Sample records for national digital seismic

  1. Ghana's experience in the establishment of a national digital seismic network observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahulu, Sylvanus; Danuor, Sylvester Kojo

    2015-07-01

    The Government of Ghana has established a National Digital Seismic Network Observatory in Ghana with the aim of monitoring events such as earthquakes, blasts from mining and quarrying, nuclear tests, etc. The Digital Observatory was commissioned on 19 December 2012, and was dedicated to Geosciences in Ghana. Previously Ghana did not have any operational, digital seismic network acquisition system with the capability of monitoring and analysing data for planning and research purposes. The Ghana Geological Survey has been monitoring seismic events with an analogue system which was not efficient and does not deliver real-time data. Hence, the importance of setting up the National Digital Seismic Network System which would enable the Geological Survey to constantly monitor, manage and coordinate both natural and man-made seismic activities in the country and around the globe, to some extent on real-time basis. The Network System is made up of six remote digital stations that transmit data via satellite to the central observatory. Sensors used are 3× Trillium Compact and 3× Trillium 120PA with Trident digitizers. The department has also acquired strong motion equipment: Titan accelerometers with Taurus digitizers from Nanometrics. Three of each of these instruments have been installed at the Akosombo and Kpong hydrodams, and also at the Weija water supply dam. These instruments are used to monitor dams. The peak ground acceleration (PGA) values established from the analysed data from the accelerometers will be used to retrofit or carry out maintenance work of the dam structures to avoid collapse. Apart from these, the observatory also assesses and analyses seismic waveforms relevant to its needs from the Global Seismographic Network (GSN) system operated by the US Geological Survey. The Ghana Geological Survey, through its Seismic Network Observatory makes data available to its stakeholder institutions for earthquake disaster mitigation; reports on all aspects of

  2. Digital recovery, modification, and analysis of Tetra Tech seismic horizon mapping, National Petroleum Reserve Alaska (NPRA), northern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Saltus, R.W.; Kulander, Christopher S.; Potter, Christopher J.

    2002-01-01

    We have digitized, modified, and analyzed seismic interpretation maps of 12 subsurface stratigraphic horizons spanning portions of the National Petroleum Reserve in Alaska (NPRA). These original maps were prepared by Tetra Tech, Inc., based on about 15,000 miles of seismic data collected from 1974 to 1981. We have also digitized interpreted faults and seismic velocities from Tetra Tech maps. The seismic surfaces were digitized as two-way travel time horizons and converted to depth using Tetra Tech seismic velocities. The depth surfaces were then modified by long-wavelength corrections based on recent USGS seismic re-interpretation along regional seismic lines. We have developed and executed an algorithm to identify and calculate statistics on the area, volume, height, and depth of closed structures based on these seismic horizons. These closure statistics are tabulated and have been used as input to oil and gas assessment calculations for the region. Directories accompanying this report contain basic digitized data, processed data, maps, tabulations of closure statistics, and software relating to this project.

  3. Design and development of digital seismic amplifier recorder

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Samsidar, Siti Alaa; Afuar, Waldy; Handayani, Gunawan, E-mail: gunawanhandayani@gmail.com

    2015-04-16

    A digital seismic recording is a recording technique of seismic data in digital systems. This method is more convenient because it is more accurate than other methods of seismic recorders. To improve the quality of the results of seismic measurements, the signal needs to be amplified to obtain better subsurface images. The purpose of this study is to improve the accuracy of measurement by amplifying the input signal. We use seismic sensors/geophones with a frequency of 4.5 Hz. The signal is amplified by means of 12 units of non-inverting amplifier. The non-inverting amplifier using IC 741 with the resistor values 1KΩmore » and 1MΩ. The amplification results were 1,000 times. The results of signal amplification converted into digital by using the Analog Digital Converter (ADC). Quantitative analysis in this study was performed using the software Lab VIEW 8.6. The Lab VIEW 8.6 program was used to control the ADC. The results of qualitative analysis showed that the seismic conditioning can produce a large output, so that the data obtained is better than conventional data. This application can be used for geophysical methods that have low input voltage such as microtremor application.« less

  4. Improved Seismic Acquisition System and Data Processing for the Italian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badiali, L.; Marcocci, C.; Mele, F.; Piscini, A.

    2001-12-01

    A new system for acquiring and processing digital signals has been developed in the last few years at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV). The system makes extensive use of the internet communication protocol standards such as TCP and UDP which are used as the transport highway inside the Italian network, and possibly in a near future outside, to share or redirect data among processes. The Italian National Seismic Network has been working for about 18 years equipped with vertical short period seismometers and transmitting through analog lines, to the computer center in Rome. We are now concentrating our efforts on speeding the migration towards a fully digital network based on about 150 stations equipped with either broad band or 5 seconds sensors connected to the data center partly through wired digital communication and partly through satellite digital communication. The overall process is layered through intranet and/or internet. Every layer gathers data in a simple format and provides data in a processed format, ready to be distributed towards the next layer. The lowest level acquires seismic data (raw waveforms) coming from the remote stations. It handshakes, checks and sends data in LAN or WAN according to a distribution list where other machines with their programs are waiting for. At the next level there are the picking procedures, or "pickers", on a per instrument basis, looking for phases. A picker spreads phases, again through the LAN or WAN and according to a distribution list, to one or more waiting locating machines tuned to generate a seismic event. The event locating procedure itself, the higher level in this stack, can exchange information with other similar procedures. Such a layered and distributed structure with nearby targets allows other seismic networks to join the processing and data collection of the same ongoing event, creating a virtual network larger than the original one. At present we plan to cooperate with other

  5. National Seismic Network of Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tumanova, N.; Kakhoberashvili, S.; Omarashvili, V.; Tserodze, M.; Akubardia, D.

    2016-12-01

    Georgia, as a part of the Southern Caucasus, is tectonically active and structurally complex region. It is one of the most active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The deformation and the associated seismicity are due to the continent-continent collision between the Arabian and Eurasian plates. Seismic Monitoring of country and the quality of seismic data is the major tool for the rapid response policy, population safety, basic scientific research and in the end for the sustainable development of the country. National Seismic Network of Georgia has been developing since the end of 19th century. Digital era of the network started from 2003. Recently continuous data streams from 25 stations acquired and analyzed in the real time. Data is combined to calculate rapid location and magnitude for the earthquake. Information for the bigger events (Ml>=3.5) is simultaneously transferred to the website of the monitoring center and to the related governmental agencies. To improve rapid earthquake location and magnitude estimation the seismic network was enhanced by installing additional 7 new stations. Each new station is equipped with coupled Broadband and Strong Motion seismometers and permanent GPS system as well. To select the sites for the 7 new base stations, we used standard network optimization techniques. To choose the optimal sites for new stations we've taken into account geometry of the existed seismic network, topographic conditions of the site. For each site we studied local geology (Vs30 was mandatory for each site), local noise level and seismic vault construction parameters. Due to the country elevation, stations were installed in the high mountains, no accessible in winter due to the heavy snow conditions. To secure online data transmission we used satellite data transmission as well as cell data network coverage from the different local companies. As a result we've already have the improved earthquake location and event magnitudes. We

  6. Instrumentation Guidelines for the Advanced National Seismic System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Working Group on Instrumentation, Siting

    2008-01-01

    This document provides guidelines for the seismic-monitoring instrumentation used by long-term earthquake-monitoring stations that will sense ground motion, digitize and store the resulting signals in a local data acquisition unit, and optionally transmit these digital data. These guidelines are derived from specifications and requirements for data needed to address the nation's emergency response, engineering, and scientific needs as identified in U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1188 (1999). Data needs are discussed in terms of national, regional, and urban scales of monitoring in section 3. Functional performance specifications for instrumentation are introduced in section 4.3 and discussed in detail in section 6 in terms of instrument classes and definitions described in section 5. System aspects and testing recommendations are discussed in sections 7 and 8, respectively. Although U.S. Geological Survey Circular 1188 (1999) recommends that the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) include portable instrumentation, performance specifications for this element are not specifically addressed in this document. Nevertheless, these guidelines are largely applicable to portable instrumentation. Volcano monitoring instrumentation is also beyond the scope of this document. Guidance for ANSS structural-response monitoring is discussed briefly herein but details are deferred to the ANSS document by the ANSS Structural Response Monitoring Committee (U.S. Geological Survey, 2005). Aspects of station planning, siting, and installation other than instrumentation are beyond the scope of this document.

  7. Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, L.; Solakov, D.; Nikolova, S.; Stoyanov, S.; Simeonova, S.; Zimakov, L. G.; Khaikin, L.

    2011-12-01

    The Bulgarian National Digital Seismological Network (BNDSN) consists of a National Data Center (NDC), 13 stations equipped with RefTek High Resolution Broadband Seismic Recorders - model DAS 130-01/3, 1 station equipped with Quanterra 680 and broadband sensors and accelerometers. Real-time data transfer from seismic stations to NDC is realized via Virtual Private Network of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. The communication interruptions don't cause any data loss at the NDC. The data are backed up in the field station recorder's 4Mb RAM memory and are retransmitted to the NDC immediately after the communication link is re-established. The recorders are equipped with 2 compact flash disks able to save more than 1 month long data. The data from the flash disks can be downloaded remotely using FTP. The data acquisition and processing hardware redundancy at the NDC is achieved by two clustered SUN servers and two Blade Workstations. To secure the acquisition, processing and data storage processes a three layer local network is designed at the NDC. Real-time data acquisition is performed using REFTEK's full duplex error-correction protocol RTPD. Data from the Quanterra recorder and foreign stations are fed into RTPD in real-time via SeisComP/SeedLink protocol. Using SeisComP/SeedLink software the NDC transfers real-time data to INGV-Roma, NEIC-USA, ORFEUS Data Center. Regional real-time data exchange with Romania, Macedonia, Serbia and Greece is established at the NDC also. Data processing is performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package running on the both Servers. SNDP includes subsystems: Real-time subsystem (RTS_SNDP) - for signal detection; evaluation of the signal parameters; phase identification and association; source estimation; Seismic analysis subsystem (SAS_SNDP) - for interactive data processing; Early warning subsystem (EWS_SNDP) - based on the first arrived P-phases. The signal detection process is performed by

  8. DigiSeis—A software component for digitizing seismic signals using the PC sound card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amin Khan, Khalid; Akhter, Gulraiz; Ahmad, Zulfiqar

    2012-06-01

    An innovative software-based approach to develop an inexpensive experimental seismic recorder is presented. This approach requires no hardware as the built-in PC sound card is used for digitization of seismic signals. DigiSeis, an ActiveX component is developed to capture the digitized seismic signals from the sound card and deliver them to applications for processing and display. A seismic recorder application software SeisWave is developed over this component, which provides real-time monitoring and display of seismic events picked by a pair of external geophones. This recorder can be used as an educational aid for conducting seismic experiments. It can also be connected with suitable seismic sensors to record earthquakes. The software application and the ActiveX component are available for download. This component can be used to develop seismic recording applications according to user specific requirements.

  9. The Advanced National Seismic System; management and implementation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, H.M.; Shedlock, K.M.; Buland, R.P.

    2001-01-01

    What is the Advanced National Seismic System? The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) is designed to organize, modernize, and standardize operations of seismic networks in the United States to improve the Nation’s ability to respond effectively to damaging earthquakes, volcanoes, and tsunamis. To achieve this, the ANSS will link more than 7,000 national, regional and urban monitoring stations in real time

  10. Introduction of digital object identifiers (DOI) for seismic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Peter; Strollo, Angelo; Clark, Adam; Ahern, Tim; Newman, Rob; Clinton, John; Pequegnat, Catherine; Pedersen, Helle

    2015-04-01

    Proper attribution for scientific source data is important in promoting transparency and recognising the role of data providers in science. Data sets such as those produced by seismic networks now need to be citable and permanently locatable for research users. Recently the EIDA and IRIS-DMC communities have worked together on development of methods for generation, maintenance and promotion of persistent identifiers for seismic networks. This resulted in a 2014 Recommendation by the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks (FDSN) on the use of Digital Object Identifiers (DOI) for seismic networks. These can be cited equivalently to scientific papers, and tools such as DataCite allow the tracking of citations to these datasets. The GEOFON, IRIS and RESIF data centres have now begun to roll-out of these seismic network DOIs. This has involved working with principal investigators to prepare metadata consistent with the FDSN recommendation, preparation of landing pages, and changes to the web sites to promote DOIs where available. This has involved preparing improved descriptions of the data (metadata) and clarifying how individuals and institutions should best be recognised for their contributions to making the data available. We illustrate this process for a few representative networks. We will be in contact with additional network operators to help them establish DOIs for their networks in future.

  11. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, R.W.; Harp, E.L.; Michael, J.A.

    2000-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include: (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24 000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10 m grid spacing using ARC/INFO GIS software on a UNIX computer. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure. ?? 2000 Elsevier Science B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Origins of a national seismic system in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Filson, John R.; Arabasz, Walter J.

    2016-01-01

    This historical review traces the origins of the current national seismic system in the United States, a cooperative effort that unifies national, regional, and local‐scale seismic monitoring within the structure of the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS). The review covers (1) the history and technological evolution of U.S. seismic networks leading up to the 1990s, (2) factors that made the 1960s and 1970s a watershed period for national attention to seismology, earthquake hazards, and seismic monitoring, (3) genesis of the vision of a national seismic system during 1980–1983, (4) obstacles and breakthroughs during 1984–1989, (5) consensus building and convergence during 1990–1992, and finally (6) the two‐step realization of a national system during 1993–2000. Particular importance is placed on developments during the period between 1980 and 1993 that culminated in the adoption of a charter for the Council of the National Seismic System (CNSS)—the foundation for the later ANSS. Central to this story is how many individuals worked together toward a common goal of a more rational and sustainable approach to national earthquake monitoring in the United States. The review ends with the emergence of ANSS during 1999 and 2000 and its statutory authorization by Congress in November 2000.

  13. Technical guidelines for the implementation of the Advanced National Seismic System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Committee, ANSS Technical Integration

    2002-01-01

    The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) is a major national initiative led by the US Geological Survey that serves the needs of the earthquake monitoring, engineering, and research communities as well as national, state, and local governments, emergency response organizations, and the general public. Legislation authorizing the ANSS was passed in 2000, and low levels of funding for planning and initial purchases of new seismic instrumentation have been appropriated beginning in FY2000. When fully operational, the ANSS will be an advanced monitoring system (modern digital seismographs and accelerographs, communications networks, data collection and processing centers, and well-trained personnel) distributed across the United States that operates with high performance standards, gathers critical technical data, and effectively provides timely and reliable earthquake products, information, and services to meet the Nation’s needs. The ANSS will automatically broadcast timely and authoritative products describing the occurrence of earthquakes, earthquake source properties, the distribution of ground shaking, and, where feasible, broadcast early warnings and alerts for the onset of strong ground shaking. Most importantly, the ANSS will provide earthquake data, derived products, and information to the public, emergency responders, officials, engineers, educators, researchers, and other ANSS partners rapidly and in forms that are useful for their needs.

  14. Unravelling Responses for the Canadian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulder, T. L.

    2009-12-01

    There are a number of attendant difficulties any network must deal with that range from defining the transfer function to instrument naming conventions to choices of final local file format representation. These choices ultimately result in the ease of conversion to other data formats and therefore directly impact useability. In particular, the ease of data exhange and use of established software that is dependent on standard data types is impacted. This becomes particularly critical with large (terabyte) dataset processing and when integrating external datasets into analysis procedures. Transfer functions, often referred to as instrument responses, are a key component in describing instrumentation. The transfer function describes the complete response of the seismic system. The seismic system is designed to be a linear system that can be decomposed into discrete components. Analogue or digital convolution can be represented as multiplication in the frequency domain. The two basic elements of a seismic system are the sensor and datalogger. The analogue sensor can be represented mathmatically as poles and zeroes. The datalogger can be further broken down into its discrete analogue and digital components: the preamp, A/D converter, and fir filters. The Canadian seismic network (CNSN) digitizers have an additional complication. To save telemetry band-width, the 32 bit signal from the digitizer has a transmission gain removed. The transmission gain (txgain) represents the number of the least significant bits truncated from the sample (2^txgain) after which the data is compressed and transmitted. While telemetry band-width is not the issue it was, now that many sites have ip connectivity, this user programmable transmission gain is still in use and can vary from station to station. The processes receiving the transmitted data do not restore the pre-transmission scaling, consequently the archived waveform files can vary in bit weight over time from station to station

  15. Regional seismic lines reprocessed using post-stack processing techniques; National Petroleum Reserve, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, John J.; Agena, W.F.; Lee, M.W.; Zihlman, F.N.; Grow, J.A.; Taylor, D.J.; Killgore, Michele; Oliver, H.L.

    2000-01-01

    This CD-ROM contains stacked, migrated, 2-Dimensional seismic reflection data and associated support information for 22 regional seismic lines (3,470 line-miles) recorded in the National Petroleum Reserve ? Alaska (NPRA) from 1974 through 1981. Together, these lines constitute about one-quarter of the seismic data collected as part of the Federal Government?s program to evaluate the petroleum potential of the Reserve. The regional lines, which form a grid covering the entire NPRA, were created by combining various individual lines recorded in different years using different recording parameters. These data were reprocessed by the USGS using modern, post-stack processing techniques, to create a data set suitable for interpretation on interactive seismic interpretation computer workstations. Reprocessing was done in support of ongoing petroleum resource studies by the USGS Energy Program. The CD-ROM contains the following files: 1) 22 files containing the digital seismic data in standard, SEG-Y format; 2) 1 file containing navigation data for the 22 lines in standard SEG-P1 format; 3) 22 small scale graphic images of each seismic line in Adobe Acrobat? PDF format; 4) a graphic image of the location map, generated from the navigation file, with hyperlinks to the graphic images of the seismic lines; 5) an ASCII text file with cross-reference information for relating the sequential trace numbers on each regional line to the line number and shotpoint number of the original component lines; and 6) an explanation of the processing used to create the final seismic sections (this document). The SEG-Y format seismic files and SEG-P1 format navigation file contain all the information necessary for loading the data onto a seismic interpretation workstation.

  16. Analyzing crack development pattern of masonry structure in seismic oscillation by digital photography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojian; Yu, Chengxin; Ding, Xinhua

    2018-01-01

    In this study, digital photography is used to monitor the instantaneous deformation of a masonry wall in seismic oscillation. In order to obtain higher measurement accuracy, the image matching-time baseline parallax method (IM-TBPM) is used to correct errors caused by the change of intrinsic and extrinsic parameters of digital cameras. Results show that the average errors of control point C5 are 0.79mm, 0.44mm and 0.96mm in X, Z and comprehensive direction, respectively. The average errors of control point C6 are 0.49mm, 0.44mm and 0.71mm in X, Z and comprehensive direction, respectively. These suggest that IM-TBPM can meet the accuracy requirements of instantaneous deformation monitoring. In seismic oscillation the middle to lower of the masonry wall develops cracks firstly. Then the shear failure occurs on the middle of masonry wall. This study provides technical basis for analyzing the crack development pattern of masonry structure in seismic oscillation and have significant implications for improved construction of masonry structures in earthquake prone areas.

  17. Incorporating induced seismicity in the 2014 United States National Seismic Hazard Model: results of the 2014 workshop and sensitivity studies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Mueller, Charles S.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Hoover, Susan M.; Rubinstein, Justin L.; Llenos, Andrea L.; Michael, Andrew J.; Ellsworth, William L.; McGarr, Arthur F.; Holland, Austin A.; Anderson, John G.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model for the conterminous United States was updated in 2014 to account for new methods, input models, and data necessary for assessing the seismic ground shaking hazard from natural (tectonic) earthquakes. The U.S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model project uses probabilistic seismic hazard analysis to quantify the rate of exceedance for earthquake ground shaking (ground motion). For the 2014 National Seismic Hazard Model assessment, the seismic hazard from potentially induced earthquakes was intentionally not considered because we had not determined how to properly treat these earthquakes for the seismic hazard analysis. The phrases “potentially induced” and “induced” are used interchangeably in this report, however it is acknowledged that this classification is based on circumstantial evidence and scientific judgment. For the 2014 National Seismic Hazard Model update, the potentially induced earthquakes were removed from the NSHM’s earthquake catalog, and the documentation states that we would consider alternative models for including induced seismicity in a future version of the National Seismic Hazard Model. As part of the process of incorporating induced seismicity into the seismic hazard model, we evaluate the sensitivity of the seismic hazard from induced seismicity to five parts of the hazard model: (1) the earthquake catalog, (2) earthquake rates, (3) earthquake locations, (4) earthquake Mmax (maximum magnitude), and (5) earthquake ground motions. We describe alternative input models for each of the five parts that represent differences in scientific opinions on induced seismicity characteristics. In this report, however, we do not weight these input models to come up with a preferred final model. Instead, we present a sensitivity study showing uniform seismic hazard maps obtained by applying the alternative input models for induced seismicity. The final model will be released after

  18. Local magnitude determinations for intermountain seismic belt earthquakes from broadband digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pechmann, J.C.; Nava, S.J.; Terra, F.M.; Bernier, J.C.

    2007-01-01

    The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) earthquake catalogs for the Utah and Yellowstone National Park regions contain two types of size measurements: local magnitude (ML) and coda magnitude (MC), which is calibrated against ML. From 1962 through 1993, UUSS calculated ML values for southern and central Intermountain Seismic Belt earthquakes using maximum peak-to-peak (p-p) amplitudes on paper records from one to five Wood-Anderson (W-A) seismographs in Utah. For ML determinations of earthquakes since 1994, UUSS has utilized synthetic W-A seismograms from U.S. National Seismic Network and UUSS broadband digital telemetry stations in the region, which numbered 23 by the end of our study period on 30 June 2002. This change has greatly increased the percentage of earthquakes for which ML can be determined. It is now possible to determine ML for all M ???3 earthquakes in the Utah and Yellowstone regions and earthquakes as small as M <1 in some areas. To maintain continuity in the magnitudes in the UUSS earthquake catalogs, we determined empirical ML station corrections that minimize differences between MLs calculated from paper and synthetic W-A records. Application of these station corrections, in combination with distance corrections from Richter (1958) which have been in use at UUSS since 1962, produces ML values that do not show any significant distance dependence. ML determinations for the Utah and Yellowstone regions for 1981-2002 using our station corrections and Richter's distance corrections have provided a reliable data set for recalibrating the MC scales for these regions. Our revised ML values are consistent with available moment magnitude determinations for Intermountain Seismic Belt earthquakes. To facilitate automatic ML measurements, we analyzed the distribution of the times of maximum p-p amplitudes in synthetic W-A records. A 30-sec time window for maximum amplitudes, beginning 5 sec before the predicted Sg time, encompasses 95% of the

  19. Integrate urban‐scale seismic hazard analyses with the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Luco, Nicolas; Frankel, Arthur; Petersen, Mark D.; Aagaard, Brad T.; Baltay, Annemarie S.; Blanpied, Michael; Boyd, Oliver; Briggs, Richard; Gold, Ryan D.; Graves, Robert; Hartzell, Stephen; Rezaeian, Sanaz; Stephenson, William J.; Wald, David J.; Williams, Robert A.; Withers, Kyle

    2018-01-01

    For more than 20 yrs, damage patterns and instrumental recordings have highlighted the influence of the local 3D geologic structure on earthquake ground motions (e.g., M">M 6.7 Northridge, California, Gao et al., 1996; M">M 6.9 Kobe, Japan, Kawase, 1996; M">M 6.8 Nisqually, Washington, Frankel, Carver, and Williams, 2002). Although this and other local‐scale features are critical to improving seismic hazard forecasts, historically they have not been explicitly incorporated into the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM, national model and maps), primarily because the necessary basin maps and methodologies were not available at the national scale. Instead,...

  20. An assessment of seismic monitoring in the United States; requirement for an Advanced National Seismic System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1999-01-01

    This report assesses the status, needs, and associated costs of seismic monitoring in the United States. It sets down the requirement for an effective, national seismic monitoring strategy and an advanced system linking national, regional, and urban monitoring networks. Modernized seismic monitoring can provide alerts of imminent strong earthquake shaking; rapid assessment of distribution and severity of earthquake shaking (for use in emergency response); warnings of a possible tsunami from an offshore earthquake; warnings of volcanic eruptions; information for correctly characterizing earthquake hazards and for improving building codes; and data on response of buildings and structures during earthquakes, for safe, cost-effective design, engineering, and construction practices in earthquake-prone regions.

  1. 2008 United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey recently updated the National Seismic Hazard Maps by incorporating new seismic, geologic, and geodetic information on earthquake rates and associated ground shaking. The 2008 versions supersede those released in 1996 and 2002. These maps are the basis for seismic design provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, earthquake loss studies, retrofit priorities, and land-use planning. Their use in design of buildings, bridges, highways, and critical infrastructure allows structures to better withstand earthquake shaking, saving lives and reducing disruption to critical activities following a damaging event. The maps also help engineers avoid costs from over-design for unlikely levels of ground motion.

  2. Seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dewey, James W.

    2006-01-01

    This publication describes the seismicity of Afghanistan and vicinity and is intended for use in seismic hazard studies of that nation. Included are digital files with information on earthquakes that have been recorded in Afghanistan and vicinity through mid-December 2004. Chapter A provides an overview of the seismicity and tectonics of Afghanistan and defines the earthquake parameters included in the 'Summary Catalog' and the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects.' Chapter B summarizes compilation of the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' and documents their formats. The 'Summary Catalog' itself is presented as a comma-delimited ASCII file, the 'Summary of Macroseismic Effects' is presented as an html file, and the 'Master Catalog' and 'Sub-Threshold Catalog' are presented as flat ASCII files. Finally, this report includes as separate plates a digital image of a map of epicenters of earthquakes occurring since 1964 (Plate 1) and a representation of areas of damage or strong shaking from selected past earthquakes in Afghanistan and vicinity (Plate 2).

  3. Seismic hazard in the Nation's breadbasket

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boyd, Oliver; Haller, Kathleen; Luco, Nicolas; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mueller, Charles; Petersen, Mark D.; Rezaeian, Sanaz; Rubinstein, Justin L.

    2015-01-01

    The USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps were updated in 2014 and included several important changes for the central United States (CUS). Background seismicity sources were improved using a new moment-magnitude-based catalog; a new adaptive, nearest-neighbor smoothing kernel was implemented; and maximum magnitudes for background sources were updated. Areal source zones developed by the Central and Eastern United States Seismic Source Characterization for Nuclear Facilities project were simplified and adopted. The weighting scheme for ground motion models was updated, giving more weight to models with a faster attenuation with distance compared to the previous maps. Overall, hazard changes (2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, across a range of ground-motion frequencies) were smaller than 10% in most of the CUS relative to the 2008 USGS maps despite new ground motion models and their assigned logic tree weights that reduced the probabilistic ground motions by 5–20%.

  4. Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidrih, R.; Godec, M.; Gosar, A.; Sincic, P.; Tasic, I.; Zivcic, M.

    2003-04-01

    The Environmental Agency of the Republic of Slovenia, the Seismology Office is responsible for the fast and reliable information about earthquakes, originating in the area of Slovenia and nearby. In the year 2000 the project Modernization of the Slovenian National Seismic Network started. The purpose of a modernized seismic network is to enable fast and accurate automatic location of earthquakes, to determine earthquake parameters and to collect data of local, regional and global earthquakes. The modernized network will be finished in the year 2004 and will consist of 25 Q730 remote broadband data loggers based seismic station subsystems transmitting in real-time data to the Data Center in Ljubljana, where the Seismology Office is located. The remote broadband station subsystems include 16 surface broadband seismometers CMG-40T, 5 broadband seismometers CMG-40T with strong motion accelerographs EpiSensor, 4 borehole broadband seismometers CMG-40T, all with accurate timing provided by GPS receivers. The seismic network will cover the entire Slovenian territory, involving an area of 20,256 km2. The network is planned in this way; more seismic stations will be around bigger urban centres and in regions with greater vulnerability (NW Slovenia, Krsko Brezice region). By the end of the year 2002, three old seismic stations were modernized and ten new seismic stations were built. All seismic stations transmit data to UNIX-based computers running Antelope system software. The data is transmitted in real time using TCP/IP protocols over the Goverment Wide Area Network . Real-time data is also exchanged with seismic networks in the neighbouring countries, where the data are collected from the seismic stations, close to the Slovenian border. A typical seismic station consists of the seismic shaft with the sensor and the data acquisition system and, the service shaft with communication equipment (modem, router) and power supply with a battery box. which provides energy in case

  5. The seismic project of the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Oppenheimer, D.H.; Bittenbinder, A.N.; Bogaert, B.M.; Buland, R.P.; Dietz, L.D.; Hansen, R.A.; Malone, S.D.; McCreery, C.S.; Sokolowski, T.J.; Whitmore, P.M.; Weaver, C.S.

    2005-01-01

    In 1997, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), and the five western States of Alaska, California, Hawaii, Oregon, and Washington joined in a partnership called the National Tsunami Hazard Mitigation Program (NTHMP) to enhance the quality and quantity of seismic data provided to the NOAA tsunami warning centers in Alaska and Hawaii. The NTHMP funded a seismic project that now provides the warning centers with real-time seismic data over dedicated communication links and the Internet from regional seismic networks monitoring earthquakes in the five western states, the U.S. National Seismic Network in Colorado, and from domestic and global seismic stations operated by other agencies. The goal of the project is to reduce the time needed to issue a tsunami warning by providing the warning centers with high-dynamic range, broadband waveforms in near real time. An additional goal is to reduce the likelihood of issuing false tsunami warnings by rapidly providing to the warning centers parametric information on earthquakes that could indicate their tsunamigenic potential, such as hypocenters, magnitudes, moment tensors, and shake distribution maps. New or upgraded field instrumentation was installed over a 5-year period at 53 seismic stations in the five western states. Data from these instruments has been integrated into the seismic network utilizing Earthworm software. This network has significantly reduced the time needed to respond to teleseismic and regional earthquakes. Notably, the West Coast/Alaska Tsunami Warning Center responded to the 28 February 2001 Mw 6.8 Nisqually earthquake beneath Olympia, Washington within 2 minutes compared to an average response time of over 10 minutes for the previous 18 years. ?? Springer 2005.

  6. Seismic source characterization for the 2014 update of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moschetti, Morgan P.; Powers, Peter; Petersen, Mark D.; Boyd, Oliver; Chen, Rui; Field, Edward H.; Frankel, Arthur; Haller, Kathleen; Harmsen, Stephen; Mueller, Charles S.; Wheeler, Russell; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    We present the updated seismic source characterization (SSC) for the 2014 update of the National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) for the conterminous United States. Construction of the seismic source models employs the methodology that was developed for the 1996 NSHM but includes new and updated data, data types, source models, and source parameters that reflect the current state of knowledge of earthquake occurrence and state of practice for seismic hazard analyses. We review the SSC parameterization and describe the methods used to estimate earthquake rates, magnitudes, locations, and geometries for all seismic source models, with an emphasis on new source model components. We highlight the effects that two new model components—incorporation of slip rates from combined geodetic-geologic inversions and the incorporation of adaptively smoothed seismicity models—have on probabilistic ground motions, because these sources span multiple regions of the conterminous United States and provide important additional epistemic uncertainty for the 2014 NSHM.

  7. CEA SMAD 2016 Digitizer Evaluation.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Merchant, Bion J.

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated an updated SMAD digitizer, developed by the French Alternative Energies and Atomic Energy Commission (CEA). The SMAD digitizers are intended to record sensor output for seismic and infrasound monitoring applications. The purpose of this digitizer evaluation is to measure the performance characteristics in such areas as power consumption, input impedance, sensitivity, full scale, self-noise, dynamic range, system noise, response, passband, and timing. The SMAD digitizers have been updated since their last evaluation by Sandia to improve their performance when recording at a sample rate of 20 Hz for infrasound applications and 100 Hzmore » for hydro-acoustic seismic stations. This evaluation focuses primarily on the 20 Hz and 100 Hz sample rates. The SMAD digitizers are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test- Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).« less

  8. The Berkeley Digital Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, B.; Dreger, D.; Neuhauser, D.; Karavas, W.; Hellweg, M.; Uhrhammer, R.; Lombard, P.; Friday, J.; Lellinger, R.; Gardner, J.; McKenzie, M. R.; Bresloff, C.

    2007-05-01

    Since it began monitoring earthquakes in northern California 120 years ago, the Berkeley Seismological Laboratory (BSL) has been striving to produce the highest quality and most complete seismic data possible in the most modern way. This goal has influenced choices in instrumentation, installation and telemetry, as well as the investment in expertise and manpower. Since the transition to broadband (BB) instrumentation in the mid- 1980s and to a fully digitally telemetered network in the early 1990s, we have continued these efforts. Each of our 25 BB installations includes three component BB seismometers (STS-1s or STS-2) and digital accelerometers to capture the full range of ground motion from distant teleseisms to large, nearby earthquakes (almost 250 dB). The ground motion is recorded on-site by 24 bit dataloggers. Additional environmental parameters, such as temperature and pressure, are also monitored continuously. Many stations record also C-GPS data that is transmitted continuously to the BSL via shared real-time telemetry. The BDSN's first stations were installed in abandoned mines. In the last 15 years, we developed installations using buried shipping containers to reduce environmental noise and provide security and easy access to the equipment. Data are transmitted in real-time at several sampling rates to one or more processing centers, using frame relay, radio, microwave, and/or satellite. Each site has 7-30 days of onsite data storage to guard against data loss during telemetry outages. Each station is supplied with backup batteries to provide power for 3 days. The BDSN real-time data acquisition, earthquake analysis and archiving computers are housed in a building built to "emergency grade" seismic standards, with air conditioning and power backed up by a UPS and a large generator. Data latency and power are monitored by automated processes that alert staff via pager and email. Data completeness and timing quality are automatically assessed on a daily

  9. 2017 Guralp Affinity Digitizer Evaluation.

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Merchant, Bion J.

    Sandia National Laboratories has tested and evaluated two Guralp Affinity digitizers. The Affinity digitizers are intended to record sensor output for seismic and infrasound monitoring applications. The purpose of this digitizer evaluation is to measure the performance characteristics in such areas as power consumption, input impedance, sensitivity, full scale, self- noise, dynamic range, system noise, response, passband, and timing. The Affinity digitizers are being evaluated for potential use in the International Monitoring System (IMS) of the Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO).

  10. The Italian National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelini, Alberto

    2016-04-01

    The Italian National Seismic Network is composed by about 400 stations, mainly broadband, installed in the Country and in the surrounding regions. About 110 stations feature also collocated strong motion instruments. The Centro Nazionale Terremoti, (National Earthquake Center), CNT, has installed and operates most of these stations, although a considerable number of stations contributing to the INGV surveillance has been installed and is maintained by other INGV sections (Napoli, Catania, Bologna, Milano) or even other Italian or European Institutions. The important technological upgrades carried out in the last years has allowed for significant improvements of the seismic monitoring of Italy and of the Euro-Mediterranean Countries. The adopted data transmission systems include satellite, wireless connections and wired lines. The Seedlink protocol has been adopted for data transmission. INGV is a primary node of EIDA (European Integrated Data Archive) for archiving and distributing, continuous, quality checked data. The data acquisition system was designed to accomplish, in near-real-time, automatic earthquake detection and hypocenter and magnitude determination (moment tensors, shake maps, etc.). Database archiving of all parametric results are closely linked to the existing procedures of the INGV seismic monitoring environment. Overall, the Italian earthquake surveillance service provides, in quasi real-time, hypocenter parameters which are then revised routinely by the analysts of the Bollettino Sismico Nazionale. The results are published on the web page http://cnt.rm.ingv.it/ and are publicly available to both the scientific community and the the general public. This presentation will describe the various activities and resulting products of the Centro Nazionale Terremoti. spanning from data acquisition to archiving, distribution and specialised products.

  11. Surface Wave Dispersion Measurements and Tomography From Ambient Seismic Noise in China

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-12-20

    Recovering the Green’s function from field - field correlations in an open scattering medium (L), J. Acoust. Soc. Amer. 113 (6), 2973- 2976, 2003. Eagle, D...The basic approach can be traced back much earlier studies of random fields in seismology (Aki, 1957; Toksoz, 1964; Claerbout, 1968), in...Seismic Network (CNDSN), Center of China Digital Seismic Network (CCDSN) stations, and China Seismic Network ( CSN ). We refer here as China National

  12. The performance of the stations of the Romanian seismic network in monitoring the local seismic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ardeleanu, Luminita Angela; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Romania is mainly performed by the national seismic network operated by the National Institute for Earth Physics of Bucharest. After successive developments and upgrades, the network consists at present of 123 permanent stations equipped with high quality digital instruments (Kinemetrics K2, Quantera Q330, Quantera Q330HR, PS6-24 and Basalt digitizers) - 102 real time and 20 off-line stations - which cover the whole territory of the country. All permanent stations are supplied with 3 component accelerometers (episenzor type), while the real time stations are in addition provided with broadband (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T, STS2) or short period (SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, GS21, L22_VEL) velocity sensors. Several communication systems are currently used for the real time data transmission: an analog line in UHF band, a line through GPRS (General Packet Radio Service), a dedicated line through satellite, and a dedicated line provided by the Romanian Special Telecommunication Service. During the period January 1, 2006 - June 30, 2013, 5936 shallow depth seismic events - earthquakes and quarry blasts - with local magnitude ML ≥ 1.2 were localized on the Romanian territory, or in its immediate vicinity, using the records of the national seismic network; 1467 subcrustal earthquakes (depth ≥ 60 km) with magnitude ML ≥ 1.9 were also localized in the Vrancea region, at the bend of the Eastern Carpathians. The goal of the present study is to evaluate the individual contribution of the real time seismic stations to the monitoring of the local seismicity. The performance of each station is estimated by taking into consideration the fraction of events that are localised using the station records, compared to the total number of events of the catalogue, occurred during the time of station operation. Taking into account the nonuniform space distribution of earthquakes, the location of the site and the recovery

  13. PG&E's Seismic Network Goes Digital With Strong Motion: Successes and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stanton, M. A.; Cullen, J.; McLaren, M. K.

    2008-12-01

    Pacific Gas and Electric Company (PG&E) is in year 3 of a 5-year project to upgrade the Central Coast Seismic Network (CCSN) from analog to digital. Located along the south-central California coast, the CCSN began operation in 1987, with 20 analog stations; 15 vertical component and 5 dual gain 3-component S-13 sensors. The analog signals travel over FM radio telemetry links and voice channels via PG&E's microwave network to our facility in San Francisco (SF), where the A/D conversion is performed on a computer running Earthworm v7.1, which also transmits the data to the USGS in Menlo Park. At the conversion point the dynamic ranges of the vertical and dual-gain sensors are 40-50dB and 60-70dB, respectively. Dynamic range exceedance (data clipping) generally occurs for a M2.5 or greater event within about 40 km of a station. The motivations to upgrade the seismic network were the need for higher dynamic range and to retire obsolete analog transmission equipment. The upgraded digital stations consist of the existing velocity sensors, a 131A-02/3 accelerometer and a Reftek 130-01 Broadband Seismic Recorder for digital data recording and transmission to SF. Vertical only stations have one component of velocity and 3 components of acceleration. Dual gain sites have 3 components of velocity and 3 of acceleration. To date we have successfully upgraded 6 sites; 3 more will be installed by the end of 2008. Some of the advantages of going digital are 1) data is recorded at each site and in SF, 2) substantially increased dynamic range of the velocity sensors to 120dB, as observed by on scale, close-by recordings from a M3.9 San Simeon aftershock on 04/29/2008, 3) accelerometers for on scale recording of large earthquakes, and 4) ability to contribute our strong motion data to USGS ShakeMaps. A significant challenge has been consistent radio communications. To resolve this issue we are installing point-to-multipoint Motorola Canopy spread spectrum radios at the stations and

  14. Seismic databases of The Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gunia, I.; Sokhadze, G.; Mikava, D.; Tvaradze, N.; Godoladze, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Caucasus is one of the active segments of the Alpine-Himalayan collision belt. The region needs continues seismic monitoring systems for better understanding of tectonic processes going in the region. Seismic Monitoring Center of Georgia (Ilia State University) is operating the digital seismic network of the country and is also collecting and exchanging data with neighboring countries. The main focus of our study was to create seismic database which is well organized, easily reachable and is convenient for scientists to use. The seismological database includes the information about more than 100 000 earthquakes from the whole Caucasus. We have to mention that it includes data from analog and digital seismic networks. The first analog seismic station in Georgia was installed in 1899 in the Caucasus in Tbilisi city. The number of analog seismic stations was increasing during next decades and in 1980s about 100 analog stations were operated all over the region. From 1992 due to political and economical situation the number of stations has been decreased and in 2002 just two analog equipments was operated. New digital seismic network was developed in Georgia since 2003. The number of digital seismic stations was increasing and in current days there are more than 25 digital stations operating in the country. The database includes the detailed information about all equipments installed on seismic stations. Database is available online. That will make convenient interface for seismic data exchange data between Caucasus neighboring countries. It also makes easier both the seismic data processing and transferring them to the database and decreases the operator's mistakes during the routine work. The database was created using the followings: php, MySql, Javascript, Ajax, GMT, Gmap, Hypoinverse.

  15. Geothermal Induced Seismicity National Environmental Policy Act Review

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Levine, Aaron L; Cook, Jeffrey J; Beckers, Koenraad J

    In 2016, the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) contracted with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to assist the BLM in developing and building upon tools to better understand and evaluate induced seismicity caused by geothermal projects. This review of NEPA documents for four geothermal injection or EGS projects reveals the variety of approaches to analyzing and mitigating induced seismicity. With the exception of the Geysers, where induced seismicity has been observed and monitored for an extended period of time due to large volumes of water being piped in to recharge the hydrothermal reservoir, induced seismicity caused by geothermalmore » projects is a relative new area of study. As this review highlights, determining the level of mitigation required for induced seismic events has varied based on project location, when the review took place, whether the project utilized the International Energy Agency or DOE IS protocols, and the federal agency conducting the review. While the NEPA reviews were relatively consistent for seismic monitoring and historical evaluation of seismic events near the project location, the requirements for public outreach and mitigation for induced seismic events once stimulation has begun varied considerably between the four projects. Not all of the projects were required to notify specific community groups or local government entities before beginning the project, and only one of the reviews specifically stated the project proponent would hold meetings with the public to answer questions or address concerns.« less

  16. Documentation for the 2008 Update of the United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Mueller, Charles S.; Haller, Kathleen M.; Wheeler, Russell L.; Wesson, Robert L.; Zeng, Yuehua; Boyd, Oliver S.; Perkins, David M.; Luco, Nicolas; Field, Edward H.; Wills, Chris J.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2008-01-01

    The 2008 U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Maps display earthquake ground motions for various probability levels across the United States and are applied in seismic provisions of building codes, insurance rate structures, risk assessments, and other public policy. This update of the maps incorporates new findings on earthquake ground shaking, faults, seismicity, and geodesy. The resulting maps are derived from seismic hazard curves calculated on a grid of sites across the United States that describe the frequency of exceeding a set of ground motions. The USGS National Seismic Hazard Mapping Project developed these maps by incorporating information on potential earthquakes and associated ground shaking obtained from interaction in science and engineering workshops involving hundreds of participants, review by several science organizations and State surveys, and advice from two expert panels. The National Seismic Hazard Maps represent our assessment of the 'best available science' in earthquake hazards estimation for the United States (maps of Alaska and Hawaii as well as further information on hazard across the United States are available on our Web site at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/research/hazmaps/).

  17. Digital processing of array seismic recordings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryall, Alan; Birtill, John

    1962-01-01

    This technical letter contains a brief review of the operations which are involved in digital processing of array seismic recordings by the methods of velocity filtering, summation, cross-multiplication and integration, and by combinations of these operations (the "UK Method" and multiple correlation). Examples are presented of analyses by the several techniques on array recordings which were obtained by the U.S. Geological Survey during chemical and nuclear explosions in the western United States. Seismograms are synthesized using actual noise and Pn-signal recordings, such that the signal-to-noise ratio, onset time and velocity of the signal are predetermined for the synthetic record. These records are then analyzed by summation, cross-multiplication, multiple correlation and the UK technique, and the results are compared. For all of the examples presented, analysis by the non-linear techniques of multiple correlation and cross-multiplication of the traces on an array recording are preferred to analyses by the linear operations involved in summation and the UK Method.

  18. Seismic hazard in the South Carolina coastal plain: 2002 update of the USGS national seismic hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.; Mays, T.W.; ,

    2005-01-01

    The damaging 1886 moment magnitude ???7 Charleston, South Carolina earthquake is indicative of the moderately likely earthquake activity along this portion of the Atlantic Coast. A recurrence of such an earthquake today would have serious consequences for the nation. The national seismic hazard maps produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide a picture of the levels of seismic hazard across the nation based on the best and most current scientific information. The USGS national maps were updated in 2002 and will become part of the International Codes in 2006. In the past decade, improvements have occurred in the scientific understanding of the nature and character of earthquake activity and expected ground motions in the central and eastern U.S. The paper summarizes the new knowledge of expected earthquake locations, magnitudes, recurrence, and ground-motion decay with distance. New estimates of peak ground acceleration and 0.2 s and 1.0 s spectral acceleration are compared with those displayed in the 1996 national maps. The 2002 maps show increased seismic hazard in much of the coastal plain of South Carolina, but a decrease in long period (1 s and greater) hazard by up to 20% at distances of over 50 km from the Charleston earthquake zone. Although the national maps do not account for the effects of local or regional sediments, deep coastal-plain sediments can significally alter expected ground shaking, particularly at long period motions where it can be 100% higher than the national maps.

  19. The 2017 Maple Creek Seismic Swarm in Yellowstone National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, G.; Hale, J. M.; Farrell, J.; Burlacu, R.; Koper, K. D.; Smith, R. B.

    2017-12-01

    The University of Utah Seismograph Stations (UUSS) performs near-real-time monitoring of seismicity in the region around Yellowstone National Park in partnership with the United States Geological Survey and the National Park Service. UUSS operates and maintains 29 seismic stations with network code WY (short-period, strong-motion, and broadband) and records data from five other seismic networks—IW, MB, PB, TA, and US—to enhance the location capabilities in the Yellowstone region. A seismic catalog is produced using a conventional STA/LTA detector and single-event location techniques (Hypoinverse). On June 12, 2017, a seismic swarm began in Yellowstone National Park about 5 km east of Hebgen Lake. The swarm is adjacent to the source region of the 1959 MW 7.3 Hebgen Lake earthquake, in an area corresponding to positive Coulumb stress change from that event. As of Aug. 1, 2017, the swarm consists of 1481 earthquakes with 1 earthquake above magnitude 4, 8 earthquakes in the magnitude 3 range, 115 earthquakes in the magnitude 2 range, 469 earthquakes in the magnitude 1 range, 856 earthquakes in the magnitude 0 range, 22 earthquakes with negative magnitudes, and 10 earthquakes with no magnitude. Earthquake depths are mostly between 3 and 10 km and earthquake depth increases toward the northwest. Moment tensors for the 2 largest events (3.6 MW and 4.4. MW) show strike-slip faulting with T axes oriented NE-SW, consistent with the regional stress field. We are currently using waveform cross-correlation methods to measure differential travel times that are being used with the GrowClust program to generate high-accuracy relative relocations. Those locations will be used to identify structures in the seismicity and make inferences about the tectonic and magmatic processes causing the swarm.

  20. Archive of digital CHIRP seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 06FSH01 offshore of Siesta Key, Florida, May 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Robbins, Lisa L.

    2007-01-01

    In May of 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Siesta Key, Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital chirp seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and formal FGDC metadata. Gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  1. Archive of digital CHIRP seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 06SCC01 offshore of Isles Dernieres, Louisiana, June 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Ferina, Nick F.; Wiese, Dana S.; Flocks, James G.

    2007-01-01

    In June of 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a geophysical survey offshore of Isles Dernieres, Louisiana. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital CHIRP seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and formal FGDC metadata. Gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic UNIX (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  2. Archive of digital and digitized analog boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 96CCT02 in Copano, Corpus Christi, and Nueces Bays and Corpus Christi Bayou, Texas, July 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Morton, Robert A.; Blum, Mike D.; Wiese, Dana S.; Subiño, Janice A.

    2007-01-01

    In June of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys from Nueces to Copano Bays, Texas. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, cruise log, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles and high resolution scanned TIFF images of the original paper printouts are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  3. Design and Implementation of the National Seismic Monitoring Network in the Kingdom of Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmi, S.; Inoue, H.; Chophel, J.; Pelgay, P.; Drukpa, D.

    2017-12-01

    Bhutan-Himalayan district is located along the plate collision zone between Indian and Eurasian plates, which is one of the most seismically active region in the world. Recent earthquakes such as M7.8 Gorkha Nepal earthquake in April 25, 2015 and M6.7 Imphal, India earthquake in January 3, 2016 are examples of felt earthquakes in Bhutan. However, there is no permanent seismic monitoring system ever established in Bhutan, whose territory is in the center of the Bhutan-Himalayan region. We started establishing permanent seismic monitoring network of minimum requirements and intensity meter network over the nation. The former is composed of six (6) observation stations in Bhutan with short period weak motion and strong motion seismometers as well as three (3) broad-band seismometers, and the latter is composed of twenty intensity meters located in every provincial government office. Obtained data are transmitted to the central processing system in the DGM office in Thimphu in real time. In this project, DGM will construct seismic vault with their own budget which is approved as the World Bank project, and Japan team assists the DGM for site survey of observation site, designing the observation vault, and designing the data telemetry system as well as providing instruments for the observation such as seismometers and digitizers. We already started the operation of the six (6) weak motion stations as well as twenty (20) intensity meter stations. Additionally, the RIMES (Regional Integrated Multi-hazard Early Warning System for Africa and Asia) is also providing eight (8) weak motion stations and we are keeping close communication to operate them as one single seismic monitoring network composed of fourteen (14) stations. This network will be definitely utilized for not only for seismic disaster mitigation of the country but also for studying the seismotectonics in the Bhutan-Himalayan region which is not yet precisely revealed due to the lack of observation data in the

  4. Digital access and national character.

    PubMed

    Yang, Bijou; Lester, David

    2006-04-01

    A digital access index was associated with measures of national character (such as extraversion and individualism) for 18 industrialized nations, but statistical controls for gross domestic product per capita eliminated these associations.

  5. 50 years of Global Seismic Observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, K. R.; Butler, R.; Berger, J.; Davis, P.; Derr, J.; Gee, L.; Hutt, C. R.; Leith, W. S.; Park, J. J.

    2007-12-01

    Seismological recordings have been made on Earth for hundreds of years in some form or another, however, global monitoring of earthquakes only began in the 1890's when John Milne created 40 seismic observatories to measure the waves from these events. Shortly after the International Geophysical Year (IGY), a concerted effort was made to establish and maintain a more modern standardized seismic network on the global scale. In the early 1960's, the World-Wide Standardized Seismograph Network (WWSSN) was established through funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and was installed and maintained by the USGS's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (then a part of the US Coast and Geodetic Survey). This network of identical seismic instruments consisted of 120 stations in 60 countries. Although the network was motivated by nuclear test monitoring, the WWSSN facilitated numerous advances in observational seismology. From the IGY to the present, the network has been upgraded (High-Gain Long-Period Seismograph Network, Seismic Research Observatories, Digital WWSSN, Global Telemetered Seismograph Network, etc.) and expanded (International Deployment of Accelerometers, US National Seismic Network, China Digital Seismograph Network, Joint Seismic Project, etc.), bringing the modern day Global Seismographic Network (GSN) to a current state of approximately 150 stations. The GSN consists of state-of-the-art very broadband seismic transducers, continuous power and communications, and ancillary sensors including geodetic, geomagnetic, microbarographic, meteorological and other related instrumentation. Beyond the GSN, the system of global network observatories includes contributions from other international partners (e.g., GEOSCOPE, GEOFON, MEDNET, F-Net, CTBTO), forming an even larger backbone of permanent seismological observatories as a part of the International Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks. 50 years of seismic network operations have provided

  6. The improved broadband Real-Time Seismic Network in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagoe, C.; Ionescu, C.

    2009-04-01

    Starting with 2002 the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) has developed its real-time digital seismic network. This network consists of 96 seismic stations of which 48 broad band and short period stations and two seismic arrays are transmitted in real-time. The real time seismic stations are equipped with Quanterra Q330 and K2 digitizers, broadband seismometers (STS2, CMG40T, CMG 3ESP, CMG3T) and strong motions sensors Kinemetrics episensors (+/- 2g). SeedLink and AntelopeTM (installed on MARMOT) program packages are used for real-time (RT) data acquisition and exchange. The communication from digital seismic stations to the National Data Center in Bucharest is assured by 5 providers (GPRS, VPN, satellite communication, radio lease line and internet), which will assure the back-up communications lines. The processing centre runs BRTT's AntelopeTM 4.10 data acquisition and processing software on 2 workstations for real-time processing and post processing. The Antelope Real-Time System is also providing automatic event detection, arrival picking, event location and magnitude calculation. It provides graphical display and reporting within near-real-time after a local or regional event occurred. Also at the data center was implemented a system to collect macroseismic information using the internet on which macro seismic intensity maps are generated. In the near future at the data center will be install Seiscomp 3 data acquisition processing software on a workstation. The software will run in parallel with Antelope software as a back-up. The present network will be expanded in the near future. In the first half of 2009 NIEP will install 8 additional broad band stations in Romanian territory, which also will be transmitted to the data center in real time. The Romanian Seismic Network is permanently exchanging real -time waveform data with IRIS, ORFEUS and different European countries through internet. In Romania, magnitude and location of an earthquake are now

  7. Site characterization of the national seismic network of Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bordoni, Paola; Pacor, Francesca; Cultrera, Giovanna; Casale, Paolo; Cara, Fabrizio; Di Giulio, Giuseppe; Famiani, Daniela; Ladina, Chiara; PIschiutta, Marta; Quintiliani, Matteo

    2017-04-01

    The national seismic network of Italy (Rete Sismica Nazionale, RSN) run by Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) consists of more than 400 seismic stations connected in real time to the institute data center in order to locate earthquakes for civil defense purposes. A critical issue in the performance of a network is the characterization of site condition at the recording stations. Recently INGV has started addressing this subject through the revision of all available geological and geophysical data, the acquisition of new information by means of ad-hoc field measurements and the analysis of seismic waveforms. The main effort is towards building a database, integrated with the other INGV infrastructures, designed to archive homogeneous parameters through the seismic network useful for a complete site characterization, including housing, geological, seismological and geotechnical features as well as the site class according to the European and Italian building codes. Here we present the ongoing INGV activities.

  8. Romanian Complex Data Center for Dense Seismic network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagoe, Cristian; Ionescu, Constantin; Marius Manea, Liviu

    2010-05-01

    Since 2002 the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) developed its own real-time digital seismic network: consisting of 96 seismic stations of which 35 are broadband sensors and 24 stations equipped with short period sensors and two arrays earthquakes that transmit data in real time at the National Data Center (NDC) and Eforie Nord (EFOR) Seismic Observatory. EFOR is the back-up for the NDC and also a monitoring center for Black Sea tsunamis. Seismic stations are equipped with Quanterra Q330 and K2 digitizers, broadband seismometers (STS2, CMG40T, CMG 3ESP, CMG3T) and acceleration sensors Episensor Kinemetrics (+ / - 2G). SeedLink who is a part of Seiscomp2.5 and Antelope are software packages used for acquisition in real time (RT) and for data exchange. Communication of digital seismic stations to the National Data Center in Bucharest and Seismic Observatory Eforie Nord is assured by 5 providers (GPRS, VPN, satellite radio and Internet communication). For acquisition and data processing at the two centers of reception and processing is used AntelopeTM 4.11 running on 2 workstations: one for real-time and other for offline processing and also a Seiscomp 3 server that works as back-up for Antelope 4.11 Both acquisition and analysis of seismic data systems produced information about local and global parameters of earthquakes, in addition Antelope is used for manual processing (association events, the calculation of magnitude, creating a database, sending seismic bulletins, calculation of PGA and PGV , etc.), generating ShakeMap products and interacts with global data centers. In order to make all this information easily available across the Web and also lay the grounds for a more modular and flexible development environment the National Data Center developed tools to enable centralizing of data from software such as Antelope which is using a dedicated database system ( Datascope, a database system based on text files ) to a more general-purpose database, My

  9. Romanian Data Center: A modern way for seismic monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neagoe, Cristian; Marius Manea, Liviu; Ionescu, Constantin

    2014-05-01

    The main seismic survey of Romania is performed by the National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) which operates a real-time digital seismic network. The NIEP real-time network currently consists of 102 stations and two seismic arrays equipped with different high quality digitizers (Kinemetrics K2, Quanterra Q330, Quanterra Q330HR, PS6-26, Basalt), broadband and short period seismometers (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T,STS2, SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, gs21, Mark l22) and acceleration sensors (Episensor Kinemetrics). The data are transmitted at the National Data Center (NDC) and Eforie Nord (EFOR) Seismic Observatory. EFOR is the back-up for the NDC and also a monitoring center for the Black Sea tsunami events. NIEP is a data acquisition node for the seismic network of Moldova (FDSN code MD) composed of five seismic stations. NIEP has installed in the northern part of Bulgaria eight seismic stations equipped with broadband sensors and Episensors and nine accelerometers (Episensors) installed in nine districts along the Danube River. All the data are acquired at NIEP for Early Warning System and for primary estimation of the earthquake parameters. The real-time acquisition (RT) and data exchange is done by Antelope software and Seedlink (from Seiscomp3). The real-time data communication is ensured by different types of transmission: GPRS, satellite, radio, Internet and a dedicated line provided by a governmental network. For data processing and analysis at the two data centers Antelope 5.2 TM is being used running on 3 workstations: one from a CentOS platform and two on MacOS. Also a Seiscomp3 server stands as back-up for Antelope 5.2 Both acquisition and analysis of seismic data systems produce information about local and global parameters of earthquakes. In addition, Antelope is used for manual processing (event association, calculation of magnitude, creating a database, sending seismic bulletins, calculation of PGA and PGV, etc.), generating

  10. A method for producing digital probabilistic seismic landslide hazard maps; an example from the Los Angeles, California, area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jibson, Randall W.; Harp, Edwin L.; Michael, John A.

    1998-01-01

    The 1994 Northridge, California, earthquake is the first earthquake for which we have all of the data sets needed to conduct a rigorous regional analysis of seismic slope instability. These data sets include (1) a comprehensive inventory of triggered landslides, (2) about 200 strong-motion records of the mainshock, (3) 1:24,000-scale geologic mapping of the region, (4) extensive data on engineering properties of geologic units, and (5) high-resolution digital elevation models of the topography. All of these data sets have been digitized and rasterized at 10-m grid spacing in the ARC/INFO GIS platform. Combining these data sets in a dynamic model based on Newmark's permanent-deformation (sliding-block) analysis yields estimates of coseismic landslide displacement in each grid cell from the Northridge earthquake. The modeled displacements are then compared with the digital inventory of landslides triggered by the Northridge earthquake to construct a probability curve relating predicted displacement to probability of failure. This probability function can be applied to predict and map the spatial variability in failure probability in any ground-shaking conditions of interest. We anticipate that this mapping procedure will be used to construct seismic landslide hazard maps that will assist in emergency preparedness planning and in making rational decisions regarding development and construction in areas susceptible to seismic slope failure.

  11. Archive of digital boomer and CHIRP seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruise 06FSH03 offshore of Fort Lauderdale, Florida, September 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Reich, Christopher D.; Wiese, Dana S.; Greenwood, Jason W.; Swarzenski, Peter W.

    2007-01-01

    In September of 2006, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys offshore of Fort Lauderdale, FL. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer and CHIRP seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observer's logbook, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  12. Geothermal Induced Seismicity National Environmental Policy Act Review

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Levine, Aaron L; Cook, Jeffrey J; Beckers, Koenraad J

    This presentation reviews four National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) documents to understand how Federal agencies, including the U.S. Bureau of Land Management and Department of Energy, review and analyze the potential impacts to the human environment when funding or approving permits for enhanced geothermal system with the potential for induced seismicity.

  13. A National Consideration of Digital Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, T.; Fuller, M.; Jackson, S.; Pittman, J.; Sweet, J.

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES) report, "Computer and Internet Use by Students in 2003" (NCES, 2006) reveals that the digital divide continues to exist, particularly along demographic and socioeconomic lines. Though an exact definition remains elusive, the term "digital divide" generally refers to the…

  14. Analysis of recently digitized continuous seismic data recorded during the March-May, 1980, eruption sequence at Mount St. Helens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moran, S. C.; Malone, S. D.

    2013-12-01

    The May 18, 1980, eruption of Mount St. Helens (MSH) was an historic event, both for society and for the field of volcanology. However, our knowledge of the eruption and the precursory period leading up it is limited by the fact that most of the data, particularly seismic recordings, were not kept due to severe limitations in the amount of digital data that could be handled and stored using 1980 computer technology. Because of these limitations, only about 900 digital event files have been available for seismic studies of the March-May seismic sequence out of a total of more than 4,000 events that were counted using paper records. Fortunately, data from a subset of stations were also recorded continuously on a series of 24 analog 14-track IRIG magnetic tapes. We have recently digitized these tapes and time-corrected and cataloged the resultant digital data streams, enabling more in-depth studies of the (almost) complete pre-eruption seismic sequence using modern digital processing techniques. Of the fifteen seismic stations operating near MSH for at least a part of the two months between March 20 and May 18, six stations have relatively complete analog recordings. These recordings have gaps of minutes to days because of radio noise, poor tape quality, or missing tapes. In addition, several other stations have partial records. All stations had short-period vertical-component sensors with very limited dynamic range and unknown response details. Nevertheless, because the stations were at a range of distances and were operated at a range of gains, a variety of earthquake sizes were recorded on scale by at least one station, and therefore a much more complete understanding of the evolution of event types, sizes and character should be achievable. In our preliminary analysis of this dataset we have found over 10,000 individual events as recorded on stations 35-40 km from MSH, spanning a recalculated coda-duration magnitude range of ~1.5 to 4.1, including many M < 3

  15. Digital Seismic-Reflection Data from Eastern Rhode Island Sound and Vicinity, 1975-1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1975 and 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted two seismic-reflection surveys in Rhode Island Sound (RIS) aboard the research vessel Asterias: cruise ASTR75-June surveyed eastern RIS in 1975 and cruise AST-80-6B surveyed southern RIS in 1980. Data from these surveys were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center's Data Library. In response to recent interest in the geology of RIS and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from these cruises were scanned and converted to black and white Tagged Image File Format and grayscale Portable Network Graphics images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation time delays to latitudes and longitudes that are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc., shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format. This report complements two others that contain analog seismic-reflection data from RIS (McMullen and others, 2009) and Long Island and Block Island Sounds (Poppe and others, 2002) and were converted into digital form.

  16. Newberry Seismic Deployment Fieldwork Report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wang, J; Templeton, D C

    2012-03-21

    This report summarizes the seismic deployment of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Geotech GS-13 short-period seismometers at the Newberry Enhanced Geothermal System (EGS) Demonstration site located in Central Oregon. This Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration project is managed by AltaRock Energy Inc. AltaRock Energy had previously deployed Geospace GS-11D geophones at the Newberry EGS Demonstration site, however the quality of the seismic data was somewhat low. The purpose of the LLNL deployment was to install more sensitive sensors which would record higher quality seismic data for use in future seismic studies, such as ambient noise correlation, matched field processing earthquakemore » detection studies, and general EGS microearthquake studies. For the LLNL deployment, seven three-component seismic stations were installed around the proposed AltaRock Energy stimulation well. The LLNL seismic sensors were connected to AltaRock Energy Gueralp CMG-DM24 digitizers, which are powered by AltaRock Energy solar panels and batteries. The deployment took four days in two phases. In phase I, the sites were identified, a cavity approximately 3 feet deep was dug and a flat concrete pad oriented to true North was made for each site. In phase II, we installed three single component GS-13 seismometers at each site, quality controlled the data to ensure that each station was recording data properly, and filled in each cavity with native soil.« less

  17. Digital single-channel seismic-reflection data from western Santa Monica basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Normark, William R.; Piper, David J.W.; Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter; Gutmacher, Christina E.

    2006-01-01

    During a collaborative project in 1992, Geological Survey of Canada and United States Geological Survey scientists obtained about 850 line-km of high-quality single-channel boomer and sleeve-gun seismic-reflection profiles across Hueneme, Mugu and Dume submarine fans, Santa Monica Basin, off southern California. The goals of this work were to better understand the processes that lead to the formation of sandy submarine fans and the role of sea-level changes in controlling fan development. This report includes a trackline map of the area surveyed, as well as images of the sleeve-gun profiles and the opportunity to download both images and digital data files (SEG-Y) of all the sleeve-gun profiles.

  18. Reprocessing Seismic Data - Using Wits Seismic Exploration Data to Image the Karoo Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, S. J.; Scheiber-Enslin, S. E.; Manzi, M. S.

    2016-12-01

    During the heyday of seismic exploration of the Witwatersrand Basin, Anglo American's Gold Division acquired several thousand kilometres of Vibroseis reflection seismic data. These data, acquired from 1983-1994, were collected with the goal of finding extensions to the Witwatersrand Basin. In a prescient move, over 500 line kilometres were collected at 16 s two way travel time (TWT), extending to depths of 50 -70 km and have provided critical insight into the formation of the Kaapvaal Craton. In addition to these deep seismic lines, Anglo American acquired an extensive network of heretofore unpublished seismic lines that were collected at 6 sec TWT extending well beyond the known limits of the Witwatersrand Basin. The South African government as part of the national geophysical program in the late 1980s acquired six research reflection seismic lines in varied geological settings accruing another 700 km of data. Many of these data are now hosted at the University of the Witwatersrand's newly established Seismic Research Centre and represent unprecedented coverage and research opportunities. With recent global interest in shale gas, attention focused on the Karoo Basin in South Africa. Early exploration seismic data acquired by Soekor in the 1970s has been lost; however, digitized paper records indicate clear reflection targets. Here we examine one of the AngloGold seismic lines that was acquired in the middle of the Karoo Basin just south of Trompsburg extending to the southeast towards Molteno. This 150 km long line crosses the edge of the Kaapvaal Craton and shows clear reflectors throughout the Karoo Basin. These include the well-defined base of the Karoo and a number of dolerite sills within it. Nearby gas escape structures have been identified on surface and it is likely that several disruptions along this line are related to these or to dykes associated with the sills.

  19. A National Solar Digital Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.

    2000-05-01

    The continuing development of the Internet as a research tool, combined with an improving funding climate, has sparked new interest in the development of Internet-linked astronomical data bases and analysis tools. Here I outline a concept for a National Solar Digital Observatory (NSDO), a set of data archives and analysis tools distributed in physical location at sites which already host such systems. A central web site would be implemented from which a user could search all of the component archives, select and download data, and perform analyses. Example components include NSO's Digital Library containing its synoptic and GONG data, and the forthcoming SOLIS archive. Several other archives, in various stages of development, also exist. Potential analysis tools include content-based searches, visualized programming tools, and graphics routines. The existence of an NSDO would greatly facilitate solar physics research, as a user would no longer need to have detailed knowledge of all solar archive sites. It would also improve public outreach efforts. The National Solar Observatory is operated by AURA, Inc. under a cooperative agreement with the National Science Foundation.

  20. Computation of dynamic seismic responses to viscous fluid of digitized three-dimensional Berea sandstones with a coupled finite-difference method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yang; Toksöz, M Nafi

    2012-08-01

    The seismic response of saturated porous rocks is studied numerically using microtomographic images of three-dimensional digitized Berea sandstones. A stress-strain calculation is employed to compute the velocities and attenuations of rock samples whose sizes are much smaller than the seismic wavelength of interest. To compensate for the contributions of small cracks lost in the imaging process to the total velocity and attenuation, a hybrid method is developed to recover the crack distribution, in which the differential effective medium theory, the Kuster-Toksöz model, and a modified squirt-flow model are utilized in a two-step Monte Carlo inversion. In the inversion, the velocities of P- and S-waves measured for the dry and water-saturated cases, and the measured attenuation of P-waves for different fluids are used. By using such a hybrid method, both the velocities of saturated porous rocks and the attenuations are predicted accurately when compared to laboratory data. The hybrid method is a practical way to model numerically the seismic properties of saturated porous rocks until very high resolution digital data are available. Cracks lost in the imaging process are critical for accurately predicting velocities and attenuations of saturated porous rocks.

  1. National Earthquake Information Center Seismic Event Detections on Multiple Scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patton, J.; Yeck, W. L.; Benz, H.; Earle, P. S.; Soto-Cordero, L.; Johnson, C. E.

    2017-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) monitors seismicity on local, regional, and global scales using automatic picks from more than 2,000 near-real time seismic stations. This presents unique challenges in automated event detection due to the high variability in data quality, network geometries and density, and distance-dependent variability in observed seismic signals. To lower the overall detection threshold while minimizing false detection rates, NEIC has begun to test the incorporation of new detection and picking algorithms, including multiband (Lomax et al., 2012) and kurtosis (Baillard et al., 2014) pickers, and a new bayesian associator (Glass 3.0). The Glass 3.0 associator allows for simultaneous processing of variably scaled detection grids, each with a unique set of nucleation criteria (e.g., nucleation threshold, minimum associated picks, nucleation phases) to meet specific monitoring goals. We test the efficacy of these new tools on event detection in networks of various scales and geometries, compare our results with previous catalogs, and discuss lessons learned. For example, we find that on local and regional scales, rapid nucleation of small events may require event nucleation with both P and higher-amplitude secondary phases (e.g., S or Lg). We provide examples of the implementation of a scale-independent associator for an induced seismicity sequence (local-scale), a large aftershock sequence (regional-scale), and for monitoring global seismicity. Baillard, C., Crawford, W. C., Ballu, V., Hibert, C., & Mangeney, A. (2014). An automatic kurtosis-based P-and S-phase picker designed for local seismic networks. Bulletin of the Seismological Society of America, 104(1), 394-409. Lomax, A., Satriano, C., & Vassallo, M. (2012). Automatic picker developments and optimization: FilterPicker - a robust, broadband picker for real-time seismic monitoring and earthquake early-warning, Seism. Res. Lett. , 83, 531-540, doi: 10

  2. Advanced National Seismic System—Current status, development opportunities, and priorities for 2017–2027

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    2017-05-25

    SummaryEarthquakes pose a threat to the safety of over 143 million people living in the United States. Earthquake impacts can be significantly reduced if communities understand their risk and take proactive steps to mitigate that risk. The Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) is a cooperative effort to collect and analyze seismic and geodetic data on earthquakes, issue timely and reliable notifications of their occurrence and impacts, and provide data for earthquake research and the hazard and risk assessments that are the foundation for creating an earthquakeresilient nation.

  3. Early Learnings from the National Library of New Zealand's National Digital Heritage Archive Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Knight, Steve

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief description of the digital preservation programme at the National Library of New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: Following a description of the legislative and strategic context for digital preservation in New Zealand, details are provided of the system for the National Digital…

  4. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA04 in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, Central Florida, September 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    From September 2 through 4, 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Cherry, Helen, Hiawassee, Louisa, and Prevatt, central Florida. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS information, FACS logs, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  5. Digitized analog boomer seismic-reflection data collected during U.S. Geological Survey cruises Erda 90-1_HC, Erda 90-1_PBP, and Erda 91-3 in Mississippi Sound, June 1990 and September 1991

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bosse, Stephen T.; Flocks, James G.; Forde, Arnell S.

    2017-04-21

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Coastal and Marine Geology Program has actively collected geophysical and sedimentological data in the northern Gulf of Mexico for several decades, including shallow subsurface data in the form of high-resolution seismic-reflection profiles (HRSP). Prior to the mid-1990s most HRSP data were collected in analog format as paper rolls of continuous profiles up to 25 meters long. A large portion of this data resides in a single repository with minimal metadata. As part of the National Geological and Geophysical Data Preservation Program, scientists at the USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center are converting the analog paper records to digital format using a large-format continuous scanner.This report, along with the accompanying USGS data release (Bosse and others, 2017), serves as an archive of seismic profiles with headers, converted Society of Exploration Geophysicists Y format (SEG-Y) files, navigation data, and geographic information system data files for digitized boomer seismic-reflection data collected from the Research Vessel (R/V) Erda during two cruises in 1990 and 1991. The Erda 90-1 geophysical cruise was conducted in two legs. The first leg included seismic data collected from the Hancock County region of the Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_HC) from June 4 to June 6, 1990. The second leg included seismic data collected from the Petit Bois Pass area of Mississippi Sound (Erda 90-1_PBP) from June 8 to June 9, 1990. The Erda 91-3 cruise occurred between September 12 and September 23, 1991, and surveyed the Mississippi Sound region just west of Horn Island, Mississippi.

  6. USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, A.D.; Mueller, C.S.; Barnhard, T.P.; Leyendecker, E.V.; Wesson, R.L.; Harmsen, S.C.; Klein, F.W.; Perkins, D.M.; Dickman, N.C.; Hanson, S.L.; Hopper, M.G.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) recently completed new probabilistic seismic hazard maps for the United States, including Alaska and Hawaii. These hazard maps form the basis of the probabilistic component of the design maps used in the 1997 edition of the NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures, prepared by the Building Seismic Safety Council arid published by FEMA. The hazard maps depict peak horizontal ground acceleration and spectral response at 0.2, 0.3, and 1.0 sec periods, with 10%, 5%, and 2% probabilities of exceedance in 50 years, corresponding to return times of about 500, 1000, and 2500 years, respectively. In this paper we outline the methodology used to construct the hazard maps. There are three basic components to the maps. First, we use spatially smoothed historic seismicity as one portion of the hazard calculation. In this model, we apply the general observation that moderate and large earthquakes tend to occur near areas of previous small or moderate events, with some notable exceptions. Second, we consider large background source zones based on broad geologic criteria to quantify hazard in areas with little or no historic seismicity, but with the potential for generating large events. Third, we include the hazard from specific fault sources. We use about 450 faults in the western United States (WUS) and derive recurrence times from either geologic slip rates or the dating of pre-historic earthquakes from trenching of faults or other paleoseismic methods. Recurrence estimates for large earthquakes in New Madrid and Charleston, South Carolina, were taken from recent paleoliquefaction studies. We used logic trees to incorporate different seismicity models, fault recurrence models, Cascadia great earthquake scenarios, and ground-motion attenuation relations. We present disaggregation plots showing the contribution to hazard at four cities from potential earthquakes with various magnitudes and

  7. A filter circuit board for the Earthworm Seismic Data Acquisition System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jensen, Edward Gray

    2000-01-01

    The Earthworm system is a seismic network data acquisition and processing system used by the Northern California Seismic Network as well as many other seismic networks. The input to the system is comprised of many realtime electronic waveforms fed to a multi-channel digitizer on a PC platform. The digitizer consists of one or more National Instruments Corp. AMUX–64T multiplexer boards attached to an A/D converter board located in the computer. Originally, passive filters were installed on the multiplexers to eliminate electronic noise picked up in cabling. It was later discovered that a small amount of crosstalk occurred between successive channels in the digitizing sequence. Though small, this crosstalk will cause what appear to be small earthquake arrivals at the wrong time on some channels. This can result in erroneous calculation of earthquake arrival times, particularly by automated algorithms. To deal with this problem, an Earthworm filter board was developed to provide the needed filtering while eliminating crosstalk. This report describes the tests performed to find a suitable solution, and the design of the circuit board. Also included are all the details needed to build and install this board in an Earthworm system or any other system using the AMUX–64T board. Available below is the report in PDF format as well as an archive file containing the circuit board manufacturing information.

  8. Seismic Monitoring of Rock Falls in Yosemite National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimmer, V. L.; Stock, G. M.; Sitar, N.

    2008-12-01

    Between 1857 and 2007, more than 600 landslide events have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with the vast majority of events occurring as rock falls in Yosemite Valley. The conditions leading to and triggering rock fall are understood in approximately 50 percent of cases, but in the other 50 percent, there were no apparent triggers. Occasionally, large rock falls have been preceded by smaller events that, in retrospect, may have been precursors. Close range seismic monitoring presents an opportunity to study the conditions leading up to rock fall, as well as the mechanics of the actual rock fall as recorded seismically. During the winter of 2007-08, we conducted a rock fall seismic monitoring feasibility study in Yosemite Valley. A station consisting of an 8 Hz geophone and an accelerometer was placed on a ledge 1000 feet above the valley floor, in a historically active rock fall area known as the Three Brothers. At least two rock falls in this area were recorded by the instrumentation and witnessed by visitors, representing the first time rock falls have been recorded with seismic instrumentation in Yosemite Valley. Significant energy was recorded in a wide frequency range, from a few Hz to approximately 150 Hz, limited by the geophone response and attenuation of the signal due to distance to the source (400 m). Furthermore, there exists a weak signal approximately 5-10 seconds before the obvious rock fall signature. We hypothesize that the weak signal represents rock fall initiation manifesting as the first blocks sliding down the cliff face, while the stronger impulses represent these blocks impacting ledges and the bottom talus field. This study demonstrated that rock fall monitoring is feasible with seismic instrumentation, and serves as the catalyst for future studies using a network of sensors for more advanced analysis.

  9. A Deep-towed Digital Multichannel Seismic Streamer For Very High-resolution Studies Of Marine Subsurface Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breitzke, M.; Bialas, J.; Inggas Working Group

    A deep-towed digital multichannel seismic streamer and side scan sonar system has been developed to collect marine seismic data with a very high lateral in- and cross- line resolution particularly in regions of special interest for gas hydrate research. As marine seismic sources conventional air-, GI or waterguns will be shot close to the sea surface. A depressor of about 2 tons weight ensures the slightly buoyant deep-towed system to keep in depth. The streamer is a modular digital system which can be operated in water depths up to 6000 m. At this stage of development, it consists of a 50 m lead-in cable towed behind the side scan sonar fish and 26 single nodes for each channel. Each node houses a sin- gle hydrophone, low- and high-cut filter, preamplifier and 24-bit AD converter. Three special engineering nodes additionally include a pressure sensor and compass which provide information on the depth of the node and on its geographical position relative to the ship. Nodes are interchangeable and can arbitrarily be connected by cables of 1 or 6.5 m length. A minimum sample interval of 0.25 ms allows to use sufficiently high- frequency seismic sources to guarantee both a very high vertical and lateral resolution. Data are stored both underwater on a linux-based PC with 120 GB storage capacity installed in a pressure vessel mounted on the side scan sonar fish, and onboard on a PC running a data acquisition program and a DLT device. Data are transferred between underwater and onboard systems via telemetry controlled by a second linux-based PC onboard, using coaxial cable or fibre optic technology. The exact position of the side scan sonar fish is determined by the ultra-short base line (USBL) Posidonia system. It mainly consists of a hull-mounted acoustic unit (antenna) and a responder mounted on the side scan sonar fish. Additionally, the three engineering nodes measure the depth and heading of the streamer at three positions relative to the side scan sonar fish. All

  10. Seismic hazard assessment of Syria using seismicity, DEM, slope, active tectonic and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Raed; Adris, Ahmad; Singh, Ramesh

    2016-07-01

    In the present work, we discuss the use of an integrated remote sensing and Geographical Information System (GIS) techniques for evaluation of seismic hazard areas in Syria. The present study is the first time effort to create seismic hazard map with the help of GIS. In the proposed approach, we have used Aster satellite data, digital elevation data (30 m resolution), earthquake data, and active tectonic maps. Many important factors for evaluation of seismic hazard were identified and corresponding thematic data layers (past earthquake epicenters, active faults, digital elevation model, and slope) were generated. A numerical rating scheme has been developed for spatial data analysis using GIS to identify ranking of parameters to be included in the evaluation of seismic hazard. The resulting earthquake potential map delineates the area into different relative susceptibility classes: high, moderate, low and very low. The potential earthquake map was validated by correlating the obtained different classes with the local probability that produced using conventional analysis of observed earthquakes. Using earthquake data of Syria and the peak ground acceleration (PGA) data is introduced to the model to develop final seismic hazard map based on Gutenberg-Richter (a and b values) parameters and using the concepts of local probability and recurrence time. The application of the proposed technique in Syrian region indicates that this method provides good estimate of seismic hazard map compared to those developed from traditional techniques (Deterministic (DSHA) and probabilistic seismic hazard (PSHA). For the first time we have used numerous parameters using remote sensing and GIS in preparation of seismic hazard map which is found to be very realistic.

  11. Observations and modeling of seismic background noise

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon R.

    1993-01-01

    The preparation of this report had two purposes. One was to present a catalog of seismic background noise spectra obtained from a worldwide network of seismograph stations. The other purpose was to refine and document models of seismic background noise that have been in use for several years. The second objective was, in fact, the principal reason that this study was initiated and influenced the procedures used in collecting and processing the data.With a single exception, all of the data used in this study were extracted from the digital data archive at the U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory (ASL). This archive dates from 1972 when ASL first began deploying digital seismograph systems and collecting and distributing digital data under the sponsorship of the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). There have been many changes and additions to the global seismograph networks during the past twenty years, but perhaps none as significant as the current deployment of very broadband seismographs by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the University of California San Diego (UCSD) under the scientific direction of the IRIS consortium. The new data acquisition systems have extended the bandwidth and resolution of seismic recording, and they utilize high-density recording media that permit the continuous recording of broadband data. The data improvements and continuous recording greatly benefit and simplify surveys of seismic background noise.Although there are many other sources of digital data, the ASL archive data were used almost exclusively because of accessibility and because the data systems and their calibration are well documented for the most part. Fortunately, the ASL archive contains high-quality data from other stations in addition to those deployed by the USGS. Included are data from UCSD IRIS/IDA stations, the Regional Seismic Test Network (RSTN) deployed by Sandia National Laboratories (SNL), and the TERRAscope network

  12. The 2014 update to the National Seismic Hazard Model in California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Powers, Peter; Field, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 update to the U. S. Geological Survey National Seismic Hazard Model in California introduces a new earthquake rate model and new ground motion models (GMMs) that give rise to numerous changes to seismic hazard throughout the state. The updated earthquake rate model is the third version of the Uniform California Earthquake Rupture Forecast (UCERF3), wherein the rates of all ruptures are determined via a self-consistent inverse methodology. This approach accommodates multifault ruptures and reduces the overprediction of moderate earthquake rates exhibited by the previous model (UCERF2). UCERF3 introduces new faults, changes to slip or moment rates on existing faults, and adaptively smoothed gridded seismicity source models, all of which contribute to significant changes in hazard. New GMMs increase ground motion near large strike-slip faults and reduce hazard over dip-slip faults. The addition of very large strike-slip ruptures and decreased reverse fault rupture rates in UCERF3 further enhances these effects.

  13. Digital information management: a progress report on the National Digital Mammography Archive

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckerman, Barbara G.; Schnall, Mitchell D.

    2002-05-01

    Digital mammography creates very large images, which require new approaches to storage, retrieval, management, and security. The National Digital Mammography Archive (NDMA) project, funded by the National Library of Medicine (NLM), is developing a limited testbed that demonstrates the feasibility of a national breast imaging archive, with access to prior exams; patient information; computer aids for image processing, teaching, and testing tools; and security components to ensure confidentiality of patient information. There will be significant benefits to patients and clinicians in terms of accessible data with which to make a diagnosis and to researchers performing studies on breast cancer. Mammography was chosen for the project, because standards were already available for digital images, report formats, and structures. New standards have been created for communications protocols between devices, front- end portal and archive. NDMA is a distributed computing concept that provides for sharing and access across corporate entities. Privacy, auditing, and patient consent are all integrated into the system. Five sites, Universities of Pennsylvania, Chicago, North Carolina and Toronto, and BWXT Y12, are connected through high-speed networks to demonstrate functionality. We will review progress, including technical challenges, innovative research and development activities, standards and protocols being implemented, and potential benefits to healthcare systems.

  14. Toward a digital library strategy for a National Information Infrastructure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coyne, Robert A.; Hulen, Harry

    1993-01-01

    Bills currently before the House and Senate would give support to the development of a National Information Infrastructure, in which digital libraries and storage systems would be an important part. A simple model is offered to show the relationship of storage systems, software, and standards to the overall information infrastructure. Some elements of a national strategy for digital libraries are proposed, based on the mission of the nonprofit National Storage System Foundation.

  15. Updated Colombian Seismic Hazard Map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eraso, J.; Arcila, M.; Romero, J.; Dimate, C.; Bermúdez, M. L.; Alvarado, C.

    2013-05-01

    The Colombian seismic hazard map used by the National Building Code (NSR-98) in effect until 2009 was developed in 1996. Since then, the National Seismological Network of Colombia has improved in both coverage and technology providing fifteen years of additional seismic records. These improvements have allowed a better understanding of the regional geology and tectonics which in addition to the seismic activity in Colombia with destructive effects has motivated the interest and the need to develop a new seismic hazard assessment in this country. Taking advantage of new instrumental information sources such as new broad band stations of the National Seismological Network, new historical seismicity data, standardized global databases availability, and in general, of advances in models and techniques, a new Colombian seismic hazard map was developed. A PSHA model was applied. The use of the PSHA model is because it incorporates the effects of all seismic sources that may affect a particular site solving the uncertainties caused by the parameters and assumptions defined in this kind of studies. First, the seismic sources geometry and a complete and homogeneous seismic catalog were defined; the parameters of seismic rate of each one of the seismic sources occurrence were calculated establishing a national seismotectonic model. Several of attenuation-distance relationships were selected depending on the type of seismicity considered. The seismic hazard was estimated using the CRISIS2007 software created by the Engineering Institute of the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México -UNAM (National Autonomous University of Mexico). A uniformly spaced grid each 0.1° was used to calculate the peak ground acceleration (PGA) and response spectral values at 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.5, 0.75, 1, 1.5, 2, 2.5 and 3.0 seconds with return periods of 75, 225, 475, 975 and 2475 years. For each site, a uniform hazard spectrum and exceedance rate curves were calculated. With the results, it is

  16. Comparison of Iranian National Medical Library with digital libraries of selected countries

    PubMed Central

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Atashpour, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: The important role of information and communication technologies and their influence on methods of storing, retrieving information in digital libraries, has not only changed the meanings behind classic library activates but has also created great changes in their services. However, it seems that not all digital libraries provide their users with similar services and only some of them are successful in fulfilling their role in digital environment. The Iranian National Medical library is among those that appear to come short compared to other digital libraries around the world. By knowing the different services provided by digital libraries worldwide, one can evaluate the services provided by Iranian National Medical library. The goal of this study is a comparison between Iranian National Medical library and digital libraries of selected countries. Materials and Methods: This is an applied study and uses descriptive – survey method. The statistical population is the digital libraries around the world which were actively providing library services between October and December 2011 and were selected by using the key word “Digital Library” in Google search engine. The data-gathering tool was direct access to the websites of these digital libraries. The statistical study is descriptive and Excel software was used for data analysis and plotting of the charts. Results: The findings showed that among the 33 digital libraries investigated worldwide, most of them provided Browse (87.87%), Search (84.84%), and Electronic information retrieval (57.57%) services. The “Help” in public services (48/48%) and “Interlibrary Loan” in traditional services (27/27%) had the highest frequency. The Iranian National Medical library provides more digital services compared to other libraries but has less classic and public services and has less than half of possible public services. Other than Iranian National Medical library, among the 33 libraries investigated

  17. Comparison of Iranian National Medical Library with digital libraries of selected countries.

    PubMed

    Zare-Farashbandi, Firoozeh; Najafi, Nayere Sadat Soleimanzade; Atashpour, Bahare

    2014-01-01

    The important role of information and communication technologies and their influence on methods of storing, retrieving information in digital libraries, has not only changed the meanings behind classic library activates but has also created great changes in their services. However, it seems that not all digital libraries provide their users with similar services and only some of them are successful in fulfilling their role in digital environment. The Iranian National Medical library is among those that appear to come short compared to other digital libraries around the world. By knowing the different services provided by digital libraries worldwide, one can evaluate the services provided by Iranian National Medical library. The goal of this study is a comparison between Iranian National Medical library and digital libraries of selected countries. This is an applied study and uses descriptive - survey method. The statistical population is the digital libraries around the world which were actively providing library services between October and December 2011 and were selected by using the key word "Digital Library" in Google search engine. The data-gathering tool was direct access to the websites of these digital libraries. The statistical study is descriptive and Excel software was used for data analysis and plotting of the charts. The findings showed that among the 33 digital libraries investigated worldwide, most of them provided Browse (87.87%), Search (84.84%), and Electronic information retrieval (57.57%) services. The "Help" in public services (48/48%) and "Interlibrary Loan" in traditional services (27/27%) had the highest frequency. The Iranian National Medical library provides more digital services compared to other libraries but has less classic and public services and has less than half of possible public services. Other than Iranian National Medical library, among the 33 libraries investigated, the leaders in providing different services are Library of

  18. Adding seismic broadband analysis to characterize Andean backarc seismicity in Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvarado, P.; Giuliano, A.; Beck, S.; Zandt, G.

    2007-05-01

    Characterization of the highly seismically active Andean backarc is crucial for assessment of earthquake hazards in western Argentina. Moderate-to-large crustal earthquakes have caused several deaths, damage and drastic economic consequences in Argentinean history. We have studied the Andean backarc crust between 30°S and 36°S using seismic broadband data available from a previous ("the CHARGE") IRIS-PASSCAL experiment. We collected more than 12 terabytes of continuous seismic data from 22 broadband instruments deployed across Chile and Argentina during 1.5 years. Using free software we modeled full regional broadband waveforms and obtained seismic moment tensor inversions of crustal earthquakes testing for the best focal depth for each event. We also mapped differences in the Andean backarc crustal structure and found a clear correlation with different types of crustal seismicity (i.e. focal depths, focal mechanisms, magnitudes and frequencies of occurrence) and previously mapped terrane boundaries. We now plan to use the same methodology to study other regions in Argentina using near-real time broadband data available from the national seismic (INPRES) network and global seismic networks operating in the region. We will re-design the national seismic network to optimize short-period and broadband seismic station coverage for different network purposes. This work is an international effort that involves researchers and students from universities and national government agencies with the goal of providing more information about earthquake hazards in western Argentina.

  19. P-Cable: New High-Resolution 3D Seismic Acquisition Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planke, Sverre; Berndt, Christian; Mienert, Jürgen; Bünz, Stefan; Eriksen, Frode N.; Eriksen, Ola K.

    2010-05-01

    We have developed a new cost-efficient technology for acquisition of high-resolution 3D seismic data: the P-Cable system. This technology is very well suited for deep water exploration, site surveys, and studies of shallow gas and fluid migration associated with gas hydrates or leaking reservoirs. It delivers unparalleled 3D seismic images of subsurface sediment architectures. The P-Cable system consists of a seismic cable towed perpendicular to a vessel's steaming direction. This configuration allows us to image an up to 150 m wide swath of the sub-surface for each sail line. Conventional 3D seismic technology relies on several very long streamers (up to 10 km long streamers are common), large sources, and costly operations. In contrast, the P-Cable system is light-weight and fast to deploy from small vessels. Only a small source is required as the system is made for relatively shallow imaging, typically above the first water-bottom multiple. The P-Cable system is particularly useful for acquisition of small 3D cubes, 10-50 km2, in focus areas, rather than extensive mapping of large regions. The rapid deployment and recovery of the system makes it possible to acquire several small cubes (10 to 30 km2) with high-resolution (50-250 Hz) seismic data in during one cruise. The first development of the P-Cable system was a cooperative project achieved by Volcanic Basin Petroleum Research (VBPR), University of Tromsø, National Oceanography Centre, Southampton, and industry partners. Field trials using a 12-streamer system were conducted on sites with active fluid-leakage systems on the Norwegian-Barents-Svalbard margin, the Gulf of Cadiz, and the Mediterranean. The second phase of the development introduced digital streamers. The new P-Cable2 system also includes integrated tow and cross cables for power and data transmission and improved doors to spread the larger cross cable. This digital system has been successfully used during six cruises by the University of Troms

  20. Location Performance and Detection Threshold of the Spanish National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Alessandro, Antonino; Badal, José; D'Anna, Giuseppe; Papanastassiou, Dimitris; Baskoutas, Ioannis; Özel, Nurcan M.

    2013-11-01

    Spain is a low-to-moderate seismicity area with relatively low seismic hazard. However, several strong shallow earthquakes have shaken the country causing casualties and extensive damage. Regional seismicity is monitored and surveyed by means of the Spanish National Seismic Network, maintenance and control of which are entrusted to the Instituto Geográfico Nacional. This array currently comprises 120 seismic stations distributed throughout Spanish territory (mainland and islands). Basically, we are interested in checking the noise conditions, reliability, and seismic detection capability of the Spanish network by analyzing the background noise level affecting the array stations, errors in hypocentral location, and detection threshold, which provides knowledge about network performance. It also enables testing of the suitability of the velocity model used in the routine process of earthquake location. To perform this study we use a method that relies on P and S wave travel times, which are computed by simulation of seismic rays from virtual seismic sources placed at the nodes of a regular grid covering the study area. Given the characteristics of the seismicity of Spain, we drew maps for M L magnitudes 2.0, 2.5, and 3.0, at a focal depth of 10 km and a confidence level 95 %. The results relate to the number of stations involved in the hypocentral location process, how these stations are distributed spatially, and the uncertainties of focal data (errors in origin time, longitude, latitude, and depth). To assess the extent to which principal seismogenic areas are well monitored by the network, we estimated the average error in the location of a seismic source from the semiaxes of the ellipsoid of confidence by calculating the radius of the equivalent sphere. Finally, the detection threshold was determined as the magnitude of the smallest seismic event detected at least by four stations. The northwest of the peninsula, the Pyrenees, especially the westernmost segment

  1. Global Seismicity: Three New Maps Compiled with Geographic Information Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul D., Jr.; Montgomery, Brian C.

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents three new maps of global seismicity compiled from NOAA digital data, covering the interval 1963-1998, with three different magnitude ranges (mb): greater than 3.5, less than 3.5, and all detectable magnitudes. A commercially available geographic information system (GIS) was used as the database manager. Epicenter locations were acquired from a CD-ROM supplied by the National Geophysical Data Center. A methodology is presented that can be followed by general users. The implications of the maps are discussed, including the limitations of conventional plate models, and the different tectonic behavior of continental vs. oceanic lithosphere. Several little-known areas of intraplate or passive margin seismicity are also discussed, possibly expressing horizontal compression generated by ridge push.

  2. Seismic Catalogue and Seismic Network in Haiti

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belizaire, D.; Benito, B.; Carreño, E.; Meneses, C.; Huerfano, V.; Polanco, E.; McCormack, D.

    2013-05-01

    The destructive earthquake occurred on January 10, 2010 in Haiti, highlighted the lack of preparedness of the country to address seismic phenomena. At the moment of the earthquake, there was no seismic network operating in the country, and only a partial control of the past seismicity was possible, due to the absence of a national catalogue. After the 2010 earthquake, some advances began towards the installation of a national network and the elaboration of a seismic catalogue providing the necessary input for seismic Hazard Studies. This paper presents the state of the works carried out covering both aspects. First, a seismic catalogue has been built, compiling data of historical and instrumental events occurred in the Hispaniola Island and surroundings, in the frame of the SISMO-HAITI project, supported by the Technical University of Madrid (UPM) and Developed in cooperation with the Observatoire National de l'Environnement et de la Vulnérabilité of Haiti (ONEV). Data from different agencies all over the world were gathered, being relevant the role of the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico seismological services which provides local data of their national networks. Almost 30000 events recorded in the area from 1551 till 2011 were compiled in a first catalogue, among them 7700 events with Mw ranges between 4.0 and 8.3. Since different magnitude scale were given by the different agencies (Ms, mb, MD, ML), this first catalogue was affected by important heterogeneity in the size parameter. Then it was homogenized to moment magnitude Mw using the empirical equations developed by Bonzoni et al (2011) for the eastern Caribbean. At present, this is the most exhaustive catalogue of the country, although it is difficult to assess its degree of completeness. Regarding the seismic network, 3 stations were installed just after the 2010 earthquake by the Canadian Government. The data were sent by telemetry thought the Canadian System CARINA. In 2012, the Spanish IGN together

  3. Preliminary Design Study for a National Digital Seismograph Network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon; Hutt, Charles R.

    1981-01-01

    Introduction Recently, the National Research Council published a report by the Panel on National, Regional, and Local Seismograph Networks of the Committee on Seismology in which the principal recommendation was for the establishment of a national digital seismograph network (NDSN). The Panel Report (Bolt, 1980) addresses both the need and the scientific requirements for the new national network. The purpose of this study has been to translate the scientific requirements into an instrumentation concept for the NSDS. There are literally hundreds, perhaps thousands, of seismographs in operation within the United States. Each serves an important purpose, but most have limited objectives in time, in region, or in the types of data that are being recorded. The concept of a national network, funded and operated by the Federal Government, is based on broader objectives that include continuity of time, uniform coverage, standardization of data format and instruments, and widespread use of the data for a variety of research purposes. A national digital seismograph network will be an important data resource for many years to come; hence, its design is likely to be of interest to most seismologists. Seismologists have traditionally been involved in the development and field operation of seismic systems and thus have been familiar with both the potential value and the limitations of the data. However, in recent years of increasing technological sophistication, the development of data sstems has fallen more to system engineers, and this trend is likely to continue. One danger in this is that the engineers may misinterpret scientific objectives or subordinate them to purely technological considerations. Another risk is that the data users may misuse or misinterpret the data because they are not aware of the limitations of the data system. Perhaps the most important purpose of a design study such as this is to stimulate a dialogue between system engineers and potential data users

  4. Mikhnevo: from seismic station no. 1 to a modern geophysical observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adushkin, V. V.; Ovchinnikov, V. M.; Sanina, I. A.; Riznichenko, O. Yu.

    2016-01-01

    The Mikhnevo seismic station was founded in accordance with directive no. 1134 RS of the Council of Ministers of the Soviet Union of February 6, 1954. The station, installed south of Moscow, began its operations on monitoring nuclear tests in the United States and England in 1954. For dozens of years this station was the leading experimental base for elaborating new technical solutions and methods for monitoring nuclear explosions, equipped with modern seismological instruments. At present, the focus of activities has been moved from military applications to fundamental geophysical research. The station preserves its leading position in seismological observations due to the development of national high-performance digital instruments and creation of the small-aperture seismic array, the only one in the central part of European Russia, which is capable of recording weak seismic events with M L ≥ 1.5 within a distance of 100 km.

  5. What Makes the Digital "Special"? The Research Program in Digital Collections at the National Library of Wales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cusworth, Andrew; Hughes, Lorna M.; James, Rhian; Roberts, Owain; Roderick, Gareth Lloyd

    2015-01-01

    This article introduces some of the digital projects currently in development at the National Library of Wales as part of its Research Program in Digital Collections. These projects include the digital representation of the Library's Kyffin Willams art collection, musical collections, and probate collection, and of materials collected by the…

  6. Earthquake information products and tools from the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wald, Lisa

    2006-01-01

    This Fact Sheet provides a brief description of postearthquake tools and products provided by the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) through the U.S. Geological Survey Earthquake Hazards Program. The focus is on products specifically aimed at providing situational awareness in the period immediately following significant earthquake events.

  7. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Payne, Suzette; Coppersmith, Ryan; Coppersmith, Kevin

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Naval Reactors Facility (NRF), and the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) (Figure 1-1). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures appropriate for a Study Level 1 provided in the guidance advanced by the Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) in U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) NUREG/CR-6372 and NUREG-2117 (NRC, 1997; 2012a). The SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs for MFC and ATR were conducted as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project (INL Project number 31287) to develop and apply a new-riskmore » informed methodology, respectively. The SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels. The SRA project is developing a new risk-informed methodology that will provide a systematic approach for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The new methodology proposes criteria to be employed at specific analysis, decision, or comparison points in its evaluation process. The first four of seven criteria address changes in inputs and results of the PSHA and are given in U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Standard, DOE-STD-1020-2012 (DOE, 2012a) and American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society (ANSI/ANS) 2.29 (ANS, 2008a). The last three criteria address evaluation of quantitative hazard and risk-focused information of an existing nuclear facility. The seven criteria and decision points are applied to Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3, 4, and 5, which are defined in American Society of Civil Engineers/Structural Engineers Institute (ASCE/SEI) 43-05 (ASCE, 2005). The application of the criteria and decision points could lead to an update or could determine that such update is not necessary.« less

  8. Reassessment of the Seismicity and seismic hazards of Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Suleman, A.; Elmeladi, A.

    2009-04-01

    The tectonic evolution of Libya, located at the northern extreme of the African continent, has yielded a complex crustal structure that is composed of a series of basins and uplifts. The present day deformation of Libya is the result of the Eurasia-Africa continental collision. At the end of the year 2005, The Libyan National Seismological Network was established to monitor local, regional and teleseismic activities, as well as to provide high quality data for research projects both locally and on the regional and global scale. This study aims to discuss the seismicity of Libya by using the new data from the Libyan national seismological network and to focus on the seismic hazards. At first glance the seismic activity map shows dominant trends of seismicity with most of the seismic activity concentrated along the northern coastal areas. Four major seismic trends were quite noticeable. A first trend is a NW-SE direction coinciding with the eastern boarder of the Hun Graben. A second trend is also a NW-SE direction in the offshore area and might be a continuation of this trend. The other two trends were located in the western Gulf of Sirt and Cyrenaica platform. The rest of seismicity is diffuse either offshore or in land, with no good correlation with well-mapped faults. Detailed investigations of the Libyan seismicity indicates that the Libya has experienced earthquakes of varying magnitudes and that there is definitely a certain amount of seismic risk involved in engineering projects, particularly in the northern regions. Detailed investigation of the distribution of the Libyan earthquakes in space and time along with all other geological considerations suggested the classification of the country into four seismic zones with the Hun graben zone being the most seismically active zone.

  9. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected offshore east-central Florida during USGS cruise 00FGS01, July 14-22, 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Subino, Janice A.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Wiese, Dana S.; Calderon, Karynna; Phelps, Daniel C.

    2009-01-01

    In July of 2000, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS), conducted a geophysical survey of the Atlantic Ocean offshore Florida's east coast from Brevard County to northern Martin County. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) information, digital and handwritten Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, and Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. A filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital image of each seismic profile is also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of all acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU) (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). Example SU processing scripts and USGS Software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 00FGS01 tells us the data were collected in 2000 for cooperative work with the Florida Geological Survey (FGS) and the data were collected during the first field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged, emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water, sediment column, or rock beneath. The acoustic energy is reflected

  10. Digital Technology at the National Science Museum of Japan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lydens, Lois; Saito, Yasuji; Inoue, Tohru

    2007-01-01

    The National Science Museum (NSM) in Japan has recently completed a project using different types of visitor-oriented digital technologies. With sponsorship from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS), the NSM team carried out a four-year study to examine how digital technologies can be used to enhance as well as educationally…

  11. Digitized Database of Old Seismograms Recorder in Romania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulescu, Daniel; Rogozea, Maria; Popa, Mihaela; Radulian, Mircea

    2016-08-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe a managing system for a unique Romanian database of historical seismograms and complementary documentation (metadata) and its dissemination and analysis procedure. For this study, 5188 historical seismograms recorded between 1903 and 1957 by the Romanian seismological observatories (Bucharest-Filaret, Focşani, Bacău, Vrincioaia, Câmpulung-Muscel, Iaşi) were used. In order to reconsider the historical instrumental data, the analog seismograms are converted to digital images and digital waveforms (digitization/ vectorialisation). First, we applied a careful scanning procedure of the seismograms and related material (seismic bulletins, station books, etc.). In a next step, the high resolution scanned seismograms will be processed to obtain the digital/numeric waveforms. We used a Colortrac Smartlf Cx40 scanner which provides images in TIFF or JPG format. For digitization the algorithm Teseo2 developed by the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology in Rome (Italy), within the framework of the SISMOS Project, will be used.

  12. Identifying & Inventorying Legacy Materials for Digitization at the National Transportation Library

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    As an all-digital repository of transportation knowledge, the National Transportation Library (NTL) has undertaken several digitization projects over the years to preserve legacy print materials and make them accessible to stakeholders, researchers, ...

  13. Fifth National Seismic Conference on Bridges & Highways : innovations in earthquake engineering for highway structures

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2007-02-01

    This document is the conference program of the 5th National Seismic Conference on Bridges and Highways. The conference was held in San Francisco on September 18-20, 2006 and attracted over 300 engineers, academician, and students from around the worl...

  14. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS field activities 95LCA03 and 96LCA02 in the Peace River of West-Central Florida, 1995 and 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Tihansky, Ann B.; Lewelling, Bill R.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Harrison, Arnell S.

    2006-01-01

    In October and November of 1995 and February of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Southwest Florida Water Management District, conducted geophysical surveys of the Peace River in west-central Florida from east of Bartow to west of Arcadia. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, GIS files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, observers' logbooks, and formal FGDC metadata. Filtered and gained digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided.

  15. Large-band seismic characterization of the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Canonico, R.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we present the scientific data recorded by tunable mechanical monolithic horizontal seismometers located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN, within thermally insulating enclosures onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock. The main goals of this long-term large-band measurements are for the seismic characterization of the site in the frequency band 10-6÷10Hz and the acquisition of all the relevant information for the optimization of the sensors.

  16. United States National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, M.D.; ,

    2008-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey?s maps of earthquake shaking hazards provide information essential to creating and updating the seismic design provisions of building codes and insurance rates used in the United States. Periodic revisions of these maps incorporate the results of new research. Buildings, bridges, highways, and utilities built to meet modern seismic design provisions are better able to withstand earthquakes, not only saving lives but also enabling critical activities to continue with less disruption. These maps can also help people assess the hazard to their homes or places of work and can also inform insurance rates.

  17. Archive of digital boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS cruises 94GFP01, 95GFP01, 96GFP01, 97GFP01, and 98GFP02 in Lakes Pontchartrain, Borgne, and Maurepas, Louisiana, 1994-1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Williams, S. Jeffress; Flocks, James G.; Penland, Shea; Wiese, Dana S.

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the University of New Orleans, the Lake Pontchartrain Basin Foundation, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the Coalition to Restore Coastal Louisiana, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, the Environmental Protection Agency, and the University of Georgia, conducted five geophysical surveys of Lakes Pontchartrain, Borgne, and Maurepas in Louisiana from 1994 to 1998. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained digital GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansion of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y headers (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser, and scanned handwritten logbooks may be viewed with Adobe Reader. To access the information contained on these discs, open the file 'index.htm' located at the top level of the discs using a web browser. This report also contains hyperlinks to USGS collaborators and other agencies. These links are only accessible if access to the Internet is available while viewing these documents.

  18. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA01 in 10 Central Florida Lakes, March 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In March of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Avalon, Big, Colby, Helen, Johns, Prevatt, Searcy, Saunders, Three Island, and Trout, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU) (Cohen and Stockwell, 2005). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA01 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the first field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where yy is the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, e is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer), ## is a 2-digit number representing a specific track, and a is a letter representing the section of a line

  19. California Fault Parameters for the National Seismic Hazard Maps and Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wills, Chris J.; Weldon, Ray J.; Bryant, W.A.

    2008-01-01

    This report describes development of fault parameters for the 2007 update of the National Seismic Hazard Maps and the Working Group on California Earthquake Probabilities (WGCEP, 2007). These reference parameters are contained within a database intended to be a source of values for use by scientists interested in producing either seismic hazard or deformation models to better understand the current seismic hazards in California. These parameters include descriptions of the geometry and rates of movements of faults throughout the state. These values are intended to provide a starting point for development of more sophisticated deformation models which include known rates of movement on faults as well as geodetic measurements of crustal movement and the rates of movements of the tectonic plates. The values will be used in developing the next generation of the time-independent National Seismic Hazard Maps, and the time-dependant seismic hazard calculations being developed for the WGCEP. Due to the multiple uses of this information, development of these parameters has been coordinated between USGS, CGS and SCEC. SCEC provided the database development and editing tools, in consultation with USGS, Golden. This database has been implemented in Oracle and supports electronic access (e.g., for on-the-fly access). A GUI-based application has also been developed to aid in populating the database. Both the continually updated 'living' version of this database, as well as any locked-down official releases (e.g., used in a published model for calculating earthquake probabilities or seismic shaking hazards) are part of the USGS Quaternary Fault and Fold Database http://earthquake.usgs.gov/regional/qfaults/ . CGS has been primarily responsible for updating and editing of the fault parameters, with extensive input from USGS and SCEC scientists.

  20. SSHAC Level 1 Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for the Idaho National Laboratory

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Payne, Suzette Jackson; Coppersmith, Ryan; Coppersmith, Kevin

    A Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis (PSHA) was completed for the Materials and Fuels Complex (MFC), Advanced Test Reactor (ATR), and Naval Reactors Facility (NRF) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The PSHA followed the approaches and procedures for Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 study and included a Participatory Peer Review Panel (PPRP) to provide the confident technical basis and mean-centered estimates of the ground motions. A new risk-informed methodology for evaluating the need for an update of an existing PSHA was developed as part of the Seismic Risk Assessment (SRA) project. To develop and implement the newmore » methodology, the SRA project elected to perform two SSHAC Level 1 PSHAs. The first was for the Fuel Manufacturing Facility (FMF), which is classified as a Seismic Design Category (SDC) 3 nuclear facility. The second was for the ATR Complex, which has facilities classified as SDC-4. The new methodology requires defensible estimates of ground motion levels (mean and full distribution of uncertainty) for its criteria and evaluation process. The INL SSHAC Level 1 PSHA demonstrates the use of the PPRP, evaluation and integration through utilization of a small team with multiple roles and responsibilities (four team members and one specialty contractor), and the feasibility of a short duration schedule (10 months). Additionally, a SSHAC Level 1 PSHA was conducted for NRF to provide guidance on the potential use of a design margin above rock hazard levels for the Spent Fuel Handling Recapitalization Project (SFHP) process facility.« less

  1. A Digital Library for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, Michael L.

    1999-01-01

    We describe the digital library (DL) for the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA), the NACA Technical Report Server (NACATRS). The predecessor organization for the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), NACA existed from 1915 until 1958. The primary manifestation of NACA's research was the NACA report series. We describe the process of converting this collection of reports to digital format and making it available on the World Wide Web (WWW) and is a node in the NASA Technical Report Server (NTRS). We describe the current state of the project, the resulting DL technology developed from the project, and the future plans for NACATRS.

  2. Hydra—The National Earthquake Information Center’s 24/7 seismic monitoring, analysis, catalog production, quality analysis, and special studies tool suite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patton, John M.; Guy, Michelle R.; Benz, Harley M.; Buland, Raymond P.; Erickson, Brian K.; Kragness, David S.

    2016-08-18

    This report provides an overview of the capabilities and design of Hydra, the global seismic monitoring and analysis system used for earthquake response and catalog production at the U.S. Geological Survey National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC). Hydra supports the NEIC’s worldwide earthquake monitoring mission in areas such as seismic event detection, seismic data insertion and storage, seismic data processing and analysis, and seismic data output.The Hydra system automatically identifies seismic phase arrival times and detects the occurrence of earthquakes in near-real time. The system integrates and inserts parametric and waveform seismic data into discrete events in a database for analysis. Hydra computes seismic event parameters, including locations, multiple magnitudes, moment tensors, and depth estimates. Hydra supports the NEIC’s 24/7 analyst staff with a suite of seismic analysis graphical user interfaces.In addition to the NEIC’s monitoring needs, the system supports the processing of aftershock and temporary deployment data, and supports the NEIC’s quality assurance procedures. The Hydra system continues to be developed to expand its seismic analysis and monitoring capabilities.

  3. Modernization of the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory Seismic Processing Infrastructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antolik, L.; Shiro, B.; Friberg, P. A.

    2016-12-01

    The USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO) operates a Tier 1 Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) seismic network to monitor, characterize, and report on volcanic and earthquake activity in the State of Hawaii. Upgrades at the observatory since 2009 have improved the digital telemetry network, computing resources, and seismic data processing with the adoption of the ANSS Quake Management System (AQMS) system. HVO aims to build on these efforts by further modernizing its seismic processing infrastructure and strengthen its ability to meet ANSS performance standards. Most notably, this will also allow HVO to support redundant systems, both onsite and offsite, in order to provide better continuity of operation during intermittent power and network outages. We are in the process of implementing a number of upgrades and improvements on HVO's seismic processing infrastructure, including: 1) Virtualization of AQMS physical servers; 2) Migration of server operating systems from Solaris to Linux; 3) Consolidation of AQMS real-time and post-processing services to a single server; 4) Upgrading database from Oracle 10 to Oracle 12; and 5) Upgrading to the latest Earthworm and AQMS software. These improvements will make server administration more efficient, minimize hardware resources required by AQMS, simplify the Oracle replication setup, and provide better integration with HVO's existing state of health monitoring tools and backup system. Ultimately, it will provide HVO with the latest and most secure software available while making the software easier to deploy and support.

  4. Korea Integrated Seismic System tool(KISStool) for seismic monitoring and data sharing at the local data center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, J.; Chi, H. C.; Lim, I.; Jeong, B.

    2011-12-01

    The Korea Integrated Seismic System(KISS) is a back-bone seismic network which distributes seismic data to different organizations in near-real time at Korea. The association of earthquake monitoring institutes has shared their seismic data through the KISS from 2003. Local data centers operating remote several stations need to send their free field seismic data to NEMA(National Emergency Management Agency) by the law of countermeasure against earthquake hazard in Korea. It is very important the efficient tool for local data centers which want to rapidly detect local seismic intensity and to transfer seismic event information toward national wide data center including PGA, PGV, dominant frequency of P-wave, raw data, and etc. We developed the KISStool(Korea Integrated Seismic System tool) for easy and convenient operation seismic network in local data center. The KISStool has the function of monitoring real time waveforms by clicking station icon on the Google map and real time variation of PGA, PGV, and other data by opening the bar type monitoring section. If they use the KISStool, any local data center can transfer event information to NEMA(National Emergency Management Agency), KMA(Korea Meteorological Agency) or other institutes through the KISS using UDP or TCP/IP protocols. The KISStool is one of the most efficient methods to monitor and transfer earthquake event at local data center in Korea. KIGAM will support this KISStool not only to the member of the monitoring association but also local governments.

  5. Seismicity, arrival time delays of the seismic phases and slowness characteristics study in Abu Dabbab area, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sami, Mahmoud; Hassoup, Awad; Hosny, Ahmed; Mohamed, Gadelkarem A.

    2013-12-01

    The temporal variations of seismicity from the Abu Dabbab area, 25 km west of the Red Sea coast, are collected from the Egyptian national seismic network (ENSN), which has magnified the detection capability in that area to ML < 1 earthquakes. These data show a sequence of the micro earthquake swarm during 2003-2011. This area has experienced larger shocks up to M = 6 during the 20th century and its seismicity is concentrated in a narrow spatial volume. We analyze the digital waveform data of about 1000 seismograms, recorded by portable network of 10 vertical component seismographs that are employed in a temporary survey experiment in the Abu Dabbab area in 2004, and the results indicate: firstly, there are similar waveform seismograms, which are classified into three groups. In each group a master event is identified. Then, the arrival time delays of the P and S phases (Δtp and Δts, respectively) are measured between the master event and its slave events. Δtp and Δts range between -0.01 and 0.02 s, respectively. These values are used to relocate the studied events. Secondly, the slowness vector (Δs) in 3-dimensional pattern, which is estimated using the genetic algorithms, is found Δsx = 0.0153, Δsy = 0.00093 and Δsz = 0.2086 s/km in the three spatial coordinates (X, Y and Z), respectively. These analyses demonstrate the inhomogeneities within the upper crust of the study area. Also, Δs shows little dependence of lateral distances and reasonably high slowness along the depth extent, which is consistent with the seismic velocity structure variations.

  6. Seismic safety in conducting large-scale blasts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashukov, I. V.; Chaplygin, V. V.; Domanov, V. P.; Semin, A. A.; Klimkin, M. A.

    2017-09-01

    In mining enterprises to prepare hard rocks for excavation a drilling and blasting method is used. With the approach of mining operations to settlements the negative effect of large-scale blasts increases. To assess the level of seismic impact of large-scale blasts the scientific staff of Siberian State Industrial University carried out expertise for coal mines and iron ore enterprises. Determination of the magnitude of surface seismic vibrations caused by mass explosions was performed using seismic receivers, an analog-digital converter with recording on a laptop. The registration results of surface seismic vibrations during production of more than 280 large-scale blasts at 17 mining enterprises in 22 settlements are presented. The maximum velocity values of the Earth’s surface vibrations are determined. The safety evaluation of seismic effect was carried out according to the permissible value of vibration velocity. For cases with exceedance of permissible values recommendations were developed to reduce the level of seismic impact.

  7. A Technique to Determine the Self-Noise of Seismic Sensors for Performance Screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rademacher, H.; Hart, D.; Guralp, C.

    2012-04-01

    Seismic noise affects the performance of a seismic sensor and is thereby a limiting factor for the detection threshold of monitoring networks. Among the various sources of noise, the intrinsic self-noise of a seismic sensor is most diffcult to determine, because it is mostly masked by natural and anthropogenic ground noise and is also affected by the noise characteristic of the digitizer. Here we present a new technique to determine the self-noise of a seismic system (digitizer + sensors). It is based on a method introduced by Sleeman et al. (2005) to test the noise performance of digitizers. We infer the self-noise of a triplet of identical sensors by comparing coherent waveforms over a wide spectral band across the set-up. We will show first results from a proof-of-concept study done in a vault near Albuquerque, New Mexico. We will show, how various methods of shielding the sensors affect the results of this technique. This method can also be used as a means of quality control during sensor production, because poorly performing sensors can easily be identified.

  8. Emergency seismic and CGPS networks: a first employment for the L'Aquila Mw 6.3 earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abruzzese, L.; Avallone, A.; Cecere, G.; Cattaneo, M.; Cardinale, V.; Castagnozzi, A.; Cogliano, R.; Criscuoli, F.; D'Agostino, N.; D'Ambrosio, C.; de Luca, G.; D'Anastasio, E.; Falco, L.; Flammia, V.; Migliari, F.; Minichiello, F.; Memmolo, A.; Monachesi, G.; Moschillo, R.; Pignone, M.; Pucillo, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Zarrilli, L.; Delladio, A.; Govoni, A.; Franceschi, D.; de Martin, M.; Moretti, M.

    2009-12-01

    During the last 2 years, the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia (INGV) developed an important real-time temporary seismic network infrastructure in order to densify the Italian National Seismic Network in epicentral areas thus enhancing the localization of the micro-seismicity after main earthquake events. This real-time temporary seismic network is constituted by various mobile and autonomous seismic stations that in group of three are telemetered to a Very Small Aperture Terminal (VSAT). This system uses a dedicated bandwidth on UHF, Wi-Fi and satellite frequency that allows the data flow in real-time at INGV centre in Rome (and Grottaminarda as backup center). The deployment of the seismic network is managed in a geographical information systems (GIS) by particular scenarios that visualizes, for the epicentral area, information about instrumental seismicity, seismic risk, macroseismic felts and territorial data. Starting from digital terrain model, the surface spatial analysis (Viewshed, Observer Point) allows the geographic arrangement of the stations and relative scenarios. The April, 6th, 2009 Mw 6.3 L'Aquila destructive earthquake represented the first real-case to test the entire emergency seismic network infrastructure. Less than 6 hours after the earthquake occurrence, a first accelerometer station was already sending data at INGV seismic monitoring headquarters. A total number of 9 seismic stations have been installed within 3 days after the earthquake. Furthermore, 5 permanent GPS stations have been installed in the epicentral area within 1 to 9 days after the main shock to detect the post-seismic deformation induced by the earthquake. We will show and describe the details of the Emergency Seismic Network infrastructure, and the first results from the collected data.

  9. Historical Seismicity of Central Panama

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camacho, E.

    2013-05-01

    Central Panama lies in the Panama microplate, neighboring seismically active regions of Costa Rica and Colombia. This region, crossed by the Panama Canal, concentrates most of the population and economic activity of the Republic of Panama. Instrumental observation of earthquakes in Panama began on 1882 by the Compagnie Universelle du Canal Interocéanique de Panama and continued from 1904 to 1977 by the Panama Canal Company. From October 1997 to March 1998 the USGS deployed a temporary digital seismic network. Since 2003 this region is monitored by a digital seismic network operated by the Panama Canal Authority and I complemented by the broad band stations of the University of Panama seismic network. The seismicity in this region is very diffuse and the few events which are recorded have magnitudes less than 3.0. Historical archives and antique newspapers from Spain, Colombia, Panama and the United Sates have been searched looking for historical earthquake information which could provide a better estimate of the seismicity in this region. We find that Panama City has been shaken by two destructive earthquakes in historical times. One by a local fault (i.e. Pedro Miguel fault) on May 2, 1621 (I=Vlll MM), and a subduction event from the North Panama Deformed Belt (NPDB) on September 7, 1882 (I=Vll MM). To test these findings two earthquakes scenarios were generated, using SELENA, for Panama City Old Quarter. Panama City was rebuilt on January 21, 1673, on a rocky point facing the Pacific Ocean after the sack by pirate Morgan on January 28, 1671. The pattern of damage to calicanto (unreinforced colonial masonry) and wood structures for a crustal local event are higher than those for an event from the NPDB and seem to confirm that the city has not been shaken by a major local event since May 2, 1621 and a subduction event since September 7, 1882

  10. Alaska Volcano Observatory Seismic Network Data Availability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, J. P.; Haney, M. M.; McNutt, S. R.; Power, J. A.; Prejean, S. G.; Searcy, C. K.; Stihler, S. D.; West, M. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Alaska Volcano Observatory (AVO) established in 1988 as a cooperative program of the U.S. Geological Survey, the Geophysical Institute at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, and the Alaska Division of Geological and Geophysical Surveys, monitors active volcanoes in Alaska. Thirty-three volcanoes are currently monitored by a seismograph network consisting of 193 stations, of which 40 are three-component stations. The current state of AVO’s seismic network, and data processing and availability are summarized in the annual AVO seismological bulletin, Catalog of Earthquake Hypocenters at Alaska Volcanoes, published as a USGS Data Series (most recent at http://pubs.usgs.gov/ds/467). Despite a rich seismic data set for 12 VEI 2 or greater eruptions, and over 80,000 located earthquakes in the last 21 years, the volcanic seismicity in the Aleutian Arc remains understudied. Initially, AVO seismic data were only provided via a data supplement as part of the annual bulletin, or upon request. Over the last few years, AVO has made seismic data more available with the objective of increasing volcano seismic research on the Aleutian Arc. The complete AVO earthquake catalog data are now available through the annual AVO bulletin and have been submitted monthly to the on-line Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) composite catalog since 2008. Segmented waveform data for all catalog earthquakes are available upon request and efforts are underway to make this archive web accessible as well. Continuous data were first archived using a tape backup, but the availability of low cost digital storage media made a waveform backup of continuous data a reality. Currently the continuous AVO waveform data can be found in several forms. Since late 2002, AVO has burned all continuous waveform data to DVDs, as well as storing these data in Antelope databases at the Geophysical Institute. Beginning in 2005, data have been available through a Winston Wave Server housed at the USGS in

  11. Evaluation of potential surface rupture and review of current seismic hazards program at the Los Alamos National Laboratory. Final report

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Not Available

    1991-12-09

    This report summarizes the authors review and evaluation of the existing seismic hazards program at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The report recommends that the original program be augmented with a probabilistic analysis of seismic hazards involving assignment of weighted probabilities of occurrence to all potential sources. This approach yields a more realistic evaluation of the likelihood of large earthquake occurrence particularly in regions where seismic sources may have recurrent intervals of several thousand years or more. The report reviews the locations and geomorphic expressions of identified fault lines along with the known displacements of these faults and last knowmore » occurrence of seismic activity. Faults are mapped and categorized into by their potential for actual movement. Based on geologic site characterization, recommendations are made for increased seismic monitoring; age-dating studies of faults and geomorphic features; increased use of remote sensing and aerial photography for surface mapping of faults; the development of a landslide susceptibility map; and to develop seismic design standards for all existing and proposed facilities at LANL.« less

  12. Back to the Future: Long-Term Seismic Archives Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2007-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring seismic activity. These archives typically consist of waveforms of seismic events and associated parametric data such as phase arrival time picks and the location of hypocenters. Catalogs of earthquake locations are fundamental data in seismology, and even in the Earth sciences in general. Yet, these locations have notoriously low spatial resolution because of errors in both the picks and the models commonly used to locate events one at a time. This limits their potential to address fundamental questions concerning the physics of earthquakes, the structure and composition of the Earth's interior, and the seismic hazards associated with active faults. We report on the comprehensive use of modern waveform cross-correlation based methodologies for high- resolution earthquake location - as applied to regional and global long-term seismic databases. By simultaneous re-analysis of two decades of the digital seismic archive of Northern California, reducing pick errors via cross-correlation and model errors via double-differencing, we achieve up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. The relocated events image networks of discrete faults at seismogenic depths across various tectonic settings that until now have been hidden in location uncertainties. Similar location improvements are obtained for earthquakes recorded at global networks by re- processing 40 years of parametric data from the ISC and corresponding waveforms archived at IRIS. Since our methods are scaleable and run on inexpensive Beowulf clusters, periodic re-analysis of entire archives may thus become a routine procedure to continuously improve resolution in existing catalogs. We demonstrate the role of seismic archives

  13. A New Database of Digitized Regional Seismic Waveforms from Nuclear Explosions in Eurasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolova, I. N.; Richards, P. G.; Kim, W. Y.; Mikhailova, N. N.

    2014-12-01

    Seismology is an observational science. Hence, the effort to understand details of seismic signals from underground nuclear explosions requires analysis of waveforms recorded from past nuclear explosions. Of principal interest, are regional signals from explosions too small to be reliably identified via teleseismic recording. But the great majority of stations operated today, even those in networks for nuclear explosion monitoring, have never recorded explosion signals at regional distances, because most stations were installed long after the period when most underground nuclear explosions were conducted; and the few nuclear explosions since the early 1990s were mostly recorded only at teleseismic distances. We have therefore gathered thousands of nuclear explosion regional seismograms from more than 200 analog stations operated in the former Soviet Union. Most of them lie in a region stretching approximately 6000 km East-West and 2000 km North-South and including much of Central Asia. We have digitized them and created a modern digital database, including significant metadata. Much of this work has been done in Kazakhstan. Most of the explosions were underground, but several were conducted in the atmosphere. This presentation will characterize the content and overall quality of the new database for signals from nuclear explosions in Eurasia, which were conducted across substantial ranges of yield and shot-point depth, and under a great variety of different geological conditions. This work complements a 20-year collaborative effort which made the original digital recordings of the Borovoye Geophysical Observatory, Kazakhstan, openly available in a modern format (see http://www.ldeo.columbia.edu/res/pi/Monitoring/Data/). For purposes of characterizing explosive sources, it would be of assistance to have seismogram archives from explosions conducted in all regions including the Pacific, North Africa, and the United States (including the Aleutians). Openly available

  14. The Caucasus Seismic Network (CNET): Seismic Structure of the Greater and Lesser Caucasus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandvol, E. A.; Mackey, K. G.; Nabelek, J.; Yetermishli, G.; Godoladze, T.; Babayan, H.; Malovichko, A.

    2017-12-01

    The Greater Caucasus are a portion of the Alpine-Himalayan mountain belt that has undergone rapid uplift in the past 5 million years, thus serving as a unique natural laboratory to study the early stages of orogenesis. Relatively lower resolution seismic velocity models of this region show contradictory lateral variability. Furthermore, recent waveform modeling of seismograms has clearly demonstrated the presence of deep earthquakes (with a maximum hypocentral depth of 175 km) below the Greater Caucasus. The region has been largely unexplored in terms of the detailed uppermost mantle and crustal seismic structure due in part to the disparate data sets that have not yet been merged as well as key portions being sparsely instrumented. We have established collaborative agreements across the region. Building on these agreements we recently deployed a major multi-national seismic array across the Greater Caucasus to address fundamental questions about the nature of continental deformation in this poorly understood region. Our seismic array has two components: (1) a grid of stations spanning the entire Caucasus and (2) two seismic transects consisting of stations spaced at distances of less than 10 km that cross the Greater Caucasus. In addition to the temporary stations, we are working to integrate data from the national networks to produce high resolution images of the seismic structure. Using data from over 106 new seismic stations in Azerbaijan, Armenia, Russia, and Georgia, we hope to gain a better understanding of the recent uplift ( 5 Ma) of the Greater Caucasus and the nature of seismogenic deformation in the region.

  15. Reevaluation of the Seismicity and seismic hazards of Northeastern Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben Suleman, abdunnur; Aousetta, Fawzi

    2014-05-01

    Libya, located at the northern margin of the African continent, underwent many episodes of orogenic activities. These episodes of orogenic activities affected and shaped the geological setting of the country. This study represents a detailed investigation that aims to focus on the seismicity and its implications on earthquake hazards of Northeastern Libya. At the end of year 2005 the Libyan National Seismological Network starts functioning with 15 stations. The Seismicity of the area under investigation was reevaluated using data recorded by the recently established network. The Al-Maraj earthquake occurred in May 22nd 2005was analyzed. This earthquake was located in a known seismically active area. This area was the sight of the well known 1963 earthquake that kills over 200 people. Earthquakes were plotted and resulting maps were interpreted and discussed. The level of seismic activity is higher in some areas, such as the city of Al-Maraj. The offshore areas north of Al-Maraj seem to have higher seismic activity. It is highly recommended that the recent earthquake activity is considered in the seismic hazard assessments for the northeastern part of Libya.

  16. Archive of Digital Boomer and CHIRP Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 08LCA03 in Lake Panasoffkee, Florida, May 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; McBride, W. Scott; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2009-01-01

    In May of 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted geophysical surveys in Lake Panasoffkee, located in central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer and Compressed High Intensity Radar Pulse (CHIRP)* seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles and geospatially corrected interactive profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. *Due to poor data acquisition conditions associated with the lake bottom sediments, only two CHIRP tracklines were collected during this field activity. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 08LCA03 tells us the data were collected in 2008 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the third field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The naming convention used for each seismic line is as follows: yye##a, where 'yy' are the last two digits of the year in which the data were collected, 'e' is a 1-letter abbreviation for the equipment type (for example, b for boomer and c

  17. Seismic Hazard and Risk Assessments for Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan, China, Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, F.; Wang, Z.; Liu, J.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic hazard and risk in the Beijing-Tianjin-Tangshan, China, area were estimated from 500-year intensity observations. First, we digitized the intensity observations (maps) using ArcGIS with a cell size of 0.1 ?? 0.1??. Second, we performed a statistical analysis on the digitized intensity data, determined an average b value (0.39), and derived the intensity-frequency relationship (hazard curve) for each cell. Finally, based on a Poisson model for earthquake occurrence, we calculated seismic risk in terms of a probability of I ??? 7, 8, or 9 in 50 years. We also calculated the corresponding 10 percent probability of exceedance of these intensities in 50 years. The advantages of assessing seismic hazard and risk from intensity records are that (1) fewer assumptions (i. e., earthquake source and ground motion attenuation) are made, and (2) site-effect is included. Our study shows that the area has high seismic hazard and risk. Our study also suggests that current design peak ground acceleration or intensity for the area may not be adequate. ?? 2010 Birkh??user / Springer Basel AG.

  18. Construction and development of IGP DMC of China National Seismological Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, X.; Zheng, J.; Lin, P.; Yao, Z.; Liang, J.

    2011-12-01

    In 2003, CEA (China Earthquake Administration) commenced the construction of China Digital Seismological Observation Network. By the end of 2007, a new-generation digital seismological observation system had been established, which consists of 1 National Seismic Network, 32 regional seismic networks, 2 small-aperture seismic arrays, 6 volcano monitoring networks and 19 mobile seismic networks, as well as CENC (China Earthquake Network Center) DMC (Data Management Centre) and IGP (Institute of Geophysics) DMC. Since then, the seismological observation system of China has completely entered a digital time. For operational, data backup and data security considerations, the DMC at the Institute of Geophysics (IGP), CEA was established at the end of 2007. IGP DMC now receives and archives waveform data from more than 1000 permanent seismic stations around China in real-time. After the great Wenchuan and Yushu earthquakes, the real-time waveform data from 56 and 8 portable seismic stations deployed in the aftershock area are added to IGP DMC. The technical system of IGP DMC is designed to conduct data management, processing and service through the network of CEA. We developed and integrated a hardware system with high-performance servers, large-capacity disc arrays, tape library and other facilities, as well as software packages for real-time waveform data receiving, storage, quality control, processing and service. Considering the demands from researchers for large quantities of seismic event waveform data, IGP DMC adopts an innovative "user order" method to extract event waveform data. Users can specify seismic stations, epicenter distance and record length. In a short period of 3 years, IGP DMC has supplied about 350 Terabytes waveform data to over 200 researches of more than 40 academic institutions. According to incomplete statistics, over 40 papers have been published in professional journals, in which 30 papers were indexed by SCI. Now, IGP DMC has become an

  19. Keepers of Our Digital Future: An Assessment of the National Digital Stewardship Residencies, 2013-2016

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mink, Meridith Beck

    2016-01-01

    In September 2015, the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS) awarded the Council on Library and Information Resources (CLIR) a grant to investigate the early impacts of the National Digital Stewardship Residency (NDSR) programs, in order to inform subsequent development of similar programs by others with a vested interest in building…

  20. Valuing national effects of digital health investments: an applied method.

    PubMed

    Hagens, Simon; Zelmer, Jennifer; Frazer, Cassandra; Gheorghiu, Bobby; Leaver, Chad

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an approach which has been applied to value national outcomes of investments by federal, provincial and territorial governments, clinicians and healthcare organizations in digital health. Hypotheses are used to develop a model, which is revised and populated based upon the available evidence. Quantitative national estimates and qualitative findings are produced and validated through structured peer review processes. This methodology has applied in four studies since 2008.

  1. A permanent seismic station beneath the Ocean Bottom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, David; Cessaro, Robert K.; Duennebier, Fred K.; Byrne, David A.

    1987-03-01

    The Hawaii Institute of Geophysics began development of the Ocean Subbottom Seisometer (OSS) system in 1978, and OSS systems were installed in four locations between 1979 and 1982. The OSS system is a permanent, deep ocean borehole seismic recording system composed of a borehole sensor package (tool), an electromechanical cable, recorder package, and recovery system. Installed near the bottom of a borehole (drilled by the D/V Glomar Challenger), the tool contains three orthogonal, 4.5-Hz geophones, two orthogonal tilt meters; and a temperature sensor. Signals from these sensors are multiplexed, digitized (with a floating point technique), and telemetered through approximately 10 km of electromechanical cable to a recorder package located near the ocean bottom. Electrical power for the tool is supplied from the recorder package. The digital seismic signals are demultiplexed, converted back to analog form, processed through an automatic gain control (AGC) circuit, and recorded along with a time code on magnetic tape cassettes in the recorder package. Data may be recorded continuously for up to two months in the self-contained recorder package. Data may also be recorded in real time (digital formal) during the installation and subsequent recorder package servicing. The recorder package is connected to a submerged recovery buoy by a length of bouyant polypropylene rope. The anchor on the recovery buoy is released by activating either of the acoustical command releases. The polypropylene rope may also be seized with a grappling hook to effect recovery. The recorder package may be repeatedly serviced as long as the tool remains functional A wide range of data has been recovered from the OSS system. Recovered analog records include signals from natural seismic sources such as earthquakes (teleseismic and local), man-made seismic sources such as refraction seismic shooting (explosives and air cannons), and nuclear tests. Lengthy continuous recording has permitted analysis

  2. Site characterization of the Romanian Seismic Network stations: a national initiative and its first preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grecu, Bogdan; Zahria, Bogdan; Manea, Elena; Neagoe, Cristian; Borleanu, Felix; Diaconescu, Mihai; Constantinescu, Eduard; Bala, Andrei

    2017-04-01

    The seismic activity in Romania is dominated by the intermediate-depth earthquakes occurring in Vrancea region, although weak to moderate crustal earthquakes are produced regularly in different areas of the country. The National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) built in the last years an impressive infrastructure for monitoring this activity, known as the Romanian Seismic Network (RSN). At present, RSN consists of 122 seismic stations, of which 70 have broadband velocity sensors and 42 short period sensors. One hundred and eleven stations out of 122 have accelerometer sensors collocated with velocity sensors and only 10 stations have only accelerometers. All the stations record continuously the ground motion and the data are transmitted in real-time to the Romanian National Data Center (RoNDC), in Magurele. Last year, NIEP has started a national project that addresses the characterization of all real-time seismic stations that constitute the RSN. We present here the steps that were undertaken and the preliminary results obtained since the beginning the project. The first two activities consisted of collecting all the existent technical and geological data, with emphasize on the latter. Then, we performed station noise investigations and analyses in order to characterize the noise level and estimate the resonances of the sites. The computed H/V ratios showed clear resonant peaks at different frequencies which correlate relatively well with the thickness of the sedimentary package beneath the stations. The polarization analysis of the H/V ratios indicates for some stations a strong directivity of the resonance peak which suggests possible topographic effects at the stations. At the same time, special attention was given to the estimation of the site amplification from earthquake data. The spectral ratios obtained from the analysis of more than 50 earthquakes with magnitudes (Mw) larger than 4.1 are characterized by similar resonance peaks as those obtained from

  3. Analysis of the seismicity in the region of Mirovo salt mine after 8 years monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dimitrova, Liliya; Solakov, Dimcho; Simeonova, Stela; Aleksandrova, Irena; Georgieva, Gergana

    2015-04-01

    Mirovo salt deposit is situated in the NE part of Bulgaria and 5 kilometers away from the town of Provadiya. The mine is in operation since 1956. The salt is produced by dilution and extraction of the brine to the surface. A system of chambers-pillars is formed within the salt body as a result of the applied technology. The mine is situated in a seismically quiet part of the state. The region is characterized with complex geological structure and several faults. During the last 3 decades a large number of small and moderate earthquakes (M<4.5) are realized in the close vicinity of the salt deposit. Local seismological network (LSN) is deployed in the region to monitor the local seismicity. It consists of 6 three component digital stations. A real-time data transfer from LSN stations to National Data Center (in Sofia) is implemented using the VPN and MAN networks of the Bulgarian Telecommunication Company. Common processing and interpretation of the data from LSN and the national seismic network is performed. Real-time and interactive data processing are performed by the Seismic Network Data Processor (SNDP) software package. More than 700 earthquakes are registered by the LSN within 30km region around the mine during the 8 years monitoring. First we processed the data and compile a catalogue of the earthquakes occur within the studied region (30km around the salt mine). Spatial pattern of seismicity is analyzed. A large number of the seismic events occurred within the northern and north-western part of the salt body. Several earthquakes occurred in close vicinity of the mine. Concerning that the earthquakes could be tectonic and/or induced an attempt is made to find criteria to distinguish natural from induced seismicity. To characterize and distinguish the main processes active in the area we also made waveform and spectral analysis of a number of earthquakes.

  4. On-line Data Transmission, as Part of the Seismic Evaluation Process in the Buildings Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorin Dragomir, Claudiu; Dobre, Daniela; Craifaleanu, Iolanda; Georgescu, Emil-Sever

    2017-12-01

    The thorough analytical modelling of seismic actions, of the structural system and of the foundation soil is essential for a proper dynamic analysis of a building. However, the validation of the used models should be made, whenever possible, with reference to results obtained from experimental investigations, building instrumentation and monitoring of vibrations generated by various seismic or non-seismic sources. In Romania, the permanent seismic instrumentation/monitoring of buildings is part of a special follow-up activity, performed in accordance with the P130/1999 code for the time monitoring of building behaviour and with the seismic design code, P100-2013. By using the state-of-the-art modern equipment (GeoSIG and Kinemetrics digital accelerographs) in the seismic network of the National Institute for Research and Development URBAN-INCERC, the instrumented buildings can be monitored remotely, with recorded data being sent to authorities or to research institutes in the field by a real-time data transmission system. The obtained records are processed, computing the Fourier amplitude spectra and the response spectra, and the modal parameters of buildings are determined. The paper presents some of the most important results of the institute in the field of building monitoring, focusing on the situation of some significant instrumented buildings located in different parts of the country. In addition, maps with data received from seismic stations after the occurrence of two recent Vrancea (Romania) earthquakes, showing the spatial distribution of ground accelerations, are presented, together with a comparative analysis, performed with reference to previous studies in the literature.

  5. Seismic Monitoring for the United Arab Emirates

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Rodgers, A; Nakanishi, K

    2005-04-11

    There is potential for earthquakes in the United Arab Emirates and in the Zagros mountains to cause structural damage and pose a threat to safety of people. Damaging effects from earthquakes can be mitigated by knowledge of the location and size of earthquakes, effects on construction, and monitoring these effects over time. Although a general idea of seismicity in the UAE may be determined with data from global seismic networks, these global networks do not have the sensitivity to record smaller seismic events and do not have the necessary accuracy to locate the events. A National Seismic Monitoring Observatory ismore » needed for the UAE that consists of a modern seismic network and a multidisciplinary staff that can analyze and interpret the data from the network. A seismic network is essential to locate earthquakes, determine event magnitudes, identify active faults and measure ground motions from earthquakes. Such a network can provide the data necessary for a reliable seismic hazard assessment in the UAE. The National Seismic Monitoring Observatory would ideally be situated at a university that would provide access to the wide range of disciplines needed in operating the network and providing expertise in analysis and interpretation.« less

  6. Seismic activity in northeastern Brazill-new perspectives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, J. M.; Do Nascimento, A. F.; Vilar, C. S.; Bezerra, F. H.; Assumpcao, M.; Berrocal, J.; Fuck, R. A.

    2007-05-01

    Northeastern Brazil is the most seismic active region in the country. Some earthquakes with magnitude above 5.0 and intensity VII MM associated with swam-like seismic activity lasting for many years are a serious social concern. Since the 1980's macroseismic and instrumental surveys have been carried out in this region and they are an important data archive which allows the composition of a reliable catalogue of seismic activity for this region. Among the many scientific results it was possible to identify the main seismogenic areas, obtain reliable hypocentres and focal mechanisms. As a consequence, it was possible also to analyse the relationship between seismicity and geological features. It was also possible to determined maximum horizontal stress direction for the region. An important induced seismic activity case has also been reported in the area as being a classical example of pore pressure diffusion triggering mechanism. The majority of the results were obtained using analogic data. Recently, a new research project is being conducted and will allow us to provide a regional scale monitoring with 6 broad-band stations and a new portable six station digital seismic network equipped with short- period sensors. Thus, with the continuous seismic activity in the area we trust that the results of this project will increase the present knowledge of seismic activity in northeastern Brazil.

  7. Angola Seismicity MAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, F. A. P.; Franca, G.

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this job was to study and document the Angola natural seismicity, establishment of the first database seismic data to facilitate consultation and search for information on seismic activity in the country. The study was conducted based on query reports produced by National Institute of Meteorology and Geophysics (INAMET) 1968 to 2014 with emphasis to the work presented by Moreira (1968), that defined six seismogenic zones from macro seismic data, with highlighting is Zone of Sá da Bandeira (Lubango)-Chibemba-Oncócua-Iona. This is the most important of Angola seismic zone, covering the epicentral Quihita and Iona regions, geologically characterized by transcontinental structure tectono-magmatic activation of the Mesozoic with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks of ultrabasic-alkaline composition, basic and alkaline, kimberlites and carbonatites, strongly marked by intense tectonism, presenting with several faults and fractures (locally called corredor de Lucapa). The earthquake of May 9, 1948 reached intensity VI on the Mercalli-Sieberg scale (MCS) in the locality of Quihita, and seismic active of Iona January 15, 1964, the main shock hit the grade VI-VII. Although not having significant seismicity rate can not be neglected, the other five zone are: Cassongue-Ganda-Massano de Amorim; Lola-Quilengues-Caluquembe; Gago Coutinho-zone; Cuima-Cachingues-Cambândua; The Upper Zambezi zone. We also analyzed technical reports on the seismicity of the middle Kwanza produced by Hidroproekt (GAMEK) region as well as international seismic bulletins of the International Seismological Centre (ISC), United States Geological Survey (USGS), and these data served for instrumental location of the epicenters. All compiled information made possible the creation of the First datbase of seismic data for Angola, preparing the map of seismicity with the reconfirmation of the main seismic zones defined by Moreira (1968) and the identification of a new seismic

  8. Site-specific probabilistic seismic hazard analyses for the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory. Volume 2: Appendices

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    NONE

    1996-05-01

    The identification of seismic sources is often based on a combination of geologic and tectonic considerations and patterns of observed seismicity; hence, a historical earthquake catalogue is important. A historical catalogue of earthquakes of approximate magnitude (M) 2.5 and greater for the time period 1850 through 1992 was compiled for the INEL region. The primary data source used was the Decade of North American Geology (DNAG) catalogue for the time period from about 1800 through 1985 (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1988). A large number of felt earthquakes, especially prior to the 1970`s, which were below the threshold of completeness established inmore » the DNAG catalogue (Engdahl and Rinehart, 1991), were taken from the state catalogues compiled by Stover and colleagues at the National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) and combined with the DNAG catalogue for the INEL region. The state catalogues were those of Idaho, Montana, Nevada, Utah, and Wyoming. NEIC`s Preliminary Determination of Epicenters (PDE) and the state catalogues compiled by the Oregon Department of Geology and Mineral Industries (DOGAMI), and the University of Nevada at Reno (UNR) were also used to supplement the pre-1986 time period. A few events reanalyzed by Jim Zollweg (Boise State University, written communication, 1994) were also modified in the catalogue. In the case of duplicate events, the DNAG entry was preferred over the Stover et al. entry for the period 1850 through 1985. A few events from Berg and Baker (1963) were also added to the catalogue. This information was and will be used in determining the seismic risk of buildings and facilities located at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory.« less

  9. Preliminary deformation model for National Seismic Hazard map of Indonesia

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Meilano, Irwan; Gunawan, Endra; Sarsito, Dina

    Preliminary deformation model for the Indonesia’s National Seismic Hazard (NSH) map is constructed as the block rotation and strain accumulation function at the elastic half-space. Deformation due to rigid body motion is estimated by rotating six tectonic blocks in Indonesia. The interseismic deformation due to subduction is estimated by assuming coupling on subduction interface while deformation at active fault is calculated by assuming each of the fault‘s segment slips beneath a locking depth or in combination with creeping in a shallower part. This research shows that rigid body motion dominates the deformation pattern with magnitude more than 15 mm/year, except inmore » the narrow area near subduction zones and active faults where significant deformation reach to 25 mm/year.« less

  10. Documentation for the 2014 update of the United States national seismic hazard maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Powers, Peter M.; Mueller, Charles S.; Haller, Kathleen M.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Zeng, Yuehua; Rezaeian, Sanaz; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Field, Edward; Chen, Rui; Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Luco, Nico; Wheeler, Russell L.; Williams, Robert A.; Olsen, Anna H.

    2014-01-01

    The national seismic hazard maps for the conterminous United States have been updated to account for new methods, models, and data that have been obtained since the 2008 maps were released (Petersen and others, 2008). The input models are improved from those implemented in 2008 by using new ground motion models that have incorporated about twice as many earthquake strong ground shaking data and by incorporating many additional scientific studies that indicate broader ranges of earthquake source and ground motion models. These time-independent maps are shown for 2-percent and 10-percent probability of exceedance in 50 years for peak horizontal ground acceleration as well as 5-hertz and 1-hertz spectral accelerations with 5-percent damping on a uniform firm rock site condition (760 meters per second shear wave velocity in the upper 30 m, VS30). In this report, the 2014 updated maps are compared with the 2008 version of the maps and indicate changes of plus or minus 20 percent over wide areas, with larger changes locally, caused by the modifications to the seismic source and ground motion inputs.

  11. R/V EWING seismic source array calibrations: 2003

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diebold, J.; Webb, S.; Tolstoy, M.; Rawson, M.; Holmes, C.; Bohnenstiehl, D.; Chapp, E.

    2003-12-01

    In the Northern Gulf of Mexico, May, 2003, an NSF-funded effort was carried out to obtain calibrated measurements of the various airgun arrays deployed by R/V EWING during its seismic surveys. The motivations for this were several: to ground-truth the modeling upon which safety radii for marine mammal mitigation are established; to obtain broadband digitized signals which will accurately define the full spectral content of airgun signatures; to investigate the effects of seafloor interactions and their contribution to the acoustic noise levels from seismic sources. For this purpose, a digital, remotely telemetering spar buoy was designed and assembled; affording interactive control over the choice of two hydrophone channels, four fixed gain settings and four digitizing rates [6,250 - 50,000 Hz.] Three deployments were planned: a deep-water site, suitable for comparison of actual signals with modeled results; a shallow-water [25 - 50m] site where the effects of bottom interaction would be strongest; and a continental-slope site, which represents the favored habitat of many cetacean species. Methodology was developed which enabled the sequential discharge of four subarrays of 6, 10, 12 and 20 airguns. A separate run was made with two "GI" airguns, the favored high resolution survey source. An Incidental Harassment Authorization and a Biological Opinion, including an Incidental Take Statement were issued for the project by National Marine Fisheries, and a suite of marine mammal observation and mitigation procedures was followed. The deep and shallow water sites were occupied, and some 440 airgun signals were recorded. The slope site work was cancelled due to weather too poor for accurate marine mammal observation, but calibration was subsequently carried out with an exploration industry source vessel in a similar environment. Preliminary results indicate that the mitigation modeling is accurate, though somewhat conservative; that the radiated energy from airgun arrays

  12. Seismic hazard map of the western hemisphere

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.; Tanner, J.G.

    1999-01-01

    Vulnerability to natural disasters increases with urbanization and development of associated support systems (reservoirs, power plants, etc.). Catastrophic earthquakes account for 60% of worldwide casualties associated with natural disasters. Economic damage from earthquakes is increasing, even in technologically advanced countries with some level of seismic zonation, as shown by the 1989 Loma Prieta, CA ($6 billion), 1994 Northridge, CA ($ 25 billion), and 1995 Kobe, Japan (> $ 100 billion) earthquakes. The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures, due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local governments, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes), emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of the Americas is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful global seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for the western hemisphere. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions specify the

  13. Archive of digital Boomer seismic reflection data collected during USGS Cruises 94CCT01 and 95CCT01, eastern Texas and western Louisiana, 1994 and 1995

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Morton, Robert A.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2004-01-01

    In June of 1994 and August and September of 1995, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the University of Texas Bureau of Economic Geology, conducted geophysical surveys of the Sabine and Calcasieu Lake areas and the Gulf of Mexico offshore eastern Texas and western Louisiana. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser. Scanned handwritten logbooks and Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs may be viewed with Adobe Reader.

  14. Romanian Educational Seismic Network Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tataru, Dragos; Ionescu, Constantin; Zaharia, Bogdan; Grecu, Bogdan; Tibu, Speranta; Popa, Mihaela; Borleanu, Felix; Toma, Dragos; Brisan, Nicoleta; Georgescu, Emil-Sever; Dobre, Daniela; Dragomir, Claudiu-Sorin

    2013-04-01

    Romania is one of the most active seismic countries in Europe, with more than 500 earthquakes occurring every year. The seismic hazard of Romania is relatively high and thus understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects at the earth surface represents an important step toward the education of population in earthquake affected regions of the country and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this direction, the first national educational project in the field of seismology has recently started in Romania: the ROmanian EDUcational SEISmic NETwork (ROEDUSEIS-NET) project. It involves four partners: the National Institute for Earth Physics as coordinator, the National Institute for Research and Development in Construction, Urban Planning and Sustainable Spatial Development " URBAN - INCERC" Bucharest, the Babeş-Bolyai University (Faculty of Environmental Sciences and Engineering) and the software firm "BETA Software". The project has many educational, scientific and social goals. The main educational objectives are: training students and teachers in the analysis and interpretation of seismological data, preparing of several comprehensive educational materials, designing and testing didactic activities using informatics and web-oriented tools. The scientific objective is to introduce into schools the use of advanced instruments and experimental methods that are usually restricted to research laboratories, with the main product being the creation of an earthquake waveform archive. Thus a large amount of such data will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. For the social objectives, the project represents an effective instrument for informing and creating an awareness of the seismic risk, for experimentation into the efficacy of scientific communication, and for an increase in the direct involvement of schools and the general public. A network of nine seismic stations with SEP seismometers

  15. Exploring Large-Scale Cross-Correlation for Teleseismic and Regional Seismic Event Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, Doug; Walter, William; Myers, Steve; Ford, Sean; Harris, Dave; Ruppert, Stan; Buttler, Dave; Hauk, Terri

    2013-04-01

    The decrease in costs of both digital storage space and computation power invites new methods of seismic data processing. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory(LLNL) we operate a growing research database of seismic events and waveforms for nuclear explosion monitoring and other applications. Currently the LLNL database contains several million events associated with tens of millions of waveforms at thousands of stations. We are making use of this database to explore the power of seismic waveform correlation to quantify signal similarities, to discover new events not in catalogs, and to more accurately locate events and identify source types. Building on the very efficient correlation methodologies of Harris and Dodge (2011) we computed the waveform correlation for event pairs in the LLNL database in two ways. First we performed entire waveform cross-correlation over seven distinct frequency bands. The correlation coefficient exceeds 0.6 for more than 40 million waveform pairs for several hundred thousand events at more than a thousand stations. These correlations reveal clusters of mining events and aftershock sequences, which can be used to readily identify and locate events. Second we determine relative pick times by correlating signals in time windows for distinct seismic phases. These correlated picks are then used to perform very high accuracy event relocations. We are examining the percentage of events that correlate as a function of magnitude and observing station distance in selected high seismicity regions. Combining these empirical results and those using synthetic data, we are working to quantify relationships between correlation and event pair separation (in epicenter and depth) as well as mechanism differences. Our exploration of these techniques on a large seismic database is in process and we will report on our findings in more detail at the meeting.

  16. Exploring Large-Scale Cross-Correlation for Teleseismic and Regional Seismic Event Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dodge, D.; Walter, W. R.; Myers, S. C.; Ford, S. R.; Harris, D.; Ruppert, S.; Buttler, D.; Hauk, T. F.

    2012-12-01

    The decrease in costs of both digital storage space and computation power invites new methods of seismic data processing. At Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) we operate a growing research database of seismic events and waveforms for nuclear explosion monitoring and other applications. Currently the LLNL database contains several million events associated with tens of millions of waveforms at thousands of stations. We are making use of this database to explore the power of seismic waveform correlation to quantify signal similarities, to discover new events not in catalogs, and to more accurately locate events and identify source types. Building on the very efficient correlation methodologies of Harris and Dodge (2011) we computed the waveform correlation for event pairs in the LLNL database in two ways. First we performed entire waveform cross-correlation over seven distinct frequency bands. The correlation coefficient exceeds 0.6 for more than 40 million waveform pairs for several hundred thousand events at more than a thousand stations. These correlations reveal clusters of mining events and aftershock sequences, which can be used to readily identify and locate events. Second we determine relative pick times by correlating signals in time windows for distinct seismic phases. These correlated picks are then used to perform very high accuracy event relocations. We are examining the percentage of events that correlate as a function of magnitude and observing station distance in selected high seismicity regions. Combining these empirical results and those using synthetic data, we are working to quantify relationships between correlation and event pair separation (in epicenter and depth) as well as mechanism differences. Our exploration of these techniques on a large seismic database is in process and we will report on our findings in more detail at the meeting.

  17. Preliminary seismic studies at Ceboruco Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, C. R.; Nunez-Cornu, F. J.; Ochoa, J.; Robles, F. J.

    2012-12-01

    Many societies and their economies endure the disastrous consequences of destructive volcanic eruptions. The Ceboruco stratovolcano is located at the west of the Mexican volcanic belt at 21.125o north, 76 km from the pacific coast and 2,280 meters above sea level. It has an eruptive recurrence of 200 years and its last activity was at 1875. This natural hazard could affect more than eight communities and important highways. Scientific knowledge constitutes the only way to avoid or at least to mitigate the negative effects of an eventual eruptive event, accordingly the main objective of this project is monitor and analyze the potential destructive effects of the Ceboruco volcano. Seismic studies began at 2003 with the deployment of one MARSlite station equipped LE3d (1Hz) sensor. Station that works until 2009 and allow us to identify and characterize the seismic activity associated to the volcano;. Since March 2012 we installed four seismic stations, each includes a digital acquisition system TAURUS of Nanometrix and a Lennartz 3D lite seismometer. Batteries are change and data collected monthly. We use the data to establish the average seismic activity rate; we also aim to corroborate previous studies that showed four families of seismic events; and to localize and make preliminary evaluations of the events.

  18. National Park Service digital transit data sharing pilot results and discussion

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-04-06

    This report describes the National Park Services pilot project to convert select NPS transit schedules to a digital format, known as General Transit Feed Specification (GTFS), in order to share more widely with the public. The GTFS pilot effort be...

  19. Black Thunder Coal Mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory experimental study of seismic energy generated by large scale mine blasting

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Martin, R.L.; Gross, D.; Pearson, D.C.

    In an attempt to better understand the impact that large mining shots will have on verifying compliance with the international, worldwide, Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT, no nuclear explosion tests), a series of seismic and videographic experiments has been conducted during the past two years at the Black Thunder Coal Mine. Personnel from the mine and Los Alamos National Laboratory have cooperated closely to design and perform experiments to produce results with mutual benefit to both organizations. This paper summarizes the activities, highlighting the unique results of each. Topics which were covered in these experiments include: (1) synthesis of seismic,more » videographic, acoustic, and computer modeling data to improve understanding of shot performance and phenomenology; (2) development of computer generated visualizations of observed blasting techniques; (3) documentation of azimuthal variations in radiation of seismic energy from overburden casting shots; (4) identification of, as yet unexplained, out of sequence, simultaneous detonation in some shots using seismic and videographic techniques; (5) comparison of local (0.1 to 15 kilometer range) and regional (100 to 2,000 kilometer range) seismic measurements leading to determine of the relationship between local and regional seismic amplitude to explosive yield for overburden cast, coal bulking and single fired explosions; and (6) determination of the types of mining shots triggering the prototype International Monitoring System for the CTBT.« less

  20. Populating the Advanced National Seismic System Comprehensive Earthquake Catalog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earle, P. S.; Perry, M. R.; Andrews, J. R.; Withers, M. M.; Hellweg, M.; Kim, W. Y.; Shiro, B.; West, M. E.; Storchak, D. A.; Pankow, K. L.; Huerfano Moreno, V. A.; Gee, L. S.; Wolfe, C. J.

    2016-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey maintains a repository of earthquake information produced by networks in the Advanced National Seismic System with additional data from the ISC-GEM catalog and many non-U.S. networks through their contributions to the National Earthquake Information Center PDE bulletin. This Comprehensive Catalog (ComCat) provides a unified earthquake product while preserving attribution and contributor information. ComCat contains hypocenter and magnitude information with supporting phase arrival-time and amplitude measurements (when available). Higher-level products such as focal mechanisms, earthquake slip models, "Did You Feel It?" reports, ShakeMaps, PAGER impact estimates, earthquake summary posters, and tectonic summaries are also included. ComCat is updated as new events are processed and the catalog can be accesed at http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/. Throughout the past few years, a concentrated effort has been underway to expand ComCat by integrating global and regional historic catalogs. The number of earthquakes in ComCat has more than doubled in the past year and it presently contains over 1.6 million earthquake hypocenters. We will provide an overview of catalog contents and a detailed description of numerous tools and semi-automated quality-control procedures developed to uncover errors including systematic magnitude biases, missing time periods, duplicate postings for the same events, and incorrectly associated events.

  1. Visualizing research collections in the National Transportation Library's digital repository : ROSA P.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2017-01-01

    The National Transportation Library's (NTL) Repository and Open Science Portal (ROSA P) : is a digital library for transportation, including U. S. Department of Transportation : sponsored research results and technical publications, other documents a...

  2. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 96LCA04 in Lakes Mabel and Starr, Central Florida, August 1996

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Swancar, Amy; Tihansky, Ann B.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In August of 1996, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys of Lakes Mabel and Starr, central Florida, as part of the Central Highlands Lakes project, which is part of a larger USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, observer's logbook; and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. For detailed information about the hydrologic setting of Lake Starr and the interpretation of some of these seismic reflection data, see Swancar and others (2000) at http://fl.water.usgs.gov/publications/Abstracts/wri00_4030_swancar.html. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 96LCA04 tells us the data were collected in 1996 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the fourth field activity for that project in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when

  3. UK National Data Centre archive of seismic recordings of (presumed) underground nuclear tests 1964-1996

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, John; Peacock, Sheila

    2016-04-01

    The year 1996 has particular significance for forensic seismologists. This was the year when the Comprehensive Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) was signed in September at the United Nations, setting an international norm against nuclear testing. Blacknest, as a long time seismic centre for research into detecting and identifying underground explosions using seismology, provided significant technical advice during the CTBT negotiations. Since 1962 seismic recordings of both presumed nuclear explosions and earthquakes from the four seismometer arrays Eskdalemuir, Scotland (EKA), Yellowknife, Canada (YKA), Gauribidanur, India (GBA), and Warramunga, Australia (WRA) have been copied, digitised, and saved. There was a possibility this archive would be lost. It was decided to process the records and catalogue them for distribution to other groups and institutions. This work continues at Blacknest but the archive is no longer under threat. In addition much of the archive of analogue tape recordings has been re-digitised with modern equipment, allowing sampling rates of 100 rather than 20 Hz.

  4. Comment on "How can seismic hazard around the New Madrid seismic zone be similar to that in California?" by Arthur Frankel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.; Shi, B.; Kiefer, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    PSHA is the method used most to assess seismic hazards for input into various aspects of public and financial policy. For example, PSHA was used by the U.S. Geological Survey to develop the National Seismic Hazard Maps (Frankel et al., 1996, 2002). These maps are the basis for many national, state, and local seismic safety regulations and design standards, such as the NEHRP Recommended Provisions for Seismic Regulations for New Buildings and Other Structures, the International Building Code, and the International Residential Code. Adoption and implementation of these regulations and design standards would have significant impacts on many communities in the New Madrid area, including Memphis, Tennessee and Paducah, Kentucky. Although "mitigating risks to society from earthquakes involves economic and policy issues" (Stein, 2004), seismic hazard assessment is the basis. Seismologists should provide the best information on seismic hazards and communicate them to users and policy makers. There is a lack of effort in communicating the uncertainties in seismic hazard assessment in the central U.S., however. Use of 10%, 5%, and 2% PE in 50 years causes confusion in communicating seismic hazard assessment. It would be easy to discuss and understand the design ground motions if the true meaning of the ground motion derived from PSHA were presented, i.e., the ground motion with the estimated uncertainty or the associated confidence level.

  5. Preliminary consideration on the seismic actions recorded during the 2016 Central Italy seismic sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlo Ponzo, Felice; Ditommaso, Rocco; Nigro, Antonella; Nigro, Domenico S.; Iacovino, Chiara

    2017-04-01

    After the Mw 6.0 mainshock of August 24, 2016 at 03.36 a.m. (local time), with the epicenter located between the towns of Accumoli (province of Rieti), Amatrice (province of Rieti) and Arquata del Tronto (province of Ascoli Piceno), several activities were started in order to perform some preliminary evaluations on the characteristics of the recent seismic sequence in the areas affected by the earthquake. Ambient vibration acquisitions have been performed using two three-directional velocimetric synchronized stations, with a natural frequency equal to 0.5Hz and a digitizer resolution of equal to 24bit. The activities are continuing after the events of the seismic sequence of October 26 and October 30, 2016. In this paper, in order to compare recorded and code provision values in terms of peak (PGA, PGV and PGD), spectral and integral (Housner Intensity) seismic parameters, several preliminary analyses have been performed on accelerometric time-histories acquired by three near fault station of the RAN (Italian Accelerometric Network): Amatrice station (station code AMT), Norcia station (station code NRC) and Castelsantangelo sul Nera station (station code CNE). Several comparisons between the elastic response spectra derived from accelerometric recordings and the elastic demand spectra provided by the Italian seismic code (NTC 2008) have been performed. Preliminary results retrieved from these analyses highlight several apparent difference between experimental data and conventional code provision. Then, the ongoing seismic sequence appears compatible with the historical seismicity in terms of integral parameters, but not in terms of peak and spectral values. It seems appropriate to reconsider the necessity to revise the simplified design approach based on the conventional spectral values. Acknowledgements This study was partially funded by the Italian Department of Civil Protection within the project DPC-RELUIS 2016 - RS4 ''Seismic observatory of structures and

  6. Representing Value as Digital Object: A Discussion of Transferability and Anonymity; Digital Library Initiatives of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft; CrossRef Turns One; Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (Fermilab).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kahn, Robert E.; Lyons, Patrice A.; Brahms, Ewald; Brand, Amy; van den Bergen, Mieke

    2001-01-01

    Includes four articles that discuss the use of digital objects to represent value in a network environment; digital library initiatives at the central public funding organization for academic research in Germany; an application of the Digital Object Identifier System; and the Web site of the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. (LRW)

  7. Seismic activity monitoring in the Izvorul Muntelui dam region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borleanu, Felix; Otilia Placinta, Anca; Popa, Mihaela; Adelin Moldovan, Iren; Popescu, Emilia

    2016-04-01

    Earthquakes occurrences near the artificial water reservoirs are caused by stress variation due to the weight of water, weakness of fractures or faults and increasing of pore pressure in crustal rocks. In the present study we aim to investigate how Izvorul Muntelui dam, located in the Eastern Carpathians influences local seismicity. For this purpose we selected from the seismic bulletins computed within National Data Center of National Institute for Earth Physics, Romania, crustal events occurred between 984 and 2015 in a range of 0.3 deg around the artificial lake. Subsequently to improve the seismic monitoring of the region we applied a cross-correlation detector on the continuous recordings of Bicaz (BIZ) seismic stations. Besides the tectonic events we detected sources within this region that periodically generate artificial evens. We couldn't emphasize the existence of a direct correlation between the water level variations and natural seismicity of the investigated area.

  8. Digital seismic-reflection data from western Rhode Island Sound, 1980

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McMullen, K.Y.; Poppe, L.J.; Soderberg, N.K.

    2009-01-01

    During 1980, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) conducted a seismic-reflection survey in western Rhode Island Sound aboard the Research Vessel Neecho. Data from this survey were recorded in analog form and archived at the USGS Woods Hole Science Center's Data Library. Due to recent interest in the geology of Rhode Island Sound and in an effort to make the data more readily accessible while preserving the original paper records, the seismic data from this cruise were scanned and converted to Tagged Image File Format (TIFF) images and SEG-Y data files. Navigation data were converted from U.S. Coast Guard Long Range Aids to Navigation (LORAN-C) time delays to latitudes and longitudes, which are available in Environmental Systems Research Institute, Inc. (ESRI) shapefile format and as eastings and northings in space-delimited text format.

  9. Seismic Characterization of EGS Reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, D. C.; Pyle, M. L.; Matzel, E.; Myers, S.; Johannesson, G.

    2014-12-01

    To aid in the seismic characterization of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), we enhance the traditional microearthquake detection and location methodologies at two EGS systems. We apply the Matched Field Processing (MFP) seismic imaging technique to detect new seismic events using known discrete microearthquake sources. Events identified using MFP are typically smaller magnitude events or events that occur within the coda of a larger event. Additionally, we apply a Bayesian multiple-event seismic location algorithm, called MicroBayesLoc, to estimate the 95% probability ellipsoids for events with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Such probability ellipsoid information can provide evidence for determining if a seismic lineation could be real or simply within the anticipated error range. We apply this methodology to the Basel EGS data set and compare it to another EGS dataset. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Toward uniform probabilistic seismic hazard assessments for Southeast Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, C. H.; Wang, Y.; Shi, X.; Ornthammarath, T.; Warnitchai, P.; Kosuwan, S.; Thant, M.; Nguyen, P. H.; Nguyen, L. M.; Solidum, R., Jr.; Irsyam, M.; Hidayati, S.; Sieh, K.

    2017-12-01

    Although most Southeast Asian countries have seismic hazard maps, various methodologies and quality result in appreciable mismatches at national boundaries. We aim to conduct a uniform assessment across the region by through standardized earthquake and fault databases, ground-shaking scenarios, and regional hazard maps. Our earthquake database contains earthquake parameters obtained from global and national seismic networks, harmonized by removal of duplicate events and the use of moment magnitude. Our active-fault database includes fault parameters from previous studies and from the databases implemented for national seismic hazard maps. Another crucial input for seismic hazard assessment is proper evaluation of ground-shaking attenuation. Since few ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs) have used local observations from this region, we evaluated attenuation by comparison of instrumental observations and felt intensities for recent earthquakes with predicted ground shaking from published GMPEs. We then utilize the best-fitting GMPEs and site conditions into our seismic hazard assessments. Based on the database and proper GMPEs, we have constructed regional probabilistic seismic hazard maps. The assessment shows highest seismic hazard levels near those faults with high slip rates, including the Sagaing Fault in central Myanmar, the Sumatran Fault in Sumatra, the Palu-Koro, Matano and Lawanopo Faults in Sulawesi, and the Philippine Fault across several islands of the Philippines. In addition, our assessment demonstrates the important fact that regions with low earthquake probability may well have a higher aggregate probability of future earthquakes, since they encompass much larger areas than the areas of high probability. The significant irony then is that in areas of low to moderate probability, where building codes are usually to provide less seismic resilience, seismic risk is likely to be greater. Infrastructural damage in East Malaysia during the 2015

  11. The New Italian Seismic Hazard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzocchi, W.; Meletti, C.; Albarello, D.; D'Amico, V.; Luzi, L.; Martinelli, F.; Pace, B.; Pignone, M.; Rovida, A.; Visini, F.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015 the Seismic Hazard Center (Centro Pericolosità Sismica - CPS) of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology was commissioned of coordinating the national scientific community with the aim to elaborate a new reference seismic hazard model, mainly finalized to the update of seismic code. The CPS designed a roadmap for releasing within three years a significantly renewed PSHA model, with regard both to the updated input elements and to the strategies to be followed. The main requirements of the model were discussed in meetings with the experts on earthquake engineering that then will participate to the revision of the building code. The activities were organized in 6 tasks: program coordination, input data, seismicity models, ground motion predictive equations (GMPEs), computation and rendering, testing. The input data task has been selecting the most updated information about seismicity (historical and instrumental), seismogenic faults, and deformation (both from seismicity and geodetic data). The seismicity models have been elaborating in terms of classic source areas, fault sources and gridded seismicity based on different approaches. The GMPEs task has selected the most recent models accounting for their tectonic suitability and forecasting performance. The testing phase has been planned to design statistical procedures to test with the available data the whole seismic hazard models, and single components such as the seismicity models and the GMPEs. In this talk we show some preliminary results, summarize the overall strategy for building the new Italian PSHA model, and discuss in detail important novelties that we put forward. Specifically, we adopt a new formal probabilistic framework to interpret the outcomes of the model and to test it meaningfully; this requires a proper definition and characterization of both aleatory variability and epistemic uncertainty that we accomplish through an ensemble modeling strategy. We use a weighting scheme

  12. Deep seismic sounding in northern Eurasia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Benz, H.M.; Unger, J.D.; Leith, W.S.; Mooney, W.D.; Solodilov, L.; Egorkin, A.V.; Ryaboy, V.Z.

    1992-01-01

    For nearly 40 years, the former Soviet Union has carried out an extensive program of seismic studies of the Earth's crust and upper mantle, known as “Deep Seismic Sounding” or DSS [Piwinskii, 1979; Zverev and Kosminskaya, 1980; Egorkin and Pavlenkova, 1981; Egorkin and Chernyshov, 1983; Scheimer and Borg, 1985]. Beginning in 1939–1940 with a series of small-scale seismic experiments near Moscow, DSS profiling has broadened into a national multiinstitutional exploration effort that has completed almost 150,000 km of profiles covering all major geological provinces of northern Eurasia [Ryaboy, 1989].

  13. Seismic Symphonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strinna, Elisa; Ferrari, Graziano

    2015-04-01

    symbolize cosmic harmony. But here it is the earth, "nature", the ground beneath our feet that is moving. It speaks to us not of harmony, but of our fragility. For the oldest earthquakes considered, Seismic Symphonies drew on SISMOS archives, the INGV project for recovery, high resolution digital reproduction and distribution of the seismograms of earthquakes of the Euro-Mediterranean area from 1895 to 1984. After the first exposure to the Fondazione Bevilacqua La Masa in Venice, the organ was later exhibited in Taiwan, the Taipei Biennial, with seismograms provided from the Taiwanese Central Weather Bureau, and at the EACC Castello in Spain, with seismograms of Spanish earthquakes provided by the Instituto Geográfico Nacional.

  14. CzechGeo/EPOS - Building a national data portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zednik, J.; Hejda, P.

    2012-04-01

    CzechGeo/EPOS is the consortium of seven geoscience institutions in the Czech Republic (Institute of Geophysics AS CR Prague, Institute of Rock Structure and Mechanics AS CR Prague, Institute of Geonics AS CR Ostrava, Institute of Physics of the Earth, Masaryk University Brno, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Charles University Prague, Faculty of Science, Charles University Prague, and Research Institute of Geodesy, Cartography and Topography Zdiby). These institutions operate a distributed system of seismic, GPS, magnetic, gravimetric and geodynamic observatories. The operational and personal costs of CzechGeo/EPOS are mostly covered by the Ministry of education, sports and youth within the support of twelve large research infrastructures in the Czech Republic. Web pages of the project www.czechgeo.cz are being built as a data portal which should integrate all the data and services provided by the involved institutions and research infrastructures. Seismic portal offers selected portions of digital data from permanent, local and temporary seismic stations, locations of seismic events in the country and worldwide, daily seismograms from permanent observatories and local seismic network Webnet, seismic bulletins and catalogs, and macroseismic observations on the territory of the Czech Republic. Magnetic portal involves besides real-time magnetograms also recent state of geomagnetic activity and its forecast for the next day. GPS portal will provide preprocessed data from regional GPS stations. Building the national portal is closely related with the development of the Preparatory phase of the EPOS (European Plate Observing System) project.

  15. Birth of the Program for Array Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (PASSCAL)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    James, D. E.; Sacks, I. S.

    2002-05-01

    As recently as 1984 institutions doing portable seismology depended upon their own complement of instruments, almost all designed and built in-house, and all of limited recording capability and flexibility. No data standards existed. Around 1980 the National Research Council (NRC) of the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), with National Science Foundation (NSF) support, empanelled a committee to study a major new initiative in Seismic Studies of the Continental Lithosphere (SSCL). The SSCL report in 1983 recommended that substantial numbers (1000 or more) of new generation digital seismographs be acquired for 3-D high resolution imaging of the continental lithosphere. Recommendations of the SSCL committee dovetailed with other NRC/NAS and NSF reports that highlighted imaging of the continental lithosphere as an area of highest priority. For the first time in the history of portable seismology the question asked was "What do seismologists need to do the job right?" A grassroots effort was undertaken to define instrumentation and data standards for a powerful new set of modern seismic research tools to serve the national seismological community. In the spring and fall of 1983 NSF and IASPEI sponsored workshops were convened to develop specifications for the design of a new generation of portable instrumentation. PASSCAL was the outgrowth of these seminal studies and workshops. The first step toward the formal formation of PASSCAL began with an ad-hoc organizing committee, comprised largely of the members of the NAS lithospheric seismology panel, convened by the authors at Carnegie Institution in Washington in November 1983. From that meeting emerged plans and promises of NSF support for an open organizational meeting to be held in January 1984, in Madison, Wisconsin. By the end of the two-day Madison meeting PASSCAL and an official consortium of seismological institutions for portable seismology were realities. Shortly after, PASSCAL merged with the complementary

  16. Reducing Seismic Hazard and Building Capacity Through International Cooperation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vergino, E. S.; Arakelyan, A.; Babayan, H.; Durgaryan, R.; Elashvili, M.; Godoladze, T.; Javakhishvili, Z.; Kalogeras, I.; Karakhanyan, A.; Martin, R. J.; Yetirmishli, G.

    2012-12-01

    During the last 50 years, the Caucasus, Central Asia and the Caspian Sea regions have experienced several devastating earthquakes. While each country in the region has worked with its neighbors on small, ad-hoc projects to improve preparedness, deeply ingrained political and ethnic rivalries, and severely stressed economies have severely hindered sustained regional cooperation. Future damaging earthquakes are inevitable and without proper planning the negative impact on public safety, security, economics and stability in these regions will be devastating. We have, through twelve years of international scientific cooperation, focused on the development of an expanded skill base and infrastructure, through the installation of new, modern, digital seismic monitoring networks, building of historic databases, sharing seismic, geologic and geophysical data, conducting joint scientific investigations utilizing the new digital data and applying modern techniques, as well as the development of regional hazard models that the scientists of the region share with their governments and use to advise them on the best ways to mitigate the impact of a damaging earthquake. We have established specialized regional scientific task-force teams who can carry out seismological, geological and engineering studies in the epicentral zone, including the collection of new scientific data, for better understanding of seismic and geodynamic processes as well to provide emergency support in crisis and post-crisis situations in the Southern Caucasus countries. "Secrecy" in crisis and post-crisis situations in the former Soviet Union countries, as well as political instabilities, led to an absence of seismic risk reduction and prevention measures as well as little to no training of scientific-technical personnel who could take action in emergency situations. There were few opportunities for the development of a next generation of scientific experts, thus we have placed emphasis on the inclusion

  17. A Comparative Study on Seismic Analysis of Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) with Other Building Codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bari, Md. S.; Das, T.

    2013-09-01

    Tectonic framework of Bangladesh and adjoining areas indicate that Bangladesh lies well within an active seismic zone. The after effect of earthquake is more severe in an underdeveloped and a densely populated country like ours than any other developed countries. Bangladesh National Building Code (BNBC) was first established in 1993 to provide guidelines for design and construction of new structure subject to earthquake ground motions in order to minimize the risk to life for all structures. A revision of BNBC 1993 is undergoing to make this up to date with other international building codes. This paper aims at the comparison of various provisions of seismic analysis as given in building codes of different countries. This comparison will give an idea regarding where our country stands when it comes to safety against earth quake. Primarily, various seismic parameters in BNBC 2010 (draft) have been studied and compared with that of BNBC 1993. Later, both 1993 and 2010 edition of BNBC codes have been compared graphically with building codes of other countries such as National Building Code of India 2005 (NBC-India 2005), American Society of Civil Engineering 7-05 (ASCE 7-05). The base shear/weight ratios have been plotted against the height of the building. The investigation in this paper reveals that BNBC 1993 has the least base shear among all the codes. Factored Base shear values of BNBC 2010 are found to have increased significantly than that of BNBC 1993 for low rise buildings (≤20 m) around the country than its predecessor. Despite revision of the code, BNBC 2010 (draft) still suggests less base shear values when compared to the Indian and American code. Therefore, this increase in factor of safety against the earthquake imposed by the proposed BNBC 2010 code by suggesting higher values of base shear is appreciable.

  18. National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS): A USGS-Boem Partnership to Provide Free and Easy Access to Previously Proprietary Seismic Reflection Data on the U.S. Outer Continental Shelf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Triezenberg, P. J.; Hart, P. E.; Childs, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    The National Archive of Marine Seismic Surveys (NAMSS) was established by the USGS in 2004 in an effort to rescue marine seismic reflection profile data acquired largely by the oil exploration industry throughout the US outer continental shelf (OCS). It features a Web interface for easy on-line geographic search and download. The commercial value of these data had decreased significantly because of drilling moratoria and newer acquisition technology, and large quantities were at risk of disposal. But, the data still had tremendous value for scientific research and education purposes, and an effort was undertaken to ensure that the data were preserved and publicly available. More recently, the USGS and Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) have developed a partnership to make similarly available a much larger quantity of 2D and 3D seismic data acquired by the U.S. government for assessment of resources in the OCS. Under Federal regulation, BOEM is required to publicly release all processed geophysical data, including seismic profiles, acquired under an exploration permit, purchased and retained by BOEM, no sooner than 25 years after issuance of the permit. Data acquired prior to 1989 are now eligible for release. Currently these data are distributed on CD or DVD, but data discovery can be tedious. Inclusion of these data within NAMSS vastly increases the amount of seismic data available for research purposes. A new NAMSS geographical interface provides easy and intuitive access to the data library. The interface utilizes OpenLayers, Mapnik, and the Django web framework. In addition, metadata capabilities have been greatly increased using a PostgresSQL/PostGIS database incorporating a community-developed ISO-compliant XML template. The NAMSS database currently contains 452 2D seismic surveys comprising 1,645,956 line km and nine 3D seismic surveys covering 9,385 square km. The 2D data holdings consist of stack, migrated and depth sections, most in SEG-Y format.

  19. 12 CFR 7.5005 - National bank acting as digital certification authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... persons associated with a particular public/private key pair. As part of this service, the bank may also maintain a listing or repository of public keys. (b) A national bank may issue digital certificates verifying attributes in addition to identity of persons associated with a particular public/private key pair...

  20. 12 CFR 7.5005 - National bank acting as digital certification authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... persons associated with a particular public/private key pair. As part of this service, the bank may also maintain a listing or repository of public keys. (b) A national bank may issue digital certificates verifying attributes in addition to identity of persons associated with a particular public/private key pair...

  1. 12 CFR 7.5005 - National bank acting as digital certification authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... persons associated with a particular public/private key pair. As part of this service, the bank may also maintain a listing or repository of public keys. (b) A national bank may issue digital certificates verifying attributes in addition to identity of persons associated with a particular public/private key pair...

  2. 12 CFR 7.5005 - National bank acting as digital certification authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... persons associated with a particular public/private key pair. As part of this service, the bank may also maintain a listing or repository of public keys. (b) A national bank may issue digital certificates verifying attributes in addition to identity of persons associated with a particular public/private key pair...

  3. Excerpts: Proceedings of the FHWA/NCEER Workshop on the National Representation of Seismic Ground Motion for New and Existing Highway Facilities

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    1997-09-22

    The primary objective of the FHWA/NCEER Workshop was to recommend future directions for a national representation of the seismic ground shaking hazard for the design of new highway facilities and the evaluation and retrofit of existing highway facili...

  4. High-resolution gravity and seismic-refraction surveys of the Smoke Tree Wash area, Joshua Tree National Park, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, Victoria E.; Rymer, Michael J.; Catchings, Rufus D.; Goldman, Mark R.; Watt, Janet T.; Powell, Robert E.; Matti, Jonathan C.

    2016-03-02

    We describe high-resolution gravity and seismic refraction surveys acquired to determine the thickness of valley-fill deposits and to delineate geologic structures that might influence groundwater flow beneath the Smoke Tree Wash area in Joshua Tree National Park. These surveys identified a sedimentary basin that is fault-controlled. A profile across the Smoke Tree Wash fault zone reveals low gravity values and seismic velocities that coincide with a mapped strand of the Smoke Tree Wash fault. Modeling of the gravity data reveals a basin about 2–2.5 km long and 1 km wide that is roughly centered on this mapped strand, and bounded by inferred faults. According to the gravity model the deepest part of the basin is about 270 m, but this area coincides with low velocities that are not characteristic of typical basement complex rocks. Most likely, the density contrast assumed in the inversion is too high or the uncharacteristically low velocities represent highly fractured or weathered basement rocks, or both. A longer seismic profile extending onto basement outcrops would help differentiate which scenario is more accurate. The seismic velocities also determine the depth to water table along the profile to be about 40–60 m, consistent with water levels measured in water wells near the northern end of the profile.

  5. NSR&D Program Fiscal Year (FY) 2015 Call for Proposals Mitigation of Seismic Risk at Nuclear Facilities using Seismic Isolation

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Coleman, Justin

    2015-02-01

    Seismic isolation (SI) has the potential to drastically reduce seismic response of structures, systems, or components (SSCs) and therefore the risk associated with large seismic events (large seismic event could be defined as the design basis earthquake (DBE) and/or the beyond design basis earthquake (BDBE) depending on the site location). This would correspond to a potential increase in nuclear safety by minimizing the structural response and thus minimizing the risk of material release during large seismic events that have uncertainty associated with their magnitude and frequency. The national consensus standard America Society of Civil Engineers (ASCE) Standard 4, Seismic Analysismore » of Safety Related Nuclear Structures recently incorporated language and commentary for seismically isolating a large light water reactor or similar large nuclear structure. Some potential benefits of SI are: 1) substantially decoupling the SSC from the earthquake hazard thus decreasing risk of material release during large earthquakes, 2) cost savings for the facility and/or equipment, and 3) applicability to both nuclear (current and next generation) and high hazard non-nuclear facilities. Issue: To date no one has evaluated how the benefit of seismic risk reduction reduces cost to construct a nuclear facility. Objective: Use seismic probabilistic risk assessment (SPRA) to evaluate the reduction in seismic risk and estimate potential cost savings of seismic isolation of a generic nuclear facility. This project would leverage ongoing Idaho National Laboratory (INL) activities that are developing advanced (SPRA) methods using Nonlinear Soil-Structure Interaction (NLSSI) analysis. Technical Approach: The proposed study is intended to obtain an estimate on the reduction in seismic risk and construction cost that might be achieved by seismically isolating a nuclear facility. The nuclear facility is a representative pressurized water reactor building nuclear power plant (NPP

  6. Current Seismicity in the Vicinity of Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K.; von Seggern, D.; dePolo, D.

    2001-12-01

    The 1992 to 2000 earthquakes in the Southern Great Basin have been relocated in order to better recognize the active tectonic processes in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. During this time period seismic monitoring in the Southern Great Basin transitioned from a primarily single-component analog network to a 3-component digital network. Through the transition analog and digital networks were run in tandem. The station density over this period is as great as any prior recording period. The analog and digital networks were administered separately during the transition, and we have merged the phase data from the two operations. We performed relocations starting in October 1992, thus creating a hypocentral list for FY1993-FY2000. Aftershocks of the June 1992 M 5.6 Little Skull Mountain earthquake, located approximately 20 km southeast of Yucca Mountain, dominate the seismicity in the Southern Great Basin from 1992-2000. After the Little Skull Mountain earthquake, there was a general increase in earthquake activity in southern NTS, principally associated with the Rock Valley fault zone. There was no corresponding increase in seismicity west of Little Skull Mountain near the potential repository site. The distribution of high-quality earthquake locations generally reflects trends in Miocene tectonism. In particular, a general north-south trending gravity low, interpreted by Carr (1984) as the Kawich-Greenwater Rift, is highlighted by the microseismicity in many areas. Locally small magnitude earthquakes tend to outline the 8-10 Ma Timber Mountain caldera in northern and central NTS. Although these structures do not generally correlate with Quaternary faults, the micro-earthquake activity may reflect zones of weakness within these older structures. A 100 km long, conspicuous, north-south trending seismic zone, which shows no correlation with know Quaternary features, aligns along the steep gravity gradient bordering the western side of the Kawich-Greenwater gravity

  7. The Virtual Seismic Atlas Project: sharing the interpretation of seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R.; Mortimer, E.; McCaffrey, B.; Stuart, G.; Sizer, M.; Clayton, S.

    2007-12-01

    Through the activities of academic research programs, national institutions and corporations, especially oil and gas companies, there is a substantial volume of seismic reflection data. Although the majority is proprietary and confidential, there are significant volumes of data that are potentially within the public domain and available for research. Yet the community is poorly connected to these data and consequently geological and other research using seismic reflection data is limited to very few groups of researchers. This is about to change. The Virtual Seismic Atlas (VSA) is generating an independent, free-to-use, community based internet resource that captures and shares the geological interpretation of seismic data globally. Images and associated documents are explicitly indexed using not only existing survey and geographical data but also on the geology they portray. By using "Guided Navigation" to search, discover and retrieve images, users are exposed to arrays of geological analogues that provide novel insights and opportunities for research and education. The VSA goes live, with evolving content and functionality, through 2008. There are opportunities for designed integration with other global data programs in the earth sciences.

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Site Seismic Safety Program: Summary of Findings

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Savy, J B; Foxall, W

    The Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Site Seismic Safety Program was conceived in 1979 during the preparation of the site Draft Environmental Impact Statement. The impetus for the program came from the development of new methodologies and geologic data that affect assessments of geologic hazards at the LLNL site; it was designed to develop a new assessment of the seismic hazard to the LLNL site and LLNL employees. Secondarily, the program was also intended to provide the technical information needed to make ongoing decisions about design criteria for future construction at LLNL and about the adequacy of existing facilities. Thismore » assessment was intended to be of the highest technical quality and to make use of the most recent and accepted hazard assessment methodologies. The basic purposes and objectives of the current revision are similar to those of the previous studies. Although all the data and experience assembled in the previous studies were utilized to their fullest, the large quantity of new information and new methodologies led to the formation of a new team that includes LLNL staff and outside consultants from academia and private consulting firms. A peer-review panel composed of individuals from academia (A. Cornell, Stanford University), the Department of Energy (DOE; Jeff Kimball), and consulting (Kevin Coppersmith), provided review and guidance. This panel was involved from the beginning of the project in a ''participatory'' type of review. The Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC, a committee sponsored by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission, DOE, and the Electric Power Research Institute) strongly recommends the use of participatory reviews, in which the reviewers follow the progress of a project from the beginning, rather than waiting until the end to provide comments (Budnitz et al., 1997). Following the requirements for probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) stipulated in the DOE standard DOE-STD-1023-95, a

  9. 12 CFR 7.5005 - National bank acting as digital certification authority.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... customer as of the current or a previous date, such as account balance as of a particular date, lines of credit as of a particular date, past financial performance of the customer, and verification of customer relationship with the bank as of a particular date. (c) When a national bank issues a digital certificate...

  10. The National Map seamless digital elevation model specifications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Archuleta, Christy-Ann M.; Constance, Eric W.; Arundel, Samantha T.; Lowe, Amanda J.; Mantey, Kimberly S.; Phillips, Lori A.

    2017-08-02

    This specification documents the requirements and standards used to produce the seamless elevation layers for The National Map of the United States. Seamless elevation data are available for the conterminous United States, Hawaii, Alaska, and the U.S. territories, in three different resolutions—1/3-arc-second, 1-arc-second, and 2-arc-second. These specifications include requirements and standards information about source data requirements, spatial reference system, distribution tiling schemes, horizontal resolution, vertical accuracy, digital elevation model surface treatment, georeferencing, data source and tile dates, distribution and supporting file formats, void areas, metadata, spatial metadata, and quality assurance and control.

  11. The GEOSCOPE broadband seismic observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douet, Vincent; Vallée, Martin; Zigone, Dimitri; Bonaimé, Sébastien; Stutzmann, Eléonore; Maggi, Alessia; Pardo, Constanza; Bernard, Armelle; Leroy, Nicolas; Pesqueira, Frédéric; Lévêque, Jean-Jacques; Thoré, Jean-Yves; Bes de Berc, Maxime; Sayadi, Jihane

    2016-04-01

    The GEOSCOPE observatory has provided continuous broadband data to the scientific community for the past 34 years. The 31 operational GEOSCOPE stations are installed in 17 countries, across all continents and on islands throughout the oceans. They are equipped with three component very broadband seismometers (STS1, T240 or STS2) and 24 or 26 bit digitizers (Q330HR). Seismometers are installed with warpless base plates, which decrease long period noise on horizontal components by up to 15dB. All stations send data in real time to the IPGP data center, which transmits them automatically to other data centers (FDSN/IRIS-DMC and RESIF) and tsunami warning centers. In 2016, three stations are expected to be installed or re-installed: in Western China (WUS station), in Saint Pierre and Miquelon Island (off the East coast of Canada) and in Walis and Futuna (SouthWest Pacific Ocean). The waveform data are technically validated by IPGP (25 stations) or EOST (6 stations) in order to check their continuity and integrity. Scientific data validation is also performed by analyzing seismic noise level of the continuous data and by comparing real and synthetic earthquake waveforms (body waves). After these validations, data are archived by the IPGP data center in Paris. They are made available to the international scientific community through different interfaces (see details on http://geoscope.ipgp.fr). Data are duplicated at the FDSN/IRIS-DMC data center and a similar duplication at the French national data center RESIF will be operational in 2016. The GEOSCOPE broadband seismic observatory also provides near-real time information on global moderate-to-large seismicity (above magnitude 5.5-6) through the automated application of the SCARDEC method (Vallée et al., 2011). By using global data from the FDSN - in particular from GEOSCOPE and IRIS/USGS stations -, earthquake source parameters (depth, moment magnitude, focal mechanism, source time function) are determined about 45

  12. The compilation of the instrumental seismic catalogue of Italy: 1975-1984

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giardini, D.; Velonà, M. A.; Boschi, E.

    1992-12-01

    We compile a homogeneous and complete catalogue of the seismicity of the Italian region for 1975-1984, the period marking the transition from standard analogue seismometry to the new digital era. The work is developed in three phases: (1) the creation of a uniform digital databank of all seismic station readings, unifying the database available at the Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica with the catalogue of the International Seismological Centre; (2) the preparation of numerical procedures for automatic association of arrival data and for hypocentre location, using arrivals from local, regional and teleseismic stations in a spherical geometry; (3) the introduction of lateral heterogeneity by calibrating regional travel-time curves and station corrections. The first two phases have been completed, providing a new instrumental catalogue obtained using a spherical Earth model; the third phase is presented here in a preliminary stage.

  13. New Observations of Seismic Group Velocities in the Western Solomon Islands from Cross-Correlation of Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ku, C. S.; You, S. H.; Kuo, Y. T.; Huang, B. S.; Wu, Y. M.; Chen, Y. G.; Taylor, F. W.

    2015-12-01

    A MW 8.1 earthquake occurred on 1 April 2007 in the western Solomon Islands. Following this event, a damaging tsunami was induced and hit the Island Gizo where the capital city of Western Province of Solomon Islands located. Several buildings of this city were destroyed and several peoples lost their lives during this earthquake. However, during this earthquake, no near source seismic instrument has been installed in this region. The seismic evaluations for the aftershock sequence, the possible earthquake early warning and tsunami warning were unavailable. For the purpose of knowing more detailed information about seismic activity in this region, we have installed 9 seismic stations (with Trillium 120PA broadband seismometer and Q330S 24bit digitizer) around the rupture zone of the 2007 earthquake since September of 2009. Within a decade, it has been demonstrated both theoretically and experimentally that the Green's function or impulse response between two seismic stations can be retrieved from the cross-correlation of ambient noise. In this study, 6 stations' observations which are more complete during 2011/10 ~ 2012/12 period, were selected for the purpose of the cross-correlation analysis of ambient seismic noise. The group velocities at period 2-20 seconds of 15 station-pairs were extracted by using multiple filter technique (MFT) method. The analyzed results of this study presented significant results of group velocities with higher frequency contents than other studies (20-60 seconds in usually cases) and opened new opportunities to study the shallow crustal structure of the western Solomon Islands.

  14. The 2018 and 2020 Updates of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petersen, M. D.

    2017-12-01

    During 2018 the USGS will update the 2014 National Seismic Hazard Models by incorporating new seismicity models, ground motion models, site factors, fault inputs, and by improving weights to ground motion models using empirical and other data. We will update the earthquake catalog for the U.S. and introduce new rate models. Additional fault data will be used to improve rate estimates on active faults. New ground motion models (GMMs) and site factors for Vs30 have been released by the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research Center (PEER) and we will consider these in assessing ground motions in craton and extended margin regions of the central and eastern U.S. The USGS will also include basin-depth terms for selected urban areas of the western United States to improve long-period shaking assessments using published depth estimates to 1.0 and 2.5 km/s shear wave velocities. We will produce hazard maps for input into the building codes that span a broad range of periods (0.1 to 5 s) and site classes (shear wave velocity from 2000 m/s to 200 m/s in the upper 30 m of the crust, Vs30). In the 2020 update we plan on including: a new national crustal model that defines basin depths required in the latest GMMs, new 3-D ground motion simulations for several urban areas, new magnitude-area equations, and new fault geodetic and geologic strain rate models. The USGS will also consider including new 3-D ground motion simulations for inclusion in these long-period maps. These new models are being evaluated and will be discussed at one or more regional and topical workshops held at the beginning of 2018.

  15. Seismicity of Cascade Volcanoes: Characterization and Comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thelen, W. A.

    2016-12-01

    Here we summarize and compare the seismicity around each of the Very High Threat Volcanoes of the Cascade Range of Washington, Oregon and California as defined by the National Volcanic Early Warning System (NVEWS) threat assessment (Ewert et al., 2005). Understanding the background seismic activity and processes controlling it is critical for assessing changes in seismicity and their implications for volcanic hazards. Comparing seismicity at different volcanic centers can help determine what critical factors or processes affect the observed seismic behavior. Of the ten Very High Threat Volcanoes in the Cascade Range, five volcanoes are consistently seismogenic when considering earthquakes within 10 km of the volcanic center or caldera edge (Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, Mount Hood, Newberry Caldera, Lassen Volcanic Center). Other Very High Threat volcanoes (South Sister, Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Crater Lake and Mount Shasta) have comparatively low rates of seismicity and not enough recorded earthquakes to calculate catalog statistics. Using a swarm definition of 3 or more earthquakes occurring in a day with magnitudes above the largest of the network's magnitude of completenesses (M 0.9), we find that Lassen Volcanic Center is the "swarmiest" in terms of percent of seismicity occurring in swarms, followed by Mount Hood, Mount St. Helens and Rainier. The predominance of swarms at Mount Hood may be overstated, as much of the seismicity is occurring on surrounding crustal faults (Jones and Malone, 2005). Newberry Caldera has a relatively short record of seismicity since the permanent network was installed in 2011, however there have been no swarms detected as defined here. Future work will include developing discriminates for volcanic versus tectonic seismicity to better filter the seismic catalog and more precise binning of depths at some volcanoes so that we may better consider different processes. Ewert J. W., Guffanti, M. and Murray, T. L. (2005). An

  16. Implementation of NGA-West2 ground motion models in the 2014 U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Petersen, Mark D.; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Powers, Peter; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Frankel, Arthur D.

    2014-01-01

    The U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHMs) have been an important component of seismic design regulations in the United States for the past several decades. These maps present earthquake ground shaking intensities at specified probabilities of being exceeded over a 50-year time period. The previous version of the NSHMs was developed in 2008; during 2012 and 2013, scientists at the U.S. Geological Survey have been updating the maps based on their assessment of the “best available science,” resulting in the 2014 NSHMs. The update includes modifications to the seismic source models and the ground motion models (GMMs) for sites across the conterminous United States. This paper focuses on updates in the Western United States (WUS) due to the use of new GMMs for shallow crustal earthquakes in active tectonic regions developed by the Next Generation Attenuation (NGA-West2) project. Individual GMMs, their weighted combination, and their impact on the hazard maps relative to 2008 are discussed. In general, the combined effects of lower medians and increased standard deviations in the new GMMs have caused only small changes, within 5–20%, in the probabilistic ground motions for most sites across the WUS compared to the 2008 NSHMs.

  17. The 2008 U.S. Geological Survey national seismic hazard models and maps for the central and eastern United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petersen, Mark D.; Frankel, Arthur D.; Harmsen, Stephen C.; Mueller, Charles S.; Boyd, Oliver S.; Luco, Nicolas; Wheeler, Russell L.; Rukstales, Kenneth S.; Haller, Kathleen M.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the scientific basis for the source and ground-motion models applied in the 2008 National Seismic Hazard Maps, the development of new products that are used for building design and risk analyses, relationships between the hazard maps and design maps used in building codes, and potential future improvements to the hazard maps.

  18. Global Seismic Monitoring: Past, Present, and Future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoback, M.; Benz, H.; Oppenheimer, D.

    2007-12-01

    Global seismological observations began in April 1889 when an earthquake in Tokyo, Japan was accurately recorded in Germany on two different horizontal pendulum instruments. However, modern global observational seismology really began 46 years ago when the 120-station World Wide Standard Seismograph Network was installed by the US to monitor underground nuclear tests and earthquakes using well-calibrated short- and long- period stations. At the same time rapid advances in computing technology enabled researchers to begin sophisticated analysis of the increasing amount of seismic data, which led to better understanding of earthquake source properties and their use in establishing plate tectonics. Today, global seismic networks are operated by German (Geophon), France (Geoscope), the United States (Global Seismograph Network) and the International Monitoring System. Presently, the Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks registers more than 1,000 broadband stations world-wide, a small percentage of the total number of digital seismic stations around the world. Following the devastating Kobe, Japan and Northridge, California earthquakes, Japan and the US have led the world in the integration of existing seismic sensor systems (weak and strong motion) into development of near-real-time, post-earthquake response products like ShakeMap, detailing the spatial distribution of strong shaking. Future challenges include expanding real-time integration of both seismic and geodetic sensor systems to produce early warning of strong shaking, rapid source determination, as well as near-realtime post- earthquake damage assessment. Seismic network data, hydro-acoustic arrays, deep water tide gauges, and satellite imagery of wave propagation should be integrated in real-time to provide input for hydrodynamic modeling yielding the distribution, timing and size of tsunamis runup--which would then be available instantly on the web, e.g. in a Google Earth format. Dense arrays of strong

  19. OGS improvements in the year 2011 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bragato, P. L.; Pesaresi, D.; Saraò, A.; Di Bartolomeo, P.; Durı, G.

    2012-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 15 very sensitive broad band and 21 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. Since 2002 OGS-CRS is using the Antelope software suite on several workstations plus a SUN Cluster as the main tool for collecting, analyzing, archiving and exchanging seismic data, initially in the framework of the EU Interreg IIIA project "Trans-national seismological networks in the South-Eastern Alps". SeisComP is also used as a real time data exchange server tool. In order to improve the seismological monitoring of the Northeastern Italy area, at OGS-CRS we tuned existing programs and created ad hoc ones like: a customized web server named PickServer to manually relocate earthquakes, a script for automatic moment tensor determination, scripts for web publishing of earthquake parametric data, waveforms, state of health parameters and shaking maps, noise characterization by means of automatic spectra analysis, and last but not least scripts for email/SMS/fax alerting. The OGS-CRS Real Time Seismological website (RTS, http://rts.crs.inogs.it/) operative since several years was initially developed in the framework of the Italian DPC-INGV S3 Project: the RTS website shows classic earthquake locations

  20. Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Chiu, S.C.C.; Johnston, A.C.; Chiu, J.M.

    1994-08-01

    The seismic activity in the southern Appalachian area was monitored by the Southern Appalachian Regional Seismic Network (SARSN) since late 1979 by the Center for Earthquake Research and Information (CERI) at Memphis State University. This network provides good spatial coverage for earthquake locations especially in east Tennessee. The level of activity concentrates more heavily in the Valley and Ridge province of eastern Tennessee, as opposed to the Blue Ridge or Inner Piedmont. The large majority of these events lie between New York - Alabama lineament and the Clingman/Ocoee lineament, magnetic anomalies produced by deep-seated basement structures. Therefore SARSN, even withmore » its wide station spacing, has been able to define the essential first-order seismological characteristics of the Southern Appalachian seismic zone. The focal depths of the southeastern U.S. earthquakes concentrate between 8 and 16 km, occurring principally beneath the Appalachian overthrust. In cross-sectional views, the average seismicity is shallower to the east beneath the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces and deeper to the west beneath the Valley and Ridge and the North American craton. Results of recent focal mechanism studies by using the CERI digital earthquake catalog between October, 1986 and December, 1991, indicate that the basement of the Valley and Ridge province is under a horizontal, NE-SW compressive stress. Right-lateral strike-slip faulting on nearly north-south fault planes is preferred because it agrees with the trend of the regional magnetic anomaly pattern.« less

  1. Readiness for Delivering Digital Health at Scale: Lessons From a Longitudinal Qualitative Evaluation of a National Digital Health Innovation Program in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Lennon, Marilyn R; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Devlin, Alison M; O'Connor, Siobhan; O'Donnell, Catherine; Chetty, Ula; Agbakoba, Ruth; Bikker, Annemieke; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Watson, Nicholas; Wyke, Sally

    2017-01-01

    Background Digital health has the potential to support care delivery for chronic illness. Despite positive evidence from localized implementations, new technologies have proven slow to become accepted, integrated, and routinized at scale. Objective The aim of our study was to examine barriers and facilitators to implementation of digital health at scale through the evaluation of a £37m national digital health program: ‟Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale” (dallas) from 2012-2015. Methods The study was a longitudinal qualitative, multi-stakeholder, implementation study. The methods included interviews (n=125) with key implementers, focus groups with consumers and patients (n=7), project meetings (n=12), field work or observation in the communities (n=16), health professional survey responses (n=48), and cross program documentary evidence on implementation (n=215). We used a sociological theory called normalization process theory (NPT) and a longitudinal (3 years) qualitative framework analysis approach. This work did not study a single intervention or population. Instead, we evaluated the processes (of designing and delivering digital health), and our outcomes were the identified barriers and facilitators to delivering and mainstreaming services and products within the mixed sector digital health ecosystem. Results We identified three main levels of issues influencing readiness for digital health: macro (market, infrastructure, policy), meso (organizational), and micro (professional or public). Factors hindering implementation included: lack of information technology (IT) infrastructure, uncertainty around information governance, lack of incentives to prioritize interoperability, lack of precedence on accountability within the commercial sector, and a market perceived as difficult to navigate. Factors enabling implementation were: clinical endorsement, champions who promoted digital health, and public and professional willingness. Conclusions

  2. IMS Seismic and Infrasound Stations Instrumental Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starovoit, Y. O.; Dricker, I. G.; Marty, J.

    2016-12-01

    The IMS seismic network is a set of monitoring facilities including 50 primary stations and 120 auxiliary stations. Besides the difference in the mode of data transmission to the IDC, technical specifications for seismographic equipment to be installed at both types of stations are essentially the same. The IMS infrasound network comprises 60 facilities with the requirement of continuous data transmission to IDC. The objective of this presentation is to report instrumental challenges associated with both seismic and infrasound technologies. In context of specifications for IMS seismic stations it was stressed that verification seismology is concerned with searching of reliable methods of signal detections at high frequencies. In the meantime MS/mb screening criteria between earthquakes and explosions relies on reliable detection of surface waves. The IMS seismic requirements for instrumental noise and operational range of data logger are defined as certain dB level below minimum background within the required frequency band from 0.02 to 16Hz. The type of sensors response is requested to be flat either in velocity or acceleration. The compliance with IMS specifications may thus introduce a challenging task when low-noise conditions have been recorded at the site. It means that as a station noise PSD approaches the NLNM it requires a high sensitive sensor to be connected to a quiet digitizer which may cause a quick system clip and waste of the available dynamic range. The experience has shown that hybrid frequency response of seismic sensors where combination of flat to velocity and flat to acceleration portions of the sensor frequency response may provide an optimal solution for utilization of the dynamic range and low digitizer noise floor. Vast efforts are also being undertaken and results achieved in the infrasound technology to standardize and optimize the response of the Wind-Noise Reduction System within the IMS infrasound passband from 0.02-4Hz and to deploy

  3. Level up Learning: A National Survey on Teaching with Digital Games

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Takeuchi, Lori M.; Vaala, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    Digital games have the potential to transform K-12 education as we know it. But what has been the real experience among teachers who use games in the classroom? In 2013, the Games and Learning Publishing Council conducted a national survey among nearly 700 K-8 teachers. The report reveals key findings from the survey, and looks at how often and…

  4. Ground motion models used in the 2014 U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rezaeian, Sanaz; Petersen, Mark D.; Moschetti, Morgan P.

    2015-01-01

    The National Seismic Hazard Maps (NSHMs) are an important component of seismic design regulations in the United States. This paper compares hazard using the new suite of ground motion models (GMMs) relative to hazard using the suite of GMMs applied in the previous version of the maps. The new source characterization models are used for both cases. A previous paper (Rezaeian et al. 2014) discussed the five NGA-West2 GMMs used for shallow crustal earthquakes in the Western United States (WUS), which are also summarized here. Our focus in this paper is on GMMs for earthquakes in stable continental regions in the Central and Eastern United States (CEUS), as well as subduction interface and deep intraslab earthquakes. We consider building code hazard levels for peak ground acceleration (PGA), 0.2-s, and 1.0-s spectral accelerations (SAs) on uniform firm-rock site conditions. The GMM modifications in the updated version of the maps created changes in hazard within 5% to 20% in WUS; decreases within 5% to 20% in CEUS; changes within 5% to 15% for subduction interface earthquakes; and changes involving decreases of up to 50% and increases of up to 30% for deep intraslab earthquakes for most U.S. sites. These modifications were combined with changes resulting from modifications in the source characterization models to obtain the new hazard maps.

  5. Impact of Topography on Seismic Amplification During the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, S.; van der Meijde, M.; van der Werff, H.; Shafique, M.

    2016-12-01

    This study assesses topographic amplification of seismic response during the 2005 Kashmir Earthquake in northern Pakistan. Topography scatters seismic waves, which causes variation in seismic response on the surface of the earth. During the Kashmir earthquake, topography induced amplification was suspected to have had major influence on the damage of infrastructure. We did a 3-dimensional simulation of the event using SPECFEM3D software. We first analyzed the impact of data resolution (mesh and Digital Elevation Model) on the derived seismic response. ASTER GDEM elevation data was used to build a 3D finite element mesh, and the parameters (latitude, longitude, depth, moment tensor) of the Kashmir earthquake were used in simulating the event. Our results show amplification of seismic response on ridges and de-amplification in valleys. It was also found that slopes facing away from the source receive an amplified seismic response when compared to slopes facing towards the source. The PGD would regularly fall within the range 0.23-5.8 meters. The topographic amplification causes local changes in the range of -2.50 to +3.50 meters; causing the PGD to fall in the range of 0.36-7.85 meters.

  6. Time-dependent seismic tomography of the Coso geothermal area, 1996-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Julian, B.R.; Foulger, G.R.

    2005-01-01

    The permanent 18-station network of three-component digital seismometers at the seismically active Coso geothermal area, California, provides high-quality microearthquake (MEQ) data that are well suited to investigating temporal variations in structure related to processes within the geothermal reservoir. A preliminary study [Julian, et al., 2003; Julian, et al., 2004] comparing data from 1996 and 2003 found significant variations in the ratio of the seismic wave-speeds, Vp/Vs, at shallow depths over this time interval. This report describes results of a more detailed study of each year from 1996 through 2004.

  7. Seismic Risk Assessment of Italian Seaports Using GIS

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Bartolomei, Anna; Corigliano, Mirko; Lai, Carlo G.

    Seaports are crucial elements in the export and import of goods and/or on the flow of travellers in the tourism industry of many industrialised nations included Italy. Experience gained from recent earthquakes (e.g. 1989 Loma Prieta in USA, 1995 Hyogoken-Nanbu and 2003 Tokachi-Oki in Japan) have dramatically demonstrated the seismic vulnerability of seaport structures and the severe damage that can be caused by ground shaking. In Italy, the Department of Civil Protection has funded a research project to develop a methodology for the seismic design of new marginal wharves and assessment of existing structures at seaports located in areas ofmore » medium or high seismicity. This paper shows part of the results of this research project, currently underway, with particular reference to the seismic risk assessment through an interactive, geographically referenced database (GIS). Standard risk assessment have been carried out for the Gioia Tauro port in Calabria (Italy) using the empirical curves implemented by the National Institute of Building Sciences (NIBS, 2004)« less

  8. Evaluation of seismic design spectrum based on UHS implementing fourth-generation seismic hazard maps of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ali; Hasan, Rafiq; Pekau, Oscar A.

    2016-12-01

    Two recent developments have come into the forefront with reference to updating the seismic design provisions for codes: (1) publication of new seismic hazard maps for Canada by the Geological Survey of Canada, and (2) emergence of the concept of new spectral format outdating the conventional standardized spectral format. The fourth -generation seismic hazard maps are based on enriched seismic data, enhanced knowledge of regional seismicity and improved seismic hazard modeling techniques. Therefore, the new maps are more accurate and need to incorporate into the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code (CHBDC) for its next edition similar to its building counterpart National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). In fact, the code writers expressed similar intentions with comments in the commentary of CHBCD 2006. During the process of updating codes, NBCC, and AASHTO Guide Specifications for LRFD Seismic Bridge Design, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington (2009) lowered the probability level from 10 to 2% and 10 to 5%, respectively. This study has brought five sets of hazard maps corresponding to 2%, 5% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years developed by the GSC under investigation. To have a sound statistical inference, 389 Canadian cities are selected. This study shows the implications of the changes of new hazard maps on the design process (i.e., extent of magnification or reduction of the design forces).

  9. Closet to Cloud: The online archiving of tape-based continuous NCSN seismic data from 1993-2005

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhauser, D. S.; Aranha, M. A.; Kohler, W. M.; Oppenheimer, D.

    2016-12-01

    As earthquake monitoring systems in the 1980s moved from analog to digital recording systems, most seismic networks only archived digital waveforms from detected events due to lack of affordable online digital storage for continuous high-rate (100 sps) data. The Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC), established in 1991 by UC Berkeley and the USGS Menlo Park, archived 20 sps continuous data and triggerd high-rate from the sparse Berkeley seismic network, but could not afford the online storage for continuous high-rate data from the 300+ stations of the USGS Northern California Seismic Network (NCSN). The discovery of non-volcanic tremor and the use of continuous waveform correlation techniques for detecting repeating earthquakes combined with the increase in disk capacity capacity and significant reduction in disk costs led the Northern California Earthquake Data Center (NCEDC) to begin archiving continuous high-rate waveforms in 2004-2005. The USGS Menlo Park NCSN network had backup tapes of continuous high-rate waveform data since 1993 on the shelf, and the USGS and NCEDC embarked on a project to restore and archive all continuous NCSN data from 1993 through 2005. We will discuss the procedures and problems encountered when reading, transcribing, converting data formats, SEED channel naming, and archiving the 1993-2005 continuous NCSN waveforms. We will also illustrate new science enabled by these data. These and other northern California seismic and geophysical data are available via web services at http://service.ncedc.org

  10. National Information Policy Developments Worldwide II: Universal Access-Addressing the Digital Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Adrienne; Oppenheim, Charles

    2002-01-01

    Describes the results of a literature survey on recent developments in national information policies in the area of universal access that tries to ensure equal access to information, and considers the digital divide. Highlights include policies in Australia, Canada, the European Union, Hong Kong, the United States, and Okinawa. (Contains 64…

  11. Change Detection via Cross-Borehole and VSP Seismic Surveys for the Source Physics Experiments (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knox, H. A.; Abbott, R. E.; Bonal, N. D.; Aldridge, D. F.; Preston, L. A.; Ober, C.

    2012-12-01

    In support of the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) at the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS), we have conducted two cross-borehole seismic experiments in the Climax Stock. The first experiment was conducted prior to the third shot in this multi-detonation program using two available boreholes and the shot hole, while the second experiment was conducted after the shot using four of the available boreholes. The first study focused on developing a well-characterized 2D pre-explosion Vp model including two VSPs and a seismic refraction survey, as well as quantifying baseline waveform similarity at reoccupied sites. This was accomplished by recording both "sparker" and accelerated weight drop sources on a hydrophone string and surface geophones. In total more than 18,500 unique source-receiver pairs were acquired during this testing. In the second experiment, we reacquired aproximately 8,800 source-receiver pairs and performed a cross-line survey allowing for a 3D post-explosion Vp model. The data acquired from the reoccupied sites was processed using cross-correlation methods and change detection methodologies, including comparison of the tomographic images. The survey design and subsequent processing provided an opportunity to investigate seismic wave propagation through damaged rock. We also performed full waveform forward modelling for a granitic body hosting a perched aquifer. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  12. Seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shedlock, K.M.

    1999-01-01

    Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. National, state, and local government, decision makers, engineers, planners, emergency response organizations, builders, universities, and the general public require seismic hazard estimates for land use planning, improved building design and construction (including adoption of building construction codes), emergency response preparedness plans, economic forecasts, housing and employment decisions, and many more types of risk mitigation. The seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean is the concatenation of various national and regional maps, involving a suite of approaches. The combined maps and documentation provide a useful regional seismic hazard framework and serve as a resource for any national or regional agency for further detailed studies applicable to their needs. This seismic hazard map depicts Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years. PGA, a short-period ground motion parameter that is proportional to force, is the most commonly mapped ground motion parameter because current building codes that include seismic provisions specify the horizontal force a building should be able to withstand during an earthquake. This seismic hazard map of North and Central America and the Caribbean depicts the likely level of short-period ground motion from earthquakes in a fifty-year window. Short-period ground motions effect short-period structures (e.g., one-to-two story buildings). The highest seismic hazard values in the region generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes.

  13. Global Seismic Cross-Correlation Results: Characterizing Repeating Seismic Events

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vieceli, R.; Dodge, D. A.; Walter, W. R.

    2016-12-01

    Increases in seismic instrument quality and coverage have led to increased knowledge of earthquakes, but have also revealed the complex and diverse nature of earthquake ruptures. Nonetheless, some earthquakes are sufficiently similar to each other that they produce correlated waveforms. Such repeating events have been used to investigate interplate coupling of subduction zones [e.g. Igarashi, 2010; Yu, 2013], study spatio-temporal changes in slip rate at plate boundaries [e.g. Igarashi et al., 2003], observe variations in seismic wave propagation velocities in the crust [e.g. Schaff and Beroza, 2004; Sawazaki et al., 2015], and assess inner core rotation [e.g. Yu, 2016]. The characterization of repeating events on a global scale remains a very challenging problem. An initial global seismic cross-correlation study used over 310 million waveforms from nearly 3.8 million events recorded between 1970 and 2013 to determine an initial look at global correlated seismicity [Dodge and Walter, 2015]. In this work, we analyze the spatial and temporal distribution of the most highly correlated event clusters or "multiplets" from the Dodge and Walter [2015] study. We examine how the distributions and characteristics of multiplets are effected by tectonic environment, source-station separation, and frequency band. Preliminary results suggest that the distribution of multiplets does not correspond to the tectonic environment in any obvious way, nor do they always coincide with the occurrence of large earthquakes. Future work will focus on clustering correlated pairs and working to reduce the bias introduced by non-uniform seismic station coverage and data availability. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessment for Iraq

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Onur, Tuna; Gok, Rengin; Abdulnaby, Wathiq

    Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Assessments (PSHA) form the basis for most contemporary seismic provisions in building codes around the world. The current building code of Iraq was published in 1997. An update to this edition is in the process of being released. However, there are no national PSHA studies in Iraq for the new building code to refer to for seismic loading in terms of spectral accelerations. As an interim solution, the new draft building code was considering to refer to PSHA results produced in the late 1990s as part of the Global Seismic Hazard Assessment Program (GSHAP; Giardini et al.,more » 1999). However these results are: a) more than 15 years outdated, b) PGA-based only, necessitating rough conversion factors to calculate spectral accelerations at 0.3s and 1.0s for seismic design, and c) at a probability level of 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years, not the 2% that the building code requires. Hence there is a pressing need for a new, updated PSHA for Iraq.« less

  15. Modernization of the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R.; Devora, A.; Hauksson, E.; Johnson, D.; Thomas, V.; Watkins, M.; Yip, R.; Yu, E.; Given, D.; Cone, G.; Koesterer, C.

    2009-12-01

    The USGS/ANSS/ARRA program is providing Government Furnished Equipment (GFE), and two year funding for upgrading the Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN). The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in southern California that monitors seismicity and provides real-time earthquake information products such as rapid notifications, moment tensors, and ShakeMap. The SCSN has evolved through the years and now consists of several well-integrated components such as Short-Period analog, TERRAscope, digital stations, and real-time strong motion stations, or about 300 stations. In addition, the SCSN records data from about 100 stations provided by partner networks. To strengthen the ability of SCSN to meet the ANSS performance standards, we will install GFE and carry out the following upgrades and improvements of the various components of the SCSN: 1) Upgrade of dataloggers at seven TERRAscope stations; 2) Upgrade of dataloggers at 131 digital stations and upgrade broadband sensors at 25 stations; 3) Upgrade of SCSN metadata capabilities; 4) Upgrade of telemetry capabilities for both seismic and GPS data; and 5) Upgrade balers at stations with existing Q330 dataloggers. These upgrades will enable the SCSN to meet the ANSS Performance Standards more consistently than before. The new equipment will improve station uptimes and reduce maintenance costs. The new equipment will also provide improved waveform data quality and consequently superior data products. The data gaps due to various outages will be minimized, and ‘late’ data will be readily available through retrieval from on-site storage. Compared to the outdated equipment, the new equipment will speed up data delivery by about 10 sec, which is fast enough for earthquake early warning applications. The new equipment also has about a factor of ten lower consumption of power. We will also upgrade the SCSN data acquisition and data center facilities, which will improve the SCSN

  16. Digital analytical data from mineral resource assessments of national forest lands in Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boleneus, D.E.; Chase, D.W.

    1999-01-01

    Extensive reconnaissance assessments of the mineral resource potential of the Colville and Okanogan National Forests in northeastern Washington were conducted during 1979-1982 by a private consultant A.R. Grant, under contract with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Forest Service. These forests occupy large parts of Pend Oreille, Stevens, Ferry, and Okanogan counties, and smaller parts of Whatcom, Skagit, and Chelan counties adjoining Okanogan County in the Cascades. Sampled terrain also included the Kaniksu National Forest in Pend Oreille County and one stream bed of the Kaniksu in adjacent Bonner County, Idaho. Two unpublished reports resulting from the assessments (Grant, 1982a,b) list a total of 3,927 analyses of gold, silver, copper, lead, zinc, molybdenum, tungsten, and uranium content of stream sediment and bedrock samples collected at widely dispersed sites in the three National Forests. This report makes this important body of work available in digital form on diskettes, to enhance manipulations with computer spreadsheets, geographic information systems (GIS), and digital spatial analyses. This will allow for utilization of data by modern day explorationists and by the general geodata user community.

  17. High-resolution chirp seismic reflection data acquired from the Cap de Creus shelf and canyon area, Gulf of Lions, Spain in 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grossman, Eric E.; Hart, Patrick E.; Field, Michael E.; Triezenberg, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Seismic reflection data were collected from the Cap de Creus shelf and canyon in the southwest portion of the Gulf of Lions in October 2004. The data were acquired using the U.S. Geological Survey`s (USGS) high-resolution Edgetech CHIRP 512i seismic reflection system aboard the R/V Oceanus. Data from the shipboard 3.5 kHz echosounder were also collected but are not presented here. The seismic reflection data were collected as part of EuroSTRATAFORM funded by the Office of Naval Research. In October 2004, more than 200 km of high resolution seismic reflection data were collected in water depths ranging 30 m - 600 m. All data were recorded with a Delph Seismic PC-based digital recording system and processed with Delph Seismic software. Processed sections were georeferenced into tiff images for digital archive, processing and display. Penetration ranged 20-80 m. The data feature high quality vertical cross-section imagery of numerous sequences of Quaternary seismic stratigraphy. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles. The data are of high quality and provide new information on the location and thickness of sediment deposits overlying a major erosion surface on the Cap de Creus shelf; they also provide new insight into sediment processes on the walls and in the channel of Cap de Creus Canyon. These data are under study by researchers at the US Geological Survey, the University of Barcelona, and Texas A and M University. Copies of the data are available to all researchers.

  18. ULF radio monitoring network in a seismic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toader, Victorin; Moldovan, Iren-Adelina; Ionescu, Constantin; Marmureanu, Alexandru

    2017-04-01

    ULF monitoring is a part of a multidisciplinary network (AeroSolSys) located in Vrancea (Curvature Carpathian Mountains). Four radio receivers (100 kHz - microwave) placed on faults in a high seismic area characterized by deep earthquakes detect fairly weak radio waves. The radio power is recorded in correlation with many other parameters related to near surface low atmosphere phenomena (seismicity, solar radiation, air ionization, electromagnetic activity, radon, CO2 concentration, atmospheric pressure, telluric currents, infrasound, seismo-acoustic emission, meteorological information). We follow variations in the earth's surface propagate radio waves avoiding reflection on ionosphere. For this reason the distance between stations is less than 60 km and the main source of emission is near (Bod broadcasting transmitter for long- and medium-wave radio, next to Brasov city). In the same time tectonic stress affects the radio propagation in air and it could generates ULF waves in ground (LAI coupling). To reduce the uncertainty is necessary to monitor a location for extended periods of time to outline local and seasonal fluctuations. Solar flares do not affect seismic activity but they produce disturbances in telecommunications networks and power grids. Our ULF monitoring correlated with two local magnetometers does not indicate this so far with our receivers. Our analysis was made during magnetic storms with Kp 7 and 8 according to NOAA satellites. To correlate the results we implemented an application that monitors the satellite EUTELSAT latency compared to WiMAX land communication in the same place. ULF band radio monitoring showed that our receiver is dependent on temperature and that it is necessary to introduce a band pass filter in data analysis. ULF data acquisition is performed by Kinemetrics and National Instruments digitizers with a sampling rate of 100 Hz in Miniseed format and then converted into text files with 1 Hz rate for analysis in very low

  19. Semi-automatic mapping for identifying complex geobodies in seismic images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-C, Raymundo; Romero-Salcedo, Manuel; Velasquillo-Martínez, Luis G.; Shemeretov, Leonid

    2017-03-01

    Seismic images are composed of positive and negative seismic wave traces with different amplitudes (Robein 2010 Seismic Imaging: A Review of the Techniques, their Principles, Merits and Limitations (Houten: EAGE)). The association of these amplitudes together with a color palette forms complex visual patterns. The color intensity of such patterns is directly related to impedance contrasts: the higher the contrast, the higher the color intensity. Generally speaking, low impedance contrasts are depicted with low tone colors, creating zones with different patterns whose features are not evident for a 3D automated mapping option available on commercial software. In this work, a workflow for a semi-automatic mapping of seismic images focused on those areas with low-intensity colored zones that may be associated with geobodies of petroleum interest is proposed. The CIE L*A*B* color space was used to perform the seismic image processing, which helped find small but significant differences between pixel tones. This process generated binary masks that bound color regions to low-intensity colors. The three-dimensional-mask projection allowed the construction of 3D structures for such zones (geobodies). The proposed method was applied to a set of digital images from a seismic cube and tested on four representative study cases. The obtained results are encouraging because interesting geobodies are obtained with a minimum of information.

  20. A fast topographic characterization of seismic station locations in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karimzadeh, Sadra; Miyajima, Masakatsu; Kamel, Batoul; Pessina, Vera

    2015-10-01

    We present topographic slope positions of seismic stations within four independent networks (IGUT, IIEES, GSI, and BHRC) in Iran through integrated use of digital elevation models and GIS. Since topographic amplification factor (TAF) due to ground surface irregularity could be one of the reasons of earthquake wave amplification and unexpected damage of structures located on the top of ridges in many previous studies, the ridge stations in the study area are recognized using topographic position index (TPI) as a spatial-based scale-dependent approach that helps in classification of topographic positions. We also present the correlation between local topographic positions and V {/s 30} along with Voronoi tiles of two networks (IGUT and IIEES). The obtained results can be profitably used in seismology to establish homogeneous subnetworks based on Voronoi tiles with precise feedback and in the formulation of new ground motion prediction equations with respect to topographic position and topographic amplification factor.

  1. Continuous, Large-Scale Processing of Seismic Archives for High-Resolution Monitoring of Seismic Activity and Seismogenic Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waldhauser, F.; Schaff, D. P.

    2012-12-01

    Archives of digital seismic data recorded by seismometer networks around the world have grown tremendously over the last several decades helped by the deployment of seismic stations and their continued operation within the framework of monitoring earthquake activity and verification of the Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty. We show results from our continuing effort in developing efficient waveform cross-correlation and double-difference analysis methods for the large-scale processing of regional and global seismic archives to improve existing earthquake parameter estimates, detect seismic events with magnitudes below current detection thresholds, and improve real-time monitoring procedures. We demonstrate the performance of these algorithms as applied to the 28-year long seismic archive of the Northern California Seismic Network. The tools enable the computation of periodic updates of a high-resolution earthquake catalog of currently over 500,000 earthquakes using simultaneous double-difference inversions, achieving up to three orders of magnitude resolution improvement over existing hypocenter locations. This catalog, together with associated metadata, form the underlying relational database for a real-time double-difference scheme, DDRT, which rapidly computes high-precision correlation times and hypocenter locations of new events with respect to the background archive (http://ddrt.ldeo.columbia.edu). The DDRT system facilitates near-real-time seismicity analysis, including the ability to search at an unprecedented resolution for spatio-temporal changes in seismogenic properties. In areas with continuously recording stations, we show that a detector built around a scaled cross-correlation function can lower the detection threshold by one magnitude unit compared to the STA/LTA based detector employed at the network. This leads to increased event density, which in turn pushes the resolution capability of our location algorithms. On a global scale, we are currently building

  2. Building a National Heritage Registry for the Sudan: the Friedrich W. Hinkel Archive Digitization Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawrenz, S.

    2017-08-01

    The Republic of the Sudan is home to outstanding and diverse cultural heritage ranging from Neolithic sites of human activity and settlement to historic sites of the 19th and 20th century. While certain phases of the Sudan's cultural heritage such as the period of Egyptian influence during the second and first millennium B.C. have been the focus of archaeological research since the 19th century, other aspects of the country's rich history have remained largely unknown locally and internationally due to a lack of documentation and registration of such sites. Since 2014, the German Archaeological Institute (DAI) has been engaged in an effort to support the creation of a national heritage registry in close cooperation with the National Corporation for Antiquities and Museums (NCAM) by digitizing the archive of German architect Friedrich W. Hinkel and engaging in capacity building measures focusing on analog and digital data curation. The archive contains structured information (photos, drawings, maps and assembled written documentation) regarding over 14,000 archaeological and historical sites in the Sudan using an alphanumeric coding system that allows for easy integration of data in a digital environment such as the DAI's IT infrastructure, the iDAI.world. As such the data assembled by Hinkel will serve as the basis of the national heritage registry currently in development.

  3. LANL seismic screening method for existing buildings

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Dickson, S.L.; Feller, K.C.; Fritz de la Orta, G.O.

    1997-01-01

    The purpose of the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Seismic Screening Method is to provide a comprehensive, rational, and inexpensive method for evaluating the relative seismic integrity of a large building inventory using substantial life-safety as the minimum goal. The substantial life-safety goal is deemed to be satisfied if the extent of structural damage or nonstructural component damage does not pose a significant risk to human life. The screening is limited to Performance Category (PC) -0, -1, and -2 buildings and structures. Because of their higher performance objectives, PC-3 and PC-4 buildings automatically fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method andmore » will be subject to a more detailed seismic analysis. The Laboratory has also designated that PC-0, PC-1, and PC-2 unreinforced masonry bearing wall and masonry infill shear wall buildings fail the LANL Seismic Screening Method because of their historically poor seismic performance or complex behavior. These building types are also recommended for a more detailed seismic analysis. The results of the LANL Seismic Screening Method are expressed in terms of separate scores for potential configuration or physical hazards (Phase One) and calculated capacity/demand ratios (Phase Two). This two-phase method allows the user to quickly identify buildings that have adequate seismic characteristics and structural capacity and screen them out from further evaluation. The resulting scores also provide a ranking of those buildings found to be inadequate. Thus, buildings not passing the screening can be rationally prioritized for further evaluation. For the purpose of complying with Executive Order 12941, the buildings failing the LANL Seismic Screening Method are deemed to have seismic deficiencies, and cost estimates for mitigation must be prepared. Mitigation techniques and cost-estimate guidelines are not included in the LANL Seismic Screening Method.« less

  4. Seismic Imaging of the Source Physics Experiment Site with the Large-N Seismic Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.

    2017-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) consists of a series of chemical explosions at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand seismic wave generation and propagation from these explosions. To achieve this goal, we need an accurate geophysical model of the SPE site. A Large-N seismic array that was deployed at the SPE site during one of the chemical explosions (SPE-5) helps us construct high-resolution local geophysical model. The Large-N seismic array consists of 996 geophones, and covers an area of approximately 2 × 2.5 km. The array is located in the northern end of the Yucca Flat basin, at a transition from Climax Stock (granite) to Yucca Flat (alluvium). In addition to the SPE-5 explosion, the Large-N array also recorded 53 weight drops. Using the Large-N seismic array recordings, we perform body wave and surface wave velocity analysis, and obtain 3D seismic imaging of the SPE site for the top crust of approximately 1 km. The imaging results show clear variation of geophysical parameter with local geological structures, including heterogeneous weathering layer and various rock types. The results of this work are being incorporated in the larger 3D modeling effort of the SPE program to validate the predictive models developed for the site.

  5. Seismic local site effects characterization in the Andarax River Valley (SE Spain) from ambient seismic noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carmona, Enrique; García-Jerez, Antonio; Luzón, Francisco; Sánchez-Martos, Francisco; Sánchez-Sesma, Francisco J.; Piña, José

    2014-05-01

    This work is focused on the characterization of seismic local effects in the Low Andarax River Valley (SE Spain). The Low Andarax River valley is located in an active seismic region, with the higher seismic hazard values in Spain. The landform is composed mainly by sedimentary materials which increase its seismic hazard due to the amplification of the seismic inputs and spectral resonances. We study seismic local effects in the Low Andarax River by analyzing the Horizontal-to-Vertical Spectral Ratio (HVSR) of ambient noise records. The noise data were recorded during two field campaigns in 2012 and 2013. There have been a total of 374 noise measurements with 15 and 30 minutes duration. The acquisition was performed with a Digital Broadband Seismometer Guralp CMG-6TD. The distance between measurements was about 200 meters, covering an area around 40 km2. There have been 6 significant peak frequencies between 0.3 Hz and 5 Hz. It was possible to find interesting areas with similar spectral peaks that coincide with zones with similar microgravimetric anomalies at the alluvial valley. It is also observed a decrease in the frequency peaks from West to East suggesting increased sediment layer. We also compute the soil models at those sites where geotechnical information is available, assuming that the seismic noise is diffuse. We invert the HVSR for these places using horizontally layered models and in the imaginary part the Green functions at the source. It is observed that the S wave velocity inverted models are consistent with the known geotechnical information obtained from drilled boreholes. We identify the elastodynamic properties of the limestone-dolomite materials with a formation of phyllites and quartzite that form the basement of the depression, and those properties of the Miocene and Pliocene detrital deposits (marls, sandy silts, sands and conglomerates) that fill the valley. These results together with the observed resonant frequencies along the Andarax

  6. Readiness for Delivering Digital Health at Scale: Lessons From a Longitudinal Qualitative Evaluation of a National Digital Health Innovation Program in the United Kingdom.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Marilyn R; Bouamrane, Matt-Mouley; Devlin, Alison M; O'Connor, Siobhan; O'Donnell, Catherine; Chetty, Ula; Agbakoba, Ruth; Bikker, Annemieke; Grieve, Eleanor; Finch, Tracy; Watson, Nicholas; Wyke, Sally; Mair, Frances S

    2017-02-16

    Digital health has the potential to support care delivery for chronic illness. Despite positive evidence from localized implementations, new technologies have proven slow to become accepted, integrated, and routinized at scale. The aim of our study was to examine barriers and facilitators to implementation of digital health at scale through the evaluation of a £37m national digital health program: ‟Delivering Assisted Living Lifestyles at Scale" (dallas) from 2012-2015. The study was a longitudinal qualitative, multi-stakeholder, implementation study. The methods included interviews (n=125) with key implementers, focus groups with consumers and patients (n=7), project meetings (n=12), field work or observation in the communities (n=16), health professional survey responses (n=48), and cross program documentary evidence on implementation (n=215). We used a sociological theory called normalization process theory (NPT) and a longitudinal (3 years) qualitative framework analysis approach. This work did not study a single intervention or population. Instead, we evaluated the processes (of designing and delivering digital health), and our outcomes were the identified barriers and facilitators to delivering and mainstreaming services and products within the mixed sector digital health ecosystem. We identified three main levels of issues influencing readiness for digital health: macro (market, infrastructure, policy), meso (organizational), and micro (professional or public). Factors hindering implementation included: lack of information technology (IT) infrastructure, uncertainty around information governance, lack of incentives to prioritize interoperability, lack of precedence on accountability within the commercial sector, and a market perceived as difficult to navigate. Factors enabling implementation were: clinical endorsement, champions who promoted digital health, and public and professional willingness. Although there is receptiveness to digital health

  7. The SISIFO project: Seismic Safety at High Schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peruzza, Laura; Barnaba, Carla; Bragato, Pier Luigi; Dusi, Alberto; Grimaz, Stefano; Malisan, Petra; Saraò, Angela; Mucciarelli, Marco

    2014-05-01

    For many years, the Italian scientific community has faced the problem of the reduction of earthquake risk using innovative educational techniques. Recent earthquakes in Italy and around the world have clearly demonstrated that seismic codes alone are not able to guarantee an effective mitigation of risk. After the tragic events of San Giuliano di Puglia (2002), where an earthquake killed 26 school children, special attention was paid in Italy to the seismic safety of schools, but mainly with respect to structural aspects. Little attention has been devoted to the possible and even significant damage to non-structural elements (collapse of ceilings, tipping of cabinets and shelving, obstruction of escape routes, etc..). Students and teachers trained on these aspects may lead to a very effective preventive vigilance. Since 2002, the project EDURISK (www.edurisk.it) proposed educational tools and training programs for schools, at primary and middle levels. More recently, a nationwide campaign aimed to adults (www.iononrischio.it) was launched with the extensive support of civil protection volounteers. There was a gap for high schools, and Project SISIFO was designed to fill this void and in particular for those schools with technical/scientific curricula. SISIFO (https://sites.google.com/site/ogssisifo/) is a multidisciplinary initiative, aimed at the diffusion of scientific culture for achieving seismic safety in schools, replicable and can be structured in training the next several years. The students, helped by their teachers and by experts from scientific institutions, followed a course on specialized training on earthquake safety. The trial began in North-East Italy, with a combination of hands-on activities for the measurement of earthquakes with low-cost instruments and lectures with experts in various disciplines, accompanied by specifically designed teaching materials, both on paper and digital format. We intend to raise teachers and students knowledge of the

  8. Seismic Risk Perception compared with seismic Risk Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Pessina, Vera; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Peruzza, Laura

    2016-04-01

    The communication of natural hazards and their consequences is one of the more relevant ethical issues faced by scientists. In the last years, social studies have provided evidence that risk communication is strongly influenced by the risk perception of people. In order to develop effective information and risk communication strategies, the perception of risks and the influencing factors should be known. A theory that offers an integrative approach to understanding and explaining risk perception is still missing. To explain risk perception, it is necessary to consider several perspectives: social, psychological and cultural perspectives and their interactions. This paper presents the results of the CATI survey on seismic risk perception in Italy, conducted by INGV researchers on funding by the DPC. We built a questionnaire to assess seismic risk perception, with a particular attention to compare hazard, vulnerability and exposure perception with the real data of the same factors. The Seismic Risk Perception Questionnaire (SRP-Q) is designed by semantic differential method, using opposite terms on a Likert scale to seven points. The questionnaire allows to obtain the scores of five risk indicators: Hazard, Exposure, Vulnerability, People and Community, Earthquake Phenomenon. The questionnaire was administered by telephone interview (C.A.T.I.) on a statistical sample at national level of over 4,000 people, in the period January -February 2015. Results show that risk perception seems be underestimated for all indicators considered. In particular scores of seismic Vulnerability factor are extremely low compared with house information data of the respondents. Other data collected by the questionnaire regard Earthquake information level, Sources of information, Earthquake occurrence with respect to other natural hazards, participation at risk reduction activities and level of involvement. Research on risk perception aims to aid risk analysis and policy-making by

  9. Preparing for a Trustworthiness Assessment of the National Transportation Library’s Digital Repository ROSA P

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2018-01-01

    The National Transportation Library (NTL) is an all-digital repository of transportation knowledge that falls under federal mandates to serve as a central clearinghouse for transportation data and information of the Federal Government. as well ...

  10. Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huerta-Lopez, C. I.; Martínez-Cruzado, J. A.; Martínez-Pagan, J.; Santana-Torres, E. X.; Torres-O, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network is currently in charge of the operation of: (i) free-field (ff) strong motion stations, (ii) instrumented structures (STR) (Dams, Bridges, Buildings), and (iii) the data acquisition/monitoring and analysis of earthquakes considered strong from the point of view of their intensity and magnitude. All these instruments are deployed in the Puerto Rico Island (PRI), US-, and British-Virgin Islands (BVI), and Dominican Republic (DR). The Puerto Rico Island and the Caribbean region have high potential to be affected by earthquakes that could be catastrophic for the area. The Puerto Rico Strong Motion Seismic Network (actually Puerto Rico Strong Motion Program, PRSMP) has grown since 1970's from 7 ff strong motion stations and one instrumented building with analog accelerographs to 111 ff strong motion stations and 16 instrumented buildings with digital accelerographs: PRI: 88 ff, 16 STR., DR: 13 ff, BVI: 5 ff, 2 STR collecting data via IP (internet), DU (telephone), and stand alone stations The current stage of the PRSMP seismic network, the analysis of moderate earthquakes that were recorded and/or occurred on the island, results of the intensity distribution of selected earthquakes, as well as results of dynamic parameter identification of some of the instrumented structures are here presented.

  11. Seismic design guidelines for highway bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayes, R. L.; Sharpe, R. L.

    1981-10-01

    Guidelines for the seismic design of highway bridges are given. The guidelines are the recommendations of a team of nationally recognized experts which included consulting engineers, academicians, State highway, and Federal agency representatives from throughout the United States. The guidelines are comprehensive in nature and they embody several new concepts which are significant departures from existing design provisions. An extensive commentary documenting the basis for the guidelines and an example demonstrating their use are included. A draft of the guidelines was used to seismically redesign twenty-one bridges. A summary of the redesigns is included.

  12. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, Damiano; Romanelli, Marco; Barnaba, Carla; Bragato, Pier Luigi; Durì, Giorgio

    2013-04-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Center) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data center in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of Northeastern Italy. The southwestern edge of the OGS seismic network stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML=5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on May 20, 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the Northeastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of the Ferrara VBB

  13. Digital Management and Curation of the National Rock and Ore Collections at NMNH, Smithsonian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cottrell, E.; Andrews, B.; Sorensen, S. S.; Hale, L. J.

    2011-12-01

    The National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, is home to the world's largest curated rock collection. The collection houses 160,680 physical rock and ore specimen lots ("samples"), all of which already have a digital record that can be accessed by the public through a searchable web interface (http://collections.mnh.si.edu/search/ms/). In addition, there are 66 accessions pending that when catalogued will add approximately 60,000 specimen lots. NMNH's collections are digitally managed on the KE EMu° platform which has emerged as the premier system for managing collections in natural history museums worldwide. In 2010 the Smithsonian released an ambitious 5 year Digitization Strategic Plan. In Mineral Sciences, new digitization efforts in the next five years will focus on integrating various digital resources for volcanic specimens. EMu sample records will link to the corresponding records for physical eruption information housed within the database of Smithsonian's Global Volcanism Program (GVP). Linkages are also planned between our digital records and geochemical databases (like EarthChem or PetDB) maintained by third parties. We anticipate that these linkages will increase the use of NMNH collections as well as engender new scholarly directions for research. Another large project the museum is currently undertaking involves the integration of the functionality of in-house designed Transaction Management software with the EMu database. This will allow access to the details (borrower, quantity, date, and purpose) of all loans of a given specimen through its catalogue record. We hope this will enable cross-referencing and fertilization of research ideas while avoiding duplicate efforts. While these digitization efforts are critical, we propose that the greatest challenge to sample curation is not posed by digitization and that a global sample registry alone will not ensure that samples are available for reuse. We suggest instead that the ability

  14. Utah's Regional/Urban ANSS Seismic Network---Strategies and Tools for Quality Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlacu, R.; Arabasz, W. J.; Pankow, K. L.; Pechmann, J. C.; Drobeck, D. L.; Moeinvaziri, A.; Roberson, P. M.; Rusho, J. A.

    2007-05-01

    The University of Utah's regional/urban seismic network (224 stations recorded: 39 broadband, 87 strong-motion, 98 short-period) has become a model for locally implementing the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS) because of successes in integrating weak- and strong-motion recording and in developing an effective real-time earthquake information system. Early achievements included implementing ShakeMap, ShakeCast, point-to- multipoint digital telemetry, and an Earthworm Oracle database, as well as in-situ calibration of all broadband and strong-motion stations and submission of all data and metadata into the IRIS DMC. Regarding quality performance, our experience as a medium-size regional network affirms the fundamental importance of basics such as the following: for data acquisition, deliberate attention to high-quality field installations, signal quality, and computer operations; for operational efficiency, a consistent focus on professional project management and human resources; and for customer service, healthy partnerships---including constant interactions with emergency managers, engineers, public policy-makers, and other stakeholders as part of an effective state earthquake program. (Operational cost efficiencies almost invariably involve trade-offs between personnel costs and the quality of hardware and software.) Software tools that we currently rely on for quality performance include those developed by UUSS (e.g., SAC and shell scripts for estimating local magnitudes) and software developed by other organizations such as: USGS (Earthworm), University of Washington (interactive analysis software), ISTI (SeisNetWatch), and IRIS (PDCC, BUD tools). Although there are many pieces, there is little integration. One of the main challenges we face is the availability of a complete and coherent set of tools for automatic and post-processing to assist in achieving the goals/requirements set forth by ANSS. Taking our own network---and ANSS---to the next level

  15. Long term seismic noise acquisition and analysis with tunable monolithic horizontal sensors at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2012-04-01

    In this paper we present the scientific data recorded by tunable mechanical monolithic horizontal seismometers located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN, within thermally insulating enclosures onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock. The main goals of this long term test are a preliminary seismic characterization of the site in the frequency band 10-5÷1Hz and the acquisition of all the relevant information for the optimization of the sensors.

  16. Long term seismic noise acquisition and analysis with tunable monolithic horizontal sensors at the INFN Gran Sasso National Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Acernese, F.; Canonico, R.; De Rosa, R.; Giordano, G.; Romano, R.; Barone, F.

    2012-10-01

    In this paper we present the scientific data recorded by tunable mechanical monolithic horizontal seismometers located in the Gran Sasso National Laboratory of the INFN, within thermally insulating enclosures onto concrete slabs connected to the bedrock. The main goals of this long term test are a preliminary seismic characterization of the site in the frequency band 10-7÷1Hz and the acquisition of all the relevant information for the optimization of the sensors.

  17. Digital Games and the US National Research Council's Science Proficiency Goals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez-Garza, Mario; Clark, Douglas B.; Nelson, Brian C.

    2013-01-01

    This review synthesises research on digital games and science learning as it supports the goals for science proficiency outlined in the report by the US National Research Council on science education reform. The review is organised in terms of these research-based goals for science proficiency in light of their alignment with current science…

  18. Historical seismometry database project: A comprehensive relational database for historical seismic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bono, Andrea

    2007-01-01

    The recovery and preservation of the patrimony made of the instrumental registrations regarding the historical earthquakes is with no doubt a subject of great interest. This attention, besides being purely historical, must necessarily be also scientific. In fact, the availability of a great amount of parametric information on the seismic activity in a given area is a doubtless help to the seismologic researcher's activities. In this article the project of the Sismos group of the National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology of Rome new database is presented. In the structure of the new scheme the matured experience of five years of activity is summarized. We consider it useful for those who are approaching to "recovery and reprocess" computer based facilities. In the past years several attempts on Italian seismicity have followed each other. It has almost never been real databases. Some of them have had positive success because they were well considered and organized. In others it was limited in supplying lists of events with their relative hypocentral standards. What makes this project more interesting compared to the previous work is the completeness and the generality of the managed information. For example, it will be possible to view the hypocentral information regarding a given historical earthquake; it will be possible to research the seismograms in raster, digital or digitalized format, the information on times of arrival of the phases in the various stations, the instrumental standards and so on. The relational modern logic on which the archive is based, allows the carrying out of all these operations with little effort. The database described below will completely substitute Sismos' current data bank. Some of the organizational principles of this work are similar to those that inspire the database for the real-time monitoring of the seismicity in use in the principal offices of international research. A modern planning logic in a distinctly historical

  19. Information system evolution at the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engels, F.; Grunberg, M.

    2013-12-01

    The aging information system of the French National Network of Seismic Survey (BCSF-RENASS), located in Strasbourg (EOST), needed to be updated to satisfy new practices from Computer science world. The latter means to evolve our system at different levels : development method, datamining solutions, system administration. The new system had to provide more agility for incoming projects. The main difficulty was to maintain old system and the new one in parallel the time to validate new solutions with a restricted team. Solutions adopted here are coming from standards used by the seismological community and inspired by the state of the art of devops community. The new system is easier to maintain and take advantage of large community to find support. This poster introduces the new system and choosen solutions like Puppet, Fabric, MongoDB and FDSN Webservices.

  20. A Digital Tectonic Activity Map of the Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowman, Paul; Masuoka, Penny; Montgomery, Brian; OLeary, Jay; Salisbury, Demetra; Yates, Jacob

    1999-01-01

    The subject of neotectonics, covering the structures and structural activity of the last 5 million years (i.e., post-Miocene) is a well-recognized field, including "active tectonics," focussed on the last 500,000 years in a 1986 National Research Council report of that title. However, there is a cartographic gap between tectonic maps, generally showing all features regardless of age, and maps of current seismic or volcanic activity. We have compiled a map intended to bridge this gap, using modern data bases and computer-aided cartographic techniques. The maps presented here are conceptually descended from an earlier map showing tectonic and volcanic activity of the last one million years. Drawn by hand with the National Geographic Society's 1975 "The Physical World" map as a base, the 1981 map in various revisions has been widely reproduced in textbooks and various technical publications. However, two decades of progress call for a completely new map that can take advantage of new knowledge and cartographic techniques. The digital tectonic activity map (DTM), presented in shaded relief (Fig. 1) and schematic (Fig. 2) versions, is the result. The DTM is intended to show tectonism and volcanism of the last one million years, a period long enough to be representative of global activity, but short enough that features such as fault scarps and volcanos are still geomorphically recognizable. Data Sources and Cartographic Methods The DTM is based on a wide range of sources, summarized in Table 1. The most important is the digital elevation model, used to construct a shaded relief map. The bathymetry is largely from satellite altimetry, specifically the marine gravity compilations by Smith and Sandwell (1996). The shaded relief map was designed to match the new National Geographic Society world physical map (1992), although drawn independently, from the digital elevation model. The Robinson Projection is used instead of the earlier Van der Grinten one. Although neither

  1. Earthquake Monitoring: SeisComp3 at the Swiss National Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clinton, J. F.; Diehl, T.; Cauzzi, C.; Kaestli, P.

    2011-12-01

    The Swiss Seismological Service (SED) has an ongoing responsibility to improve the seismicity monitoring capability for Switzerland. This is a crucial issue for a country with low background seismicity but where a large M6+ earthquake is expected in the next decades. With over 30 stations with spacing of ~25km, the SED operates one of the densest broadband networks in the world, which is complimented by ~ 50 realtime strong motion stations. The strong motion network is expected to grow with an additional ~80 stations over the next few years. Furthermore, the backbone of the network is complemented by broadband data from surrounding countries and temporary sub-networks for local monitoring of microseismicity (e.g. at geothermal sites). The variety of seismic monitoring responsibilities as well as the anticipated densifications of our network demands highly flexible processing software. We are transitioning all software to the SeisComP3 (SC3) framework. SC3 is a fully featured automated real-time earthquake monitoring software developed by GeoForschungZentrum Potsdam in collaboration with commercial partner, gempa GmbH. It is in its core open source, and becoming a community standard software for earthquake detection and waveform processing for regional and global networks across the globe. SC3 was originally developed for regional and global rapid monitoring of potentially tsunamagenic earthquakes. In order to fulfill the requirements of a local network recording moderate seismicity, SED has tuned configurations and added several modules. In this contribution, we present our SC3 implementation strategy, focusing on the detection and identification of seismicity on different scales. We operate several parallel processing "pipelines" to detect and locate local, regional and global seismicity. Additional pipelines with lower detection thresholds can be defined to monitor seismicity within dense subnets of the network. To be consistent with existing processing

  2. New Seismic Monitoring Station at Mohawk Ridge, Valles Caldera

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Roberts, Peter Morse

    Two new broadband digital seismic stations were installed in the Valles Caldera in 2011 and 2012. The first is located on the summit of Cerros del Abrigo (station code CDAB) and the second is located on the flanks of San Antonio Mountain (station code SAMT). Seismic monitoring stations in the caldera serve multiple purposes. These stations augment and expand the current coverage of the Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN), which is operated to support seismic and volcanic hazards studies for LANL and northern New Mexico (Figure 1). They also provide unique continuous seismic data within the caldera that can bemore » used for scientific studies of the caldera’s substructure and detection of very small seismic signals that may indicate changes in the current and evolving state of remnant magma that is known to exist beneath the caldera. Since the installation of CDAB and SAMT, several very small earthquakes have already been detected near San Antonio Mountain just west of SAMT (Figure 2). These are the first events to be seen in that area. Caldera stations also improve the detection and epicenter determination quality for larger local earthquakes on the Pajarito Fault System east of the Preserve and the Nacimiento Uplift to the west. These larger earthquakes are a concern to LANL Seismic Hazards assessments and seismic monitoring of the Los Alamos region, including the VCNP, is a DOE requirement. Currently the next closest seismic stations to the caldera are on Pipeline Road (PPR) just west of Los Alamos, and Peralta Ridge (PER) south of the caldera. There is no station coverage near the resurgent dome, Redondo Peak, in the center of the caldera. Filling this “hole” is the highest priority for the next new LASN station. We propose to install this station in 2018 on Mohawk Ridge just east of Redondito, in the same area already occupied by other scientific installations, such as the MCON flux tower operated by UNM.« less

  3. 2015 National Agenda for Digital Stewardship

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-01

    tool and framework that explores the aspects of “benefit,” “risk,” “value,”’ “ quality ,” and “sustainability.” It is analyzing previous work on cost...evidence of the value of digital stewardship activities is needed. Improved and sharable metrics about the quality and success of digital stewardship...Significant Properties .................................. 38 5.3.4 Policy Research on Trust Frameworks

  4. Spatial and temporal variation of seismic velocity during earthquakes and volcanic eruptions in western Japan: Insight into mechanism for seismic velocity variation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuji, T.; Ikeda, T.; Nimiya, H.

    2017-12-01

    We report spatio-temporal variations of seismic velocity around the seismogenic faults in western Japan. We mainly focus on the seismic velocity variation during (1) the 2016 Off-Mie earthquake in the Nankai subduction zone (Mw5.8) and (2) the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake in Kyushu Island (Mw7.0). We applied seismic interferometry and surface wave analysis to the ambient noise data recorded by Hi-net and DONET seismometers of National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Resilience (NIED). Seismic velocity near the rupture faults and volcano decreased during the earthquake. For example, we observed velocity reduction around the seismogenic Futagawa-Hinagu fault system and Mt Aso in the 2016 Kumamoto earthquake. We also identified velocity increase after the eruptions of Mt Aso. During the 2016 Off-Mie earthquake, we observed seismic velocity variation in the Nankai accretionary prism. After the earthquakes, the seismic velocity gradually returned to the pre-earthquake value. The velocity recovering process (healing process) is caused by several mechanisms, such as pore pressure reduction, strain change, and crack sealing. By showing the velocity variations obtained at different geologic settings (volcano, seismogenic fault, unconsolidated sediment), we discuss the mechanism of seismic velocity variation as well as the post-seismic fault healing process.

  5. Advances through collaboration: sharing seismic reflection data via the Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wardell, N.; Childs, J. R.; Cooper, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    The Antarctic Seismic Data Library System for Cooperative Research (SDLS) has served for the past 16 years under the auspices of the Antarctic Treaty (ATCM Recommendation XVI-12) as a role model for collaboration and equitable sharing of Antarctic multichannel seismic reflection (MCS) data for geoscience studies. During this period, collaboration in MCS studies has advanced deciphering the seismic stratigraphy and structure of Antarctica’s continental margin more rapidly than previously. MCS data compilations provided the geologic framework for scientific drilling at several Antarctic locations and for high-resolution seismic and sampling studies to decipher Cenozoic depositional paleoenvironments. The SDLS successes come from cooperation of National Antarctic Programs and individual investigators in “on-time” submissions of their MCS data. Most do, but some do not. The SDLS community has an International Polar Year (IPY) goal of all overdue MCS data being sent to the SDLS by end of IPY. The community science objective is to compile all Antarctic MCS data to derive a unified seismic stratigraphy for the continental margin – a stratigraphy to be used with drilling data to derive Cenozoic circum-Antarctic paleobathymetry maps and local-to-regional scale paleoenvironmental histories.

  6. Digital data from the Great Sand Dunes airborne gravity gradient survey, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drenth, B.J.; Abraham, J.D.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Labson, V.F.; Hodges, G.

    2013-01-01

    This report contains digital data and supporting explanatory files describing data types, data formats, and survey procedures for a high-resolution airborne gravity gradient (AGG) survey at Great Sand Dunes National Park, Alamosa and Saguache Counties, south-central Colorado. In the San Luis Valley, the Great Sand Dunes survey covers a large part of Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve. The data described were collected from a high-resolution AGG survey flown in February 2012, by Fugro Airborne Surveys Corp., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey. Scientific objectives of the AGG survey are to investigate the subsurface structural framework that may influence groundwater hydrology and seismic hazards, and to investigate AGG methods and resolution using different flight specifications. Funding was provided by an airborne geophysics training program of the U.S. Department of Defense's Task Force for Business & Stability Operations.

  7. High-resolution seismic-reflection data offshore of Dana Point, southern California borderland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Ryan, Holly F.; Triezenberg, Peter J.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection profiles in September 2006 in the offshore area between Dana Point and San Mateo Point in southern Orange and northern San Diego Counties, California. Reflection profiles were located to image folds and reverse faults associated with the San Mateo fault zone and high-angle strike-slip faults near the shelf break (the Newport-Inglewood fault zone) and at the base of the slope. Interpretations of these data were used to update the USGS Quaternary fault database and in shaking hazard models for the State of California developed by the Working Group for California Earthquake Probabilities. This cruise was funded by the U.S. Geological Survey Coastal and Marine Catastrophic Hazards project. Seismic-reflection data were acquired aboard the R/V Sea Explorer, which is operated by the Ocean Institute at Dana Point. A SIG ELC820 minisparker seismic source and a SIG single-channel streamer were used. More than 420 km of seismic-reflection data were collected. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth? software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats.

  8. Assessing the seismic risk potential of South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jaiswal, Kishor; Petersen, Mark D.; Harmsen, Stephen; Smoczyk, Gregory M.

    2016-01-01

    We present here a simplified approach to quantifying regional seismic risk. The seismic risk for a given region can be inferred in terms of average annual loss (AAL) that represents long-term value of earthquake losses in any one year caused from a long-term seismic hazard. The AAL are commonly measured in the form of earthquake shaking-induced deaths, direct economic impacts or indirect losses caused due to loss of functionality. In the context of South American subcontinent, the analysis makes use of readily available public data on seismicity, population exposure, and the hazard and vulnerability models for the region. The seismic hazard model was derived using available seismic catalogs, fault databases, and the hazard methodologies that are analogous to the U.S. Geological Survey’s national seismic hazard mapping process. The Prompt Assessment of Global Earthquakes for Response (PAGER) system’s direct empirical vulnerability functions in terms of fatality and economic impact were used for performing exposure and risk analyses. The broad findings presented and the risk maps produced herein are preliminary, yet they do offer important insights into the underlying zones of high and low seismic risks in the South American subcontinent. A more detailed analysis of risk may be warranted by engaging local experts, especially in some of the high risk zones identified through the present investigation.

  9. Digitally-Assisted Stone Carving of a Relief Sculpture for the Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayes, J.; Fai, S.; Kretz, S.; Ouimet, C.; White, P.

    2015-08-01

    The emerging field of digital fabrication is a process where three-dimensional datasets can be directly transferred to fabrication equipment to create models or even 1:1 building elements. In this paper, we will discuss the results of a collaboration between the Carleton Immersive Media Studio (CIMS), the Dominion Sculptor of Canada, and the Heritage Conservation Directorate (HCD) of Public Works and Government Services Canada (PWGSC), that utilizes digital fabrication technologies in the development of a digitally-assisted stone carving process. The collaboration couples the distinguished skill of the Dominion Sculptor with the latest digital acquisition and digital fabrication technologies for the reconstruction of a deteriorated stone bas-relief on the façade of the East Block building of the Parliament Buildings National Historic Site of Canada. The intention of the research is to establish a workflow of hybrid digital/analogue methodologies from acquisition through rehabilitation and ultimately to the fabrication of stone elements.

  10. Participation in the Apollo passive seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Press, F.; Toksoez, M. N.; Dainty, A.

    1972-01-01

    Computer programs which were written to read digital tapes containing lunar seismic data were studied. Interpreting very early parts of the lunar seismogram as seismic body-wave phases enabled the determination of the structure of the outer part of the moon in the Fra Mauro region. The crust in the Fra Mauro region is 60 to 65 km-thick, overlaying a high velocity mantle. The crust is further divided into an upper part, 25 km thick, apparently made of material similar to the surficial basalts, and a lower part of seemingly different composition, possibly an anorthositic gabbro. The generation of the exceedingly long reverberating wave-train observed in lunar seismogram was also studied. This is believed to be due to an intense scattering layer with very high quality coefficient overlying a more homogeneous elastic medium. Titles and abstracts of related published papers are included.

  11. The National Solar Observatory Digital Library - a resource for space weather studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.; Erdwurm, W.; Branston, D.; McGraw, R.

    2000-09-01

    We describe the National Solar Observatory Digital Library (NSODL), consisting of 200GB of on-line archived solar data, a RDBMS search engine, and an Internet HTML-form user interface. The NSODL is open to all users and provides simple access to solar physics data of basic importance for space weather research and forecasting, heliospheric research, and education. The NSODL can be accessed at the URL www.nso.noao.edu/diglib.

  12. Bayesian identification of multiple seismic change points and varying seismic rates caused by induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya-Noguera, Silvana; Wang, Yu

    2017-04-01

    The Central and Eastern United States (CEUS) has experienced an abnormal increase in seismic activity, which is believed to be related to anthropogenic activities. The U.S. Geological Survey has acknowledged this situation and developed the CEUS 2016 1 year seismic hazard model using the catalog of 2015 by assuming stationary seismicity in that period. However, due to the nonstationary nature of induced seismicity, it is essential to identify change points for accurate probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA). We present a Bayesian procedure to identify the most probable change points in seismicity and define their respective seismic rates. It uses prior distributions in agreement with conventional PSHA and updates them with recent data to identify seismicity changes. It can determine the change points in a regional scale and may incorporate different types of information in an objective manner. It is first successfully tested with simulated data, and then it is used to evaluate Oklahoma's regional seismicity.

  13. Real-time seismic monitoring of instrumented hospital buildings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkan, Erol; Fletcher, Jon Peter B.; Leith, William S.; McCarthy, William S.; Banga, Krishna

    2012-01-01

    In collaboration with the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA), the U.S. Geological Survey's National Strong Motion Project has recently installed sophisticated seismic monitoring systems to monitor the structural health of two hospital buildings at the Memphis VA Medical Center in Tennessee. The monitoring systems in the Bed Tower and Spinal Cord Injury buildings combine sensing technologies with an on-site computer to capture and analyze seismic performance of buildings in near-real time.

  14. OGS improvements in 2012 in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: the Ferrara VBB borehole seismic station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesaresi, D.; Romanelli, M.; Barnaba, C.; Bragato, P. L.; Durì, G.

    2014-07-01

    The Centro di Ricerche Sismologiche (CRS, Seismological Research Centre) of the Istituto Nazionale di Oceanografia e di Geofisica Sperimentale (OGS, Italian National Institute for Oceanography and Experimental Geophysics) in Udine (Italy) after the strong earthquake of magnitude M=6.4 occurred in 1976 in the Italian Friuli-Venezia Giulia region, started to operate the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network: it currently consists of 17 very sensitive broad band and 18 simpler short period seismic stations, all telemetered to and acquired in real time at the OGS-CRS data centre in Udine. Real time data exchange agreements in place with other Italian, Slovenian, Austrian and Swiss seismological institutes lead to a total number of about 100 seismic stations acquired in real time, which makes the OGS the reference institute for seismic monitoring of North-eastern Italy. The south-western edge of the OGS seismic network (Fig. 1) stands on the Po alluvial basin: earthquake localization and characterization in this area is affected by the presence of soft alluvial deposits. OGS ha already experience in running a local seismic network in high noise conditions making use of borehole installations in the case of the micro-seismicity monitoring of a local gas storage site for a private company. Following the ML = 5.9 earthquake that struck the Emilia region around Ferrara in Northern Italy on 20 May 2012 at 02:03:53 UTC, a cooperation of Istituto Nazionale di Geofisica e Vulcanologia, OGS, the Comune di Ferrara and the University of Ferrara lead to the reinstallation of a previously existing very broad band (VBB) borehole seismic station in Ferrara. The aim of the OGS intervention was on one hand to extend its real time seismic monitoring capabilities toward South-West, including Ferrara and its surroundings, and on the other hand to evaluate the seismic response at the site. We will describe improvements in running the North-eastern Italy Seismic Network, including details of

  15. Real-time Seismic Amplitude Measurement (RSAM): a volcano monitoring and prediction tool

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Endo, E.T.; Murray, T.

    1991-01-01

    Seismicity is one of the most commonly monitored phenomena used to determine the state of a volcano and for the prediction of volcanic eruptions. Although several real-time earthquake-detection and data acquisition systems exist, few continuously measure seismic amplitude in circumstances where individual events are difficult to recognize or where volcanic tremor is prevalent. Analog seismic records provide a quick visual overview of activity; however, continuous rapid quantitative analysis to define the intensity of seismic activity for the purpose of predicing volcanic eruptions is not always possible because of clipping that results from the limited dynamic range of analog recorders. At the Cascades Volcano Observatory, an inexpensive 8-bit analog-to-digital system controlled by a laptop computer is used to provide 1-min average-amplitude information from eight telemetered seismic stations. The absolute voltage level for each station is digitized, averaged, and appended in near real-time to a data file on a multiuser computer system. Raw realtime seismic amplitude measurement (RSAM) data or transformed RSAM data are then plotted on a common time base with other available volcano-monitoring information such as tilt. Changes in earthquake activity associated with dome-building episodes, weather, and instrumental difficulties are recognized as distinct patterns in the RSAM data set. RSAM data for domebuilding episodes gradually develop into exponential increases that terminate just before the time of magma extrusion. Mount St. Helens crater earthquakes show up as isolated spikes on amplitude plots for crater seismic stations but seldom for more distant stations. Weather-related noise shows up as low-level, long-term disturbances on all seismic stations, regardless of distance from the volcano. Implemented in mid-1985, the RSAM system has proved valuable in providing up-to-date information on seismic activity for three Mount St. Helens eruptive episodes from 1985 to

  16. Probabilistic seismic hazard zonation for the Cuban building code update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, J.; Llanes-Buron, C.

    2013-05-01

    A probabilistic seismic hazard assessment has been performed in response to a revision and update of the Cuban building code (NC-46-99) for earthquake-resistant building construction. The hazard assessment have been done according to the standard probabilistic approach (Cornell, 1968) and importing the procedures adopted by other nations dealing with the problem of revising and updating theirs national building codes. Problems of earthquake catalogue treatment, attenuation of peak and spectral ground acceleration, as well as seismic source definition have been rigorously analyzed and a logic-tree approach was used to represent the inevitable uncertainties encountered through the whole seismic hazard estimation process. The seismic zonation proposed here, is formed by a map where it is reflected the behaviour of the spectral acceleration values for short (0.2 seconds) and large (1.0 seconds) periods on rock conditions with a 1642 -year return period, which being considered as maximum credible earthquake (ASCE 07-05). In addition, other three design levels are proposed (severe earthquake: with a 808 -year return period, ordinary earthquake: with a 475 -year return period and minimum earthquake: with a 225 -year return period). The seismic zonation proposed here fulfils the international standards (IBC-ICC) as well as the world tendencies in this thematic.

  17. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEWS AND CASE STUDIES: Addressing the Public Outreach Responsibilities of the National Historic Preservation Act: Argonne National Laboratory’s Box Digital Display Platform

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    O’Rourke, Daniel J.; Weber, Cory C.; Richmond, Pamela D.

    Federal agencies are made responsible for managing the historic properties under their jurisdiction by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended. A component of this responsibility is to mitigate the effect of a federal undertaking on historic properties through mitigation often through documentation. Providing public access to this documentation has always been a challenge. To address the issue of public access to mitigation information, personnel from Argonne National Laboratory created the Box Digital Display Platform, a system for communicating information about historic properties to the public. The platform, developed for the US Army Dugway Proving Ground, uses shortmore » introductory videos to present a topic but can also incorporate photos, drawings, GIS information, and documents. The system operates from a small, self-contained computer that can be attached to any digital monitor via an HDMI cable. The system relies on web-based software that allows the information to be republished as a touch-screen device application or as a website. The system does not connect to the Internet, and this increases security and eliminates the software maintenance fees associated with websites. The platform is designed to incorporate the products of past documentation to make this information more accessible to the public; specifically those documentations developed using the Historic American Building Survey/ Historic American Engineering Record (HABS/HAER) standards. Argonne National Laboratory’s Box Digital Display Platform can assist federal agencies in complying with the requirements of the National Historic Preservation Act. Environmental Practice 18: 209–213 (2016)« less

  18. Seismic-reflection investigations of the Texas Springs Syncline for ground water development, Death Valley National Park

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Stephenson, W.J.; Williams, R.A.; Odum, J.K.; Worley, D.M.; Dart, R.L.

    2000-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey has completed an integrated geologic and geophysical study of the Texas Springs syncline for the National Park Service with the intention of locating a new production water well near existing water-collection and distribution facilities. Subsurface information was required to determine which, if any, sites within the syncline would be favorable for a well. About 4.2 km (2.6 mi.) of high-resolution seismic-reflection data were collected across and along the Texas Springs syncline. Two of our three lines, designated DV-1 and DV-3, cross the syncline, whereas the third line (DV-2) runs parallel to the north-northwest-trending syncline axis.

  19. Scanning for Digitization Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wentzel, Larry

    2007-01-01

    Librarians and archivists find themselves facing the prospect of digitization. Everyone is doing it, everyone needs it. Discussions rage nationally and internationally concerning what to digitize and the best means to present and retain digital objects. Digitization is the act of making something digital, expressing a physical object "in numerical…

  20. United States National seismograph network

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Masse, R.P.; Filson, J.R.; Murphy, A.

    1989-01-01

    The USGS National Earthquake Information Center (NEIC) has planned and is developing a broadband digital seismograph network for the United States. The network will consist of approximately 150 seismograph stations distributed across the contiguous 48 states and across Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. Data transmission will be via two-way satellite telemetry from the network sites to a central recording facility at the NEIC in Golden, Colorado. The design goal for the network is the on-scale recording by at least five well-distributed stations of any seismic event of magnitude 2.5 or greater in all areas of the United States except possibly part of Alaska. All event data from the network will be distributed to the scientific community on compact disc with read-only memory (CD-ROM). ?? 1989.

  1. Induced Seismicity Potential of Energy Technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hitzman, Murray

    2013-03-01

    Earthquakes attributable to human activities-``induced seismic events''-have received heightened public attention in the United States over the past several years. Upon request from the U.S. Congress and the Department of Energy, the National Research Council was asked to assemble a committee of experts to examine the scale, scope, and consequences of seismicity induced during fluid injection and withdrawal associated with geothermal energy development, oil and gas development, and carbon capture and storage (CCS). The committee's report, publicly released in June 2012, indicates that induced seismicity associated with fluid injection or withdrawal is caused in most cases by change in pore fluid pressure and/or change in stress in the subsurface in the presence of faults with specific properties and orientations and a critical state of stress in the rocks. The factor that appears to have the most direct consequence in regard to induced seismicity is the net fluid balance (total balance of fluid introduced into or removed from the subsurface). Energy technology projects that are designed to maintain a balance between the amount of fluid being injected and withdrawn, such as most oil and gas development projects, appear to produce fewer seismic events than projects that do not maintain fluid balance. Major findings from the study include: (1) as presently implemented, the process of hydraulic fracturing for shale gas recovery does not pose a high risk for inducing felt seismic events; (2) injection for disposal of waste water derived from energy technologies does pose some risk for induced seismicity, but very few events have been documented over the past several decades relative to the large number of disposal wells in operation; and (3) CCS, due to the large net volumes of injected fluids suggested for future large-scale carbon storage projects, may have potential for inducing larger seismic events.

  2. Open Source Seismic Software in NOAA's Next Generation Tsunami Warning System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellman, S. B.; Baker, B. I.; Hagerty, M. T.; Leifer, J. M.; Lisowski, S.; Thies, D. A.; Donnelly, B. K.; Griffith, F. P.

    2014-12-01

    The Tsunami Information technology Modernization (TIM) is a project spearheaded by National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration to update the United States' Tsunami Warning System software currently employed at the Pacific Tsunami Warning Center (Eva Beach, Hawaii) and the National Tsunami Warning Center (Palmer, Alaska). This entirely open source software project will integrate various seismic processing utilities with the National Weather Service Weather Forecast Office's core software, AWIPS2. For the real-time and near real-time seismic processing aspect of this project, NOAA has elected to integrate the open source portions of GFZ's SeisComP 3 (SC3) processing system into AWIPS2. To provide for better tsunami threat assessments we are developing open source tools for magnitude estimations (e.g., moment magnitude, energy magnitude, surface wave magnitude), detection of slow earthquakes with the Theta discriminant, moment tensor inversions (e.g. W-phase and teleseismic body waves), finite fault inversions, and array processing. With our reliance on common data formats such as QuakeML and seismic community standard messaging systems, all new facilities introduced into AWIPS2 and SC3 will be available as stand-alone tools or could be easily integrated into other real time seismic monitoring systems such as Earthworm, Antelope, etc. Additionally, we have developed a template based design paradigm so that the developer or scientist can efficiently create upgrades, replacements, and/or new metrics to the seismic data processing with only a cursory knowledge of the underlying SC3.

  3. Contribution of seismic processing to put up the scaffolding for the 3-dimensional study of deep sedimentary basins: the fundaments of trans-national 3D modelling in the project GeoMol

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Capar, Laure

    2013-04-01

    Within the framework of the transnational project GeoMol geophysical and geological information on the entire Molasse Basin and on the Po Basin are gathered to build consistent cross-border 3D geological models based on borehole evidence and seismic data. Benefiting from important progress in seismic processing, these new models will provide some answers to various questions regarding the usage of subsurface resources, as there are geothermal energy, CO2 and gas storage, oil and gas production, and support decisions-making to national and local administrations as well as to industries. More than 28 000 km of 2D seismic lines are compiled reprocessed and harmonized. This work faces various problems like the vertical drop of more than 700 meters between West and East of the Molasse Basin and to al lesser extent in the Po Plain, the heterogeneities of the substratum, the large disparities between the period and parameters of seismic acquisition, and depending of their availability, the use of two types of seismic data, raw and processed seismic data. The main challenge is to harmonize all lines at the same reference level, amplitude and step of signal processing from France to Austria, spanning more than 1000 km, to avoid misfits at crossing points between seismic lines and artifacts at the country borders, facilitating the interpretation of the various geological layers in the Molasse Basin and Po Basin. A generalized stratigraphic column for the two basins is set up, representing all geological layers relevant to subsurface usage. This stratigraphy constitutes the harmonized framework for seismic reprocessing. In general, processed seismic data is available on paper at stack stage and the mandatory information to take these seismic lines to the final stage of processing, the migration step, are datum plane and replacement velocity. However several datum planes and replacement velocities were used during previous processing projects. Our processing sequence is to

  4. Archive of Digital Boomer Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Field Activity 02LCA02 in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, Central Florida, July 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harrison, Arnell S.; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Davis, Jeffrey B.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2008-01-01

    In July of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey and St. Johns River Water Management District (SJRWMD) conducted geophysical surveys in Lakes Ada, Crystal, Jennie, Mary, Rice, and Sylvan, central Florida, as part of the USGS Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital boomer seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, Geographic Information System (GIS) files, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. Filtered and gained (a relative increase in signal amplitude) digital images of the seismic profiles are also provided. Refer to the Acronyms page for expansions of acronyms and abbreviations used in this report. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and others, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Example SU processing scripts and USGS software for viewing the SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. The USGS Florida Integrated Science Center (FISC) - St. Petersburg assigns a unique identifier to each cruise or field activity. For example, 02LCA02 tells us the data were collected in 2002 for the Lakes and Coastal Aquifers (LCA) study and the data were collected during the second field activity for that study in that calendar year. Refer to http://walrus.wr.usgs.gov/infobank/programs/html/definition/activity.html for a detailed description of the method used to assign the field activity ID. The boomer plate is an acoustic energy source that consists of capacitors charged to a high voltage and discharged through a transducer in the water. The transducer is towed on a sled floating on the water surface and when discharged emits a short acoustic pulse, or shot, which propagates through the water, sediment column, or rock beneath. The acoustic energy is reflected at density boundaries (such as the seafloor, sediment, or rock layers beneath the

  5. Key science issues in the central and eastern United States for the next version of the USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, M.D.; Mueller, C.S.

    2011-01-01

    The USGS National Seismic Hazard Maps are updated about every six years by incorporating newly vetted science on earthquakes and ground motions. The 2008 hazard maps for the central and eastern United States region (CEUS) were updated by using revised New Madrid and Charleston source models, an updated seismicity catalog and an estimate of magnitude uncertainties, a distribution of maximum magnitudes, and several new ground-motion prediction equations. The new models resulted in significant ground-motion changes at 5 Hz and 1 Hz spectral acceleration with 5% damping compared to the 2002 version of the hazard maps. The 2008 maps have now been incorporated into the 2009 NEHRP Recommended Provisions, the 2010 ASCE-7 Standard, and the 2012 International Building Code. The USGS is now planning the next update of the seismic hazard maps, which will be provided to the code committees in December 2013. Science issues that will be considered for introduction into the CEUS maps include: 1) updated recurrence models for New Madrid sources, including new geodetic models and magnitude estimates; 2) new earthquake sources and techniques considered in the 2010 model developed by the nuclear industry; 3) new NGA-East ground-motion models (currently under development); and 4) updated earthquake catalogs. We will hold a regional workshop in late 2011 or early 2012 to discuss these and other issues that will affect the seismic hazard evaluation in the CEUS.

  6. Detecting Seismic Events Using a Supervised Hidden Markov Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burks, L.; Forrest, R.; Ray, J.; Young, C.

    2017-12-01

    We explore the use of supervised hidden Markov models (HMMs) to detect seismic events in streaming seismogram data. Current methods for seismic event detection include simple triggering algorithms, such as STA/LTA and the Z-statistic, which can lead to large numbers of false positives that must be investigated by an analyst. The hypothesis of this study is that more advanced detection methods, such as HMMs, may decreases false positives while maintaining accuracy similar to current methods. We train a binary HMM classifier using 2 weeks of 3-component waveform data from the International Monitoring System (IMS) that was carefully reviewed by an expert analyst to pick all seismic events. Using an ensemble of simple and discrete features, such as the triggering of STA/LTA, the HMM predicts the time at which transition occurs from noise to signal. Compared to the STA/LTA detection algorithm, the HMM detects more true events, but the false positive rate remains unacceptably high. Future work to potentially decrease the false positive rate may include using continuous features, a Gaussian HMM, and multi-class HMMs to distinguish between types of seismic waves (e.g., P-waves and S-waves). Acknowledgement: Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-mission laboratory managed and operated by National Technology and Engineering Solutions of Sandia, LLC., a wholly owned subsidiary of Honeywell International, Inc., for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-NA-0003525.SAND No: SAND2017-8154 A

  7. Digital Data Acquisition System for experiments with segmented detectors at National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starosta, K.; Vaman, C.; Miller, D.; Voss, P.; Bazin, D.; Glasmacher, T.; Crawford, H.; Mantica, P.; Tan, H.; Hennig, W.; Walby, M.; Fallu-Labruyere, A.; Harris, J.; Breus, D.; Grudberg, P.; Warburton, W. K.

    2009-11-01

    A 624-channel Digital Data Acquisition System capable of instrumenting the Segmented Germanium Array at National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory has been implemented using Pixie-16 Digital Gamma Finder modules by XIA LLC. The system opens an opportunity for determination of the first interaction position of a γ ray in a SeGA detector from implementation of γ-ray tracking. This will translate into a significantly improved determination of angle of emission, and in consequence much better Doppler corrections for experiments with fast beams. For stopped-beam experiments the system provides means for zero dead time measurements of rare decays, which occur on time scales of microseconds.

  8. Seismic Signatures of Brine Release at Blood Falls, Taylor Glacier, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, C. G.; Pettit, E. C.; Carmichael, J.

    2017-12-01

    Blood Falls is created by the release of subglacially-sourced, iron-rich brine at the surface of Taylor Glacier, McMurdo Dry Valleys, Antarctica. The supraglacial portion of this hydrological feature is episodically active. Englacial liquid brine flow occurs despite ice temperatures of -17°C and we document supraglacial liquid brine release despite ambient air temperatures average -20°C. In this study, we use data from a seismic network, time-lapse cameras, and publicly available weather station data to address the questions: what are the characteristics of seismic events that occur during Blood Falls brine release and how do these compare with seismic events that occur during times of Blood Falls quiescence? How are different processes observable in the time-lapse imagery represented in the seismic record? Time-lapse photography constrains the timing of brine release events during the austral winter of 2014. We use a noise-adaptive digital power detector to identify seismic events and cluster analysis to identify repeating events based on waveform similarity across the network. During the 2014 wintertime brine release, high-energy repeated seismic events occurred proximal to Blood Falls. We investigate the ground motions associated with these clustered events, as well as their spatial distribution. We see evidence of possible tremor during the brine release periods, an indicator of fluid movement. If distinctive seismic signatures are associated with Blood Falls brine release they could be identified based solely on seismic data without any aid from time-lapse cameras. Passive seismologic monitoring has the benefit of continuity during the polar night and other poor visibility conditions, which make time-lapse imagery unusable.

  9. Out of a digital chrysalis: NIHNMF (pronounced nymph--the National Indigenous Health and New Media Forum).

    PubMed

    Cattoni, Jan; Gamble, Lucinda; Gibson, Julie; Hunter, Ernest; Jones, Anita; Mitchell, Sarah; Pelham, Steven; Smith, Rakana; Travers, Helen

    2009-08-01

    In conjunction with the Creating Futures conference, the inaugural meeting of the National Indigenous Health and New Media Forum (NIHNMF--pronounced as 'nymph') was held at the Tanks Gallery in Cairns, Queensland, Australia. This paper describes the background to this innovative meeting of media minds. It also explores an emerging vision for addressing Indigenous health disparities through digital inclusion to overcome the 'digital divide' between mainstream and Indigenous Australians that constrains the delivery of appropriate health promotion to this health priority population.

  10. The Mexican Seismic Network (Red Sísmica Mexicana)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valdes-Gonzales, C. M.; Arreola-Manzano, J.; Castelan-Pescina, G.; Alonso-Rivera, P.; Saldivar-Rangel, M. A.; Rodriguez-Arteaga, O. O.; Lopez-Lena-Villasana, R.

    2014-12-01

    The Mexican Seismic Network (Red Sísmica Mexicana) was created to give sufficient information and opportune to make decisions in order to mitigate seismic and tsunami risk. This was a Mexican government initiative headed by CENAPRED (National Disaster Prevention Center) who made an effort to integrated academic institutions and civil agencies to work together through a collaboration agreement. This network is supported by Universidad National Autónoma de México (UNAM) and its seismic networks (Broad Band and Strong Motion), the Centro de Instrumentación y Registro Sismico (CIRES) with its Earthquake Early Warning System that covers the Guerrero Gap and Oaxaca earthquakes, The Centro de Investigación Científica y de Educación Superior de Ensenada (CICESE) with the support of its expertise in tsunami observation and the Secretaria de Marina (SEMAR) to monitor the sea level and operate the Mexican Tsunami Warning Center. The institutions involved in this scope have the compromise to interchange and share the data and advice to the Civil Protection authorities.

  11. Seismic assessment of Technical Area V (TA-V).

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Medrano, Carlos S.

    The Technical Area V (TA-V) Seismic Assessment Report was commissioned as part of Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) Self Assessment Requirement per DOE O 414.1, Quality Assurance, for seismic impact on existing facilities at Technical Area-V (TA-V). SNL TA-V facilities are located on an existing Uniform Building Code (UBC) Seismic Zone IIB Site within the physical boundary of the Kirtland Air Force Base (KAFB). The document delineates a summary of the existing facilities with their safety-significant structure, system and components, identifies DOE Guidance, conceptual framework, past assessments and the present Geological and Seismic conditions. Building upon the past information and themore » evolution of the new seismic design criteria, the document discusses the potential impact of the new standards and provides recommendations based upon the current International Building Code (IBC) per DOE O 420.1B, Facility Safety and DOE G 420.1-2, Guide for the Mitigation of Natural Phenomena Hazards for DOE Nuclear Facilities and Non-Nuclear Facilities.« less

  12. Digital TMI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rios, Joseph

    2012-01-01

    Presenting the current status of the Digital TMI project to visiting members of the FAA Command Center. Digital TMI is an effort to store national-level traffic management initiatives in a standards-compliant manner. Work is funded by the FAA.

  13. Using Antelope and Seiscomp in the framework of the Romanian Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marius Craiu, George; Craiu, Andreea; Marmureanu, Alexandru; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    The National Institute for Earth Physics (NIEP) operates a real-time seismic network designed to monitor the seismic activity on the Romania territory, dominated by the Vrancea intermediate-depth (60-200 km) earthquakes. The NIEP real-time network currently consists of 102 stations and two seismic arrays equipped with different high quality digitizers (Kinemetrics K2, Quanterra Q330, Quanterra Q330HR, PS6-26, Basalt), broadband and short period seismometers (CMG3ESP, CMG40T, KS2000, KS54000, KS2000, CMG3T, STS2, SH-1, S13, Mark l4c, Ranger, Gs21, Mark 22) and acceleration sensors (Episensor Kinemetrics). The primary goal of the real-time seismic network is to provide earthquake parameters from more broad-band stations with a high dynamic range, for more rapid and accurate computation of the locations and magnitudes of earthquakes. The Seedlink and AntelopeTM program packages are completely automated Antelope seismological system is run at the Data Center in Măgurele. The Antelope data acquisition and processing software is running for real-time processing and post processing. The Antelope real-time system provides automatic event detection, arrival picking, event location, and magnitude calculation. It also provides graphical displays and automatic location within near real time after a local, regional or teleseismic event has occurred SeisComP 3 is another automated system that is run at the NIEP and which provides the following features: data acquisition, data quality control, real-time data exchange and processing, network status monitoring, issuing event alerts, waveform archiving and data distribution, automatic event detection and location, easy access to relevant information about stations, waveforms, and recent earthquakes. The main goal of this paper is to compare both of these data acquisitions systems in order to improve their detection capabilities, location accuracy, magnitude and depth determination and reduce the RMS and other location errors.

  14. Urban Seismic Hazard Mapping for Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gomberg, Joan

    2006-01-01

    Earthquakes cannot be predicted, but scientists can forecast how strongly the ground is likely to shake as a result of an earthquake. Seismic hazard maps provide one way of conveying such forecasts. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), which produces seismic hazard maps for the Nation, is now engaged in developing more detailed maps for vulnerable urban areas. The first set of these maps is now available for Memphis, Tennessee.

  15. Ambient seismic noise monitoring of the Super-Sauze landslide from a very dense temporary seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chtouki, Toufik; Vergne, Jerome; Provost, Floriane; Malet, Jean-Philippe; Burtin, Arnaud; Hibert, Clément

    2017-04-01

    The Super-Sauze landslide is located on the southern part of the Barcelonnette Basin (French Alps) and has developed in a soft clay-shale environment. It is one of the four sites continuously monitored through a wide variety of geophysical and hydro-geological techniques in the framework of the OMIV French national landslide observatory. From early June to mid-July 2016, a temporary dense seismic array has been installed in the most active part of the landslide and at its surroundings. 50 different sites with an average inter-station distance of 50m have been instrumented with 150 miniaturized and autonomous seismic stations (Zland nodes), allowing a continuous record of the seismic signal at frequencies higher than 0.2Hz over an almost regular grid. Concurrently, a Ground-Based InSAR device allowed for a precise and continuous monitoring of the surface deformation. Overall, this experiment is intended to better characterize the spatio-temporal evolution of the deformation processes related to various type of forcing. We analyze the continuous records of ambient seismic noise recorded by the dense array. Using power spectral densities, we characterize the various types of natural and anthropogenic seismic sources, including the effect of water turbulence and bedload transport in the small nearby torrents. We also compute the correlation of the ambient diffuse seismic noise in various frequency bands for the 2448 station pairs to recover the empirical Green functions between them. The temporal evolution of the coda part of these noise correlation functions allows monitoring and localizing shear wave velocity variations in the sliding mass. Here we present some preliminary results of this analysis and compare the seismic variations to meteorological data and surface deformation.

  16. Your fate is in your hands? Handedness, digit ratio (2D:4D), and selection to a national talent development system.

    PubMed

    Baker, Joseph; Kungl, Ann-Marie; Pabst, Jan; Strauß, Bernd; Büsch, Dirk; Schorer, Jörg

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade a small evidence base has highlighted the potential importance of seemingly innocuous variables related to one's hands, such as hand dominance and the relative length of the second and fourth digits (2D:4D ratio), to success in sport. This study compared 2D:4D digit ratio and handedness among handball players selected to advance in a national talent development system with those not selected. Participants included 480 youth handball players (240 females and 240 males) being considered as part of the talent selection programme for the German Youth National team. Hand dominance and digit ratio were compared to age-matched control data using standard t-tests. There was a greater proportion of left-handers compared to the normal population in males but not in females. There was also a lower digit ratio in both females and males. However, there were no differences between those selected for the next stage of talent development and those not selected on either handedness or digit ratio. These results add support for general effects for both digit ratio and handedness in elite handball; however, these factors seem inadequate to explain talent selection decisions at this level.

  17. A Phenomenological Study of an Emergent National Digital Library, Part I: Theory and Methodological Framework

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalbello, Marija

    2005-01-01

    The activities surrounding the National Digital Library Program (NDLP) at the Library of Congress (1995-2000) are used to study institutional processes associated with technological innovation in the library context. The study identified modalities of successful innovation and the characteristics of creative decision making. Theories of social…

  18. Caltech/USGS Southern California Seismic Network: Recent Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R.; Chen, S.; Crummey, J.; Hauksson, E.; Solanki, K.; Thomas, V. I.; Watkins, M.; Yip, R.; Yu, E.; Given, D.; Peats, R.; Schwarz, S.

    2010-12-01

    The SCSN is the modern digital ground motion seismic network in Southern California and performs the following tasks: 1) Operates remote seismic stations and the central data processing systems in Pasadena; 2) Generates and reports real-time products including location, magnitude, ShakeMap, and others; 3) Responds to FEMA, CalEMA, media, and public inquiries about earthquakes; 4) Manages the production, archival, and distribution of waveforms, phase picks, and other data at the SCEDC; 5) Contributes to development and maintenance of the ANSS Quake Monitoring System (AQMS) software to add new features and improve robustness; 6) Supports the deployment of AQMS to other ANSS member regional seismic networks. The public regularly accesses the CISN, SCSN, and SCEDC web pages for up-to-date quake info and more than 230,000 users subscribe to the Electronic Notification System (ENS) which sends rapid notifications via email and cell phones. We distribute our products via Internet (EIDS), email, and paging, to USGS in Reston and Golden, FEMA, CalEMA, local governments, partner members, and other subscribers. We have developed CISN Display and provide ShakeCast for customers who require real-time earthquake information. The SCSN also exchanges waveform, phase pick, and amplitude data in real-time with several other partner networks, including Menlo Park, UCB, UNR, Anza network, the Tsunami Warning Centers, IRIS, and the NEIC. We operate a number of 24/7 on-call rotations to provide quick response to verify seismic events as well as addressing systems and telemetry issues. As part of our goals to improve quality, robustness, and coverage, some of our recent efforts include: 1) Converting the digital stations in the network to Q330 dataloggers; 2) Developing command and control capabilities such as automated mass re-centering; 3) Migration from serial to Ethernet communications; 4) Clustering of data acquisition servers for fail-over to improve data availability; 5) Use of

  19. Martian seismicity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Roger J.; Grimm, Robert E.

    1991-01-01

    The design and ultimate success of network seismology experiments on Mars depends on the present level of Martian seismicity. Volcanic and tectonic landforms observed from imaging experiments show that Mars must have been a seismically active planet in the past and there is no reason to discount the notion that Mars is seismically active today but at a lower level of activity. Models are explored for present day Mars seismicity. Depending on the sensitivity and geometry of a seismic network and the attenuation and scattering properties of the interior, it appears that a reasonable number of Martian seismic events would be detected over the period of a decade. The thermoelastic cooling mechanism as estimated is surely a lower bound, and a more refined estimate would take into account specifically the regional cooling of Tharsis and lead to a higher frequency of seismic events.

  20. Deployment of the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Harben, P.E.; Rock, D.W.

    1989-01-20

    This paper discusses the Oklahoma borehole seismic experiment, currently in operation, set up by members of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Treaty Verification Program and the Oklahoma Geophysical Observatory to determine deep-borehole seismic characteristics in geology typical of large regions in the Soviet Union. We evaluated and logged an existing 772-m deep borehole on the Observatory site by running caliper, cement bonding, casing inspection, and hole-deviation logs. Two Teledyne Geotech borehole-clamping seismometers were placed at various depths and spacings in the deep borehole. Currently, they are deployed at 727 and 730 m. A Teledyne Geotech shallow-borehole seismometer was mounted inmore » a 4.5-m hole, one meter from the deep borehole. The seismometers' system coherency were tested and found to be excellent to 35 Hz. We have recorded seismic noise, quarry blasts, regional earthquakes and teleseisms in the present configuration. We will begin a study of seismic noise and attenuation as a function of depth in the near future. 7 refs., 18 figs.« less

  1. Minimally invasive surgery for pedal digital deformity: an audit of complications using national benchmark indicators.

    PubMed

    Gilheany, Mark; Baarini, Omar; Samaras, Dean

    2015-01-01

    There is increasing global interest and performance of minimally invasive foot surgery (MIS) however, limited evidence is available in relation to complications associated with MIS for digital deformity correction. The aim of this prospective audit is to report the surgical and medical complications following MIS for digital deformity against standardised clinical indicators. A prospective clinical audit of 179 patients who underwent MIS to reduce simple and complex digital deformities was conducted between June 2011 and June 2013. All patients were followed up to a minimum of 12 months post operatively. Data was collected according to a modified version of the Australian Council of Healthcare standards (ACHS) clinical indicator program. The audit was conducted in accordance with the National Research Ethics Service (NRES) guidelines on clinical audit. The surgical complications included 1 superficial infection (0.53%) and 2 under-corrected digits (0.67%), which required revision surgery. Two patients who underwent isolated complex digital corrections had pain due to delayed union (0.7%), which resolved by 6 months post-op. No neurovascular compromise and no medical complications were encountered. The results compare favourably to rates reported in the literature for open reduction of digital deformity. This audit has illustrated that performing MIS to address simple and complex digital deformity results in low complication rates compared to published standards. MIS procedures were safely performed in a range of clinical settings, on varying degrees of digital deformity and on a wide range of ages and health profiles. Further studies investigating the effectiveness of these techniques are warranted and should evaluate long term patient reported outcome measures, as well as developing treatment algorithms to guide clinical decision making.

  2. Seismic Ecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seleznev, V. S.; Soloviev, V. M.; Emanov, A. F.

    The paper is devoted to researches of influence of seismic actions for industrial and civil buildings and people. The seismic actions bring influence directly on the people (vibration actions, force shocks at earthquakes) or indirectly through various build- ings and the constructions and can be strong (be felt by people) and weak (be fixed by sensing devices). The great number of work is devoted to influence of violent seismic actions (first of all of earthquakes) on people and various constructions. This work is devoted to study weak, but long seismic actions on various buildings and people. There is a need to take into account seismic oscillations, acting on the territory, at construction of various buildings on urbanized territories. Essential influence, except for violent earthquakes, man-caused seismic actions: the explosions, seismic noise, emitted by plant facilities and moving transport, radiation from high-rise buildings and constructions under action of a wind, etc. can exert. Materials on increase of man- caused seismicity in a number of regions in Russia, which earlier were not seismic, are presented in the paper. Along with maps of seismic microzoning maps to be built indicating a variation of amplitude spectra of seismic noise within day, months, years. The presence of an information about amplitudes and frequencies of oscillations from possible earthquakes and man-caused oscillations in concrete regions allows carry- ing out soundly designing and construction of industrial and civil housing projects. The construction of buildings even in not seismically dangerous regions, which have one from resonance frequencies coincident on magnitude to frequency of oscillations, emitted in this place by man-caused objects, can end in failure of these buildings and heaviest consequences for the people. The practical examples of detail of engineering- seismological investigation of large industrial and civil housing projects of Siberia territory (hydro power

  3. Publications - DGGS Digital Data Series Series | Alaska Division of

    Science.gov Websites

    Sections Geologic Communications Alaska Geologic Data Index (AGDI) Volcanology Alaska Volcano Observatory and Location Policy and Facilities Staff Seismic and Well Data Data Reports Contact Us Frequently Publications DGGS Series DDS main content DGGS Digital Data Series Publications These icons indicate the

  4. A design method for high performance seismic data acquisition based on oversampling delta-sigma modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Shanghua; Xue, Bing

    2017-04-01

    The dynamic range of the currently most widely used 24-bit seismic data acquisition devices is 10-20 dB lower than that of broadband seismometers, and this can affect the completeness of seismic waveform recordings under certain conditions. However, this problem is not easy to solve because of the lack of analog to digital converter (ADC) chips with more than 24 bits in the market. So the key difficulties for higher-resolution data acquisition devices lie in achieving more than 24-bit ADC circuit. In the paper, we propose a method in which an adder, an integrator, a digital to analog converter chip, a field-programmable gate array, and an existing low-resolution ADC chip are used to build a third-order 16-bit oversampling delta-sigma modulator. This modulator is equipped with a digital decimation filter, thus forming a complete analog to digital converting circuit. Experimental results show that, within the 0.1-40 Hz frequency range, the circuit board's dynamic range reaches 158.2 dB, its resolution reaches 25.99 dB, and its linearity error is below 2.5 ppm, which is better than what is achieved by the commercial 24-bit ADC chips ADS1281 and CS5371. This demonstrates that the proposed method may alleviate or even solve the amplitude-limitation problem that broadband observation systems so commonly have to face during strong earthquakes.

  5. Accelerating Harmonization in Digital Health.

    PubMed

    Moore, Carolyn; Werner, Laurie; BenDor, Amanda Puckett; Bailey, Mike; Khan, Nighat

    2017-01-01

    Digital tools play an important role in supporting front-line health workers who deliver primary care. This paper explores the current state of efforts undertaken to move away from single-purpose applications of digital health towards integrated systems and solutions that align with national strategies. Through examples from health information systems, data and health worker training, this paper demonstrates how governments and stakeholders are working to integrate digital health services. We emphasize three factors as crucial for this integration: development and implementation of national digital health strategies; technical interoperability and collaborative approaches to ensure that digital health has an impact on the primary care level. Consolidation of technologies will enable an integrated, scaleable approach to the use of digital health to support health workers. As this edition explores a paradigm shift towards harmonization in primary healthcare systems, this paper explores complementary efforts undertaken to move away from single-purpose applications of digital health towards integrated systems and solutions that align with national strategies. It describes a paradigm shift towards integrated and interoperable systems that respond to health workers' needs in training, data and health information; and calls for the consolidation and integration of digital health tools and approaches across health areas, functions and levels of the health system. It then considers the critical factors that must be in place to support this paradigm shift. This paper aims not only to describe steps taken to move from fractured pilots to effective systems, but to propose a new perspective focused on consolidation and collaboration guided by national digital health strategies.

  6. Surface seismic measurements of near-surface P-and S-wave seismic velocities at earthquake recording stations, Seattle, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.A.; Stephenson, W.J.; Frankel, A.D.; Odum, J.K.

    1999-01-01

    We measured P-and S-wave seismic velocities to about 40-m depth using seismic-refraction/reflection data on the ground surface at 13 sites in the Seattle, Washington, urban area, where portable digital seismographs recently recorded earthquakes. Sites with the lowest measured Vs correlate with highest ground motion amplification. These sites, such as at Harbor Island and in the Duwamish River industrial area (DRIA) south of the Kingdome, have an average Vs in the upper 30 m (V??s30) of 150 to 170 m/s. These values of V??s30 place these sites in soil profile type E (V??s30 < 180 m/s). A "rock" site, located at Seward Park on Tertiary sedimentary deposits, has a V??S30 of 433 m/s, which is soil type C (V??s30: 360 to 760 m/s). The Seward Park site V??s30 is about equal to, or up to 200 m/s slower than sites that were located on till or glacial outwash. High-amplitude P-and S-wave seismic reflections at several locations appear to correspond to strong resonances observed in earthquake spectra. An S-wave reflector at the Kingdome at about 17 to 22 m depth probably causes strong 2-Hz resonance that is observed in the earthquake data near the Kingdome.

  7. The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN): Improved Network Instrumentation, Local Earthquake Catalog Updates, and Peculiar Types of Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; Ten Cate, J. A.; House, L. S.; Greene, M. K.; Morton, E.; Kelley, R. E.

    2013-12-01

    The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN) has operated for 41 years, and provided the data to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. The network was installed for seismic verification research, as well as to monitor and locate earthquakes near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LASN stations are the only monitoring stations in New Mexico north of Albuquerque. The original network once included 22 stations in northern Mew Mexico. With limited funding in the early 1980's, the network was downsized to 7 stations within an area of about 15 km (N-S) by 15 km (E-W), centered on Los Alamos. Over the last four years, eight additional stations have been installed, which have considerably expanded the spatial coverage of the network. Currently, 7 stations have broadband, three-component seismometers with digital telemetry, and the remaining 8 have traditional 1 Hz short-period seismometers with either analog telemetry or on-site digital recording. A vertical array of accelerometers was also installed in a wellbore on LANL property. This borehole array has 3-component digital strong-motion sensors. Recently we began upgrading the local strong-motion accelerometer (SMA) network as well, with the addition of high-resolution digitizers and high-sensitivity force-balance accelerometers (FBA). We will present an updated description of the current LASN station, instrumentation and telemetry configurations, as well as the data acquisition and event-detection software structure used to record events in Earthworm. Although more than 2,000 earthquakes were detected and located in north-central New Mexico during the first 11 years of LASN's operation (1973 to 1984), currently only 1-2 earthquakes per month are detected and located within about 150 km of Los Alamos. Over 850 of these nearby earthquakes have been located from 1973 to present. We recently updated the LASN earthquake catalog for north-central New Mexico up through 2012 and most of 2013. Locations

  8. Non-seismic tsunamis: filling the forecast gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, C. W.; Titov, V. V.; Spillane, M. C.

    2015-12-01

    Earthquakes are the generation mechanism in over 85% of tsunamis. However, non-seismic tsunamis, including those generated by meteorological events, landslides, volcanoes, and asteroid impacts, can inundate significant area and have a large far-field effect. The current National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) tsunami forecast system falls short in detecting these phenomena. This study attempts to classify the range of effects possible from these non-seismic threats, and to investigate detection methods appropriate for use in a forecast system. Typical observation platforms are assessed, including DART bottom pressure recorders and tide gauges. Other detection paths include atmospheric pressure anomaly algorithms for detecting meteotsunamis and the early identification of asteroids large enough to produce a regional hazard. Real-time assessment of observations for forecast use can provide guidance to mitigate the effects of a non-seismic tsunami.

  9. Assessing the nation's earthquakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The basic purposes of this report are: (1) to make a convincing case for the intrinsic value of regional seismic networks; (2) to describe the seriousness of persistent problems in the current configuration and operation of these networks; (3) to outline recommendations for their modernization and future evolution, in particular, their short-term integration and long-term affiliation with the U.S. National Seismic Network. Important supplementary information is included in two appendices: a survey of regional seismic networks and implementation strategies for revitalization of regional seismic networks.

  10. Explaining the Global Digital Divide: Economic, Political and Sociological Drivers of Cross-National Internet Use

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillen, Mauro F.; Suarez, Sandra L.

    2005-01-01

    We argue that the global digital divide, as measured by cross-national differences in Internet use, is the result of the economic, regulatory and sociopolitical characteristics of countries and their evolution over time. We predict Internet use to increase with world-system status, privatization and competition in the telecommunications sector,…

  11. Seismic Noise Characterization in the Northern Mississippi Embayment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiley, S.; Deshon, H. R.; Boyd, O. S.

    2009-12-01

    We present a study of seismic noise sources present within the northern Mississippi embayment near the New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ). The northern embayment contains up to 1 km of unconsolidated coastal plain sediments overlying bedrock, making it an inherently noisy environment for seismic stations. The area is known to display high levels of cultural noise caused by agricultural activity, passing cars, trains, etc. We characterize continuous broadband seismic noise data recorded for the months of March through June 2009 at six stations operated by the Cooperative New Madrid Seismic Network. We looked at a single horizontal component of data during nighttime hours, defined as 6:15PM to 5:45AM Central Standard Time, which we determined to be the lowest amplitude period of noise for the region. Hourly median amplitudes were compared to daily average wind speeds downloaded from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. We find a correlation between time periods of increased noise and days with high wind speeds, suggesting that wind is likely a prevalent source of seismic noise in the area. The effects of wind on seismic recordings may result from wind induced tree root movement which causes ground motion to be recorded at the vaults located ~3m below ground. Automated studies utilizing the local network or the EarthScope Transportable Array, scheduled to arrive in the area in 2010-11, should expect to encounter wind induced noise fluctuations and must account for this in their analysis.

  12. Program and plans of the U.S. Geological Survey for producing information needed in National Seismic hazards and risk assessment, fiscal years 1980-84

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hays, Walter W.

    1979-01-01

    In accordance with the provisions of the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act of 1977 (Public Law 95-124), the U.S. Geological Survey has developed comprehensive plans for producing information needed to assess seismic hazards and risk on a national scale in fiscal years 1980-84. These plans are based on a review of the needs of Federal Government agencies, State and local government agencies, engineers and scientists engaged in consulting and research, professional organizations and societies, model code groups, and others. The Earthquake Hazards Reduction Act provided an unprecedented opportunity for participation in a national program by representatives of State and local governments, business and industry, the design professions, and the research community. The USGS and the NSF (National Science Foundation) have major roles in the national program. The ultimate goal of the program is to reduce losses from earthquakes. Implementation of USGS research in the Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program requires the close coordination of responsibility between Federal, State and local governments. The projected research plan in national seismic hazards and risk for fiscal years 1980-84 will be accomplished by USGS and non-USGS scientists and engineers. The latter group will participate through grants and contracts. The research plan calls for (1) national maps based on existing methods, (2) improved definition of earthquake source zones nationwide, (3) development of improved methodology, (4) regional maps based on the improved methodology, and (5) post-earthquake investigations. Maps and reports designed to meet the needs, priorities, concerns, and recommendations of various user groups will be the products of this research and provide the technical basis for improved implementation.

  13. Opto-mechanical lab-on-fibre seismic sensors detected the Norcia earthquake.

    PubMed

    Pisco, Marco; Bruno, Francesco Antonio; Galluzzo, Danilo; Nardone, Lucia; Gruca, Grzegorz; Rijnveld, Niek; Bianco, Francesca; Cutolo, Antonello; Cusano, Andrea

    2018-04-27

    We have designed and developed lab-on-fibre seismic sensors containing a micro-opto-mechanical cavity on the fibre tip. The mechanical cavity is designed as a double cantilever suspended on the fibre end facet and connected to a proof mass to tune its response. Ground acceleration leads to displacement of the cavity length, which in turn can be remotely detected using an interferometric interrogation technique. After the sensors characterization, an experimental validation was conducted at the Italian National Institute of Geophysics and Volcanology (INGV), which is responsible for seismic surveillance over the Italian country. The fabricated sensors have been continuously used for long periods to demonstrate their effectiveness as seismic accelerometer sensors. During the tests, fibre optic seismic accelerometers clearly detected the seismic sequence that culminated in the severe Mw6.5 Norcia earthquake that struck central Italy on October 30, 2016. The seismic data provided by the optical sensors were analysed by specialists at the INGV. The wave traces were compared with state-of-the-art traditional sensors typically incorporated into the INGV seismic networks. The comparison verifies the high fidelity of the optical sensors in seismic wave detection, indicating their suitability for a novel class of seismic sensors to be employed in practical scenarios.

  14. Development and programming of Geophonino: A low cost Arduino-based seismic recorder for vertical geophones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soler-Llorens, J. L.; Galiana-Merino, J. J.; Giner-Caturla, J.; Jauregui-Eslava, P.; Rosa-Cintas, S.; Rosa-Herranz, J.

    2016-09-01

    The commercial data acquisition systems used for seismic exploration are usually expensive equipment. In this work, a low cost data acquisition system (Geophonino) has been developed for recording seismic signals from a vertical geophone. The signal goes first through an instrumentation amplifier, INA155, which is suitable for low amplitude signals like the seismic noise, and an anti-aliasing filter based on the MAX7404 switched-capacitor filter. After that, the amplified and filtered signal is digitized and processed by Arduino Due and registered in an SD memory card. Geophonino is configured for continuous registering, where the sampling frequency, the amplitude gain and the registering time are user-defined. The complete prototype is an open source and open hardware system. It has been tested by comparing the registered signals with the ones obtained through different commercial data recording systems and different kind of geophones. The obtained results show good correlation between the tested measurements, presenting Geophonino as a low-cost alternative system for seismic data recording.

  15. Archive of digital Boomer and Chirp seismic reflection data collected during USGS Cruises 01RCE05 and 02RCE01 in the Lower Atchafalaya River, Mississippi River Delta, and offshore southeastern Louisiana, October 23-30, 2001, and August 18-19, 2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Flocks, James G.; Ferina, Nicholas F.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2004-01-01

    In October of 2001 and August of 2002, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted geophysical surveys of the Lower Atchafalaya River, the Mississippi River Delta, Barataria Bay, and the Gulf of Mexico south of East Timbalier Island, Louisiana. This report serves as an archive of unprocessed digital marine seismic reflection data, trackline maps, navigation files, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal FGDC metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained GIF image of each seismic profile is provided. The archived trace data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry and othes, 1975) and may be downloaded and processed with commercial or public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU). Examples of SU processing scripts and in-house (USGS) software for viewing SEG-Y files (Zihlman, 1992) are also provided. Processed profile images, trackline maps, navigation files, and formal metadata may be viewed with a web browser. Scanned handwritten logbooks and Field Activity Collection System (FACS) logs may be viewed with Adobe Reader.

  16. Quantification of depositional changes and paleo-seismic activities from laminated sediments using outcrop data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidlich, O.; Bernecker, M.

    2004-04-01

    Measurements of laminations from marine and limnic sediments are commonly a time-consuming procedure. However, the resulting quantitative proxies are of importance for the interpretation of both, climate changes and paleo-seismic activities. Digital image analysis accelerates the generation and interpretation of large data sets from laminated sediments based on contrasting grey values of dark and light laminae. Statistical transformation and correlation of the grey value signals reflect high frequency cycles due to changing mean laminae thicknesses, and thus provide data monitoring climate change. Perturbations (e.g., slumping structures, seismites, and tsunamites) of the commonly continuous laminae record seismic activities and obtain proxies for paleo-earthquake frequency. Using outcrop data from (i) the Pleistocene Lisan Formation of Jordan (Dead Sea Basin) and (ii) the Carboniferous-Permian Copacabana Formation of Bolivia (Lake Titicaca), we present a two-step approach to gain high-resolution time series based on field data for both purposes from unconsolidated and lithified outcrops. Step 1 concerns the construction of a continuous digital phototransect and step 2 covers the creation of a grey density curve based on digital photos along a line transect using image analysis. The applied automated image analysis technique provides a continuous digital record of the studied sections and, therefore, serves as useful tool for the evaluation of further proxy data. Analysing the obtained grey signal of the light and dark laminae of varves using phototransects, we discuss the potential and limitations of the proposed technique.

  17. A digital model for planning water management at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, David A.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Fields, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge is an important area for waterfowl production and migratory stopover in west-central Montana. Eight wetland units covering about 5,600 acres are the essential features of the refuge. Water availability for the wetland units can be uncertain owing to the large natural variations in precipitation and runoff and the high cost of pumping supplemental water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has developed a digital model for planning water management. The model can simulate strategies for water transfers among the eight wetland units and account for variability in runoff and pumped water. This report describes this digital model, which uses a water-accounting spreadsheet to track inputs and outputs to each of the wetland units of Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Inputs to the model include (1) monthly values for precipitation, pumped water, runoff, and evaporation; (2) water-level/capacity data for each wetland unit; and (3) the pan-evaporation coefficient. Outputs include monthly water volume and flooded surface area for each unit for as many as 5 consecutive years. The digital model was calibrated by comparing simulated and historical measured water volumes for specific test years.

  18. geoPebble: Combined Seismic, Acoustic, and GPS Sensor with Wireless Communications for Glaciological Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anandakrishnan, S.; Burkett, P. G.; Long, B.

    2009-12-01

    Glaciologist and geophysicists study many dynamic processes in glaciated environments such as sliding, crevasse formation, and water flow. These processes generate signals that can be interpreted for fundamental parameters needed for numerical models of glacier and ice sheet flow. These signals include microearthquakes beneath glaciers and ice streams during stick-slip processes; seismically identifiable harmonic tremors associated with subglacial water flow; supraglacial lake drainage which can produce rapid uplift of the 1 m/hr. In addition, researchers use active seismic experiments to determine bed properties such as roughness and lubrication. Currently, each process requires different instrumentation and/or different field equipment to collect the data such as a GPS receiver for displacement, a passive seismic instrument for microearthquakes, and a multichannel seismic recorder for active seismic experiments. We report on the development of an instrument specifically designed for observing dynamic glaciated environments in a single platform, reducing the need for multiple field systems and reducing the cost considerably. The geoPebble wireless seismic acquisition system, designed and built at the Pennsylvania State University, comprises 4 channels of 24-bit seismic and acoustic digitizing, an L1 GPS engine, onboard data storage and an 802.15 ZigBee radio. Three of the four ADC channels are intended to be used with a 3 component seismic sensor. The fourth channel is a dedicated to an audio frequency microphone. The 1 Hz L1 GPS system is capable of horizontal position accuracy to better than 10 cm when post-processed against L1/L2 stations within 10 km. Onboard storage is achieved with a Secure Digital card where volumes now exceed 32 GB. The ZigBee radio is capable of forming a mesh network which reduces transmit and receive power requirements while maintaing communication throughout the array and provides state-of-health information as well as sufficient data

  19. Implementing Audio Digital Feedback Loop Using the National Instruments RIO System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Huang, G.; Byrd, J. M.

    2006-11-20

    Development of system for high precision RF distribution and laser synchronization at Berkeley Lab has been ongoing for several years. Successful operation of these systems requires multiple audio bandwidth feedback loops running at relatively high gains. Stable operation of the feedback loops requires careful design of the feedback transfer function. To allow for flexible and compact implementation, we have developed digital feedback loops on the National Instruments Reconfigurable Input/Output (RIO) platform. This platform uses an FPGA and multiple I/Os that can provide eight parallel channels running different filters. We present the design and preliminary experimental results of this system.

  20. Impact of 3-D seismic data on the Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation/Chevron Nigeria Limited joint venture development drilling program

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Quam, S.

    The Nigerian National Petroleum Corporation/Chevron Nigeria Limited joint venture has been acquiring three-dimensional (3-D) seismic data over its concessions since 1984. To date, 1700 km[sup 2] have been recorded and processed at a cumulative cost of US $39 million. During 1991 - 1992, 20 development wells were drilled based directly on new 3-D seismic interpretations. These wells have added 148 million bbl of oil in new recoverable reserves, and to date have added 37,000 bbl/day to the joint venture's production. In addition, the 3-D interpretations have resulted in a sizable inventory of wells for future development drilling. The new 3-Dmore » interpretations provided more accurate pictures of fault patterns, fluid contacts, channel trends, stratigraphic continuity, and velocity/amplitude anomalies. In addition, the 3-D data were invaluable in designing low risk, directional well trajectories to tap relatively thin oil legs under large gas caps. Wells often were programmed to hit several objectives at their respective gas/oil contacts, resulting in maximized net oil sand pays and reducing the risk of gas production. In order to do this, directional [open quotes]sharpshooting,[close quotes] accurate depth conversion of the seismic time maps, was critical. By using the 3-D seismic, checkshot, and sonic data to develop a variable velocity space, well-top prognoses within 50 ft at depths of 6,000-10,000 ft were possible, and were key to the success of the program. As the joint venture acreage becomes more mature, development wells will be drilled for smaller numbers of stacked objectives, and sometimes for single sands. Highly accurate 3-D interpretations and depth conversions will become even more critical in order to tap thinner pay zones in a cost-effect manner.« less

  1. Next generation seismic fragility curves for California bridges incorporating the evolution in seismic design philosophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramanathan, Karthik Narayan

    Quantitative and qualitative assessment of the seismic risk to highway bridges is crucial in pre-earthquake planning, and post-earthquake response of transportation systems. Such assessments provide valuable knowledge about a number of principal effects of earthquakes such as traffic disruption of the overall highway system, impact on the regions’ economy and post-earthquake response and recovery, and more recently serve as measures to quantify resilience. Unlike previous work, this study captures unique bridge design attributes specific to California bridge classes along with their evolution over three significant design eras, separated by the historic 1971 San Fernando and 1989 Loma Prieta earthquakes (these events affected changes in bridge seismic design philosophy). This research developed next-generation fragility curves for four multispan concrete bridge classes by synthesizing new knowledge and emerging modeling capabilities, and by closely coordinating new and ongoing national research initiatives with expertise from bridge designers. A multi-phase framework was developed for generating fragility curves, which provides decision makers with essential tools for emergency response, design, planning, policy support, and maximizing investments in bridge retrofit. This framework encompasses generational changes in bridge design and construction details. Parameterized high-fidelity three-dimensional nonlinear analytical models are developed for the portfolios of bridge classes within different design eras. These models incorporate a wide range of geometric and material uncertainties, and their responses are characterized under seismic loadings. Fragility curves were then developed considering the vulnerability of multiple components and thereby help to quantify the performance of highway bridge networks and to study the impact of seismic design principles on the performance within a bridge class. This not only leads to the development of fragility relations

  2. Contribution to the study of historical seismicity in the Maghrebian region, Catalogue of historiacal seismicity of the Maghreb region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elmrabet, T.

    2009-04-01

    The seismic risk assessment in countries with moderate seismic activity is a very delicate action as well as a high priority one in land use management and urban rehabilitation. The credibility of this assessment is based mainly on the effects of destructive earthquakes whose maximum intensities become a reference for determining the level of protection. This knowledge requires a detailed study of the damage caused by major earthquakes over a long period of time. In this context, a broad scale research about past earthquakes started in the Geophysics Laboratory, now called the National Geophysics Institute (ING) within the National Center for Scientific and Technical Research in Rabat, Morocco. It supported a thorough study which included critical historical texts scattered in various local and foreign archives. The pursuit of this study, under the project called PAMERAR, which was launched in the early 80's aimed at reducing of earthquake risk in the Arab region, led us to investigate the origin of these texts according to various public and private libraries, as in Spain and France. The scientific interest in the historical seismicity in Morocco was highlighted at the beginning of the twentieth century in several reports and catalogs but with several gaps in time and space, further research was thus necessary especially to explore documents in particular from origin sources. This interest in historical archives is within the scope of understanding the natural hazards over long period to evaluate the recurrence of earthquakes. This study leads to significant results covering 11 centuries, from AD 846 to the present. We continued to study the effects of recent earthquakes on humans and buildings heritage, this work has led to a study in the footsteps of local seismic culture. Since earthquakes do not recognize the limits of political geography, since 1993 we have undertaken to extend the research to include the entire Maghreb region. We then used the database

  3. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiles collected in 1979 aboard M/V Seismic Explorer on the western Florida shelf

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, M.M.; Soderberg, N.K.

    1989-01-01

    In August 1979, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) aboard the M/V SEISMIC EXPLORER of Seismic Explorations International (SEI), ran 17 lines (1,270 km) of multichannel, seismic-reflection profiles on the western Florida Shelf. The main features of the SEI system were (1) a digital recorder with an instantaneous-floating-point-gain constant of 24 dB, (2) a 64-channel hydrophone streamer, 3,200 m long, and (3) a 21-airgun array that had a total volume of 2,000 in and a pressure of 2,000 psi. Sampling interval was array to the center of the farthest phone group was 3,338 m and to the nearest phone group, 188 m. Shot points were 5O m apart to obtain a 32-fold stack. Navigation was by an integrated satellite/Loran/doppler-sonar system.The SEI data were processed by Geophysical Data Processing Center, Inc. of Houston, Texas. Processing procedures were standard with the following exceptions: (1) a deringing deconvolution that had a 128-ms operator length was done prior to stacking. (2) a time-variant predictive deconvolution that had a filter operator length of 100 ms and automatic picking of the second zero-crossing was applied after stacking to further suppress multiple energy. (3) Velocity analyses were performed every 3 km, using a technique that included the determination and consideration of both the amount and direction of apparent dip. (4) Automatic gain ranging using a 750-ms window was applied pre- and post-stack. ( 5) Lines affected by sea floor's angle of slope were deconvolved again before stacking and time-variant filter parameters were adjusted to follow the sea-floor geometry.The data taken with the 3,200-m streamer and 2,000 in3 airgun array, aboard M/V SEISMIC EXPLORER (Arabic numerals) are vastly superior to those obtained by R/V GYRE using a much smaller streamer and source (Roman numerals). The former consistently show coherent primary events from within the units underlying the Mesozoic section on the western Florida Shelf, while the latter tend to do

  4. Background noise model development for seismic stations of KMA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeon, Youngsoo

    2010-05-01

    The background noise recorded at seismometer is exist at any seismic signal due to the natural phenomena of the medium which the signal passed through. Reducing the seismic noise is very important to improve the data quality in seismic studies. But, the most important aspect of reducing seismic noise is to find the appropriate place before installing the seismometer. For this reason, NIMR(National Institution of Meteorological Researches) starts to develop a model of standard background noise for the broadband seismic stations of the KMA(Korea Meteorological Administration) using a continuous data set obtained from 13 broadband stations during the period of 2007 and 2008. We also developed the model using short period seismic data from 10 stations at the year of 2009. The method of Mcmara and Buland(2004) is applied to analyse background noise of Korean Peninsula. The fact that borehole seismometer records show low noise level at frequency range greater than 1 Hz compared with that of records at the surface indicate that the cultural noise of inland Korean Peninsula should be considered to process the seismic data set. Reducing Double Frequency peak also should be regarded because the Korean Peninsula surrounded by the seas from eastern, western and southern part. The development of KMA background model shows that the Peterson model(1993) is not applicable to fit the background noise signal generated from Korean Peninsula.

  5. Combining Real-time Seismic and Geodetic Data to Improve Rapid Earthquake Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, M. H.; Neuhauser, D. S.; Gee, L. S.; Dreger, D. S.; Basset, A.; Romanowicz, B.

    2002-12-01

    The Berkeley Seismological Laboratory operates seismic and geodetic stations in the San Francisco Bay area and northern California for earthquake and deformation monitoring. The seismic systems, part of the Berkeley Digital Seismic Network (BDSN), include strong motion and broadband sensors, and 24-bit dataloggers. The data from 20 GPS stations, part of the Bay Area Regional Deformation (BARD) network of more than 70 stations in northern California, are acquired in real-time. We have developed methods to acquire GPS data at 12 stations that are collocated with the seismic systems using the seismic dataloggers, which have large on-site data buffer and storage capabilities, merge it with the seismic data stream in MiniSeed format, and continuously stream both data types using reliable frame relay and/or radio modem telemetry. Currently, the seismic data are incorporated into the Rapid Earthquake Data Integration (REDI) project to provide notification of earthquake magnitude, location, moment tensor, and strong motion information for hazard mitigation and emergency response activities. The geodetic measurements can provide complementary constraints on earthquake faulting, including the location and extent of the rupture plane, unambiguous resolution of the nodal plane, and distribution of slip on the fault plane, which can be used, for example, to refine strong motion shake maps. We are developing methods to rapidly process the geodetic data to monitor transient deformation, such as coseismic station displacements, and for combining this information with the seismic observations to improve finite-fault characterization of large earthquakes. The GPS data are currently processed at hourly intervals with 2-cm precision in horizontal position, and we are beginning a pilot project in the Bay Area in collaboration with the California Spatial Reference Center to do epoch-by-epoch processing with greater precision.

  6. Improving the Detectability of the Catalan Seismic Network for Local Seismic Activity Monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jara, Jose Antonio; Frontera, Tànit; Batlló, Josep; Goula, Xavier

    2016-04-01

    The seismic survey of the territory of Catalonia is mainly performed by the regional seismic network operated by the Cartographic and Geologic Institute of Catalonia (ICGC). After successive deployments and upgrades, the current network consists of 16 permanent stations equipped with 3 component broadband seismometers (STS2, STS2.5, CMG3ESP and CMG3T), 24 bits digitizers (Nanometrics Trident) and VSAT telemetry. Data are continuously sent in real-time via Hispasat 1D satellite to the ICGC datacenter in Barcelona. Additionally, data from other 10 stations of neighboring areas (Spain, France and Andorra) are continuously received since 2011 via Internet or VSAT, contributing both to detect and to locate events affecting the region. More than 300 local events with Ml ≥ 0.7 have been yearly detected and located in the region. Nevertheless, small magnitude earthquakes, especially those located in the south and south-west of Catalonia may still go undetected by the automatic detection system (DAS), based on Earthworm (USGS). Thus, in order to improve the detection and characterization of these missed events, one or two new stations should be installed. Before making the decision about where to install these new stations, the performance of each existing station is evaluated taking into account the fraction of detected events using the station records, compared to the total number of events in the catalogue, occurred during the station operation time from January 1, 2011 to December 31, 2014. These evaluations allow us to build an Event Detection Probability Map (EDPM), a required tool to simulate EDPMs resulting from different network topology scenarios depending on where these new stations are sited, and becoming essential for the decision-making process to increase and optimize the event detection probability of the seismic network.

  7. Validating induced seismicity forecast models—Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király-Proag, Eszter; Zechar, J. Douglas; Gischig, Valentin; Wiemer, Stefan; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Doetsch, Joseph

    2016-08-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. In this study, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models; this test bench can be used for model development, model selection, and ensemble model building. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models: Shapiro and Smoothed Seismicity (SaSS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). These models incorporate a different mix of physics-based elements and stochastic representation of the induced sequences. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. Generally, HySei forecasts the seismicity rate better after shut-in but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SaSS forecasts the spatial distribution better and gives better seismicity rate estimates before shut-in. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in.

  8. Western Rainier Seismic Zone Airborne Laser Swath Mapping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David J.; Haugerud, Ralph A.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scott, Kevin M.; Weaver, Craig S.; Martinez, Diana M.; Zeigler, John C.; Latypov, Damir

    2003-01-01

    Airborne laser swath mapping (ALSM) of the Puget Lowland conducted by TerraPoint LLC for the Purget Sound Lidar Concortium (PSLC), has been successful in revealing Holocene fault scarps and lendsliders hidden beneath the dense, temperate rain forest cover and in quantifying shoreline terrace uplift. Expanding the PSLC efforts, NASA-USGS collaboration is now focusing on topographic mapping of seismogenic zones adjacent to volcanois in the western Cascades range in order to assess the presence of active faulting and tectonic deformation, better define the extend of lahars and understand their flow processes, and characterize landslide occurrence. Mapping of the western Rainier zone (WRZ) was conducted by TerraPoint in late 2002, after leaf fall and before snow accumulation. The WRZ is a NNW-trending, approx. 30 km-long zone of seismicity west of Mount Rainier National Park. The Puget Lowland ALSM methods were modified to accommodate challenges posed by the steep, high relief terrian. The laser data, acquired with a density of approx. 2 pulses /sq m, was filtered to identify returns from the ground from which a bare Earth digital elevation model (DEM) was produced with a grid size of 1.8 m. The RMS elevation accuracy of the DEM in flat, unvegetated areas is approx. 10cm based on consistency between overlapping flight swaths and comparisons to ground control points. The resulting DEM substantially improves upon Shuttle Radar Topography Mission and USGS photogrammetric mapping. For example, the DEM defines the size and spatial distribution of flood erratics left by the Electron lahar and of megaclasts within the Round Pass lahar, important for characterizing the lahar hydraulics. A previously unknown lateral levee on the Round Pass lahar is also revealed. In addition, to illustrating geomorfic feature within the WRZ, future plans for laser mapping of the Saint Helens and Darrington seismic zones will be described.

  9. Multichannel seismic-reflection profiling on the R/V Maurice Ewing during the Los Angeles Region Seismic Experiment (LARSE), California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Clayton, Robert W.; Klitgord, Kim D.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Sliter, Ray; McRaney, John K.; Gardner, James V.; Keene, J.B.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection data in the Inner California Borderland aboard the R/V Maurice Ewing, conducted in October 1994 as part of the Los Angeles Regional Seismic Experiment (LARSE). LARSE is a cooperative study of the crustal structure of southern California involving earth scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey, Caltech, the University of Southern California, the University of California Los Angeles, and the Southern California Earthquake Center (SCEC). During LARSE, the R/V Ewing's 20- element air gun array, totaling 137.7 liters (8470 cu. in.), was used as the primary seismic source for wide-angle recording along three main onshore-offshore lines centered on the Los Angeles basin and the epicenters of the 1933 Long Beach and 1994 Northridge earthquakes. The LARSE onshore-offshore lines were each 200-250 km long, with the offshore portions being between 90 and 150 km long. The nearly 24,000 air gun signals generated by the Ewing were recorded by an array of 170 PASSCAL REFTEK recorders deployed at 2 km intervals along all three of the onshore lines and 9 ocean bottom seismometers (OBSs) deployed along two of the lines. Separate passes over the OBS-deployment lines were performed with a long air gun repetition rate (60 and 90 seconds) to minimize acoustic-wave interference from previous shots in the OBS data. The Ewing's 4.2-km, 160-channel, digital streamer was also used to record approximately 1250 km of 40-fold multichannel seismic-reflection data. To enhance the fold of the wide-angle data recorded onshore, mitigating against cultural and wind noise in the Los Angeles basin, the entire ship track was repeated at least once resulting in fewer than about 660 km of unique trackline coverage in the Inner Borderland. Portions of the seismic-reflection lines were repeated up to 6 times. A variety of other geophysical data were also continuously recorded, including 3.5 kHz bathymetry, multi

  10. Hydrophone Investigations of Earthquakes and Explosion Generated High-Frequency Seismic Phases

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-06-30

    stacked along three axes, a temperature sensor , a 2- component tiltmeter , and floating point analog-to-digital electronics. It is clamped inside the... sensors within the ocean- sediment-basement column in order to maximize the signal-to-noise ratio and the signal fidelity of various seismic and acoustic...improved by siting the sensors below the ocean-sediment interface. These changes are especially pronounced on horizontal sensors . Although siting the

  11. Seismic hazard estimation of northern Iran using smoothed seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoshnevis, Naeem; Taborda, Ricardo; Azizzadeh-Roodpish, Shima; Cramer, Chris H.

    2017-07-01

    This article presents a seismic hazard assessment for northern Iran, where a smoothed seismicity approach has been used in combination with an updated seismic catalog and a ground motion prediction equation recently found to yield good fit with data. We evaluate the hazard over a geographical area including the seismic zones of Azerbaijan, the Alborz Mountain Range, and Kopeh-Dagh, as well as parts of other neighboring seismic zones that fall within our region of interest. In the chosen approach, seismic events are not assigned to specific faults but assumed to be potential seismogenic sources distributed within regular grid cells. After performing the corresponding magnitude conversions, we decluster both historical and instrumental seismicity catalogs to obtain earthquake rates based on the number of events within each cell, and smooth the results to account for the uncertainty in the spatial distribution of future earthquakes. Seismicity parameters are computed for each seismic zone separately, and for the entire region of interest as a single uniform seismotectonic region. In the analysis, we consider uncertainties in the ground motion prediction equation, the seismicity parameters, and combine the resulting models using a logic tree. The results are presented in terms of expected peak ground acceleration (PGA) maps and hazard curves at selected locations, considering exceedance probabilities of 2 and 10% in 50 years for rock site conditions. According to our results, the highest levels of hazard are observed west of the North Tabriz and east of the North Alborz faults, where expected PGA values are between about 0.5 and 1 g for 10 and 2% probability of exceedance in 50 years, respectively. We analyze our results in light of similar estimates available in the literature and offer our perspective on the differences observed. We find our results to be helpful in understanding seismic hazard for northern Iran, but recognize that additional efforts are necessary to

  12. Active seismic experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovach, R. L.; Watkins, J. S.; Talwani, P.

    1972-01-01

    The Apollo 16 active seismic experiment (ASE) was designed to generate and monitor seismic waves for the study of the lunar near-surface structure. Several seismic energy sources are used: an astronaut-activated thumper device, a mortar package that contains rocket-launched grenades, and the impulse produced by the lunar module ascent. Analysis of some seismic signals recorded by the ASE has provided data concerning the near-surface structure at the Descartes landing site. Two compressional seismic velocities have so far been recognized in the seismic data. The deployment of the ASE is described, and the significant results obtained are discussed.

  13. Seismic source parameters of the induced seismicity at The Geysers geothermal area, California, by a generalized inversion approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picozzi, Matteo; Oth, Adrien; Parolai, Stefano; Bindi, Dino; De Landro, Grazia; Amoroso, Ortensia

    2017-04-01

    The accurate determination of stress drop, seismic efficiency and how source parameters scale with earthquake size is an important for seismic hazard assessment of induced seismicity. We propose an improved non-parametric, data-driven strategy suitable for monitoring induced seismicity, which combines the generalized inversion technique together with genetic algorithms. In the first step of the analysis the generalized inversion technique allows for an effective correction of waveforms for the attenuation and site contributions. Then, the retrieved source spectra are inverted by a non-linear sensitivity-driven inversion scheme that allows accurate estimation of source parameters. We therefore investigate the earthquake source characteristics of 633 induced earthquakes (ML 2-4.5) recorded at The Geysers geothermal field (California) by a dense seismic network (i.e., 32 stations of the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory Geysers/Calpine surface seismic network, more than 17.000 velocity records). We find for most of the events a non-selfsimilar behavior, empirical source spectra that requires ωγ source model with γ > 2 to be well fitted and small radiation efficiency ηSW. All these findings suggest different dynamic rupture processes for smaller and larger earthquakes, and that the proportion of high frequency energy radiation and the amount of energy required to overcome the friction or for the creation of new fractures surface changes with the earthquake size. Furthermore, we observe also two distinct families of events with peculiar source parameters that, in one case suggests the reactivation of deep structures linked to the regional tectonics, while in the other supports the idea of an important role of steeply dipping fault in the fluid pressure diffusion.

  14. How a Country-Wide Seismological Network Can Improve Understanding of Seismicity and Seismic Hazard -- The Example of Bhutan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hetényi, G.; Diehl, T.; Singer, J.; Kissling, E. H.; Clinton, J. F.; Wiemer, S.

    2015-12-01

    The Eastern Himalayas are home to a seemingly complex seismo-tectonic evolution. The rate of instrumental seismicity is lower than the average along the orogen, there is no record of large historical events, but both paleoseismology and GPS studies point to potentially large (M>8) earthquakes. Due to the lack of a permanent seismic monitoring system in the area, our current level of understanding is inappropriate to create a reliable quantitative seismic hazard model for the region. Existing maps are based on questionable hypotheses and show major inconsistencies when compared to each other. Here we present results on national and regional scales from a 38-station broadband seismological network we operated for almost 2 years in the Kingdom of Bhutan. A thorough, state-of-the-art analysis of local and regional earthquakes builds a comprehensive catalogue that reveals significantly (2-to-3 orders of magnitude) more events than detected from global networks. The seismotectonic analysis reveals new patterns of seismic activity as well as striking differences over relatively short distances within the Himalayas, only partly explained by surface observations such as geology. We compare a priori and a posteriori (BMC) magnitude of completeness maps and show that our network was able to detect all felt events during its operation. Some of these events could be felt at surprisingly large distances. Based on our experiment and experience, we draft the pillars on which a permanent seismological observatory for Bhutan could be constructed. Such a continuous monitoring system of seismic activity could then lead to a reliable quantitative seismic hazard model for Bhutan and surrounding regions, and serve as a base to improve building codes and general preparedness.

  15. Digital pathology access and usage in the UK: results from a national survey on behalf of the National Cancer Research Institute’s CM-Path initiative

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Bethany Jill; Lee, Jessica; Oien, Karin A; Treanor, Darren

    2018-01-01

    Aim To canvass the UK pathology community to ascertain current levels of digital pathology usage in clinical and academic histopathology departments, and prevalent attitudes to digital pathology. Methods A 15-item survey was circulated to National Health Service and academic pathology departments across the UK using the SurveyMonkey online survey tool. Responses were sought at a departmental or institutional level. Where possible, departmental heads were approached and asked to complete the survey, or forward it to the most relevant individual in their department. Data were collected over a 6-month period from February to July 2017. Results 41 institutes from across the UK responded to the survey. 60% (23/39) of institutions had access to a digital pathology scanner, and 60% (24/40) had access to a digital pathology workstation. The most popular applications of digital pathology in current use were undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, research and quality assurance. Investigating the deployment of digital pathology in their department was identified as a high or highest priority by 58.5% of institutions, with improvements in efficiency, turnaround times, reporting times and collaboration in their institution anticipated by the respondents. Access to funding for initial hardware, software and staff outlay, pathologist training and guidance from the Royal College of Pathologists were identified as factors that could enable respondent institutions to increase their digital pathology usage. Conclusion Interest in digital pathology adoption in the UK is high, with usage likely to increase in the coming years. In light of this, pathologists are seeking more guidance on safe usage. PMID:29317516

  16. On the Complicated 410 km Discontinuity beneath Eastern China with the Seismic Triplications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Y.; Li, G.; Sui, Y.

    2013-12-01

    The seismic triplications from the seismograms of mid-deep earthquakes at the Ryuku subduction zone recorded by the Chinese Digital Seismic Network (CDSN) between the epicentral distance between 10°-23° are used to study the upper mantle structure beneath Eastern China. Comparing the observed seismograms with the synthetic ones from different models based on IASP91 earth model and using the ray-tracing method, we found that the 410 km discontinuity is a gradient zone with the thickness of 20 km and there is low velocity layer atop the discontinuity which becomes thin from north to south beneath Eastern China. The complicated 410 km discontinuity with an atop low velocity layer may be caused by the dehydration of the Philippine sea subducting materials which are observed by the seismic tomopgraphy (Qu, et al., 2007; Li and van der Hilst, 2010). The low velocity gradient zone between the depths of 80-200 km is also been observed and may be related to the lithospheric-asthenosphere boundary.

  17. Cultural Dimensions of Digital Library Development, Part II: The Cultures of Innovation in Five European National Libraries (Narratives of Development)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalbello, Marija

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the narrative accounts of the beginnings of digital library programs in five European national libraries: Biblioteca nacional de Portugal, Bibliotheque nationale de France, Die Deutsche Bibliothek, the National Library of Scotland, and the British Library. Based on interviews with policy makers and developers of digital…

  18. Finite-Difference Numerical Simulation of Seismic Gradiometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aldridge, D. F.; Symons, N. P.; Haney, M. M.

    2006-12-01

    separation. Finally, numerical tests of the "point seismic array" concept are oriented toward understanding its potential and limitations. Sandia National Laboratories is a multiprogram science and engineering facility operated by Sandia Corporation, a Lockheed-Martin company, for the United States Department of Energy under contract DE- AC04-94AL85000.

  19. The Southern Kansas Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Terra, F. M.

    2015-12-01

    Historically aseismic Harper and Sumner counties in Southern Kansas experienced a dramatic increase in seismicity beginning in early 2014, coincident with the development of new oil production in the Mississippi Lime Play. In order to better understand the potential relationships between seismicity and oil development, the USGS installed a real-time telemetered seismic network in cooperation with the Kansas Geological Survey, the Kansas Corporation Commission, the Kansas Department of Health and Environment, Harper County, and the Oklahoma Geological Survey. The network began operation in March 2014 with an initial deployment of 5 NetQuakes accelerometers and by July 2014 had expanded to include 10 broadband sites. The network currently has 14 stations, all with accelerometers and 12 with broadband seismometers. The network has interstation spacing of 15 - 25 km and typical azimuthal gap of 80 for well-located events. Data are continuously streamed to IRIS at 200 samples per second from most sites. Earthquake locations are augmented with additional stations from the USGS National Network, Oklahoma Geological Survey Seismic Network, Kansas Seismic Monitoring Network and the Enid Oklahoma Network. Since the spring of 2014 over 7500 earthquakes have been identified with data from this network, 1400 of which have been manually timed and cataloged. Focal depths for earthquakes typically range between 2 and 7 km. The catalog is available at earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/search/ under network code 'Ismpkansas'. The network recorded the largest known earthquake in Harper County, Mw 4.3, on October 2, 2014 and in Sumner County, Mw 4.9, on November 12, 2014. Recorded ground motions at the epicenter of the October earthquake were 0.70 g (PGA) and 12 cm/s (PGV). These high ground motion values agree with near-source recordings made by other USGS temporary deployments in the U. S. midcontinent, indicating a significant shaking hazard from such shallow, moderate

  20. The Crustal Structure and Seismicity of Eastern Venezuela

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitz, M.; Martins, A.; Sobiesiak, M.; Alvarado, L.; Vasquez, R.

    2001-12-01

    Eastern Venezuela is characterized by a moderate to high seismicity, evidenced recently by the 1997 Cariaco earthquake located on the El Pilar Fault, a right lateral strike slip fault which marks the plate boundary between the Caribbean and South-American plates in this region. Recently, the seismic activity seems to migrate towards the zone of subduction of the Lesser Antilles in the northeast, where a mb 6.0 earthquake occurred in October 2000 at 120 km of depth. Periodical changes in the seismic activity are related to the interaction of the stress fields of the strike-slip and the subduction regimes. The seismic activity decreases rapidly towards to the south with some disperse events on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield, related to the Guri fault system. The crustal models used in the region are derived from the information generated by the national seismological network since 1982 and by microseismicity studies in northeastern Venezuela, coinciding in a crustal thickness of about 35 km in depth. Results of seismic refraction measurements for the region were obtained during field campains in 1998 (ECOGUAY) for the Guayana Shield and the Cariaco sedimentary basin and in 2001 (ECCO) for the Oriental Basin. The total crustal thickness decreases from about 45 km on the northern edge of the Guayana Shield to some 36 km close to El Tigre in the center of the Oriental Basin. The average crustal velocity decreases in the same sense from 6.5 to 5.8 km/s. In the Cariaco sedimentary basin a young sedimentary cover of 1 km thickness with a seismic velocity of 2 km/s was derived. Towards the northern limit of the South-American plate, no deep seismic refraction data are available up to now. The improvement of the crustal models used in that region would constitute a step forward in the analysis of the seismic hazard. Seismic refraction studies funded by CONICIT S1-97002996 and S1-2000000685 projects and PDVSA (additional drilling and blasting), recording equipment

  1. Small Arrays for Seismic Intruder Detections: A Simulation Based Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarka, A.

    2014-12-01

    Seismic sensors such as geophones and fiber optic have been increasingly recognized as promising technologies for intelligence surveillance, including intruder detection and perimeter defense systems. Geophone arrays have the capability to provide cost effective intruder detection in protecting assets with large perimeters. A seismic intruder detection system uses one or multiple arrays of geophones design to record seismic signals from footsteps and ground vehicles. Using a series of real-time signal processing algorithms the system detects, classify and monitors the intruder's movement. We have carried out numerical experiments to demonstrate the capability of a seismic array to detect moving targets that generate seismic signals. The seismic source is modeled as a vertical force acting on the ground that generates continuous impulsive seismic signals with different predominant frequencies. Frequency-wave number analysis of the synthetic array data was used to demonstrate the array's capability at accurately determining intruder's movement direction. The performance of the array was also analyzed in detecting two or more objects moving at the same time. One of the drawbacks of using a single array system is its inefficiency at detecting seismic signals deflected by large underground objects. We will show simulation results of the effect of an underground concrete block at shielding the seismic signal coming from an intruder. Based on simulations we found that multiple small arrays can greatly improve the system's detection capability in the presence of underground structures. This work was performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344

  2. Progressive Seismic Failure, Seismic Gap, and Great Seismic Risk across the Densely Populated North China Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, A.; Yu, X.; Shen, Z.

    2014-12-01

    Although the seismically active North China basin has the most complete written records of pre-instrumentation earthquakes in the world, this information has not been fully utilized for assessing potential earthquake hazards of this densely populated region that hosts ~200 million people. In this study, we use the historical records to document the earthquake migration pattern and the existence of a 180-km seismic gap along the 600-km long right-slip Tangshan-Hejian-Cixian (THC) fault zone that cuts across the North China basin. The newly recognized seismic gap, which is centered at Tianjin with a population of 11 million people and ~120 km from Beijing (22 million people) and Tangshan (7 million people), has not been ruptured in the past 1000 years by M≥6 earthquakes. The seismic migration pattern in the past millennium suggests that the epicenters of major earthquakes have shifted towards this seismic gap along the THC fault, which implies that the 180- km gap could be the site of the next great earthquake with M≈7.6 if it is ruptured by a single event. Alternatively, the seismic gap may be explained by aseismic creeping or seismic strain transfer between active faults.

  3. Time-Independent Annual Seismic Rates, Based on Faults and Smoothed Seismicity, Computed for Seismic Hazard Assessment in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murru, M.; Falcone, G.; Taroni, M.; Console, R.

    2017-12-01

    In 2015 the Italian Department of Civil Protection, started a project for upgrading the official Italian seismic hazard map (MPS04) inviting the Italian scientific community to participate in a joint effort for its realization. We participated providing spatially variable time-independent (Poisson) long-term annual occurrence rates of seismic events on the entire Italian territory, considering cells of 0.1°x0.1° from M4.5 up to M8.1 for magnitude bin of 0.1 units. Our final model was composed by two different models, merged in one ensemble model, each one with the same weight: the first one was realized by a smoothed seismicity approach, the second one using the seismogenic faults. The spatial smoothed seismicity was obtained using the smoothing method introduced by Frankel (1995) applied to the historical and instrumental seismicity. In this approach we adopted a tapered Gutenberg-Richter relation with a b-value fixed to 1 and a corner magnitude estimated with the bigger events in the catalogs. For each seismogenic fault provided by the Database of the Individual Seismogenic Sources (DISS), we computed the annual rate (for each cells of 0.1°x0.1°) for magnitude bin of 0.1 units, assuming that the seismic moments of the earthquakes generated by each fault are distributed according to the same tapered Gutenberg-Richter relation of the smoothed seismicity model. The annual rate for the final model was determined in the following way: if the cell falls within one of the seismic sources, we merge the respective value of rate determined by the seismic moments of the earthquakes generated by each fault and the value of the smoothed seismicity model with the same weight; if instead the cells fall outside of any seismic source we considered the rate obtained from the spatial smoothed seismicity. Here we present the final results of our study to be used for the new Italian seismic hazard map.

  4. The Pollino Seismic Sequence: Activated Graben Structures in a Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rößler, Dirk; Passarelli, Luigi; Govoni, Aladino; Bindi, Dino; Cesca, Simone; Hainzl, Sebatian; Maccaferri, Francesco; Rivalta, Eleonora; Woith, Heiko; Dahm, Torsten

    2015-04-01

    The Mercure Basin (MB) and the Castrovillari Fault (CF) in the Pollino range (Southern Apennines, Italy) represent one of the most prominent seismic gaps in the Italian seismic catalogue, with no M>5.5 earthquakes during the last centuries. In historical times several swarm-like seismic sequences occurred in the area including two intense swarms within the past two decades. The most energetic one started in 2010 and has been still active in 2014. The seismicity culminated in autumn 2012 with a M=5 event on 25 October. The range hosts a number of opposing normal faults forming a graben-like structure. Their rheology and their interactions are unclear. Current debates include the potential of the MB and the CF to host large earthquakes and the style of deformation. Understanding the seismicity and the behaviour of the faults is necessary to assess the tectonics and the seismic hazard. The GFZ German Research Centre for Geosciences and INGV, Italy, have jointly monitored the ongoing seismicity using a small-aperture seismic array, integrated in a temporary seismic network. Based on this installation, we located more than 16,000 local earthquakes that occurred between November 2012 and September 2014. Here we investigate quantitatively all the phases of the seismic sequence starting from January 2010. Event locations along with moment tensor inversion constrain spatially the structures activated by the swarm and the migration pattern of the seismicity. The seismicity forms clusters concentrated within the southern part of the MB and along the Pollino Fault linking MB and CF. Most earthquakes are confined to the upper 10 km of the crust in an area of ~15x15 km2. However, sparse seismicity at depths between 15 and 20 km and moderate seismicity further north with deepening hypocenters also exist. In contrast, the CF appears aseismic; only the northern part has experienced micro-seismicity. The spatial distribution is however more complex than the major tectonic structures

  5. Coherent Waves in Seismic Researches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emanov, A.; Seleznev, V. S.

    2013-05-01

    Development of digital processing algorithms of seismic wave fields for the purpose of useful event picking to study environment and other objects is the basis for the establishment of new seismic techniques. In the submitted paper a fundamental property of seismic wave field coherence is used. The authors extended conception of coherence types of observed wave fields and devised a technique of coherent component selection from observed wave field. Time coherence and space coherence are widely known. In this paper conception "parameter coherence" has been added. The parameter by which wave field is coherent can be the most manifold. The reason is that the wave field is a multivariate process described by a set of parameters. Coherence in the first place means independence of linear connection in wave field of parameter. In seismic wave fields, recorded in confined space, in building-blocks and stratified mediums time coherent standing waves are formed. In prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping head waves are coherent by parallel correlation course or, in other words, by one measurement on generalized plane of observation system. For detail prospecting seismology at observation systems with multiple overlapping on basis of coherence property by one measurement of area algorithms have been developed, permitting seismic records to be converted to head wave time sections which have neither reflected nor other types of waves. Conversion in time section is executed on any specified observation base. Energy storage of head waves relative to noise on basis of multiplicity of observation system is realized within area of head wave recording. Conversion on base below the area of wave tracking is performed with lack of signal/noise ratio relative to maximum of this ratio, fit to observation system. Construction of head wave time section and dynamic plots a basis of automatic processing have been developed, similar to CDP procedure in method of

  6. The impact of lake level variation on seismicity around XianNvShan fault in the Three Gorge area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, W.; Li, J.; Zhang, L.

    2017-12-01

    Since the impounding of Three Gorge Project in 2003,more than 10000 earthquakes have been recorded by the digital telemetry seismic network. Most of them occurred around the GaoQiao fault and the Northern segment of XianNvShan fault . In March 2014, the M4.3 and M4.7 earthquake happened in the northern segment of Xiannvshshan fault .In order to study the relationship between the seismicity around the XianNvShan fault and the lake level variation, we had been deployed 5 temporal seismic stations in this area from 2015 to 2016. More than 3000 earthquakes recorded during the time of temporal seismic monitoring are located by hypo-center of by waveform cross-correlation and double-difference method. The depth of most earthquakes is from 5 to 7 km.but it is obvious that the variation of depth is relate to the fluctuation of water level.

  7. Digital pathology access and usage in the UK: results from a national survey on behalf of the National Cancer Research Institute's CM-Path initiative.

    PubMed

    Williams, Bethany Jill; Lee, Jessica; Oien, Karin A; Treanor, Darren

    2018-05-01

    To canvass the UK pathology community to ascertain current levels of digital pathology usage in clinical and academic histopathology departments, and prevalent attitudes to digital pathology. A 15-item survey was circulated to National Health Service and academic pathology departments across the UK using the SurveyMonkey online survey tool. Responses were sought at a departmental or institutional level. Where possible, departmental heads were approached and asked to complete the survey, or forward it to the most relevant individual in their department. Data were collected over a 6-month period from February to July 2017. 41 institutes from across the UK responded to the survey. 60% (23/39) of institutions had access to a digital pathology scanner, and 60% (24/40) had access to a digital pathology workstation. The most popular applications of digital pathology in current use were undergraduate and postgraduate teaching, research and quality assurance. Investigating the deployment of digital pathology in their department was identified as a high or highest priority by 58.5% of institutions, with improvements in efficiency, turnaround times, reporting times and collaboration in their institution anticipated by the respondents. Access to funding for initial hardware, software and staff outlay, pathologist training and guidance from the Royal College of Pathologists were identified as factors that could enable respondent institutions to increase their digital pathology usage. Interest in digital pathology adoption in the UK is high, with usage likely to increase in the coming years. In light of this, pathologists are seeking more guidance on safe usage. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  8. Seismic microzonation in Latin America and the Caribbean: social, cultural, economic and political aspects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murria, J.

    2009-04-01

    The lack of success, not to say failure, of seismic microzonation projects in the Latin America and Caribbean nations-and for that matter elsewhere in the world-should not be attributed to the lack of technical and scientific expertise of our engineers and scientists as there exists in our continent sufficient knowledge and information about the techniques and procedures that have been successfully used elsewhere in the world in the implementation of seismic microzonation projects. The main constrains to the implementation of seismic microzonation projects in Latin America and the Caribbean are of an economic, social, political, and cultural aspects rather than the purely scientific and engineering aspects. Another very important factor contributing to this lack of success has been the apparent failure of the scientific and technical community to convince decision makers (both official and private) that the sound implementation of seismic microzonation projects are a valid instrument to mitigate the negative effects that earthquakes have on the population, on the physical infrastructure and on the environment. An attempt will be made in this paper to analyze these "non technical" aspects and try to arrive at some conclusions as well as to some possible lines of action for the successful implementation of seismic microzonation projects in the seismic risk prone Latin American and Caribbean nations.

  9. JCE Digital Library Grand Opening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of Chemical Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The National Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematical Education Digital Library (NSDL), inaugurated in December 2002, is developed to promote science education on a comprehensive scale. The Journal of Chemical, Education (JCE) Digital Library, incorporated into NSDL, contains its own collections of digital resources for chemistry…

  10. 2014 Update of the Pacific Northwest portion of the U.S. National Seismic Hazard Maps

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Frankel, Arthur; Chen, Rui; Petersen, Mark; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Sherrod, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Several aspects of the earthquake characterization were changed for the Pacific Northwest portion of the 2014 update of the national seismic hazard maps, reflecting recent scientific findings. New logic trees were developed for the recurrence parameters of M8-9 earthquakes on the Cascadia subduction zone (CSZ) and for the eastern edge of their rupture zones. These logic trees reflect recent findings of additional M8 CSZ earthquakes using offshore deposits of turbidity flows and onshore tsunami deposits and subsidence. These M8 earthquakes each rupture a portion of the CSZ and occur in the time periods between M9 earthquakes that have an average recurrence interval of about 500 years. The maximum magnitude was increased for deep intraslab earthquakes. An areal source zone to account for the possibility of deep earthquakes under western Oregon was expanded. The western portion of the Tacoma fault was added to the hazard maps.

  11. The National Agricultural Text Digitizing Project: Toward the Electronic Library. Report of the Pilot Project, Phases 1-2, 1986-1992.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eaton, Nancy L.; Andre, Pamela Q. J.

    The National Agricultural Text Digitizing Project (NATDP) began in 1986 with cooperation between the National Agricultural Library and the University of Vermont, and then expanded to include 45 land-grant university libraries and 1 special library. The first activity was to evaluate the new technology of optical scanning. The project was designed…

  12. 41 CFR 128-1.8005 - Seismic safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... the model building codes that the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC...) Uniform Building Code (UBC); (2) The 1992 Supplement to the Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA) National Building Code (NBC); and (3) The 1992 Amendments to the Southern Building Code...

  13. 41 CFR 128-1.8005 - Seismic safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the model building codes that the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC...) Uniform Building Code (UBC); (2) The 1992 Supplement to the Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA) National Building Code (NBC); and (3) The 1992 Amendments to the Southern Building Code...

  14. 41 CFR 128-1.8005 - Seismic safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the model building codes that the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC...) Uniform Building Code (UBC); (2) The 1992 Supplement to the Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA) National Building Code (NBC); and (3) The 1992 Amendments to the Southern Building Code...

  15. 41 CFR 128-1.8005 - Seismic safety standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the model building codes that the Interagency Committee on Seismic Safety in Construction (ICSSC...) Uniform Building Code (UBC); (2) The 1992 Supplement to the Building Officials and Code Administrators International (BOCA) National Building Code (NBC); and (3) The 1992 Amendments to the Southern Building Code...

  16. Induced Seismicity: Balancing the Scientific Process With the Need for Rapid Communication of Evolving Seismic Hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cochran, E. S.; Ellsworth, W. L.; Llenos, A. L.; Rubinstein, J. L.

    2014-12-01

    studies changed the public discourse from providing primary information about the on-going earthquake sequences to how to mitigate the hazard associated with wastewater injection. And, scientific studies are now focused on how to include the impact of induced events within the National Seismic Hazard Maps (e.g. Peterson et al., 2014).

  17. Description and Preliminary Testing of the CDSN Seismic Sensor Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon; Tilgner, Edwin E.

    1985-01-01

    INTRODUCTION The China Digital Seismograph Network (CDSN) is being designed and installed to provide the People's Republic of China with the facilities needed to create a national digital database for earthquake research. The CDSN, which is being developed jointly by the PRC State Seismological Bureau and the U.S. Geological Survey, will consist initially of nine digitally-recording seismograph stations, a data management system to be used for compiling network-day tapes, and a depot maintenance center. Data produced by the network will be shared with research scientists throughout the world. A national seismograph network must be designed to support a variety of research objectives. From this standpoint, the choices and tradeoffs involved in specifying signal bandwidth, resolution, and dynamic range are the most important decisions in system design. As in the case of the CDSN, these decisions are made during the selection and design of the seismic sensor system and encoder components. The purpose of this report is to describe the CDSN sensor systems, their important signal characteristics, and the results of preliminary tests that have been performed on the instruments. Four overlapping data bands will be recorded at each station: short period (SP), broadband (BB), long period (LP), and very long period (VLP). Amplitude response curves are illustrated in Figure I. Vertical and horizontal components will be recorded for each data band. The SP and LP channels will be recorded with sufficient sensitivities to resolve earth background noise at seismically quiet sites. The BB channels will have a lower sensitivity and are intended for broadband recording of moderate-to-large body-wave signals and for increasing the effective amplitude range in the short- and long-period bands. The VLP channel does not provide additional spectral coverage at long periods; its purpose is to make use of on-site filtration and decimation to reduce post processing requirements for VLP

  18. Seismic Noise Analysis and Reduction through Utilization of Collocated Seismic and Atmospheric Sensors at the GRO Chile Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrell, M. E.; Russo, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    The installation of Earthscope Transportable Array-style geophysical observatories in Chile expands open data seismic recording capabilities in the southern hemisphere by nearly 30%, and has nearly tripled the number of seismic stations providing freely-available data in southern South America. Through the use of collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at these stations we are able to analyze how local atmospheric conditions generate seismic noise, which can degrade data in seismic frequency bands at stations in the ';roaring forties' (S latitudes). Seismic vaults that are climate-controlled and insulated from the local environment are now employed throughout the world in an attempt to isolate seismometers from as many noise sources as possible. However, this is an expensive solution that is neither practical nor possible for all seismic deployments; and also, the increasing number and scope of temporary seismic deployments has resulted in the collection and archiving of terabytes of seismic data that is affected to some degree by natural seismic noise sources such as wind and atmospheric pressure changes. Changing air pressure can result in a depression and subsequent rebound of Earth's surface - which generates low frequency noise in seismic frequency bands - and even moderate winds can apply enough force to ground-coupled structures or to the surface above the seismometers themselves, resulting in significant noise. The 10 stations of the permanent Geophysical Reporting Observatories (GRO Chile), jointly installed during 2011-12 by IRIS and the Chilean Servicio Sismológico, include instrumentation in addition to the standard three seismic components. These stations, spaced approximately 300 km apart along the length of the country, continuously record a variety of atmospheric data including infrasound, air pressure, wind speed, and wind direction. The collocated seismic and atmospheric sensors at each station allow us to analyze both datasets together, to

  19. An Interactive Program on Digitizing Historical Seismograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Y.; Xu, T.

    2013-12-01

    Retrieving information from historical seismograms is of great importance since they are considered the unique sources that provide quantitative information of historical earthquakes. Modern techniques of seismology require digital forms of seismograms that are essentially a sequence of time-amplitude pairs. However, the historical seismograms, after scanned into computers, are two dimensional arrays. Each element of the arrays contains the grayscale value or RGB value of the corresponding pixel. The problem of digitizing historical seismograms, referred to as converting historical seismograms to digital seismograms, can be formulated as an inverse problem that generating sequences of time-amplitude pairs from a two dimension arrays. This problem has infinite solutions. The algorithm for automatic digitization of historical seismogram presented considers several features of seismograms, including continuity, smoothness of the seismic traces as the prior information, and assumes that the amplitude is a single-valued function of time. An interactive program based on the algorithm is also presented. The program is developed using Matlab GUI and has both automatic and manual modality digitization. Users can easily switch between them, and try different combinations to get the optimal results. Several examples are given to illustrate the results of digitizing seismograms using the program, including a photographic record and a wide-angle reflection/refraction seismogram. Digitized result of the program (redrawn using Golden Software Surfer for high resolution image). (a) shows the result of automatic digitization, and (b) is the result after manual correction.

  20. Expected Seismicity and the Seismic Noise Environment of Europa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panning, Mark P.; Stähler, Simon C.; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Vance, Steven D.; Kedar, Sharon; Tsai, Victor C.; Pike, William T.; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2018-01-01

    Seismic data will be a vital geophysical constraint on internal structure of Europa if we land instruments on the surface. Quantifying expected seismic activity on Europa both in terms of large, recognizable signals and ambient background noise is important for understanding dynamics of the moon, as well as interpretation of potential future data. Seismic energy sources will likely include cracking in the ice shell and turbulent motion in the oceans. We define a range of models of seismic activity in Europa's ice shell by assuming each model follows a Gutenberg-Richter relationship with varying parameters. A range of cumulative seismic moment release between 1016 and 1018 Nm/yr is defined by scaling tidal dissipation energy to tectonic events on the Earth's moon. Random catalogs are generated and used to create synthetic continuous noise records through numerical wave propagation in thermodynamically self-consistent models of the interior structure of Europa. Spectral characteristics of the noise are calculated by determining probabilistic power spectral densities of the synthetic records. While the range of seismicity models predicts noise levels that vary by 80 dB, we show that most noise estimates are below the self-noise floor of high-frequency geophones but may be recorded by more sensitive instruments. The largest expected signals exceed background noise by ˜50 dB. Noise records may allow for constraints on interior structure through autocorrelation. Models of seismic noise generated by pressure variations at the base of the ice shell due to turbulent motions in the subsurface ocean may also generate observable seismic noise.

  1. Updating Hawaii Seismicity Catalogs with Systematic Relocations and Subspace Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okubo, P.; Benz, H.; Matoza, R. S.; Thelen, W. A.

    2015-12-01

    We continue the systematic relocation of seismicity recorded in Hawai`i by the United States Geological Survey's (USGS) Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO), with interests in adding to the products derived from the relocated seismicity catalogs published by Matoza et al., (2013, 2014). Another goal of this effort is updating the systematically relocated HVO catalog since 2009, when earthquake cataloging at HVO was migrated to the USGS Advanced National Seismic System Quake Management Software (AQMS) systems. To complement the relocation analyses of the catalogs generated from traditional STA/LTA event-triggered and analyst-reviewed approaches, we are also experimenting with subspace detection of events at Kilauea as a means to augment AQMS procedures for cataloging seismicity to lower magnitudes and during episodes of elevated volcanic activity. Our earlier catalog relocations have demonstrated the ability to define correlated or repeating families of earthquakes and provide more detailed definition of seismogenic structures, as well as the capability for improved automatic identification of diverse volcanic seismic sources. Subspace detectors have been successfully applied to cataloging seismicity in situations of low seismic signal-to-noise and have significantly increased catalog sensitivity to lower magnitude thresholds. We anticipate similar improvements using event subspace detections and cataloging of volcanic seismicity that include improved discrimination among not only evolving earthquake sequences but also diverse volcanic seismic source processes. Matoza et al., 2013, Systematic relocation of seismicity on Hawai`i Island from 1992 to 2009 using waveform cross correlation and cluster analysis, J. Geophys. Res., 118, 2275-2288, doi:10.1002/jgrb.580189 Matoza et al., 2014, High-precision relocation of long-period events beneath the summit region of Kīlauea Volcano, Hawai`i, from 1986 to 2009, Geophys. Res. Lett., 41, 3413-3421, doi:10.1002/2014GL059819

  2. Sub-crustal seismic activity beneath Klyuchevskoy Volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carr, M. J.; Droznina, S.; Levin, V. L.; Senyukov, S.

    2013-12-01

    Seismic activity is extremely vigorous beneath the Klyuchevskoy Volcanic Group (KVG). The unique aspect is the distribution in depth. In addition to upper-crustal seismicity, earthquakes take place at depths in excess of 20 km. Similar observations are known in other volcanic regions, however the KVG is unique in both the number of earthquakes and that they occur continuously. Most other instances of deep seismicity beneath volcanoes appear to be episodic or transient. Digital recording of seismic signals started at the KVG in early 2000s.The dense local network reliably locates earthquakes as small as ML~1. We selected records of 20 earthquakes located at depths over 20 km. Selection was based on the quality of the routine locations and the visual clarity of the records. Arrivals of P and S waves were re-picked, and hypocentral parameters re-established. Newl locations fell within the ranges outlined by historical seismicity, confirming the existence of two distinct seismically active regions. A shallower zone is at ~20 km depth, and all hypocenters are to the northeast of KVG, in a region between KVG and Shiveluch volcano. A deeper zone is at ~30 km, and all hypocenters cluster directly beneath the edifice of the Kyuchevskoy volcano. Examination of individual records shows that earthquakes in both zones are tectonic, with well-defined P and S waves - another distinction of the deep seismicity beneath KVG. While the upper seismic zone is unquestionably within the crust, the provenance of the deeper earthquakes is enigmatic. The crustal structure beneath KVG is highly complex, with no agreed-upon definition of the crust-mantle boundary. Rather, a range of values, from under 30 to over 40 km, exists in the literature. Similarly, a range of velocity structures has been reported. Teleseismic receiver functions (RFs) provide a way to position the earthquakes with respect to the crust-mantle boundary. We compare the differential travel times of S and P waves from deep

  3. Apalachicola Bay interpreted seismic horizons and updated IRIS chirp seismic-reflection data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cross, V.A.; Twichell, D.C.; Foster, D.S.; O'Brien, T.F.

    2012-01-01

    Apalachicola Bay and St. George Sound contain the largest oyster fishery in Florida, and the growth and distribution of the numerous oyster reefs here are the combined product of modern estuarine conditions and the late Holocene evolution of the bay. A suite of geophysical data and cores were collected during a cooperative study by the U.S. Geological Survey, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Coastal Services Center, and the Apalachicola National Estuarine Research Reserve to refine the geology of the bay floor as well as the bay's Holocene stratigraphy. Sidescan-sonar imagery, bathymetry, high-resolution seismic profiles, and cores show that oyster reefs occupy the crests of sandy shoals that range from 1 to 7 kilometers in length, while most of the remainder of the bay floor is covered by mud. The sandy shoals are the surficial expression of broader sand deposits associated with deltas that advanced southward into the bay between 6,400 and 4,400 years before present. The seismic and core data indicate that the extent of oyster reefs was greatest between 2,400 and 1,200 years before present and has decreased since then due to the continued input of mud to the bay by the Apalachicola River. The association of oyster reefs with the middle to late Holocene sandy delta deposits indicates that the present distribution of oyster beds is controlled in part by the geologic evolution of the estuary.

  4. High-Resolution Seismic-Reflection and Marine Magnetic Data Along the Hosgri Fault Zone, Central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sliter, Ray W.; Triezenberg, Peter J.; Hart, Patrick E.; Watt, Janet T.; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Scheirer, Daniel S.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) collected high-resolution shallow seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data in June 2008 in the offshore areas between the towns of Cayucos and Pismo Beach, Calif., from the nearshore (~6-m depth) to just west of the Hosgri Fault Zone (~200-m depth). These data are in support of the California State Waters Mapping Program and the Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between the Pacific Gas & Electric Co. and the U.S. Geological Survey. Seismic-reflection and marine magnetic data were acquired aboard the R/V Parke Snavely, using a SIG 2Mille minisparker seismic source and a Geometrics G882 cesium-vapor marine magnetometer. More than 550 km of seismic and marine magnetic data was collected simultaneously along shore-perpendicular transects spaced 800 m apart, with an additional 220 km of marine magnetometer data collected across the Hosgri Fault Zone, resulting in spacing locally as smallas 400 m. This report includes maps of the seismic-survey sections, linked to Google Earth software, and digital data files showing images of each transect in SEG-Y, JPEG, and TIFF formats, as well as preliminary gridded marine-magnetic-anomaly and residual-magnetic-anomaly (shallow magnetic source) maps.

  5. Evaluation of induced seismicity forecast models in the Induced Seismicity Test Bench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Király, Eszter; Gischig, Valentin; Zechar, Jeremy; Doetsch, Joseph; Karvounis, Dimitrios; Wiemer, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    Induced earthquakes often accompany fluid injection, and the seismic hazard they pose threatens various underground engineering projects. Models to monitor and control induced seismic hazard with traffic light systems should be probabilistic, forward-looking, and updated as new data arrive. Here, we propose an Induced Seismicity Test Bench to test and rank such models. We apply the test bench to data from the Basel 2006 and Soultz-sous-Forêts 2004 geothermal stimulation projects, and we assess forecasts from two models that incorporate a different mix of physical understanding and stochastic representation of the induced sequences: Shapiro in Space (SiS) and Hydraulics and Seismics (HySei). SiS is based on three pillars: the seismicity rate is computed with help of the seismogenic index and a simple exponential decay of the seismicity; the magnitude distribution follows the Gutenberg-Richter relation; and seismicity is distributed in space based on smoothing seismicity during the learning period with 3D Gaussian kernels. The HySei model describes seismicity triggered by pressure diffusion with irreversible permeability enhancement. Our results show that neither model is fully superior to the other. HySei forecasts the seismicity rate well, but is only mediocre at forecasting the spatial distribution. On the other hand, SiS forecasts the spatial distribution well but not the seismicity rate. The shut-in phase is a difficult moment for both models in both reservoirs: the models tend to underpredict the seismicity rate around, and shortly after, shut-in. Ensemble models that combine HySei's rate forecast with SiS's spatial forecast outperform each individual model.

  6. Advanced Seismic While Drilling System

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Robert Radtke; John Fontenot; David Glowka

    by TII. An APS Turbine Alternator powered the SeismicPULSER{trademark} to produce two Hz frequency peak signals repeated every 20 seconds. Since the ION Geophysical, Inc. (ION) seismic survey surface recording system was designed to detect a minimum downhole signal of three Hz, successful performance was confirmed with a 5.3 Hz recording with the pumps running. The two Hz signal generated by the sparker was modulated with the 3.3 Hz signal produced by the mud pumps to create an intense 5.3 Hz peak frequency signal. The low frequency sparker source is ultimately capable of generating selectable peak frequencies of 1 to 40 Hz with high-frequency spectra content to 10 kHz. The lower frequencies and, perhaps, low-frequency sweeps, are needed to achieve sufficient range and resolution for realtime imaging in deep (15,000 ft+), high-temperature (150 C) wells for (a) geosteering, (b) accurate seismic hole depth, (c) accurate pore pressure determinations ahead of the bit, (d) near wellbore diagnostics with a downhole receiver and wired drill pipe, and (e) reservoir model verification. Furthermore, the pressure of the sparker bubble will disintegrate rock resulting in an increased overall rates of penetration. Other applications for the SeismicPULSER{trademark} technology are to deploy a low-frequency source for greater range on a wireline for Reverse Vertical Seismic Profiling (RVSP) and Cross-Well Tomography. Commercialization of the technology is being undertaken by first contacting stakeholders to define the value proposition for rig site services utilizing SeismicPULSER{trademark} technologies. Stakeholders include national oil companies, independent oil companies, independents, service companies, and commercial investors. Service companies will introduce a new Drill Bit SWD service for deep HTHP wells. Collaboration will be encouraged between stakeholders in the form of joint industry projects to develop prototype tools and initial field trials. No barriers have been

  7. High prevalence of self-reported symptoms of digital ischemia in elite male volleyball players in the Netherlands: a cross-sectional national survey.

    PubMed

    van de Pol, Daan; Kuijer, P Paul F M; Langenhorst, Ton; Maas, Mario

    2012-10-01

    In the past 3 years, 6 volleyball players with ischemic digits and small microemboli in the digital arteries of the dominant hand presented themselves in our hospital. These complaints were caused by an aneurysmatic dilation of the posterior circumflex humeral artery (PCHA) with distal occlusion and digital emboli in the isolateral limb. All were elite male volleyball players active in the national top league. Little is known about the exact symptoms associated with PCHA pathological lesions with digital emboli (PCHAP with DE) and its prevalence in elite volleyball players. If vascular injury can be identified at an early stage, thromboembolic complications and irreversible damage to the digits might be prevented. To assess the prevalence of symptoms that are consistent with digital ischemia and may be caused by PCHAP with DE in elite male volleyball players in the Netherlands. Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. A questionnaire survey was performed among elite volleyball players in the Dutch national top league and the Dutch beach volleyball team. The questionnaire was constructed using literature-based data on symptoms associated with PCHAP with DE, together with data retrieved from medical files. A total of 99 of the 107 athletes participated, with a response rate of 93%. The most frequently reported symptoms associated with PCHAP with DE were cold, blue, or pale digits in the dominant hand during or immediately after practice or competition. The prevalence of these symptoms ranged from 11% to 27%. The prevalence of cold digits during practice and competition was 27%. The prevalence of cold, blue, and pale digits during or immediately after practice and competition was 12%. An unexpectedly high percentage of elite volleyball players reported symptoms that are associated with PCHAP with DE in the dominant hand. Because these athletes are considered potentially at risk for developing critical digital ischemia, further analysis of the presence of digital

  8. Gas and seismicity within the Istanbul seismic gap.

    PubMed

    Géli, L; Henry, P; Grall, C; Tary, J-B; Lomax, A; Batsi, E; Riboulot, V; Cros, E; Gürbüz, C; Işık, S E; Sengör, A M C; Le Pichon, X; Ruffine, L; Dupré, S; Thomas, Y; Kalafat, D; Bayrakci, G; Coutellier, Q; Regnier, T; Westbrook, G; Saritas, H; Çifçi, G; Çağatay, M N; Özeren, M S; Görür, N; Tryon, M; Bohnhoff, M; Gasperini, L; Klingelhoefer, F; Scalabrin, C; Augustin, J-M; Embriaco, D; Marinaro, G; Frugoni, F; Monna, S; Etiope, G; Favali, P; Bécel, A

    2018-05-01

    Understanding micro-seismicity is a critical question for earthquake hazard assessment. Since the devastating earthquakes of Izmit and Duzce in 1999, the seismicity along the submerged section of North Anatolian Fault within the Sea of Marmara (comprising the "Istanbul seismic gap") has been extensively studied in order to infer its mechanical behaviour (creeping vs locked). So far, the seismicity has been interpreted only in terms of being tectonic-driven, although the Main Marmara Fault (MMF) is known to strike across multiple hydrocarbon gas sources. Here, we show that a large number of the aftershocks that followed the M 5.1 earthquake of July, 25 th 2011 in the western Sea of Marmara, occurred within a zone of gas overpressuring in the 1.5-5 km depth range, from where pressurized gas is expected to migrate along the MMF, up to the surface sediment layers. Hence, gas-related processes should also be considered for a complete interpretation of the micro-seismicity (~M < 3) within the Istanbul offshore domain.

  9. Noise analysis of the seismic system employed in the northern and southern California seismic nets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton, J.P.

    1984-01-01

    The seismic networks have been designed and operated to support recording on Develocorders (less than 40db dynamic range) and analog magnetic tape (about 50 db dynamic range). The principal analysis of the records has been based on Develocorder films; and background earth noise levels have been adjusted to be about 1 to 2 mm p-p on the film readers. Since the traces are separated by only 10 to 12 mm on the reader screen, they become hopelessly tangled when signal amplitudes on several adjacent traces exceed 10 to 20 mm p-p. Thus, the background noise level is hardly more than 20 db below the level of largest readable signals. The situation is somewhat better on tape playbacks, but the high level of background noise set to accomodate processing from film records effectively limits the range of maximum-signal to background-earth-noise on high gain channels to a little more than 30 db. Introduction of the PDP 11/44 seismic data acquisition system has increased the potential dynamic range of recorded network signals to more than 60 db. To make use of this increased dynamic range we must evaluate the characteristics and performance of the seismic system. In particular, we must determine whether the electronic noise in the system is or can be made sufficiently low so that background earth noise levels can be lowered significantly to take advantage of the increased dynamic range of the digital recording system. To come to grips with the complex problem of system noise, we have carried out a number of measurements and experiments to evaluate critical components of the system as well as to determine the noise characteristics of the system as a whole.

  10. Digital interactive image analysis by array processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sabels, B. E.; Jennings, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    An attempt is made to draw a parallel between the existing geophysical data processing service industries and the emerging earth resources data support requirements. The relationship of seismic data analysis to ERTS data analysis is natural because in either case data is digitally recorded in the same format, resulting from remotely sensed energy which has been reflected, attenuated, shifted and degraded on its path from the source to the receiver. In the seismic case the energy is acoustic, ranging in frequencies from 10 to 75 cps, for which the lithosphere appears semi-transparent. In earth survey remote sensing through the atmosphere, visible and infrared frequency bands are being used. Yet the hardware and software required to process the magnetically recorded data from the two realms of inquiry are identical and similar, respectively. The resulting data products are similar.

  11. Development of a National Digital Geospatial Data Framework

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1995-01-01

    This proposal of a data framework to organize and enhance the activities of the geospatial data community to meet needs for basic themes of data was developed in response to a request in Executive Order 12906, Coordinating Geographic Data Acquisition and Access: The National Spatial Data Infrastructure (U.S. Executive Office of the President, 1994). The request stated: in consultation with State, local, and tribal governments and within 9 months of the date of this order, the FGDC shall submit a plan and schedule to OMB [U.S. Office of Management and Budget] for completing the initial implementation of a national digital geospatial data framework ("framework") by January 2000 and for establishing a process of ongoing data maintenance. The framework shall include geospatial data that are significant, in the determination of the FGDC, to a broad variety of users within any geographic area or nationwide. At a minimum, the plan shall address how the initial transportation, hydrology, and boundary elements of the framework might be completed by January 1998 in order to support the decennial census of 2000. The proposal was developed by representatives of local, regional, State, and Federal agencies under the auspices of the Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC). The individuals are listed in the appendix of this report. This Framework Working Group identified the purpose and goals for the framework; identified incentives for participation; defined the information content; developed preliminary technical, operational, and business contexts; specified the institutional roles needed; and developed a strategy for a phased implementation of the framework.Members of the working group presented the concepts of the framework for discussion at several national and regional public meetings. The draft of the report also was provided for public, written review. These discussions and reviews were the source of many improvements to the report.The FGDC approved the report for

  12. Tsunami hazard maps of spanish coast at national scale from seismic sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aniel-Quiroga, Íñigo; González, Mauricio; Álvarez-Gómez, José Antonio; García, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    Tsunamis are a moderately frequent phenomenon in the NEAM (North East Atlantic and Mediterranean) region, and consequently in Spain, as historic and recent events have affected this area. I.e., the 1755 earthquake and tsunami affected the Spanish Atlantic coasts of Huelva and Cadiz and the 2003 Boumerdés earthquake triggered a tsunami that reached Balearic island coast in less than 45 minutes. The risk in Spain is real and, its population and tourism rate makes it vulnerable to this kind of catastrophic events. The Indian Ocean tsunami in 2004 and the tsunami in Japan in 2011 launched the worldwide development and application of tsunami risk reduction measures that have been taken as a priority in this field. On November 20th 2015 the directive of the Spanish civil protection agency on planning under the emergency of tsunami was presented. As part of the Spanish National Security strategy, this document specifies the structure of the action plans at different levels: National, regional and local. In this sense, the first step is the proper evaluation of the tsunami hazard at National scale. This work deals with the assessment of the tsunami hazard in Spain, by means of numerical simulations, focused on the elaboration of tsunami hazard maps at National scale. To get this, following a deterministic approach, the seismic structures whose earthquakes could generate the worst tsunamis affecting the coast of Spain have been compiled and characterized. These worst sources have been propagated numerically along a reconstructed bathymetry, built from the best resolution available data. This high-resolution bathymetry was joined with a 25-m resolution DTM, to generate continuous offshore-onshore space, allowing the calculation of the flooded areas prompted by each selected source. The numerical model applied for the calculation of the tsunami propagations was COMCOT. The maps resulting from the numerical simulations show not only the tsunami amplitude at coastal areas but

  13. Next Generation Polar Seismic Instrumentation Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, T.; Beaudoin, B. C.; Gridley, J.; Anderson, K. R.

    2011-12-01

    Polar region logistics are the limiting factor for deploying deep field seismic arrays. The IRIS PASSCAL Instrument Center, in collaboration with UNAVCO, designed and deployed several systems that address some of the logistical constraints of polar deployments. However, continued logistics' pressures coupled with increasingly ambitious science projects require further reducing the logistics required for deploying both summer and over winter stations. Our focus is to reduce station power requirements and bulk, thereby minimizing the time and effort required to deploy these arrays. We will reduce the weight of the battery bank by incorporating the most applicable new high energy-density battery technology. Using these batteries will require a completely new power management system along with an appropriate smart enclosure. The other aspect will be to integrate the digitizing system with the sensor. Both of these technologies should reduce the install time and shipping volume plus weight while reducing some instrument costs. We will also continue work on an effective Iridium telemetry solution for automated data return. The costs and limitations of polar deep-field science easily justifies a specialized development effort but pays off doubly in that we will continue to leverage the advancements in reduced logistics and increased performance for the benefit of low-latitude seismic research.

  14. First USGS urban seismic hazard maps predict the effects of soils

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.; Gomberg, J.S.; Schweig, E.S.; Waldron, B.A.; Tucker, K.

    2006-01-01

    Probabilistic and scenario urban seismic hazard maps have been produced for Memphis, Shelby County, Tennessee covering a six-quadrangle area of the city. The nine probabilistic maps are for peak ground acceleration and 0.2 s and 1.0 s spectral acceleration and for 10%, 5%, and 2% probability of being exceeded in 50 years. Six scenario maps for these three ground motions have also been generated for both an M7.7 and M6.2 on the southwest arm of the New Madrid seismic zone ending at Marked Tree, Arkansas. All maps include the effect of local geology. Relative to the national seismic hazard maps, the effect of the thick sediments beneath Memphis is to decrease 0.2 s probabilistic ground motions by 0-30% and increase 1.0 s probabilistic ground motions by ???100%. Probabilistic peak ground accelerations remain at levels similar to the national maps, although the ground motion gradient across Shelby County is reduced and ground motions are more uniform within the county. The M7.7 scenario maps show ground motions similar to the 5%-in-50-year probabilistic maps. As an effect of local geology, both M7.7 and M6.2 scenario maps show a more uniform seismic ground-motion hazard across Shelby County than scenario maps with constant site conditions (i.e., NEHRP B/C boundary).

  15. Comparative statistical and spectral studies of seismic and non-seismic sub-ionospheric VLF anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolbang, Daniel; Biernat, Helfried; Schwingenschuh, Konrad; Eichelberger, Hans; Prattes, Gustav; Besser, Bruno; Boudjada, Mohammed Y.; Rozhnoi, Alexander; Solovieva, Maria; Biagi, Pier Francesco; Friedrich, Martin

    2013-04-01

    measured and derived VLF parameters are compared with VLF observations several weeks before an earthquake (e.g. L'Aquila, Italy, April 6, 2009) and with co- and post-seismic phenomena. It is shown that this comparative study will improve the one parameter seismo-electromagnetic VLF methods. References: [1] A. Molchanov, M. Hayakawa: Seismo-Electromagnetics and related Phenomena: History and latest results, Terrapub, 2008. [2] S. Pulinets, K. Boyarchuk: Ionospheric Precursors of Earthquakes, Springer, 2004 [3] A. Rozhnoi et al.: Observation evidences of atmospheric Gravity Waves induced by seismic activity from analysis of subionospheric LF signal spectra, National Hazards and Earth System Sciences, 7, 625-628, 2007.

  16. Seismic gradiometry using ambient seismic noise in an anisotropic Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Ridder, S. A. L.; Curtis, A.

    2017-05-01

    We introduce a wavefield gradiometry technique to estimate both isotropic and anisotropic local medium characteristics from short recordings of seismic signals by inverting a wave equation. The method exploits the information in the spatial gradients of a seismic wavefield that are calculated using dense deployments of seismic arrays. The application of the method uses the surface wave energy in the ambient seismic field. To estimate isotropic and anisotropic medium properties we invert an elliptically anisotropic wave equation. The spatial derivatives of the recorded wavefield are evaluated by calculating finite differences over nearby recordings, which introduces a systematic anisotropic error. A two-step approach corrects this error: finite difference stencils are first calibrated, then the output of the wave-equation inversion is corrected using the linearized impulse response to the inverted velocity anomaly. We test the procedure on ambient seismic noise recorded in a large and dense ocean bottom cable array installed over Ekofisk field. The estimated azimuthal anisotropy forms a circular geometry around the production-induced subsidence bowl. This conforms with results from studies employing controlled sources, and with interferometry correlating long records of seismic noise. Yet in this example, the results were obtained using only a few minutes of ambient seismic noise.

  17. The Indonesian Digital Library Network Is Born To Struggle with the Digital Divide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fahmi, Ismail

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Indonesian Digital Library Network that is designed to develop Indonesia as a knowledge-based society. Highlights include the digital divide; problems in a developing country, including Internet accessibility, bandwidth capacity, and network delays; gathering information about national assets; information infrastructure; data…

  18. Compilation of seismic-refraction crustal data in the Soviet Union

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Robert; Durbin, William P.; Healy, J.H.; Warren, David H.

    1964-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is preparing a series of terrain atlases of the Sino-Soviet bloc of nations for use in a possible nuclear-test detection program. Part of this project is concerned with the compilation and evaluation of crustal-structure data. To date, a compilation has been made of data from Russian publications that discuss seismic refraction and gravity studies of crustal structure. Although this compilation deals mainly with explosion seismic-refraction measurements, some results from earthquake studies are also included. None of the data have been evaluated.

  19. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  20. Digital database architecture and delineation methodology for deriving drainage basins, and a comparison of digitally and non-digitally derived numeric drainage areas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupree, Jean A.; Crowfoot, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    The drainage basin is a fundamental hydrologic entity used for studies of surface-water resources and during planning of water-related projects. Numeric drainage areas published by the U.S. Geological Survey water science centers in Annual Water Data Reports and on the National Water Information Systems (NWIS) Web site are still primarily derived from hard-copy sources and by manual delineation of polygonal basin areas on paper topographic map sheets. To expedite numeric drainage area determinations, the Colorado Water Science Center developed a digital database structure and a delineation methodology based on the hydrologic unit boundaries in the National Watershed Boundary Dataset. This report describes the digital database architecture and delineation methodology and also presents the results of a comparison of the numeric drainage areas derived using this digital methodology with those derived using traditional, non-digital methods. (Please see report for full Abstract)

  1. Probabilistic Seismic Hazard Analysis for Georgia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsereteli, N. S.; Varazanashvili, O.; Sharia, T.; Arabidze, V.; Tibaldi, A.; Bonali, F. L. L.; Russo, E.; Pasquaré Mariotto, F.

    2017-12-01

    Nowadays, seismic hazard studies are developed in terms of the calculation of Peak Ground Acceleration (PGA), Spectral Acceleration (SA), Peak Ground Velocity (PGV) and other recorded parameters. In the frame of EMME project PSH were calculated for Georgia using GMPE based on selection criteria. In the frame of Project N 216758 (supported by Shota Rustaveli National Science Foundation (SRNF)) PSH maps were estimated using hybrid- empirical ground motion prediction equation developed for Georgia. Due to the paucity of seismically recorded information, in this work we focused our research on a more robust dataset related to macroseismic data,and attempted to calculate the probabilistic seismic hazard directly in terms of macroseismicintensity. For this reason, we started calculating new intensity prediction equations (IPEs)for Georgia taking into account different sets, belonging to the same new database, as well as distances from the seismic source.With respect to the seismic source, in order to improve the quality of the results, we have also hypothesized the size of faults from empirical relations, and calculated new IPEs also by considering Joyner-Boore and rupture distances in addition to epicentral and hypocentral distances. Finally, site conditions have been included as variables for IPEs calculation Regarding the database, we used a brand new revised set of macroseismic data and instrumental records for the significant earthquakes that struck Georgia between 1900 and 2002.Particularly, a large amount of research and documents related to macroseismic effects of individual earthquakes, stored in the archives of the Institute of Geophysics, were used as sources for the new macroseismic data. The latter are reported in the Medvedev-Sponheuer-Karnikmacroseismic scale (MSK64). For each earthquake the magnitude, the focal depth and the epicenter location are also reported. An online version of the database, with therelated metadata,has been produced for the 69

  2. Seismic Structural Setting of Western Farallon Basin, Southern Gulf of California, Mexico.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinero-Lajas, D.; Gonzalez-Fernandez, A.; Lopez-Martinez, M.; Lonsdale, P.

    2007-05-01

    Data from a number of high resolution 2D multichannel seismic (MCS) lines were used to investigate the structure and stratigraphy of the western Farallon basin in the southern Gulf of California. A Generator-Injector air gun provided a clean seismic source shooting each 12 s at a velocity of 6 kts. Each signal was recorded during 6- 8 s, at a sampling interval of 1 ms, by a 600 m long digital streamer with 48 channels and a spacing of 12.5 m. The MCS system was installed aboard CICESE's (Centro de Investigacion Cientifica y de Educacion Superior de Ensenada) 28 m research vessel Francisco de Ulloa. MCS data were conventionally processed, to obtain post- stack time-migrated seismic sections. The MCS seismic sections show a very detailed image of the sub-bottom structure up to 2-3 s two-way travel time (aprox. 2 km). We present detailed images of faulting based on the high resolution and quality of these data. Our results show distributed faulting with many active and inactive faults. Our study also constrains the depth to basement near the southern Baja California eastern coast. The acoustic basement appears as a continuous feature in the western part of the study area and can be correlated with some granite outcrops located in the southern Gulf of California islands. To the East, near the center of the Farallon basin, the acoustic basement changes, it is more discontinuous, and the seismic sections show a number of diffracted waves.

  3. Vegetation mapping of Nowitna National Wildlife Reguge, Alaska using Landsat MSS digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S. S.; Markon, Carl J.

    1986-01-01

    A Landsat-derived vegetation map was prepared for Nowitna National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge lies within the middle boreal subzone of north central Alaska. Seven major vegetation classes and sixteen subclasses were recognized: forest (closed needleleaf, open needleleaf, needleleaf woodland, mixed, and broadleaf); broadleaf scrub (lowland, alluvial, subalpine); dwarf scrub (prostrate dwarf shrub tundra, dwarf shrub-graminoid tussock peatland); herbaceous (graminoid bog, marsh and meadow); scarcely vegetated areas (scarcely vegetated scree and floodplain); water (clear, turbid); and other areas (mountain shadow). The methodology employed a cluster-block technique. Sample areas were described based on a combination of helicopter-ground survey, aerial photointerpretation, and digital Landsat data. Major steps in the Landsat analysis involved preprocessing (geometric correction), derivation of statistical parameters for spectral classes, spectral class labeling of sample areas, preliminary classification of the entire study area using a maximum-likelihood algorithm, and final classification utilizing ancillary information such as digital elevation data. The final product is a 1:250,000-scale vegetation map representative of distinctive regional patterns and suitable for use in comprehensive conservation planning.

  4. Recent Seismicity in the Ceboruco Volcano, Western Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, D.; Chávez-Méndez, M. I.; Nuñez-Cornu, F. J.; Sandoval, J. M.; Rodriguez-Ayala, N. A.; Trejo-Gomez, E.

    2017-12-01

    The Ceboruco volcano is the largest (2280 m.a.s.l) of several volcanoes along the Tepic-Zacoalco rift zone in Nayarit state (Mexico). During the last 1000 years, this volcano had effusive-explosive episodes with eight eruptions providing an average of one eruption each 125 years. Since the last eruption occurred in 1870, 147 years ago, a new eruption likelihood is really high and dangerous due to nearby population centers, important roads and lifelines that traverse the volcano's slopes. This hazards indicates the importance of monitoring the seismicity associated with the Ceboruco volcano whose ongoing activity is evidenced by fumaroles and earthquakes. During 2003 and 2008, this region was registered by just one Lennartz Marslite seismograph featuring a Lennartz Le3D sensor (1 Hz) [Rodríguez Uribe et al. (2013)] where they observed that seismicity rates and stresses appear to be increasing indicating higher levels of activity within the volcano. Until July 2017, a semi-permanent network with three Taurus (Nanometrics) and one Q330 Quanterra (Kinemetrics) digitizers with Lennartz 3Dlite sensors of 1 Hz natural frequency was registering in the area. In this study, we present the most recent seismicity obtained by the semi-permanent network and a temporary network of 21 Obsidians 4X and 8X (Kinemetrics) covering an area of 16 km x 16 km with one station every 2.5-3 km recording from November 2016 to July 2017.

  5. Deployment of broadband seismic and infrasonic networks on Tungurahua and Cotopaxi Volcanoes, Ecuador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumagai, H.; Yepes, H.; Vaca, M.; Caceres, V.; Nagai, T.; Yokoe, K.; Imai, T.; Miyakawa, K.; Yamashina, T.; Arrais, S.; Vasconez, F.; Pinajota, E.; Cisneros, C.; Ramos, C.; Paredes, M.; Gomezjurado, L.; Garcia-Aristizabal, A.; Molina, I.; Ramon, P.; Segovia, M.; Palacios, P.; Enriquez, W.; Inoue, I.; Nakano, M.; Inoue, H.

    2006-12-01

    Tungurahua and Cotopaxi are andesitic active volcanoes in Ecuadorian Andes. Tungurahua continues its eruptive activity since 1999, in which explosive eruptions accompanying pyroclastic flows occurred in July- August, 2006. Cotopaxi is one of the world's highest glacier-clad active volcanoes, and its seismic activity remains high since 2001. To enhance the monitoring capability of these volcanoes, we have installed broadband seismometers (Guralp CMG-40T: 60 s-50 Hz) and infrasonic sensors (ACO TYPE7144/4144: 10 s- 100 Hz) on these volcanoes through the technical cooperation program of Japan International Cooperation Agency (JICA). Three and five stations are currently installed at Tungurahua and Cotopaxi, respectively, and additional two stations will be installed at Tungurahua. Both seismic and infrasonic waveform data at each station are digitized by a Geotech Smart24D datalogger with a sampling frequency of 50 Hz, and transmitted by a digital telemetry system using 2.4 GHz Wireless LAN to the central office in Quito. The Tungurahua's eruptive activity accompanying pyroclastic flows in July-August 2006 was monitored in real-time by the network. The observed waveforms show a wide variety of signatures in response to various eruption styles: intermittent tremor during Strombolian eruptions, five-hour-long continuous strong tremor during heightened eruptions, very-long-period (VLP) seismic signals (10-50 s) associated with pyroclastic flows, and impulsive seismic and infrasonic events of explosions. At Cotopaxi Volcano, VLP signals (2 s) accompanying long- period signals (1-2 Hz) were detected by our network. Similar events occurred in 2002, and are interpreted as gas-release process from magma in an intruded dike beneath Cotopaxi (Molina et al, submitted to JGR). The present observation of the same type of events suggests that the intruded dike is still active beneath Cotopaxi. These signals detected by our networks are highly useful to understand volcanic processes

  6. Application of a time probabilistic approach to seismic landslide hazard estimates in Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajabi, A. M.; Del Gaudio, V.; Capolongo, D.; Khamehchiyan, M.; Mahdavifar, M. R.

    2009-04-01

    the slope critical acceleration (Ac)x for which a prefixed probability exists that seismic shaking would result in a Dn value equal to a threshold x whose exceedence would cause landslide triggering. The obtained ac values represent the minimum slope resistance required to keep the probability of seismic-landslide triggering within the prefixed value. In particular we calculated the spatial distribution of (Ac)x for x thresholds of 10 and 2 cm in order to represent triggering conditions for coherent slides (e.g., slumps, block slides, slow earth flows) and disrupted slides (e.g., rock falls, rock slides, rock avalanches), respectively. Then we produced a probabilistic national map that shows the spatial distribution of (Ac)10 and (Ac)2, for a 10% probability of exceedence in 50 year, which is a significant level of hazard equal to that commonly used for building codes. The spatial distribution of the calculated (Ac)xvalues can be compared with the in situ actual ac values of specific slopes to estimate whether these slopes have a significant probability of failing under seismic action in the future. As example of possible application of this kind of time probabilistic map to hazard estimates, we compared the values obtained for the Manjil region with a GIS map providing spatial distribution of estimated ac values in the same region. The spatial distribution of slopes characterized by ac < (Ac)10 was then compared with the spatial distribution of the major landslides of coherent type triggered by the Manjil earthquake. This comparison provides indications on potential, problems and limits of the experimented approach for the study area. References Cornell, C.A., 1968: Engineering seismic risk analysis, Bull. Seism. Soc. Am., 58, 1583-1606. Del Gaudio V., Wasowski J., & Pierri P., 2003: An approach to time probabilistic evaluation of seismically-induced landslide hazard. Bull Seism. Soc. Am., 93, 557-569. Jibson, R.W., E.L. Harp and J.A. Michael, 1998: A method for

  7. Seismic reflection and refraction data acquired in Canada Basin, Northwind Ridge and Northwind Basin, Arctic Ocean in 1988, 1992 and 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grantz, Arthur; Hart, Patrick E.; May, Steven D.

    2004-01-01

    Seismic reflection and refraction data were collected in generally ice-covered waters of the Canada Basin and the eastern part of the Chukchi Continental Borderland of the Amerasia Basin, Arctic Ocean, during the late summers of 1988, 1992, and 1993. The data were acquired from a Polar class icebreaker, the U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Polar Star, using a seismic reflection system designed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The northernmost data extend to 78? 48' N latitude. In 1988, 155 km of reflection data were acquired with a prototype system consisting of a single 195 cubic inch air gun seismic source and a two-channel hydrophone streamer with a 150-m active section. In 1992 and 1993, 500 and 1,900 km, respectively, of seismic reflection profile data were acquired with an improved six air gun, 674 to 1303 cubic inch tuned seismic source array and the same two-channel streamer. In 1993, a 12-channel streamer with a 150-m active section was used to record five of the reflection lines and one line was acquired using a three air gun, 3,000 cubic inch source. All data were recorded with a DFS-V digital seismic recorder. Processed sections feature high quality vertical incidence images to more than 6 km of sub-bottom penetration in the Canada Basin. Refraction data were acquired with U.S. Navy sonobuoys recorded simultaneously with the seismic reflection profiles. In 1988 eight refraction profiles were recorded with the single air gun, and in 1992 and 1993 a total of 47 refraction profiles were recorded with the six air gun array. The sonobuoy refraction records, with offsets up to 35 km, provide acoustic velocity information to complement the short-offset reflection data. The report includes trackline maps showing the location of the data, as well as both digital data files (SEG-Y) and images of all of the profiles.

  8. Passive (Micro-) Seismic Event Detection by Identifying Embedded "Event" Anomalies Within Statistically Describable Background Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baziw, Erick; Verbeek, Gerald

    2012-12-01

    Among engineers there is considerable interest in the real-time identification of "events" within time series data with a low signal to noise ratio. This is especially true for acoustic emission analysis, which is utilized to assess the integrity and safety of many structures and is also applied in the field of passive seismic monitoring (PSM). Here an array of seismic receivers are used to acquire acoustic signals to monitor locations where seismic activity is expected: underground excavations, deep open pits and quarries, reservoirs into which fluids are injected or from which fluids are produced, permeable subsurface formations, or sites of large underground explosions. The most important element of PSM is event detection: the monitoring of seismic acoustic emissions is a continuous, real-time process which typically runs 24 h a day, 7 days a week, and therefore a PSM system with poor event detection can easily acquire terabytes of useless data as it does not identify crucial acoustic events. This paper outlines a new algorithm developed for this application, the so-called SEED™ (Signal Enhancement and Event Detection) algorithm. The SEED™ algorithm uses real-time Bayesian recursive estimation digital filtering techniques for PSM signal enhancement and event detection.

  9. Seismic Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Seismic methods are the most commonly conducted geophysical surveys for engineering investigations. Seismic refraction provides engineers and geologists with the most basic of geologic data via simple procedures with common equipment.

  10. Digital Mapping and Environmental Characterization of National Wild and Scenic River Systems

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    McManamay, Ryan A; Bosnall, Peter; Hetrick, Shelaine L

    2013-09-01

    Spatially accurate geospatial information is required to support decision-making regarding sustainable future hydropower development. Under a memorandum of understanding among several federal agencies, a pilot study was conducted to map a subset of National Wild and Scenic Rivers (WSRs) at a higher resolution and provide a consistent methodology for mapping WSRs across the United States and across agency jurisdictions. A subset of rivers (segments falling under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service) were mapped at a high resolution using the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD). The spatial extent and representation of river segments mapped at NHD scale were compared withmore » the prevailing geospatial coverage mapped at a coarser scale. Accurately digitized river segments were linked to environmental attribution datasets housed within the Oak Ridge National Laboratory s National Hydropower Asset Assessment Program database to characterize the environmental context of WSR segments. The results suggest that both the spatial scale of hydrography datasets and the adherence to written policy descriptions are critical to accurately mapping WSRs. The environmental characterization provided information to deduce generalized trends in either the uniqueness or the commonness of environmental variables associated with WSRs. Although WSRs occur in a wide range of human-modified landscapes, environmental data layers suggest that they provide habitats important to terrestrial and aquatic organisms and recreation important to humans. Ultimately, the research findings herein suggest that there is a need for accurate, consistent, mapping of the National WSRs across the agencies responsible for administering each river. Geospatial applications examining potential landscape and energy development require accurate sources of information, such as data layers that portray realistic spatial representations.« less

  11. The Seismic risk perception in Italy deduced by a statistical sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crescimbene, Massimo; La Longa, Federica; Camassi, Romano; Pino, Nicola Alessandro; Pessina, Vera; Peruzza, Laura; Cerbara, Loredana; Crescimbene, Cristiana

    2015-04-01

    In 2014 EGU Assembly we presented the results of a web a survey on the perception of seismic risk in Italy. The data were derived from over 8,500 questionnaires coming from all Italian regions. Our questionnaire was built by using the semantic differential method (Osgood et al. 1957) with a seven points Likert scale. The questionnaire is inspired the main theoretical approaches of risk perception (psychometric paradigm, cultural theory, etc.) .The results were promising and seem to clearly indicate an underestimation of seismic risk by the italian population. Based on these promising results, the DPC has funded our research for the second year. In 2015 EGU Assembly we present the results of a new survey deduced by an italian statistical sample. The importance of statistical significance at national scale was also suggested by ISTAT (Italian Statistic Institute), considering the study as of national interest, accepted the "project on the perception of seismic risk" as a pilot study inside the National Statistical System (SISTAN), encouraging our RU to proceed in this direction. The survey was conducted by a company specialised in population surveys using the CATI method (computer assisted telephone interview). Preliminary results will be discussed. The statistical support was provided by the research partner CNR-IRPPS. This research is funded by Italian Civil Protection Department (DPC).

  12. Numerical Simulations of 3D Seismic Data Final Report CRADA No. TC02095.0

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Friedmann, S. J.; Kostov, C.

    This was a collaborative effort between Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC (formerly The Regents of the University of Califomia)/Lawrence-Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Schlumberger Cambridge Research (SCR), to develop synthetic seismic data sets and supporting codes.

  13. Local magnitude calibration of the Hellenic Unified Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scordilis, E. M.; Kementzetzidou, D.; Papazachos, B. C.

    2016-01-01

    A new relation is proposed for accurate determination of local magnitudes in Greece. This relation is based on a large number of synthetic Wood-Anderson (SWA) seismograms corresponding to 782 regional shallow earthquakes which occurred during the period 2007-2013 and recorded by 98 digital broad-band stations. These stations are installed and operated by the following: (a) the National Observatory of Athens (HL), (b) the Department of Geophysics of the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki (HT), (c) the Seismological Laboratory of the University of Athens (HA), and (d) the Seismological Laboratory of the Patras University (HP). The seismological networks of the above institutions constitute the recently (2004) established Hellenic Unified Seismic Network (HUSN). These records are used to calculate a refined geometrical spreading factor and an anelastic attenuation coefficient, representative for Greece and surrounding areas, proper for accurate calculation of local magnitudes in this region. Individual station corrections depending on the crustal structure variations in their vicinity and possible inconsistencies in instruments responses are also considered in order to further ameliorate magnitude estimation accuracy. Comparison of such calculated local magnitudes with corresponding original moment magnitudes, based on an independent dataset, revealed that these magnitude scales are equivalent for a wide range of values.

  14. A seismic hazard uncertainty analysis for the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cramer, C.H.

    2001-01-01

    A review of the scientific issues relevant to characterizing earthquake sources in the New Madrid seismic zone has led to the development of a logic tree of possible alternative parameters. A variability analysis, using Monte Carlo sampling of this consensus logic tree, is presented and discussed. The analysis shows that for 2%-exceedence-in-50-year hazard, the best-estimate seismic hazard map is similar to previously published seismic hazard maps for the area. For peak ground acceleration (PGA) and spectral acceleration at 0.2 and 1.0 s (0.2 and 1.0 s Sa), the coefficient of variation (COV) representing the knowledge-based uncertainty in seismic hazard can exceed 0.6 over the New Madrid seismic zone and diminishes to about 0.1 away from areas of seismic activity. Sensitivity analyses show that the largest contributor to PGA, 0.2 and 1.0 s Sa seismic hazard variability is the uncertainty in the location of future 1811-1812 New Madrid sized earthquakes. This is followed by the variability due to the choice of ground motion attenuation relation, the magnitude for the 1811-1812 New Madrid earthquakes, and the recurrence interval for M>6.5 events. Seismic hazard is not very sensitive to the variability in seismogenic width and length. Published by Elsevier Science B.V.

  15. A preliminary regional assessment of earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility for Vrancea Seismic Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micu, Mihai; Balteanu, Dan; Ionescu, Constantin; Havenith, Hans; Radulian, Mircea; van Westen, Cees; Damen, Michiel; Jurchescu, Marta

    2015-04-01

    ) with head scarps near mountain tops and close to faults is similar to the one of large mass movements for which a seismic origin is proved (such as in the Tien Shan, Pamir, Longmenshan, etc.). Thus, correlations between landslide occurrence and combined seismotectonic and climatic factors are needed to support a regional multi-hazard risk assessment. The purpose of this paper is to harmonize for the first time at a regional scale the landslide predisposing factors and seismotectonic triggers and to present a first qualitative insight into the earthquake-induced landslide susceptibility for the Vrancea Seismic Region in terms of a GIS-based analysis of Newmark displacement (ND). In this way, it aims at better defining spatial and temporal distribution patterns of earthquake-triggered landslides. Arias Intensity calculation involved in the assessment considers both regional seismic hazard aspects and singular earthquake scenarios (adjusted by topography amplification factors). The known distribution of landslides mapped through digital stereographic interpretation of high-resolution aerial photos is compared with digital active fault maps and the computed ND maps to statistically outline the seismotectonic influence on slope stability in the study area. The importance of this approach resides in two main outputs. The fist one, of a fundamental nature, by providing the first regional insight into the seismic landslides triggering framework, is allowing us to understand if deep-focus earthquakes may trigger massive slope failures in an area with a relatively smooth relief (compared to the high mountain regions in Central Asia, the Himalayas), considering possible geologic and topographic site effects. The second one, more applied, will allow a better accelerometer instrumentation and monitoring of slopes and also will provide a first correlation of different levels of seismic shaking with precipitation recurrences, an important relationship within a multi-hazard risk

  16. Tunnel Detection Using Seismic Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, R.; Park, C. B.; Xia, J.; Ivanov, J.; Steeples, D. W.; Ryden, N.; Ballard, R. F.; Llopis, J. L.; Anderson, T. S.; Moran, M. L.; Ketcham, S. A.

    2006-05-01

    Surface seismic methods have shown great promise for use in detecting clandestine tunnels in areas where unauthorized movement beneath secure boundaries have been or are a matter of concern for authorities. Unauthorized infiltration beneath national borders and into or out of secure facilities is possible at many sites by tunneling. Developments in acquisition, processing, and analysis techniques using multi-channel seismic imaging have opened the door to a vast number of near-surface applications including anomaly detection and delineation, specifically tunnels. Body waves have great potential based on modeling and very preliminary empirical studies trying to capitalize on diffracted energy. A primary limitation of all seismic energy is the natural attenuation of high-frequency energy by earth materials and the difficulty in transmitting a high- amplitude source pulse with a broad spectrum above 500 Hz into the earth. Surface waves have shown great potential since the development of multi-channel analysis methods (e.g., MASW). Both shear-wave velocity and backscatter energy from surface waves have been shown through modeling and empirical studies to have great promise in detecting the presence of anomalies, such as tunnels. Success in developing and evaluating various seismic approaches for detecting tunnels relies on investigations at known tunnel locations, in a variety of geologic settings, employing a wide range of seismic methods, and targeting a range of uniquely different tunnel geometries, characteristics, and host lithologies. Body-wave research at the Moffat tunnels in Winter Park, Colorado, provided well-defined diffraction-looking events that correlated with the subsurface location of the tunnel complex. Natural voids related to karst have been studied in Kansas, Oklahoma, Alabama, and Florida using shear-wave velocity imaging techniques based on the MASW approach. Manmade tunnels, culverts, and crawl spaces have been the target of multi-modal analysis

  17. J-SHIS - an integrated system for knowing seismic hazard information in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azuma, H.; Fujiwara, H.; Kawai, S.; Hao, K. X.; Morikawa, N.

    2015-12-01

    An integrated system of Japan seismic hazard information station (J-SHIS) was established in 2005 for issuing and exchanging information of the National Seismic Hazard Maps for Japan that are based on seismic hazard assessment (SHA). A simplified app, also named J-SHIS, for smartphones is popularly used in Japan based on the integrated system of http://www.j-shis.bosai.go.jp/map/?lang=en. "Smartphone tells hazard" is realized on a cellphone, a tablet and/or a PC. At a given spot, the comprehensive information of SHA map can be easily obtained as below: 1) A SHA probability at given intensity (JMA=5-, 5+, 6-, 6+) within 30 years. 2) A site amplification factor varies within 0.5 ~ 3.0 and expectation is 1 based on surface geology map information. 3) A depth of seismic basement down to ~3,000m based on deeper borehole and geological structure. 4) Scenario earthquake maps: By choosing an active fault, one got the average case for different parameters of the modeling. Then choose a case, you got the shaking map of intensity with color scale. "Seismic Hazard Karte tells more hazard" is another app based on website of http://www.j-shis.bosai.go.jp/labs/karte/. (1) For every mesh of 250m x 250m, professional service SHA information is provided over national-world. (2) With five ranks for eight items, comprehensive SHA information could be delivered. (3) Site amplification factor with an average index is given. (4) Deeper geologic structure modeling is provided with borehole profiling. (5) A SHA probability is assessed within 30 and/or 50 years for the given site. (6) Seismic Hazard curves are given for earthquake sources from inland active fault, subduction zone, undetermined and their summarization. (7) The JMA seismic intensities are assessed in long-term averaged periods of 500-years to ~100,000 years. The app of J-SHIS can be downloaded freely from http://www.j-shis.bosai.go.jp/app-jshis.

  18. GEODIS: A Portable Ocean Bottom Very Broadband Seismic Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    KARCZEWSKI, J.; MONTAGNER, J.; BEGUERY, L.; STUTZMANN, E.; ROULT, G.; LOGNONNE, P.; CACHO, S.; KOENIG, J.; SAVARY, J.

    2001-12-01

    The last ten years have seen the simultaneous development of a global seismic network coordinated through the FDSN (Federation of Digital Seismograph Networks) and of portable broadband seismic arrays. The same approach can be followed for improving our scientific understanding of the Earth processes below oceanic areas. Both components of ocean bottom geophysical networks, will be coordinated by ION (international Ocean Network). They are complementary since they enable to investigate the Earth structure and processes at different spatial and temporal scales. Geophysical Ocean bottom observatories (hereafter referred as GOBO) and portable seismic stations are sharing common technological problems. However, the issues of power supply and real-time data transmission are more crucial for a GOBO than for a portable temporary station. Since 1999, our group is developing a new "portable" geophysical ocean bottom autonomous station, named GEODIS. This station might be a basic element for a GOBO. It relies on the use of adapted VBB sensors issued from space experiments and technology and on improved electronics compared with previous ocean bottom experiments (SISMOBS/OFM 1992; MOISE 1997). The main characteristics of GEODIS are the following: - 3 axes VBB seismic sensors with a classical flat velocity response 360-0.2s. at 2500V/m/s (intrinsic noise level smaller than LNM). - Automatic (under software control) installation, levelling, centring of the 3 component seismic sensors. - 24 bit digitiser recording at 20sps, 3 seismic component and 1 infrasonic sensor. - Recording by a 16 bit converter at 1sps of the sea temperature in the vicinity of the instrument and housekeeping parameters (temperature, inclinations, power,...). - 1 year autonomy by using Lithium batteries. - Storage of data on Flash card and recording on hard disk every day. - Weight of GEODIS: 186kg in air and 110kg in water. - Overall dimensions: 930 x 930 x 440 mm. GEODIS can be easily installed by a

  19. Development of GIS Database for New Madrid Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birhanemeskel, Y. T.; Vlahovic, G.; Arroucau, P.; Malhotra, R.; Powell, C. A.

    2010-12-01

    The New Madrid Seismic Zone (NMSZ) of the central Mississippi river valley is currently the most seismically active region in the central and eastern United States. A number of earthquakes occurred in NMSZ between 1811 and 1812, of which three major earthquakes with magnitudes greater than 7 destroyed the town of New Madrid, Missouri. Intraplate seismicity like the New Madrid seismicity is difficult to explain in the framework of plate tectonics and requires analyzing various geological, geophysical and seismological data to better understand its causes. ArcGIS® 9.3.1 software with license type ArcEditor was used to build a geodatabase containing multiple layers that are useful for the study of intraplate seismicity. These layers include earthquake locations, gravity and magnetic anomalies, lithology, topography, velocity anomalies as resolved by arrival time tomography and geological structures like intrusions and faults. The data for these layers were obtained from the U.S Geological Survey, from the Center for Earthquake Research and Information at the University of Memphis, TN, and from paper maps. Zipped files of various formats (.xls, .shp, .txt, .tar, etc) were downloaded and converted to a format compatible with ArcGIS. To keep compatibility of the data, editing of the attribute table of the raw data was completed before importing the data to Arc Catalog. Geo-referencing and digitizing processes were also done to import layers of contour lines and geological structures with correct vector information from papers maps. Layers were clipped in order to make sure that they fit the spatial extent of the study area (from 34°S to 40°N in latitude and from 93°W to 86°W in longitude). The New Madrid seismicity will be analyzed by looking for possible relationships that exist between the data layers using various spatial and geostatistical tools. For example the distribution of earthquakes will be analyzed with respect to the potential field and velocity

  20. Causality between expansion of seismic cloud and maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in geothermal field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukuhira, Yusuke; Asanuma, Hiroshi; Ito, Takatoshi; Häring, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Occurrence of induced seismicity with large magnitude is critical environmental issues associated with fluid injection for shale gas/oil extraction, waste water disposal, carbon capture and storage, and engineered geothermal systems (EGS). Studies for prediction of the hazardous seismicity and risk assessment of induced seismicity has been activated recently. Many of these studies are based on the seismological statistics and these models use the information of the occurrence time and event magnitude. We have originally developed physics based model named "possible seismic moment model" to evaluate seismic activity and assess seismic moment which can be ready to release. This model is totally based on microseismic information of occurrence time, hypocenter location and magnitude (seismic moment). This model assumes existence of representative parameter having physical meaning that release-able seismic moment per rock volume (seismic moment density) at given field. Seismic moment density is to be estimated from microseismic distribution and their seismic moment. In addition to this, stimulated rock volume is also inferred by progress of microseismic cloud at given time and this quantity can be interpreted as the rock volume which can release seismic energy due to weakening effect of normal stress by injected fluid. Product of these two parameters (equation (1)) provide possible seismic moment which can be released from current stimulated zone as a model output. Difference between output of this model and observed cumulative seismic moment corresponds the seismic moment which will be released in future, based on current stimulation conditions. This value can be translated into possible maximum magnitude of induced seismicity in future. As this way, possible seismic moment can be used to have feedback to hydraulic stimulation operation in real time as an index which can be interpreted easily and intuitively. Possible seismic moment is defined as equation (1), where D

  1. Comparison of Amplitudes and Frequencies of Explosive vs. Hammer Seismic Sources for a 1-km Seismic Line in West Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaip, G.; Harder, S. H.; Karplus, M. S.; Vennemann, A.

    2016-12-01

    In May 2016, the National Seismic Source Facility (NSSF) located at the University of Texas at El Paso (UTEP) Department of Geological Sciences collected seismic data at the Indio Ranch located 30 km southwest of Van Horn, Texas. Both hammer on an aluminum plate and explosive sources were used. The project objective was to image subsurface structures at the ranch, owned by UTEP. Selecting the appropriate seismic source is important to reach project objectives. We compare seismic sources between explosions and hammer on plate, focusing on amplitude and frequency. The seismic line was 1 km long, trending WSW to ENE, with 200 4.5 Hz geophones at 5m spacing and shot locations at 10m spacing. Clay slurry was used in shot holes to increase shot coupling around booster. Trojan Spartan cast boosters (150g) were used in explosive sources in each shot hole (1 hole per station). The end of line shots had 5 shot holes instead of 1 (750g total). The hammer source utilized a 5.5 kg hammer and an aluminum plate. Five hammer blows were stacked at each location to improve signal-to-noise ratio. Explosive sources yield higher amplitude, but lower frequency content. The explosions exhibit a higher signal-to-noise ratio, allowing us to recognize seismic energy deeper and farther from the source. Hammer sources yield higher frequencies, allowing better resolution at shallower depths but have a lower signal-to-noise ratio and lower amplitudes, even with source stacking. We analyze the details of the shot spectra from the different types of sources. A combination of source types can improve data resolution and amplitude, thereby improving imaging potential. However, cost, logistics, and complexities also have a large influence on source selection.

  2. Time dependent data, time independent models: challenges of updating Australia's National Seismic Hazard Assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Griffin, J.; Clark, D.; Allen, T.; Ghasemi, H.; Leonard, M.

    2017-12-01

    Standard probabilistic seismic hazard assessment (PSHA) simulates earthquake occurrence as a time-independent process. However paleoseismic studies in slowly deforming regions such as Australia show compelling evidence that large earthquakes on individual faults cluster within active periods, followed by long periods of quiescence. Therefore the instrumental earthquake catalog, which forms the basis of PSHA earthquake recurrence calculations, may only capture the state of the system over the period of the catalog. Together this means that data informing our PSHA may not be truly time-independent. This poses challenges in developing PSHAs for typical design probabilities (such as 10% in 50 years probability of exceedance): Is the present state observed through the instrumental catalog useful for estimating the next 50 years of earthquake hazard? Can paleo-earthquake data, that shows variations in earthquake frequency over time-scales of 10,000s of years or more, be robustly included in such PSHA models? Can a single PSHA logic tree be useful over a range of different probabilities of exceedance? In developing an updated PSHA for Australia, decadal-scale data based on instrumental earthquake catalogs (i.e. alternative area based source models and smoothed seismicity models) is integrated with paleo-earthquake data through inclusion of a fault source model. Use of time-dependent non-homogeneous Poisson models allows earthquake clustering to be modeled on fault sources with sufficient paleo-earthquake data. This study assesses the performance of alternative models by extracting decade-long segments of the instrumental catalog, developing earthquake probability models based on the remaining catalog, and testing performance against the extracted component of the catalog. Although this provides insights into model performance over the short-term, for longer timescales it is recognised that model choice is subject to considerable epistemic uncertainty. Therefore a formal

  3. Using Seismic Interferometry to Investigate Seismic Swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matzel, E.; Morency, C.; Templeton, D. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismicity provides a direct means of measuring the physical characteristics of active tectonic features such as fault zones. Hundreds of small earthquakes often occur along a fault during a seismic swarm. This seismicity helps define the tectonically active region. When processed using novel geophysical techniques, we can isolate the energy sensitive to the fault, itself. Here we focus on two methods of seismic interferometry, ambient noise correlation (ANC) and the virtual seismometer method (VSM). ANC is based on the observation that the Earth's background noise includes coherent energy, which can be recovered by observing over long time periods and allowing the incoherent energy to cancel out. The cross correlation of ambient noise between a pair of stations results in a waveform that is identical to the seismogram that would result if an impulsive source located at one of the stations was recorded at the other, the Green function (GF). The calculation of the GF is often stable after a few weeks of continuous data correlation, any perturbations to the GF after that point are directly related to changes in the subsurface and can be used for 4D monitoring.VSM is a style of seismic interferometry that provides fast, precise, high frequency estimates of the Green's function (GF) between earthquakes. VSM illuminates the subsurface precisely where the pressures are changing and has the potential to image the evolution of seismicity over time, including changes in the style of faulting. With hundreds of earthquakes, we can calculate thousands of waveforms. At the same time, VSM collapses the computational domain, often by 2-3 orders of magnitude. This allows us to do high frequency 3D modeling in the fault region. Using data from a swarm of earthquakes near the Salton Sea, we demonstrate the power of these techniques, illustrating our ability to scale from the far field, where sources are well separated, to the near field where their locations fall within each other

  4. Reprocessing of multi-channel seismic-reflection data collected in the Beaufort Sea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Agena, W.F.; Lee, Myung W.; Hart, P.E.

    2000-01-01

    Contained on this set of two CD-ROMs are stacked and migrated multi-channel seismic-reflection data for 65 lines recorded in the Beaufort Sea by the United States Geological Survey in 1977. All data were reprocessed by the USGS using updated processing methods resulting in improved interpretability. Each of the two CD-ROMs contains the following files: 1) 65 files containing the digital seismic data in standard, SEG-Y format; 2) 1 file containing navigation data for the 65 lines in standard SEG-P1 format; 3) an ASCII text file with cross-reference information for relating the sequential trace numbers on each line to cdp numbers and shotpoint numbers; 4) 2 small scale graphic images (stacked and migrated) of a segment of line 722 in Adobe Acrobat (R) PDF format; 5) a graphic image of the location map, generated from the navigation file; 6) PlotSeis, an MS-DOS Application that allows PC users to interactively view the SEG-Y files; 7) a PlotSeis documentation file; and 8) an explanation of the processing used to create the final seismic sections (this document).

  5. Seismic array processing and computational infrastructure for improved monitoring of Alaskan and Aleutian seismicity and volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindquist, Kent Gordon

    We constructed a near-real-time system, called Iceworm, to automate seismic data collection, processing, storage, and distribution at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center (AEIC). Phase-picking, phase association, and interprocess communication components come from Earthworm (U.S. Geological Survey). A new generic, internal format for digital data supports unified handling of data from diverse sources. A new infrastructure for applying processing algorithms to near-real-time data streams supports automated information extraction from seismic wavefields. Integration of Datascope (U. of Colorado) provides relational database management of all automated measurements, parametric information for located hypocenters, and waveform data from Iceworm. Data from 1997 yield 329 earthquakes located by both Iceworm and the AEIC. Of these, 203 have location residuals under 22 km, sufficient for hazard response. Regionalized inversions for local magnitude in Alaska yield Msb{L} calibration curves (logAsb0) that differ from the Californian Richter magnitude. The new curve is 0.2\\ Msb{L} units more attenuative than the Californian curve at 400 km for earthquakes north of the Denali fault. South of the fault, and for a region north of Cook Inlet, the difference is 0.4\\ Msb{L}. A curve for deep events differs by 0.6\\ Msb{L} at 650 km. We expand geographic coverage of Alaskan regional seismic monitoring to the Aleutians, the Bering Sea, and the entire Arctic by initiating the processing of four short-period, Alaskan seismic arrays. To show the array stations' sensitivity, we detect and locate two microearthquakes that were missed by the AEIC. An empirical study of the location sensitivity of the arrays predicts improvements over the Alaskan regional network that are shown as map-view contour plots. We verify these predictions by detecting an Msb{L} 3.2 event near Unimak Island with one array. The detection and location of four representative earthquakes illustrates the expansion

  6. Promoting Diversity in Undergraduate Research in Robotics-Based Seismic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gifford, C. M.; Arthur, C. L.; Carmichael, B. L.; Webber, G. K.; Agah, A.

    2006-12-01

    The motivation for this research was to investigate forming evenly-spaced grid patterns with a team of mobile robots for future use in seismic imaging in polar environments. A team of robots was incrementally designed and simulated by incorporating sensors and altering each robot's controller. Challenges, design issues, and efficiency were also addressed. This research project incorporated the efforts of two undergraduate REU students from Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) in North Carolina, and the research staff at the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) at the University of Kansas. ECSU is a historically black university. Mentoring these two minority students in scientific research, seismic, robotics, and simulation will hopefully encourage them to pursue graduate degrees in science-related or engineering fields. The goals for this 10-week internship during summer 2006 were to educate the students in the fields of seismology, robotics, and virtual prototyping and simulation. Incrementally designing a robot platform for future enhancement and evaluation was central to this research, and involved simulation of several robots working together to change seismic grid shape and spacing. This process gave these undergraduate students experience and knowledge in an actual research project for a real-world application. The two undergraduate students gained valuable research experience and advanced their knowledge of seismic imaging, robotics, sensors, and simulation. They learned that seismic sensors can be used in an array to gather 2D and 3D images of the subsurface. They also learned that robotics can support dangerous or difficult human activities, such as those in a harsh polar environment, by increasing automation, robustness, and precision. Simulating robot designs also gave them experience in programming behaviors for mobile robots. Thus far, one academic paper has resulted from their research. This paper received third place at the 2006

  7. Seismic Characterization of the Newberry and Cooper Basin EGS Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templeton, D. C.; Wang, J.; Goebel, M.; Johannesson, G.; Myers, S. C.; Harris, D.; Cladouhos, T. T.

    2015-12-01

    To aid in the seismic characterization of Engineered Geothermal Systems (EGS), we enhance traditional microearthquake detection and location methodologies at two EGS systems: the Newberry EGS site and the Habanero EGS site in the Cooper Basin of South Australia. We apply the Matched Field Processing (MFP) seismic imaging technique to detect new seismic events using known discrete microearthquake sources. Events identified using MFP typically have smaller magnitudes or occur within the coda of a larger event. Additionally, we apply a Bayesian multiple-event location algorithm, called MicroBayesLoc, to estimate the 95% probability ellipsoids for events with high signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). Such probability ellipsoid information can provide evidence for determining if a seismic lineation is real, or simply within the anticipated error range. At the Newberry EGS site, 235 events were reported in the original catalog. MFP identified 164 additional events (an increase of over 70% more events). For the relocated events in the Newberry catalog, we can distinguish two distinct seismic swarms that fall outside of one another's 95% probability error ellipsoids.This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  8. Geomorphology and seismic risk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panizza, Mario

    1991-07-01

    The author analyses the contributions provided by geomorphology in studies suited to the assessment of seismic risk: this is defined as function of the seismic hazard, of the seismic susceptibility, and of the vulnerability. The geomorphological studies applicable to seismic risk assessment can be divided into two sectors: (a) morpho-neotectonic investigations conducted to identify active tectonic structures; (b) geomorphological and morphometric analyses aimed at identifying the particular situations that amplify or reduce seismic susceptibility. The morpho-neotectonic studies lead to the identification, selection and classification of the lineaments that can be linked with active tectonic structures. The most important geomorphological situations that can condition seismic susceptibility are: slope angle, debris, morphology, degradational slopes, paleo-landslides and underground cavities.

  9. Large-N Seismic Deployment at the Source Physics Experiment (SPE) Site

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, T.; Snelson, C. M.; Mellors, R. J.; Pitarka, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Source Physics Experiment (SPE) is multi-institutional and multi-disciplinary project that consists of a series of chemical explosion experiments at the Nevada National Security Site. The goal of SPE is to understand the complicated effect of earth structures on source energy partitioning and seismic wave propagation, develop and validate physics-based monitoring, and ultimately better discriminate low-yield nuclear explosions from background seismicity. Deployment of a large number of seismic sensors is planned for SPE to image the full 3-D wavefield with about 500 three-component sensors and 500 vertical component sensors. This large-N seismic deployment will operate near the site of SPE-5 shot for about one month, recording the SPE-5 shot, ambient noise, and additional controlled-sources. This presentation focuses on the design of the large-N seismic deployment. We show how we optimized the sensor layout based on the geological structure and experiment goals with a limited number of sensors. In addition, we will also show some preliminary record sections from deployment. This work was conducted under Contract No. DE-AC52-06NA25946 with the U.S. Department of Energy.

  10. Seismic sequences in the Sombrero Seismic Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pulliam, J.; Huerfano, V. A.; ten Brink, U.; von Hillebrandt, C.

    2007-05-01

    The northeastern Caribbean, in the vicinity of Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, has a long and well-documented history of devastating earthquakes and tsunamis, including major events in 1670, 1787, 1867, 1916, 1918, and 1943. Recently, seismicity has been concentrated to the north and west of the British Virgin Islands, in the region referred to as the Sombrero Seismic Zone by the Puerto Rico Seismic Network (PRSN). In the combined seismicity catalog maintained by the PRSN, several hundred small to moderate magnitude events can be found in this region prior to 2006. However, beginning in 2006 and continuing to the present, the rate of seismicity in the Sombrero suddenly increased, and a new locus of activity developed to the east of the previous location. Accurate estimates of seismic hazard, and the tsunamigenic potential of seismic events, depend on an accurate and comprehensive understanding of how strain is being accommodated in this corner region. Are faults locked and accumulating strain for release in a major event? Or is strain being released via slip over a diffuse system of faults? A careful analysis of seismicity patterns in the Sombrero region has the potential to both identify faults and modes of failure, provided the aggregation scheme is tuned to properly identify related events. To this end, we experimented with a scheme to identify seismic sequences based on physical and temporal proximity, under the assumptions that (a) events occur on related fault systems as stress is refocused by immediately previous events and (b) such 'stress waves' die out with time, so that two events that occur on the same system within a relatively short time window can be said to have a similar 'trigger' in ways that two nearby events that occurred years apart cannot. Patterns that emerge from the identification, temporal sequence, and refined locations of such sequences of events carry information about stress accommodation that is obscured by large clouds of

  11. Alaska Seismic Hazards Safety Commission

    Science.gov Websites

    State Employees ASHSC State of Alaska search Alaska Seismic Hazards Safety Commission View of Anchorage and Commissions Alaska Seismic Hazards Safety Commission (ASHSC) main contant Alaska Seismic Hazards Safety Commission logo Alaska Seismic Hazards Safety Commission (ASHSC) - Mission The Alaska Seismic

  12. Automatic recognition of seismic intensity based on RS and GIS: a case study in Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake of China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiuwen; Zhang, Yan; Yang, Xiaohong; Su, Bin

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, earthquakes have frequently occurred all over the world, which caused huge casualties and economic losses. It is very necessary and urgent to obtain the seismic intensity map timely so as to master the distribution of the disaster and provide supports for quick earthquake relief. Compared with traditional methods of drawing seismic intensity map, which require many investigations in the field of earthquake area or are too dependent on the empirical formulas, spatial information technologies such as Remote Sensing (RS) and Geographical Information System (GIS) can provide fast and economical way to automatically recognize the seismic intensity. With the integrated application of RS and GIS, this paper proposes a RS/GIS-based approach for automatic recognition of seismic intensity, in which RS is used to retrieve and extract the information on damages caused by earthquake, and GIS is applied to manage and display the data of seismic intensity. The case study in Wenchuan Ms8.0 earthquake in China shows that the information on seismic intensity can be automatically extracted from remotely sensed images as quickly as possible after earthquake occurrence, and the Digital Intensity Model (DIM) can be used to visually query and display the distribution of seismic intensity.

  13. Fractal interrelationships in field and seismic data. Quarterly report, September 21 - December 31, 1995

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Wilson, T.H.; Dominic, J.; Halverson, J.

    1995-12-31

    Under task 1 contour irregularities traced over both study areas in the previous quarter were scanned into the computer and digitized at a 30 meter interval. Patters mapped in both the Granny Creek and Middle Mountain field areas are presented in Figures 1 and 2 respectively. One of the hypotheses of this research project is that contour irregularities must be controlled by a combination of sedimentation features, lithologic variation, and local structure and fracture distribution. The most promising result obtained thus far in this study are those reported under Tasks 4 and 5, seismic analysis. If further tests continue tomore » support the observation that increased fractal dimension reflects the presence of detached structure, the analytical techniques employed here may be of use in the routine evaluation of seismic data to locate subtle traps. The observations may allow one to predict the variation of fractal dimension within a subsurface fracture network based on seismic observation of resolvable structural parameters. Such predictions would provide a working hypothesis, which could be modified within the context of available subsurface data.« less

  14. Test and Calibration of the Seismic Research Observatory

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peterson, Jon; Hutt, Charles R.; Holcomb, L. Gary

    1980-01-01

    Introduction The Seismic Research Observatory (SRO) network is generating an important new data base for seismological research. The SRO systems have extended both the range and resolution of seismic measurements beyond the limits of conventional seismographs and the data are recorded in digital format making it convenient to automate processing and analysis. The SRO network now comprises 12 stations and one additional station will be installed. The data produced by the SRO network, and other digital systems being installed to supplement the SRO network, will be collected by the U.S. Geological Survey's Albuquerque Seismological Laboratory, organized into network-day tapes, and made available to research organizations throughout the world. The network-day tapes are particularly unique and useful data files as they will contain not only seismic data but all of the information needed by an analyst to interpret the data, including station constants and calibration and other instrumental parameters. Hoffman (in preperation) describe these tapes and the format used in their compilation. The global digital data base for seismology is still relatively limited in terms of both geographical and temporal coverage. For this reason there is a tendency, perhaps, to stretch the applicability of the available data beyond the intended purposes. The danger in this is compounded by the fact that computer processing and analysis often can be done without even looking at the waveforms, and it is done with deceptively high computational precision that belies the basic accuracy of the measurements. The day may be passing when seismologists have a hands-on familiarity with the data acquisition systems, but clearly it is as important as ever that they have a knowledge of the capabilities and limitations of the instruments. The primary objective of the SRO network was to lower the threshold of event detection in the long-period band. This was achieved by using a newly-developed borehole

  15. Advanced digital image archival system using MPEG technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Wo

    2009-08-01

    Digital information and records are vital to the human race regardless of the nationalities and eras in which they were produced. Digital image contents are produced at a rapid pace from cultural heritages via digitalization, scientific and experimental data via high speed imaging sensors, national defense satellite images from governments, medical and healthcare imaging records from hospitals, personal collection of photos from digital cameras. With these mass amounts of precious and irreplaceable data and knowledge, what standards technologies can be applied to preserve and yet provide an interoperable framework for accessing the data across varieties of systems and devices? This paper presents an advanced digital image archival system by applying the international standard of MPEG technologies to preserve digital image content.

  16. Using Seismic Refraction and Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to Characterize the Valley Fill in Beaver Meadows, Rocky Mountain National Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramer, N.; Harry, D. L.; Wohl, E. E.

    2010-12-01

    This study is one of the first to use near surface geophysical techniques to characterize the subsurface stratigraphy in a high alpine, low gradient valley with a past glacial history and to obtain a preliminary grasp on the impact of Holocene beaver activity. Approximately 1 km of seismic refraction data and 5 km of GPR data were collected in Beaver Meadows, Rocky Mountain National Park. An asymmetric wedge of sediment ranging in depth from 0-20 m transverse to the valley profile was identified using seismic refraction. Complementary analysis of the GPR data suggests that the valley fill can be subdivided into till deposited during the Pleistocene glaciations and alluvium deposited during the Holocene. Two main facies were identified in the GPR profiles through pattern recognition. Facie Fd, which consists of chaotic discontinuous reflectors with an abundance of diffractions, is interpreted to be glacial till. Facie Fc, which is a combination of packages of complex slightly continuous reflectors interfingered with continuous horizontal to subhorizontal reflectors, is interpreted to be post-glacial alluvium and includes overbank, pond and in-channel deposits. Fc consistently overlies Fd throughout the study area and is no more than 7 m thick in the middle of the valley. The thickness of Holocene sedimentation (<7 m) is much less than the total amount of valley fill identified in the seismic refraction survey (0-20 m). A subfacie of Fc, Fch, which has reflectors with long periods was identified within Fc and is interpreted to be ponded sediments. The spatial distribution of facie Fch, along with: slight topographical features resembling buried beaver dams, a high abundance of fine sediment including silts and clays, historical records of beavers, and the name "Beaver Meadows" all suggest that Holocene beaver activity played a large role in sediment accumulation at this site, despite the lack of surficial relict beaver dams containing wood.

  17. ANZA Seismic Network- From Monitoring to Science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vernon, F.; Eakin, J.; Martynov, V.; Newman, R.; Offield, G.; Hindley, A.; Astiz, L.

    2007-05-01

    The ANZA Seismic Network (http:eqinfo.ucsd.edu) utilizes broadband and strong motion sensors with 24-bit dataloggers combined with real-time telemetry to monitor local and regional seismicity in southernmost California. The ANZA network provides real-time data to the IRIS DMC, California Integrated Seismic Network (CISN), other regional networks, and the Advanced National Seismic System (ANSS), in addition to providing near real-time information and monitoring to the greater San Diego community. Twelve high dynamic range broadband and strong motion sensors adjacent to the San Jacinto Fault zone contribute data for earthquake source studies and continue the monitoring of the seismic activity of the San Jacinto fault initiated 24 years ago. Five additional stations are located in the San Diego region with one more station on San Clemente Island. The ANZA network uses the advance wireless networking capabilities of the NSF High Performance Wireless Research and Education Network (http:hpwren.ucsd.edu) to provide the communication infrastructure for the real-time telemetry of Anza seismic stations. The ANZA network uses the Antelope data acquisition software. The combination of high quality hardware, communications, and software allow for an annual network uptime in excess of 99.5% with a median annual station real-time data return rate of 99.3%. Approximately 90,000 events, dominantly local sources but including regional and teleseismic events, comprise the ANZA network waveform database. All waveform data and event data are managed using the Datascope relational database. The ANZA network data has been used in a variety of scientific research including detailed structure of the San Jacinto Fault Zone, earthquake source physics, spatial and temporal studies of aftershocks, array studies of teleseismic body waves, and array studies on the source of microseisms. To augment the location, detection, and high frequency observations of the seismic source spectrum from local

  18. Worldwide seismicity in view of non-extensive statistical physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chochlaki, Kaliopi; Vallianatos, Filippos; Michas, George

    2014-05-01

    In the present work we study the distribution of worldwide shallow seismic events occurred from 1981 to 2011 extracted from the CMT catalog, with magnitude equal or greater than Mw 5.0. Our analysis based on the subdivision of the Earth surface into seismic zones that are homogeneous with regards to seismic activity and orientation of the predominant stress field. To this direction we use the Flinn-Engdahl regionalization (Flinn and Engdahl, 1965), which consists of 50 seismic zones as modified by Lombardi and Marzocchi (2007), where grouped the 50 FE zones into larger tectonically homogeneous ones, utilizing the cumulative moment tensor method. As a result Lombardi and Marzocchi (2007), limit the initial 50 regions to 39 ones, in which we apply the non- extensive statistical physics approach. The non-extensive statistical physics seems to be the most adequate and promising methodological tool for analyzing complex systems, such as the Earth's interior. In this frame, we introduce the q-exponential formulation as the expression of probability distribution function that maximizes the Sq entropy as defined by Tsallis, (1988). In the present work we analyze the interevent time distribution between successive earthquakes by a q-exponential function in each of the seismic zones defined by Lombardi and Marzocchi (2007).confirming the importance of long-range interactions and the existence of a power-law approximation in the distribution of the interevent times. Our findings supports the ideas of universality within the Tsallis approach to describe Earth's seismicity and present strong evidence on temporal clustering of seismic activity in each of the tectonic zones analyzed. Our analysis as applied in worldwide seismicity with magnitude equal or greater than Mw 5.5 and 6.) is presented and the dependence of our result on the cut-off magnitude is discussed. This research has been funded by the European Union (European Social Fund) and Greek national resources under the

  19. Wide-angle seismic recordings from the 1998 Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS), western Washington and British Columbia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brocher, Thomas M.; Parsons, Tom; Creager, Ken C.; Crosson, Robert S.; Symons, Neill P.; Spence, George D.; Zelt, Barry C.; Hammer, Philip T.C.; Hyndman, Roy D.; Mosher, David C.; Tréhu, Anne M.; Miller, Kate C.; ten Brink, Uri S.; Fisher, Michael A.; Pratt, Thomas L.; Alvarez, Marcos G.; Beaudoin, Bruce C.; Louden, Keith E.; Weaver, Craig S.

    1999-01-01

    This report describes the acquisition and processing of deep-crustal wide-angle seismic reflection and refraction data obtained in the vicinity of Puget Lowland, the Strait of Juan de Fuca, and Georgia Strait, western Washington and southwestern British Columbia, in March 1998 during the Seismic Hazards Investigation of Puget Sound (SHIPS). As part of a larger initiative to better understand lateral variations in crustal structure along the Cascadia margin, SHIPS participants acquired 1000 km of deep-crustal multichannel seismic-reflection profiles and 1300 km of wideangle airgun shot lines in this region using the R/V Thompson and R/V Tully. The Tully was used to record airgun shots fired by the Thompson in two different geometries: (1) expanding spread profiles (ESPs) and (2) constant offset profiles (COPs). Prior to this reflection survey, we deployed 257 Reftek and 15 ocean-bottom seismic recorders to record the airgun signals at far offsets. All data were recorded digitally on large-capacity hard disks. Although most of these stations only recorded the vertical component of motion, 95 of these seismographs recorded signals from an oriented 3-component seismometer. By recording signals generated by the Thompson's marine air gun array, operated in two differing geometries having a total volume of 110 and 79 liters (6730 and 4838 cu. in.), respectively, the arrays of wide-angle recorders were designed to (1) image the crustal structure, particularly in the vicinity of crustal faults and Cenozoic sedimentary basins, (2) determine the geometry of the Moho, and (3) image the subducting Gorda and Juan de Fuca plates. Nearly 33,300 air gun shots were recorded along several seismic lines. In this report, we illustrate the expanding spread profiles acquired using the Thompson and Tully, describe the land and ocean-bottom recording of the air gun signals, discuss the processing of the land recorder data into common receiver gathers, and illustrate the processed wide

  20. Micro-seismicity and seismic moment release within the Coso Geothermal Field, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaven, Joern; Hickman, Stephen H.; Davatzes, Nicholas C.

    2014-01-01

    We relocate 16 years of seismicity in the Coso Geothermal Field (CGF) using differential travel times and simultaneously invert for seismic velocities to improve our knowledge of the subsurface geologic and hydrologic structure. We expand on our previous results by doubling the number of relocated events from April 1996 through May 2012 using a new field-wide 3-D velocity model. Relocated micro-seismicity sharpens in many portions of the active geothermal reservoir, likely defining large-scale fault zones and fluid pressure compartment boundaries. However, a significant fraction of seismicity remains diffuse and does not cluster into sharply defined structures, suggesting that permeability is maintained within the reservoir through distributed brittle failure. The seismic velocity structure reveals heterogeneous distributions of compressional (Vp) and shear (Vs) wave speed, with Vs generally higher in the Main Field and East Flank and Vp remaining relatively uniform across the CGF, but with significant local variations. The Vp/Vs ratio appears to outline the two main producing compartments of the reservoir at depths below mean ground level of approximately 1 to 2.5 km, with a ridge of relatively high Vp/Vs separating the Main Field from the East Flank. Detailed analyses of spatial and temporal variations in earthquake relocations and cumulative seismic moment release in the East Flank reveal three regions with persistently high rates of seismic activity. Two of these regions exhibit sharp, stationary boundaries at the margins of the East Flank that likely represent barriers to fluid flow and advective heat transport. However, seismicity and moment release in a third region at the northern end of the East Flank spread over time to form an elongated NE to SW structure, roughly parallel both to an elongated cluster of seismicity at the southern end of the East Flank and to regional fault traces mapped at the surface. Our results indicate that high

  1. Automated detection and characterization of harmonic tremor in continuous seismic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Diana C.

    2017-06-01

    Harmonic tremor is a common feature of volcanic, hydrothermal, and ice sheet seismicity and is thus an important proxy for monitoring changes in these systems. However, no automated methods for detecting harmonic tremor currently exist. Because harmonic tremor shares characteristics with speech and music, digital signal processing techniques for analyzing these signals can be adapted. I develop a novel pitch-detection-based algorithm to automatically identify occurrences of harmonic tremor and characterize their frequency content. The algorithm is applied to seismic data from Popocatepetl Volcano, Mexico, and benchmarked against a monthlong manually detected catalog of harmonic tremor events. During a period of heightened eruptive activity from December 2014 to May 2015, the algorithm detects 1465 min of harmonic tremor, which generally precede periods of heightened explosive activity. These results demonstrate the algorithm's ability to accurately characterize harmonic tremor while highlighting the need for additional work to understand its causes and implications at restless volcanoes.

  2. Seismic noise level variation in South Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheen, D.; Shin, J.

    2008-12-01

    The variations of seismic background noise in South Korea have been investigated by means of power spectral analysis. The Korea Institute of Geoscience and Mineral Resources (KIGAM) and the Korea Meteorological Administation (KMA) have national wide seismic networks in South Korea, and, in the end of 2007, there are 30 broadband stations which have been operating for more than a year. In this study, we have estimated the power spectral density of seismic noise for 30 broadband stations from 2005 to 2007. Since we estimate PSDs from a large dataset of continuous waveform in this study, a robust PSD estimate of McNamara and Buland (2004) is used. In the frequency range 1-5 Hz, the diurnal variations of noise are observed at most of stations, which are especially larger at coastal stations and at insular than at inland. Some stations shows daily difference of diurnal variations, which represents that cultural activities contribute to the noise level of a station. The variation of number of triggered stations, however, shows that cultural noise has little influence on the detection capability of seismic network in South Korea. Seasonal variations are observed well in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz, while much less found in the frequency range 1-5 Hz. We observed that strong peaks in the range 0.1-0.5 Hz occur at the summer when Pacific typhoons are close to the Korean Peninsula.

  3. Digital Elevation Models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1993-01-01

    The Earth Science Information Center (ESIC) distributes digital cartographic/geographic data files produced by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) as part of the National Mapping Program. Digital cartographic data files may be grouped into four basic types. The first of these, called a Digital Line Graph (DLG), is the line map information in digital form. These data files include information on base data categories, such as transportation, hypsography, hydrography, and boundaries. The second type, called a Digital Elevation Model (DEM), consists of a sampled array of elevations for a number of ground positions at regularly spaced intervals. The third type is Land Use and Land Cover digital data which provides information on nine major classes of land use such as urban, agricultural, or forest as well as associated map data such as political units and Federal land ownership. The fourth type, the Geographic Names Information System, provides primary information for all known places, features, and areas in the United States identified by a proper name.

  4. The 26 December 2004 tsunami source estimated from satellite radar altimetry and seismic waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Tony Y.; Ji, Chen; Fu, L. -L.; Zlotnicki, Victor; Shum, C. K.; Yi, Yuchan; Hjorleifsdottir, Vala

    2005-01-01

    The 26 December 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami was the first earthquake tsunami of its magnitude to occur since the advent of both digital seismometry and satellite radar altimetry. Both have independently recorded the event from different physical aspects. The seismic data has then been used to estimate the earthquake fault parameters, and a three-dimensional ocean-general-circulation-model (OGCM) coupled with the fault information has been used to simulate the satellite-observed tsunami waves. Here we show that these two datasets consistently provide the tsunami source using independent methodologies of seismic waveform inversion and ocean modeling. Cross-examining the two independent results confirms that the slip function is the most important condition controlling the tsunami strength, while the geometry and the rupture velocity of the tectonic plane determine the spatial patterns of the tsunami.

  5. Toward 2D Seismic Wavefield Monitoring: Seismic Gradiometry for Long-Period Seismogram and Short-Period Seismogram Envelope applied to the Hi-net Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maeda, T.; Nishida, K.; Takagi, R.; Obara, K.

    2015-12-01

    The high-sensitive seismograph network Japan (Hi-net) operated by National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) has about 800 stations with average separation of 20 km. We can observe long-period seismic wave propagation as a 2D wavefield with station separations shorter than wavelength. In contrast, short-period waves are quite incoherent at stations, however, their envelope shapes resemble at neighbor stations. Therefore, we may be able to extract seismic wave energy propagation by seismogram envelope analysis. We attempted to characterize seismic waveform at long-period and its envelope at short-period as 2D wavefield by applying seismic gradiometry. We applied the seismic gradiometry to a synthetic long-period (20-50s) dataset prepared by numerical simulation in realistic 3D medium at the Hi-net station layout. Wave amplitude and its spatial derivatives are estimated by using data at nearby stations. The slowness vector, the radiation pattern and the geometrical spreading are extracted from estimated velocity, displacement and its spatial derivatives. For short-periods at shorter than 1 s, seismogram envelope shows temporal and spatial broadening through scattering by medium heterogeneity. It is expected that envelope shape may be coherent among nearby stations. Based on this idea, we applied the same method to the time-integration of seismogram envelope to estimate its spatial derivatives. Together with seismogram envelope, we succeeded in estimating the slowness vector from the seismogram envelope as well as long-period waveforms by synthetic test, without using phase information. Our preliminarily results show that the seismic gradiometry suits the Hi-net to extract wave propagation characteristics both at long and short periods. This method is appealing that it can estimate waves at homogeneous grid to monitor seismic wave as a wavefield. It is promising to obtain phase velocity variation from direct waves, and to grasp wave

  6. Seismic hazard maps of Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanner, J.G.; Shedlock, K.M.

    2004-01-01

    The growth of megacities in seismically active regions around the world often includes the construction of seismically unsafe buildings and infrastructures due to an insufficient knowledge of existing seismic hazard and/or economic constraints. Minimization of the loss of life, property damage, and social and economic disruption due to earthquakes depends on reliable estimates of seismic hazard. We have produced a suite of seismic hazard estimates for Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America. One of the preliminary maps in this suite served as the basis for the Caribbean and Central and South America portion of the Global Seismic Hazard Map (GSHM) published in 1999, which depicted peak ground acceleration (pga) with a 10% chance of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. Herein we present maps depicting pga and 0.2 and 1.0 s spectral accelerations (SA) with 50%, 10%, and 2% chances of exceedance in 50 years for rock sites. The seismicity catalog used in the generation of these maps adds 3 more years of data to those used to calculate the GSH Map. Different attenuation functions (consistent with those used to calculate the U.S. and Canadian maps) were used as well. These nine maps are designed to assist in global risk mitigation by providing a general seismic hazard framework and serving as a resource for any national or regional agency to help focus further detailed studies required for regional/local needs. The largest seismic hazard values in Mexico, the Caribbean, and Central and South America generally occur in areas that have been, or are likely to be, the sites of the largest plate boundary earthquakes. High hazard values occur in areas where shallow-to-intermediate seismicity occurs frequently. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Development of XML Schema for Broadband Digital Seismograms and Data Center Portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, N.; Tsuboi, S.; Ishihara, Y.; Nagao, H.; Yamagishi, Y.; Watanabe, T.; Yanaka, H.; Yamaji, H.

    2008-12-01

    There are a number of data centers around the globe, where the digital broadband seismograms are opened to researchers. Those centers use their own user interfaces and there are no standard to access and retrieve seismograms from different data centers using unified interface. One of the emergent technologies to realize unified user interface for different data centers is the concept of WebService and WebService portal. Here we have developed a prototype of data center portal for digital broadband seismograms. This WebService portal uses WSDL (Web Services Description Language) to accommodate differences among the different data centers. By using the WSDL, alteration and addition of data center user interfaces can be easily managed. This portal, called NINJA Portal, assumes three WebServices: (1) database Query service, (2) Seismic event data request service, and (3) Seismic continuous data request service. Current system supports both station search of database Query service and seismic continuous data request service. Data centers supported by this NINJA portal will be OHP data center in ERI and Pacific21 data center in IFREE/JAMSTEC in the beginning. We have developed metadata standard for seismological data based on QuakeML for parametric data, which has been developed by ETH Zurich, and XML-SEED for waveform data, which was developed by IFREE/JAMSTEC. The prototype of NINJA portal is now released through IFREE web page (http://www.jamstec.go.jp/pacific21/).

  8. Determination of trajectories of fireballs using seismic network data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishihara, Y.

    2006-12-01

    Fireballs, Bolides, which are caused by high velocity passages of meteoroids through the atmosphere, generate shockwaves. Meteor shockwave provide us very important information (arrival time and amplitude) to study meteor physics. The shockwave arrival time data enable us to determine trajectories of the fireballs. On the other hand, the shockwave amplitude tells us size and ablation history of the meteoroid. Infrasound observation is one of the ways of detecting bolide shockwaves. However, we have no infrasound observational networks extends for large area with enough spatial distribution for determination of trajectories and estimate ablation histories. We have only a few infrasound arrays that have three or four elements, in the Japanese islands. Last decade, digital seismic networks are greatly improved for the purpose of monitoring micro earthquakes. Those seismic networks are quite sensitive for detecting micro ground vibration, and then those networks could detect not only seismic wave generated by earthquakes, but also ground oscillations generated by coupling of meteor shockwave with the ground near station. Last years, I analyses this kind of ground motion data recorded by seismic network, as meteor shockwave signals. For example, we estimate some great fireball's aerial path from arrival times of shockwaves (e.g., Ishihara et. al., 2003 Earth Planets, and Space, 2004 Geophysical Research. Letters.; Pujol et al., 2006 Planetary and Space Science), and we estimate sizes and ablation history of some great fireball and a meteorite fall (Ishihara et al., 2004 Meteoroids2004). In Japan, some great fireball falls occurred during 2004 to 2005. In this presentation, I show the trajectories of these fireballs determined from shockwave analysis. Some fireballs trajectories are also determined from photographic records. The trajectories determined from shockwave and that from photos show good agreement.

  9. Writing user selectable data on the extended header of seismic recordings made on the Texas Instruments DFS-V

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Robinson, W.C.

    1996-01-01

    A circuit has been developed to allow the writing of up to 192 digits of user-selectable data on a portion of tape called extended header, which is always available for use before each DFS-V seismic record is written. Such data could include navigation information, air gun and streamer depth and shot times.

  10. US GeoData: Digital cartographic and geographic data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1985-01-01

    The increasing use of computers for storing and analyzing earth science information has sparked a growth in the demand for various types of cartographic data in digital form. The production of map data in computerized form is called digital cartography, and it involves the collection, storage, processing, analysis, and display of map data with the aid of computers. The U.S. Geological Survey, the Nation's largest earth science research agency, has expanded its national mapping program to incorporate operations associated with digital cartography, including the collection of planimetric, elevation, and geographic names information in digital form. This digital information is available for use in meeting the multipurpose needs and applications of the map user community.

  11. pySeismicDQA: open source post experiment data quality assessment and processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polkowski, Marcin

    2017-04-01

    Seismic Data Quality Assessment is python based, open source set of tools dedicated for data processing after passive seismic experiments. Primary goal of this toolset is unification of data types and formats from different dataloggers necessary for further processing. This process requires additional data checks for errors, equipment malfunction, data format errors, abnormal noise levels, etc. In all such cases user needs to decide (manually or by automatic threshold) if data is removed from output dataset. Additionally, output dataset can be visualized in form of website with data availability charts and waveform visualization with earthquake catalog (external). Data processing can be extended with simple STA/LTA event detection. pySeismicDQA is designed and tested for two passive seismic experiments in central Europe: PASSEQ 2006-2008 and "13 BB Star" (2013-2016). National Science Centre Poland provided financial support for this work via NCN grant DEC-2011/02/A/ST10/00284.

  12. Angola seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neto, Francisco António Pereira; França, George Sand; Condori, Cristobal; Sant'Anna Marotta, Giuliano; Chimpliganond, Cristiano Naibert

    2018-05-01

    This work describes the development of the Angolan earthquake catalog and seismicity distribution in the Southwestern African Plate, in Angola. This region is one of the least seismically active, even for stable continental regions (SCRs) in the world. The maximum known earthquake had a magnitude of 6.0 Ms, while events with magnitudes of 4.5 have return period of about 10 years. Events with magnitude 5 and above occur with return period of about 20 years. Five seismic zones can be confirmed in Angola, within and along craton edges and in the sedimentary basins including offshore. Overall, the exposed cratonic regions tend to have more earthquakes compared to other regions such as sedimentary basins. Earthquakes tend to occur in Archaic rocks, especially inside preexisting weakness zones and in tectonic-magmatic reactivation zones of Mesozoic and Meso-Cenozoic, associated with the installation of a wide variety of intrusive rocks, strongly marked by intense tectonism. This fact can be explained by the models of preexisting weakness zones and stress concentration near intersecting structures. The Angolan passive margin is also a new region where seismic activity occurs. Although clear differences are found between different areas along the passive margin, in the middle near Porto Amboim city, seismic activity is more frequent compared with northwestern and southwestern regions.

  13. Rescaled Range analysis of Induced Seismicity: rapid classification of clusters in seismic crisis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejar-Pizarro, M.; Perez Lopez, R.; Benito-Parejo, M.; Guardiola-Albert, C.; Herraiz, M.

    2017-12-01

    Different underground fluid operations, mainly gas storing, fracking and water pumping, can trigger Induced Seismicity (IS). This seismicity is normally featured by small-sized earthquakes (M<2.5), although particular cases reach magnitude as great as 5. It has been up for debate whether earthquakes greater than 5 can be triggered by IS or this level of magnitude only corresponds to tectonic earthquakes caused by stress change. Whatever the case, the characterization of IS for seismic clusters and seismic series recorded close but not into the gas storage, is still under discussion. Time-series of earthquakes obey non-linear patterns where the Hurst exponent describes the persistency or anti-persistency of the sequence. Natural seismic sequences have an H-exponent close to 0.7, which combined with the b-value time evolution during the time clusters, give us valuable information about the stationarity of the phenomena. Tectonic earthquakes consist in a main shock with a decay of time-occurrence of seismic shocks obeying the Omori's empirical law. On the contrary, IS does not exhibit a main shock and the time occurrence depends on the injection operations instead of on the tectonic energy released. In this context, the H-exponent can give information about the origin of the sequence. In 2013, a seismic crisis was declared from the Castor underground gas storing located off-shore in the Mediterranean Sea, close to the Northeastern Spanish cost. The greatest induced earthquake was 3.7. However, a 4.2 earthquake, probably of tectonic origin, occurred few days after the operations stopped. In this work, we have compared the H-exponent and the b-value time evolution according to the timeline of gas injection. Moreover, we have divided the seismic sequence into two groups: (1) Induced Seismicity and (2) Triggered Seismicity. The rescaled range analysis allows the differentiation between natural and induced seismicity and gives information about the persistency and long

  14. Accessing seismic data through geological interpretation: Challenges and solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Butler, R. W.; Clayton, S.; McCaffrey, B.

    2008-12-01

    Between them, the world's research programs, national institutions and corporations, especially oil and gas companies, have acquired substantial volumes of seismic reflection data. Although the vast majority are proprietary and confidential, significant data are released and available for research, including those in public data libraries. The challenge now is to maximise use of these data, by providing routes to seismic not simply on the basis of acquisition or processing attributes but via the geology they image. The Virtual Seismic Atlas (VSA: www.seismicatlas.org) meets this challenge by providing an independent, free-to-use community based internet resource that captures and shares the geological interpretation of seismic data globally. Images and associated documents are explicitly indexed by extensive metadata trees, using not only existing survey and geographical data but also the geology they portray. The solution uses a Documentum database interrogated through Endeca Guided Navigation, to search, discover and retrieve images. The VSA allows users to compare contrasting interpretations of clean data thereby exploring the ranges of uncertainty in the geometric interpretation of subsurface structure. The metadata structures can be used to link reports and published research together with other data types such as wells. And the VSA can link to existing data libraries. Searches can take different paths, revealing arrays of geological analogues, new datasets while providing entirely novel insights and genuine surprises. This can then drive new creative opportunities for research and training, and expose the contents of seismic data libraries to the world.

  15. New comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D seismic noise variation for Morocco territory, North Africa, obtained using seismic broadband stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Fellah, Younes; El-Aal, Abd El-Aziz Khairy Abd; Harnafi, Mimoun; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    In the current work, we constructed new comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D temporal-spatial seismic noise level cubes for Morocco in north-west Africa to be used for seismological and engineering purposes. Indeed, the original global standard seismic noise models published by Peterson (1993) and their following updates by Astiz and Creager (1995), Ekström (2001) and Berger et al. (2003) had no contributing seismic stations deployed in North Africa. Consequently, this preliminary study was conducted to shed light on seismic noise levels specific to north-west Africa. For this purpose, 23 broadband seismic stations recently installed in different structural domains throughout Morocco are used to study the nature and characteristics of seismic noise and to create seismic noise models for Morocco. Continuous data recorded during 2009, 2010 and 2011 were processed and analysed to construct these new noise models and 3D noise levels from all stations. We compared the Peterson new high-noise model (NHNM) and low-noise model (NLNM) with the Moroccan high-noise model (MHNM) and low-noise model (MLNM). These new noise models are comparable to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) models in the short period band; however, in the period range 1.2 s to 1000 s for MLNM and 10 s to 1000 s for MHNM display significant variations. This variation is attributed to differences in the nature of seismic noise sources that dominate Morocco in these period bands. The results of this study have a new perception about permanent seismic noise models for this spectacular region and can be considered a significant contribution because it supplements the Peterson models and can also be used to site future permanent seismic stations in Morocco.

  16. Recent Studies on the increase in Seismicity in the Antarctic Plate: Observations from BB Seismological Observatory (MAIT) at Maitri, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    N, R.; Ec, M.

    2008-12-01

    The permanent Seismological Observatory was established in 1997 at Maitri in Central Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica (70 °45' South 11 °43' East) primarily to monitor the seismicity in and around Antarctica, the space and time distribution of earthquake occurrences and obtain hypocentral parameters, magnitudes of earthquakes, velocity inversion for underground structure and earthquake source mechanism. The observatory has been upgraded during 25th Indian Silver Jubilee Scientific Expedition to Antarctica (December 2005 to February 2007) and 26th Indian Antarctic Expedition (IAE) with the new generation Geotech KS-2000M Seismometer and Smart 24R digitizer. During the 27th IAE the Seismic Observatory was further upgraded by adding Reftek 130 seismic system. Uninterrupted good quality digital Broad Band Seismic data is continuously being acquired. The SEISAN 8.1 software was used for final processing and analysis of about 300 earthquakes recorded. During the year 2006 the tele-seismic events, and quite a number of regional earthquakes of the order of 4 to 6.0 magnitude within Antarctic Plate, 23 in South Sandwich Islands, 7 in Scotia Sea, 2 in Macqurie Islands and 23 in Mid Oceanic Ridges in the Indian Ocean were recorded. 48 earthquakes of the magnitude above 4.5 from the nearby South Indian Ocean, South of South Africa, Chile, Argentina, Bolivia and about 40 earthquakes of the magnitude above 5.0 from the Indonesian Region were analysed. An earthquake of magnitude Ms=7.3 from the seismically active region of South Sandwich Islands Δ =16.5 °, Mb=7.8 earthquake from Tonga Islands and Mb=7.2 earthquake from Java were the large earthquakes that were recorded. Along with this the MOHO depth beneath MAIT was also estimated to be about 40km using receiver function analysis. All the analysed monthly data was reported to the I.S.C., U.K.,Global Data Centre for the final processing and inclusion in the yearly ISC Seismic Bulletin. The increasing seismic activity in

  17. Integrated Digital Survey of the "FONTANA RUSTICA" in the Gardens of the Quirinale.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paris, L.; Troiano, W.

    2013-07-01

    The paper illustrates the results of a research on integrated digital survey of the "Fontana Rustica" in the gardens of the Quirinale, artifact somewhat atypical for its particular organical configuration, and whose history is still to be discovered. The activity is performed by Critevat, interdepartmental research center in Rieti, within of the scientific collaboration with the Office for the conservation of artistic heritage of the Quirinale Palace. The integrated digital survey in recent years has had a strong impulse thanks to the technological development of the shape acquisition instruments. The research has analyzed the problems of interaction and integration of digital data obtainable using the latest digital technologies such as 3D laser-scanner and digital photogrammetry. A further level of research has focused on the possibility of management of 3D models in relation to data obtained by instruments and methods of investigation of different scientific culture such as seismic transmission tomography and thermografy.

  18. Two applications of time reversal mirrors: seismic radio and seismic radar.

    PubMed

    Hanafy, Sherif M; Schuster, Gerard T

    2011-10-01

    Two seismic applications of time reversal mirrors (TRMs) are introduced and tested with field experiments. The first one is sending, receiving, and decoding coded messages similar to a radio except seismic waves are used. The second one is, similar to radar surveillance, detecting and tracking a moving object(s) in a remote area, including the determination of the objects speed of movement. Both applications require the prior recording of calibration Green's functions in the area of interest. This reference Green's function will be used as a codebook to decrypt the coded message in the first application and as a moving sensor for the second application. Field tests show that seismic radar can detect the moving coordinates (x(t), y(t), z(t)) of a person running through a calibration site. This information also allows for a calculation of his velocity as a function of location. Results with the seismic radio are successful in seismically detecting and decoding coded pulses produced by a hammer. Both seismic radio and radar are highly robust to signals in high noise environments due to the super-stacking property of TRMs. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  19. Seismic component of the STEEP project, Alaska: Results of the first field season

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansen, R. A.; Estes, S.; Stachnik, J.; Lafevers, M.; Roush, J.; Sanches, R.; Fuerst, E.; Sandru, J.; Ruppert, N.; Pavlis, G.; Bauer, M.

    2005-12-01

    STEEP (SainT Elias Erosion/tectonics Project) is a five year, multi-disciplinary study that addresses evolution of the highest coastal mountain range on Earth - the St. Elias Mountains of southern Alaska and northwestern Canada. The overall goal of the project is to develop a comprehensive model for the St. Elias orogen that accounts for the interaction of regional plate tectonic processes, structural development, and rapid erosion. The seismic component of this project includes passive seismic experiment utilizing the IRIS PASSCAL Program instruments. The total project consists of 22 new, telemetered, digital broad band seismic stations, most accessible by helicopter only. There are 12 existing short period stations in the area. Eight new stations were installed in the coastal region in June 2005. Freewave IP radios provide the telemetry to the newly installed VSAT at the Bering Glacier camp site. The challenge was to find ice-free locations, on bedrock, large enough to install equipment and still have a helicopter landing zone nearby. The stations consist of Quanterra Q330 digitizers with baler, a STS-2 seismometer installed in a vault, a Freewave IP radio, a Scala 900 Mhz antenna, twenty 100 AH rechargeable batteries with a 2400AH backup Celair primary battery, and three solar panels mounted on hut. The acquired data is recorded in real time at the Alaska Earthquake Information Center located in Fairbanks and is incorporated into the standard data processing procedures. High quality data allows for more reliable automatic earthquake detections in the region with lower magnitude threshold. In addition to tectonic earthquakes, glacial events that occur within the vast ice fields of the region are also regularly detected. Broadband instruments complement regional broadband network for more reliable calculations of the regional moment tensors.

  20. Seismic intrusion detector system

    DOEpatents

    Hawk, Hervey L.; Hawley, James G.; Portlock, John M.; Scheibner, James E.

    1976-01-01

    A system for monitoring man-associated seismic movements within a control area including a geophone for generating an electrical signal in response to seismic movement, a bandpass amplifier and threshold detector for eliminating unwanted signals, pulse counting system for counting and storing the number of seismic movements within the area, and a monitoring system operable on command having a variable frequency oscillator generating an audio frequency signal proportional to the number of said seismic movements.

  1. Digital seismo-acoustic signal processing aboard a wireless sensor platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcillo, O.; Johnson, J. B.; Lorincz, K.; Werner-Allen, G.; Welsh, M.

    2006-12-01

    We are developing a low power, low-cost wireless sensor array to conduct real-time signal processing of earthquakes at active volcanoes. The sensor array, which integrates data from both seismic and acoustic sensors, is based on Moteiv TMote Sky wireless sensor nodes (www.moteiv.com). The nodes feature a Texas Instruments MSP430 microcontroller, 48 Kbytes of program memory, 10 Kbytes of static RAM, 1 Mbyte of external flash memory, and a 2.4-GHz Chipcon CC2420 IEEE 802.15.4 radio. The TMote Sky is programmed in TinyOS. Basic signal processing occurs on an array of three peripheral sensor nodes. These nodes are tied into a dedicated GPS receiver node, which is focused on time synchronization, and a central communications node, which handles data integration and additional processing. The sensor nodes incorporate dual 12-bit digitizers sampling a seismic sensor and a pressure transducer at 100 samples per second. The wireless capabilities of the system allow flexible array geometry, with a maximum aperture of 200m. We have already developed the digital signal processing routines on board the Moteiv Tmote sensor nodes. The developed routines accomplish Real-time Seismic-Amplitude Measurement (RSAM), Seismic Spectral- Amplitude Measurement (SSAM), and a user-configured Short Term Averaging / Long Term Averaging (STA LTA ratio), which is used to calculate first arrivals. The processed data from individual nodes are transmitted back to a central node, where additional processing may be performed. Such processing will include back azimuth determination and other wave field analyses. Future on-board signal processing will focus on event characterization utilizing pattern recognition and spectral characterization. The processed data is intended as low bandwidth information which can be transmitted periodically and at low cost through satellite telemetry to a web server. The processing is limited by the computational capabilities (RAM, ROM) of the nodes. Nevertheless, we

  2. Quantifying the similarity of seismic polarizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Joshua P.; Eaton, David W.; Caffagni, Enrico

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the similarities of seismic attributes can help identify tremor, low signal-to-noise (S/N) signals and converted or reflected phases, in addition to diagnosing site noise and sensor misalignment in arrays. Polarization analysis is a widely accepted method for studying the orientation and directional characteristics of seismic phases via computed attributes, but similarity is ordinarily discussed using qualitative comparisons with reference values or known seismic sources. Here we introduce a technique for quantitative polarization similarity that uses weighted histograms computed in short, overlapping time windows, drawing on methods adapted from the image processing and computer vision literature. Our method accounts for ambiguity in azimuth and incidence angle and variations in S/N ratio. Measuring polarization similarity allows easy identification of site noise and sensor misalignment and can help identify coherent noise and emergent or low S/N phase arrivals. Dissimilar azimuths during phase arrivals indicate misaligned horizontal components, dissimilar incidence angles during phase arrivals indicate misaligned vertical components and dissimilar linear polarization may indicate a secondary noise source. Using records of the Mw = 8.3 Sea of Okhotsk earthquake, from Canadian National Seismic Network broad-band sensors in British Columbia and Yukon Territory, Canada, and a vertical borehole array at Hoadley gas field, central Alberta, Canada, we demonstrate that our method is robust to station spacing. Discrete wavelet analysis extends polarization similarity to the time-frequency domain in a straightforward way. Time-frequency polarization similarities of borehole data suggest that a coherent noise source may have persisted above 8 Hz several months after peak resource extraction from a `flowback' type hydraulic fracture.

  3. Seismic Design of a Single Bored Tunnel: Longitudinal Deformations and Seismic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, J.; Moon, T.

    2018-03-01

    The large diameter bored tunnel passing through rock and alluvial deposits subjected to seismic loading is analyzed for estimating longitudinal deformations and member forces on the segmental tunnel liners. The project site has challenges including high hydrostatic pressure, variable ground profile and high seismic loading. To ensure the safety of segmental tunnel liner from the seismic demands, the performance-based two-level design earthquake approach, Functional Evaluation Earthquake and Safety Evaluation Earthquake, has been adopted. The longitudinal tunnel and ground response seismic analyses are performed using a three-dimensional quasi-static linear elastic and nonlinear elastic discrete beam-spring elements to represent segmental liner and ground spring, respectively. Three components (longitudinal, transverse and vertical) of free-field ground displacement-time histories evaluated from site response analyses considering wave passage effects have been applied at the end support of the strain-compatible ground springs. The result of the longitudinal seismic analyses suggests that seismic joint for the mitigation measure requiring the design deflection capacity of 5-7.5 cm is to be furnished at the transition zone between hard and soft ground condition where the maximum member forces on the segmental liner (i.e., axial, shear forces and bending moments) are induced. The paper illustrates how detailed numerical analyses can be practically applied to evaluate the axial and curvature deformations along the tunnel alignment under difficult ground conditions and to provide the seismic joints at proper locations to effectively reduce the seismic demands below the allowable levels.

  4. Method of migrating seismic records

    DOEpatents

    Ober, Curtis C.; Romero, Louis A.; Ghiglia, Dennis C.

    2000-01-01

    The present invention provides a method of migrating seismic records that retains the information in the seismic records and allows migration with significant reductions in computing cost. The present invention comprises phase encoding seismic records and combining the encoded seismic records before migration. Phase encoding can minimize the effect of unwanted cross terms while still allowing significant reductions in the cost to migrate a number of seismic records.

  5. Deep Seismic Reflection Images of the Sumatra Seismic and Aseismic Gaps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, S. C.; Hananto, N. D.; Chauhan, A.; Carton, H. D.; Midenet, S.; Djajadihardja, Y.

    2009-12-01

    The Sumatra subduction zone is seismically most active region on the Earth, and has been the site of three great earthquakes only in the last four years. The first of the series, the 2004 Boxing Day earthquake, broke 1300 km of the plate boundary and produced the devastating tsunami around the Indian Ocean. The second great earthquake occurred three months later in March 2005, about 150 km SE of the 2004 event. The Earth waited for three years, and then broke again in September 2007 at 1300 km SE of the 2004 event producing a twin earthquake of magnitudes of 8.5 and 7.9 at an interval of 12 hours, leaving a seismic gap of about 600 km between the second and third earthquake, the Sumatra Seismic Gap. Seismological and geodetic studies suggest that this gap is fully locked and may break any time. In order to study the seismic and tsunami risk in this locked region, a deep seismic reflection survey (Tsunami Investigation Deep Evaluation Seismic -TIDES) was carried out in May 2009 using the CGGVeritas vessel Geowave Champion towing a 15 long streamer, the longest ever used during a seismic survey, to image the nature of the subducting plate and associated features, including the seismogenic zone, from seafloor down to 50 km depth. A total of 1700 km of deep seismic reflection data were acquired. Three dip lines traverse the Sumatra subduction zone; one going through the Sumatra Seismic Gap, one crossing the region that broke during the 2007 great earthquake, and one going through the aseismic zone. These three dip profiles should provide insight about the locking mechanism and help us to understand why an earthquake occurs in one zone and not in aseismic zone. A strike-line was shot in the forearc basin connecting the locked zone with broken zone profiles, which should provide insight about barriers that might have stopped propagation of 2007 earthquake rupture further northward.

  6. Seismic hazard in the Intermountain West

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haller, Kathleen; Moschetti, Morgan P.; Mueller, Charles; Rezaeian, Sanaz; Petersen, Mark D.; Zeng, Yuehua

    2015-01-01

    The 2014 national seismic-hazard model for the conterminous United States incorporates new scientific results and important model adjustments. The current model includes updates to the historical catalog, which is spatially smoothed using both fixed-length and adaptive-length smoothing kernels. Fault-source characterization improved by adding faults, revising rates of activity, and incorporating new results from combined inversions of geologic and geodetic data. The update also includes a new suite of published ground motion models. Changes in probabilistic ground motion are generally less than 10% in most of the Intermountain West compared to the prior assessment, and ground-motion hazard in four Intermountain West cities illustrates the range and magnitude of change in the region. Seismic hazard at reference sites in Boise and Reno increased as much as 10%, whereas hazard in Salt Lake City decreased 5–6%. The largest change was in Las Vegas, where hazard increased 32–35%.

  7. Archive of Boomer and Chirp Seismic Reflection Data Collected During USGS Cruise 01RCE02, Southern Louisiana, April and May 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Calderon, Karynna; Dadisman, Shawn V.; Flocks, James G.; Wiese, Dana S.

    2003-01-01

    In April and May of 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a geophysical study of the Mississippi River Delta, Atchafalaya River Delta, and Shell Island Pass in southern Louisiana. This study was part of a larger USGS River Contaminant Evaluation (RCE) Project. This disc serves as an archive of unprocessed digital seismic reflection data, trackline navigation files, shotpoint navigation maps, observers' logbooks, GIS information, and formal Federal Geographic Data Committee (FGDC) metadata. In addition, a filtered and gained digital GIF-formatted image of each seismic profile is provided. For your convenience, a list of acronyms and abbreviations frequently used in this report has also been provided. This DVD (Digital Versatile Disc) document is readable on any computing platform that has standard DVD driver software installed. Documentation on this DVD was produced using Hyper Text Markup Language (HTML) utilized by the World Wide Web (WWW) and allows the user to access the information by using a web browser (i.e. Netscape or Internet Explorer). To access the information contained on this disc, open the file 'index.htm' located at the top level of the disc using your web browser. This report also contains WWW links to USGS collaborators and other agencies. These links are only accessible if access to the internet is available while viewing the DVD. The archived boomer and chirp seismic reflection data are in standard Society of Exploration Geophysicists (SEG) SEG-Y format (Barry et al., 1975) and may be downloaded for processing with public domain software such as Seismic Unix (SU), currently located at http://www.cwp.mines.edu/cwpcodes. Examples of SU processing scripts are provided in the boom.tar and chirp.tar files located in the SU subfolder of the SOFTWARE folder located at the top level of this DVD. In-house (USGS) DOS and Microsoft Windows compatible software for viewing SEG-Y headers - DUMPSEGY.EXE (Zilhman, 1992) - is provided in the USGS subfolder

  8. South-Central Tibetan Seismicity from HiCLIMB Seismic Array Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpenter, S.; Nabelek, J.; Braunmiller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The HiCLIMB broadband passive seismic experiment (2002-2005) operated 233 sites along a 800-km long north-south array extending from the Himalayan foreland into the Central Tibetan Plateau and a flanking 350x350 km lateral array in southern Tibet and eastern Nepal. We use data from the experiment’s second phase (June 2004 to August 2005), when stations operated in Tibet, to locate earthquakes in south-central Tibet, a region with no permanent seismic network where little is known about its seismicity. We used the Antelope software for automatic detection and arrival time picking, event-arrival association and event location. Requiring a low detection and event association threshold initially resulted in ~110,000 declared events. The large database size rendered manual inspection unfeasible and we developed automated post-processing modules to weed out spurious detections and erroneous phase and event associations, which stemmed, e.g., from multiple coincident earthquakes within the array or misplaced seismicity from the great 2004 Sumatra earthquake. The resulting database contains ~32,000 events within 5° distance from the closest station. We consider ~7,600 events defined by more than 30 P and S arrivals well located and discuss them here. Seismicity in the subset correlates well with mapped faults and structures seen on satellite imagery attesting to high location quality. This is confirmed by non-systematic, kilometer-scale differences between automatic and manual locations for selected events. Seismicity in south-central Tibet is intense north of the Yarlung-Tsangpo Suture. Almost 90% of events occurred in the Lhasa Terrane mainly along north-south trending rifts. Vigorous activity (>4,800 events) accompanied two M>6 earthquakes in the Payang Basin (84°E), ~100 km west of the linear array. The Tangra-Yum Co (86.5°E) and Pumqu-Xianza (88°E) rifts were very active (~1,000 events) without dominant main shocks indicating swarm like-behavior possibly related

  9. Computational Modeling of Seismic Wave Propagation Velocity-Saturation Effects in Porous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deeks, J.; Lumley, D. E.

    2011-12-01

    Compressional and shear velocities of seismic waves propagating in porous rocks vary as a function of the fluid mixture and its distribution in pore space. Although it has been possible to place theoretical upper and lower bounds on the velocity variation with fluid saturation, predicting the actual velocity response of a given rock with fluid type and saturation remains an unsolved problem. In particular, we are interested in predicting the velocity-saturation response to various mixtures of fluids with pressure and temperature, as a function of the spatial distribution of the fluid mixture and the seismic wavelength. This effect is often termed "patchy saturation' in the rock physics community. The ability to accurately predict seismic velocities for various fluid mixtures and spatial distributions in the pore space of a rock is useful for fluid detection, hydrocarbon exploration and recovery, CO2 sequestration and monitoring of many subsurface fluid-flow processes. We create digital rock models with various fluid mixtures, saturations and spatial distributions. We use finite difference modeling to propagate elastic waves of varying frequency content through these digital rock and fluid models to simulate a given lab or field experiment. The resulting waveforms can be analyzed to determine seismic traveltimes, velocities, amplitudes, attenuation and other wave phenomena for variable rock models of fluid saturation and spatial fluid distribution, and variable wavefield spectral content. We show that we can reproduce most of the published effects of velocity-saturation variation, including validating the Voigt and Reuss theoretical bounds, as well as the Hill "patchy saturation" curve. We also reproduce what has been previously identified as Biot dispersion, but in fact in our models is often seen to be wave multi-pathing and broadband spectral effects. Furthermore, we find that in addition to the dominant seismic wavelength and average fluid patch size, the

  10. Updates to building-code maps for the 2015 NEHRP recommended seismic provisions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luco, Nicolas; Bachman, Robert; Crouse, C.B; Harris, James R.; Hooper, John D.; Kircher, Charles A.; Caldwell, Phillp; Rukstales, Kenneth S.

    2015-01-01

    With the 2014 update of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Seismic Hazard Model (NSHM) as a basis, the Building Seismic Safety Council (BSSC) has updated the earthquake ground motion maps in the National Earthquake Hazards Reduction Program (NEHRP) Recommended Seismic Provisions for New Buildings and Other Structures, with partial funding from the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Anticipated adoption of the updated maps into the American Society of Civil Engineers Minimum Design Loads for Building and Other Structures and the International Building and Residential Codes is underway. Relative to the ground motions in the prior edition of each of these documents, most of the updated values are within a ±20% change. The larger changes are, in most cases, due to the USGS NSHM updates, reasons for which are given in companion publications. In some cases, the larger changes are partly due to a BSSC update of the slope of the fragility curve that is used to calculate the risk-targeted ground motions, and/or the introduction by BSSC of a quantitative definition of “active faults” used to calculate deterministic ground motions.

  11. Seismic-wave attenuation associated with crustal faults in the New Madrid seismic zone

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, R.M.; Mooney, W.D.

    1990-01-01

    The attenuation of upper crustal seismic waves that are refracted with a velocity of about 6 kilometers per second varies greatly among profiles in the area of the New Madrid seismic zone in the central Mississippi Valley. The waves that have the strongest attenuation pass through the seismic trend along the axis of the Reelfoot rift in the area of the Blytheville arch. Defocusing of the waves in a low-velocity zone and/ or seismic scattering and absorption could cause the attenuation; these effects are most likely associated with the highly deformed rocks along the arch. Consequently, strong seismic-wave attenuation may be a useful criterion for identifying seismogenic fault zones.

  12. Seismic hazard assessment: Issues and alternatives

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Z.

    2011-01-01

    Seismic hazard and risk are two very important concepts in engineering design and other policy considerations. Although seismic hazard and risk have often been used inter-changeably, they are fundamentally different. Furthermore, seismic risk is more important in engineering design and other policy considerations. Seismic hazard assessment is an effort by earth scientists to quantify seismic hazard and its associated uncertainty in time and space and to provide seismic hazard estimates for seismic risk assessment and other applications. Although seismic hazard assessment is more a scientific issue, it deserves special attention because of its significant implication to society. Two approaches, probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) and deterministic seismic hazard analysis (DSHA), are commonly used for seismic hazard assessment. Although PSHA has been pro-claimed as the best approach for seismic hazard assessment, it is scientifically flawed (i.e., the physics and mathematics that PSHA is based on are not valid). Use of PSHA could lead to either unsafe or overly conservative engineering design or public policy, each of which has dire consequences to society. On the other hand, DSHA is a viable approach for seismic hazard assessment even though it has been labeled as unreliable. The biggest drawback of DSHA is that the temporal characteristics (i.e., earthquake frequency of occurrence and the associated uncertainty) are often neglected. An alternative, seismic hazard analysis (SHA), utilizes earthquake science and statistics directly and provides a seismic hazard estimate that can be readily used for seismic risk assessment and other applications. ?? 2010 Springer Basel AG.

  13. Seismic and Tectonic Regionalization of the State of Michoacan.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez Rosas, R.; Aguirre, J.; Garduño-Monroy, V. H.; Ramirez-Guzman, L.

    2017-12-01

    In Mexico it is a country with seismically active regions, mainly the zones that are next to the pacific where the zone of subduction is located, in this work we focus on the state of Michoacán, since this has not been completely studied in the last 30 years after the earthquake in Michoacán in 1985. The first most important step is to know the region which are the most seismic zones within the state and one way is to carry out the regionalization of Michoacán identifying the sources of earthquakes as well as where occur more frequently.If we could know each of the factors that influence seismicity and describe every point of the terrain, every rupture, every rock, etc., then we could describe in an analytical way the seismic process and predict the occurrence of earthquakes such as eclipses. Unfortunately the number of parameters is so enormous that we cannot arrive at an exact description; however, we can take advantage of statistical properties to evaluate probabilities, even in the case of small systems such as a particular seismic zone.In this paper, epicenter data were collected from 1970 to 2014, and with them a statistical study was carried out and the epicenter data plotted using data reported by the National Seismological Service and the IRIS catalog as well as some data from the Institute of engineering UNAM. Where earthquakes of equal and greater than M = 4 were used. Graphing these in function with the depth and with that it was graficaron and was made an overlapping the faults of the state and with that it was divided in 4 seismic zones in function of the faults and the localized seismicity.Zone A. is located within the Michoacán Block set of faults, as well as part of the subduction zone on the coast of the state. Seismicity in this area is high. Zone B-1. This is located between the limits of Jalisco and Michoacán in the set of faults called Tepalcatepec depression and limits with the Jorullo-Tacámbaro fracture. At this site seismicity is

  14. Very-long-period seismic signals - filling the gap between deformation and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuberg, Jurgen; Smith, Paddy

    2013-04-01

    Good broadband seismic sensors are capable to record seismic transients with dominant wavelengths of several tens or even hundreds of seconds. This allows us to generate a multi-component record of seismic volcanic events that are located in between the conventional high to low-frequency seismic spectrum and deformation signals. With a much higher temporal resolution and accuracy than e.g. GPS records, these signals fill the gap between seismicity and deformation studies. In this contribution we will review the non-trivial processing steps necessary to retrieve ground deformation from the original velocity seismogram and explore which role the resulting displacement signals have in the analysis of volcanic events. We use examples from Soufriere Hills volcano in Montserrat, West Indies, to discuss the benefits and shortcomings of such methods regarding new insights into volcanic processes.

  15. Remote monitoring of electromagnetic signals and seismic events using smart mobile devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Pantelis; Cavouras, Dionisis; Sidiropoulos, Konstantinos; Ninos, Konstantinos; Nomicos, Constantine

    2009-06-01

    This study presents the design and development of a novel mobile wireless system to be used for monitoring seismic events and related electromagnetic signals, employing smart mobile devices like personal digital assistants (PDAs) and wireless communication technologies such as wireless local area networks (WLANs), general packet radio service (GPRS) and universal mobile telecommunications system (UMTS). The proposed system enables scientists to access critical data while being geographically independent of the sites of data sources, rendering it as a useful tool for preliminary scientific analysis.

  16. Internet-Based Solutions for a Secure and Efficient Seismic Network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhadha, R.; Black, M.; Bruton, C.; Hauksson, E.; Stubailo, I.; Watkins, M.; Alvarez, M.; Thomas, V.

    2017-12-01

    The Southern California Seismic Network (SCSN), operated by Caltech and USGS, leverages modern Internet-based computing technologies to provide timely earthquake early warning for damage reduction, event notification, ShakeMap, and other data products. Here we present recent and ongoing innovations in telemetry, security, cloud computing, virtualization, and data analysis that have allowed us to develop a network that runs securely and efficiently.Earthquake early warning systems must process seismic data within seconds of being recorded, and SCSN maintains a robust and resilient network of more than 350 digital strong motion and broadband seismic stations to achieve this goal. We have continued to improve the path diversity and fault tolerance within our network, and have also developed new tools for latency monitoring and archiving.Cyberattacks are in the news almost daily, and with most of our seismic data streams running over the Internet, it is only a matter of time before SCSN is targeted. To ensure system integrity and availability across our network, we have implemented strong security, including encryption and Virtual Private Networks (VPNs).SCSN operates its own data center at Caltech, but we have also installed real-time servers on Amazon Web Services (AWS), to provide an additional level of redundancy, and eventually to allow full off-site operations continuity for our network. Our AWS systems receive data from Caltech-based import servers and directly from field locations, and are able to process the seismic data, calculate earthquake locations and magnitudes, and distribute earthquake alerts, directly from the cloud.We have also begun a virtualization project at our Caltech data center, allowing us to serve data from Virtual Machines (VMs), making efficient use of high-performance hardware and increasing flexibility and scalability of our data processing systems.Finally, we have developed new monitoring of station average noise levels at most stations

  17. Seismic signature of crustal magma and fluid from deep seismic sounding data across Tengchong volcanic area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Z. M.; Zhang, Z. Z.; Wang, C. Y.; Klemperer, S. L.

    2012-04-01

    . There are typical tectonic and deep origin mechanisms for the moderate-strong earthquakes nearby SP Tuantian, and precaution should be added on this area in case of the potential earthquake. Our fusion image also clearly revealed that there exist two remarkable positions on the Moho discontinuity through which the heat from the upper mantle was transmitted upward, and this is attributed to the widely distributed hot material within the crust and upper mantle. We acknowledge the financial support of the Ministry of Land and Resources of China (SinoProbe-02-02), and the National Nature Science Foundation of China (No. 41074033 and No. 40830315). Key Words: Seismic Signature, Magma, Tengchong Volcanic Area, Deep Seismic Sounding, Seismic Attribute Fusion Li, Chang, van der Hilst, D., Meltzer, A.S., Engdahl, E.R., 2008. Subduction of the Indian lithosphere beneath the Tibetan Plateau and Burma. Earth Planet. Sci. Lett. 274. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2008.07.016. Lebedev, S., van der Hilst, R.D., 2008. Global upper-mantle tomography with the automated multi-mode surface and S waveforms. Geophys. J. Int. 173 (2), 505-518. Wang C.Y. and Huangfu G.. 2004. Crustal structure in Tengchong Volcano-Geothermal Area, western Yunnan, China. Tectonophysics, 380: 69-87.

  18. Seismic and Geodetic Monitoring of the Nicoya, Costa Rica, Seismic Gap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protti, M.; Gonzalez, V.; Schwartz, S.; Dixon, T.; Kato, T.; Kaneda, Y.; Simila, G.; Sampson, D.

    2007-05-01

    The Nicoya segment of the Middle America Trench has been recognized as a mature seismic gap with potential to generate a large earthquake in the near future (it ruptured with large earthquakes in 1853, 1900 and 1950). Low level of background seismicity and fast crustal deformation of the forearc are indicatives of strong coupling along the plate interface. Given its high seismic potential, the available data and especially the fact that the Nicoya peninsula extends over large part of the rupture area, this gap was selected as one of the two sites for a MARGINS-SEIZE experiment. With the goal of documenting the evolution of loading and stress release along this seismic gap, an international effort involving several institutions from Costa Rica, the United States and Japan is being carried out for over a decade in the region. This effort involves the installation of temporary and permanent seismic and geodetic networks. The seismic network includes short period, broad band and strong motion instruments. The seismic monitoring has provided valuable information on the geometry and characteristics of the plate interface. The geodetic network includes temporary and permanent GPS stations as well as surface and borehole tiltmeters. The geodetic networks have helped quantify the extend and degree of coupling. A continuously recording, three- station GPS network on the Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica, recorded what we believe is the first slow slip event observed along the plate interface of the Costa Rica subduction zone. We will present results from these monitoring networks. Collaborative international efforts are focused on expanding these seismic and geodetic networks to provide improved resolution of future creep events, to enhanced understanding of the mechanical behavior of the Nicoya subduction segment of the Middle American Trench and possibly capture the next large earthquake and its potential precursor deformation.

  19. Assessing the need for an update of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis using a SSHAC Level 1 study and the Seismic Hazard Periodic Reevaluation Methodology

    DOE PAGES

    Payne, Suzette J.; Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Coppersmith, Ryan; ...

    2017-08-23

    A key decision for nuclear facilities is evaluating the need for an update of an existing seismic hazard analysis in light of new data and information that has become available since the time that the analysis was completed. We introduce the newly developed risk-informed Seismic Hazard Periodic Review Methodology (referred to as the SHPRM) and present how a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) was performed in an implementation of this new methodology. The SHPRM offers a defensible and documented approach that considers both the changes in seismic hazard and engineering-based risk informationmore » of an existing nuclear facility to assess the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The SHPRM has seven evaluation criteria that are employed at specific analysis, decision, and comparison points which are applied to seismic design categories established for nuclear facilities in United States. The SHPRM is implemented using a SSHAC Level 1 study performed for the Idaho National Laboratory, USA. The implementation focuses on the first six of the seven evaluation criteria of the SHPRM which are all provided from the SSHAC Level 1 PSHA. Finally, to illustrate outcomes of the SHPRM that do not lead to the need for an update and those that do, the example implementations of the SHPRM are performed for nuclear facilities that have target performance goals expressed as the mean annual frequency of unacceptable performance at 1x10 -4, 4x10 -5 and 1x10 -5.« less

  20. Assessing the need for an update of a probabilistic seismic hazard analysis using a SSHAC Level 1 study and the Seismic Hazard Periodic Reevaluation Methodology

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Payne, Suzette J.; Coppersmith, Kevin J.; Coppersmith, Ryan

    A key decision for nuclear facilities is evaluating the need for an update of an existing seismic hazard analysis in light of new data and information that has become available since the time that the analysis was completed. We introduce the newly developed risk-informed Seismic Hazard Periodic Review Methodology (referred to as the SHPRM) and present how a Senior Seismic Hazard Analysis Committee (SSHAC) Level 1 probabilistic seismic hazard analysis (PSHA) was performed in an implementation of this new methodology. The SHPRM offers a defensible and documented approach that considers both the changes in seismic hazard and engineering-based risk informationmore » of an existing nuclear facility to assess the need for an update of an existing PSHA. The SHPRM has seven evaluation criteria that are employed at specific analysis, decision, and comparison points which are applied to seismic design categories established for nuclear facilities in United States. The SHPRM is implemented using a SSHAC Level 1 study performed for the Idaho National Laboratory, USA. The implementation focuses on the first six of the seven evaluation criteria of the SHPRM which are all provided from the SSHAC Level 1 PSHA. Finally, to illustrate outcomes of the SHPRM that do not lead to the need for an update and those that do, the example implementations of the SHPRM are performed for nuclear facilities that have target performance goals expressed as the mean annual frequency of unacceptable performance at 1x10 -4, 4x10 -5 and 1x10 -5.« less

  1. Seismic Structure of Perth Basin (Australia) and surroundings from Passive Seismic Deployments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issa, N.; Saygin, E.; Lumley, D. E.; Hoskin, T. E.

    2016-12-01

    We image the subsurface structure of Perth Basin, Western Australia and surroundings by using ambient seismic noise data from 14 seismic stations recently deployed by University of Western Australia (UWA) and other available permanent stations from Geoscience Australia seismic network and the Australian Seismometers in Schools program. Each of these 14 UWA seismic stations comprises a broadband sensor and a high fidelity 3-component 10 Hz geophone, recording in tandem at 250 Hz and 1000 Hz. The other stations used in this study are equipped with short period and broadband sensors. In addition, one shallow borehole station is operated with eight 3 component geophones at depths of between 2 and 44 m. The network is deployed to characterize natural seismicity in the basin and to try and identify any microseismic activity across Darling Fault Zone (DFZ), bounding the basin to the east. The DFZ stretches to approximately 1000 km north-south in Western Australia, and is one of the longest fault zones on the earth with a limited number of detected earthquakes. We use seismic noise cross- and auto-correlation methods to map seismic velocity perturbations across the basin and the transition from DFZ to the basin. Retrieved Green's functions are stable and show clear dispersed waveforms. Travel times of the surface wave Green's functions from noise cross-correlations are inverted with a two-step probabilistic framework to map the absolute shear wave velocities as a function of depth. The single station auto-correlations from the seismic noise yields P wave reflectivity under each station, marking the major discontinuities. Resulting images show the shear velocity perturbations across the region. We also quantify the variation of ambient seismic noise at different depths in the near surface using the geophones in the shallow borehole array.

  2. Strong Motion Network of Medellín and Aburrá Valley: technical advances, seismicity records and micro-earthquake monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Posada, G.; Trujillo, J. C., Sr.; Hoyos, C.; Monsalve, G.

    2017-12-01

    The tectonics setting of Colombia is determined by the interaction of Nazca, Caribbean and South American plates, together with the Panama-Choco block collision, which makes a seismically active region. Regional seismic monitoring is carried out by the National Seismological Network of Colombia and the Accelerometer National Network of Colombia. Both networks calculate locations, magnitudes, depths and accelerations, and other seismic parameters. The Medellín - Aburra Valley is located in the Northern segment of the Central Cordillera of Colombia, and according to the Colombian technical seismic norm (NSR-10), is a region of intermediate hazard, because of the proximity to seismic sources of the Valley. Seismic monitoring in the Aburra Valley began in 1996 with an accelerometer network which consisted of 38 instruments. Currently, the network consists of 26 stations and is run by the Early Warning System of Medellin and Aburra Valley (SIATA). The technical advances have allowed the real-time communication since a year ago, currently with 10 stations; post-earthquake data is processed through operationally near-real-time, obtaining quick results in terms of location, acceleration, spectrum response and Fourier analysis; this information is displayed at the SIATA web site. The strong motion database is composed by 280 earthquakes; this information is the basis for the estimation of seismic hazards and risk for the region. A basic statistical analysis of the main information was carried out, including the total recorded events per station, natural frequency, maximum accelerations, depths and magnitudes, which allowed us to identify the main seismic sources, and some seismic site parameters. With the idea of a more complete seismic monitoring and in order to identify seismic sources beneath the Valley, we are in the process of installing 10 low-cost shake seismometers for micro-earthquake monitoring. There is no historical record of earthquakes with a magnitude

  3. Innovations in seismic tomography, their applications and induced seismic events in carbon sequestration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Peng

    algorithm with the inclusion of full topography that is integrated from the Digital Elevation Model data. We present both synthetic and real data tests based on the compressional (P) wave arrival time data for Kilauea volcano in Hawai'i. A total of 33,768 events with 515,711 P-picks recorded by 35 stations at the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory are used in these tests. The comparison between the new and traditional methods based on the synthetic test shows that our new algorithm significantly improves the accuracy of the velocity model, especially at shallow depths. In the real data test, the P-wave velocity model of Kilauea shows some intriguing features. Velocity decrease from the surface to 2 km depth beneath Kilauea caldera indicates a state change of the basalt. Low velocity zones beneath Pu'u'O'o, Heiheiahulu and the Hilina fault system between 5 and 12 km are possible partial melting zones. High velocity anomalies are resolved below 6 km depth beneath the summit caldera, which may suggest the presence of consolidated gabbro-ultramafic cumulates. In the third work, we installed three broadband seismic stations (Test1, Test2 and Test3) in an Enhanced Oil Recovery field to monitor the potential seismic events associated with CO 2 injection. In the two years of continuous seismic data between October 2011 and October 2013, we observed a type of long duration (LD) events instead of typical micro earthquakes, with an average daily rate of 12. The LD events have the following characteristics: (1) their duration varies from ˜30 to ˜300 sec; (2) the amplitude changes smoothly from the beginning to the end of the LD event window; (3) they are local seismic events and were not recorded by regional seismic stations (e.g., ˜200 km away); (4) the waveforms are very different from those of typical earthquakes, but similar to volcanic tremors; (5) the frequency content is mainly concentrated between 0.5 and 6 Hz, which is similar to the frequency band of volcanic tremors; and (6

  4. A seismic reflection velocity study of a Mississippian mud-mound in the Illinois basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ranaweera, Chamila Kumari

    Two mud-mounds have been reported in the Ullin limestone near, but not in, the Aden oil field in Hamilton County, Illinois. One mud-mound is in the Broughton oil field of Hamilton County 25 miles to the south of Aden. The second mud-mound is in the Johnsonville oil field in Wayne County 20 miles to the north of Aden. Seismic reflection profiles were shot in 2012 adjacent to the Aden oil field to evaluate the oil prospects and to investigate the possibility of detecting Mississippian mud-mounds near the Aden field. A feature on one of the seismic profiles was interpreted to be a mud-mound or carbonate buildup. A well drilled at the location of this interpreted structure provided digital geophysical logs and geological logs used to refine the interpretation of the seismic profiles. Geological data from the new well at Aden, in the form of drill cuttings, have been used to essentially confirm the existence of a mud-mound in the Ullin limestone at a depth of 4300 feet. Geophysical well logs from the new well near Aden were used to create 1-D computer models and synthetic seismograms for comparison to the seismic data. The reflection seismic method is widely used to aid interpreting subsurface geology. Processing seismic data is an important step in the method as a properly processed seismic section can give a better image of the subsurface geology whereas a poorly processed section could mislead the interpretation. Seismic reflections will be more accurately depicted with careful determination of seismic velocities and by carefully choosing the processing steps and parameters. Various data processing steps have been applied and parameters refined to produce improved stacked seismic records. The resulting seismic records from the Aden field area indicate a seismic response similar to what is expected from a carbonate mud-mound. One-dimensional synthetic seismograms were created using the available sonic and density logs from the well drilled near the Aden seismic lines

  5. Study of the Nankai seismogenic fault using dynamic wave propagation modelling of digital rock from the Nobeoka Fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eng, Chandoeun; Ikeda, Tatsunori; Tsuji, Takeshi

    2018-10-01

    To understand the characteristics of the Nankai seismogenic fault in the plate convergent margin, we calculated the P- and S-wave velocities (VP and VS) of digital rock models constructed from core samples of an ancient plate boundary fault at Nobeoka, Kyushu Island, Japan. We first constructed 3D digital rock models from microcomputed tomography images and identified their heterogeneous textures such as cracks and veins. We replaced the cracks and veins with air, water, quartz, calcite and other materials with different bulk and shear moduli. Using the Rotated Staggered Grid Finite-Difference Method, we performed dynamic wave propagation simulations and quantified the effective VP, VS and the ratio of VP to VS (VP/VS) of the 3D digital rock models with different crack-filling minerals. Our results demonstrate that the water-saturated cracks considerably decreased the seismic velocity and increased VP/VS. The VP/VS of the quartz-filled rock model was lower than that in the water-saturated case and in the calcite-filled rock model. By comparing the elastic properties derived from the digital rock models with the seismic velocities (e.g. VP and VP/VS) around the seismogenic fault estimated from field seismic data, we characterised the evolution process of the deep seismogenic fault. The high VP/VS and low VP observed at the transition from aseismic to coseismic regimes in the Nankai Trough can be explained by open cracks (or fractures), while the low VP/VS and high VP observed at the deeper coseismic fault zone suggests quartz-filled cracks. The quartz-rich fault zone characterised as low VP/VS and high VP in this study could partially relate to the coseismic behaviour as suggested by previous studies, because quartz exhibits slip-weakening behaviour (i.e. unstable coseismic slip).

  6. Improvement of real-time seismic magnitude estimation by combining seismic and geodetic instrumentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, D.; Bock, Y.; Melgar, D.

    2017-12-01

    Rapid seismic magnitude assessment is a top priority for earthquake and tsunami early warning systems. For the largest earthquakes, seismic instrumentation tends to underestimate the magnitude, leading to an insufficient early warning, particularly in the case of tsunami evacuation orders. GPS instrumentation provides more accurate magnitude estimations using near-field stations, but isn't sensitive enough to detect the first seismic wave arrivals, thereby limiting solution speed. By optimally combining collocated seismic and GPS instruments, we demonstrate improved solution speed of earthquake magnitude for the largest seismic events. We present a real-time implementation of magnitude-scaling relations that adapts to consider the length of the recording, reflecting the observed evolution of ground motion with time.

  7. Digital I and C system upgrade integration technique

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    Huang, H. W.; Shih, C.; Wang, J. R.

    2012-07-01

    This work developed an integration technique for digital I and C system upgrade, the utility can replace the I and C systems step by step systematically by this method. Inst. of Nuclear Energy Research (INER) developed a digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) replacement integration technique on the basis of requirement of the three existing nuclear power plants (NPPs), which are Chin-Shan (CS) NPP, Kuo-Sheng (KS) NPP, and Maanshan (MS) NPP, in Taiwan, and also developed the related Critical Digital Review (CDR) Procedure. The digital I and C replacement integration technique includes: (I) Establishment of Nuclear Power Plant Digitalmore » Replacement Integration Guideline, (2) Preliminary Investigation on I and C System Digitalization, (3) Evaluation on I and C System Digitalization, and (4) Establishment of I and C System Digitalization Architectures. These works can be a reference for performing I and C system digital replacement integration of the three existing NPPs of Taiwan Power Company (TPC). A CDR is the review for a critical system digital I and C replacement. The major reference of this procedure is EPRI TR- 1011710 (2005) 'Handbook for Evaluating Critical Digital Equipment and Systems' which was published by the Electric Power Research Inst. (EPRI). With this document, INER developed a TPC-specific CDR procedure. Currently, CDR becomes one of the policies for digital I and C replacement in TPC. The contents of this CDR procedure include: Scope, Responsibility, Operation Procedure, Operation Flow Chart, CDR review items. The CDR review items include the comparison of the design change, Software Verification and Validation (SVandV), Failure Mode and Effects Analysis (FMEA), Evaluation of Diversity and Defense-in-depth (D3), Evaluation of Watchdog Timer, Evaluation of Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC), Evaluation of Grounding for System/Component, Seismic Evaluation, Witness and Inspection, Lessons Learnt from the Digital I and C Failure Events

  8. Seismic Monitoring of Stability of Unique Historical Buildings in the Czech Republic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broz, M.; Strunc, J.; Buben, J.

    2008-05-01

    The persistence of unique Historical Buildings is restricted due to weathering of construction material enhanced by meteorological processes such as storms, driving rain and temperature variations beneath the freezing point. Dynamic forces endangering the mechanical stability of exposed elements of building structures could be caused also by impacts of seismic waves. The long-time decrease of earthquake resistance is monitored using empirical functions of seismic response. This method is based on evaluation the co-spectra of exciting and forced vibrations of foundations and the structure elements in question. This poster notifies three examples of utilization of this method as follows: 1) In the course of renovating the St. Barbora temple in the Kutná Hora village, the vibrations caused by meteorological processes, supersonic aircraft transit and blasting in quarries have been evaluated. After completing the renovation of endangered spire elements, the local maximum of co-spectral function at 4Hz was shifted to 7Hz and the function approached more likely a wide-band course. 2) In the course of installation of the third bell in the bell tower of the of the Sázava monastery, the co-spectra of forced vibrations of tower walls were monitored and a more convenient time-function of bell clang was adjusted. 3) In connection with the construction of a highway tunnel in the 1,4 km distance from the St. Vit cathedral in the Praha-Hradèany castle, the long-term schedule of motoring seismic vibrations was started. In the course of driving the tunnels, the mili-sec blasting of charges up to 5 kg is used. Seismic vibrations are recorded by pickups situated on the subsoil and on the voussoir arch. The digital multichannel seismic recording apparatus (256 samples per sec) is equipped for continuous telemetric data transfer and automated evaluation. (Grant Foundation of the Czech Republic, 103/07/1522).

  9. MSNoise: a Python Package for Monitoring Seismic Velocity Changes using Ambient Seismic Noise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, T.; Caudron, C.; Brenguier, F.

    2013-12-01

    Earthquakes occur every day all around the world and are recorded by thousands of seismic stations. In between earthquakes, stations are recording "noise". In the last 10 years, the understanding of this noise and its potential usage have been increasing rapidly. The method, called "seismic interferometry", uses the principle that seismic waves travel between two recorders and are multiple-scattered in the medium. By cross-correlating the two records, one gets an information on the medium below/between the stations. The cross-correlation function (CCF) is a proxy to the Green Function of the medium. Recent developments of the technique have shown those CCF can be used to image the earth at depth (3D seismic tomography) or study the medium changes with time. We present MSNoise, a complete software suite to compute relative seismic velocity changes under a seismic network, using ambient seismic noise. The whole is written in Python, from the monitoring of data archives, to the production of high quality figures. All steps have been optimized to only compute the necessary steps and to use 'job'-based processing. We present a validation of the software on a dataset acquired during the UnderVolc[1] project on the Piton de la Fournaise Volcano, La Réunion Island, France, for which precursory relative changes of seismic velocity are visible for three eruptions betwee 2009 and 2011.

  10. Quake Final Video

    DOE Office of Scientific and Technical Information (OSTI.GOV)

    None

    Critical infrastructures of the world are at constant risks for earthquakes. Most of these critical structures are designed using archaic, seismic, simulation methods that were built from early digital computers from the 1970s. Idaho National Laboratory’s Seismic Research Group are working to modernize the simulation methods through computational research and large-scale laboratory experiments.

  11. Seismic Reflection Methods

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Seismic methods are the most commonly conducted geophysical surveys for engineering investigations. Seismic refraction provides engineers and geologists with the most basic of geologic data via simple procedures with common equipment.

  12. Pitfalls of negationist approach in communicating induced seismicity hazard in Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mucciarelli, Marco

    2013-04-01

    Italy is a country rich in hydropower, geothermal wells, extraction/reinjection of hydrocarbons, but surprisingly from 1964 to date only three papers have been published on the seismicity induced by dams, two on the problem of seismicity induced by reinjection of fluids and one that studies the effect on seismicity by the variation of the groundwater regime possibly caused by the excavation of a tunnel or by climate change. What has happened in Italy to cause this (at least apparent) disregard for the induced seismicity? We must go back to 1964, after the catastrophe of Vajont. In that year, prof. Caloi, then principal geophysicist of the National Institute of Geophysics published a work in which he noted as the start of the reservoir impounding gave rise to a sequence of induced seismicity in the same rock shoulder that later collapsed causing an inundation claiming more than 2000 casualties. Since then induced seismicity is a taboo, constantly downplayed by companies and utilities, dismissed as impossible or communicated with artifacts like the constant use of the prefix "micro-". The Emilia 2012 occurred close to a site that was selected for a gas storage facility in an (un)confined aquifer. Regional government denied permission due to the vicinity to an active fault and the question was still pending in front of the National authority in charge of licensing the plant when the earthquake occurred. The local residents, that were opposing the gas storage, misinterpreted the motivation of the denial of permission, understanding that the fault would became active only if the storage was working. Thus they concluded the the earthquake occurred because the company performed secret drillings. Badly informed journalists mounted the case, calling it a "fracking" operation. Incredible it may sound, the governor of the Emilia-Romagna region appointed an international commission charged to investigate the relationship between drillings (not storage) and earthquakes. In the

  13. Seismic risk assessment for road in Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyfur, Mona Foralisa; Pribadi, Krishna S.

    2016-05-01

    Road networks in Indonesia consist of 446,000 km of national, provincial and local roads as well as toll highways. Indonesia is one of countries that exposed to various natural hazards, such as earthquakes, floods, landslides, etc. Within the Indonesian archipelago, several global tectonic plates interact, such as the Indo-Australian, Pacific, Eurasian, resulting in a complex geological setting, characterized by the existence of seismically active faults and subduction zones and a chain of more than one hundred active volcanoes. Roads in Indonesia are vital infrastructure needed for people and goods movement, thus supporting community life and economic activities, including promoting regional economic development. Road damages and losses due to earthquakes have not been studied widely, whereas road disruption caused enormous economic damage. The aim of this research is to develop a method to analyse risk caused by seismic hazard to roads. The seismic risk level of road segment is defined using an earthquake risk index, adopting the method of Earthquake Disaster Risk Index model developed by Davidson (1997). Using this method, road segments' risk level can be defined and compared, and road risk map can be developed as a tool for prioritizing risk mitigation programs for road networks in Indonesia.

  14. Seismic Expression of Fault Related Folding in Southeastern Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beauchamp, W.; McDonald, D.

    2009-12-01

    Weldon Beauchamp, and David McDonald,TransAtlantic Petroleum Corp. 5910 N. Central Expressway, Suite 1755, Dallas, TX 75206 weldon@tapcor.com, 214-395-7125 The Zagros fold belt extends northwest from Iran and Iraq into southeastern Turkey. Large scale fault related folds control the topography of this region and the path of the Tigris river. Large surface anticlines in the Zagros Mountains provide traps for giant oil and gas fields in Iran and Iraq. Similar scale folds extend into southeast Turkey. These southward verging fault related folds are believed to detach in the Paleozoic. Borehole data, surface geological maps, satellite data and digital topographic models were used to create models to constrain structure at depth. Structural modeling of these folds was used to design, acquire and process seismic reflection data in the region. The seismic reflection data confirmed the presence of asymmetrical, south verging complex fault related folding. Faults related to these folds detach in the Lower Ordovician to Cambrian age shales. These folds are believed to form doubly plunging structures that fold Tertiary through Paleozoic age rocks forming multiple levels of possible hydrocarbon entrapment.

  15. A Seismic Source Model for Central Europe and Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyst, M.; Williams, C.; Onur, T.

    2006-12-01

    We present a seismic source model for Central Europe (Belgium, Germany, Switzerland, and Austria) and Italy, as part of an overall seismic risk and loss modeling project for this region. A separate presentation at this conference discusses the probabilistic seismic hazard and risk assessment (Williams et al., 2006). Where available we adopt regional consensus models and adjusts these to fit our format, otherwise we develop our own model. Our seismic source model covers the whole region under consideration and consists of the following components: 1. A subduction zone environment in Calabria, SE Italy, with interface events between the Eurasian and African plates and intraslab events within the subducting slab. The subduction zone interface is parameterized as a set of dipping area sources that follow the geometry of the surface of the subducting plate, whereas intraslab events are modeled as plane sources at depth; 2. The main normal faults in the upper crust along the Apennines mountain range, in Calabria and Central Italy. Dipping faults and (sub-) vertical faults are parameterized as dipping plane and line sources, respectively; 3. The Upper and Lower Rhine Graben regime that runs from northern Italy into eastern Belgium, parameterized as a combination of dipping plane and line sources, and finally 4. Background seismicity, parameterized as area sources. The fault model is based on slip rates using characteristic recurrence. The modeling of background and subduction zone seismicity is based on a compilation of several national and regional historic seismic catalogs using a Gutenberg-Richter recurrence model. Merging the catalogs encompasses the deletion of double, fake and very old events and the application of a declustering algorithm (Reasenberg, 2000). The resulting catalog contains a little over 6000 events, has an average b-value of -0.9, is complete for moment magnitudes 4.5 and larger, and is used to compute a gridded a-value model (smoothed historical

  16. Co-seismic slip, post-seismic slip, and largest aftershock associated with the 1994 Sanriku-haruka-oki, Japan, earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Yuji; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Nishimura, Takuya

    2003-11-01

    We analyzed continuous GPS data to investigate the spatio-temporal distribution of co-seismic slip, post-seismic slip, and largest aftershock associated with the 1994 Sanriku-haruka-oki, Japan, earthquake (Mw = 7.7). To get better resolution for co-seismic and post-seismic slip distribution, we imposed a weak constraint as a priori information of the co-seismic slip determined by seismic wave analyses. We found that the post-seismic slip during 100 days following the main-shock amount to as much moment release as the main-shock, and that the sites of co-seismic slip and post-seismic slip are partitioning on a plate boundary region in complimentary fashion. The major post-seismic slip was triggered by the mainshock in western side of the co-seismic slip, and the extent of the post-seismic slip is almost unchanged with time. It rapidly developed a shear stress concentration ahead of the slip area, and triggered the largest aftershock.

  17. Tempo-spatial analysis of Fennoscandian intraplate seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Roland; Lund, Björn

    2017-04-01

    Coupled spatial-temporal patterns of the occurrence of earthquakes in Fennoscandia are analysed using non-parametric methods. The occurrence of larger events is unambiguously and very strongly temporally clustered, with major implications for the assessment of seismic hazard in areas such as Fennoscandia. In addition, there is a clear pattern of geographical migration of activity. Data from the Swedish National Seismic Network and a collated international catalogue are analysed. Results show consistent patterns on different spatial and temporal scales. We are currently investigating these patterns in order to assess the statistical significance of the tempo-spatial patterns, and to what extent these may be consistent with stress transfer mechanism such as coulomb stress and pore fluid migration. Indications are that some further mechanism is necessary in order to explain the data, perhaps related to post-glacial uplift, which is up to 1cm/year.

  18. Small aperture seismic arrays for studying planetary interiors and seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmerr, N. C.; Lekic, V.; Fouch, M. J.; Panning, M. P.; Siegler, M.; Weber, R. C.

    2017-12-01

    Seismic arrays are a powerful tool for understanding the interior structure and seismicity across objects in the Solar System. Given the operational constraints of ground-based lander investigations, a small aperture seismic array can provide many of the benefits of a larger-scale network, but does not necessitate a global deployment of instrumentation. Here we define a small aperture array as a deployment of multiple seismometers, with a separation between instruments of 1-1000 meters. For example, small aperture seismic arrays have been deployed on the Moon during the Apollo program, the Active Seismic Experiments of Apollo 14 and 16, and the Lunar Seismic Profiling Experiment deployed by the Apollo 17 astronauts. Both were high frequency geophone arrays with spacing of 50 meters that provided information on the layering and velocity structure of the uppermost kilometer of the lunar crust. Ideally such arrays would consist of instruments that are 3-axis short period or broadband seismometers. The instruments must have a sampling rate and frequency range sensitivity capable of distinguishing between waves arriving at each station in the array. Both terrestrial analogs and the data retrieved from the Apollo arrays demonstrate the efficacy of this approach. Future opportunities exist for deployment of seismic arrays on Europa, asteroids, and other objects throughout the Solar System. Here we will present both observational data and 3-D synthetic modeling results that reveal the sensing requirements and the primary advantages of a small aperture seismic array over single station approach. For example, at the smallest apertures of < 1 m, we constrain that sampling rates must exceed 500 Hz and instrument sensitivity must extend to 100 Hz or greater. Such advantages include the improved ability to resolve the location of the sources near the array through detection of backazimuth and differential timing between stations, determination of the small-scale structure

  19. The use of vertical seismic profiles in seismic investigations of the earth

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Balch, Alfred H.; Lee, M.W.; Miller, J.J.; Ryder, Robert T.

    1982-01-01

    During the past 8 years, the U.S. Geological Survey has conducted an extensive investigation on the use of vertical seismic profiles (VSP) in a variety of seismic exploration applications. Seismic sources used were surface air guns, vibrators, explosives, marine air guns, and downhole air guns. Source offsets have ranged from 100 to 7800 ft. Well depths have been from 1200 to over 10,000 ft. We have found three specific ways in which VSPs can be applied to seismic exploration. First, seismic events observed at the surface of the ground can be traced, level by level, to their point of origin within the earth. Thus, one can tie a surface profile to a well log with an extraordinarily high degree of confidence. Second, one can establish the detectability of a target horizon, such as a porous zone. One can determine (either before or after surface profiling) whether or not a given horizon or layered sequence returns a detectable reflection to the surface. The amplitude and character of the reflection can also be observed. Third, acoustic properties of a stratigraphic sequence can be measured and sometimes correlated to important exploration parameters. For example, sometimes a relationship between apparent attenuation and sand percentage can be established. The technique shows additional promise of aiding surface exploration indirectly through studies of the evolution of the seismic pulse, studies of ghosts and multiples, and studies of seismic trace inversion techniques. Nearly all current seismic data‐processing techniques are adaptable to the processing of VSP data, such as normal moveout (NMO) corrections, stacking, single‐and multiple‐channel filtering, deconvolution, and wavelet shaping.

  20. Building an educational seismic network in Romanian schools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaharia, Bogdan; Tataru, Dragos; Grecu, Bogdan; Ionescu, Constantin; Bican-Brisan, Nicoleta; Neagoe, Cristian

    2014-05-01

    Understanding the earthquake phenomena and their effects is an important step toward the education of population and aims to raise the awareness about the earthquake risk and possible mitigation actions. In this sense, The Romanian Educational Seismic Network project represents an efficient communication tool, allowing teaching and learning about the earthquakes and seismic wave impact through experimental practices and educational activities. The seismic network consist of nine SEP seismometers installed in high-schools from the most important seismic areas (Vrancea, Banat, Făgăraş, Dobrogea), vulnerable cities (Bucharest, Iasi) or high populated places (Cluj, Sibiu, Timisoara, Zalău) and is coordinated by the National Institute of Earth Physics from Bucharest. Once installed, the seismic network is the starting point of activities for students through an e-learning platform. Some objectives are aimed: - To train students and teachers how to make analysis and interpretation of seismological data; - To make science more interesting for students; - To improve the participation rates in physical sciences for students; - To raise awareness of geoscience as a scientific discipline for pre-university students; - To promote the installation and effective use of educational seismographs and seismic data; - To reinforce and develop relationships between participating schools and research institutes; - To create an earthquake database this will be used by students and teachers for educational purposes. Different types of practical activities using educational seismometer, designed by researchers for students, are described in educational materials and in the web platform project. Also we encourage the teachers from the participating schools to share their experiences and produce new didactic tools for the classroom. This collaborative work could illustrate the conjugated efforts of researchers and teachers for a better education and awareness of the risk culture

  1. The Los Alamos Seismic Network (LASN): Recent Network Upgrades and Northern New Mexico Earthquake Catalog Updates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, P. M.; House, L. S.; Greene, M.; Ten Cate, J. A.; Schultz-Fellenz, E. S.; Kelley, R.

    2012-12-01

    From the first data recorded in the fall of 1973 to now, the Los Alamos Seismograph Network (LASN) has operated for nearly 40 years. LASN data have been used to locate more than 2,500 earthquakes in north-central New Mexico. The network was installed for seismic verification research, as well as to monitor and locate earthquakes near Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). LASN stations are the only earthquake monitoring stations in New Mexico north of Albuquerque. In the late 1970s, LASN included 22 stations spread over a geographic area of 150 km (N-S) by 350 km (E-W), of northern New Mexico. In the early 1980s, the available funding limited the stations that could be operated to a set of 7, located within an area of about 15 km (N-S) by 15 km (E-W), centered on Los Alamos. Over the last 3 years, 6 additional stations have been installed, which have considerably expanded the spatial coverage of the network. These new stations take advantage of broadband state-of-the-art sensors as well as digital recording and telemetry technology. Currently, 7 stations have broadband, three-component seismometers with digital telemetry, and the remaining 6 have traditional 1 Hz short-period seismometers with analog telemetry. In addition, a vertical array of accelerometers was installed in a wellbore on LANL property. This borehole station has 3-component digital strong-motion sensors. In addition, four forensic strong-motion accelerometers (SMA) are operated at LANL facilities. With 3 of the new broadband stations in and around the nearby Valles Caldera, LASN is now able to monitor any very small volcano-seismic events that may be associated with the caldera. We will present a complete description of the current LASN station, instrumentation and telemetry configurations, as well as the data acquisition and event-detection software structure used to record events in Earthworm. More than 2,000 earthquakes were detected and located in north-central New Mexico during the first 11

  2. Seismic imaging of the oil and geothermal reservoirs using the induced seismicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.; Toksoz, M. N.; Fehler, M.

    2011-12-01

    It is known that microseismicity can be induced in the oil field due to the stress change caused by oil/gas production. Similarly, injection of high-pressure fluids into the reservoir can also induce microseismicity. Due to the proximity of induced seismicity to the reservoir, in some cases, it may be advantageous to use induced seismicity to image the reservoir. The seismic stations for monitoring the induced seismicity are usually sparse. Conventional travel time tomography using travel times from seismic events to stations may not be applicable because of poor ray coverage outside the source region. In comparison, the double-difference tomography method of Zhang and Thurber (2003) that uses the differential travel times is able to image the reservoir by avoiding determining the velocity structure outside the source region. In this study, we present two case studies of applying double-difference tomography to induced seismicity monitored by borehole stations. In the case of an oil field in Oman, five closely spaced monitoring wells are used to monitor mic