septal abscess if unrecognized or early intervention is not performed. It can cause compression and thereby necrosis that evolve to a septal abscess in which cultures reveal saprophyte bacteria. Cartilage necrosis and destruction can produce impaired breathing and aesthetic deformities with collapse of the dorsum and the tip of the nose. We present a 10 year old masculine infant, that suffered a nasal fracture with a septal haematoma that remained undiagnosed. The patient developed a septal abscess that required drainage and resulted in nasal sequelae with collapse of dorsum and cranial displacement of tip and columella. Functional and aesthetic reconstruction was performed using rib cartilage grafts. No complications occurred. Functional and aesthetic improvement was observed. Result after 2 months of follow-up is considered favourable.

  1. The use of auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure for treatment of adult obstructive sleep apnea. An American Academy of Sleep Medicine review.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard B; Parish, James M; Hartse, Kristyna M

    2002-03-15

    This paper reviews the efficacy of auto-titrating continuous positive airway pressure (APAP) for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea. It is based on a review of 30 articles published in peer review journals conducted by a task force appointed by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine to develop practice parameters for use of APAP devices for treatment of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). The data indicate that APAP can be used to treat many patients with OSA (auto-adjusting) or to identify an effective optimal fixed level of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) for treatment (auto-titration). Patients with significant congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), or significant amounts of central apnea were excluded from many treatment trials and there is insufficient evidence that APAP can be used to treat these patients. Many clinical trials have been performed in patients already on CPAP or with the initial APAP night in a laboratory setting. At this time only a few studies have evaluated initial titration with APAP in CPAP-naïve patients in an unattended setting. Further studies of APAP in this circumstance are needed. No studies have systematically compared the efficacy of one APAP technology with another. Devices using different technology may not give the same results in a given patient. Devices solely dependent on vibration may not work in non-snorers or patient who have undergone upper-airway surgery. High mask or mouth leaks may prevent adequate titration in devices monitoring snoring, flow, or impedance (forced oscillation technique). Review of the raw data to identify periods of high leak was performed in several of the APAP titration studies, to identify a pressure for fixed CPAP treatment or to determine if the titration was adequate. There is conflicting evidence for and against the premise that treatment with APAP increases acceptance and adherence compared to fixed CPAP. In studies demonstrating an increase in

  2. Comparison of functional results after ethmoidectomy and nasalization for diffuse and severe nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Jankowski, R; Pigret, D; Decroocq, F

    1997-07-01

    Taking advantage of a natural experimental situation, we compared, retrospectively, functional results after nasalization and ethmoidectomy for diffuse nasal polyposis. Nasalization was a radical ethmoidectomy systematically removing all the bony lamellae and mucosa within the labyrinth, with large antrostomy, sphenoidotomy, frontotomy, and middle turbinectomy (Surgeon 1, 39 consecutive patients operated on between March and September 1991). Ethmoidectomy was a less systematic procedure, that was adapted to the extent of the pathology (Surgeon 2, 37 consecutive patients, operated on between October 1991 and November 1994). In May 1994, a third physician mailed a questionnaire simultaneously to all patients including 10-point visual analog scales 34/39 patients in the nasalization group (age: 28-71 years: 20 asthmatics; follow-up: 32-36 months), and 29/37 patients in the ethmoidectomy group (age: 26-65 years: 9 asthmatics: follow-up: 18-31 months) participated in the study. The overall nasal improvement was 8.8 +/- 0.2 (mean +/- SEM) after nasalization and 5.9 +/- 0.6 after ethmoidectomy (p = 0.0001). Olfaction improvement was similar in both groups 6 months after surgery, remained at the same level 36 months after nasalization (6.9 +/- 0.7), but decreased to 4.2 +/- 1 points 24 months after ethmoidectomy (p = 0.02). Asthma improvement remained significantly better after nasalization (p = 0.05), and the need for systemic steroids was also lower (p = 0.03). Results of this study suggest that when dealing with nasal polyposis, the more radical the surgery, the better the functional results.

  3. Continuous positive airway pressure for sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome: usefulness of a 2 week trial to identify factors associated with long term use

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, G; Latham, M; Allgar, V; Elliott, M

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The sleep apnoea/hypopnoea syndrome (SAHS) is common and treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) is effective. However, not all patients can cope with the demands of using mask positive pressure. Compliance can be improved with an intensive educational programme and patient support, but this is not practical in most centres given the large numbers of patients coming forward for treatment. Several studies have evaluated correlations between various parameters at diagnosis in order to anticipate patients' behaviour and to avoid the social and health implications of undertreated SAHS. We have evaluated the use of additional data derived during a 2 week home CPAP trial to identify factors associated with longer term use of CPAP and compliance.
METHODS—Following a diagnostic study, 209 patients were offered a CPAP machine for a 2 week home trial. After completing the trial, patients were reassessed and scored their overall satisfaction with CPAP treatment on a five point scale ranging from "much worse" to "much better" and an Epworth score relating to the loan period. Machine run time was recorded from the integral clock. These data were added to those available at diagnosis to construct models indicative of continuing CPAP and average nightly use at 1year.
RESULTS—209 patients were offered the 2 week loan at least a year before June 1999 (90.9% men, mean (SD) age 51.0 (10.6) years, body mass index (BMI) 34.6 (7.7) kg/m2, Epworth score 15 (IQR 11-18), apnoea/hypopnoea index (AHI) 38.1(22.9) events/h). 153 patients (73.2%) opted to continue CPAP and 56 declined. One year later data were available for 187 patients; 128 (68.5% on an intention to treat analysis) continued to use the machine with a mean use of 5.0 (2.4) hours/night. A logistic regression model indicated that mean CPAP use during the loan period and the overall satisfaction score accurately defined continuing CPAP and "satisfactory" CPAP use at 1 year. For patients with

  4. A grading system for nasal dorsal deformities.

    PubMed

    Kienstra, Matthew A; Gassner, Holger G; Sherris, David A; Kern, Eugene B

    2003-01-01

    There is no uniform grading system for nasal dorsal deformities currently in general use among surgeons who perform rhinoplasty. Given the popularity of this procedure among both the general public and surgeons, it is time that there was a uniform system describing dorsal deformities. Such a system has value in the education of students of rhinology and cosmetic nasal surgery. We have developed one such system, and applied it to 100 cases. In all cases it accurately describes the major pathological conditions of the dorsum, if present, as noted on physical examination. We have found application of this system to be facile.

  5. Bilateral Nasoalveolar Cyst Causing Nasal Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yildizoglu, Uzeyir; Polat, Bahtiyar; Durmaz, Abdullah

    2016-01-01

    Nasoalveolar cysts, which originate from epithelial remnants of nasolacrimal duct, are nonodontogenic soft tissue lesions of the upper jaw. These cysts are thought to be developmental and are presented with fullness in the upper lip and nose, swelling on the palate, and sometimes nasal obstruction. Because of cosmetic problems, they are often diagnosed at an early stage. These lesions are mostly revealed unilaterally but also can be seen on both sides. In this case report, a patient who complained of nasal obstruction and then diagnosed with bilateral nasoalveolar cysts and treated by sublabial excision is presented and clinical features and treatment approaches are discussed with the review of literature. PMID:27980871

  6. [Cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae) from the North Pacific Coast of Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Santoro, Mario; Orrego, Carlos Mario; Hernández Gómez, Giovanna

    2006-03-01

    Cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of Lepidochelys olivacea (Testudines: Cheloniidae) from the North Pacific coast of Costa Rica. The aerobic cloacal and nasal bacterial flora of 45 apparently healthy female olive ridley sea turtles (Lepidochelys olivacea) was studied at Nancite nesting beach, in Santa Rosa National Park (Costa Rican North Pacific) during July and August 2002. Bacterial samples were obtained by inserting sterile swabs directly into the cloaca and the nasal cavities of the turtles. Ninety-nine aerobic bacterial isolates, including 10 Gram-negative and 5 Gram-positive bacteria, were recovered. The most common bacteria cultured were Aeromonas spp. (13/45) and Citrobacter freundi (6/45) from cloacal samples and Bacillus spp. (32/45), Staphylococcus aureus (6/45) and Corynebacterium spp. (5/45) from nasal ducts. The results of the present study showed that the aerobic bacterial flora of nesting female olive ridleys was composed of several potential human and animal microbe pathogens.

  7. The nasal septum and the development of the midface. A longitudinal study of a pair of monozygotic twins.

    PubMed

    Grymer, L F; Bosch, C

    1997-03-01

    The development of the nose and the growth of the midface has been followed in a pair of identical twins. One of them (twin A) had nasal septum destruction after septal haematoma and abscess at the age of 7 years, and was treated by immediate implantation of homologous septal cartilage from a tissue bank. From 7-17 years of age the growth and development of the nose and face were followed. Lateral cephalograms, photographs, acoustic rhinometry and rhinoscopy were performed. Twin B presented a normal nasal and facial growth and served as control. Twin A developed a saddle nose, an upward displacement of the anterior part of the maxilla, diminished vertical development of the nasal cavity, and a retrognathically positioned maxilla due to decreased anteroposterior maxillary growth. This case report seems to indicate that the cartilaginous nasal septum is an important factor influencing vertical and sagittal growth of the maxilla.

  8. Nasal bots...a fascinating world!

    PubMed

    Angulo-Valadez, Carlos E; Scholl, Philip J; Cepeda-Palacios, Ramón; Jacquiet, Philippe; Dorchies, Philippe

    2010-11-24

    Larvae causing obligatory myiasis are numerous and they may affect cutaneous and subcutaneous tissues, wounds, nasopharyngeal cavities (nasal bots), internal organs and the digestive tract (bots) of domestic and wild animals and humans as well. Nasal bots belong to the Family Oestridae, Subfamily Oestrinae, which includes several important genera: Oestrus, Kirkioestrus, and Gedoelstia infecting Artiodactyla (except Cervidae) in Africa and Eurasia, Cephenemyia and Pharyngomyia infecting Cervidae, Rhinoestrus infecting horses, Cephalopina infecting camels, Pharyngobolus infecting African elephants, and Tracheomyia infecting Australian kangaroos. Nasal bots are widespread in Mediterranean and tropical areas and in affected animals they induce sneezing and nasal discharge which may become caked with dust making breathing very difficult. The aforementioned species of larvae are host-specific but sometimes the may be deposited in human eyes inducing a painful opthalmomyiasis of short duration. The first fascinating trait of these parasites is the very efficient morphological and biological adaptations to parasitism they show either as larvae or as adults, in order to facilitate their survival and search for a suitable host. Nasal bots have reached different degrees of complexity in their life cycles. Indeed, while for some species (e.g., Oestrus ovis, Rhinoestrus usbekistanicus) larvae are injected by flies directly into nostrils and develop in the sinuses before being ejected for external pupation, some other species migrate from eyes to blood before returning to nasal cavities either through the ethmoid bone (Gedoelstia hässleri) or via lungs and bronchi (Gedoelstia cristata). Moreover, larvae are very well-adapted to their environment being able to undergo through hypobiosis either inside or outside the host, according to the climatic environmental conditions and seasonality. The second fascinating trait of nasal bots is related to host behavioural and immune

  9. NORMAL NASAL GENE EXPRESSION LEVELS USING CDNA ARRAY TECHNOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Normal Nasal Gene Expression Levels Using cDNA Array Technology.

    The nasal epithelium is a target site for chemically-induced toxicity and carcinogenicity. To detect and analyze genetic events which contribute to nasal tumor development, we first defined the gene expressi...

  10. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint. (a) Identification. An external nasal splint is a rigid or partially rigid device intended for use externally for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section...

  11. 21 CFR 874.5800 - External nasal splint.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...) MEDICAL DEVICES EAR, NOSE, AND THROAT DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 874.5800 External nasal splint. (a) Identification. An external nasal splint is a rigid or partially rigid device intended for use externally for... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false External nasal splint. 874.5800 Section...

  12. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  13. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  14. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  15. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  16. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  18. 21 CFR 868.5340 - Nasal oxygen cannula.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen cannula. 868.5340 Section 868.5340...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5340 Nasal oxygen cannula. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen cannula is a two-pronged device used to administer oxygen to a patient...

  19. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  20. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  1. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  2. Underlying Phoneme Velar Nasal with Lip Rounding in Hueyapan Nahuatl

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, R. Joe

    1976-01-01

    Reasons are given for the idea that Hueyapan (Morelos) Nahuatl has an underlying velar nasal with lip rounding phoneme which never has the surface reflex of a rounded velar nasal allophone, but occurs phonetically as a velar nasal allophone or a labial dental voiced allophone or disappears. (SCC)

  3. Extradural frontal abscess complicating nasal septal abscess in a child.

    PubMed

    Thomson, C J; Berkowitz, R G

    1998-10-02

    Nasal septal abscess (NSA) is an uncommon sequel to minor nasal trauma. Abscess extension beyond the nasal cavity is rarely documented. A case of a 10-year-old boy who presented with a NSA associated with a large extradural frontal abscess is presented and indications for CT scanning in the workup of pediatric patients with NSA is discussed.

  4. Two-piece nasal septum prosthesis for a large nasal septum perforation: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Sashi Purna, C R; Annapurna, P D; Ahmed, Syed Basheer; Vurla, Samyuktha; Nalla, Sandeep; Abhishek, S M

    2013-02-01

    Nasal septum perforation presents with the symptoms of epistaxis and crusting. Obturation of the defect will decrease the symptoms and increase patient comfort. Prosthetic closure is more predictable and thus the treatment of choice in larger defects. This article describes a procedure for construction of a magnet-retained, heat-processed acrylic nasal septum prosthesis. The two-piece nasal septum prosthesis was processed and joined together in situ by magnets. Each piece of the septum prosthesis conforms to the remaining medial wall of each nostril and forms the missing half of the nasal septum. The prosthesis not only alleviates symptoms, but also provides structural support to the saddle-shaped nose and improves esthetics.

  5. Effectiveness of flow inflating device in providing Continuous Positive Airway Pressure for critically ill children in limited-resource settings: A prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Anitha, G. Fatima Shirly; Velmurugan, Lakshmi; Sangareddi, Shanthi; Nedunchelian, Krishnamurthy; Selvaraj, Vinoth

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Noninvasive ventilation (NIV) is an emerging popular concept, which includes bi-level positive airway pressure or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP). In settings with scarce resources for NIV machines, CPAP can be provided through various indigenous means and one such mode is flow inflating device - Jackson-Rees circuit (JR)/Bain circuit. The study analyses the epidemiology, various clinical indications, predictors of CPAP failure, and stresses the usefulness of flow inflating device as an indigenous way of providing CPAP. Methods: A prospective observational study was undertaken in the critical care unit of a Government Tertiary Care Hospital, from November 2013 to September 2014. All children who required CPAP in the age group 1 month to 12 years of both sexes were included in this study. They were started on indigenous CPAP through flow inflating device on clinical grounds based on the pediatric assessment triangle, and the duration and outcome were analyzed. Results: This study population included 214 children. CPAP through flow inflating device was successful in 89.7% of cases, of which bronchiolitis accounted for 98.3%. A prolonged duration of CPAP support of >96 h was required in pneumonia. CPAP failure was noted in 10.3% of cases, the major risk factors being children <1 year and pneumonia with septic shock. Conclusion: We conclude that flow inflating devices - JR/Bain circuit are effective as an indigenous CPAP in limited resource settings. Despite its benefits, CPAP is not a substitute for invasive ventilation, as when the need for intubation arises timely intervention is needed. PMID:27630454

  6. Nasalance Changes Following Various Endonasal Surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Amer, Hazem Saeed; Elaassar, Ahmed Shaker; Anany, Ahmad Mohammad; Quriba, Amal Saeed

    2017-01-01

    Introduction There is change in nasalance post endonasal surgery which is not permanent. Objectives The objective of this study is to evaluate the long-term nasalance changes following different types of endonasal surgeries. Methods We included in this study patients who underwent sinonasal surgery at the Otorhinolaryngology Department in Zagazig University Hospitals from February 2015 until March 2016. We divided the patients into two groups according to the surgeries they underwent: Group (A) was the FESS group and group (B), the septoturbinoplasty group. We checked nasalance using a nasometer before and after the sinonasal surgery. Results Nasalance increased at one month after the operation in both groups. However, it returned to nearly original levels within three months postoperatively. Conclusion FESS, septoplasty, and turbinate surgery may lead to hypernasal speech. This hypernasal speech can be a result of change in the shape and diameter of the resonating vocal tract. Hypernasal speech in these circumstances may be a temporary finding that can decrease with time. Surgeons should inform their patients about the possibility of hypernasality after such types of surgery, especially if they are professional voice users. PMID:28382115

  7. How to Use Nasal Pump Sprays

    MedlinePlus

    Using Nasal Pump SpraysBlow your nose gently before using the spray. Prime the pump bottle by spraying it into the air a ... Breathe in quickly while squeezing down on the pump bottle one time. Repeat in other nostril. Do ...

  8. Nasal neuron PET imaging quantifies neuron generation and degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C.; Riley, Misha M.; Cao, Luxiang; Herrick, Scott P.; Ricq, Emily L.; O’Neill, Michael J.; Ahmed, Zeshan; Murray, Tracey K.; Smith, Jaclyn E.; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A.; Albers, Mark W.; Hooker, Jacob M.

    2017-01-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is broadly associated with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases and predicts increased mortality rates in healthy individuals. Conventional measurements of olfactory health assess odor processing pathways within the brain and provide a limited understanding of primary odor detection. Quantification of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which detect odors within the nasal cavity, would provide insight into the etiology of olfactory dysfunction associated with disease and mortality. Notably, OSNs are continually replenished by adult neurogenesis in mammals, including humans, so OSN measurements are primed to provide specialized insights into neurological disease. Here, we have evaluated a PET radiotracer, [11C]GV1-57, that specifically binds mature OSNs and quantifies the mature OSN population in vivo. [11C]GV1-57 monitored native OSN population dynamics in rodents, detecting OSN generation during postnatal development and aging-associated neurodegeneration. [11C]GV1-57 additionally measured rates of neuron regeneration after acute injury and early-stage OSN deficits in a rodent tauopathy model of neurodegenerative disease. Preliminary assessment in nonhuman primates suggested maintained uptake and saturable binding of [18F]GV1-57 in primate nasal epithelium, supporting its translational potential. Future applications for GV1-57 include monitoring additional diseases or conditions associated with olfactory dysregulation, including cognitive decline, as well as monitoring effects of neuroregenerative or neuroprotective therapeutics. PMID:28112682

  9. Nasal neuron PET imaging quantifies neuron generation and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Van de Bittner, Genevieve C; Riley, Misha M; Cao, Luxiang; Ehses, Janina; Herrick, Scott P; Ricq, Emily L; Wey, Hsiao-Ying; O'Neill, Michael J; Ahmed, Zeshan; Murray, Tracey K; Smith, Jaclyn E; Wang, Changning; Schroeder, Frederick A; Albers, Mark W; Hooker, Jacob M

    2017-02-01

    Olfactory dysfunction is broadly associated with neurodevelopmental and neurodegenerative diseases and predicts increased mortality rates in healthy individuals. Conventional measurements of olfactory health assess odor processing pathways within the brain and provide a limited understanding of primary odor detection. Quantification of the olfactory sensory neurons (OSNs), which detect odors within the nasal cavity, would provide insight into the etiology of olfactory dysfunction associated with disease and mortality. Notably, OSNs are continually replenished by adult neurogenesis in mammals, including humans, so OSN measurements are primed to provide specialized insights into neurological disease. Here, we have evaluated a PET radiotracer, [11C]GV1-57, that specifically binds mature OSNs and quantifies the mature OSN population in vivo. [11C]GV1-57 monitored native OSN population dynamics in rodents, detecting OSN generation during postnatal development and aging-associated neurodegeneration. [11C]GV1-57 additionally measured rates of neuron regeneration after acute injury and early-stage OSN deficits in a rodent tauopathy model of neurodegenerative disease. Preliminary assessment in nonhuman primates suggested maintained uptake and saturable binding of [18F]GV1-57 in primate nasal epithelium, supporting its translational potential. Future applications for GV1-57 include monitoring additional diseases or conditions associated with olfactory dysregulation, including cognitive decline, as well as monitoring effects of neuroregenerative or neuroprotective therapeutics.

  10. An Unusual Case of a Nasal Foreign Body in a Cat with Chronic Nasal Discharge.

    PubMed

    Bellei, Emma; Pisoni, Luciano; Joechler, Monika; Pietra, Marco

    2015-01-01

    This report describes a cat infected with the feline infectious virus and a 1 yr history of unilateral mucopurulent nasal discharge. Intraoral radiography and endoscopic examination revealed the presence of a large fragment of tooth root in the right nasal cavity. The cat had previously undergone maxillary canine tooth (104) extraction. The root was successfully removed by an endoscopic-assisted procedure, and follow-up examination 1 yr later documented complete disappearance of the respiratory signs.

  11. Sensory properties of selected terpenes. Thresholds for odor, nasal pungency, nasal localization, and eye irritation.

    PubMed

    Cometto-Muñiz, J E; Cain, W S; Abraham, M H; Kumarsingh, R

    1998-11-30

    We tested four normosmics and four anosmics in detection thresholds for six terpenes commonly found indoors: cumene, p-cymene, delta-3-carene, linalool, 1,8-cineole and geraniol. Normosmics provided odor thresholds and anosmics provided nasal pungency thresholds. All subjects provided nasal localization (i.e., right/left nostril) and eye irritation thresholds. Each type of threshold was measured eight times per subject-stimulus combination. Stimuli were presented from squeeze bottles in a two-alternative forced-choice procedure via an ascending method of limits. Odor thresholds ranged between 0.1 and 1.0 parts per million (ppm, by volume). Nasal pungency thresholds lay about three orders of magnitude above odor thresholds. Nasal localization and eye irritation thresholds did not differ between normosmics and anosmics, and fell close to nasal pungency thresholds. Olfactory thresholds could be obtained for all stimuli in all repetitions using the criterion of five correct choices in a row. Trigeminal thresholds (i.e., pungency, localization and eye irritation) could be obtained on all repetitions only for some terpenes using that same criterion. Carene and cineol produced nasal pungency and eye irritation on all repetitions. None of the terpenes could be localized on all repetitions, but cineol was localized a higher percentage of instances than were the other stimuli. At the other extreme, geraniol failed to evoke any of the three trigeminal responses in most instances. Overall, the results indicate that the three trigeminal thresholds produce a uniform view of the potency of these terpenes, with nasal pungency and eye irritation being slightly more sensitive than nasal localization. Furthermore, application of a previously derived linear solvation energy relationship to the results reinforced the view that physicochemical properties can predict the chemesthetic impact of volatile organic compounds.

  12. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution

    SciTech Connect

    Calderon-Garciduenas, L.; Osnaya-Brizuela, N.; Ramirez-Martinez, L.

    1996-02-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p>0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 {+-}8.34% in the first week to 67.29 {+-}2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be evaluated in ozone-exposed individuals. 43 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  13. Nasal delivery of analgesic ketorolac tromethamine thermo- and ion-sensitive in situ hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Li, Xin; Du, Lina; Chen, Xu; Ge, Pingju; Wang, Yu; Fu, Yangmu; Sun, Haiyan; Jiang, Qingwei; Jin, Yiguang

    2015-07-15

    Ketorolac tromethamine (KT) was potent to treat moderate to moderately severe pains. However, KT solutions for nasal delivery lost quickly from the nasal route. Thermo- and ion-sensitive in-situ hydrogels (ISGs) are appropriate for nasal drug delivery because the intranasal temperature maintains ∼37 °C and nasal fluids consist of plentiful cations. In this study, a novel nasal thermo- and ion-sensitive ISG of KT was prepared with thermo-sensitive poloxamer 407 (P407) and ion-sensitive deacetylated gellan gum (DGG). The optimal formulation of the KT ISG consisted of 3% (w/v) DGG and 18% (w/v) P407 and its viscosity was up to 7.63 Pas at 37 °C. Furthermore, penetration enhancers and bacterial inhibitors were added and their fractions in the ISG were optimized based on transmucosal efficiencies and toxicity on toad pili. Sulfobutyl ether-β-cyclodextrin of 2.5% (w/v) and chlorobutanol of 0.5% (w/v) were chosen as the penetration enhancer and the bacterial inhibitor, respectively. The Fick's diffusion and dissolution of KT could drive it continuous release from the dually sensitive ISG according to the in vitro investigation. Two methods, writhing frequencies induced by acetic acid and latency time of tails retracting from hot water, were used to evaluate the pharmacodynamics of the KT ISG on the mouse models. The writhing frequencies significantly decreased and the latency time of tail retracting was obviously prolonged (p<0.05) for the KT ISG compared to the control. The thermo- and ion-sensitive KT ISG had appropriate gelation temperature, sustained drug release, improved intranasal absorption, obvious pharmacodynamic effect, and negligible nasal ciliotoxicity. It is a promising intranasal analgesic formulation.

  14. Industry leading satellite based GNSS (Global Navigation Satellite System) positioning and monitoring solutions with real-time CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station) networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janousek, Martin

    2010-05-01

    Real-Time CORS (Continuously Operating Reference Station Networks) today are typically GNSS networks for positioning and monitoring purposes. Real-Time networks can consist of a few stations for a local network up to nation- or continental wide networks with several hundred CORS stations. Such networks use wide area modeling of GNSS error sources including ionospheric, tropospheric and satellite orbit correction parameters to produce highest precision and efficiency method of positioning using GNSS. In 1998 Trimble Navigation Ltd. introduced a method of surveying with a non-physical or computed base station, called VRS (Virtual Reference Station). It is the most widely supported method of producing a network solution for precise carrier phase positioning in the industry. Surveying historically required one base as the fixed point of reference, and one or multiple rovers using that point of reference to compute their location by processing a vector result, either in real-time or in a postprocessed sense. Real-time survey is often referred to as RTK, short for real-time kinematic, and as the name suggests the results are in real time and you can move. The power of VRS is in the ability to compute a real-time wide-area solution to the factors that cause single base methods to degrade with distance. Namely, ionospheric and tropospheric modeling, and satellite orbit corrections. This is achieved by the reference network of CORS. A wide scattering of CORS across a state, typically 50-70km in mid-latitudes, creates a ground based sampling which significantly reduces the distance dependent errors that accumulate in the single base-rover relationship described early. Furthermore, GNSS networks can be used for real-time monitoring purposes at various distance range. Trimble Integrity Manager software provides a suite of motion engines designed to detect and quantify any movement in a range of scales from slow, creeping movement like subsidence, through sudden events such as

  15. Cigarette Smoke Attenuates the Nasal Host Response to Streptococcus pneumoniae and Predisposes to Invasive Pneumococcal Disease in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Pamela; Morissette, Mathieu C.; Vanderstocken, Gilles; Gao, Yang; Hassan, Muhammad; Roos, Abraham; Thayaparan, Danya; Merlano, Maria; Dorrington, Michael G.; Nikota, Jake K.; Bauer, Carla M. T.; Kwiecien, Jacek M.; Labiris, Renee; Bowdish, Dawn M. E.; Stevenson, Christopher S.

    2016-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of invasive bacterial infections, with nasal colonization an important first step in disease. While cigarette smoking is a strong risk factor for invasive pneumococcal disease, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. This is partly due to a lack of clinically relevant animal models investigating nasal pneumococcal colonization in the context of cigarette smoke exposure. We present a model of nasal pneumococcal colonization in cigarette smoke-exposed mice and document, for the first time, that cigarette smoke predisposes to invasive pneumococcal infection and mortality in an animal model. Cigarette smoke increased the risk of bacteremia and meningitis without prior lung infection. Mechanistically, deficiency in interleukin 1α (IL-1α) or platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR), an important host receptor thought to bind and facilitate pneumococcal invasiveness, did not rescue cigarette smoke-exposed mice from invasive pneumococcal disease. Importantly, we observed cigarette smoke to attenuate nasal inflammatory mediator expression, particularly that of neutrophil-recruiting chemokines, normally elicited by pneumococcal colonization. Smoking cessation during nasal pneumococcal colonization rescued nasal neutrophil recruitment and prevented invasive disease in mice. We propose that cigarette smoke predisposes to invasive pneumococcal disease by suppressing inflammatory processes of the upper respiratory tract. Given that smoking prevalence remains high worldwide, these findings are relevant to the continued efforts to reduce the invasive pneumococcal disease burden. PMID:26930709

  16. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea.

    PubMed

    Sharples, Linda D; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L; Glover, Matthew J; Bennett, Maxine S; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A; Quinnell, Timothy G

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD -9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP -25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease.

  17. Effect of continuous positive airway pressure on arterial stiffness in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and hypertension: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Chen, Gongping; Qi, Jiachao; Chen, Xiaofang; Zhao, Jiangming; Lin, Qichang

    2016-12-01

    Arterial stiffness has been recognized as a predictor of cardiovascular and all-cause mortality in hypertensive patients. However, the impact of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on arterial stiffness in patients with OSA and hypertension remains inconclusive. We performed a meta-analysis to determine whether effective CPAP therapy could decrease arterial stiffness. Two reviewers independently searched PubMed, Embase, Web of Science and Cochrane Library prior to March 5, 2015. Information on characteristics of subjects, study design and pre- and post-CPAP treatment of arterial stiffness was extracted for analysis. Standardized mean difference (SMD) was used to analyze the summary estimates for CPAP therapy. Three articles with 186 patients were included in this meta-analysis, including two observational studies and one randomized controlled study. The meta-analysis showed that CPAP was associated with a statistically significant decrease in arterial stiffness in patients with OSA and hypertension (SMD = -0.65, 95 % confidence interval (CI) = -1.14 to -0.16, z = 2.60, p = 0.009). Our meta-analysis suggested that CPAP among OSA and hypertensive patients was significantly associated with a decrease in arterial stiffness. Further prospective large-scale multicenter RCTs are needed to explore the precise impact of CPAP therapy on arterial stiffness in patients with OSA and hypertension.

  18. Effects of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure on Cognitive Deficits in Middle-aged Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome: A Meta-analysis of Randomized Controlled Trials

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Yue-Ying; Deng, Yan; Xu, Xiu; Liu, Ya-Ping; Liu, Hui-Guo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Current views on continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment to improve the cognitive deficits of patients with obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) are controversial, so we performed a meta-analysis. Methods: A comprehensive literature search was undertaken in PubMed, CINAHL, Medline, PsycInfo, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, CNKI, WanFang, VIP, and CBMdisc for studies published from June 1971 to July 2014. The outcome measures included neuropsychological tests of the 7 cognitive domains detailed below. Results: After screening the titles and abstracts and thoroughly reading the full text, we obtained 13 studies with little risk of bias that incorporated 1744 middle-aged obese participants with mild to severe OSAS. The studies were published from 1994 to 2012. Treatment durations varied from 1 to 24 weeks. The effect sizes of attention, vigilance, processing speed, working memory, memory, verbal fluency, and visuoconstructive skills domains were −0.10 (P = 0.24), −0.12 (P = 0.04), −0.08 (P = 0.16), 0.00 (P = 0.95), −0.04 (P = 0.30), −0.06 (P = 0.34), and −0.01 (P = 0.92), respectively. Conclusions: Cognition partially improved in patients with OSAS after CPAP treatment. The only domain with significant improvement was vigilance. Rigorous randomized controlled trials need to be performed to obtain clear results. PMID:26315086

  19. Evaluation of an oral appliance in patients with mild to moderate obstructive sleep apnea syndrome intolerant to continuous positive airway pressure use: Preliminary results.

    PubMed

    Cantore, S; Ballini, A; Farronato, D; Malcangi, G; Dipalma, G; Assandri, F; Garagiola, U; Inchingolo, F; De Vito, D; Cirulli, N

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnea syndrome (OSAS) is a phenomenon of repeated, episodic reduction, or cessation of airflow (hypopnea/apnea) as a result of upper airways obstruction. First-line treatment in younger children is adenotonsillectomy, although other available treatment options in middle-aged adults include continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) and airway adjuncts. Oral appliances (OA) are a viable treatment alternative in patients with OSAS.The objective of this study was to assess, in a 1-year follow-up study, an OA in OSAS patients. The participants were subjected to polysomnographic examination with a validated device (MicroMESAM). Eight participants were fitted with a Thornton Adjustable Positioner (TAP). The participants were asked to wear the test appliance for 7 nights, and in case of compliance, for 6 months. The selected patients record their usage of the appliance and any adverse effects in a treatment journal. The research focused on the following outcomes: sleep apnea (i.e. reduction in the apnea/hypopnea index) and the effect of oral appliances on daytime function.In conclusion, the results suggest that OA have a definite role in the treatment of snoring and sleep apnea.

  20. Meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials of oral mandibular advancement devices and continuous positive airway pressure for obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea

    PubMed Central

    Sharples, Linda D.; Clutterbuck-James, Abigail L.; Glover, Matthew J.; Bennett, Maxine S.; Chadwick, Rebecca; Pittman, Marcus A.; Quinnell, Timothy G.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Obstructive sleep apnoea-hypopnoea (OSAH) causes excessive daytime sleepiness, impairs quality-of-life, and increases cardiovascular disease and road traffic accident risks. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) treatment and mandibular advancement devices (MAD) have been shown to be effective in individual trials but their effectiveness particularly relative to disease severity is unclear. A MEDLINE, Embase and Science Citation Index search updating two systematic reviews to August 2013 identified 77 RCTs in adult OSAH patients comparing: MAD with conservative management (CM); MAD with CPAP; or CPAP with CM. Overall MAD and CPAP significantly improved apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI) (MAD −9.3/hr (p < 0.001), CPAP −25.4 (p < 0.001)). In direct comparisons mean AHI and Epworth sleepiness scale score were lower (7.0/hr (p < 0.001) and 0.67 (p = 0.093) respectively) for CPAP. There were no CPAP vs. MAD trials in mild OSAH but in comparisons with CM, MAD and CPAP reduced ESS similarly (MAD 2.01 (p < 0.001); CPAP 1.23 (p = 0.012). Both MAD and CPAP are clinically effective in the treatment of OSAH. Although CPAP has a greater treatment effect, MAD is an appropriate treatment for patients who are intolerant of CPAP and may be comparable to CPAP in mild disease. PMID:26163056

  1. Nasal septum giant pyogenic granuloma after a long lasting nasal intubation: case report.

    PubMed

    Neves-Pinto, Roberto M; Carvalho, Adolpho; Araujo, Elizabeth; Alberto, Carlos; Basilio-De-Oliveira; De Carvalho, Gustavo Adolpho

    2005-03-01

    The authors present a case of Pyogenic Granuloma (PG) arising from the nasal septum in the posterior nasal cavity of a patient male sex, caucasian, 32 years old, with a previous history of cranioencephalic trauma, several neurosurgeries for different subsequent neurological problems and the use of a nasogastric tube for feeding (nasal intubation) during 30 days. He underwent surgery in St. Vincent de Paul Hospital (Rio de Janeiro) on May 18, 1993, for the tumor removal and straightening of the nasal septum. Under endoscopic guidance the complete excision of the tumor mass was perfectly done thanks to the excellent exposure of the lesion, provided by the enlarged telescopic view, and the wide access afforded by the septum straighttening plus the cartilaginous septum mobilization through the maxilla-premaxilla approach of Cottle, allied to the lateralization and volume reduction of the right inferior nasal concha, simultaneously performed, thus making lateral rhinotomy or "degloving" unnecessary. The patient is until now (2004) completely free of the lesion operated on. This is the first report in the literature of such a lesion associated to nasal intubation as the triggering agent.

  2. Preparation and Characterization of Chitosan Nanoparticles for Zidovudine Nasal Delivery.

    PubMed

    Barbi, Mariana Da Silva; Carvalho, Flávia Chiva; Kiill, Charlene Priscila; Barud, Hernane Da Silva; Santagneli, Sílvia Helena; Ribeiro, Sidney José Lima; Gremião, Maria Palmira Daflon

    2015-01-01

    Zidovudine (AZT) is the antiretroviral drug most frequently used for the treatment of Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome. Its low oral bioavailability demands the development of innovative strategies to overcome the first pass metabolism. The nasal route is an option for enhanced therapeutic efficacy and to reduce the extent of the first-pass effect. In this article, AZT loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared by a modified ionotropic gelation method with sodium tripolyphosphate. The increase proportion of CS (NP1 10:01 (w/w)) promoted the formation of smaller nanoparticles (260 nm), while raising the proportion of TPP (NP2 5:1 w/w) increased the nanoparticles size (330 nm). The incorporation of AZT increased the nanoparticles size for both AZT-loaded nanoparticles AZT-loaded NP1 (406 nm) and AZT-loaded NP2 (425 nm). The incorporation of AZT into NP1 did not change the electrophoretic mobility, however, in AZT-loaded NP2 there was a significant increase. The positive surface of the nanoparticles is very important for the mucoadhesive properties due interaction with the sialic groups of the mucin. Nuclear resonance magnetic data showed that the higher concentration of chitosan in the nanoparticles favored the interaction of few phosphate units (pyrophosphate) by ionic interaction Scanning electron microscopy, revealed that the nanoparticles are nearly spherical shape with porous surface. The entrapment efficiency of AZT, was 17.58% ± 1.48 and 11.02% ± 2.05 for NP1 and NP2, respectively. The measurement of the mucoadhesion force using mucin discs and nasal tissue obtained values of NP1 = 2.12 and NP2 = 4.62. In vitro permeation study showed that the nanoparticles promoted an increase in the flux of the drug through the nasal mucosa. In view of these results, chitosan nanoparticles were found to be a promising approach for the incorporation of hydrophilic drugs and these results suggest that the CS-containing nanoparticles have great potential for nasal AZT

  3. Disseminated Mycobacterium marinum Infection With a Destructive Nasal Lesion Mimicking Extranodal NK/T Cell Lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Asakura, Takanori; Ishii, Makoto; Kikuchi, Taku; Kameyama, Kaori; Namkoong, Ho; Nakata, Noboru; Sugita, Kayoko; Tasaka, Sadatomo; Shimizu, Takayuki; Hoshino, Yoshihiko; Okamoto, Shinichiro; Betsuyaku, Tomoko; Hasegawa, Naoki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Mycobacterium marinum is a ubiquitous waterborne organism that mainly causes skin infection in immunocompetent patients, and its disseminated infection is rare. Extranodal NK/T cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL) usually localizes at the nasal and/or paranasal area, but occasionally disseminates into the skin/soft tissue and gastrointestinal tract. Compromised immunity is a risk factor for developing nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) infection and malignant lymphoma, and the 2 diseases may share similar clinical presentation; however, only a few reports have described NTM infection mimicking malignant lymphoma. A 43-year-old Japanese man presented to our hospital complaining of multiple progressive skin nodules and purulent nasal discharge for 3 weeks. He was diagnosed with Crohn disease with refractory enteropathic arthritis and has been treated with anti-tumor necrosis factor alpha agents for 25 years. Fiberoptic nasal examination revealed septal perforation with hemorrhagic mucus and purulent rhinorrhea. Histological examination of the nasal septum revealed the infiltration of atypical medium-to-large-sized cells with erosion. The cells were positive for cytoplasmic CD3, granzyme B, and Epstein–Barr virus-encoded small RNA. Histological examination of the skin nodules and auricle also showed infiltration of atypical lymphocytes. The patient was tentatively diagnosed with ENKL, and chemotherapy was considered. However, the skin lesions decreased in size after discontinuation of immunosuppressive agents and minocycline administration. Two weeks later, nasal septum and lavage fluid and left leg skin cultures were positive for M marinum, and minocycline was discontinued. The skin and the nasal lesions improved after 2 months. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case of disseminated M marinum infection with a destructive nasal lesion mimicking ENKL. The differentiation between M marinum infection and ENKL is clinically important because

  4. The effects of prosodic boundaries on nasality in Taiwan Min.

    PubMed

    Pan, Ho-hsien

    2007-06-01

    This study explores the effects of prosodic boundaries on nasality at intonational phrase, word, and syllable boundaries. The subjects were recorded saying phrases that contained a syllable-final nasal consonant followed by a syllable-initial stop. The timing, duration, and magnitude of the nasal airflows measured were used to determine the extent of nasality across boundaries. Nasal amplitudes were found to vary in a speaker-dependent manner among boundary types. However, the patterns of nasal contours and temporal aspects of the airflow parameters consistently varied with boundary type across all the speakers. In general, the duration of nasal airflow and nasal plateau were the longest at the intonational phrase boundary, followed by word boundary and then syllable boundary. In addition to the hierarchical influence of boundary strength, there were unique phonetic markings associated with individual boundaries. In particular, two nasal rises interrupted by nasal inhalation occurred only across an intonation phrase boundary. Also, unexpectedly, a word boundary was marked by the longest postboundary vowel, whereas a syllable boundary was marked with the shortest nasal duration. The results here support the hierarchical effect of boundary on both domain-edge strengthening and cross-boundary coarticulation.

  5. Clinical response of patients with sickle cell anemia to cromolyn sodium nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Karimi, Mehran; Zekavat, Omid R; Sharifzadeh, Sedigeh; Mousavizadeh, Kazem; Mosavizadeh, Kazem

    2006-11-01

    Sickle cell anemia is the most common heritable hematological disease affecting humans. Although hydroxyurea is the most commonly used antisickling agent, several previous studies suggest that cromolyn sodium also prevents sickling when administered acutely. However, no previous studies have evaluated the safety or efficacy of prolonged administration of cromolyn to patients with sickle cell anemia. The purpose of this study, therefore, was to test the hypothesis that prolonged administration of cromolyn alone or in combination with hydroxyurea would decrease the incidence of pain crises and/or alter the chronic pain seen in patients with this disease. In this crossover, single-blind, in vivo and in vitro study, 17 patients with sickle cell disease were studied. Each patient had to fill out a standard pain chart. Every 3 months the patients' medications changed in the following manner: The first 3 months the patients used cromolyn sodium nasal spray; the second 3 months they received placebo nasal spray; the third 3 months they received cromolyn sodium nasal spray and hydroxyurea capsule; and the last 3 months they received hydroxyurea capsule and placebo nasal spray. The least pain was felt with the mixture of hydroxyurea capsule and cromolyn sodium nasal inhaler. Furthermore, with the other combinations of medications, there were no significant statistical changes in the number of sickled red blood cells. Every combination used in this survey had positive effects on decreasing the pain. cromolyn sodium nasal spray is significantly efficient in decreasing sickle cell crisis as well as pain intensity in patients with sickle cell anemia.

  6. Inhalation of diethylamine--acute nasal effects and subjective response

    SciTech Connect

    Lundqvist, G.R.; Yamagiwa, M.; Pedersen, O.F.; Nielsen, G.D. )

    1992-03-01

    Adult volunteers were exposed to 25 ppm (75 mg/m3) diethylamine in a climate chamber for 15 min in order to study the acute nasal reactions to an exposure equivalent to the present threshold limit value-short-term exposure limit. Changes in nasal volume and nasal resistance were measured by acoustic rhinometry and by rhinomanometry. Acute change in nasal volume, usually seen as acute nasal mucosa response to thermal stimuli, was not observed, nor was an acute change in nasal airway resistance. In a subsequent experiment, the aim was to measure acute sensory effects. Exposure to a concentration increasing from 0 to 12 ppm took place for 60 min, equal to an average concentration of 10 ppm (30 mg/m3). A moderate to strong olfactory response and distinct nasal and eye irritation were observed. In spite of considerable individual variation, the results were in agreement with sensory effect estimates obtained from animal studies.

  7. Dialectal and gender differences in nasalance for a Mandarin population.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ha-Kyung; Yu, Xiao-meng; Cao, Yan-jing; Liu, Xiao-ming; Huang, Zhao-Ming

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether there are dialectal and gender related differences in nasalance of main Mandarin vowels and three sentences in 400 Chinese normal adults. The mean nasalance score difference for dialect and gender was significant (p < .001) in all speech materials. For different dialects, the average nasalance scores show that Chongqing > Beijing > Shanghai > Guangzhou for the nasal sentence, oro-nasal sentence, /a/, /i/ and /u/. In addition, the average nasalance scores of females were higher than those of males for all speech materials in all dialects. The clinical significance of this study can be helpful in making nasalance clinical decisions for Chinese people with cleft palate, hearing disorders and dysarthria with resonance disorders. It also shows the theoretical and socio-cultural features for linguists considering dialects and gender.

  8. Unilateral nasal obstruction affects motor representation development within the face primary motor cortex in growing rats.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yasunori; Kato, Chiho; Uchima Koecklin, Karin Harumi; Okihara, Hidemasa; Ishida, Takayoshi; Fujita, Koichi; Yabushita, Tadachika; Kokai, Satoshi; Ono, Takashi

    2017-03-23

    Postnatal growth is influenced by genetic and environmental factors. Nasal obstruction during growth alters the electromyographic activity of orofacial muscles. The facial primary motor area represents muscles of the tongue and jaw, which are essential in regulating orofacial motor functions, including chewing and jaw opening. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of chronic unilateral nasal obstruction during growth on the motor representations within the face primary motor cortex (M1). Seventy-two 6-day-old male Wistar rats were randomly divided into control (n = 36) and experimental (n = 36) groups. Rats in the experimental group underwent unilateral nasal obstruction after cauterization of the external nostril at 8 days of age. Intracortical microstimulation (ICMS) mapping was performed when the rats were 5, 7, 9, and 11 weeks old in control and experimental groups (n = 9 per group per time point). Repeated-measures multivariate analysis of variance was used for intergroup and intragroup statistical comparisons. In the control and experimental groups, the total number of positive ICMS sites for the genioglossus and anterior digastric muscles was significantly higher at 5, 7, and 9 weeks, but there was no significant difference between 9 and 11 weeks of age. Moreover, the total number of positive ICMS sites was significantly smaller in the experimental group than in the control at each age. It is possible that nasal obstruction induced the initial changes in orofacial motor behavior in response to the altered respiratory pattern, which eventually contributed to face-M1 neuroplasticity.

  9. Effect of Continuous Positive Airway Pressure Therapy on Glycemic Excursions and Insulin Sensitivity in Patients with Obstructive Sleep Apnea-hypopnea Syndrome and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Li-Xin; Zhao, Xin; Pan, Qi; Sun, Xue; Li, Hui; Wang, Xiao-Xia; Zhang, Li-Na; Wang, Yao

    2015-01-01

    Background: For patients with obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), the night sleep interruption and intermittent hypoxia due to apnea or hypopnea may induce glycemic excursions and reduce insulin sensitivity. This study aimed to investigate the effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy in patients with OSAHS and T2DM. Methods: Continuous glucose monitoring system (CGMS) was used in 40 patients with T2DM and newly diagnosed OSAHS. The measurements were repeated after 30 days of CPAP treatment. Subsequently, insulin sensitivity and glycohemoglobin (HbA1c) were measured and compared to the pretreatment data. Results: After CPAP therapy, the CGMS indicators showed that the 24-h mean blood glucose (MBG) and the night time MBG were significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.03, respectively). The mean ambulatory glucose excursions (MAGEs) and the mean of daily differences were also significantly reduced (P < 0.05 and P = 0.002, respectively) compared to pretreatment levels. During the night, MAGE also significantly decreased (P = 0.049). The differences between the highest and lowest levels of blood glucose over 24 h and during the night were significantly lower than prior to CPAP treatment (P < 0.05 and P = 0.024, respectively). The 24 h and night time durations of high blood glucose (>7.8 mmol/L and > 11.1 mmol/L) decreased (P < 0.05 and P < 0.05, respectively) after the treatment. In addition, HbA1c levels were also lower than those before treatment (P < 0.05), and the homeostasis model assessment index of insulin resistance was also significantly lower than before CPAP treatment (P = 0.034). Conclusions: CPAP therapy may have a beneficial effect on improving not only blood glucose but also upon insulin sensitivity in T2DM patients with OSAHS. This suggests that CPAP may be an effective treatment for T2DM in addition to intensive diabetes management. PMID:26315076

  10. Nasalance measures in German-speaking cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Swennen, Gwen R J; Grimaldi, Hannes; Upheber, Juliane; Kramer, Franz-Josef; Dempf, Rupert

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate nasalance measures in German-speaking patients with different types of repaired cleft lip and palate and to find out if significant nasalance gender differences exist in the different cleft groups. A total of 125 German-speaking cleft patients (74 male and 51 female) were included in this study: 18 patients with isolated unilateral cleft lip (UCL; mean age: 13.00 +/- 2.03 years), 66 patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (UCLP; mean age: 14.80 +/- 3.45 years), 25 patients with isolated cleft palate (CP; mean age: 14.60 +/- 3.48 years), and 16 patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP; mean age: 14.30 +/- 3.61 years). Nasalance data were collected and computed using the NasalView hardware/software system (Fa. Tiger Electronics, Seattle, WA). Speech stimuli according to a modified Heidelberg Rhinophonia Assessment Form (sustained vowels "a," "e," "i," "o," and "u"; oral and nasal sentences; and three oral-nasal reading passages) were used to obtain nasalance scores. Nasalance distance and ratio were also calculated for the oral and nasal sentences and for one of the oral-nasal reading passages. Unpaired t tests showed no significant gender nasalance differences in each cleft group. Analysis of variance showed no significant differences in mean nasalance distance and ratio. For the nasal sentence, a significant difference (P = 0.032) in mean nasalance scores was found between the UCL and UCLP groups.

  11. Patient Education Combined in a Music and Habit-Forming Intervention for Adherence to Continuous Positive Airway (CPAP) Prescribed for Sleep Apnea

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Carol E.; Dauz, Emily; Clements, Faye; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Whitman, Robert

    2009-01-01

    Objective As many as 50% of patients diagnosed with obstructive sleep apnea stop adhering to the prescribed medical treatment of CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) within one to three weeks of onset. Thus, a theory based intervention using music to support habit formation was designed to improve CPAP adherence at onset. The intervention materials included directions for CPAP nightly use, a diary for recording nightly use and writing about CPAP benefits or problems. In addition, an audiotape with softly spoken instructions for placing the CPAP mask comfortably, using deep breathing and muscle relaxation along with the slowly decreasing music tempo was provided to listen to at bedtime each night. Methods Effects of this music intervention were tested in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial of 97 patients with 53 males (55%) and 44 females (45%). Moderate to severe apnea/hyponea scores (per sleep laboratory data) and medical diagnosis of OSA were required for study inclusion. Results Compared to placebo controls, a greater proportion of experimental patients were adhering (χ2=14.67, p<.01; a large difference, Phi=.39) at the end of the first month of CPAP onset. There were no differences in CPAP adherence at 3 (X2=.065, p=.79) and 6 (X2=.118, p=.73) months. Patients’ diary data and satisfaction survey results indicated the intervention was rated as helpful and guided formation of a relaxing, habitual routine of CPAP nightly use. Conclusion The intervention had a strong effect for improving adherence to CPAP at 1 month. Practice Implications Adherence at the onset of treatment is critical and the audio music intervention was easily administered. Other interventions that target problems interfering with longer-term CPAP adherence are needed. PMID:18829212

  12. Randomised controlled comparison of continuous positive airways pressure, bilevel non-invasive ventilation, and standard treatment in emergency department patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema

    PubMed Central

    Crane, S; Elliott, M; Gilligan, P; Richards, K; Gray, A

    2004-01-01

    Background: Continuous positive airways pressure (CPAP) and bilevel non-invasive ventilation may have beneficial effects in the treatment of patients with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema. The efficacy of both treatments was assessed in the UK emergency department setting, in a randomised comparison with standard oxygen therapy. Methods: Sixty patients presenting with acidotic (pH<7.35) acute, cardiogenic pulmonary oedema, were randomly assigned conventional oxygen therapy, CPAP (10 cm H2O), or bilevel ventilation (IPAP 15 cm H2O, EPAP 5 cm H2O) provided by a standard ventilator through a face mask. The main end points were treatment success at two hours and in-hospital mortality. Analyses were by intention to treat. Results: Treatment success (defined as all of respiratory rate<23 bpm, oxygen saturation of>90%, and arterial blood pH>7.35 (that is, reversal of acidosis), at the end of the two hour study period) occurred in three (15%) patients in the control group, seven (35%) in the CPAP group, and nine (45%) in the bilevel group (p = 0.116). Fourteen (70%) of the control group patients survived to hospital discharge, compared with 20 (100%) in the CPAP group and 15 (75%) in the bilevel group (p = 0.029; Fisher's test). Conclusions: In this study, patients presenting with acute cardiogenic pulmonary oedema and acidosis, were more likely to survive to hospital discharge if treated with CPAP, rather than with bilevel ventilation or with conventional oxygen therapy. There was no relation between in hospital survival and early physiological changes. Survival rates were similar to other studies despite a low rate of endotracheal intubation. PMID:14988338

  13. Effects of continuous positive airway pressure treatment on clinic and ambulatory blood pressures in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and resistant hypertension: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Muxfeldt, Elizabeth S; Margallo, Victor; Costa, Leonardo M S; Guimarães, Gleison; Cavalcante, Aline H; Azevedo, João C M; de Souza, Fabio; Cardoso, Claudia R L; Salles, Gil F

    2015-04-01

    The effect of continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) on blood pressures (BPs) in patients with resistant hypertension and obstructive sleep apnea is not established. We aimed to evaluate it in a randomized controlled clinical trial, with blinded assessment of outcomes. Four hundred thirty-four resistant hypertensive patients were screened and 117 patients with moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, defined by an apnea-hypopnea index ≥15 per hour, were randomized to 6-month CPAP treatment (57 patients) or no therapy (60 patients), while maintaining antihypertensive treatment. Clinic and 24-hour ambulatory BPs were obtained before and after 6-month treatment. Primary outcomes were changes in clinic and ambulatory BPs and in nocturnal BP fall patterns. Intention-to-treat and per-protocol (limited to those with uncontrolled ambulatory BPs) analyses were performed. Patients had mean (SD) 24-hour BP of 129(16)/75(12) mm Hg, and 59% had uncontrolled ambulatory BPs. Mean apnea-hypopnea index was 41 per hour and 58.5% had severe obstructive sleep apnea. On intention-to-treat analysis, there was no significant difference in any BP change, neither in nocturnal BP fall, between CPAP and control groups. The best effect of CPAP was on night-time systolic blood pressure in per-protocol analysis, with greater reduction of 4.7 mm Hg (95% confidence interval, -11.3 to +3.1 mm Hg; P=0.24) and an increase in nocturnal BP fall of 2.2% (95% confidence interval, -1.6% to +5.8%; P=0.25), in comparison with control group. In conclusion, CPAP treatment had no significant effect on clinic and ambulatory BPs in patients with resistant hypertension and moderate/severe obstructive sleep apnea, although a beneficial effect on night-time systolic blood pressure and on nocturnal BP fall might exist in patients with uncontrolled ambulatory BP levels.

  14. Safety and Efficacy of Oral Feeding in Infants with BPD on nasal CPAP

    PubMed Central

    Hanin, Melissa; Nuthakki, Sushma; Malkar, Manish B.; Jadcherla, Sudarshan

    2016-01-01

    Objective Safety and efficacy of oral feeding was examined in infants with bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) on nasal continuous positive airway pressure (NCPAP). We hypothesized that repetitive oral feeding enhances aerodigestive outcomes and reduces resource utilization. Methods Data from infants with BPD (37–42 weeks post menstrual age) that were orally fed while on NCPAP (n=26) were compared with those that were exclusively gavage fed on NCPAP (n=27). Subject assignment was random and physician practice based. Specifically, we compared the differences in aero-digestive milestones, resource utilization and safety metrics. Results Demographic characteristics such as gender distribution, gestational age and birth weight, clinical characteristics such as frequency of intraventricular hemorrhage and patent ductus arteriosus needing surgical ligation were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). Characteristics of respiratory support and airway milestones were similar in both groups (p > 0.05). However, infants in NCPAP-oral fed group had earlier acquisition of full oral feeding milestone by 17 days (median) vs. infants who were not orally fed during NCPAP (p < 0.05). Discharge weights and the frequency of gastrostomy tube placement were also similar in both groups (p > 0.05). There were no tracheostomies in either group. There was no incidence of clinically significant aspiration pneumonia in infants during the period of the oral feeding while on NCPAP. Conclusion Controlled introduction of oral feedings in infants with BPD during NCPAP is safe and may accelerate the acquisition of oral feeding milestones. PMID:25380678

  15. Normal Anatomy, Histology, and Spontaneous Pathology of the Nasal Cavity of the Cynomolgus Monkey (Macaca fascicularis).

    PubMed

    Chamanza, Ronnie; Taylor, Ian; Gregori, Michela; Hill, Colin; Swan, Mark; Goodchild, Joel; Goodchild, Kane; Schofield, Jane; Aldous, Mark; Mowat, Vasanthi

    2016-07-01

    The evaluation of inhalation studies in monkeys is often hampered by the scarcity of published information on the relevant nasal anatomy and pathology. We examined nasal cavities of 114 control cynomolgus monkeys from 11 inhalation studies evaluated 2008 to 2013, in order to characterize and document the anatomic features and spontaneous pathology. Compared to other laboratory animals, the cynomolgus monkey has a relatively simple nose with 2 unbranched, dorsoventrally stacked turbinates, large maxillary sinuses, and a nasal septum that continues into the nasopharynx. The vomeronasal organ is absent, but nasopalatine ducts are present. Microscopically, the nasal epithelium is thicker than that in rodents, and the respiratory (RE) and transitional epithelium (TE) rest on a thick basal lamina. Generally, squamous epithelia and TE line the vestibule, RE, the main chamber and nasopharynx, olfactory epithelium, a small caudodorsal region, while TE is observed intermittently along the passages. Relatively high incidences of spontaneous pathology findings, some resembling induced lesions, were observed and included inflammation, luminal exudate, scabs, squamous and respiratory metaplasia or hyperplasia, mucous cell hyperplasia/metaplasia, and olfactory degeneration. Regions of epithelial transition were the most affected. This information is considered helpful in the histopathology evaluation and interpretation of inhalation studies in monkeys.

  16. The role of temporalis fascia for free mucosal graft survival in small nasal septal perforation repair.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Eun-Ju; Choi, Jin; Lee, Joo-Hyung; Kim, Sung-Won; Nam, In-Chul; Park, Yong-Su; Jin, Sang-Gyun; Cheon, Byung-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Temporalis fascia has been used widely as a interposition graft for mucosal rotation flap in nasal septal perforation repair. However, the exact role of temporalis fascia in healing process has not yet been clarified. For the pedicle of rotation flap has been considered as a major vehicle for nutrition distribution, the role of temporalis fascia has been devaluated. In this study, we experienced small nasal septal perforation repairs using free mucosal graft not having pedicles but covered by temporalis fascia. Three patients with small nasal septal perforations not larger than 1 × 1 cm were included. In 2 patients, the perforations were repaired using free composite grafts from the inferior turbinate mucosa covered by continuous temporalis fascia not divided, and the surgical results were successful with complete healings. In 1 patient, however, the temporalis fascia was divided into 2 parts to better fit the shape of the perforation, and the graft failed to survive. These surgical results suggest that the temporalis fascia might have an important role in healing process of nasal septal defect and could be used as a beneficial options for small mucosal defect repair surgeries using free mucosal grafts.

  17. High Frequency and Diversity of Antimicrobial Activities Produced by Nasal Staphylococcus Strains against Bacterial Competitors

    PubMed Central

    Janek, Daniela; Zipperer, Alexander; Kulik, Andreas; Krismer, Bernhard; Peschel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    The human nasal microbiota is highly variable and dynamic often enclosing major pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. The potential roles of bacteriocins or other mechanisms allowing certain bacterial clones to prevail in this nutrient-poor habitat have hardly been studied. Of 89 nasal Staphylococcus isolates, unexpectedly, the vast majority (84%) was found to produce antimicrobial substances in particular under habitat-specific stress conditions, such as iron limitation or exposure to hydrogen peroxide. Activity spectra were generally narrow but highly variable with activities against certain nasal members of the Actinobacteria, Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, or several groups of bacteria. Staphylococcus species and many other Firmicutes were insusceptible to most of the compounds. A representative bacteriocin was identified as a nukacin-related peptide whose inactivation reduced the capacity of the producer Staphylococcus epidermidis IVK45 to limit growth of other nasal bacteria. Of note, the bacteriocin genes were found on mobile genetic elements exhibiting signs of extensive horizontal gene transfer and rearrangements. Thus, continuously evolving bacteriocins appear to govern bacterial competition in the human nose and specific bacteriocins may become important agents for eradication of notorious opportunistic pathogens from human microbiota. PMID:27490492

  18. The nasal complex of Neanderthals: an entry portal to their place in human ancestry.

    PubMed

    Márquez, Samuel; Pagano, Anthony S; Delson, Eric; Lawson, William; Laitman, Jeffrey T

    2014-11-01

    Neanderthals are one of the most intensely studied groups of extinct humans, as aspects of their phylogeny and functional morphology remain controversial. They have long been described as cold adapted but recent analyses of their nasal anatomy suggest that traits formerly considered adaptations may be the result of genetic drift. This study performs quantitative and qualitative analysis of aspects of the nasal complex (NC) in Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene fossils from Europe and Africa. A geographically diverse sample of modern human crania was used to establish an anatomical baseline for populations inhabiting cold and tropical climates. Nasofrontal angle, piriform aperture dimensions, and relative maxillary sinus volume were analyzed along with qualitative features of the piriform aperture rim. Results indicate that Neanderthals and other later Pleistocene Homo possessed NC's that align them with tropical modern humans. Thus comparison of Neanderthal nasal morphology with that of modern humans from cold climates may not be appropriate as differences in overall craniofacial architecture may constrain the narrowing of the piriform apertures in Neanderthals. They retain primitively long, low crania, large maxillary sinuses, and large piriform aperture area similar to mid-Pleistocene Homo specimens such as Petralona 1 and Kabwe 1. Adaptation to cold climate may have necessitated other adaptations such as bony medial projections at the piriform aperture rim and, potentially, midfacial prognathism. Nasal complex components of the upper respiratory tract remain a critical but poorly understood area that may yet offer novel insight into one of the greatest continuing controversies in paleoanthropology.

  19. Fundus imaging with a nasal endoscope.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh; Mishra, K C Divyansh

    2015-01-01

    Wide field fundus imaging is needed to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients with retinal pathology. This is more applicable for pediatric patients as repeated evaluation is a challenge. The presently available imaging machines though provide high definition images, but carry the obvious disadvantages of either being costly or bulky or sometimes both, which limits its usage only to large centers. We hereby report a technique of fundus imaging using a nasal endoscope coupled with viscoelastic. A regular nasal endoscope with viscoelastic coupling was placed on the cornea to image the fundus of infants under general anesthesia. Wide angle fundus images of various fundus pathologies in infants could be obtained easily with readily available instruments and without the much financial investment for the institutes.

  20. Fundus imaging with a nasal endoscope

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, P Mahesh; Ramanjulu, Rajesh; Mishra, KC Divyansh

    2015-01-01

    Wide field fundus imaging is needed to diagnose, treat, and follow-up patients with retinal pathology. This is more applicable for pediatric patients as repeated evaluation is a challenge. The presently available imaging machines though provide high definition images, but carry the obvious disadvantages of either being costly or bulky or sometimes both, which limits its usage only to large centers. We hereby report a technique of fundus imaging using a nasal endoscope coupled with viscoelastic. A regular nasal endoscope with viscoelastic coupling was placed on the cornea to image the fundus of infants under general anesthesia. Wide angle fundus images of various fundus pathologies in infants could be obtained easily with readily available instruments and without the much financial investment for the institutes. PMID:25686069

  1. Simulating the nasal cycle with computational fluid dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ruchin G.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Frank-Ito, Dennis O.; Kimbell, Julia S.; Rhee, John S.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives (1) Develop a method to account for the confounding effect of the nasal cycle when comparing pre- and post-surgery objective measures of nasal patency. (2) Illustrate this method by reporting objective measures derived from computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models spanning the full range of mucosal engorgement associated with the nasal cycle in two subjects. Study Design Retrospective Setting Academic tertiary medical center. Subjects and Methods A cohort of 24 nasal airway obstruction patients was reviewed to select the two patients with the greatest reciprocal change in mucosal engorgement between pre- and post-surgery computed tomography (CT) scans. Three-dimensional anatomic models were created based on the pre- and post-operative CT scans. Nasal cycling models were also created by gradually changing the thickness of the inferior turbinate, middle turbinate, and septal swell body. CFD was used to simulate airflow and to calculate nasal resistance and average heat flux. Results Before accounting for the nasal cycle, Patient A appeared to have a paradoxical worsening nasal obstruction in the right cavity postoperatively. After accounting for the nasal cycle, Patient A had small improvements in objective measures postoperatively. The magnitude of the surgical effect also differed in Patient B after accounting for the nasal cycle. Conclusion By simulating the nasal cycle and comparing models in similar congestive states, surgical changes in nasal patency can be distinguished from physiological changes associated with the nasal cycle. This ability can lead to more precise comparisons of pre and post-surgery objective measures and potentially more accurate virtual surgery planning. PMID:25450411

  2. Assessment of the effect of deviated nasal septum on the structure of nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junguo; Dou, Xin; Liu, Dingding; Song, Panpan; Qian, Xiaoyun; Wang, Shoulin; Gao, Xia

    2016-06-01

    The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of DNS on the structure of nasal cavity. The paranasal sinus coronal view CT of 108 patients with DNS and 129 hospitalized patients without DNS was retrospectively analyzed. The transverse diameter of nasal cavity (a), transverse diameter of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus (b), angle between maxillary and palatal bone, interalveolar distance, and maxillary rotation distance were measured. The ratio of a/b in experimental group was 0.367 ± 0.006 which was significantly (P = 0.0023) less than that in control group (0.391 ± 0.005). For the angle between maxillary and palatal bone, there was no significant difference found between DNS and control group for both right and left sides. The interalveolar distance was 40.75 mm in experimental group, and 38.8 mm in control (P = 0.0002). For the maxillary rotation distance, findings were considered as significant (P < 0.0001) in experimental group (11.25 mm) compared with control (10.1 mm). The present study demonstrates that long-term DNS affects the development of nasal cavity and paranasal sinus, as well as increases the interalveolar distance and maxillary rotation distance. These influences may be caused by the alteration of airflow inside the nasal cavities.

  3. Nasal high flow reduces dead space.

    PubMed

    Möller, Winfried; Feng, Sheng; Domanski, Ulrike; Franke, Karl-Josef; Celik, Gülnaz; Bartenstein, Peter; Becker, Sven; Meyer, Gabriele; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Tatkov, Stanislav; Nilius, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that nasal high flow (NHF) therapy can support ventilation in patients with acute or chronic respiratory disorders. Clearance of dead space has been suggested as being the key mechanism of respiratory support with NHF therapy. The hypothesis of this study was that NHF in a dose-dependent manner can clear dead space of the upper airways from expired air and decrease rebreathing. The randomized crossover study involved 10 volunteers using scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton ((81m)Kr) gas during a breath-holding maneuver with closed mouth and in 3 nasally breathing tracheotomized patients by volumetric capnography and oximetry through sampling CO2 and O2 in the trachea and measuring the inspired volume with inductance plethysmography following NHF rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The scintigraphy revealed a decrease in (81m)Kr gas clearance half-time with an increase of NHF in the nasal cavities [Pearson's correlation coefficient cc = -0.55, P < 0.01], the pharynx (cc = -0.41, P < 0.01), and the trachea (cc = -0.51, P < 0.01). Clearance rates in nasal cavities derived from time constants and MRI-measured volumes were 40.6 ± 12.3 (SD), 52.5 ± 17.7, and 72.9 ± 21.3 ml/s during NHF (15, 30, and 45 l/min, respectively). Measurement of inspired gases in the trachea showed an NHF-dependent decrease of inspired CO2 that correlated with an increase of inspired O2 (cc = -0.77, P < 0.05). NHF clears the upper airways of expired air, which reduces dead space by a decrease of rebreathing making ventilation more efficient. The dead space clearance is flow and time dependent, and it may extend below the soft palate.

  4. [The informative value of determination of the cytological status of nasal and oral mucosae in the assessment of the quality of water].

    PubMed

    Beliaeva, N N; Rakhmanin, Iu A; Gorelova, Zh Iu; Aleksandrova, V P; Aleksandrovskiĭ, S B; Shamarin, A A; Sevost'ianova, E M

    2005-01-01

    The nasal and oral mucosal cytological status was studied in children of a control kindergarten who used boiled Moscow tap water and in those of two experimental kindergartens who had drunk bottled "Troitsa" water supplemented by a fortified "Zolotoy Shar" drink for 6 months. Impression smears were taken from their nasal and oral mucosae twice: before and 6 months after water use. The data presented indicate that the use of the water of improved quality in its trace and vitamin contents may be used in preventive and rehabilitative medicine as it leads to improvement of the nasal and oral cytological status, by normalizing and/or positively affecting the latter.

  5. Surgical Nasal Implants: Indications and Risks.

    PubMed

    Genther, Dane J; Papel, Ira D

    2016-10-01

    Rhinoplasty often requires the use of grafting material, and the goal of the specific graft dictates the ideal characteristics of the material to be used. An ideal material would be biologically inert, resistant to infection, noncarcinogenic, nondegradable, widely available, cost-effective, readily modifiable, and easily removable, have compatible biomechanical characteristics, retain physical properties over time, and not migrate. Unfortunately, no material currently in existence meets all of these criteria. In modern rhinoplasty, autologous grafts are the gold standard against which all other nasal implants are measured and offer the safest long-term results for most patients. They are easily manipulated, have inherent stability and biomechanical characteristics similar to the native nasal framework, and confer minimal risk of complications. Modern homologous and alloplastic materials have gained considerable support in recent years because they are readily available in endless quantity, do not require a second surgical site for harvest, and are generally considered safe if most circumstances, but they confer additional risk and have biomechanical characteristics different from that of the native nasal framework. To address some of these issues, we provide a contemporary review of autologous, homologous, and alloplastic materials commonly used in rhinoplasty surgery.

  6. Nasal nitric oxide in unilateral sinus disease

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chia-Hsiang; Tseng, Hsiao-Jung; Huang, Chi-Che; Chang, Po-Hung; Chen, Yi-Wei; Lee, Ta-Jen

    2017-01-01

    Unilateral sinus disease (USD) can sometimes be difficult to accurately diagnose before surgery. The application of nasal nitric oxide (nNO) for USD diagnosis and its surgical outcome in USD has not been reported in the literature. We prospectively enrolled sixty-six USD patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery for fungal rhinosinusitis (n = 19), chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) without nasal polyps (n = 13), CRS with nasal polyps (n = 12) and sinonasal mass lesions (n = 22). nNO levels were measured preoperatively and at three and six months postoperatively. Correlations between nNO levels and potential clinical parameters, type of disease, disease severity, and disease-related quality of life (QOL) were assessed. Unlike bilateral CRS, in USD, nNO levels did not correlate with disease severity or postoperative QOL improvements. Except for fungus group, there were no differences in nNO levels between lesion and non-lesion sides in all the other groups. nNO levels on both sides were significantly elevated six months postoperatively in all groups. Fungal rhinosinusitis patients had the lowest preoperative nNO levels, and a cutoff of 239.3 ppb had the best sensitivity (79.0%) and specificity (87.2%) for preoperative diagnosis. While preoperative nNO levels cannot serve as an alternative marker for disease severity of USD, they were lower in fungal rhinosinusitis patients than in other USD patients and may be useful for more accurate diagnosis prior to surgery. PMID:28199369

  7. [Nasal cavity and paranasal sinus cancer].

    PubMed

    Peyraga, G; Lafond, C; Pointreau, Y; Giraud, P; Maingon, P

    2016-09-01

    The nasal cavity and parasinusal cancer are rare (10% of tumors of the head and neck) and are mainly represented by squamous cell carcinoma of the nasal cavity or the maxillary sinus and adenocarcinoma of the ethmoid sinus (occupational disease, wood dust). The most common clinical sign is nasal obstruction, but tumors can also manifest as rhinorrhea and/or epistaxis (usually unilateral signs). A magnetic resonance imaging of the facial structure is systematic for staging before treatment. The treatment consists of a first surgery if the patient is operable with a resectable tumor. If it is not the case, the treatment consists of radiotherapy (RT) associated with chemotherapy (CT) according to the initial data (T3/T4 or N+). After first surgery, RT is indicated (except T1N0 with complete resection) associated with a CT based on postoperative data (capsular effraction or incomplete resection). Lymph node irradiation is considered case by case, but is indicated in any nodal involvement. RT must be an intensity modulated RT (IMRT), static or dynamic, and must be imagery guided (IGRT). According to ICRU 83, doses to organs at risk and target volumes must be carried. Finally, after a post-treatment baseline imaging between 2 and 4 months, monitoring will be alternated with the ENT surgeon every 2 or 3 months for 2 years, then every 4 to 6 months for 5 years.

  8. Standardization of Malaysian adult female nasal cavity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chih Fang; Abdullah, Mohd Zulkifly; Ahmad, Kamarul Arifin; Lutfi Shuaib, Ibrahim

    2013-01-01

    This research focuses on creating a standardized nasal cavity model of adult Malaysian females. The methodology implemented in this research is a new approach compared to other methods used by previous researchers. This study involves 26 females who represent the test subjects for this preliminary study. Computational fluid dynamic (CFD) analysis was carried out to better understand the characteristics of the standardized model and to compare it to the available standardized Caucasian model. This comparison includes cross-sectional areas for both half-models as well as velocity contours along the nasal cavities. The Malaysian female standardized model is larger in cross-sectional area compared to the standardized Caucasian model thus leading to lower average velocity magnitudes. The standardized model was further evaluated with four more Malaysian female test subjects based on its cross-sectional areas and average velocity magnitudes along the nasal cavities. This evaluation shows that the generated model represents an averaged and standardized model of adult Malaysian females.

  9. Autologous Diced Cartilage in Nasal Septoplasty

    PubMed Central

    Sersar, Sameh Ibrahim; Yassin, Ibrahim; Eldin Aly, Mohammed Saad

    2016-01-01

    Diced rib cartilage is an acceptable option in severe nasal deformities. We present our preliminary experience in KAMC in nasal septoplasties using the autologous diced costal cartilage. This is a retrospective study of the 22 cases who needed the autologous diced costal cartilage in our centre in 4 years. All our patients needed autologous diced rib cartilages. Twelve were wrapped with temporalis fascia, eight needed rectus fascia and perichondrium was used in only 2 cases. The naso-frontal angle for the whole series decreased by a mean of 4.41° (p=0.008) for the group using the rectus fascia diced cartilage graft. From the aesthetic point of view, all cases were satisfied except 3 (13.6%); two in the group of diced cartilage temporalis fascia; group 1. From the functional breathing view, only 1 case was not satisfied. He was in group 1. Autologous rib cartilage was shown to be a good graft in nasal septoplasty especially if wrapped with rectus fascia. PMID:27853694

  10. Nasal cytokine responses to natural colds in asthmatic children

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Toby C.; Henderson, Tiffany A.; Carpenter, Ashley R.; Ramirez, Ixsy A.; McHenry, Christina L.; Goldsmith, Adam M.; Ren, Xiaodan; Mentz, Graciela B.; Mukherjee, Bhramar; Robins, Thomas G.; Joiner, Terence A.; Mohammad, Layla S.; Nguyen, Emily R.; Burns, Mark A.; Burke, David T.; Hershenson, Marc B.

    2014-01-01

    Background The mechanisms by which viruses induce asthma exacerbations are not well-understood. Objective We characterized fluctuations in nasal aspirate cytokines during naturally-occurring respiratory viral infections in children with asthma. Methods Sixteen children underwent home collections of nasal aspirates when they were without cold symptoms and again during self-reported respiratory illnesses. The presence of viral infection was ascertained by multiplex PCR. Cytokines were measured by multiplex immune assay. mRNA expression for selected markers of viral infection was measured by RT-PCR. A cumulative respiratory symptom score was calculated for each day of measurement. Generalized estimated equations were used to evaluate associations between viral infection and marker elevation, and between marker elevation and symptom score. Results The 16 patients completed a total of 37 weeks of assessment (15 “well” weeks; 22 self-assessed “sick” weeks). Viral infections were detected in three of the “well” weeks and 17 of the “sick” weeks (10 rhinovirus, 3 coronavirus, 2 influenza A, 2 influenza B, 2 respiratory syncytial virus, 1 parainfluenza). Compared to virus-negative well weeks, nasal aspirate IFN-γ, CXCL8/IL-8, CXCL10/IP-10, CCL5/RANTES, CCL11/eotaxin-1, CCL2/MCP-1, CCL4/MIP-1β, CCL7/MCP-3 and CCL20/MIP3α protein levels increased during virus-positive sick weeks. Only a subset of cytokines (IFN-γ, CXCL8, CCL2, CCL4, CCL5 and CCL20) correlated with self-reported respiratory tract symptoms. While many aspirates were dilute and showed no mRNA signal, viral infection significantly increased the number of samples that were positive for IFN-λ1, IFN-λ2/3, TLR3, RIG-I and IRF7 mRNA. Conclusions & Clinical Relevance We conclude that, in children with asthma, naturally-occurring viral infections apparently induce a robust innate immune response including expression of specific chemokines, IFNs and IFN-responsive genes. PMID:23181789

  11. Efficacy of Nasya (nasal medication) in coma: A case study

    PubMed Central

    Ramteke, Rajkala S.; Patil, Panchakshari D.; Thakar, Anup B.

    2016-01-01

    For emergency conditions, Ayurveda has never been given importance in recent times. However, there are certain emergency conditions where biomedicine has limitations but, Ayurveda can provide solution. Classics have many references regarding management of acute conditions like syncope, coma, episodic conditions of bronchial asthma, epilepsy, etc., In the present study, a 61 year female patient had a two year history of hypertension and was suffering with coma. She was treated with an Ayurvedic treatment modality. Nasya (nasal medication) of Trikaṭu cūrṇa (powder) for seven days, followed by dhūmapāna (~fumigation) with saṅkhyāsthāpana (consciousness restorative) drugs for seven days was administered. The outcome of this management was appreciable, as it resulted in positive changes in Glasgow Coma Scale (GSCS) from 3 to 11. PMID:27621522

  12. Fos immunohistochemical determination of brainstem neuronal activation in the muskrat after nasal stimulation.

    PubMed

    McCulloch, P F; Panneton, W M

    1997-06-01

    Stimulation of the nasal passages of muskrats with either ammonia vapours or retrogradely-flowing water produced cardiorespiratory responses (an immediate 62% decrease in heart rate, 29% increase in mean arterial blood pressure, and sustained expiratory apnoea). We used the immunohistological detection of Fos, the protein product of the c-fos gene, as a marker of neuronal activation to help elucidate the brainstem circuitry of this cardiorespiratory response. After repeated ammonia stimulation of the nasal passages, increased Fos expression was detected within the spinal trigeminal nucleus (ventral laminae I and II of the medullary dorsal horn, ventral paratrigeminal nucleus, and spinal trigeminal nucleus interpolaris), an area just ventromedial to the medullary dorsal horn, the caudal dorsal reticular formation and the area of the A5 catecholamine group compared to control animals. Repeated water stimulation of the nasal passages produced increased Fos expression only in the A5 catecholamine group. There was an increase in the number of Fos-positive cells in the ammonia group in the ventral laminae I and II of the medullary dorsal horn and the ventral paratrigeminal nuclei compared with the water group. We conclude that ammonia stimulation of the nasal passages produces a different pattern of neuronal activation within the brainstem compared with water stimulation. We also conclude that Fos immunohistochemistry is a good technique to determine functional afferent somatotopy, but that immunohistochemical detection of Fos is not a good technique to identify the medullary neurons responsible for the efferent aspects of an intermittently produced cardiorespiratory reflex.

  13. Evaluation of droplet velocity and size from nasal spray devices using phase Doppler anemometry (PDA).

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaofei; Doub, William H; Guo, Changning

    2010-03-30

    To determine aerosol deposition during the inhalation drug delivery, it is important to understand the combination of velocity and droplet size together. In this study, phase Doppler anemometry (PDA) was used to simultaneously characterize the aerosol velocity and droplet size distribution (DSD) of three nasal spray pumps filled with water. Thirteen sampling positions were located in the horizontal cross-sectional area of the nasal spray plumes at a distance of 3cm from the pump orifice. The results showed droplet velocities near the center of the spray plume were higher and more consistent than those near the edge. The pumps examined showed significant differences in their aerosol velocity at the center of the spray plume, which suggest that this metric might be used as a discriminating parameter for in vitro testing of nasal sprays. Droplet size measurements performed using PDA were compared with results from laser light scattering measurements. The ability of PDA to provide simultaneous measurements of aerosol velocity and size makes it a powerful tool for the detailed investigation of nasal spray plume characteristics.

  14. Nasal submucosal administration of antigen-presenting cells induces effective immunological responses in cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Yoshitaka; Fujikawa, Akira; Kurosaki, Motoyoshi; Yamasaki, Kazuki; Sakurai, Daijyu; Horiguchi, Shigetoshi; Nakayama, Toshinori

    2011-01-01

    Human NKT cells are known to have strong antitumor activities and to be activated by specific ligand, α-galactosylceramide (αGelCer). We examined the migration pattern of αGalCer-pulsed DCs and the immune responses after administration by different routes. DCs injected into nasal submucosa quickly migrated to the lateral neck lymph rather than the lateral lymph nodes. The absolute number of NKT cells and the IFN-γ-producing cells increased in peripheral blood after injection of the DCs into nasal submucosa. We conducted a phase I study with αGalCer-pulsed DCs administered in nasal submucosa of patients with head and neck cancer, and evaluated safety and feasibility. The results showed that nasal submucosal administration of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs was safe and a smaller number of these DCs could exhibit significant immune responses and some positive clinical effects. In additional study, the use of the intra-arterial infusion of activated NKT cells and the submucosal injection of α-GalCer-pulsed DCs has been shown to induce significant antitumor immunity and had beneficial clinical effects in the management of advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. The NKT cell-based cancer immunotherapy may be helpful in management of head and neck cancer and needs to be explored in further detail.

  15. The nasal delivery of nanoencapsulated statins – an approach for brain delivery

    PubMed Central

    Clementino, Adryana; Batger, Mellissa; Garrastazu, Gabriela; Pozzoli, Michele; Del Favero, Elena; Rondelli, Valeria; Gutfilen, Bianca; Barboza, Thiago; Sukkar, Maria B; Souza, Sergio A L; Cantù, Laura; Sonvico, Fabio

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Along with their cholesterol-lowering effect, statins have shown a wide range of pleiotropic effects potentially beneficial to neurodegenerative diseases. However, such effects are extremely elusive via the conventional oral administration. The purpose of the present study was to prepare and characterize the physicochemical properties and the in vivo biodistribution of simvastatin-loaded lecithin/chitosan nanoparticles (SVT-LCNs) suitable for nasal administration in view of an improved delivery of the statins to the brain. Materials and methods Chitosan, lecithin, and different oil excipients were used to prepare nanocapsules loaded with simvastatin. Particle size distribution, surface charge, structure, simvastatin loading and release, and interaction with mucus of nanoparticles were determined. The nanoparticle nasal toxicity was evaluated in vitro using RPMI 2651 nasal cell lines. Finally, in vivo biodistribution was assessed by gamma scintigraphy via Tc99m labeling of the particles. Results Among the different types of nanoparticles produced, the SVT-LCN_MaiLab showed the most ideal physicochemical characteristics, with small diameter (200 nm), positive surface charge (+48 mV) and high encapsulation efficiency (EE; 98%). Size distribution was further confirmed by nanoparticle tracking analysis and electron microscopy. The particles showed a relatively fast release of simvastatin in vitro (35.6%±4.2% in 6 hours) in simulated nasal fluid. Blank nanoparticles did not show cytotoxicity, evidencing that the formulation is safe for nasal administration, while cytotoxicity of simvastatin-loaded nanoparticles (IC50) was found to be three times lower than the drug solution (9.92 vs 3.50 μM). In rats, a significantly higher radioactivity was evidenced in the brain after nasal delivery of simvastatin-loaded nanoparticles in comparison to the administration of a similar dose of simvastatin suspension. Conclusion The SVT-LCNs developed presented some of the most

  16. The Effect of Menstrual Cycle on Nasal Resonance Characteristics in Females

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Suman; Basu, Shriya; Sinha, Anisha; Chatterjee, Indranil

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze resonance characteristics (nasality and nasalance values) during the menstrual cycle. Previous studies indicate changes in voice quality and nasal mucosa due to temporary falling estrogen levels in human females during their menstrual cycle. The present study compared the nasality and "nasalance scores"…

  17. Nasal high flow reduces dead space

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sheng; Domanski, Ulrike; Franke, Karl-Josef; Celik, Gülnaz; Bartenstein, Peter; Becker, Sven; Meyer, Gabriele; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Tatkov, Stanislav; Nilius, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that nasal high flow (NHF) therapy can support ventilation in patients with acute or chronic respiratory disorders. Clearance of dead space has been suggested as being the key mechanism of respiratory support with NHF therapy. The hypothesis of this study was that NHF in a dose-dependent manner can clear dead space of the upper airways from expired air and decrease rebreathing. The randomized crossover study involved 10 volunteers using scintigraphy with 81mKrypton (81mKr) gas during a breath-holding maneuver with closed mouth and in 3 nasally breathing tracheotomized patients by volumetric capnography and oximetry through sampling CO2 and O2 in the trachea and measuring the inspired volume with inductance plethysmography following NHF rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The scintigraphy revealed a decrease in 81mKr gas clearance half-time with an increase of NHF in the nasal cavities [Pearson’s correlation coefficient cc = −0.55, P < 0.01], the pharynx (cc = −0.41, P < 0.01), and the trachea (cc = −0.51, P < 0.01). Clearance rates in nasal cavities derived from time constants and MRI-measured volumes were 40.6 ± 12.3 (SD), 52.5 ± 17.7, and 72.9 ± 21.3 ml/s during NHF (15, 30, and 45 l/min, respectively). Measurement of inspired gases in the trachea showed an NHF-dependent decrease of inspired CO2 that correlated with an increase of inspired O2 (cc = −0.77, P < 0.05). NHF clears the upper airways of expired air, which reduces dead space by a decrease of rebreathing making ventilation more efficient. The dead space clearance is flow and time dependent, and it may extend below the soft palate. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Clearance of expired air in upper airways by nasal high flow (NHF) can be extended below the soft palate and de facto causes a reduction of dead space. Using scintigraphy, the authors found a relationship between NHF, time, and clearance. Direct measurement of CO2 and O2 in the trachea confirmed a reduction of rebreathing, providing

  18. Infective endocarditis of native valve after anterior nasal packing.

    PubMed

    Jayawardena, Suriya; Eisdorfer, Jacob; Indulkar, Shalaka; Zarkaria, Muhammad

    2006-01-01

    We present a case report of a patient who was previously treated for spontaneous epistaxis with a petroleum jelly gauze (0.5 in x 72 in) anterior nasal packing filled with an antibiotic ointment, along with prophylactic oral clindamycin. The patient presented with fever and hypotension 3 days after the nasal packing. Her blood cultures grew methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and the transesophageal echocardiography showed vegetation on the atrial surface of the posterior mitral valve leaflet, confirming the diagnosis of bacterial endocarditis attributable to nasal packing. Several case reports discuss toxic shock syndrome after nasal packing, but none describe endocarditis of the native heart valves subsequent to anterior nasal packing. Current guidelines on endocarditis prophylaxis produced by the American Heart Association, European Cardiac Society, and British Cardiac Society together with published evidence do not recommend endocarditis prophylaxis for patients with native heart valves undergoing anterior nasal packing.

  19. Osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap in subtotal nasal reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Alexander Michael; Montgomery, Jenny; McMahon, Jeremy; Sheikh, Saghir

    2014-01-01

    A 66-year-old man presented with a large squamous cell carcinoma of the right nasal vestibule. He underwent partial rhinectomy and medial maxillectomy followed by staged reconstruction. Reconstruction of a full-thickness nasal defect requires repair of three distinct layers: the skin–soft tissue envelope, subsurface framework and intranasal lining. We report the first use in the UK of an osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap in the reconstruction of a subtotal nasal deficit. The skin of the radial forearm free flap was tubed to recreate the nasal lining and the radial bone reconstructed the dorsal contour of the nose. A full-thickness paramedian forehead flap supplied external coverage. The osteocutaneous radial forearm free flap and forehead flap is a viable option for large nasal defects requiring reconstruction of framework, nasal lining and external covering. PMID:25427933

  20. Management of the middle nasal third in revision rhinoplasty.

    PubMed

    Sykes, Jonathan M

    2008-08-01

    The middle nasal third is often the source of both aesthetic and functional problems with primary rhinoplasty. Weakness of the middle nasal vault can occur from overresection of the upper lateral cartilages or cartilaginous nasal septum, malposition of the upper lateral cartilages, or from secondary scarring from the primary rhinoplasty. These functional and aesthetic problems can be avoided by maintaining an adequate infrastructure to the middle nasal vault. If secondary problems occur in the middle nasal third, precise anatomic reconstruction can be performed in the form of cartilage grafting and/or suture reconstitution. This reconstruction requires an in-depth knowledge of the functional nasal anatomy and the ability to re-create the infrastructure so that it withstands the forces of scarring and wound contraction. This article outlines the anatomy of the middle third of the nose, the conditions that cause secondary middle-third problems, and the surgical management of these deformities.

  1. [Nasal septal abscess complicating acute sinusitis in a child].

    PubMed

    Hassani, R; Aderdour, L; Maliki, O; Boumed, A; Elfakiri, M M; Bouchoua, F; Raji, A

    2011-01-01

    Nasal septal abscess is a rare complication of acute sinusitis in children. We report the case of a 9-year-old girl who presented at the emergency unit with a bilateral eyelid edema evolving over 2 days, associated with bilateral rhinorrhea and nasal obstruction. Clinical examination found a tumefied nasal septum and nasal obstruction. A computed tomography scan of the nose and paranasal sinuses showed pansinusitis with an abscess of the nasal septum. Treatment consisted in the evacuation of the abscess associated with a triple antibiotic therapy. Progression was favorable. Acute sinusitis is seldom complicated by an abscess of the nasal septum, and very few cases are reported in the literature. Early diagnosis and treatment can avoid complications, which engage not only the functional but also the vital prognosis.

  2. External nasal dilators: definition, background, and current uses

    PubMed Central

    Dinardi, Ricardo Reis; de Andrade, Cláudia Ribeiro; Ibiapina, Cássio da Cunha

    2014-01-01

    Our goal was to revise the literature about external nasal dilators (ENDs) as to their definition, history, and current uses. We reviewed journals in the PubMed and MEDLINE databases. The current uses hereby presented and discussed are physical exercise, nasal congestion and sleep, snoring, pregnancy, cancer, and healthy individuals. Numerous studies have shown that ENDs increase the cross-sectional area of the nasal valve, reducing nasal resistance and transnasal inspiratory pressure and stabilizing the lateral nasal vestibule, avoiding its collapse during final inspiration. These effects also facilitate breathing and are beneficial to patients with nasal obstruction. Furthermore, END use is simple, noninvasive, painless, affordable, and bears minimum risk to the user. Most studies have limited sample size and are mainly focused on physical exercise. In conclusion, ENDs seem useful, so further studies involving potential effects on the performance of physical tests and improvements in sleep quality are necessary, especially in children and teenagers. PMID:25419156

  3. Change in nasal congestion index after treatment in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis

    PubMed Central

    Sahin-Onder, Serap; Oysu, Cagatay; Deveci, Ildem; Sahin, Samil; Aktas, Betul

    2016-01-01

    Background: The management of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) involves both surgical and medical approaches, and remains a controversial subject. Objective: The objective of this prospective, randomized, controlled trial was to compare the medical and surgical treatments of CRSwNP in terms of their effect on the nasal congestion index (NCI). Methods: Forty-eight patients with CRSwNP were randomized either to medical or surgical therapy. Pretreatment and 3- and 6-month posttreatment assessments of the visual analog scale score, the 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, nasal endoscopy, and NCI measurement with acoustic rhinometry were performed. Forty-one subjects were included in the analysis. Results: Both the medical and surgical interventions for CRSwNP resulted in significant improvement in the visual analog scale score, 20-Item Sino-Nasal Outcome Test, saccharine clearance time, and nasal endoscopic examination scores. There was no difference between the two groups in terms of the percentage change from baseline for any of the parameters at the 6-month posttreatment assessment. NCI showed no significant difference from baseline. Similarly, no significant difference was found between the medical and surgical groups in terms of their effect on the NCI (p > 0.05). Conclusion: Because NCI does not correlate with standard subjective measures in outcomes for this group of patients, it cannot be used as an outcome measurement of treatment of subjects with CRSwNP. Results of this prospective randomized study did not find any additional benefit of surgical therapy over medical therapy in subjects with CRSwNP.

  4. Complex odontoma of the nasal cavity: a case report.

    PubMed

    Soltan, Michelle; Kacker, Ashutosh

    2008-05-01

    We describe the case of a 76-year-old man who presented with symptoms of chronic nasal obstruction and recurrent sinusitis of many years' duration. The patient's history and radiographic findings established a diagnosis of a complex odontoma of the nasal cavity. The mass was surgically excised, and the diagnosis was confirmed by histopathology. The occurrence of an odontoma in the nasal cavity is extremely rare.

  5. Application of new packing material in endoscopic nasal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Haiying; Han, Fei; Cui, Zhaoyang

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To show the efficacy and comfort of pneumatic bag packing after the endoscopic nasal surgery. Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. Significant findings: There were statistical significant differences between the pneumatic bag packing and the expansive sponge packing regarding subjective symptoms and objective findings after surgery. Conclusions: Pneumatic bag packing may be recommendable in terms of comfort and efficacy after endoscopic nasal surgery. PMID:25785173

  6. An unusual presentation of a nasal septal abscess.

    PubMed

    Cuddihy, P J; Srinivasan, V

    1998-08-01

    Nasal septal abscess is a rare complication of septal haematoma. Nasal obstruction and, less frequently, pain are the usual presenting features. We report a case of a nasal septal abscess in a 21-year-old female patient who developed a naso-oral fistula. To our knowledge this is the first report of such an unusual presentation of a septal abscess. The aetiology, pathogenesis and management of septal abscesses are discussed.

  7. Saline nasal irrigation: Its role as an adjunct treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Papsin, Blake; McTavish, Alison

    2003-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To review clinical evidence on the efficacy of saline nasal irrigation for treatment of sinonasal conditions and to explore its potential benefits. QUALITY OF EVIDENCE: Clinical trials, reviews, and treatment guidelines discussing nasal irrigation were obtained through a MEDLINE search from January 1980 to December 2001. Most trials were small and some were not controlled; evidence, therefore, is level II, or fair. MAIN MESSAGE: Flushing the nasal cavity with saline solution promotes mucociliary clearance by moisturizing the nasal cavity and by removing encrusted material. The procedure has been used safely for both adults and children, and has no documented serious adverse effects. Patients treated with nasal irrigation rely less on other medications and make fewer visits to physicians. Treatment guidelines in both Canada and the United States now advocate use of nasal irrigation for all causes of rhinosinusitis and for postoperative cleaning of the nasal cavity. CONCLUSION: Nasal irrigation is a simple, inexpensive treatment that relieves the symptoms of a variety of sinus and nasal conditions, reduces use of medical resources, and could help minimize antibiotic resistance. PMID:12619739

  8. Surgical Pearl on Reconstructing Surgical Defects of the Nasal Tip

    PubMed Central

    César, Artur; Barros, Ana; Santos, Paulo; Azevedo, Filomena

    2016-01-01

    Repairing surgical defects of the nasal tip is challenging, mainly because of the lack of freely mobile skin available peripherally. The Peng flap is a one-stage cutaneous flap that circumvents this difficulty by recruiting skin from the nasal dorsum and sidewall regions. The design produces a tridimensional shape perfectly adapted to the configuration of the nasal tip and allows for an inconspicuous closure of the defect. We present three examples of full-thickness skin defects involving the nasal tip, reconstructed using a modified version of the Peng flap, and present the experience at our department with this surgical technique. PMID:27942370

  9. Nasal and Oral Inspiration During Natural Speech Breathing

    PubMed Central

    Lester, Rosemary A.; Hoit, Jeannette D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the typical pattern for inspiration during speech breathing in healthy adults, as well as the factors that might influence it. Method Ten healthy adults, 18–45 years of age, performed a variety of speaking tasks while nasal ram pressure, audio, and video recordings were obtained. Inspirations were categorized as a nasal only, oral only, simultaneous nasal and oral, or alternating nasal and oral inspiration. The method was validated using nasal airflow, oral airflow, audio, and video recordings for two participants. Results The predominant pattern was simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations for all speaking tasks. This pattern was not affected by the nature of the speaking task or by the phonetic context surrounding the inspiration. The validation procedure confirmed that nearly all inspirations during counting and paragraph reading were simultaneous nasal and oral inspirations; whereas for sentence reading, the predominant pattern was alternating nasal and oral inspirations across the three phonetic contexts. Conclusions Healthy adults inspire through both the nose and mouth during natural speech breathing. This pattern of inspiration is likely beneficial in reducing pathway resistance while preserving some of the benefits of nasal breathing. PMID:24129013

  10. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution.

    PubMed Central

    Calderon-Garciduenas, L; Osnaya-Brizuela, N; Ramirez-Martinez, L; Villarreal-Calderon, A

    1996-01-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant induces SSBs in nasal epithelium, we studied 139 volunteers, including a control population of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p<0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 +/- 8.34% in the first week to 67.29 +/- 2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be

  11. DNA strand breaks in human nasal respiratory epithelium are induced upon exposure to urban pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderon-Garciduenas, L; Osnaya-Brizuela, N; Ramirez-Martinez, L; Villarreal-Calderon, A

    1996-02-01

    All organisms have the ability to respond and adapt to a myriad of environmental insults. The human respiratory epithelium, when exposed to oxidant gases in photochemical smog, is at risk of DNA damage and requires efficient cellular adaptative responses to resist the environmentally induced cell damage. Ozone and its reaction products induce in vitro and in vivo DNA single strand breaks (SSBs) in respiratory epithelial cells and alveolar macrophages. To determine if exposure to a polluted atmosphere with ozone as the main criteria pollutant induces SSBs in nasal epithelium, we studied 139 volunteers, including a control population of 19 children and 13 adult males who lived in a low-polluted Pacific port, 69 males and 16 children who were permanent residents of Southwest Metropolitan Mexico City (SWMMC), and 22 young males newly arrived to SWMMC and followed for 12 weeks. Respiratory symptoms, nasal cytology and histopathology, cell viabilities, and single-cell gel electrophoresis were investigated. Atmospheric pollutant data were obtained from a fixed-site monitoring station. SWMMC volunteers spent >7 hr/day outdoors and all had upper respiratory symptoms. A significant difference in the numbers of DNA-damaged nasal cells was observed between control and chronically exposed subjects, both in children (p<0.00001) and in adults (p<0.01). SSBs in newly arrived subjects quickly increased upon arrival to the city, from 39.8 +/- 8.34% in the first week to 67.29 +/- 2.35 by week 2. Thereafter, the number of cells with SSBs remained stable in spite of the continuous increase in cumulative ozone, suggesting a threshold for cumulative DNA nasal damage. Exposure to a polluted urban atmosphere induces SSBs in human nasal respiratory epithelium, and nasal SSBs could serve as a biomarker of ozone exposure. Further, because DNA strand breaks are a threat to cell viability and genome integrity and appear to be a critical lesion responsible for p53 induction, nasal SSBs should be

  12. Efficacy and safety of fixed-dose loratadine/montelukast in seasonal allergic rhinitis: effects on nasal congestion.

    PubMed

    Prenner, Bruce; Anolik, Robert; Danzig, Melvyn; Yao, Ruji

    2009-01-01

    A need exists for safe, effective therapy for the relief of the symptoms of allergic rhinitis (AR) that also consistently relieves nasal congestion, the most common and bothersome symptom. This study was performed to assess efficacy and safety of a once-daily tablet containing 10 mg of loratadine, an antihistamine, and 10 mg of montelukast, a leukotriene antagonist (SCH 445761) versus placebo and pseudoephedrine (PSE; 240 mg once-daily formulation; active comparator). In a multicenter, parallel-group, double-blind, double-dummy, randomized study, 1095 subjects with documented history of seasonal AR and positive skin-prick test to a prevailing aeroallergen were treated for 15 days with fixed-dose combination loratadine/montelukast (L/M), PSE, or placebo. After randomization, subjects rated severity of nasal congestion and measured peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF) rate in the morning and evening. The change in quality of life from baseline was also assessed. L/M and PSE were significantly more effective than placebo in alleviating nighttime and daytime nasal congestion and improving PNIF rate, an objective measure of nasal obstruction. There were no significant differences between L/M and PSE for any efficacy analysis including improvement in the quality of life. Subjects treated with L/M experienced a similar incidence of total adverse events versus placebo and a lower incidence of total adverse events (including dizziness, insomnia, jitteriness, nausea, and dry mouth) versus PSE. Nasal decongestant activity of L/M was significantly higher than that of placebo and similar to that of PSE in symptomatic AR subjects. L/M showed a safety profile similar to placebo and was better tolerated than PSE. Thus, L/M offers a safe and efficacious alternative to PSE for the treatment of nasal congestion associated with AR.

  13. Increased expression of chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR3 in nasal polyps: molecular basis for recruitment of the granulocyte infiltrate.

    PubMed

    Fundová, P; Funda, D P; Kovář, D; Holý, R; Navara, M; Tlaskalová-Hogenová, H

    2013-05-01

    Inflammatory processes play an important role in the development of nasal polyps (NP), but the etiology and, to a high degree also, the pathogenesis of NP are not fully understood. The role of several cytokines and chemokines such as eotaxins, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, and RANTES has been reported in NP. Herewith, we investigated the expression and pattern of distribution of chemokine receptors CCR1 and CCR3 in nasal polyps. Immunohistochemical detection was carried out in frozen sections of biopsies from 22 NP and 18 nasal mucosa specimens in both the epithelial and stromal compartments. Fluorescence microscopy and computerized image analysis revealed a statistically significant increased number of CCR1 (45.2 ± 2.8 vs. 15.1 ± 1.9, p < 0.001)-positive as well as CCR3 (16.4 ± 1.4 vs. 9.7 ± 1.1, p < 0.001)-positive cells in the stroma of NP compared to nasal mucosa. In comparison to healthy nasal mucosa, increased positivity of CCR3 was detected in the epithelial compartment of NP. Our data suggest that increased expression of CCR1 and CCR3 chemokine receptors may, in accord with various chemokines, contribute to the pathogenesis of nasal polyposis by facilitating increased migration and prolonged accumulation of inflammatory cells, e.g., eosinophils, in the inflammatory infiltrate of NP.

  14. Nasal and conjunctival screening prior to refractive surgery: an observational and cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Kitazawa, Koji; Sotozono, Chie; Sakamoto, Masako; Sasaki, Miho; Hieda, Osamu; Yamasaki, Toshihide; Kinoshita, Shigeru

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To investigate bacterial flora of clinically healthy conjunctiva and nasal cavity among patients prior to refractive surgery, as well as the characteristics of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) colonisation. Design Observational and cross-sectional study. Setting A single-centre study in Japan. Participants 120 consecutive patients pre-refractive surgery. Primary and secondary outcome measures methods Samples were obtained from the right conjunctival sac and the nasal cavity of 120 consecutive patients prior to refractive surgery and were then measured for the levels of the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics. Patients were interviewed regarding their occupation, family living situation and any personal history of atopic dermatitis, asthma, smoking or contact lens wear. Results Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes) (32.5%) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (4.2%) were detected from the conjunctival sac. S. epidermidis was the most commonly isolated (68.3%) in the nasal cavity. Of the 30 patients (25.0%) with colonisation by S. aureus, 2 patients, both of whom were healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis, were found to be positive for MRSA in the nasal cavity. A history of contact lens wear, asthma or smoking, as well as patient gender and age, was not associated with MRSA colonisation. Conclusions There were only 2 patients who were colonised with MRSA, both of whom were healthcare workers with atopic dermatitis. P. acnes was predominantly found in the conjunctival sac. Further study is needed to investigate the involvement between nasal and conjunctival flora, and risk factors for infectious complications. PMID:27160843

  15. Validation of self-administered nasal swabs and postage for the isolation of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Gleadall, Nicholas S.; Ba, Xiaoliang; Danesh, John; Peacock, Sharon J.; Holmes, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus carriers are at higher risk of S. aureus infection and are a reservoir for transmission to others. Detection of nasal S. aureus carriage is important for both targeted decolonization and epidemiological studies. Self-administered nasal swabbing has been reported previously, but the effects of posting swabs prior to culture on S. aureus yield have not been investigated. A longitudinal cohort study was performed in which healthy volunteers were recruited, trained in the swabbing procedure and asked to take weekly nasal swabs for 6 weeks (median: 3 weeks, range 1–6 weeks). Two swabs were taken at each sampling episode and randomly assigned for immediate processing on arrival to the laboratory (Swab A) or second class postage prior to processing (Swab B). S. aureus was isolated using standard methods. A total of 95 participants were recruited, who took 944 swabs (472 pairs) over a median of 5 weeks. Of these, 459 swabs were positive for S. aureus. We found no significant difference (P=0.25) between 472 pairs of nasal self-swabs processed immediately or following standard postage from 95 study participants (51.4 % vs. 48.6 %, respectively). We also provide further evidence that persistent carriers can be detected by two weekly swabs with high degrees of sensitivity [92.3 % (95 % CI 74.8–98.8 %)] and specificity [95.6 % (95 % CI 84.8–99.3 %)] compared with a gold standard of five weekly swabs. Self-swabbing and postage of nasal swabs prior to processing has no effect on yield of S. aureus, and could facilitate large community-based carriage studies. PMID:27902394

  16. Evaluation of the nasal microbiota in slaughter-age pigs and the impact on nasal methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) carriage

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The nasal microbiota of pigs has been poorly assessed but could play a role in carriage of important microorganisms such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The objectives of this study were to describe the nasal microbiota in slaughter age pigs, to evaluate the impact of farm management on the nasal microbiota and to provide a preliminary assessment of the influence of the microbiota on MRSA carriage. Results Nasal swabs were collected from five MRSA positive and eight MRSA negative pigs on one farm that used a liquid feeding system and routine tylosin treatment, and seven MRSA negative pigs from an antibiotic-free farm that used conventional feeding. A total of 946310 sequences passed all quality control filters. The number of sequences per sample ranged from 4307 to 165656 (mean 56092, SD 40007). CatchAll analysis of richness predicted a mean of 1749 OTUs (range 213–3736, SD 996). Overall, 6291 OTUs were identified, yet 5125 (81%) were identified less than 10 times and the 12 most abundant OTUs accounted for 80.7% of sequences. Proteobacteria predominated in all but two samples. Liquid-fed/tylosin-exposed pigs had significantly lower relative abundances of Verrucomicrobia (P = 0.004), Fibrobacteres (P = <0.0001) and sequences unclassified at the phylum level (P = 0.028). When comparing only liquid-fed pigs, MRSA carriers had significantly more Bacteroidetes (P = 0.037) than MRSA negative pigs. 124 genera were identified, with Moraxella accounting for 35.4% of sequences. In the Jaccard index tree, five of eight MRSA positive pigs clustered closely together, as did six of the seven conventionally-fed pigs. A significant difference was identified between conventional and liquid-fed pigs using parsimony test with the Jaccard (P < 0.001) but not the Yue&Clayton (P = 0.26) index. There were no significant differences between MRSA positive and negative pigs (P = 0.133 and 0.175). OTUs belonging to Firmicutes

  17. Piezoelectric sensing: Evaluation for clinical investigation of deviated nasal septum

    PubMed Central

    Manjunatha, Roopa G.; Mahapatra, Roy D.; Dorasala, Srinivas

    2013-01-01

    Noninvasive objective evaluation of nasal airflow is one of the important clinical aspects. The developed polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) sensor enables measurement of airflow through each side of the nose using its piezoelectric property. This study was designed to evaluate the diagnostic capability of the PVDF sensor in assessing the deviated nasal septum (DNS). PVDF nasal sensor uses its piezoelectric property to measure the peak-to-peak amplitude (Vp-p) of nasal airflow in both of the nostrils: right nostril (RN) and left nostril (LN), separately and simultaneously. We have compared the results of PVDF nasal sensor, visual analog scale (VAS), and clinician scale for 34 DNS patients and 28 healthy controls. Additionally, the results were further analyzed by receiver operating characteristic curve and correlation between PVDF nasal sensor and VAS in detecting DNS. We found a significant difference in the peak-to-peak amplitude values of the test group and the control group. The correlation between the PVDF nasal sensor measurements and VAS (RN and LN combined) for test group was statistically significant (−0.807; p < 0.001). Sensitivity and specificity of the PVDF nasal sensor measurements in the detection of DNS (RN and LN combined) was 85.3 and 74.4%, respectively, with optimum cutoff value ≤0.34 Vp-p. The developed PVDF nasal sensor is noninvasive and requires less patient efforts. The sensitivity and specificity of the PVDF nasal sensor are reliable. According to our findings, we propose that the said PVDF nasal sensor can be used as a new diagnostic tool to evaluate the DNS in routine clinical practice. PMID:24498519

  18. Airflow, gas deposition, and lesion distribution in the nasal passages.

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, K T; Monticello, T M

    1990-01-01

    The nasal passages of laboratory animals and man are complex, and lesions induced in the delicate nasal lining by inhaled air pollutants vary considerably in location and nature. The distribution of nasal lesions is generally a consequence of regional deposition of the inhaled material, local tissue susceptibility, or a combination of these factors. Nasal uptake and regional deposition are are influenced by numerous factors including the physical and chemical properties of the inhaled material, such as water solubility and reactivity; airborne concentration and length of exposure; the presence of other air contaminants such as particulate matter; nasal metabolism, and blood and mucus flow. For certain highly water-soluble or reactive gases, nasal airflow patterns play a major role in determining lesion distribution. Studies of nasal airflow in rats and monkeys, using casting and molding techniques combined with a water-dye model, indicate that nasal airflow patterns are responsible for characteristic differences in the distribution of nasal lesions induced by formaldehyde in these species. Local tissue susceptibility is also a complex issue that may be a consequence of many factors, including physiologic and metabolic characteristics of the diverse cell populations that comprise each of the major epithelial types lining the airways. Identification of the principal factors that influence the distribution and nature of nasal lesions is important when attempting the difficult process of determining potential human risks using data derived from laboratory animals. Toxicologic pathologists can contribute to this process by carefully identifying the site and nature of nasal lesions induced by inhaled materials. Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 6. FIGURE 7. PMID:2200663

  19. Finite Element Model and Validation of Nasal Tip Deformation.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Cyrus T; Harb, Rani; Badran, Alan; Ho, David; Wong, Brian J F

    2017-03-01

    Nasal tip mechanical stability is important for functional and cosmetic nasal airway surgery. Palpation of the nasal tip provides information on tip strength to the surgeon, though it is a purely subjective assessment. Providing a means to simulate nasal tip deformation with a validated model can offer a more objective approach in understanding the mechanics and nuances of the nasal tip support and eventual nasal mechanics as a whole. Herein we present validation of a finite element (FE) model of the nose using physical measurements recorded using an ABS plastic-silicone nasal phantom. Three-dimensional photogrammetry was used to capture the geometry of the phantom at rest and while under steady state load. The silicone used to make the phantom was mechanically tested and characterized using a linear elastic constitutive model. Surface point clouds of the silicone and FE model were compared for both the loaded and unloaded state. The average Hausdorff distance between actual measurements and FE simulations across the nose were 0.39 ± 1.04 mm and deviated up to 2 mm at the outermost boundaries of the model. FE simulation and measurements were in near complete agreement in the immediate vicinity of the nasal tip with millimeter accuracy. We have demonstrated validation of a two-component nasal FE model, which could be used to model more complex modes of deformation where direct measurement may be challenging. This is the first step in developing a nasal model to simulate nasal mechanics and ultimately the interaction between geometry and airflow.

  20. [Nasal Highflow (NHF): A New Therapeutic Option for the Treatment of Respiratory Failure].

    PubMed

    Bräunlich, J; Nilius, G

    2016-01-01

    The therapy of choice in hypoxemic respiratory failure (type 1) is the application of supplemental oxygen at flow rates of 1 to 15 l/min via nasal prongs or mask. Non-invasive or invasive positive pressure ventilation will be initiated when the oxygen therapy effects are not sufficient or if hypercapnic respiratory failure (type 2) is the underlying problem. Recently, an alternative therapy option is available, from the pathophysiology it can be classified between oxygen therapy and positive pressure ventilation. The therapy called Nasal High Flow (NHF) is based on the nasal application of a heated and humidified air oxygen mixture with a flow range of up to 60 l/min. The precise pathophysiological principles of NHF are only partly understood, yet various aspects are well studied already: it is possible to deliver high oxygen concentrations, airway dryness can be avoided, dead space ventilation reduced and clearance of nasal dead space is achieved. Additionally, an end expiratory positive pressure is built up, which helps to prevent airway collapse, thus resulting in an improvement of respiratory efficiency and reduction of breathing work. Current studies demonstrate improvement in gas exchange and reduction of reintubation rate when applying the NHF treatment in acute respiratory failure. Thus the NHF therapy attracts attention in intensive care medicine. The application in other fields like chronic respiratory insufficiency is less well clarified. The objectives of this review are to present the pathophysiological effects and mechanisms of NHF, as far as understood, and to give an overview over the current state of relevant studies.

  1. Dialectical Effects on Nasalance: A Multicenter, Cross-Continental Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Awan, Shaheen N.; Bressmann, Tim; Poburka, Bruce; Roy, Nelson; Sharp, Helen; Watts, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study investigated nasalance in speakers from six different dialectal regions across North America using recent versions of the Nasometer. It was hypothesized that many of the sound changes observed in regional dialects of North American English would have a significant impact on measures of nasalance. Method: Samples of the Zoo…

  2. NASAL FILTERING OF FINE PARTICLES IN CHILDREN VS. ADULTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nasal efficiency for removing fine particles may be affected by developmental changes in nasal structure associated with age. In healthy Caucasian children (age 6-13, n=17) and adults (age 18-28, n=11) we measured the fractional deposition (DF) of fine particles (1 and 2um MMAD)...

  3. Nasal cytochrome P4502A: Identification in rats and humans

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton-Manning, J.R.; Hotchkiss, J.A.; Ding, Xinxin

    1995-12-01

    The nasal mucosa, the first tissue of contact for inhaled xenobiotics, possesses substantial enobiotic-metabolizing capacti. Enzymes of the nasal cavity may metabolize xenobiotics to innocuous, more water-soluble compounds that are eliminated from the body, or they may bioactivate them to toxic metabolites. These toxic metabolites may find to cellular macromolecules in the nasal cavity or be transported to other parts of the body where they may react. Nasal carcinogenesis in rodents often results from bioactivation of xenobiotics. The increased incidences of nasal tumors associated with certain occupations suggest that xenobiotic bioactivation may be important in human nasal cancer etiology, as well. The increasing popularity of the nose as a route of drug administration makes information concerning nasal drug metabolism and disposition vital to accomplish therapeutic goals. For these reasons, the study of xenobiotic-met abolizing capacity of the nasal cavity is an important area of health-related research. In the present study, we have confirmed the presence of CYP2A6 mRNA in human respiratory mucosa.

  4. Chitosan in nasal delivery systems for therapeutic drugs.

    PubMed

    Casettari, Luca; Illum, Lisbeth

    2014-09-28

    There is an obvious need for efficient and safe nasal absorption enhancers for the development of therapeutically efficacious nasal products for small hydrophilic drugs, peptides, proteins, nucleic acids and polysaccharides, which do not easily cross mucosal membranes, including the nasal. Recent years have seen the development of a range of nasal absorption enhancer systems such as CriticalSorb (based on Solutol HS15) (Critical Pharmaceuticals Ltd), Chisys based on chitosan (Archimedes Pharma Ltd) and Intravail based on alkylsaccharides (Aegis Therapeutics Inc.), that is presently being tested in clinical trials for a range of drugs. So far, none of these absorption enhancers have been used in a marketed nasal product. The present review discusses the evaluation of chitosan and chitosan derivatives as nasal absorption enhancers, for a range of drugs and in a range of formulations such as solutions, gels and nanoparticles and finds that chitosan and its derivatives are able to efficiently improve the nasal bioavailability. The revirtew also questions whether chitosan nanoparticles for systemic drug delivery provide any real improvement over simpler chitosan formulations. Furthermore, the review also evaluates the use of chitosan formulations for the improvement of transport of drugs directly from the nasal cavity to the brain, based on its mucoadhesive characteristics and its ability to open tight junctions in the olfactory and respiratory epithelia. It is found that the use of chitosan nanoparticles greatly increases the transport of drugs from nose to brain over and above the effect of simpler chitosan formulations.

  5. Nasal angiocentric lymphoma: an entity that should be remembered.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, M T; Cárdenas-Camarena, L; Rodríguez-Carrillo, J

    2001-02-01

    After four nasal aesthetic functional surgeries in a period of 18 months, a 46-year-old woman was evaluated who presented with moderate functional alteration, saddle-nose deformity, and total loss of the septal cartilage. Four months before presentation the patient sustained severe nasal trauma, resulting in depression of the nasal bridge without loss of function. Her problem was diagnosed initially as a consequence of an infected septal hematoma and loss of the septal cartilage. Based on this diagnosis, the patient was subjected, in an 18-month period, to four reconstructive surgeries by different specialists, without any improvement and with worsening of clinical presentation. During the authors' physical examination of the patient, she demonstrated marked nasal cutaneous retraction, atrophic nasal conchae with total loss of the septal cartilage, and a large loss of septal bone. Three nasal mucosa biopsies were acquired and the authors proceeded to carry out complete nasal reconstruction using external cranial table and rib cartilage. Histopathologically, a lesion was noted that was compatible with angiocentric lymphoma, for which treatment was administered according to this type of illness. The authors point out the importance of establishing an adequate diagnosis in the face of an apparently obvious clinical case, present cross-disciplinary treatment, and discuss the study protocol that should be used for this type of pathology. They present their reconstructive technique of the nasal structure using a combination of bone tissue and cartilage, the results, and the current state of the patient.

  6. [Use of Solcoseryl DAP after nasal septum surgery].

    PubMed

    Krzeski, A; Makowska, W

    1991-01-01

    Solcoseryl is a biological agent, which accelerates the healing tissue procedure. This influence was studied during the nasal septum surgery. In 25 patients the postoperational nasal plug was inserted with the Solcoseryl and in 10 (control) with the paraffin. The cytologic verifications were performed before and after the surgery. In the solcoseryl group the mucosa regeneration procedure was accelerated and the inflammation reduced.

  7. Epidemiology and differential diagnosis of nasal polyps

    PubMed Central

    Chaaban, Mohamad R.; Walsh, Erika M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic medical conditions, with a significant impact on patient quality of life. CRS is broadly classified into two groups: CRS with nasal polyposis (CRSwNP) and CRS without NP (CRSsNP). Clinically, the major subtypes of CRSwNP may be divided into eosinophilic chronic rhinosinusitis (e.g., allergic fungal rhinosinusitis and aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease [AERD]) and nasal polyps associated with neutrophilic inflammation (e.g., cystic fibrosis [CF]). CF is characterized by mutation of the gene encoding the CF transmembrane conductance regulator. Functional endoscopic sinus surgery is usually required for most NP patients with increased frequency in patients with AERD. This study provides a review of the epidemiology and major classification of CRSwNP. Methods: A review was performed of the literature regarding different subtypes of CRSwNP. Results: Many definitions of CRSwNP exist and estimates of prevalence vary. Conclusion: CRSwNP is a clinical syndrome with a heterogeneous inflammatory profile. Of the subtypes associated with eosinophilic inflammation, AERD remains the most recalcitrant to medical and surgical therapeutic interventions. PMID:24274222

  8. [Numerical flow simulation : A new method for assessing nasal breathing].

    PubMed

    Hildebrandt, T; Osman, J; Goubergrits, L

    2016-08-01

    The current options for objective assessment of nasal breathing are limited. The maximum they can determine is the total nasal resistance. Possibilities to analyze the endonasal airstream are lacking. In contrast, numerical flow simulation is able to provide detailed information of the flow field within the nasal cavity. Thus, it has the potential to analyze the nasal airstream of an individual patient in a comprehensive manner and only a computed tomography (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses is required. The clinical application is still limited due to the necessary technical and personnel resources. In particular, a statistically based referential characterization of normal nasal breathing does not yet exist in order to be able to compare and classify the simulation results.

  9. Clinical evaluation of 30 patients with localized nasal rosacea.

    PubMed

    Lee, Woo Jin; Lee, Ye Jin; Won, Chong Hyun; Chang, Sung Eun; Choi, Jee Ho; Lee, Mi Woo

    2016-02-01

    The clinical features of localized nasal rosacea have not been described in detail. This study was designed to analyze the subtypes and severity of localized nasal rosacea. Our present study included 30 patients with localized nasal rosacea. The erythematotelangiectatic subtype (13/30, 43.3%) was the most common type, followed by the phymatous subtype (9/30, 30%). The duration of rosacea was shorter and the severity of localized nasal rosacea was lower in the erythematotelangiectatic subtype cases compared with the patients with mixed or phymatous subtypes. Almost all of the papulopustular eruptions or phymatous lesions were associated with erythematotelangiectatic lesions. These findings suggest that the erythematotelangiectatic subtype may be considered the initial phase of localized nasal rosacea.

  10. The role of High Mobility Group Box 1 chromosomal protein in the pathogenesis of chronic sinusitis and nasal polyposis.

    PubMed

    Bellussi, L M; Chen, L; Chen, D; Passali, F M; Passali, D

    2012-12-01

    cells of patients compared with controls. In contrast, epithelial cytoplasm HMG B1 staining was significant lower in patients. Sub-epithelial focal infiltration of HMG B1 protein expression was lower in controls, whereas the expression of HMG B1 in the inflammatory cells in patients was significantly increased in comparison with controls. These data, together with the correlation we found between HMG B1 protein expression in different portions and the number of eosinophils infiltrating cells, or IL -5, IL -8 and TNF-α positive cells in patients, suggest that HMG B1 may play a crucial role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

  11. Nasal packing in sphenopalatine artery bleeding: therapeutic or harmful?

    PubMed

    Sireci, F; Speciale, R; Sorrentino, R; Turri-Zanoni, M; Nicolotti, M; Canevari, F R

    2017-03-01

    The aim of this study is to present our management protocol of sphenopalatine artery bleeding, demonstrating that nasoendoscopic cautery (NC) was a more effective method than the nasal packing, in terms of shorter inpatient stay and reduced complications rate. We present ten posterior epistaxis not resolved by nasal packing. Tabotamp(®) was placed in the area of sphenopalatine foramen and/or in those parts of the posterior nasal cavity, where it was suspected that bleeding origins. In two cases, the bleeding was resolved in this way, instead eight cases needed of subperiosteal cauterization of sphenopalatine artery by Dessi bipolar forceps (MicroFrance(®)). 4 of these 8 patients evidenced a remarkable bleeding removing nasal packing (Hb before-nasal packing = 15 ± 0.69 versus Hb after-nasal packing = 13.3 ± 0.81; t student = 2.94; p value = 0.025). These four patients showed a deviation of the nasal septum ipsilateral to epistaxis, and according our experience, a traumatism of sphenopalatine area can be caused by Merocel(®) nasal packing in this condition. During follow-up, no recurrences of nasal bleeding have been observed in such patients. Nasal packing must be considered if posterior epistaxis is severe, but always taking into account the specific anatomy of patient and in particular septal spurs that can further compromise sphenopalatine artery. In our experience, the endoscopic endonasal cauterization of the sphenopalatine branches represented a safe and effective procedure.

  12. High-Flow Nasal Cannula Therapy for Obstructive Sleep Apnea in Children

    PubMed Central

    Joseph, Leon; Goldberg, Shmuel; Shitrit, Michal; Picard, Elie

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Over the last decade, high-flow nasal cannula (HFNC) therapy has become an increasingly important and popular mode of noninvasive respiratory support. HFNC facilitates delivery of humidified and heated oxygen at a high flow rate and generates positive airway pressure. Methods: We present five cases of children with OSA without adenotonsillar hypertrophy who were treated with HFNC. Results: We demonstrated a statistically significant improvement in apnea-hypopnea index and nadir oxygen saturation in this small cohort. Conclusion: We present our successful experience of treating severe OSA with HFNC in the home setting. Further randomized controlled trials are needed to determine whether HFNC could be considered as an established alternative for CPAP in OSA in children Citation: Joseph L, Goldberg S, Shitrit M, Picard E. High-flow nasal cannula therapy for obstructive sleep apnea in children. J Clin Sleep Med 2015;11(9):1007–1010. PMID:26094930

  13. Nasal Carriage of Staphylococcus aureus: Frequency and Antibiotic Resistance in Healthy Ruminants

    PubMed Central

    Rahimi, Heidar; Dastmalchi Saei, Habib; Ahmadi, Malahat

    2015-01-01

    Background: Staphylococcus aureus is a significant pathogen that can colonize the nares of different animals, causing a wide range of infections in various hosts. Objectives: We intended to determine the prevalence of S. aureus in the nasal cavity of healthy ruminants and also to investigate the presence of antibiotic resistance genes. Materials and Methods: In the present study, healthy cattle (n = 79), sheep (n = 78) and goats (n = 44) were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus by the Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Staphylococcus aureus isolates were further assessed for the presence of blaZ (encoding penicillin resistance), mecA (encoding methicillin resistance), tetK and tetM (encoding tetracycline resistance), and ermA and ermC (encoding macrolide-lincosamide-streptogramin B resistance) genes. Results: The proportion of S. aureus-positive nasal swabs from cattle, sheep and goats were four (5.06%), 11 (14.1%) and 11 isolates (25%), respectively. The blaZ gene was detected in 20 out of 26 S. aureus isolates (76.9%), including four cattle (100%), nine sheep (81.8%) and seven goats (63.6%). Two of the four cattle isolates possessing the blaZ gene also had the tetK gene. Of the nine sheep isolates harboring the blaZ gene, one possessed the mecA and tetK genes together. Of the seven goat isolates with blaZ gene, one harbored the tetM gene. None of the S. aureus isolates were positive for the ermA and ermC genes. Conclusions: In contrast to cattle, S. aureus is frequently present in the nose of sheep and goats, which may represent the primary reservoir of S. aureus in small ruminant flocks. This study also showed that nasal isolates of S. aureus from healthy ruminants might be a potential reservoir of antimicrobial-resistance. PMID:26568802

  14. Association of Interleukin-8 and Neutrophils with Nasal Symptom Severity During Acute Respiratory Infection

    PubMed Central

    Henriquez, Kelsey M.; Hayney, Mary S.; Xie, Yaoguo; Zhang, Zhengjun; Barrett, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    Using a large data set (n = 811), the relationship between acute respiratory infection illness severity and inflammatory biomarkers was investigated to determine whether certain symptoms are correlated more closely than others with the inflammatory biomarkers, interleukin-8 (IL-8) and nasal neutrophils. Participants with community acquired acute respiratory infection underwent nasal lavage for IL-8 and neutrophil testing, in addition to multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods for the detection and identification of respiratory viruses. Information about symptoms was obtained throughout the duration of the illness episode using the well-validated Wisconsin Upper Respiratory Symptom Survey (WURSS-21). Global symptom severity was calculated by the area under the curve (AUC) plotting duration versus WURSS total. Of the specimens tested, 56% were positively identified for one or more of nine different respiratory viruses. During acute respiratory infection illness, both IL-8 and neutrophils positively correlate with AUC (rs = 0.082, P = 0.022; rs = 0.080, P = 0.030). IL-8 and neutrophils correlate with nasal symptom severity: runny nose (r = 0.13, P = <0.00001; r = 0.18, P = <0.003), plugged nose (r = 0.045, P = 0.003; r = 0.14, P = 0.058), and sneezing (r = −0.02, P = <0.0001; r = −0.0055, P = 0.31). Neutrophils correlate with some quality of life measures such as sleeping well (r = 0.15, P = 0.026). Thus, the study demonstrates that IL-8 and neutrophils are correlated with severity of nasal symptoms during acute respiratory infection. Further research is necessary to determine if the concentration of these or other biomarkers can predict the overall duration and severity of acute respiratory infection illness. PMID:25132248

  15. Sniff Nasal Inspiratory Pressure Does Not Decrease in Elderly Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Chien-Hui; Yang, Gee-Gwo; Chen, Tung-Wei

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] Measurements of inspiratory strength are critical for detecting inspiratory muscle weakness. Sniff nasal inspiratory pressure (SNIP) is a quick, noninvasive measurement of global inspiratory strength; however, it is not clear how many trials are needed for reliable measurements. [Subjects and Methods] One hundred and nineteen subjects (age 39.9±16.5, range 18–69 yrs) completed the study. They were divided into subgroups of different ages and gender. Subjects were asked to take 20 maximal sniffs after normal expiration, with 30 seconds rest in-between. The highest values among the first 10 and last 10 SNIP maneuvers were recorded as SNIP1-10, and SNIP11-20, respectively. The paired t-test was used to compare the differences. Two-way measures ANOVA was used to compare the effects of age and gender on SNIP. [Results] SNIP 11–20 was significantly greater than SNIP1–10, suggesting that 10 trials is not enough to eliminate learning effects. Age did not affect SNIP in either gender, suggesting SNIP is preserved. In stepwise multiple linear regression analysis, the SNIP values were positively related with body mass index in women and positively related with weight in men. [Conclusion] The results suggest that twenty trials are needed for reliable SNIP measurements. The mean value and lower limits of normal SNIP are provided for clinical comparison. PMID:25276047

  16. Detection of the BLV provirus from nasal secretion and saliva samples using BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2: Comparison with blood samples from the same cattle.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Yuan; Kitamura-Muramatsu, Yuri; Saito, Susumu; Ishizaki, Hiroshi; Nakano, Miwa; Haga, Satoshi; Matoba, Kazuhiro; Ohno, Ayumu; Murakami, Hironobu; Takeshima, Shin-Nosuke; Aida, Yoko

    2015-12-02

    Bovine leukemia virus (BLV) induces enzootic bovine leukosis, which is the most common neoplastic disease in cattle. Sero-epidemiological studies show that BLV infection occurs worldwide. Direct contact between infected and uninfected cattle is thought to be one of the risk factors for BLV transmission. Contact transmission occurs via a mixture of natural sources, blood, and exudates. To confirm that BLV provirus is detectable in these samples, matched blood, nasal secretion, and saliva samples were collected from 50 cattle, and genomic DNA was extracted. BLV-CoCoMo-qPCR-2, an assay developed for the highly sensitive detection of BLV, was then used to measure the proviral load in blood (n=50), nasal secretions (n=48), and saliva (n=47) samples. The results showed that 35 blood samples, 14 nasal secretion samples, and 6 saliva samples were positive for the BLV provirus. Matched blood samples from cattle that were positive for the BLV provirus (either in nasal secretion or saliva samples) were also positive in their blood. The proviral load in the positive blood samples was >14,000 (copies/1×10(5) cells). Thus, even though the proviral load in the nasal secretion and saliva samples was much lower (<380 copies/1×10(5) cells) than that in the peripheral blood, prolonged direct contact between infected and healthy cattle may be considered as a risk factor for BLV transmission.

  17. Intranasal trigeminal sensitivity: measurements before and after nasal surgery.

    PubMed

    Scheibe, M; Schulze, S; Mueller, C A; Schuster, B; Hummel, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Nasal surgeries constitute an extensive manipulation of the nasal mucosa and therefore of structures related to trigeminal and olfactory sensitivity. While olfactory changes due to nasal surgery are relatively well investigated, there are only very few studies regarding trigeminal sensitivity. Aim of the present study was to investigate sensory changes after nasal surgery with special regard to the trigeminal sensitivity. In 38 patients prior to and around 12 weeks after nasal surgery the following psychophysical measures were performed: odor identification, odor discrimination, phenyl ethyl alcohol odor threshold, sensitivity to trigeminal stimuli, trigeminal detection thresholds and trigeminal pain thresholds. These results were compared to those of a control group (43 healthy volunteers). Psychophysical olfactory and trigeminal testing showed no major changes in patients after surgery compared to the control group. Independent from the time of measurement higher trigeminal detection thresholds were found in patients compared to healthy subjects, meaning that trigeminal thresholds were already increased before surgery. The present study revealed a decreased trigeminal sensitivity in patients already before surgery. It may be hypothesized that patients also exhibit a decreased sensitivity for nasal airflow, which may also contribute to the patients' impression of impaired nasal breathing.

  18. Exploring the bacterial assemblages along the human nasal passage.

    PubMed

    Wos-Oxley, Melissa L; Chaves-Moreno, Diego; Jáuregui, Ruy; Oxley, Andrew P A; Kaspar, Ursula; Plumeier, Iris; Kahl, Silke; Rudack, Claudia; Becker, Karsten; Pieper, Dietmar H

    2016-07-01

    The human nasal passage, from the anterior nares through the nasal vestibule to the nasal cavities, is an important habitat for opportunistic pathogens and commensals alike. This work sampled four different anatomical regions within the human nasal passage across a large cohort of individuals (n = 79) comprising individuals suffering from chronic nasal inflammation clinically known as chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) and individuals not suffering from inflammation (CRS-free). While individuals had their own unique bacterial fingerprint that was consistent across the anatomical regions, these bacterial fingerprints formed into distinct delineated groups comprising core bacterial members, which were consistent across all four swabbed anatomical regions irrespective of health status. The most significant observed pattern was the difference between the global bacterial profiles of swabbed and tissue biopsy samples from the same individuals, being also consistent across different anatomical regions. Importantly, no statistically significant differences could be observed concerning the global bacterial communities, any of the bacterial species or the range of diversity indices used to compare between CRS and CRS-free individuals, and between two CRS phenotypes (without nasal polyps and with nasal polyps). Thus, the role of bacteria in the pathogenesis of sinusitis remains uncertain.

  19. May nasal hyperreactivity be a sequela of recurrent common cold?

    PubMed

    Cassano, M; Cassano, P; Ciprandi, G

    2011-01-01

    Respiratory viral infections may worsen bronchial hyperreactivity. However, there is no data on the possible role of recurrent infectious rhinitis in nose hyperreactivity. This study was therefore designed to investigate whether subjects suffering from recurrent common cold have nasal hyperreactivity, assessed by histamine nasal challenge. This study included a group of 40 patients (19 males, mean age 34.1 years) with history of at least five episodes of common cold in the previous year, but without documented allergy, and twenty healthy subjects (8 males, mean age 32.3 years) were enrolled as control group, all of whom were non-allergic. Nasal provocation test with histamine was performed in all subjects. Nasal provocation test with histamine induced a 200% increase in nasal resistance after provocation in 24 (60%) patients suffering from recurrent viral rhinitis. No normal subject had an increase >180% in nasal resistance. There was a significant difference between the patient group and the control group (p<0.05). In conclusion, this study shows that nasal hyperreactivity might be a sequela of recurrent common cold. Further studies should be conducted to confirm this preliminary finding.

  20. Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis: diagnosis and management

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis is a rare and potentially lethal form of airway obstruction in newborns. Immediate recognition and appropriate therapy are mandatory for this potentially life-threating condition. This anomaly may present as an isolated malformation or may be associated with other cranial-facial anomalies. Clinically, CNPS shows unspecific symptoms of nasal airway obstruction such as apnoic crisis, episodic cyanosis and inability to nurse. The purpose of this report is to present author's experience in the surgical management of this rare pathology in 3 patients. Patients and Methods Three cases of congenital nasal pyriform aperture stenosis were reviewed for presentation of the disorder, management and effectiveness of the surgical treatment. Results All the patients underwent a surgical correction of the pyriform aperture stenosis using a sublabial approach followed by nasal stenting. During the follow-up no cases of restenosis, respiratory failure or cyanosis were detected. Conclusions Congenital pyriform aperture stenosis should be suspected in newborns with clinical signs of severe nasal obstruction associated with a difficulty to pass a small catheter though the anterior nasal valve. Timely recognition is mandatory to prevent a potential deadly outcome. Surgical correction of the stenosis though a sublabial approach followed by a nasal stenting revealed to be most effective treatment for these patients. PMID:22731387