Science.gov

Sample records for national wildlife refuge

  1. 78 FR 3909 - Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge, IN; Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, MN; Northern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ..., MN; Northern Tallgrass Prairie National Wildlife Refuge, MN; Whittlesey Creek National Wildlife..., Madison, IN 47250. Attention: Refuge Manager, Glacial Ridge NWR, 17788 349th St. SE., Erskine, MN 56535. Attention: Refuge Manager, Northern Tallgrass Prairie NWR, 44843 687th Avenue, Odessa, MN 56276....

  2. Refuge management analyses: research needs for Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, J.E.; Auble, G.T.; Hamilton, D.B.

    1984-01-01

    Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge, located in southeastern Indiana, was established by the Migratory Bird Conservation Commission in 1966. Land use planning for the Refuge formally began in 1971, and development of facilities designed in that planning effort is now nearing completion. As these facilities become operational, Refuge personnel will be manipulating water (both spatially and temporally) and other habitat components to achieve the joint Refuge goals of natural resource conservation and public use. This situation offers a unique opportunity to institute research and management studies designed to evaluate and enhance the effectiveness of the management regime in providing for the needs of migratory waterfowl and other wildlife resources.

  3. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2012--Individual refuge results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Alia M.; Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Conk, Shannon J.

    2013-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 560 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts nearly 45 million visitors annually, including 34.8 million people who observe and photograph wildlife, 9.6 million who hunt and fish, and nearly 675,000 teachers and students who use refuges as outdoor classrooms. Understanding visitor perceptions of refuges and characterizing their experiences on refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The purpose of the survey was to better understand visitor experiences and trip characteristics, to gauge visitors’ levels of satisfaction with existing recreational opportunities, and to garner feedback to inform the design of programs and facilities. The survey results will inform performance, planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs), visitor services, and transportation planning processes. This Data Series consists of 25 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: • Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. • Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results.• Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational

  4. 75 FR 7289 - Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuge, NE; Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge, MN; and Iowa...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... Refuge, MN; and Iowa Wetland Management District, IA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior... documents for the Boyer Chute and Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) and the Iowa Wetland... Wildlife Refuge, 26624 N. Tower Road, Detroit Lakes, MN 56501; 3. Attention: Refuge Manager, Iowa...

  5. 77 FR 67660 - Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-13

    ... Cahaba River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Bibb County, Alabama. We provide this notice in compliance... boundary. The refuge currently contains 3,608 acres in Bibb County. The refuge was established to:...

  6. San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge Well 10

    SciTech Connect

    Ensminger, J.T.; Easterly, C.E.; Ketelle, R.H.; Quarles, H.; Wade, M.C.

    1999-12-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), at the request of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, evaluated the water production capacity of an artesian well in the San Bernardino National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona. Water from the well initially flows into a pond containing three federally threatened or endangered fish species, and water from this pond feeds an adjacent pond/wetland containing an endangered plant species.

  7. Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge Workbook Summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montag, Jessica M.; Stinchfield, Holly M.

    2009-01-01

    The Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge in eastern Maine is currently developing a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) that will guide Refuge management over the next 15 years. Workbooks were provided to local residents as part of the scoping process in order to get feedback on current and future management issues from the public. The workbooks asked questions regarding residents' use of the Refuge, conservation problems and issues in the region, the acceptability of Refuge management actions, and the importance of, satisfaction with, and acceptability of various activities allowed on the Refuge. The focus of this report is to present the results of the completed workbooks. Because of the small number of returned workbooks, it is not possible to generalize these findings to the broader public, nor is it possible to determine if respondents represent the average user. However, the results do provide an idea of possible conflicts and important issues that the Refuge may have to address in the future. The permitted uses of the Refuge are one possible conflict area. Many respondents were supportive of consumptive recreation (hunting, fishing, and trapping), but a few were adamantly opposed to these sorts of activities on the Refuge. Another issue that received several comments was motorized recreation. While some people felt strongly that ATVs and snowmobiles should be allowed, others felt just as strongly that motorized recreation of any type should not be allowed in the Refuge. Many in the sample were also very concerned about Refuge development and its effects on the human and natural environments. Issues mentioned include the loss of access to private land for consumptive recreation, concern about fish and wildlife habitat degradation, and water quality.

  8. 75 FR 55600 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge), Imperial and Riverside Counties... (EA) for the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex, which consists of the...

  9. DDT contamination at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Shea, T.J.; Fleming, W.J.; Cromartie, E.

    1980-01-01

    Disposal of industrial waste resulted in massive DDT contamination atWheeler National Wildlife Refuge, Alabama. Nearly a decade after the cessation of DDT manufacturing at the facility responsible, concentrations of DDT residues in the local fauna are still high enough to suggest avian reproductive impairment and mortality. Populations of fish-eating birds are low, endangered species are being exposed, and muscle lipids of game birds contain up to 6900 parts of DDT (isomers and metabolites) per million.

  10. 43 CFR 3101.5 - National Wildlife Refuge System lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National Wildlife Refuge System lands. 3101.5 Section 3101.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Leases § 3101.5 National Wildlife Refuge System lands....

  11. 43 CFR 3101.5 - National Wildlife Refuge System lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National Wildlife Refuge System lands. 3101.5 Section 3101.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Leases § 3101.5 National Wildlife Refuge System lands....

  12. 43 CFR 3101.5 - National Wildlife Refuge System lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National Wildlife Refuge System lands. 3101.5 Section 3101.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Leases § 3101.5 National Wildlife Refuge System lands....

  13. 43 CFR 3101.5 - National Wildlife Refuge System lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National Wildlife Refuge System lands. 3101.5 Section 3101.5 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF... Leases § 3101.5 National Wildlife Refuge System lands....

  14. Summer in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This colorful image of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and the Beaufort Sea was acquired by the Multi-angle Imaging SpectroRadiometer's nadir (vertical-viewing) camera on August 16, 2000, during Terra orbit 3532. The swirling patterns apparent on the Beaufort Sea are small ice floes driven by turbulent water patterns, or eddies, caused by the interactions of water masses of differing salinity and temperature. By this time of year, all of the seasonal ice which surrounds the north coast of Alaska in winter has broken up, although the perennial pack ice remains further north. The morphology of the perennial ice pack's edge varies in response to the prevailing wind. If the wind is blowing strongly toward the perennial pack (that is, to the north), the ice edge will be more compact. In this image the ice edge is diffuse, and the patterns reflected by the ice floes indicate fairly calm weather.

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (often abbreviated to ANWR) was established by President Eisenhower in 1960, and is the largest wildlife refuge in the United States. Animals of the Refuge include the 130,000-member Porcupine caribou herd, 180 species of birds from four continents, wolves, wolverine, polar and grizzly bears, muskoxen, foxes, and over 40 species of coastal and freshwater fish. Although most of ANWR was designated as wilderness in 1980, the area along the coastal plain was set aside so that the oil and gas reserves beneath the tundra could be studied. Drilling remains a topic of contention, and an energy bill allowing North Slope oil development to extend onto the coastal plain of the Refuge was approved by the US House of Representatives on August 2, 2001.

    The Refuge encompasses an impressive variety of arctic and subarctic ecosystems, including coastal lagoons, barrier islands, arctic tundra, and mountainous terrain. Of all these, the arctic tundra is the landscape judged most important for wildlife. From the coast inland to an average of 30

  15. 75 FR 59285 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge and Coachella Valley National Wildlife Refuge), Imperial and Riverside...

  16. Bats of Ouray National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    Ouray National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is located in the northeast corner of Utah along the Green River and is part of the Upper Colorado River System and the Colorado Plateau. The Colorado Plateau is home to 19 species of bats, some of which are quite rare. Of those 19 species, a few have a more southern range and would not be expected to be found at Ouray NWR, but it is unknown what species occur at Ouray NWR or their relative abundance. The assumption is that Ouray NWR provides excellent habitat for bats, since the riparian habitat consists of a healthy population of cottonwoods with plenty of older, large trees and snags that would provide foraging and roosting habitat for bats. The more than 4,000 acres of wetland habitat, along with the associated insect population resulting from the wetland habitat, would provide ideal foraging habitat for bats. The overall objective of this project is to conduct a baseline inventory of bat species occurring on the refuge using mist nets and passive acoustic monitoring.

  17. 75 FR 41232 - Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Canyon, Owyhee, Payette, and Washington Counties, ID; Malheur...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Canyon, Owyhee, Payette, and Washington...), intend to prepare a comprehensive conservation plan (CCP) for Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge....gov . Fax: Attn: Refuge Manager, (208) 467-1019. U.S. Mail: Refuge Manager, Deer Flat...

  18. National wildlife refuge visitor survey results: 2010/2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carolos, Andrew W.; Miller, Holly M.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. The survey was conducted on 53 refuges across the National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System) to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. A total of 14,832 visitors agreed to participate in the survey between July 2010 and November 2011. In all, 10,233 visitors completed the survey for a 71% response rate. This report provides a summary of visitor and trip characteristics; visitor opinions about refuges and their offerings; and visitor opinions about alternative transportation and climate change, two Refuge System topics of interest. The Refuge System, established in 1903 and managed by the Service, is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 National Wildlife Refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. These combined results are based on surveying at 53 participating

  19. Mingo National Wildlife Refuge Environmental Education Program: Teacher's Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, Puxico, MO.

    A wide diversity of interesting plant and animal life can be observed and studied at Mingo National Wildlife Refuge, the last sizeable example of the swampland which once covered millions of acres in the area. Many of the species here, such as the swamp rabbit, are rare elsewhere in the state. The refuge's archaeological and historical resources…

  20. National wildlife refuge visitor survey 2010/2011: Individual refuge results

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Dietsch, Alia M.; Don Carlos, Andrew W.; Koontz, Lynne M.; Solomon, Adam N.; Miller, Holly M.

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System (Refuge System), established in 1903 and managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service), is the leading network of protected lands and waters in the world dedicated to the conservation of fish, wildlife and their habitats. There are 556 national wildlife refuges and 38 wetland management districts nationwide, encompassing more than 150 million acres. The Refuge System attracts more than 45 million visitors annually, including 25 million people per year to observe and photograph wildlife, over 9 million to hunt and fish, and more than 10 million to participate in educational and interpretation programs. Understanding visitors and characterizing their experiences on national wildlife refuges are critical elements of managing these lands and meeting the goals of the Refuge System. The Service collaborated with the U.S. Geological Survey to conduct a national survey of visitors regarding their experiences on national wildlife refuges. The survey was conducted to better understand visitor needs and experiences and to design programs and facilities that respond to those needs. The survey results will inform Service performance planning, budget, and communications goals. Results will also inform Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCPs), Visitor Services, and Transportation Planning processes. This data series consists of 53 separate data files. Each file describes the results of the survey for an individual refuge and contains the following information: * Introduction: An overview of the Refuge System and the goals of the national surveying effort. * Methods: The procedures for the national surveying effort, including selecting refuges, developing the survey instrument, contacting visitors, and guidance for interpreting the results. * Refuge Description: A brief description of the refuge location, acreage, purpose, recreational activities, and visitation statistics, including a map (where available) and refuge website link

  1. Stakeholder Evaluation for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge: Completion Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Burkardt, Nina; Swann, Margaret Earlene; Stewart, Susan C.

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System, managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), is the largest system of public lands in the world dedicated to wildlife conservation. There are over 545 national wildlife refuges nationwide, encompassing 95 million acres. As part of the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, each refuge is developing 15-year comprehensive conservation plans (CCPs). Each CCP describes a vision and desired future condition for the refuge and outlines goals, objectives, and management strategies for each refuge's habitat and visitor service programs. The CCP process for Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in Davis, West Virginia was initiated in 2006. This planning process provides a unique opportunity for public input and involvement. Public involvement is an important part of the CCP process. Participation by parties with a stake in the resource (stakeholders) has the potential to increase understanding and support and reduce conflicts. Additionally, meaningful public participation in a decision process may increase trust and provide satisfaction in terms of both process and outcome for management and the public. Public meetings are a common way to obtain input from community members, visitors, and potential visitors. An 'Issues Workbook' is another tool the FWS uses to obtain public input and participation early in the planning process. Sometimes, however, these traditional methods do not capture the full range of perspectives that exist. A stakeholder evaluation is a way to more fully understand community preferences and opinions related to key topics in refuge planning. It can also help refuge staff understand how changes in management affect individuals in terms of their preference for services and experiences. Secondarily, a process such as this can address 'social goals' such as fostering trust in regulating agencies and reducing conflict among stakeholders. As part of the CCP planning effort at Canaan

  2. 75 FR 44806 - Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Santa Cruz County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Santa Cruz County, CA AGENCY: Fish... Assessment (EA) for the Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge for public review and comment. The CCP/EA, prepared under the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and in accordance with...

  3. 76 FR 14042 - San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service ; 60138-1265-6CCP-S3] San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex... Statement (EIS) for the San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex) in Alamosa, Colorado. The Complex comprises Baca, Monte Vista, and Alamosa National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs).We provide this...

  4. 75 FR 19988 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... on March 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY: Fish... assessment (Draft CCP/EA) for Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) for public review and...

  5. 76 FR 78309 - Hawaiian and Pacific Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Wilderness Review and Legislative...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Hawaiian and Pacific Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex; Wilderness... Islands National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Refuge Complex), to identify Wilderness Study Areas (WSAs), and...: Information about the Refuge Complex is available on our Web ] site http://www.pacificislands.fws.gov ....

  6. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge land cover mapping project users guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1986-01-01

    Section 1002 of the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (ANILCA, 1980) requires the Secretary of Interior to conduct a continuing study of fish, wildlife, and habitats on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). Included in this study is a determination of the extent, location, and carrying capacity of fish and wildlife habitats.

  7. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: An Interdisciplinary Unit.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thieman, Gayle; Geil, Mike

    This paper presents a set of interdisciplinary lessons for teaching about the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (Alaska). Lessons include a petroleum product treasure hunt, an examination of life without petroleum, the development of a wildlife poster, an exploration of the tundra ecosystem and the plants and animals that live there, identification…

  8. 75 FR 11195 - Central Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Arkansas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-10

    ... a notice in the Federal Register on January 3, 2007 (72 FR 142). For more about the process, please... for 30 days, as announced in the Federal Register on August 27, 2009 (74 FR 43716). A total of 24... Fish and Wildlife Service Central Arkansas National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Arkansas AGENCY: Fish...

  9. National Wildlife Refuge System: Ecological context and integrity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, J.M.; Loveland, T.; Gergely, K.; Strittholt, J.; Staus, N.

    2004-01-01

    The Refuge Improvement Act of 1997 established a statutory mission and management standards for the National Wildlife Refuge system. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service subsequently issued a policy for ensuring the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system. This policy requires understanding the management objectives of each refuge in a local, regional, and national context. An assessment of the refuge system in a national and regional context reveals that refuges are typically smaller than many conservation holdings and are unevenly distributed across the conterminous U.S. Western rangelands, coastal wetlands, and northern grasslands; wetlands are the best-represented ecosystems, while temperate forests have the poorest representation. In contrast to other agency holdings or management designations in the national protected areas network (e.g., national parks, national forests, wilderness areas), refuges tend to occupy sites at lower elevations and that have higher productivity and soil quality. This difference points to the important contribution of the refuges in providing much needed ecological balance within the national protected areas network. However, the ecological integrity of the refuge system is challenged by the proximity of individual refuges to development. Overall, the refuges are becoming islands in a landscape matrix of urban and agricultural development. This creates future challenges for meeting management objectives to ensure the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system. If the policy to ensure biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the refuge system is to be successful, it may be more important to address issues about what happens on adjacent lands than uses within refuges.

  10. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the Pixley National WildlifeRefuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-10-01

    A hydrogeological assessment of Pixley National Wildlife Refuge was conducted using published reports from the USGS and private engineering consultants that pertained to land in close proximity to the Refuge and from monitoring conducted by refuge staff in collaboration with Reclamation. The compiled data clearly show that there are a large number of agricultural wells throughout the Basin and that water levels are responsive to rates of pumping - in some cases declining more than 100 ft in a matter of a few years. Aquifer properties support a groundwater conjunctive use solution to the provision of additional water supply to the Refuge. The report provides justification for this approach.

  11. 78 FR 44144 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea... Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) Complex, which includes the Sonny Bono Salton Sea NWR and the Coachella Valley NWR. The Draft CCP/EA, prepared under...

  12. 43 CFR 2650.4-6 - National wildlife refuge system lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false National wildlife refuge system lands... SELECTIONS Alaska Native Selections: Generally § 2650.4-6 National wildlife refuge system lands. (a) Every conveyance which includes lands within the national wildlife refuge system shall, as to such lands,...

  13. 43 CFR 2650.4-6 - National wildlife refuge system lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false National wildlife refuge system lands... SELECTIONS Alaska Native Selections: Generally § 2650.4-6 National wildlife refuge system lands. (a) Every conveyance which includes lands within the national wildlife refuge system shall, as to such lands,...

  14. 43 CFR 2650.4-6 - National wildlife refuge system lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false National wildlife refuge system lands... SELECTIONS Alaska Native Selections: Generally § 2650.4-6 National wildlife refuge system lands. (a) Every conveyance which includes lands within the national wildlife refuge system shall, as to such lands,...

  15. 43 CFR 2650.4-6 - National wildlife refuge system lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false National wildlife refuge system lands... SELECTIONS Alaska Native Selections: Generally § 2650.4-6 National wildlife refuge system lands. (a) Every conveyance which includes lands within the national wildlife refuge system shall, as to such lands,...

  16. Type C botulism losses at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge, 1978

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Windingstad, R.M.; Duncan, R.M.; Drieslein, R.L.

    1980-01-01

    Avian botulism was responsible for the death of over 6,000 waterfowl at Horicon National Wildlife Refuge in Wisconsin in 1978. The outbreak occurred in early fall on a flooded 250 hectare fallow agricultural area on the northeast end of the refuge. The species most severely affected was the green-winged teal (Anas carolinensis), which made up almost 45% of the total birds found. Carcass pick-up, mouse toxicity tests, and antitoxin injections of waterfowl are discussed.

  17. 75 FR 54381 - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... 59538. Montana State University- 1500 University Drive, (406) 657-2011 Billings. Billings, MT 59101... Refuge, MT AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability: Draft.... Russell NWR CCP/EIS, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457. In-Person Viewing or Pickup: Call (406)...

  18. Invasive Plant Management in the United States National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lusk, Michael; Ericson, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    Invasive species pose a significant challenge to the National Wildlife Refuge System and have been identified as the single most important threat to habitat management on refuges. At present, it is estimated that over 2 million acres of refuge lands are invaded by invasive plants. The current and potential costs of controlling invasive plants, as well as monitoring and restoring refuge lands, are significant both financially and ecologically. Budgetary expenditures for invasive species projects in FY 2009 totaled $18.4 million. A number of strategies are used to confront this threat and have resulted in success on a variety of levels. The Refuge System utilizes key partnerships, invasive species strike teams, and a dedicated cadre of volunteers to implement projects that incorporate mechanical, chemical and biological control methods.

  19. Monitoring and research at Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Roelle, James E.; Hamilton, David B.

    1993-01-01

    Walnut Creek National Wildlife Refuge-Prairie Learning Center (Walnut Creek or the Refuge) is one of the newest additions to the National Wildlife Refuge System, which consists of over 480 units throughout the United States operated by the U.S. Department of the Interior, Fish and Wildlife Service (the Service). Located about 20 miles east of Des Moines, Iowa, the Refuge has an approved acquisition boundary containing 8,654 acres (Figure 1). Acquisition is from willing sellers only, and to date the Service has purchased approximately 5,000 acres. The acquisition boundary encompasses about 43% of the watershed of Walnut Creek, which bisects the Refuge and drains into the Des Moines River to the southeast. Approximately 25%-30% of the Walnut Creek watershed is downstream of the Refuge. As authorized by Congress in 1990, the purposes of the Refuge are to (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1992): • restore native tallgrass pairie, wetland, and woodland habitats for breeding and migratory waterfowl and resident wildlife; • serve as a major environmental education center providing opportunities for study; • provide outdoor recreation benefits to the public; and • provide assistance to local landowners to improve their lands for wildlife habitat. To implement these purposes authorized by Congress, the Refuge has established the goal of recreating as nearly as possible the natural communities that existed at the time of settlement by Euro-Americans (circa 1840). Current land use is largely agricultural, including 69% cropland, 17% grazed pasture, and 7.5% grassland (dominantly brome) enrolled in the Conservation Reserve Program). About 1,395 acres of relict native communities also exist on the Refuge, including prairie (725 acres), oak savanna and woodland (450 acres), and riparian or wetland areas (220 acres). Some of these relicts are highly restorable; others contain only a few prairie plants in a matrix of brome and will be more difficult to restore. When the

  20. 75 FR 11905 - Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Fairbanks, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-12

    ... America. Doyon, Limited (Doyon) is an Alaska Native Regional Corporation established under ANCSA. Under the authority of ANCSA, Congress granted to Doyon land entitlements within an area that later became the Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge in 1980. Doyon has ownership interests in nearly 2...

  1. Two roseate spoonbills in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two roseate spoonbills wade in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  2. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska I Appendix I to Part 37 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Pt....

  3. 50 CFR 29.21-7 - What payment do we require for use and occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? 29.21-7 Section 29.21-7 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? (a) Payment for use and occupancy of lands under...

  4. 50 CFR 29.21-7 - What payment do we require for use and occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? 29.21-7 Section 29.21-7 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? (a) Payment for use and occupancy of lands under...

  5. 50 CFR 29.21-7 - What payment do we require for use and occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? 29.21-7 Section 29.21-7 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? (a) Payment for use and occupancy of lands under...

  6. 50 CFR 29.21-7 - What payment do we require for use and occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? 29.21-7 Section 29.21-7 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? (a) Payment for use and occupancy of lands under...

  7. 50 CFR 32.5 - What are the requirements for sportfishing on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.5 Section 32.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... of the National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person...

  8. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska I Appendix I to Part 37 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM GEOLOGICAL AND GEOPHYSICAL EXPLORATION OF THE COASTAL PLAIN, ARCTIC NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA Pt....

  9. 50 CFR 32.5 - What are the requirements for sportfishing on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.5 Section 32.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... of the National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person...

  10. 50 CFR 29.21-7 - What payment do we require for use and occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? 29.21-7 Section 29.21-7 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... occupancy of national wildlife refuge lands? (a) Payment for use and occupancy of lands under...

  11. 50 CFR 32.5 - What are the requirements for sportfishing on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.5 Section 32.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... of the National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person...

  12. 50 CFR 32.5 - What are the requirements for sportfishing on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.5 Section 32.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... of the National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person...

  13. 50 CFR 32.2 - What are the requirements for hunting on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.2 Section 32.2 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM... National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person while engaged...

  14. 50 CFR 32.5 - What are the requirements for sportfishing on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... on areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System? 32.5 Section 32.5 Wildlife and Fisheries UNITED STATES FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE... of the National Wildlife Refuge System? The following provisions shall apply to each person...

  15. A loggerhead shrike in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A loggerhead shrike perches on a branch in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The loggerhead shrike prefers grasslands, orchards and open areas with scattered trees throughout a range extending from southern Canada to southern Florida and the Gulf Coast. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  16. Willets gather in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Willets gather around a plant in the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Willets are best identified in flight by their black-and-white wing pattern; on the ground by their thick black bills and gray legs. They breed in southern Canada, the United States and the West Indies, wintering from the southern U.S. to central South America. The 92,000-acre refuge is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  17. Roseate Spoonbill feeds in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill searches the water for food. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  18. A roseate spoonbill in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A roseate spoonbill balancing on one leg is reflected in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000- acre refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  19. Roseate Spoonbills preen in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, two roseate spoonbills mirror each other as they preen their lipstick-colored feathers. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  20. 78 FR 70318 - Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; Notice of Intent To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ..., Louisiana, in a October 22, 2013, Federal Register notice (78 FR 62648). That notice complied with our CCP... Fish and Wildlife Service Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana; Notice... Act (NEPA) documents for Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). We provided this notice...

  1. 78 FR 62648 - Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge; West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana AGENCY...) documents for Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge (NWR). We provide this notice in compliance with our CCP... notice, we initiate our process for developing a CCP for Cat Island NWR, West Feliciana Parish,...

  2. 50 CFR 29.1 - May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM LAND USE MANAGEMENT General Rules § 29.1 May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges? We may only authorize public or private... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false May we allow economic uses on...

  3. 50 CFR 29.1 - May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM LAND USE MANAGEMENT General Rules § 29.1 May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges? We may only authorize public or private... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false May we allow economic uses on...

  4. 50 CFR 29.1 - May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM LAND USE MANAGEMENT General Rules § 29.1 May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges? We may only authorize public or private... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false May we allow economic uses on...

  5. 50 CFR 29.1 - May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM LAND USE MANAGEMENT General Rules § 29.1 May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges? We may only authorize public or private... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false May we allow economic uses on...

  6. 50 CFR 29.1 - May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ..., DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM LAND USE MANAGEMENT General Rules § 29.1 May we allow economic uses on national wildlife refuges? We may only authorize public or private... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false May we allow economic uses on...

  7. 77 FR 65574 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-29

    ... Complex. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR 27328; May, 15, 2007... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Draft... assessment (EA) for the Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes...

  8. 77 FR 19309 - Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Great Falls, MT; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-30

    ... the Federal Register August 18, 2008 (73, FR 48237). During scoping and throughout the process, we... Fish and Wildlife Service Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Great Falls, MT; Comprehensive... Lake National Wildlife Refuge Complex for public review and comment. The Draft CCP/EA describes...

  9. 76 FR 71598 - Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-18

    ... for the Refuge. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (73 FR 72826... notice of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 56130; September 15, 2010). Pearl Harbor Refuge is... Fish and Wildlife Service Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI;...

  10. Wetland modeling and information needs at Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, David B.; Auble, Gregor T.

    1993-01-01

    The marshes in and around Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (the Refuge) are extremely dynamic; expanding and contracting in size both seasonally, due to runoff and subsequent evapotranspiration, and over longer periods, due to climatic variation. The dynamic nature of these marshes results in a diversity of wetland habitats, which support a variety of migratory birds. To maintain this wetland diversity and control the loss of migratory bird habitat in the Lahontan Valley, the Refuge was established and currently manages a complex of marsh units. However, changes in the hydrology, and changes that will occur as a result of the Fallon Paiute-Shoshone and Truckee-Carson-Pyramid Lake Water Rights Settlement Act (Public Law 101-618, 104 Stat. 3389), greatly affect the Refuge's wetland management capability. In light of these changes, and the legal requirements associated with environmental impact assessments, the Refuge convened a workshop to discuss several aspects of wetland management in the Lahontan Valley. The workshop, described in this report, had three primary objectives: 1. discuss the types and relative proportions of primary wetland habitats that should be provided as described in the settlement act; 2. discuss wetland management models that might be developed to help manage these marshes under hydrologic regimes likely in the future; and 3. discuss future information and monitoring needs, including proposals for valley-wide biodiversity surveys, which would be helpful when considering withdrawn Bureau of Reclamation (BR) lands for possible incorporation into the Refuge. Several presentations at the beginning of the workshop provided a common basis for discussing these objectives. Refuge staff provided background on the history and past management. The Nature Conservatory discussed their role in the settlement act, proposals for valley-wide biodiversity surveys, and results of a literature review for Stillwater Marsh and the Lahontan Valley (Nachlinger

  11. 78 FR 48183 - Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Commerce City, CO; Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-07

    ...; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement; Two Ponds National Wildlife Refuge, Arvada, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service... (Service), intend to prepare a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and an Environmental Impact...

  12. Global change and conservation triage on National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Fred A.; Eaton, Mitchell; McMahon, Gerard; Raye Nilius,; Mike Bryant,; Dave Case,; Martin, Julien; Wood, Nathan J.; Laura Taylor,

    2015-01-01

    National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the United States play an important role in the adaptation of social-ecological systems to climate change, land-use change, and other global-change processes. Coastal refuges are already experiencing threats from sea-level rise and other change processes that are largely beyond their ability to influence, while at the same time facing tighter budgets and reduced staff. We engaged in workshops with NWR managers along the U.S. Atlantic coast to understand the problems they face from global-change processes and began a multidisciplinary collaboration to use decision science to help address them. We are applying a values-focused approach to base management decisions on the resource objectives of land managers, as well as those of stakeholders who may benefit from the goods and services produced by a refuge. Two insights that emerged from our workshops were a conspicuous mismatch between the scale at which management can influence outcomes and the scale of environmental processes, and the need to consider objectives related to ecosystem goods and services that traditionally have not been explicitly considered by refuges (e.g., protection from storm surge). The broadening of objectives complicates the decision-making process, but also provides opportunities for collaboration with stakeholders who may have agendas different from those of the refuge, as well as an opportunity for addressing problems across scales. From a practical perspective, we recognized the need to (1) efficiently allocate limited staff time and budgets for short-term management of existing programs and resources under the current refuge design and (2) develop long-term priorities for acquiring or protecting new land/habitat to supplement or replace the existing refuge footprint and thus sustain refuge values as the system evolves over time. Structuring the decision-making problem in this manner facilitated a better understanding of the issues of scale and suggested

  13. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: oil field or wilderness

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, A.

    1987-11-01

    The second session of the 100th Congress will see continued debate over the prospect of oil and gas drilling on a 19-million-acre expanse of mountains and tundra known as the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The arctic refuge, most of which lies above the Arctic Circle, is larger than any refuges in the lower 48 states. Because of its size, the area supports a broad range of linked ecosystems. Of particular concern is the 1.5-million-acre coastal plain, which may be targeted for development. The coastal plain provides a home, at least part of the year, to Alaska's porcupine caribou. The coastal plain also supports many other forms of wildlife-including the wolf, arctic fox, brown bear, polar bear, and arctic peregrine falcon, which is listed as a threatened species. The potential effects of drilling projects extend beyond loss of wildlife; they include desecration of the land itself. Although few members of Congress deny the value of protecting the amazing variety of life on the coastal plain, some insist that limited drilling could be conducted without destroying crucial habitat. Last July, the department tentatively divided some of the targeted lands among native corporations in preparation for leasing to oil companies. In response to what was felt to be an attempt to overstep congressional authority, the House passed HR 2629, banning this kind of land deal without congressional approval. In essence, the measure reiterated congressional authority provided by the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA) of 1980. This act mandated the study of environmental threats and oil potential by the Department of Interior, while putting the ANWR coastal plain off-limits to development without an explicit congressional directive.

  14. 77 FR 1503 - Massasoit National Wildlife Refuge, Plymouth, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... throughout the CCP process in the Federal Register, local news media, and on our refuge planning Web site at... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and... Register, local news media, and on our refuge planning Web site at...

  15. 77 FR 5044 - Mashpee National Wildlife Refuge, Barnstable County, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-01

    ... input throughout the CCP process in the Federal Register, local news media, and on our refuge planning... public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and... Federal Register, local news media, and on our refuge planning Web site at...

  16. 77 FR 61426 - Rose Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, American Samoa; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... comment. In the Draft CCP/EA, we present two alternatives for managing this refuge for the next 15 years... national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year... policies. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the...

  17. 76 FR 29259 - Swan Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Chariton County, MO; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-20

    ... National Wildlife Refuge. The purpose in developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year... education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with...). Goals and objectives in the CCP describe how the agency intends to manage the refuge over the next...

  18. 75 FR 57056 - Chincoteague National Wildlife Refuge and Wallops Island National Wildlife Refuge, Accomack...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental...-dependent recreational opportunities such as fishing, hunting, and wildlife photography. Wallops Island...

  19. 77 FR 18852 - Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Stevensville, MT; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ..., which will be announced in the statewide news media and on the refuge Web site. ADDRESSES: You may... Register (74 FR 50235), on September 30, 2009. Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge was established... available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and...

  20. 75 FR 27576 - J.N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Lee County, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... 27, 2007 (72 FR 35254), and extended the comment period in a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR 17991). For more about the refuge, its purposes, and our CCP process, please see... Fish and Wildlife Service J.N. ``Ding'' Darling National Wildlife Refuge, Lee County, FL AGENCY:...

  1. Regional economic impacts of current and proposed management alternatives for Don Edwards National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Leslie; Huber, Chris; Koontz, Lynne

    2012-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a Refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, located at the south end of California's San Francisco Bay and one of seven refuges in the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge Complex, is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed Refuge management strategies. For Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic analysis provides a means of estimating how current management (No Action Alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of information: (1) it illustrates the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge's contribution to the local community, and (2) it can help in determining whether economic effects are or are not a real concern in choosing among management alternatives. This report first presents a description of the local community and economy near the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Next, the methods used to conduct a regional economic impact analysis are described. An analysis of the final Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies that could affect stakeholders, residents, and the local economy is then presented. The management activities of economic concern in this analysis are: * Spending in the local community by Refuge visitors; * Refuge personnel salary spending; and * Refuge purchases of goods and services within the local

  2. American avocets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A flock of American avocets take time to feed in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. Much like spoonbills, they sweep their bills from side to side along the surface of the water to pick up crustaceans, aquatic insects and floating seeds. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  3. Willets and avocets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    In the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, willets (left) and American avocets (right) attack the water below in a feeding frenzy. Willets inhabit coastal beaches, freshwater and salt marches, lakeshores and wet prairies, ranging from southern Canada and United States to the West Indies. Avocets are not commonly seen in the East, but range from Washington and Manitoba south to Texas and California. However, avocets may stray eastward to the Atlantic coast during their southward migration in the fall. Their common habitat is freshwater marshes and shallow marshy lakes. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  4. Situation report: Heavy DDT contamination at Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fleming, W.J.; Atkeson, T.Z.

    1980-01-01

    A DDT manufacturing plant that operated on the Redstone Arsenal near Huntsville, Alabama discharged DDT-Iaden effluent from 1947 to 1970 into a creek on Wheeler National Wildlife Refuge. Seven to 9 years after the plant closed, high DDT, DDE, and DDD levels were reported in soils, river sediments, and fish in the area. Eleven of 27 mallards (Anas platyrhynchos) collected on the Refuge during February 1979 had carcass DDE residues that exceeded levels associated with eggshell thinning. DDE residues in a smaller number of mallards exceeded levels associated with egg breakage, poor hatchability, and abnormal hehavior and poor survival of offspring. Several avian species have disappeared from the Refuge since 1950, probably due to both industrial discharges of DDT from the plant and insecticidal use of DDT in the area. The contamination still presents a threat to herons, waterfowl, and raptors including occasional wintering or migrant eagles (Haliaeetus leucocephalus), and probably many other avian species. A maternity colony of endangered gray bats (Myotis grisescens) is also threatened by this contamination.

  5. Effects of cattle grazing and haying on wildlife conservation at National Wildlife Refuges in the United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strassmann, Beverly I.

    1987-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System is perhaps the most important system of federal lands for protecting wildlife in the United States. Only at refuges has wildlife conservation been legislated to have higher priority than either recreational or commercial activities. Presently, private ranchers and farmers graze cattle on 981,954 ha and harvest hay on 12,021 ha at 123 National Wildlife Refuges. US Fish and Wildlife Service policy is to permit these uses primarily when needed to benefit refuge wildlife. To evaluate the success of this policy, I surveyed grassland management practices at the 123 refuges. The survey results indicate that in fiscal year 1980 there were 374,849 animal unit months (AUMs) of cattle grazing, or 41% more than was reported by the Fish and Wildlife Service. According to managers' opinions, 86 species of wildlife are positively affected and 82 are negatively affected by refuge cattle grazing or haying. However, quantitative field studies of the effect of cattle grazing and haying on wildlife coupled with the survey data on how refuge programs are implemented suggest that these activities are impeding the goal of wildlife conservation. Particular management problems uncovered by the survey include overgrazing of riparian habitats, wildlife mortality due to collisions with cattle fences, and mowing of migratory bird habitat during the breeding season. Managers reported that they spend 919,740 administering cattle grazing and haying; thus refuge grazing and haying programs are also expensive. At any single refuge these uses occupy up to 50% of refuge funds and 55% of staff time. In light of these results, prescribed burning may be a better wildlife management option than is either cattle grazing or haying.

  6. Climate change adaptation for the US National Wildlife Refuge System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Griffith, Brad; Scott, J. Michael; Adamcik, Robert S.; Ashe, Daniel; Czech, Brian; Fischman, Robert; Gonzalez, Patrick; Lawler, Joshua J.; McGuire, A. David; Pidgorna, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Since its establishment in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) has grown to 635 units and 37 Wetland Management Districts in the United States and its territories. These units provide the seasonal habitats necessary for migratory waterfowl and other species to complete their annual life cycles. Habitat conversion and fragmentation, invasive species, pollution, and competition for water have stressed refuges for decades, but the interaction of climate change with these stressors presents the most recent, pervasive, and complex conservation challenge to the NWRS. Geographic isolation and small unit size compound the challenges of climate change, but a combined emphasis on species that refuges were established to conserve and on maintaining biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health provides the NWRS with substantial latitude to respond. Individual symptoms of climate change can be addressed at the refuge level, but the strategic response requires system-wide planning. A dynamic vision of the NWRS in a changing climate, an explicit national strategic plan to implement that vision, and an assessment of representation, redundancy, size, and total number of units in relation to conservation targets are the first steps toward adaptation. This adaptation must begin immediately and be built on more closely integrated research and management. Rigorous projections of possible futures are required to facilitate adaptation to change. Furthermore, the effective conservation footprint of the NWRS must be increased through land acquisition, creative partnerships, and educational programs in order for the NWRS to meet its legal mandate to maintain the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system and the species and ecosystems that it supports.

  7. Climate change adaptation for the US National Wildlife Refuge System.

    PubMed

    Griffith, Brad; Scott, J Michael; Adamcik, Robert; Ashe, Daniel; Czech, Brian; Fischman, Robert; Gonzalez, Patrick; Lawler, Joshua; McGuire, A David; Pidgorna, Anna

    2009-12-01

    Since its establishment in 1903, the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) has grown to 635 units and 37 Wetland Management Districts in the United States and its territories. These units provide the seasonal habitats necessary for migratory waterfowl and other species to complete their annual life cycles. Habitat conversion and fragmentation, invasive species, pollution, and competition for water have stressed refuges for decades, but the interaction of climate change with these stressors presents the most recent, pervasive, and complex conservation challenge to the NWRS. Geographic isolation and small unit size compound the challenges of climate change, but a combined emphasis on species that refuges were established to conserve and on maintaining biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health provides the NWRS with substantial latitude to respond. Individual symptoms of climate change can be addressed at the refuge level, but the strategic response requires system-wide planning. A dynamic vision of the NWRS in a changing climate, an explicit national strategic plan to implement that vision, and an assessment of representation, redundancy, size, and total number of units in relation to conservation targets are the first steps toward adaptation. This adaptation must begin immediately and be built on more closely integrated research and management. Rigorous projections of possible futures are required to facilitate adaptation to change. Furthermore, the effective conservation footprint of the NWRS must be increased through land acquisition, creative partnerships, and educational programs in order for the NWRS to meet its legal mandate to maintain the biological integrity, diversity, and environmental health of the system and the species and ecosystems that it supports.

  8. Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge: Lake Lowell water based recreation data summary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schuster, Rudy M.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Established in 1909, Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge is one of the oldest refuges in the National Wildlife Refuge System. The Refuge has two units, Lake Lowell and the Snake River Islands. The Lake Lowell Unit is 10,636 acres and includes the almost 9,000-acre Lake Lowell and surrounding lands. The Refuge offers the six priority wildlife-dependent activities (fishing, hunting, wildlife observation, wildlife interpretation, wildlife photography and environmental education) as defined in The National Wildlife Refuge System Administration Act as amended by the Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 as well as other non-wildlife-dependent activities. The purpose of this study is to describe use characteristics of recreational boaters on Lake Lowell. This study does not address use in other parts of the Refuge or other recreational activities. The sampling and data collection consisted of observations of boat activity made from fixed vantage points on the west and east pools of Lake Lowell to develop vessels-at-one-time (VAOT) estimates for three areas: the West Pool, the Headquarters section of the East Pool, and the East section of the East Pool. A complete description of the sampling locations and a map are provided below Traffic counters were also used to collect data on the number of vehicles entering the parking lots. Data were collected between April 15 and September 30, 2011.

  9. Refuge management analyses: levee alternatives at Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, Gregor T.; Hamilton, David B.; Roelle, James E.

    1984-01-01

    Do not maintain a levee so that the Refuge will flood directly with river stage. Repair of the major breaks in the levee, but not the more general wave damage, was considered as a short term alternative. Participants first specified the habitats and management controls desired at Clarence Cannon National Wildlife Refuge. These were centered around attaining the maximum feasible development and management of moist soil units. Levee alternatives were evaluated in terms of their ability to provide the desired habitats and management controls. Preliminary cost estimates were prepared for each alternative, and the qualitative consequences of each alternative identified for the full set of outputs from the Refuge Master Plan. The alternative of improving the existing levee by raising the height was unanimously preferred on purely “biological” grounds (with cost not considered). Repairing the levee with no change in elevation was unanimously selected as the most cost effective alternative.

  10. 77 FR 47435 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION... conservation plan and draft environmental impact statement (draft CCP/EIS) for Prime Hook National...

  11. 50 CFR 26.41 - What is the process for determining if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? 26.41 Section 26.41 Wildlife and Fisheries... if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? The Refuge Manager will not initiate or permit a new use of a national wildlife refuge or expand, renew, or extend an existing use of a...

  12. 50 CFR 26.41 - What is the process for determining if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? 26.41 Section 26.41 Wildlife and Fisheries... if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? The Refuge Manager will not initiate or permit a new use of a national wildlife refuge or expand, renew, or extend an existing use of a...

  13. 50 CFR 26.41 - What is the process for determining if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? 26.41 Section 26.41 Wildlife and Fisheries... if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? The Refuge Manager will not initiate or permit a new use of a national wildlife refuge or expand, renew, or extend an existing use of a...

  14. 50 CFR 26.41 - What is the process for determining if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? 26.41 Section 26.41 Wildlife and Fisheries... if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? The Refuge Manager will not initiate or permit a new use of a national wildlife refuge or expand, renew, or extend an existing use of a...

  15. 50 CFR 26.41 - What is the process for determining if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? 26.41 Section 26.41 Wildlife and Fisheries... if a use of a national wildlife refuge is a compatible use? The Refuge Manager will not initiate or permit a new use of a national wildlife refuge or expand, renew, or extend an existing use of a...

  16. 77 FR 67829 - Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge and UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge, MT...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-14

    .... Montana State University- 1500 University Drive, 406-657-2011 Billings. Billings, MT 59101. Montana State... Refuge, MT; Availability of Record of Decision for the Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Final... of the message. U.S. mail: Charles M. Russell NWR, P.O. Box 110, Lewistown, MT 59457....

  17. Experimental woodcock management at the Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sepik, G.F.; Owen, R.B.; Coulter, M.W.; Keppie, Daniel M.; Owen, Ray B.

    1977-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop woodcock(Philohela minor) management techniques that can be easily used by the small landowner or incorporated with other land management operations such as commercial timber harvesting. The Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge contains areas which are characteristic of the abandoned farms now being purchased for recreation or retirement as well as areas suitable for commercial forest management. Woodcock management, beginning in 1973, has centered on rejuvenation of diurnal habitat and creation of summer fields and singing grounds. Strips (10 mwide, 25 to 125 mlong and separated by 40 m) were clear~cut in two alder (Alnus sp.) stands resulting in increased diurnal use in at least one cover, increased singing male use and good alder regeneration. Small clear-cuts (30 X30 m) in a large contiguous woodland (1200 ha) with a history of few singing males resulted in an increased number of singing males despite an overall decrease in the number of singing males throughout the refuge. Management strategies and recommendations also are given.

  18. 76 FR 66321 - Proposed Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area; Draft Land Protection Plan and Environmental Assessment AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of availability; extension of comment period. SUMMARY: We, the Fish and...

  19. Herpetofaunal diversity of Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J.M.; Pike, D.A.

    2006-01-01

    In the past century, habitat alteration and fragmentation have increased dramatically, which increases the need for improving our understanding of how species and biological communities react to these modifications. A national strategy on biological diversity has focused attention on how these habitat modifications affect species, especially herpetofauna (i.e., changes in species richness, community evenness and similarity, and dominant/rare species). As part of this strategy, we surveyed Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, a coastal, mixed second-growth forested swamp (MFS) and pocosin wetland (PW), in North Carolina for amphibians and reptiles from September 2000 to August 2001. We randomly selected three sites (3 x 3 km) in two major habitat types (MFS, PW) and completed random surveys and trapping using transects, quadrats, nighttime aural road surveys, drift fences, canal transects, coverboards, incidental captures, and evening road surveys. We also collected herpetofauna opportunistically throughout the refuge to establish an updated species list. For analysis, we used Shannon-Weiner species diversity (H'), evenness (1'), species richness and species detectability (COMDYN4), and community percent similarity index to determine herpetofaunal community differences. We estimated 39 species in MFS and 32 species in PW (P < 0.10). Species detectability was similar between habitats (0.84 to 0.86). More reptilian species (+ 31 %) inhabited MFS than PW, but estimated amphibian species richness was identical (17 spp.). H' was higher (P < 0.000 I) for PW (2.6680) than for MFS (2.1535) because of lower J' in the latter (0.6214 vs. 0.8010). Dominance of three Rana species caused lower J' and H' in MFS. Similarity between the communities was 56.6%; we estimated 22-24 species in common for each habitat (95% CI = 18 to 31 spp.). We verified 49 of the 52 herpetofaunal species on the refuge that were known to exist in the area. Restoration of natural water flows may

  20. Analysis of Crude Oil Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    EIA Publications

    2008-01-01

    This report responds to a request from Senator Ted Stevens that the Energy Information Administration provide an assessment of federal oil and natural gas leasing in the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in Alaska.

  1. Fate of Airborne Contaminants in Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    1997-01-01

    Designation of Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge as a Class I Air Quality Area (given the highest level of protection possible from air pollutants under the Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977) affords mandatory protection of the Refuge's airshed through the permit-review process for planned developments. Rainfall is the major source of water to the swamp, and potential impacts from developments to the airshed are high. To meet management needs for baseline information, chemical contributions from atmospheric deposition and partitioning of anions and cations, with emphasis on mercury and lead, in the various matrices of the Swamp were determined between July 1993 and April 1995. Chemistry of rainfall was determined on an event basis from one site located at Refuge Headquarters. Field samples of surface water, pore water, floc and sediment were collected from four locations on the Refuge: Chesser Prairie, Chase Prairie, Durden Prairie, and the Narrows. A sediment core sample was collected from the Refuge interior at Bluff Lake for aging of mercury deposition. Rainfall was acidic (pH 4.8) with sulfate concentrations averaging 1.2 mg/L and nitrate averaging 0.8 mg/L. Lead in rainfall averaged 1 ?g/L and total and methylmercury concentrations were 11.7 ng/L and 0.025 ng/L, respectively. The drought of 1993 followed by heavy rains during the fall and winter caused a temporary alteration in the cycling and availability of trace-elements within the different matrices of the Swamp. Surface water was acidic (pH 3.8 to 4.1), dilute (specific conductance 35-60 ?S/cm), and highly organic (DOC 35-50 mg/L). Sediment and floc were also highly organic (>90%). Total mercury averaged 3.6 ng/L in surface water, 9.0 ng/L in pore water and about 170 ng/g in floc and sediments. Mercury bioaccumulated in the biota of the Refuge: fish fillets (Centrarchus macropterus, Esox niger, Lepomus gulosus and Amia calva) had >2 ?g/g dry weight, alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) >4 ?g/g dry

  2. 75 FR 17763 - Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Fairbanks, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... and in refuge area communities in Alaska. We will announce these meeting dates, times, and locations... (907) 456-0501. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 (94 Stat. 2371; ANILCA) requires us to develop a CCP for each refuge in Alaska. The purpose...

  3. 78 FR 45953 - Theodore Roosevelt National Wildlife Refuge, Sharkey County, MS; and Holt Collier National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-30

    ... observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update..., wildlife observation, and nature photography. The refuge habitat, formerly consisting of agricultural...

  4. 77 FR 28895 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-16

    ...We, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) announce the availability of a Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge for public review and comment. The CCP/EA, prepared under the National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997, and in accordance with the National Environmental Policy......

  5. Analysis and Mapping of Vegetation and Habitat for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Tagestad, Jerry D.

    2010-06-01

    The Lakeview, Oregon, office of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) contracted Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to classify vegetation communities on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge in northeastern Nevada. The objective of the mapping project was to provide USFWS refuge biologists and planners with detailed vegetation and habitat information that can be referenced to make better decisions regarding wildlife resources, fuels and fire risk, and land management. This letter report describes the datasets and methods used to develop vegetation cover type and shrub canopy cover maps for the Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge. The two map products described in this report are (1) a vegetation cover classification that provides updated information on the vegetation associations occurring on the refuge and (2) a map of shrub canopy cover based on high-resolution images and field data.

  6. User’s manual to update the National Wildlife Refuge System Water Quality Information System (WQIS)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chojnacki, Kimberly A.; Vishy, Chad J.; Hinck, Jo Ellen; Finger, Susan E.; Higgins, Michael J.; Kilbride, Kevin

    2013-01-01

    National Wildlife Refuges may have impaired water quality resulting from historic and current land uses, upstream sources, and aerial pollutant deposition. National Wildlife Refuge staff have limited time available to identify and evaluate potential water quality issues. As a result, water quality–related issues may not be resolved until a problem has already arisen. The National Wildlife Refuge System Water Quality Information System (WQIS) is a relational database developed for use by U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff to identify existing water quality issues on refuges in the United States. The WQIS database relies on a geospatial overlay analysis of data layers for ownership, streams and water quality. The WQIS provides summary statistics of 303(d) impaired waters and total maximum daily loads for the National Wildlife Refuge System at the national, regional, and refuge level. The WQIS allows U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff to be proactive in addressing water quality issues by identifying and understanding the current extent and nature of 303(d) impaired waters and subsequent total maximum daily loads. Water quality data are updated bi-annually, making it necessary to refresh the WQIS to maintain up-to-date information. This manual outlines the steps necessary to update the data and reports in the WQIS.

  7. 78 FR 4430 - Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... impact for the environmental assessment for Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in Citrus and... 8, 2009 (74 FR 27173). For more about the refuge and our planning process, please see that notice... May 11, 2012 (77 FR 27792). We provided over 125 copies of the Draft CCP/EA to individuals...

  8. 78 FR 3910 - Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Becker County, MN; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You will find the final CCP, a summary of the final CCP, and the EA... national wildlife refuge. The purpose in developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year... environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years...

  9. 76 FR 20706 - South Farallon Islands Nonnative Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National Wildlife Refuge...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-13

    ... Impact to guide the management of Farallon National Wildlife Refuge over a 15- year period (75 FR 5102... Fish and Wildlife Service South Farallon Islands Nonnative Mouse Eradication Project; Farallon National... project to eradicate nonnative mice from the South Farallon Islands, part of the Farallon...

  10. Influence of atmospheric deposition on Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.; Jackson, B.P.

    1995-12-31

    Designation of Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge (Georgia) as a Class 1 Air Quality Area affords mandatory protection of the airshed through permit-review processes for planned developments. Rainfall is the major source of water to the swamp, and potential impacts from developments in the airshed are high. To meet management needs for baseline information, chemical contributions from atmospheric deposition and partitioning of anions and cations in various matrices of the swamp, with emphasis on mercury and lead, were determined during this study. Chemistry of rainfall was measured on an event basis from one site and quarterly on surface water, pore water, floc, and sediment from four locations. A sediment core collected from the Refuge concentrations of 9 ng/L and 0.1 ng/L, respectively. Surface waters were acidic (pH 4.7--4.9), with average total and methyl mercury highly organic (dissolved organic carbon 35--50 mg/L). Total mercury was 1--3.5 ng/L in surface and pore water, and methyl mercury was 0.02--0.20 ng/L. Total mercury in sediments and floc was 100--200 ng/g dry weight, and methyl mercury was 4--16ng/g. Lead was 0--1.7 {micro}g/L in rainfall, not detectable in surface water, 3.4--5.4 {micro}g/L in pore water, and 3.9--4.9 mg/kg in floc and sediment. Historical patterns of mercury deposition showed an increase in total mercury from pre-1800 concentrations of 250 ng/g to 500 ng/g in 1950, with concentrations declining thereafter to present.

  11. Survey of invasive ants at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peck, Robert W.; Banko, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    We conducted a survey for invasive ants at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai‘i Island, during 2009–2010 to evaluate potential threats to native arthropod communities and food webs. The focal area of the survey was the upper portion of the Hakalau Unit of the refuge, where native forest was being restored in abandoned cattle pastures. This area, between 1575 and 1940 m elevations, contained much alien kikuyu grass (Pennisetum clandestinum), but koa (Acacia koa) trees and other native species that were planted in the past 20 years were rapidly filling in the pasture. We surveyed for ants at predetermined points along roads, fences, and corridors of planted koa. Sampling methods primarily consisted of hand searching and pitfall traps, but bait cards were used additionally in some instances. Our results indicated that a single species, Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi, was widespread across the upper portion of the refuge. Cardiocondyla kagutsuchi seemed absent, or at least rare, in areas of tall, dense grass. Due to the undulating topography of the area, however, the dense grass cover was interspersed with outcroppings of exposed, gravelly soil. Presumably due to warming by the sun, many of the outcropped habitats supported colonies of C. kagutsuchi. We did not detect ants in the old-growth forest below the abandoned pastures, presumably because microhabitat conditions under the forest canopy were unsuitable. Although ecological impacts of C. kagutsuchi have not been reported, they may be limited by the small size of the ant, the relatively small size of colonies, and the apparent preference of the ant for disturbed areas that are dominated by alien species. Notably, our survey of Keanakolu-Mana Road between the Observatory Road (John A. Burns Way) and the town of Waimea detected a population of Argentine ants (Linepithema humile) approximately 5.1 km north of the Maulua Section of the refuge. We also surveyed for ants on the Kona Forest Unit of the refuge

  12. Sediment quality in freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Winger, P.V.; Lasier, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    Freshwater impoundments at Savannah National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), South Carolina, provide an important habitat for wildlife species, but degraded sediment quality in the Savannah River downstream of the discharge from two impoundments have caused concern about potential contaminant problems within the impoundments. The quality of sediments from five impoundments (impoundments no. 1, 2, 6, 7, and 17) on the NWR was evaluated using physical and chemical characterization, contaminant concentrations (metals, organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons), and toxicity testing. Survival of Hyalella azteca (freshwater amphipod) exposed for 28 days to solid-phase sediments was not significantly different from controls, but growth was significantly decreased at several sites. Survival in 96-hour exposures to sediment pore water was significantly decreased at most sites. Factors contributing to the toxic responses were low pH (3.7 to 4.1), ammonia (20 mg/L), and increased concentrations of cations in the pore water. The excess of simultaneously extracted metals over the acid volatile sulfides in the sediments was also typical of sites displaying decreased sediment quality. Elemental concentrations in pore water were negatively correlated with pH, and the highest concentrations were observed in impoundment no. 7. The acidic nature of the sediment in this impoundment was exacerbated by recent draining, burning, and disking, which allowed oxidation of the previously anoxic wetland sediment. Sediment disturbance and mixing of vegetation into the sediments by disking may also have contributed to the formation of ammonia caused by microbial decomposition of the fragmented organic matter. Contaminants were not detected in sediments from the impoundments, but releases of acidic water with increased levels of sediment cations from the impoundments may have contributed to the degraded sediment conditions previously observed in the river

  13. Hydrology of C-3 Watershed, Seney National Wildlife Refuge, Michigan

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sweat, Michael J.

    2001-01-01

    Proposed changes to watershed management practices near C-3 Pool at Seney National Wildlife Refuge will affect surface-water flow patterns, ground-water levels, and possibly local plant communities. Data were collected between fall 1998 and spring 2000 to document existing conditions and to assess potential changes in hydrology that might occur as a consequence of modifications to water management practices in C-3 watershed. Minimum and maximum measured inflows and outflows for the study period are presented in light of proposed management changes to C-3 watershed. Streamflows ranged from 0 to 8.61 cubic meters per second. Low or zero flow was generally measured in late summer and early fall, and highest flows were measured during spring runoff and winter rain events. Ground-water levels varied by about a half meter, with levels closest to or above the land surface during spring runoff into the early summer, and with levels generally below land surface during late fall into early winter. A series of optional management practices that could conserve and restore habitat of the C-3 watershed is described. Modifications to the existing system of a drainage ditch and control structures are examined, as are the possibilities of reconnecting streams to their historical channels and the construction of additional or larger control structures to further manage the distribution of water in the watershed. The options considered could reduce erosion, restore presettlement streamflow conditions, and modify the ground-water gradient.

  14. 77 FR 16854 - John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge at Tinicum, Delaware and Philadelphia Counties, PA; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-22

    ... for John Heinz NWR. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 25285; May... observation, photography, and fishing. Background The CCP Process The National Wildlife Refuge System... for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  15. 75 FR 8107 - Bond Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Bibb and Twiggs Counties, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... started this process through a notice in the Federal Register on May 16, 2007 (72 FR 27586). For more... review period as announced in the Federal Register on June 22, 2009 (74 FR 29511). A total of 61 comments... Fish and Wildlife Service Bond Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Bibb and Twiggs Counties, GA...

  16. 76 FR 38414 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-30

    ... the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA... Fish and Wildlife Service James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Draft... Highway, Room 2C, Hale`iwa, HI 96712. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: David Ellis, Project Leader,...

  17. 75 FR 56130 - Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-15

    ... process by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (73 FR 72826). Pearl... Notice of Intent (NOI) in the Federal Register on December 1, 2008 (73 FR 72826), announcing our... Fish and Wildlife Service Pearl Harbor National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI;...

  18. 78 FR 24228 - Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-24

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on October 29, 2012 ] (77 FR 65574... Fish and Wildlife Service Lake Andes National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Lake Andes, SD; Final... Complex (Complex), which includes Lake Andes NWR, Karl E. Mundt NWR, and Lake Andes Wetland...

  19. 76 FR 62439 - Savannah National Wildlife Refuge Complex, GA and SC; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... through a Federal Register notice on May 19, 2008 (73 FR 28838). Please see that notice for more about the... on September 15, 2010 (75 FR 56133). We received comments from State and Federal government agencies... Fish and Wildlife Service Savannah National Wildlife Refuge Complex, GA and SC; Final...

  20. 75 FR 80524 - Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-22

    ... 12, 2007 (72 FR 11048). Watercress Darter NWR, near the city of Bessemer, Jefferson County, Alabama... Register on April 16, 2010 (75 FR 19988). We received five comments on the Draft CCP/EA. Selected... Fish and Wildlife Service Watercress Darter National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, AL AGENCY:...

  1. 75 FR 39037 - Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... continue the CCP process for Crane Meadows NWR, which we began by publishing a notice of intent on (73 FR... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Fish and Wildlife Service Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN AGENCY: Fish...

  2. 75 FR 63505 - Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Crane Meadows NWR, which we began by publishing a notice of intent on (73 FR 76677- 76678, December 17... EA to the public, announcing and requesting comments in a notice of availability on (75 FR 39037... Fish and Wildlife Service Crane Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Morrison County, MN AGENCY: U.S....

  3. 77 FR 52346 - Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Becker County, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-29

    ... began by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (75 FR 7289) on February 18, 2010. For... Fish and Wildlife Service Hamden Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Becker County, MN AGENCY: Fish and..., Detroit Lakes, MN 56501. In-Person Drop Off: You may drop off comments during regular business hours...

  4. Regional economic analysis of current and proposed management alternatives for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koontz, Lynne; Sexton, Natalie; Donovan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge System Improvement Act of 1997 requires all units of the National Wildlife Refuge System to be managed under a Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan must describe the desired future conditions of a refuge and provide long-range guidance and management direction to achieve refuge purposes. The Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge (refuge) is in the process of developing a range of management goals, objectives, and strategies for the Comprehensive Conservation Plan. The Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the refuge must contain an analysis of expected effects associated with current and proposed refuge management strategies. The purpose of this study was to assess the regional economic implications associated with draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan management strategies. Special interest groups and local residents often criticize a change in refuge management, especially if there is a perceived negative impact to the local economy. Having objective data on economic impacts may show that these fears are overstated. Quite often, the extent of economic benefits a refuge provides to a local community is not fully recognized, yet at the same time the effects of negative changes is overstated. Spending associated with refuge recreational activities, such as wildlife viewing and hunting, can generate considerable tourist activity for surrounding communities. Additionally, refuge personnel typically spend considerable amounts of money purchasing supplies in local stores, repairing equipment and purchasing fuel at the local service stations, and reside and spend their salaries in the local community. For refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan planning, a regional economic assessment provides a means of estimating how current management (no action alternative) and proposed management activities (alternatives) could affect the local economy. This type of analysis provides two critical pieces of

  5. 75 FR 8106 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo Counties, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of intent to...) and Environmental Assessment (EA) for the Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife...

  6. 50 CFR 25.21 - When and how do we open and close areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... advance notice. See 50 CFR 36.42 for procedures on closing Alaska national wildlife refuges. (f) We will... the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access and use or continue a use? 25.21 Section 25.21... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Administrative Provisions § 25.21 When and how...

  7. 50 CFR 25.21 - When and how do we open and close areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... advance notice. See 50 CFR 36.42 for procedures on closing Alaska national wildlife refuges. (f) We will... the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access and use or continue a use? 25.21 Section 25.21... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Administrative Provisions § 25.21 When and how...

  8. 50 CFR 25.21 - When and how do we open and close areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... advance notice. See 50 CFR 36.42 for procedures on closing Alaska national wildlife refuges. (f) We will... the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access and use or continue a use? 25.21 Section 25.21... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Administrative Provisions § 25.21 When and how...

  9. 50 CFR 25.21 - When and how do we open and close areas of the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... advance notice. See 50 CFR 36.42 for procedures on closing Alaska national wildlife refuges. (f) We will... the National Wildlife Refuge System to public access and use or continue a use? 25.21 Section 25.21... NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM ADMINISTRATIVE PROVISIONS Administrative Provisions § 25.21 When and how...

  10. Planning applications in east central Florida. [St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hannah, J. W.; Thomas, G. L.; Esparza, F. (Principal Investigator); Millard, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, a 4000 acre marsh, was established primarily to protect the Dusky Seaside Sparrow. A vegetation map of the refuge based on ground observations and color infrared photography was made. The preferred habitat of this sparrow is high-to-medium density spartina (a marsh grass) with no trees nearby. An increase in spartina density corresponds to an increase in marsh wetness. A thematic map shows the birds habitat preferences.

  11. An osprey at home in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Rough-legged hawk stares at the landscape from a perch in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  12. An osprey at home in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Rough-legged Hawk fans its wings as it gently lands in a tree in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. This type of hawk is rarely seen in Florida, ranging from northern Alaska through Manitoba and Newfoundland and wintering from California east to Virginia. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with the Kennedy Space Center, is habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles.

  13. Feral Hogs Management at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: Analysis of Current Management Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenfeld, Arie; Hinkle, C. Ross; Epstein, Marc

    2002-01-01

    This ST1 Technical Memorandum (TM) summarizes a two-month project on feral hog management in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR). For this project, feral hogs were marked and recaptured, with the help of local trappers, to estimate population size and habitat preferences. Habitat covers included vegetation cover and Light Detection and Ranging (LIDAR) data for MINWR. In addition, an analysis was done of hunting records compiled by the Refuge and hog-car accidents compiled by KSC Security.

  14. The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Many Alternatives and One Choice To Make. Lesson Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foundation for Teaching Economics, San Francisco, CA.

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is an area of land located in the northeast corner of Alaska within the Arctic Circle that includes a potentially oil-rich coastal plain between the Beaufort Sea, the Brooks Range, and the Prudhoe Bay oil fields. For the past several years, ANWR has also been the location of a national debate over energy…

  15. 75 FR 76611 - 50th Anniversary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... protect their indigenous traditions and way of life. Today, the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge remains... American identity. In commemorating five decades of protection and conservation of the Arctic National... of the United States of America the two hundred and thirty-fifth. (Presidential Sig.) [FR Doc....

  16. Proposed oil and gas exploration within the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-11-01

    The draft environmental impact statement describes the procedures and probable effects of aerial and geological surveying for oil and gas in the coastal area of Alaska's Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. The procedures provide for the protection of caribou caving areas and the avoidance of duplication in the survey activities. Temporary disturbances from seismic surveys would interfere with wildlife breeding and migration due to changes in the habitat. The Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act of 1980 provides the legal mandate for environmental assessment.

  17. An Ecoregional Context for Forest Management on National Wildlife Refuges of the Upper Midwest, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corace, R. Gregory; Shartell, Lindsey M.; Schulte, Lisa A.; Brininger, Wayne L.; McDowell, Michelle K. D.; Kashian, Daniel M.

    2012-02-01

    To facilitate forest planning and management on National Wildlife Refuges, we synthesized multiple data sources to describe land ownership patterns, land cover, landscape pattern, and changes in forest composition for four ecoregions and their associated refuges of the Upper Midwest. We related observed patterns to ecological processes important for forest conservation and restoration, with specific attention to refuge patterns of importance for forest landbirds of conservation priority. The large amount of public land within the ecoregions (31-80%) suggests that opportunities exist for coarse and meso-scale approaches to conserving and restoring ecological processes affecting the refuges, particularly historical fire regimes. Forests dominate both ecoregions and refuges, but refuge forest patches are generally larger and more aggregated than in associated ecoregions. Broadleaf taxa have increased in dominance in the ecoregions and displaced fire-dependent taxa such as pine ( Pinus spp.) and other coniferous species; these changes in forest composition have likely also affected refuge forests. Despite compositional changes, larger forest patches on refuges suggests that they may provide better habitat for area-sensitive forest landbirds of mature, compositionally diverse forests than surrounding lands if management continues to promote increased patch size. We reason that although fine-scale research and monitoring for species of conservation priority is important, broad scale (ecoregional) assessments provide crucial context for effective forest and wildlife management in protected areas.

  18. An ecoregional context for forest management on National Wildlife Refuges of the Upper Midwest, USA.

    PubMed

    Corace, R Gregory; Shartell, Lindsey M; Schulte, Lisa A; Brininger, Wayne L; McDowell, Michelle K D; Kashian, Daniel M

    2012-02-01

    To facilitate forest planning and management on National Wildlife Refuges, we synthesized multiple data sources to describe land ownership patterns, land cover, landscape pattern, and changes in forest composition for four ecoregions and their associated refuges of the Upper Midwest. We related observed patterns to ecological processes important for forest conservation and restoration, with specific attention to refuge patterns of importance for forest landbirds of conservation priority. The large amount of public land within the ecoregions (31-80%) suggests that opportunities exist for coarse and meso-scale approaches to conserving and restoring ecological processes affecting the refuges, particularly historical fire regimes. Forests dominate both ecoregions and refuges, but refuge forest patches are generally larger and more aggregated than in associated ecoregions. Broadleaf taxa have increased in dominance in the ecoregions and displaced fire-dependent taxa such as pine (Pinus spp.) and other coniferous species; these changes in forest composition have likely also affected refuge forests. Despite compositional changes, larger forest patches on refuges suggests that they may provide better habitat for area-sensitive forest landbirds of mature, compositionally diverse forests than surrounding lands if management continues to promote increased patch size. We reason that although fine-scale research and monitoring for species of conservation priority is important, broad scale (ecoregional) assessments provide crucial context for effective forest and wildlife management in protected areas.

  19. An ecoregional context for forest management on National Wildlife Refuges of the Upper Midwest, USA.

    PubMed

    Corace, R Gregory; Shartell, Lindsey M; Schulte, Lisa A; Brininger, Wayne L; McDowell, Michelle K D; Kashian, Daniel M

    2012-02-01

    To facilitate forest planning and management on National Wildlife Refuges, we synthesized multiple data sources to describe land ownership patterns, land cover, landscape pattern, and changes in forest composition for four ecoregions and their associated refuges of the Upper Midwest. We related observed patterns to ecological processes important for forest conservation and restoration, with specific attention to refuge patterns of importance for forest landbirds of conservation priority. The large amount of public land within the ecoregions (31-80%) suggests that opportunities exist for coarse and meso-scale approaches to conserving and restoring ecological processes affecting the refuges, particularly historical fire regimes. Forests dominate both ecoregions and refuges, but refuge forest patches are generally larger and more aggregated than in associated ecoregions. Broadleaf taxa have increased in dominance in the ecoregions and displaced fire-dependent taxa such as pine (Pinus spp.) and other coniferous species; these changes in forest composition have likely also affected refuge forests. Despite compositional changes, larger forest patches on refuges suggests that they may provide better habitat for area-sensitive forest landbirds of mature, compositionally diverse forests than surrounding lands if management continues to promote increased patch size. We reason that although fine-scale research and monitoring for species of conservation priority is important, broad scale (ecoregional) assessments provide crucial context for effective forest and wildlife management in protected areas. PMID:22052537

  20. Selawik National Wildlife Refuge land cover mapping project users guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1988-01-01

    The U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) has the responsibility for collecting the resource information to address the research, management, development and planning requirements identified in Section 304. Because of the brief period provided by the Act for data collection, habitat mapping, and habitat assessment, the USFWS in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Field Office, used digital Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data and digital terrain data to produce land cover and terrain maps. A computer assisted digital analysis of Landsat MSS data was used because coverage by aerial photographs was incomplete for the refuge and because the level of detail obtained from Landsat data was adequate to meet most USFWS research, management and planning needs. Relative cost and time requirements were also factors in the decision to use the digital analysis approach.

  1. Tetlin National Wildlife Refuge land cover mapping project users guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) has the responsibility for collecting the resource information to address the research, management, development and planning requirements identified in Section 304. Because of the brief period provided by the Act for data collection, habitat mapping, and habitat assessment, the USFWS in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Field Office, used digital Landsat multispectral scanner data (MSS) and digital terrain data to produce land cover and terrain maps. A computer assisted digital analysis of Landsat MSS data was used because coverage by aerial photographs was incomplete for much of the refuge and because the level of detail, obtained from the analysis of Landsat data, is adequate to meet most USFWS research, management and planning needs. Relative cost and time requirements were also factors in the decision to use the digital analysis approach.

  2. A rescued pelican flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican named 'Fisheater' by its rescuers, beats its wings as it flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  3. 77 FR 27792 - Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-11

    ... of hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and... promote interpretation, voluntary compliance with refuge regulations, and the new environmental education..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and...

  4. Visitor survey results for the Souris River Loop National Wildlife Refuges: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Koontz, Lynne; Stewart, Susan C.

    2005-01-01

    In support of the CCP planning effort for the Souris River Loop Refuges, the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch/Fort Collins Science Center (PASA) of the U.S. Geological Survey conducted visitor surveys at three refuges in North Dakota: Des Lacs, J. Clark Salyer, and Upper Souris National Wildlife Refuges. This research was conducted in order to assess visitor experience, perceptions, and preferences and visitor spending related to recreation on these public lands. This baseline information and input is needed by the refuges to inform their CCP process. Specifically, this survey research assesses the characteristics of visitors and their trips, the activities in which visitors engage while on the refuge, details regarding their trip experience, as well as their preferences and attitudes about various management features, including existing and future conditions. 

  5. 50 CFR 32.7 - What refuge units are open to hunting and/or sport fishing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Wildlife Refuge UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge War Horse National Wildlife Refuge Nebraska Boyer Chute... Marsh National Wildlife Refuge Bear Valley National Wildlife Refuge Cold Springs National...

  6. 50 CFR 32.7 - What refuge units are open to hunting and/or sport fishing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Wildlife Refuge Savannah National Wildlife Refuge Wassaw National Wildlife Refuge Wolf Island National... Mountains National Wildlife Refuge Oregon Bandon Marsh National Wildlife Refuge Bear Valley...

  7. Change in surficial water area, Quivera National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford County, Kansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yarger, H. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. MSS-7 images acquired in August, October, and December 1972 revealed changes in both the number of water pools and surficial water area of larger pools in Quivera National Wildlife Refuge (Big and Little Salt Marsh), Stafford County, Kansas.

  8. 75 FR 28643 - Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National Wildlife Refuges, Lee and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Register on June 27, 2007 (72 FR 35254), and extended the comment period in a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR 17991). For more about the refuges, their purposes, and our CCP process... Fish and Wildlife Service Pine Island, Matlacha Pass, Island Bay, and Caloosahatchee National...

  9. 78 FR 8577 - Final Environmental Impact Statement; Izembek National Wildlife Refuge Proposed Land Exchange...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... intent in the Federal Register (74 FR 39336; August 6, 2009; 75 FR 8396; February 24, 2010), indicating... public comment period (77 FR 16059; March 19, 2012) The Izembek National Wildlife Refuge (417,533 acres... connectivity providing undisturbed habitat for brown bear, caribou, moose, salmon and countless migratory...

  10. 75 FR 62415 - Nomans Land Island National Wildlife Refuge, Town of Chilmark, Martha's Vineyard, MA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-08

    ... the notice of intent we published in the Federal Register (69 FR 72210) on December 13, 2008. We... of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 30052) on May 28, 2010. Nomans Land Island is a 628... of the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS), consistent with sound principles of fish and...

  11. 77 FR 60137 - Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge, Ravalli County, MT; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ... process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 50235; September 30, 2009). We released the draft... Federal Register (77 FR 18852; March 28, 2012). Lee Metcalf National Wildlife Refuge was established... FR 18852; March 28, 2012). During the review period a public meeting was held in...

  12. 75 FR 73121 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-29

    ... National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs), in or near the towns of Bandon, Pacific City, Neskowin, and Lincoln City... on the scope of issues to consider during the planning process. We are also announcing public... by December 31, 2010. We will hold public meetings to begin the CCP planning process; see...

  13. 77 FR 9690 - Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Corvallis, OR; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ... process through a notice of intent in the Federal Register (73 FR 11137; February 29, 2008). We released... Federal Register (76 FR 30382; May 25, 2011). The Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex..., semipermanent, and permanent wetlands; wet prairies, upland prairie/oak savannas, oak woodlands, mixed...

  14. Use of survey data to define regional and local priorities for management on National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, J.R.; Casey, J.; Laskowski, H.; Taylor, J.D.; Fallon, J.; Ralph, C. John; Rich, Terrell D.

    2005-01-01

    National Wildlife Refuges must manage habitats to support a variety of species that often have conflicting needs. To make reasonable management decisions, managers must know what species are priorities for their refuges and the relative importance of the species. Unfortunately, species priorities are often set regionally, but refuges must develop local priorities that reconcile regional priorities with constraints imposed by refuge location and local management options. Some species cannot be managed on certain refuges, and the relative benefit of management to regional populations of species can vary greatly among refuges. We describe a process of 'stepping down' regional priorities to local priorities for bird species of management interest. We define three primary scales of management interest: regional (at which overall priority species are set); 'Sepik Blocks' (30 min blocks of latitude and longitude, which provide a landscape level context for a refuge); and the refuge. Regional surveys, such as the North American Breeding Bird Survey, provide information that can be summarized at regional and Sepik Block scales, permitting regional priorities to be focused to landscapes near refuges. However, refuges manage habitats, and managers need information about how the habitat management is likely to collectively influence the priority species. The value of the refuge for a species is also influenced by the availability of habitats within refuges and the relative amounts of those habitats at each scale. We use remotely-sensed data to assess proportions of habitats at the three geographic scales. These data provide many possible approaches for developing local priorities for management. Once these are defined, managers can use the priorities, in conjunction with predictions of the consequences of management for each species, to assess the overall benefit of alternative management actions for the priority species.

  15. Ecological dynamics of wetlands at Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Ehrhardt, Ellen A.; Fairchild, James F.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Poulton, Barry C.; Sappington, Linda C.; Kelly, Brian P.; Mabee, William R.

    2002-01-01

    The study documented the interaction between hydrology and the biological dynamics within a single spring season at Lisbon Bottom in 1999. The study goal was to provide information necessary for resource managers to develop management strategies for this and other units of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Researchers studied the hydrology, limnology, and biological dynamics of zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, fish and waterbird communities. Lisbon Bottom is one of several parcels of 1993 flood-damaged land that was purchased from willing sellers by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service as part of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Lisbon Bottom is a loop bend in the river near Glasgow in Howard County, Missouri between approximately river mile (RM) 213 to RM 219. Flooding at Lisbon in 1993 and 1995 breeched local levees and created a diverse wetland complex.

  16. Blue-winged teals in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Two male blue-winged teals are joined by a female in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. The teals inhabit marshes, shallow ponds and lakes from British Columbia, Quebec and Newfoundland to North Carolina, the Gulf Coast and southern California, wintering as far south as South America. The 92,000- acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  17. A rescued pelican is released at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A rescued white pelican, dubbed 'Fisheater' by his rescuers, takes a tentative step and stretches its wings after being let go at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Looking on is Mark Epstein, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, who had held the bird while Kat Royer, also with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  18. 76 FR 4129 - Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, Highlands and Polk Counties, FL; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-24

    ... 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of the CCP by writing to: Mr. Charles Pelizza, Refuge... next 15 years. Compatibility determinations are available in the CCP and include Research, Wildlife... wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan...

  19. Species accounts for the Alamosa/Monte Vista/Baca National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellison, Laura E.

    2011-01-01

    As part of an interagency agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS), the Alamosa/Monte Vista/Baca National Wildlife Refuge Complex requested help with the synthesis of scientific information for 10 focal species and their habitat requirements in response to common Refuge management activities in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. This information will be instrumental in developing the Service's Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP), which is required by law for each unit of the National Wildlife Refuge System. After consultation with Refuge managers and USGS staff, the 10 species chosen for detailed literature reviews and synthesis of information were the following: (1) American Avocet (Recurvirostra americana); (2) Wilson's Phalarope (Phalaropus tricolorPorzana carolina); (4) White-faced Ibis (Plegadis chihi); (5) Black Tern (Chlidonias niger); (6) Short-eared Owl (Asio flammeus); (7) Brewer's Sparrow (Spizella breweri); (8) Savannah Sparrow (Passerculus sandwichensis); (9) Northern Leopard Frog [Lithobates (=Rana) pipiens]; and, (10) Tadpole Shrimp (Triops longicaudatus).

  20. 76 FR 78939 - James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge, Honolulu County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    ..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will... basis for environmental education, research, and other compatible uses. Newly acquired refuge lands..., the design and construction of a Visitor Center/Environmental Education facility and refuge...

  1. A rescued pelican flies to freedom at the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge near KSC.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican named 'Fisheater' by its rescuers soars to open water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge as it flies to freedom. The pelican was found covered in crude oil from a contaminated ditch in northern Indiana in November, and was rescued by a local Police Department, treated, and flown to the Back to Nature Wildlife Refuge in Orlando, Fla. for care and rest. It is being released today to join a flock of about 30 other white pelicans that are wintering on the refuge, some of which are nearby. Before its release, however, Kat Royer, with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, placed on it a leg band issued by the U.S. Department of the Interior's Bird Banding Laboratory. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  2. Learning from conservation planning for the U.S. National Wildlife Refuges.

    PubMed

    Meretsky, Vicky J; Fischman, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System has nearly completed its first round of unit-level, comprehensive conservation plans (CCPs) and will soon begin required revisions. Laws and policies governing refuge planning emphasize ecological integrity, landscape-scale conservation, and adaptive management. We evaluated 185 CCPs completed during 2005-2011, which cover 324 of 555 national wildlife refuges. We reviewed CCP prescriptions addressing 5 common conservation issues (habitat and game, nongame, imperiled, and invasive species) and 3 specialized topics (landscape-scale conservation, climate change, and environmental quality). Common conservation issues received prescriptions in >90% of CCPs. Specialized topics received more variable treatment. Prescriptions for aquatic connectivity, water quantity, and climate-change impacts increased over the study period. Except for climate change, direct actions were the most common type of management prescription, followed by plans or studies. Most CCPs stated a commitment to adaptive management and prescribed monitoring for common conservation objectives; other aspects of planning for adaptive management were often lacking, despite strong support for adaptive management in the conservation planning literature. To better address refuge-specific threats, we recommend that revised plans explicitly match identified refuge issues with prescriptions, particularly for under-represented concerns such as novel pests and pathogens. We recommend incorporating triggers into monitoring frameworks and specifying actions that will occur when threshold values are reached to improve support for adaptive management. Revised CCPs should better reflect work that refuges already undertake to extend conservation objectives beyond their borders and better engage with regional conservation efforts to continue this work. More thorough landscape-scale threat assessments and explicit prioritization of planned actions would further improve conservation

  3. Learning from conservation planning for the U.S. National Wildlife Refuges.

    PubMed

    Meretsky, Vicky J; Fischman, Robert L

    2014-10-01

    The U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System has nearly completed its first round of unit-level, comprehensive conservation plans (CCPs) and will soon begin required revisions. Laws and policies governing refuge planning emphasize ecological integrity, landscape-scale conservation, and adaptive management. We evaluated 185 CCPs completed during 2005-2011, which cover 324 of 555 national wildlife refuges. We reviewed CCP prescriptions addressing 5 common conservation issues (habitat and game, nongame, imperiled, and invasive species) and 3 specialized topics (landscape-scale conservation, climate change, and environmental quality). Common conservation issues received prescriptions in >90% of CCPs. Specialized topics received more variable treatment. Prescriptions for aquatic connectivity, water quantity, and climate-change impacts increased over the study period. Except for climate change, direct actions were the most common type of management prescription, followed by plans or studies. Most CCPs stated a commitment to adaptive management and prescribed monitoring for common conservation objectives; other aspects of planning for adaptive management were often lacking, despite strong support for adaptive management in the conservation planning literature. To better address refuge-specific threats, we recommend that revised plans explicitly match identified refuge issues with prescriptions, particularly for under-represented concerns such as novel pests and pathogens. We recommend incorporating triggers into monitoring frameworks and specifying actions that will occur when threshold values are reached to improve support for adaptive management. Revised CCPs should better reflect work that refuges already undertake to extend conservation objectives beyond their borders and better engage with regional conservation efforts to continue this work. More thorough landscape-scale threat assessments and explicit prioritization of planned actions would further improve conservation

  4. Air Quality Scoping Study for Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, Johann; Kavouras, Ilias; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; Kohl, Steven; Shafer, David

    2007-04-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S.Department of Energy’s Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at seven sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Sarcobatus Flat, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, and Crater Flat, and at four sites on the NTS. The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. Letter reports provide summaries of air quality and meteorological data, on completion of each site’s sampling program.

  5. Analysis of Oil and Gas Production in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    EIA Publications

    2004-01-01

    This study analyzed the impact on future oil imports and expenditures of opening the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) to petroleum development. High, low, and mean ANWR oil resource case projections were compared to the Annual Energy Outlook 2004 reference case. The study also examined whether potential synergies exist in opening ANWR to petroleum development and the construction of an Alaska gas pipeline from the North Slope to the lower 48 states.

  6. An application of well data in oil and gas assessment-arctic national wildlife refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, P.H.; Schenk, C.J.; Bird, K.J.

    1998-01-01

    A current assessment of oil and gas resources in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) 1002 Area by the U.S. Geological Survey relies upon seismic data, geological mapping of exposures south and west of the assessment area, and exploratory wells. Information obtained from wells up to 50 km west and north of ANWR is presented. It is emphasized that the synthesis of well data with other geological and geophysical data provides a quantitative foundation for resource estimates of ANWR.

  7. 78 FR 21397 - Don Edwards San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Alameda, Santa Clara, and San Mateo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-10

    ... the next 15 years. DATES: The CCP and FONSI are available now. The FONSI was signed on October 10... national wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year... ] interpretation. We intend to review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with...

  8. Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge, comprehensive conservation plan and wilderness review

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-08-01

    Implementation of a comprehensive conservation plan is proposed for the 4.3-million-acre Alaska Peninsula National Wildlife Refuge, located in southwestern Alaska. The preferred alternative would recommend 1.9 million acres for wilderness designation, including approximately 70% of the Ugashik unit, 40% of the Chignik unit, and 30% of the Pavlof unit. The enhanced public-use management area around Cold Bay would not be proposed for wilderness designation because of existing developments and uses. Minimal management areas by the Ugashik Lakes, in the Port Heiden/Kujulik Bay and Port Moller/Pavlof Bay areas also would not be proposed for wilderness designation, to allow future consideration of transportation corridors or oil and gas activities. The plan would emphasize protection of existing fish and wildlife populations and habitats. Fishing, hunting, and trapping would be allowed throughout most of the refuge and managed to maintain fish and wildlife populations at their present levels. Habitat enhancement generally would not occur. The enhanced public-use area would be monitored closely to minimize impacts to fish and wildlife. Access to refuge lands by traditional means would be permitted for subsistence purposes. Recreational use of snowmobiles, float and wheeled airplanes, off-road vehicles, and power boats would be permitted in designated areas.

  9. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Kaniksu Unit Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    US Fish and Wildlife Service Staff

    1999-01-01

    Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge is proposing to acquire a 706-acre property located in Stevens County, Washington. The new acquisition would be called the Kaniksu Unit. A habitat evaluation was conducted on the property using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service 1980). Evaluation species were black-capped chickadee, mallard, ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were food and reproduction for black-capped chickadee, food, cover, and reproduction for mallard, available winter browse for white-tailed deer and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse.

  10. Assessment of nutrients and suspended sediment conditions in and near the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Northwest Minnesota, 2008–2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nustad, Rochelle A.; Galloway, Joel M.

    2012-01-01

    In response to concerns about water-quality impairments that may affect habitat degradation in Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Minnesota, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collected streamflow data, discrete nutrient and suspended- sediment samples, and continuous water-quality data from 2008 to 2010. Constituent loads were estimated for nutrients and suspended sediment using sample data and streamflow data. In addition, a potential water-quality and streamflow monitoring program design was developed for Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge. Results from this study can be used by resource managers to address identified impairments and protect wildlife habitat and public water supply, and may contribute toward developing more effective water-management plans for Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge.

  11. Roseate Spoonbill squawks at intruder in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    In the shallow waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, a roseate spoonbill squawks at nearby intruders. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  12. Roseate Spoonbill displays wings in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A female roseate spoonbill (left) displays her colorful wings to the male at right in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. Roseate Spoonbill displays wings in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A female roseate spoonbill displays her colorful wings in a mating ritual in Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. The birds, named for their brilliant pink color and paddle-shaped bill, feed in shallow water by swinging their bill back and forth, scooping up small fish and crustaceans. They typically inhabit mangroves on the coasts of southern Florida, Louisiana and Texas. The 92,000-acre refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center, is a habitat for more than 330 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  14. High incidence of deformity in aquatic turtles in the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge.

    PubMed

    Bell, Barbara; Spotila, James R; Congdon, Justin

    2006-08-01

    The John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge is subject to pollution from multiple sources. We studied development of snapping turtle (Chelydra serpentina) and painted turtle (Chrysemys picta) embryos from the refuge from 2000 through 2003. Mean annual deformity rate of pooled painted turtle clutches over four years ranged from 45 to 71%, while that of snapping turtle clutches ranged from 13 to 19%. Lethal deformities were more common than minor or moderate deformities in embryos of both species. Adult painted turtles had a higher deformity rate than adult snapping turtles. Snapping turtles at JHNWR had high levels of PAH contamination in their fat. This suggests that PAHs are involved in the high level of deformities. Other contaminants may also play a role. Although the refuge offers many advantages to resident turtle populations, pollution appears to place a developmental burden on the life history of these turtles. PMID:16360253

  15. 77 FR 1716 - James River National Wildlife Refuge, Prince George County, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-11

    ... news media, and on our refuge planning Web site at: http://www.fws.gov/northeast/planning/jamesriver..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will... include wildlife observation, nature photography, and onsite environmental education and...

  16. 75 FR 29582 - Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Fairbanks, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-26

    ... proposed land exchange in the Refuge was published in the Federal Register on October 19, 2005 (70 FR 60845). The notice of public scoping meetings was published in the Federal Register on March 3, 2006 (71 FR... EIS was published in the Federal Register on January 25, 2008 (73 FR 4617). Public hearings were...

  17. 75 FR 28816 - Guam National Wildlife Refuge, Yigo, Guam

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Federal Register (72 FR 37037, July 6, 2007). We released the Draft CCP and environmental assessment (EA... (74 FR 36249, July 22, 2009). The Guam Refuge is located on the unincorporated U.S. territory of Guam. Guam is the largest and southernmost island in the Marianas archipelago, situated in the...

  18. Mercury in wetlands at the Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, northwestern Minnesota, 2007-9

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowdery, Timothy K.; Brigham, Mark E.

    2013-01-01

    The Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge was established in 2004 on land in northwestern Minnesota that had previously undergone extensive wetland and prairie restorations. About 7,000 acres of drained wetlands were restored to their original hydrologic function and aquatic ecosystem. During 2007–9, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the Red Lake Watershed District, analyzed mercury concentrations in wetland water and sediment to evaluate the effect of wetland restoration on mercury methylation. The wetland waters sampled generally were of the calcium/magnesium bicarbonate type. Nitrogen in water was mostly in the form of dissolved-organic nitrogen, with very low dissolved-nitrate and dissolved-ammonia concentrations. About 71 percent of all phosphorus in water was dissolved, with one-half of that in the form of orthophosphorus. Wetland water had total-mercury and methylmercury concentrations ranging from 1.5 to 20 nanograms per liter (ng/L) and 0.2 to 16 ng/L, respectively. Median concentrations were 7.1 and 2.9 ng/L, respectively. About one-half of the mercury in wetland water samples was in the form of methylmercury, but this form ranged from 7 to 81 percent of each sample. Compared to concentrations in stream sediment samples collected throughout the United States, Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge wetland sediment samples contained typical total-mercury concentrations, but methylmercury concentrations were nearly twice as high. The maximum concentration measured in Glacial Ridge National Wildlife Refuge wetland water approached the highest published water methylmercury concentration in uncontaminated waters of which we are aware. However, the upper quartile of water methylmercury concentrations is similar to concentrations reported for some impoundments and wetlands in northwestern Minnesota and North Dakota. Methylmercury concentrations in sampled wetlands were much higher than those from typical

  19. 75 FR 74075 - Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge, Johnston County, OK; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... (NWR). In this final CCP, we describe how we will manage this Refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES... Wildlife Refuge for the next 15 years. Alternative B, with modifications ] as described in Appendix I... managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of...

  20. Characterization of sediment and measurement of groundwater levels and temperatures, Camas National Wildlife Refuge, eastern Idaho

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Twining, Brian V.; Rattray, Gordon W.

    2016-11-02

    The Camas National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in eastern Idaho, established in 1937, contains wetlands, ponds, and wet meadows that are essential resting and feeding habitat for migratory birds and nesting habitat for waterfowl. Initially, natural sources of water supported these habitats. However, during the past few decades, climate change and changes in surrounding land use have altered and reduced natural groundwater and surface water inflows such that the wetlands, ponds, and wet meadows are now maintained through water management and groundwater pumping. These water management activities have proven to be inefficient and costly, prompting the Refuge to develop alternative water management options that are more efficient and less expensive. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, is studying the hydrogeology at the Refuge to provide information for developing alternative water management options.The hydrogeologic studies at the Refuge included characterizing the type, distribution, and hydraulic conductivity of surficial sediments and measuring water levels and temperatures in monitoring wells. Four monitoring wells and seven soil probe coreholes were drilled at the Refuge. Seven water level and temperature data loggers were installed in the wells and water levels and temperatures were continuously recorded from November 2014 to June 2016. Sediment cores were collected from the coreholes and sediment type and distribution were characterized from drillers’ notes, geophysical logs, corehole samples, and particle grain-size analysis. The hydraulic conductivities of sediments were estimated using the measured average grain size and the assumed textural maturity of the sediment, and ranged from about 20 to 290 feet per day.

  1. Avian botulism and avian chlamydiosis in wild water birds, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, USA.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Douglas E; Franson, J Christian; Brannian, Roger E; Long, Renee R; Radi, Craig A; Krueger, David; Johnson, Robert F

    2012-12-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, conducted a diagnostic investigation into a water bird mortality event involving intoxication with avian botulism type C and infection with avian chlamydiosis at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana, USA. Of 24 carcasses necropsied, 11 had lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis, including two that tested positive for infectious Chlamydophila psittaci, and 12 were positive for avian botulism type C. One bird tested positive for both avian botulism type C and C. psittaci. Of 61 apparently healthy water birds sampled and released, 13 had serologic evidence of C. psittaci infection and 7 were, at the time of capture, shedding infectious C. psittaci via the cloacal or oropharyngeal route. Since more routinely diagnosed disease conditions may mask avian chlamydiosis, these findings support the need for a comprehensive diagnostic investigation when determining the cause of a wildlife mortality event.

  2. Avian botulism and avian chlamydiosis in wild water birds, Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Docherty, Douglas E.; Franson, J. Christian; Brannian, Roger E.; Long, Renee R.; Radi, Craig A.; Krueger, David; Johnson, Robert F.

    2012-01-01

    In 1999, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) National Wildlife Health Center, Madison, Wisconsin, conducted a diagnostic investigation into a water bird mortality event involving intoxication with avian botulism type C and infection with avian chlamydiosis at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Montana, USA. Of 24 carcasses necropsied, 11 had lesions consistent with avian chlamydiosis, including two that tested positive for infectious Chlamydophila psittaci, and 12 were positive for avian botulism type C. One bird tested positive for both avian botulism type C and C. psittaci. Of 61 apparently healthy water birds sampled and released, 13 had serologic evidence of C. psittaci infection and 7 were, at the time of capture, shedding infectious C. psittaci via the cloacal or oropharyngeal route. Since more routinely diagnosed disease conditions may mask avian chlamydiosis, these findings support the need for a comprehensive diagnostic investigation when determining the cause of a wildlife mortality event.

  3. Larviciding offshore islands reduces adulticidal treatment of populated areas adjacent to national wildlife refuges.

    PubMed

    Hribar, Lawrence J; Fussell, Edsel M; Leal, Andrea L

    2011-12-01

    The Florida Keys Mosquito Control District has conducted larvicide missions on uninhabited offshore islands of the Great White Heron National Wildlife Refuge and the National Key Deer Refuge since 2003. The objective of these missions is to reduce the need to apply adulticides on nearby populated islands where private lands are interspersed with refuge lands that support a diverse assemblage of native butterflies and insect-pollinated plants on Big Pine Key, No Name Key, Little Torch Key, Middle Torch Key, and Big Torch Key (the Torch Keys). More than 800 visits were made to refuge islands by Florida Keys Mosquito Control District personnel; 334 aerial larvicide missions were flown. From 2003 to 2010, a marked reduction in adult mosquito numbers was seen on Big Pine Key, and to a lesser extent on No Name Key. Seasonal distribution of mosquitoes was not different, however. Number of aerial adulticide missions flown on Big Pine Key, No Name Key, and the Torch Keys was 2, 1, and 2 in 2003; 9, 10, and 7 in 2004; 4, 4, and 2 in 2005; 6, 6, and 7 in 2006; 1, 0, and 0 in 2007; 3, 2, and 4 in 2008; 4, 3, and 4 in 2009; and 1, 1, and 3 in 2010, respectively. This is a dramatic reduction from prior years; from 1998 to 2002, 57 aerial adulticide missions were flown on Big Pine Key, 45 missions were flown on No Name Key, and 38 on the Torch Keys. Larviciding is an important component of an integrated approach to mosquito management that seeks to reduce environmental impacts on the national wildlife refuges.

  4. Change in agricultural land use constrains adaptation of national wildlife refuges to climate change

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, Christopher M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Radeloff, Volker C.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Pidgeon, Anna M.

    2015-01-01

    Land-use change around protected areas limits their ability to conserve biodiversity by altering ecological processes such as natural hydrologic and disturbance regimes, facilitating species invasions, and interfering with dispersal of organisms. This paper informs USA National Wildlife Refuge System conservation planning by predicting future land-use change on lands within 25 km distance of 461 refuges in the USA using an econometric model. The model contained two differing policy scenarios, namely a ‘business-as-usual’ scenario and a ‘pro-agriculture’ scenario. Regardless of scenario, by 2051, forest cover and urban land use were predicted to increase around refuges, while the extent of range and pasture was predicted to decrease; cropland use decreased under the business-as-usual scenario, but increased under the pro-agriculture scenario. Increasing agricultural land value under the pro-agriculture scenario slowed an expected increase in forest around refuges, and doubled the rate of range and pasture loss. Intensity of land-use change on lands surrounding refuges differed by regions. Regional differences among scenarios revealed that an understanding of regional and local land-use dynamics and management options was an essential requirement to effectively manage these conserved lands. Such knowledge is particularly important given the predicted need to adapt to a changing global climate.

  5. An expanded map of vegetation communities at Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Struckhoff, Matthew A.

    2013-01-01

    In 2012, a map of vegetation communities on Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge was expanded based on interpretation of aerial photographs and field data. National Agricultural Imagery Program aerial photographs were used to identify distinct communities on previously unmapped refuge units and newly acquired parcels. Newly mapped polygons were then visited to adjust map boundaries, classify communities according to the National Vegetation Classification System, and quantify the abundance of dominant species and non-native, invasive species of concern to the refuge and other resource management agencies along the Missouri River. The expanded map now covers 6,136 hectares representing 33 community types, including 6 previously unmapped types. The full map includes 1,113 polygons, of which 627 are new, 21 are updated from the 2009 mapping effort, and 465 are unchanged from 2009. Mortality of primarily cottonwood stems, because of growing-season floods between 2008 and 2011, has reduced foliar cover of woody stems and created more open wooded communities. In herbaceous communities, dominance by herbaceous old fields has increased due to the inclusion of refuge units dominated by lands in recent agricultural production in the expanded map. Wetland community abundance has increased slightly due to recent flooding.

  6. Survey of bats on Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Washington, December 2011-April 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan C.; Manning, Tom; Barnett, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    Bats are diverse and abundant in many ecosystems worldwide. They perform important ecosystem functions, particularly by consuming large quantities of insects (Cleveland and others, 2006; Jones and others, 2009; Kuhn and others, 2011). The importance of bats to biodiversity and to ecosystem integrity has been overlooked in many regions, largely because the challenges of detecting and studying these small, nocturnal mammals have rendered a paucity of information on matters as basic as species distribution and natural history attributes. Recently, concern for bats has arisen in response to recognition of large-scale threats, such as white-nosed syndrome (WNS; Turner and others, 2009; Frick and others, 2010) and mortality at wind energy facilities (Arnett and others, 2008), factors that are causing unprecedented population declines of bats (Boyles and others, 2011). WNS is a fungal disease that has killed more than 1 million cave-hibernating bats in eastern North America since being discovered in New York State in 2006 (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2012). WNS has spread rapidly from northeastern U.S., and as of August 2012 has been confirmed as far west as eastern Missouri(U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 2013). Given the rapid spread of WNS, there is concern that the disease may soon affect western bat populations. Hibernating bats are particularly vulnerable to the effects of WNS (Blehert and others, 2009). Refuges in eastern Washington, including the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuge Complex (MCRNWRC) and Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge, support many potential hibernacula. Sixteen species of bats potentially occur on these refuges, including one federally listed species of concern (Townsend’s big-eared bat [Corynorhinus townsendii]; see table 1 for scientific names of bats), and 12 species that are of conservation concern in Washington and Oregon (table 1). However, little is known about bats on these refuges because few surveys have been

  7. Biological diversity, ecological health and condition of aquatic assemblages at national wildlife refuges in southern indiana, USA.

    PubMed

    Simon, Thomas P; Morris, Charles C; Robb, Joseph R; McCoy, William

    2015-01-01

    The National Wildlife Refuge system is a vital resource for the protection and conservation of biodiversity and biological integrity in the United States. Surveys were conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of fish, macroinvertebrate, and crayfish populations in two watersheds that encompass three refuges in southern Indiana. The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge had the highest number of aquatic species with 355 macroinvertebrate taxa, six crayfish species, and 82 fish species, while the Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge had 163 macroinvertebrate taxa, seven crayfish species, and 37 fish species. The Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest diversity of macroinvertebrates with 96 taxa and six crayfish species, while possessing the second highest fish species richness with 51 species. Habitat quality was highest in the Muscatatuck River drainage with increased amounts of forested habitats compared to the Patoka River drainage. Biological integrity of the three refuges ranked the Patoka NWR as the lowest biological integrity (mean IBI reach scores = 35 IBI points), while Big Oaks had the highest biological integrity (mean IBI reach score = 41 IBI points). The Muscatatuck NWR had a mean IBI reach score of 31 during June, which seasonally increased to a mean of 40 IBI points during summer. Watershed IBI scores and habitat condition were highest in the Big Oaks NWR.

  8. Biological Diversity, Ecological Health and Condition of Aquatic Assemblages at National Wildlife Refuges in Southern Indiana, USA

    PubMed Central

    Morris, Charles C.; Robb, Joseph R.; McCoy, William

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The National Wildlife Refuge system is a vital resource for the protection and conservation of biodiversity and biological integrity in the United States. Surveys were conducted to determine the spatial and temporal patterns of fish, macroinvertebrate, and crayfish populations in two watersheds that encompass three refuges in southern Indiana. The Patoka River National Wildlife Refuge had the highest number of aquatic species with 355 macroinvertebrate taxa, six crayfish species, and 82 fish species, while the Big Oaks National Wildlife Refuge had 163 macroinvertebrate taxa, seven crayfish species, and 37 fish species. The Muscatatuck National Wildlife Refuge had the lowest diversity of macroinvertebrates with 96 taxa and six crayfish species, while possessing the second highest fish species richness with 51 species. Habitat quality was highest in the Muscatatuck River drainage with increased amounts of forested habitats compared to the Patoka River drainage. Biological integrity of the three refuges ranked the Patoka NWR as the lowest biological integrity (mean IBI reach scores = 35 IBI points), while Big Oaks had the highest biological integrity (mean IBI reach score = 41 IBI points). The Muscatatuck NWR had a mean IBI reach score of 31 during June, which seasonally increased to a mean of 40 IBI points during summer. Watershed IBI scores and habitat condition were highest in the Big Oaks NWR. PMID:25632261

  9. Anticipated socio-environmental impacts of the proposed Little Darby National Wildlife Refuge in Ohio.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Kerry A; Napier, Ted L

    2005-01-01

    Data were collected during the summer of 2000 from 146 residents living in a rural area located in central Ohio that had been identified as a possible site for a national wildlife refuge. The purpose of the study was to assess anticipated socio-economic and environmental impacts of the proposed refuge on local people and natural ecosystems. A 'vested interests' theoretical model was developed to guide the investigation. The theoretical model posits that attitudes of local people toward externally induced projects are a function of costs and benefits individuals expect to receive as a result of the development action. The theory posits that individuals who expect to receive greater benefits from the refuge will exhibit more favorable attitudes toward the proposed project. Anticipated impacts of the proposed refuge were assessed with a Likert-type attitude scale that was shown to be highly reliable. Variables measuring specific costs and benefits associated with the proposed project were used as predictive variables. Descriptive statistics demonstrated that respondents believed the proposed wildlife refuge would generate more costs than benefits for local residents. Multiple linear regression findings demonstrated that six variables were significant in explaining 65.1% of the variance in the attitudes toward the proposed project. The significant variables were as follows: perceived costs and benefits associated with the proposed project, perceived water quality within the Little Darby Creek at the time of the data collection, age of primary income earner, expected future water quality within the Little Darby Creek, expected impact of farmland transition on the household, and attitude toward private property rights. Study findings consistently support research hypotheses.

  10. Decision analysis of mitigation and remediation of sedimentation within large wetland systems: a case study using Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Post van der Burg, Max; Jenni, Karen E.; Nieman, Timothy L.; Eash, Josh D.; Knutsen, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    Sedimentation has been identified as an important stressor across a range of wetland systems. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has the responsibility of maintaining wetlands within its National Wildlife Refuge System for use by migratory waterbirds and other wildlife. Many of these wetlands could be negatively affected by accelerated rates of sedimentation, especially those located in agricultural parts of the landscape. In this report we document the results of a decision analysis project designed to help U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service staff at the Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (herein referred to as the Refuge) determine a strategy for managing and mitigating the negative effects of sediment loading within Refuge wetlands. The Refuge’s largest wetland, Agassiz Pool, has accumulated so much sediment that it has become dominated by hybrid cattail (Typha × glauca), and the ability of the staff to control water levels in the Agassiz Pool has been substantially reduced. This project consisted of a workshop with Refuge staff, local and regional stakeholders, and several technical and scientific experts. At the workshop we established Refuge management and stakeholder objectives, a range of possible management strategies, and assessed the consequences of those strategies. After deliberating a range of actions, the staff chose to consider the following three strategies: (1) an inexpensive strategy, which largely focused on using outreach to reduce external sediment inputs to the Refuge; (2) the most expensive option, which built on the first option and relied on additional infrastructure changes to the Refuge to increase management capacity; and (3) a strategy that was less expensive than strategy 2 and relied mostly on existing infrastructure to improve management capacity. Despite the fact that our assessments were qualitative, Refuge staff decided they had enough information to select the third strategy. Following our qualitative assessment, we discussed

  11. Gallinules in the waters of KSC-Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A mother gallinule (right) calls her two chicks to enter the algae-covered water in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Gallinules, called Moorhens in the Old World, are duck-like swimming birds that constantly bob their heads while moving. They are identified by the prominent red bill with yellow tip and red frontal shield as well as white feathers under the tail, as shown here on the mother. Gallinules range throughout the Americas, from southern Canada to southern South America, inhabiting freshwater marshes and ponds with cattails and other aquatic vegetation. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  12. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A black-necked stilt waits near its nesting mate nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  13. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A Black-necked Stilt sits on its nest in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. They usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  14. Black-necked stilts share nesting in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A pair of black-necked stilts protect their grass-lined nest in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. Stilts usually produce three or four brown-spotted buff eggs in a shallow depression lined with grass or shell fragments. In the nesting season they are particularly agressive. Stilts are identified by a distinct head pattern of black and white, very long red legs, and straight, very thin bill. Their habitat is salt marshes and shallow coastal bays from Delaware and northern South America in the East, and freshwater marshes from Oregon and Saskatchewan to the Gulf Coast. The 92,000-acre wildlife refuge is a habitat for more than 310 species of birds, 25 mammals, 117 fishes and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge also provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds.

  15. Bison grazing ecology at the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Germaine, Stephen S.; Zeigenfuss, Linda C.; Schoenecker, Kathryn A.

    2013-01-01

    The Rocky Mountain Arsenal (RMA) National Wildlife Refuge reintroduced bison to a small pasture in 2007. Refuge managers needed information on the effects of bison grazing on vegetation communities in the bison pasture as well as information on how bison might affect other management priorities at RMA. In particular, RMA managers were interested in bison grazing effects on vegetation productivity, amount of vegetation utilization by bison, and habitat selection by bison to inform RMA herd managers and for potential expansion of bison range on the refuge. In 2007, U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) designed a study to investigate bison grazing effects through measurement of vegetation in the 600-hectare enclosure where the bison are currently pastured. This research was a collaborative effort between USGS and RMA refuge staff and had active field components in 2007 and 2010. We found that the effects and intensity of bison grazing on vegetation in the RMA bison pasture is linked to prairie dog presence. Where both species were present, they were removing a significant amount of biomass compared to areas where only bison were present. Also, prairie dogs appeared to enhance the greater production of native forbs, but we were not able to identify the mechanism for this increased production. We were not able, however, to generate an accurate vegetation map for the bison pasture, and this limited our ability to achieve the level of statistical precision necessary to identify grazing impacts and habitat selection of bison.

  16. 76 FR 30959 - Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge, LA and MS; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-27

    ... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and... environmental education and interpretation. In general, the focus of refuge management would be on expanding... staff time and funds supporting a public use program, wildlife-dependent recreation and...

  17. Potential Oil Production from Coastal Plain of Arctic National Wildlife Refuge: Updated Assessment

    EIA Publications

    2000-01-01

    The Energy Information Administration (EIA) received a letter (dated March 10, 2000) from Senator Frank H. Murkowski as Chairman of the Senate Committee on Energy and Natural Resources requesting an EIA Service Report with plausible scenarios for the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) supply development consistent with the most recent U.S. Geological Survey resource assessments. This service report is prepared in response to the request of Senator Murkowski. It focuses on the ANWR coastal plain, a region currently restricted from exploration and development, and updates EIA's 1987 ANWR assessment.

  18. Blood lead concentrations in mallards from Delevan and Colusa National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mauser, David M.; Rocke, Tonie E.; Mensik, John G.; Brand, Christopher J.

    1990-01-01

    Blood samples were taken from 181 (108 adult drakes and 73 individuals of mixed age and sex) mallards, Anas platyrhynchos , from Colusa and Delevan National Wildlife Refuges during late winter and summer of 1987. The percentage of birds with elevated lead concentration was 28.7 for late winter and 16.4 for late summer. For summer trapped birds, a significantly greater proportion of males than females contained elevated lead levels. These findings indicate that lead poisoning may be a year-round event in certain areas of the Sacramento Valley.

  19. Application of well data in oil and gas assessment - Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelson, Philip H.; Schenk, Christopher J.; Bird, Kenneth J.

    1998-01-01

    A current assessment of oil and gas resources in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge 1002 area by the U.S. Geological Survey relies upon seismic data, geological mapping of exposures south and west of the assessment area and exploratory wells. Well data assembled for the 41 wells include: well logs, core descriptions and measurements, formation tops, biostratigraphic boundaries, drill-stem tests, casing points, fission-track age dates, vitrinite reflectance, and organic-carbon content. These data are used in the synthesis of all available data and presentation on a well-by-well basis, and extraction of volumetric parameters that are used to assess undiscovered accumulations.

  20. Potential oil and gas resources of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska: 1002 area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bird, K.J.

    2000-01-01

    A geologist with extensive experience in the study of northern Alaska's petroleum resources provides an overview of the first comprehensive reassessment of the petroleum potential of section 1002 of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge since the original study of 1987. The paper surveys the region's geology, and provides a description of the methods employed and assessment results. The current resource is compared with that estimated in the original study, and is considerably larger, given the availability of new geologic and geophysical data, improved seismic processing and interpretation capabilities, and changes in the economics of North Slope oil development.

  1. Future frequencies of extreme weather events in the National Wildlife Refuges of the conterminous U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martinuzzi, Sebastian; Allstadt, Andrew J.; Bateman, Brooke L.; Heglund, Patricia J.; Pidgeon, Anna M.; Thogmartin, Wayne E.; Vavrus, Stephen J.; Radeloff, Volker C.

    2016-01-01

    Climate change is a major challenge for managers of protected areas world-wide, and managers need information about future climate conditions within protected areas. Prior studies of climate change effects in protected areas have largely focused on average climatic conditions. However, extreme weather may have stronger effects on wildlife populations and habitats than changes in averages. Our goal was to quantify future changes in the frequency of extreme heat, drought, and false springs, during the avian breeding season, in 415 National Wildlife Refuges in the conterminous United States. We analyzed spatially detailed data on extreme weather frequencies during the historical period (1950–2005) and under different scenarios of future climate change by mid- and late-21st century. We found that all wildlife refuges will likely experience substantial changes in the frequencies of extreme weather, but the types of projected changes differed among refuges. Extreme heat is projected to increase dramatically in all wildlife refuges, whereas changes in droughts and false springs are projected to increase or decrease on a regional basis. Half of all wildlife refuges are projected to see increases in frequency (> 20% higher than the current rate) in at least two types of weather extremes by mid-century. Wildlife refuges in the Southwest and Pacific Southwest are projected to exhibit the fastest rates of change, and may deserve extra attention. Climate change adaptation strategies in protected areas, such as the U.S. wildlife refuges, may need to seriously consider future changes in extreme weather, including the considerable spatial variation of these changes.

  2. Land conveyances within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Introduced in the Senate, One Hundredth Congress, Second Session, Calendar No. 579

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-01-01

    The Committee on Energy and Natural Resources to which was referred the bill (S. 1493) to clarify the authority of the Secretary of the Interior to make land exchanges within the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, having considered the same, reports favorably thereon with an amendment to the text and an amendment to the title and recommends that the bill, as amended, do pass. S. 1493, as amended, prohibits the Secretary of the Interior from conveying, by exchange or otherwise, lands or interest in lands with the Coastal Plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, other than lands validly selected prior to July 28, 1987, without prior approval by Act of Congress.

  3. 76 FR 41286 - Conboy Lake and Toppenish National Wildlife Refuges, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... that will ensure the best possible approach to wildlife, plant, and habitat conservation, while... compliance with those laws and regulations. Refuge Overviews Conboy Lake NWR Conboy Lake NWR covers... * * * or (B) plants'' (16 U.S.C. 1534, Endangered Species Act of 1973). The refuge also fills an...

  4. 77 FR 75644 - Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Harney County, OR; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... final CCP/EIS for the Refuge. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR... notice of availability in the Federal Register (77 FR 13141, March 5, 2012). The Refuge was established... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  5. 75 FR 1404 - Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Soldotna, AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ..., 2008 (73 FR 26140). We announced the availability of the final CCP/EIS in the Federal Register on August 27, 2009 (74 FR 43718). In accordance with National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) (40 CFR 1506.6... Alternative E will be modified as follows: We will alter the opening date of seasonally closed lakes...

  6. 75 FR 8396 - Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, Cold Bay, Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-24

    ..., and from the State of Alaska on June 19, 2009. Our notice of August 6, 2009 (74 FR 39336), initiated... of the Aleutian arc chain of volcanoes. Landforms include mountains, active volcanoes, U-shaped... level to the 9,372-foot Shishaldin Volcano. Shishaldin Volcano is a designated National Natural...

  7. Vegetation communities at Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Struckhoff, Matthew A.; Grabner, Keith W.; Stroh, Esther D.

    2011-01-01

    New and existing data were used to describe and map vegetation communities at Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge. Existing data had been gathered during the growing seasons of 2002, 2003, and 2004. New data were collected in 2007 to describe previously unsampled communities and communities within which insufficient data had been collected. Plot data and field observations were used to describe 17 natural and semi-natural communities at the Association level of the National Vegetation Classification System (NVCS). Four ruderal communities not included in the NVCS are also described. Data were used to inform delineation of communities using aerial photos from 2000, 2002, 2003, 2005, 2006, and 2007. During this process, eleven additional land cover classes including cultural features, managed vegetation communities, and water features were identified. These features were mapped, some were described, but no vegetation data were collected. In 2009, nearly all community polygons were field visited and classified to the Association level. When necessary, polygon boundaries were adjusted based on field observations. The final map includes 482 polygons of 27 land cover classes encompassing 3,174 hectares on 5 units of the refuge. Data and information will inform the development of the refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plan.

  8. Detection probabilities and site occupancy estimates for amphibians at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, L.L.; Barichivich, W.J.; Staiger, J.S.; Smith, Kimberly G.; Dodd, C.K.

    2006-01-01

    We conducted an amphibian inventory at Okefenokee National Wildlife Refuge from August 2000 to June 2002 as part of the U.S. Department of the Interior's national Amphibian Research and Monitoring Initiative. Nineteen species of amphibians (15 anurans and 4 caudates) were documented within the Refuge, including one protected species, the Gopher Frog Rana capito. We also collected 1 y of monitoring data for amphibian populations and incorporated the results into the inventory. Detection probabilities and site occupancy estimates for four species, the Pinewoods Treefrog (Hyla femoralis), Pig Frog (Rana grylio), Southern Leopard Frog (R. sphenocephala) and Carpenter Frog (R. virgatipes) are presented here. Detection probabilities observed in this study indicate that spring and summer surveys offer the best opportunity to detect these species in the Refuge. Results of the inventory suggest that substantial changes may have occurred in the amphibian fauna within and adjacent to the swamp. However, monitoring the amphibian community of Okefenokee Swamp will prove difficult because of the logistical challenges associated with a rigorous statistical assessment of status and trends.

  9. Ground-water contamination from lead shot at Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, Delaware

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Soeder, Daniel J.; Miller, Cherie V.

    2003-01-01

    Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge is located in southeastern Delaware in coastal lowlands along the margin of Delaware Bay. For 37 years, the Broadkiln Sportsman?s Club adjacent to the refuge operated a trap-shooting range, with the clay-target launchers oriented so that the expended lead shot from the range dropped into forested wetland areas on the refuge property. Investigators have estimated that up to 58,000 shotgun pellets per square foot are present in locations on the refuge where the lead shot fell to the ground. As part of the environmental risk assessment for the site, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigated the potential for lead contamination in ground water. Results from two sampling rounds in 19 shallow wells indicate that elevated levels of dissolved lead are present in ground water at the site. The lead and associated metals, such as antimony and arsenic (common shotgun pellet alloys), are being transported along shallow ground-water flowpaths toward an open-water slough in the forested wetland adjacent to the downrange target area. Water samples from wells located along the bank of the slough contained dissolved lead concentrations higher than 400 micrograms per liter, and as high as 1 milligram per liter. In contrast, a natural background concentration of lead from ground water in a well upgradient from the site is about 1 microgram per liter. Two water samples collected several months apart from the slough directly downgradient of the shooting range contained 24 and 212 micrograms per liter of lead, respectively. The data indicate that lead from a concentrated deposit of shotgun pellets on the refuge has been mobilized through a combination of acidic water conditions and a very sandy, shallow, unconfined aquifer, and is moving along ground-water flowpaths toward the surface-water drainage. Data from this study will be used to help delineate the lead plume, and determine the fate and transport of lead from the source area.

  10. 50 CFR 32.4 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.4 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing. Wildlife refuge areas may be opened to...

  11. 50 CFR 32.1 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to hunting.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.1 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to hunting. The opening of a wildlife refuge area to...

  12. 50 CFR 32.4 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.4 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing. Wildlife refuge areas may be opened to...

  13. 50 CFR 32.4 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.4 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing. Wildlife refuge areas may be opened to...

  14. 50 CFR 32.4 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.4 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing. Wildlife refuge areas may be opened to...

  15. 50 CFR 32.4 - Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 9 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Opening of wildlife refuge areas to... THE INTERIOR (CONTINUED) THE NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE SYSTEM HUNTING AND FISHING General Provisions § 32.4 Opening of wildlife refuge areas to fishing. Wildlife refuge areas may be opened to...

  16. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Steigerwald Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 2000-2001.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna

    2001-09-01

    Steigenvald Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR, refuge) was established as a result of the U. S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) transferring ownership of the Stevenson tract located in the historic Steigerwald Lake site to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS, Service) for the mitigation of the fish and wildlife losses associated with the construction of a second powerhouse at the Bonneville Dam on the Columbia River and relocation of the town of North Bonneville (Public Law 98-396). The construction project was completed in 1983 and resulted in the loss of approximately 577 acres of habitat on the Washington shore of the Columbia River (USFWS, 1982). The COE determined that acquisition and development of the Steigenvald Lake area, along with other on-site project management actions, would meet their legal obligation to mitigate for these impacts (USCOE, 1985). Mitigation requirements included restoration and enhancement of this property to increase overall habitat diversity and productivity. From 1994 to 1999, 317 acres of additional lands, consisting of four tracts of contiguous land, were added to the original refuge with Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds provided through the Washington Wildlife Mitigation Agreement. These tracts comprised Straub (191 acres), James (90 acres), Burlington Northern (27 acres), and Bliss (9 acres). Refer to Figure 1. Under this Agreement, BPA budgeted $2,730,000 to the Service for 'the protection, mitigation, and enhancement of wildlife and wildlife habitat that was adversely affected by the construction of Federal hydroelectric dams on the Columbia River or its tributaries' in the state of Washington (BPA, 1993). Lands acquired for mitigation resulting from BPA actions are evaluated using the habitat evaluation procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the Federal Columbia River Power

  17. A white pelican and egrets in the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    A white pelican and several small egrets rest on the bank of a pond in in the waters of the Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, which shares a boundary with Kennedy Space Center. White pelicans inhabit marshy lakes and along the Pacific and Texas coasts. They winter from Florida and southern California south to Panama, chiefly in coastal lagoons. They are frequently seen flying in long lines, flapping and sailing in unison, but also ride rising air currents to soar gracefully in circles. The range of the egret includes southern and eastern states, Mexico, Central and South America, and the West Indies. The Refuge encompasses 92,000 acres that are a habitat for more than 331 species of birds, 31 mammals, 117 fishes, and 65 amphibians and reptiles. The marshes and open water of the refuge provide wintering areas for 23 species of migratory waterfowl, as well as a year-round home for great blue herons, great egrets, wood storks, cormorants, brown pelicans and other species of marsh and shore birds, as well as a variety of insects.

  18. Contaminants evaluation of Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Kansas and Missouri, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, George T.; Nash, Tom J.; Janes, David E.

    1995-05-01

    At the new Marais des Cygnes National Wildlife Refuge in Linn County, Kansas, and Bates County, Missouri, USA, we evaluated long-lived contaminants before acquisition of the land for the refuge. We sampled sediments at 16 locations and fish at seven locations. The samples were analyzed for metals and for chlorinated hydrocarbon compounds. Selected sediment samples also were analyzed for aliphatic hydrocarbons. Arsenic concentrations in sediment samples from six locations were elevated compared to US norms, but arsenic was not detected in any fish composite. Mercury concentrations in largemouth bass from two locations were comparable to the 85th percentile concentrations in nationwide fish collections. Most sediment concentrations of other metals were unlikely to have detrimental effects on biota. No chlorinated hydrocarbons were detected in any sediment sample. Chlordane compound concentrations in fish composites from two sites at the eastern end of the sampling area were 0.127 and 0.228 μg/g wet weight, respectively, which are high enough to cause concern. Most aliphatic hydrocarbons detected were found at low concentrations and probably were natural in origin. We concluded that there are no serious contaminants concerns within the project area, but past use of arsenical pesticides may mean a legacy of elevated soil arsenic levels in parts of the area and some use of banned pesticides such as chlordane and DDT likely is still occurring near the refuge.

  19. Population trends of forest birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Pratt, Thane K.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Jeffrey, John J.; Woodworth, Bethany L.

    2010-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge was established to protect native Hawaiian forest birds, particularly endangered species. Management for forest restoration on the refuge has consisted mainly of removing feral ungulates, controlling invasive alien plants, and reforesting former pastures. To assess effects of this habitat improvement for forest birds, we estimated density annually by distance sampling and examined population trends for native and alien passerines over the 21 years since the refuge was established. We examined long-term trends and recent short-term trajectories in three study areas: (1) reforested pastureland, (2) heavily grazed open forest that was recovering, and (3) lightly grazed closed forest that was relatively intact. Three species of native birds and two species of alien birds had colonized the reforested pasture and were increasing. In the open forest, densities of all eight native species were either stable or increasing. Long-term trends for alien birds were also generally stable or increasing. Worryingly, however, during the most recent 9 years, in the open forest trajectories of native species were decreasing or inconclusive, but in the reforested pasture they generally increased. The closed forest was surveyed in only the most recent 9 years, and trajectories of native species there were mixed. Overall, long-term population trends in Hakalau are stable or increasing, contrasting with declines in most other areas of Hawai'i over the same period. However, more recent mixed results may indicate emergent problems for this important bird area.

  20. Visitor and community survey results for Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge and Lighthouse: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie; Gillette, Shana C.; Koontz, Lynne; Stewart, Susan C.; Loomis, John; Wundrock, Katherine D.

    2005-01-01

    The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) and the Central Federal Lands Highway Division of the Federal Highway Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation are currently pursuing the planning and potential design of an alternative transportation system (ATS) for Kilauea Point National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge or Kilauea Point NWR). The USFWS and CFLHD seek an alternative transportation solution that provides the highest quality visitor experience and is sensitive to biological and cultural resources and the needs of the local community. In planning the alternative transportation system, managers need to consider how an ATS would change factors such as visitor access, visitor experience, visitor willingness to pay, and visitor net economic benefits. The Policy Analysis and Science Assistance branch (PASA) at the U.S. Geological Survey Fort Collins Science Center is dedicated to studying relations between humans and the environment. The objective of PASA is to conduct studies to understand how humans are affected by environmental management decisions and how human activities impact use and conservation of natural resources.

  1. Landsat-faciliated vegetation classification of the Kenai National Wildlife Refuge and adjacent areas, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S. S.; Shasby, M.B.; Bailey, T.N.

    1985-01-01

    A Landsat-based vegetation map was prepared for Kenai National Wildlife Refuge and adjacent lands, 2 million and 2.5 million acres respectively. The refuge lies within the middle boreal sub zone of south central Alaska. Seven major classes and sixteen subclasses were recognized: forest (closed needleleaf, needleleaf woodland, mixed); deciduous scrub (lowland and montane, subalpine); dwarf scrub (dwarf shrub tundra, lichen tundra, dwarf shrub and lichen tundra, dwarf shrub peatland, string bog/wetlands); herbaceous (graminoid meadows and marshes); scarcely vegetated areas ; water (clear, moderately turbid, highly turbid); and glaciers. The methodology employed a cluster-block technique. Sample areas were described based on a combination of helicopter-ground survey, aerial photo interpretation, and digital Landsat data. Major steps in the Landsat analysis involved: preprocessing (geometric connection), spectral class labeling of sample areas, derivation of statistical parameters for spectral classes, preliminary classification of the entree study area using a maximum-likelihood algorithm, and final classification through ancillary information such as digital elevation data. The vegetation map (scale 1:250,000) was a pioneering effort since there were no intermediate-sclae maps of the area. Representative of distinctive regional patterns, the map was suitable for use in comprehensive conservation planning and wildlife management.

  2. Investigation of frog abnormalities on national wildlife refuges in the Northeast U.S.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eaton-Poole, L.; Pinkney, A.E.; Green, D.E.; Sutherland, D.R.; Babbitt, K.J.; ,

    2003-01-01

    To address concerns about frog abnormalities, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service examined over 3,643 frogs and toads on National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. The objectives were to: 1) determine if certain refuges had sites where abnormalities were frequently observed; 2) evaluate if the prevalence of abnormalities at a site was consistent within a season and among years; and 3) investigate possible causes. Sampling was conducted from 1999 through 2001. A complete sample from a site consisted of ???50 metamorphs of one species. The prevalence of abnormalities ranged from 0 to 15% and fluctuated within season and among years. The most common external abnormalities were truncated limbs, and missing limbs, feet, and digits. Frogs with duplication of limb segments were rare (6). Based on radiographical examinations of 89 abnormal frogs, 55 had abnormalities due to trauma, 22 due to malformations, and 12 could not be classified. Metacercariae of the trematode Ribeiroia were detected in substantial numbers in two species from Iroquois NWR, with one specimen having supernumerary hindlimbs. We recommend continued sampling and integrated, causal evaluations on NWRs where the prevalence of abnormalities exceeds 5% or where the types of abnormalities warrant further study.

  3. 78 FR 49762 - Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge, PR; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... in the Federal Register on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77828). For more about the refuge and planning... July 11, 2012 (77 FR 40893). We provided copies of the Draft CCP/EA to a number of individuals, non... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education...

  4. 76 FR 48877 - Kootenai National Wildlife Refuge, Boundary County, ID; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-09

    ... Wildlife Refuge. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 8102; February 23..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and... the public and obtain comments. The meetings were announced through local media outlets, on the...

  5. 78 FR 58340 - Cokeville Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, WY; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-23

    ... started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 57328; November 5, 2009). This notice... Cokeville, the Lincoln County Planning Department, the Bureau of Land Management, and the public raised... from cattle on would alleviate refuge lands to wildlife and keep wildlife cattle comingling...

  6. Dust control products at Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge, Texas: environmental safety and performance

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kunz, Bethany K.; Little, Edward E.

    2015-01-01

    Controlling fugitive dust while protecting natural resources is a challenge faced by all managers of unpaved roads. Unfortunately, road managers choosing between dust control products often have little objective environmental information to aid their decisions. To address this information gap, the U.S. Geological Survey and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service collaborated on a field test of three dust control products with the objectives of (a) evaluating product performance under real-world conditions, (b) verifying the environmental safety of products identified as practically nontoxic in laboratory tests, and (c) testing the feasibility of several environmental monitoring techniques for use in dust control tests. In cooperation with refuge staff and product vendors, three products (one magnesium chloride plus binder, one cellulose, and one synthetic fluid plus binder) were applied in July 2012 to replicated road sections at the Hagerman National Wildlife Refuge in Texas. These sections were monitored periodically for 12 months after application. Product performance was assessed by mobile-mounted particulate-matter meters measuring production of fugitive dust and by observations of road conditions. Environmental safety was evaluated through on-site biological observations and leaching tests with samples of treated aggregate. All products reduced dust and improved surface condition during those 12 months. Planned environmental measurements were not always compatible with day-to-day refuge management actions; this incompatibility highlighted the need for flexible biological monitoring plans. As one of the first field tests of dust suppressants that explicitly incorporated biological endpoints, this effort provides valuable information for improving field tests and for developing laboratory or semifield alternatives.

  7. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... mean high tide of the Beaufort Lagoon, located in section 28, T. 6 N., R. 40 E., Umiat Meridian; Thence... Meridian at the line of extreme low tide; Thence northwesterly, along the northerly boundary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at the line of extreme low tide on the seaward side of all offshore bars,...

  8. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... mean high tide of the Beaufort Lagoon, located in section 28, T. 6 N., R. 40 E., Umiat Meridian; Thence... Meridian at the line of extreme low tide; Thence northwesterly, along the northerly boundary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at the line of extreme low tide on the seaward side of all offshore bars,...

  9. 50 CFR Appendix I to Part 37 - Legal Description of the Coastal Plain, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... mean high tide of the Beaufort Lagoon, located in section 28, T. 6 N., R. 40 E., Umiat Meridian; Thence... Meridian at the line of extreme low tide; Thence northwesterly, along the northerly boundary of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge at the line of extreme low tide on the seaward side of all offshore bars,...

  10. 75 FR 22620 - Upper Klamath, Lower Klamath, Tule Lake, Bear Valley, and Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuges...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... pelican and several heron species. Bald eagle and osprey nest nearby and can sometimes be seen fishing in... the Endangered Species Act to protect a major night roost site for wintering bald eagles in Southern... bald eagle pairs. Clear Lake National Wildlife Refuge was established by President William Taft in...

  11. Effects of Prairie Reconstruction on Soil-Water and Groundwater Nutrient Concentrations, Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prairie reconstruction is increasingly viewed as a viable best management practice for reducing nutrient losses in agricultural regions. At the Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge in Prairie City, IA, we are monitoring the effects of prairie reconstruction on subsurface water quality at a single sit...

  12. Cabeza Prieta National Wildlife Refuge: A survey of visitor experiences: Report to respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ponds, Phadrea D.; Burkardt, Nina; Koontz, Lynne

    2004-01-01

    What are the regional economic impacts of visitor spending? In general the respondents indicated support for current management practices of CPNWR. We found that people came to the Refuge to experience a connection with the resource and the environment. More than half of the respondents said that viewing the desert scenery, seeking wilderness solitude and viewing wildlife were the most important reasons for making the visit to the refuge.

  13. Incidence of ozone symptoms on vegetation within a National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, USA.

    PubMed

    Davis, Donald D; Orendovici, Teodora

    2006-10-01

    During 1993-1996 and 2001-2003, we evaluated the percentage of plants (incidence) exhibiting ozone-induced foliar symptoms on vegetation within a National Wildlife Refuge located along the Atlantic Ocean coast of New Jersey, USA. Incidence varied among plant species and years. Bioindicator plants most sensitive to ozone, across all years, included native common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and wild grape (Vitis spp.), as well as introduced tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). Less sensitive bioindicators included Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) and winged sumac (Rhus coppolina). Black cherry (Prunus serotina) and sassafras (Sassafras albidum) were least sensitive. The greatest incidence of ozone symptoms, across all plant species, occurred in 1996, followed by 2001>1995>1994>1993>2003>2002. A model was developed that showed a statistically significant relationship between incidence of ozone symptoms and the following parameters: plant species, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and the interaction of W126 x N100 measures of ambient ozone.

  14. Summary of oceanographic and water-quality measurements near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Maryland, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ganju, Neil K.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Brennand, Patrick; Derby, R. Kyle; Brooks, Thomas W.; Guntenspergen, Glenn R.; Martini, Marinna A.; Borden, Jonathan; Baldwin, Sandra M.

    2012-01-01

    Suspended-sediment transport is a critical element governing the geomorphology of tidal marshes. Marshes rely on both organic material and inorganic sediment deposition to maintain their elevation relative to sea level. In wetlands near the Blackwater National Wildlife Refuge, Maryland, portions of the salt marsh have been subsiding relative to sea level since the early 20th century. Other portions of the marsh have been successful at maintaining elevation. The U.S. Geological Survey performed observational deployments to measure suspended-sediment concentration in the tidal channels in order to understand the magnitude of suspended-sediment concentrations, the sediment-transport mechanisms, and differences between two marsh areas, one that subsided and one that maintained elevation. We deployed optical turbidity sensors and acoustic velocity meters at multiple sites over two periods in 2011. This report presents the time-series of oceanographic data collected during those field studies, including velocity, depth, turbidity, salinity, water temperature, and pH.

  15. Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife refuge, northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

    1988-02-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerian sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak, Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group inched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone.

  16. Initial Biotic Survey of Lisbon Bottom, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Humburg, Dale D.; Burke, Vincent J.

    1999-01-01

    The 2,300-acre Lisbon Bottom Unit, located in central Missouri, became part of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge (NFWR) after the Great Flood of 1993 devastated the Unit?s farmland and network of levees. As a result, interdisciplinary studies were initiated through collaboration among various researches, universities, and State and Federal conservation agencies to investigate the short-term effects of the flood and to expand information about the Missouri River and flood-plain systems. The studies included in these chapters investigate diverse aspects of Lisbon Bottom Unit?s physical setting and biota and provide baseline information that managers can use to assess restoration efforts on Lisbon Bottom and other units of the Big Muddy NFWR.

  17. Incidence of ozone symptoms on vegetation within a National Wildlife Refuge in New Jersey, USA.

    PubMed

    Davis, Donald D; Orendovici, Teodora

    2006-10-01

    During 1993-1996 and 2001-2003, we evaluated the percentage of plants (incidence) exhibiting ozone-induced foliar symptoms on vegetation within a National Wildlife Refuge located along the Atlantic Ocean coast of New Jersey, USA. Incidence varied among plant species and years. Bioindicator plants most sensitive to ozone, across all years, included native common milkweed (Asclepias syriaca) and wild grape (Vitis spp.), as well as introduced tree-of-heaven (Ailanthus altissima). Less sensitive bioindicators included Virginia creeper (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) and winged sumac (Rhus coppolina). Black cherry (Prunus serotina) and sassafras (Sassafras albidum) were least sensitive. The greatest incidence of ozone symptoms, across all plant species, occurred in 1996, followed by 2001>1995>1994>1993>2003>2002. A model was developed that showed a statistically significant relationship between incidence of ozone symptoms and the following parameters: plant species, Palmer Drought Severity Index, and the interaction of W126 x N100 measures of ambient ozone. PMID:16458398

  18. Manganese species migration in soil at the Sabine National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana.

    PubMed

    Gauthreaux, K; Hardaway, C; Falgoust, T; Noble, C O; Sneddon, J; Beck, M J; Beck, J N

    2001-10-01

    A modified sequential extraction procedure was employed to speciate the chemical forms of Mn in sediment using flame atomic absorption spectrophotometry. Concentrations were determined in five different fractions for each sample (Mn in the exchangeable form, bound to carbonates, bound to Mn/Fe oxides, bound to organic matter and in the residual form). The determinations were made for sediments obtained from the Sabine National Wildlife Refuge while a marshland reclamation project was being conducted. Sediment samples were taken from Ship Channel dredge spoils (thought to be contaminated), an old reclamation site, a new reclamation site and a reference site. The results indicated that the Ship Channel sediments were not contaminated, but revealed an Mn "pumping" model, which proposes that additional Mn added to a similar site is concentrated near the surface soil layers by environmental conditions, which may be a cause of the observed slow recovery of vegetation at one of the more recently developed sites.

  19. Seroprevalence of West Nile Virus in feral horses on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Franson, J. Christian; Hofmeister, Erik K.; Collins, Gail H.; Dusek, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    We screened 1,397 feral horses (Equus caballus) on Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada, United States, for IgM and IgG against flavivirus during 2004–2006, 2008, and 2009. Positive serum samples were tested for neutralizing antibodies to West Nile virus (WNV) and St. Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV). One animal was positive for antibody against WNV in 2004, but all others tested in 2004–2006 were negative. In 2008 and 2009, we found evidence of increasing seropositive horses with age, whereas seroprevalence of WNV decreased from 19% in 2008 to 7.2% in 2009. No horses were positive for antibody against SLEV. Being unvaccinated, feral horses can be useful for WNV surveillance.

  20. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San LuisNational Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-07-15

    San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex to meetReclamation s obligations for Level 4 water supply under the CentralValley Project Improvement Act. Hydrogeological assessment of the EastBear Creek Unit of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge was conductedusing a combination of field investigations and a survey of availableliterature from past US Geological Survey Reports and reports by localgeological consultants. Conservative safe yield estimates made using theavailable data show that the East Bear Creek Unit may have sufficientgroundwater resources in the shallow groundwater aquifer to meet aboutbetween 25 percent and 52 percent of its current Level II and between 17percent and 35 percent of its level IV water supply needs. The rate ofsurface and lateral recharge to the Unit and the design of the well fieldand the layout and capacity of pumped wells will decide both thepercentage of annual needs that the shallow aquifer can supply andwhether this yield is sustainable without affecting long-term aquiferquality. In order to further investigate the merits of pumping the nearsurface aquifer, which appears to have reasonable water quality for usewithin the East Bear Creek Unit -- monitoring of the potential sources ofaquifer recharge and the installation of a pilot shallow well would bewarranted. Simple monitoring stations could be installed both upstreamand downstream of both the San Joaquin River and Bear Creek and beinstrumented to measureriver stage, flow and electrical conductivity.Ideally this would be done in conjunction with a shallow pilot well,pumped to supply a portion of the Unit's needs for the wetland inundationperiod.

  1. Prevalence of the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis) at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sigafus, Brent H.; Hossack, Blake R.; Muths, Erin L.; Schwalbe, Cecil R.

    2014-01-01

    Information on disease presence can be of use to natural resource managers, especially in areas supporting threatened and endangered species that occur coincidentally with species that are suspected vectors for disease. Ad hoc reports may be of limited utility (Muths et al. 2009), but a general sense of pathogen presence (or absence) can inform management directed at T&E species, especially in regions where disease is suspected to have caused population declines (Bradley et al. 2002). The Chiricahua Leopard Frog (Lithobates chiricahuensis), a species susceptible to infection by the amphibian chytrid fungus (Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, Bd) (Bradley et al. 2002), and the non-native, invasive American Bullfrog (L. catesbeianus), a suspected vector for chytridiomycosis (Schloegel et al. 2012, Gervasi et al. 2013), both occur at Buenos Aires National Wildlife Refuge (BANWR) and surrounding lands in southern Arizona. Efforts to eradicate the bullfrog from BANWR began in 1997 (Suhre, 2010). Eradication from the southern portion of BANWR was successful by 2008 but the bullfrog remains present at the Arivaca Cienega and in areas immediately adjacent to the refuge (Fig. 1). Curtailing the re-invasion of the bullfrog into BANWR will require vigilance as to ensure the health of Chiricahua Leopard Frog populations.

  2. Intermediate-scale vegetation mapping of Innoko National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska using Landsat MSS digital data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, Stephen S.; Markon, Carl J.

    1988-01-01

    A Landsat-derived vegetation map was prepared for lnnoko National Wildlife Refuge. The refuge lies within the northern boreal subzone of northwestern central Alaska. Six major vegetation classes and 21 subclasses were recognized: forest (closed needleleaf, open needleleaf, needleleaf woodland, mixed, and broadleaf); broadleaf scrub (lowland, upland burn regeneration, subalpine); dwarf scrub (prostrate dwarf shrub tundra, erect dwarf shrub heath, dwarf shrub-graminoid peatland, dwarf shrub-graminoid tussock peatland, dwarf shrub raised bog with scattered trees, dwarf shrub-graminoid marsh); herbaceous (graminoid bog, graminoid marsh, graminoid tussock-dwarf shrub peatland); scarcely vegetated areas (scarcely vegetated scree and floodplain); and water (clear, sedimented). The methodology employed a cluster-block technique. Sample areas were described based on a combination of helicopter-ground survey, aerial photo-interpretation, and digital Landsat data. Major steps in the Landsat analysis involved preprocessing (geometric correction), derivation of statistical parameters for spectral classes, spectral class labeling of sample areas, preliminary classification of the entire study area using a maximum-likelihood algorithm, and final classification utilizing ancillary information such as digital elevation data. The final product is 1:250,000-scale vegetation map representative of distinctive regional patterns and suitable for use in comprehensive conservation planning.

  3. Hydrologic conditions in the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge, 2006-2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reese, Ronald S.

    2010-01-01

    Much of the surface water that flows into the Florida Panther National Wildlife Refuge (FPNWR) probably exits southward through Fakahatchee Strand as it did prior to development, because culverts and bridges constructed along I-75 allow overland flow to continue southward within the strand. During the dry season and periods of low water levels, however, much of the flow is diverted westward by the I-75 Canal into Merritt Canal at the southwestern corner of the FPNWR. Substantial drainage of groundwater from the FPNWR into the I-75 Canal is indicated by (1) greater surface-water outflows than inflows in the FPNWR, (2) flows that increase to the west along the I-75 Canal, and (3) correlation of rapid groundwater-level declines at sites close to the I-75 Canal with rapid declines in canal surface-water levels due to operation of a control structure in the Merritt Canal. This drainage of groundwater probably occurs through permeable limestone exposed in the I-75 Canal bank below a cap rock layer. Compared to predevelopment conditions, the time currently required to drain ponded water in some areas of the refuge should be less because of accelerated groundwater discharge into the I-75 Canal caused by the lowering of water levels in the canal during the peak of the wet season extending into the early dry season. This drainage probably reduces the duration of the hydroperiod in these wetlands from the wet season into the dry season, possibly reducing or limiting the extent or vitality of wildlife and plant community habitats.

  4. Additions to the aquatic diptera (Chaoboridae, Chironomidae, Culicidae, Tabanidae, Tipulidae) fauna of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chordas, Stephen W.; Hudson, Patrick L.; Chapman, Eric G.

    2004-01-01

    The dipteran fauna of Arkansas is generally poorly known. A previous study of the Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the White River National Wildlife Refuge, the largest refuge in Arkansas, reported only 12 diptera taxa out of 219 taxa collected (Chordas et al., 1996). Most of the dipterans from this study were identified only to the family level. The family Chironomidae is a large, diverse group and was predicted to be much more diverse in the refuge than indicated by previous studies. In this study, Chironomidae were targeted, with other aquatic or semiaquatic dipterans also retained, in collections designed to better define the dipteran fauna of the White River National Wildlife Refuge. Adult dipterans were collected from 22 sites within the refuge using sweep-nets, two types of blacklight traps, and lighted fan traps in June of 2001. Specimens from previous studies were retrieved and identified to the lowest possible taxonomic level. A total of 4,917 specimens representing 122 taxa was collected. The 122 taxa were comprised of the following: two chaoborids, 83 chironomids, 15 culicids, nine tabanids, and 13 tipulids. Of these, 46 species are new state records for Arkansas. Nine undescribed species of chironomids were collected, and eight species records represent significant range extensions.

  5. Toxicity to amphibians of environmental extracts from natural waters in National Parks and Fish and Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, Christine M.; Little, Edward E.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian population declines are not limited to overly degraded habitats, but often occur in relatively pristine environments such as national parks or wildlife refuges, thus forcing biologists to examine less obvious causes for declines such as the presence of contaminants. The objective of our study was to extract naturally-occurring compounds from amphibian habitats (using semipermeable membrane devices) in three national parks or wildlife refuges (two sites within Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, Big Bend National Park, and Kenai National Wildlife Refuge), and assess their toxicity to developing larvae using bioassays. Extracts did not cause mortality, so all effects observed were sublethal, influencing life history characteristics. In all three areas studied, amphibians reared in extracts from at least one of the two sites exhibited either a lengthened larval period or reduced mass at metamorphosis. Extracts from both the air and water at one site in Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park lengthened the larval period, which is in agreement with studies showing elevated levels of aerially transported contaminants at sites such as this within the park. Ultraviolet radiation, which is also suspected of having caused amphibian declines and was included as a factor in our study, did not act alone or alter the toxicity of the extracts.

  6. Toxicity to amphibians of environmental extracts from natural waters in National Parks and Fish and Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, C.M.; Little, E.E.

    2005-01-01

    Amphibian population declines are not limited to overtly degraded habitats, but often occur in relatively pristine environments such as national parks or wildlife refuges, thus forcing biologists to examine less obvious causes for declines such as the presence of contaminants. The objective of our study was to extract naturally-occurring compounds from amphibian habitats (using semipermeable membrane devices) in three national parks or wildlife refuges (two sites within Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park, Big Bend National Park, and Kenai National Wildlife Refuge), and assess their toxicity to developing larvae using bioassays. Extracts did not cause mortality, so all effects observed were sublethal, influencing life history characteristics. In all three areas studied, amphibians reared in extracts from at least one of the two sites exhibited either a lengthened larval period or reduced mass at metamorphosis. Extracts from both the air and water at one site in Sequoia Kings Canyon National Park lengthened the larval period, which is in agreement with studies showing elevated levels of aerially transported contaminants at sites such as this within the park. Ultraviolet radiation, which is also suspected of having caused amphibian declines and was included as a factor in our study, did not act alone or alter the toxicity of the extracts. ?? ISSCA 2005.

  7. 78 FR 51205 - Culebra National Wildlife Refuge, PR; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-20

    ... the Federal Register on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77827). For more about the refuge and planning... 30-day public review and comment period via a Federal Register notice on July 11, 2012 (77 FR 40895... observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and...

  8. 77 FR 40895 - Culebra National Wildlife Refuge, PR; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77827). For more about the refuge, please see that notice. Background The... photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every... would continue. We would continue to provide for opportunistic wildlife observation and...

  9. 75 FR 59287 - Supawna Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Salem County, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... Jersey. We will announce and post details of the public meetings in local news media, via our project... the Federal Register on September 24, 2007 (72 FR 54280). Supawna Meadows NWR currently includes 3,016.... Refuge visitors engage in wildlife observation and photography, hunting, and fishing. Portions of...

  10. 77 FR 1500 - Plum Tree Island National Wildlife Refuge, Poquoson, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... opportunities for public input throughout the CCP process in the Federal Register, local news media, and on our..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and... Register, local news media, and on our refuge planning Web site at...

  11. 77 FR 7176 - Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Rockingham County, NH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... meetings and other opportunities for public input in local news media, via our project mailing list, and on... prepare a CCP in the Federal Register on June 17, 2009 (74 FR 28722). Great Bay NWR was established in... excellent wildlife observation and nature photography opportunities. Additionally, the refuge offers a...

  12. 77 FR 18856 - Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, LA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... notice in the Federal Register on January 9, 2009 (74 FR 915). For more about the refuge, see that notice..., wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at..., 2011 (76 FR 30190). A news release was sent out to four local, state, and regional newspapers,...

  13. 76 FR 582 - Elizabeth Hartwell Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Fairfax County, VA, and Featherstone...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... will also hold public meetings. We will announce upcoming public meetings in local news media, via our... notice of intent to prepare a CCP in the Federal Register on May 18, 2007 (72 FR 28066). Mason Neck and... Potomac River. Refuge visitors engage in wildlife observation and photography, environmental education...

  14. 78 FR 32270 - Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Soldotna, AK; Environmental Impact Statement for the Shadura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-29

    ... intermingled with hundreds of lakes. Boreal forests are home to moose, wolves, black and brown bears, lynx... of 1980 (Section 303 ) established the Refuge from the Kenai Moose Range and other lands, and set... wildlife populations and habitats in their natural diversity, including, but not limited to, moose,...

  15. 76 FR 18577 - Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, Volusia and Brevard Counties, FL; Collection of Entrance...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ... improved refuge boat ramps (Bairs Cove, Beacon 42, and Bio Lab). Fees are not required to enter any other... facilities: Boat ramps at Bairs Cove, Beacon 42, and Bio Lab; Black Point Wildlife Drive; public access roads... Bio Lab. If public comments were to provide substantive reasons why we should not collect...

  16. 76 FR 30190 - Atchafalaya National Wildlife Refuge, LA; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... notice on January 9, 2009 (74 FR 915). For more about the refuge and our CCP process, please see that... inventorying and monitoring; (3) land protection; (4) oil and gas operations; (5) enhancing wildlife- dependent... opportunities. Volunteer programs and friends groups also would be expanded to enhance all aspects of...

  17. Shorebird abundance and distribution on the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, S.; Bart, J.; Lanctot, Richard B.; Johnson, J.A.; Kendall, S.; Payer, D.; Johnson, J.

    2007-01-01

    The coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge hosts seven species of migratory shorebirds listed as highly imperiled or high priority by the U.S. Shorebird Conservation Plan and five species listed as Birds of Conservation Concern by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. During the first comprehensive shorebird survey of the 674 000 ha "1002 Area" on the coastal plain, we recorded 14 species of breeding shorebirds at 197 rapidly surveyed plots during June 2002 and 2004. We also estimated detection ratios with a double counting technique, using data collected at 37 intensively studied plots located on the North Slope of Alaska and northern Canada. We stratified the study area by major habitat types, including wetlands, moist areas, uplands, and riparian areas, using previously classified Landsat imagery. We developed population estimates with confidence limits by species, and estimated the total number of shorebirds in the study area to be 230 000 (95% CI: 104 000-363 000), which exceeds the biological criterion for classification as both a Western Hemisphere Shorebird Reserve Network Site of International Importance (100 000 birds) and a Ramsar Wetland of International Importance (20 000 birds), even when conservatively estimated. Species richness and the density of many species were highest in wetland or riparian habitats, which are clustered along the coast. ?? The Cooper Ornithological Society 2007.

  18. Subspecific affinity of black bears in the White River National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Warrillow, J.; Culver, M.; Hallerman, E.; Vaughan, M.

    2001-01-01

    The black bear population of the White River National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) is adjacent to populations of black bear in Louisiana (Urusus americanus luteolus) which are listed as threatened under the U.S. Endangered Species Act. Wildlife management plans can pose restrictions on bear harvests and timber extraction; therefore the management plan for the White River NWR is sensitive to subspecific classification of its bear population. The objective of this study was to analyze genetic variation in the White River NWR and seven adjacent populations of black bears to assess the subspecific affinity of the White River NWR population. Here we report the variation at seven microsatellite DNA loci among eight black bear populations. The patterns of genetic variation gave strong support for distinguishing a southern group of black bears comprised of the White River, Arkansas; Tensas River, Louisiana; Upper Atchafalaya, Louisiana; Lower Atchafalaya, Louisiana; and Alabama/Mississippi populations. Phylogenetic analysis of individual variation suggested that historical black bear introductions into Arkansas and Louisiana affected gene pools of certain southern receiving populations, but did not significantly change interpopulation relatedness. Phylogenetic inferences at both the population and individual levels support the hypothesis that the White River NWR population of black bears belongs to the U. a. luteolus subspecies.

  19. Micrometeorological data for energy-budget studies near Rogers Spring, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 1994

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nichols, W.D.; Rapp, T.R.

    1996-01-01

    Micrometeorological data were collected at two sites near Rogers Spring in the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge for use in energy-budget studies beginning in 1994. The data collected at each site included net radiation, air temperature at two heights, dew-point temperature at two heights, windspeed at two heights, soil heat flux, and soil temperature in the interval between the land surface and the buried heat-flux plates.

  20. Coastal erosion and archeological resources on national wildlife refuges in the Southeast. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Garrett, S.E.

    1983-12-01

    The Southeastern Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages a number of refuges on which coastal erosion is the major destructive force acting on archeological resources. In the past, the lack of knowledge about the resources being damaged or about the extent of erosional damage has precluded the Service from developing a regional preservation plan for these resources. This report summarizes the known information on prehistoric resources in each of the coastal refuges in the Southeast, and provides a basis for decision-making concerning the treatment of these resources.

  1. Assessment of sediments in the riverine impoundments of national wildlife refuges in the Souris River Basin, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Gleason, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Accelerated sedimentation of reservoirs and riverine impoundments is a major concern throughout the United States. Sediments not only fill impoundments and reduce their effective life span, but they can reduce water quality by increasing turbidity and introducing harmful chemical constituents such as heavy metals, toxic elements, and nutrients. U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service national wildlife refuges in the north-central part of the United States have documented high amounts of sediment accretion in some wetlands that could negatively affect important aquatic habitats for migratory birds and other wetland-dependent wildlife. Therefore, information pertaining to sediment accumulation in refuge impoundments potentially is important to guide conservation planning, including future management actions of individual impoundments. Lands comprising Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges, collectively known as the Souris River Basin refuges, encompass reaches of the Des Lacs and Souris Rivers of northwestern North Dakota. The riverine impoundments of the Souris River Basin refuges are vulnerable to sedimentation because of the construction of in-stream dams that interrupt and slow river flows and because of post-European settlement land-use changes that have increased the potential for soil erosion and transport to rivers. Information regarding sediments does not exist for these refuges, and U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service personnel have expressed interest in assessing refuge impoundments to support refuge management decisions. Sediment cores and surface sediment samples were collected from impoundments within Des Lacs, Upper Souris, and J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuges during 2004–05. Cores were used to estimate sediment accretion rates using radioisotope (cesium-137 [137Cs], lead-210 [210Pb]) dating techniques. Sediment cores and surface samples were analyzed for a suite of elements and agrichemicals, respectively. Examination of

  2. Spatial heterogeneity in statistical power to detect changes in lake area in Alaskan National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nicol, Samuel; Roach, Jennifer K.; Griffith, Brad

    2013-01-01

    Over the past 50 years, the number and size of high-latitude lakes have decreased throughout many regions; however, individual lake trends have been variable in direction and magnitude. This spatial heterogeneity in lake change makes statistical detection of temporal trends challenging, particularly in small analysis areas where weak trends are difficult to separate from inter- and intra-annual variability. Factors affecting trend detection include inherent variability, trend magnitude, and sample size. In this paper, we investigated how the statistical power to detect average linear trends in lake size of 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 %/year was affected by the size of the analysis area and the number of years of monitoring in National Wildlife Refuges in Alaska. We estimated power for large (930–4,560 sq km) study areas within refuges and for 2.6, 12.9, and 25.9 sq km cells nested within study areas over temporal extents of 4–50 years. We found that: (1) trends in study areas could be detected within 5–15 years, (2) trends smaller than 2.0 %/year would take >50 years to detect in cells within study areas, and (3) there was substantial spatial variation in the time required to detect change among cells. Power was particularly low in the smallest cells which typically had the fewest lakes. Because small but ecologically meaningful trends may take decades to detect, early establishment of long-term monitoring will enhance power to detect change. Our results have broad applicability and our method is useful for any study involving change detection among variable spatial and temporal extents.

  3. Pond Identification, Classification, and Inundation Dynamics at St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge in northwest Florida, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, J. W.; Calhoun, D.; Barichivich, J.

    2012-12-01

    The persistence and resilience of amphibian communities is largely dependent on adequate breeding habitat. This is especially important for threatened and endangered species that may often exist as isolated populations and have specific requirements for breeding. A study currently being conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey is investigating the feasibility of a repatriation effort of the Striped Newt (Notophthalmus perstriatus), a federal candidate species, within the St. Marks National Wildlife Refuge (SMNWR) in northwest Florida. This amphibian species requires ponds that are free of fishes and, for this reason, generally chooses ephemeral ponds as breeding sites. The delineation of potential breeding habitat is a first step in selecting candidate areas for repatriation. To achieve this, a LIDAR (Light Detection and Ranging) derived digital elevation model (DEM) and a topographic position index (TPI) classification scheme was used to identify and classify isolated depressions across the landscape. The TPI evaluates the difference in elevation from a central DEM cell to the mean elevation of a neighborhood of surrounding DEM cells and is a robust tool for locating depressional features within a landscape. These candidate depression features were then screened to remove large perennial ponds and smaller connected ponds from further consideration. In addition, the perimeters of twenty-two field identified ephemeral ponds were surveyed with a high precision RTK GPS (Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System) unit to provide a calibration dataset to evaluate the performance of the feature identification method. This set of ponds was also instrumented with water-level recorders to investigate inundation dynamics across a wide range of hydrologic conditions. We anticipate being able to classify pond hydroperiod—thus each pond's potential as breeding habitat—at the monitored locations through this combination of approaches. Using estimates of pond size

  4. Growth and sustainability of black bears at White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, Joseph D.; Eastridge, R.

    2006-01-01

    The black bear (Ursus americanus) population at White River National Wildlife Refuge is isolated and genetically distinct, but hunting occurs adjacent to refuge boundaries and females with cubs are removed annually for a reintroduction project. We trapped and radiotracked bears to determine level of exploitation and compare methods for estimating population growth and sustainability. We captured 260 bears (113 M:147 F), 414 times, from 1998 through 2003. Survival estimates based on radiotracking and mark–recapture indicated that hunting and translocations were significant sources of loss. Based on mark–recapture data (Pradel estimator), the annual population growth rate (λ) averaged 1.066 (SE = 0.077) when translocation removals occurred and averaged 0.961 (SE = 0.155) when both harvest and translocations occurred. Estimates of λ based on a population simulation model (program RISKMAN) averaged 1.061 (SD = 0.104) and 1.100 (SD = 0.111) when no removals occurred, 1.003 (SD = 0.097) and 1.046 (SD = 0.102) when translocations occurred, and 0.973 (SD = 0.096) and 1.006 (SD = 0.099) when both harvest and translocations occurred, depending on the survival rate estimates we used. The probability of population decline by >25% over a 10-year period ranged from 13.8 to 68.8%, given our estimated removal rates. We conclude that hunting and translocation losses are at or exceed the maximum the population is capable of sustaining. Although extinction risks of this important bear population are low over the near term, it should continue to be closely monitored by state and federal agencies. The mark–recapture method we used to estimate λ proved to be a reliable alternative to more costly population modeling methods.

  5. A digital model for planning water management at Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, David A.; McCarthy, Peter M.; Fields, Vanessa

    2011-01-01

    Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge is an important area for waterfowl production and migratory stopover in west-central Montana. Eight wetland units covering about 5,600 acres are the essential features of the refuge. Water availability for the wetland units can be uncertain owing to the large natural variations in precipitation and runoff and the high cost of pumping supplemental water. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has developed a digital model for planning water management. The model can simulate strategies for water transfers among the eight wetland units and account for variability in runoff and pumped water. This report describes this digital model, which uses a water-accounting spreadsheet to track inputs and outputs to each of the wetland units of Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Inputs to the model include (1) monthly values for precipitation, pumped water, runoff, and evaporation; (2) water-level/capacity data for each wetland unit; and (3) the pan-evaporation coefficient. Outputs include monthly water volume and flooded surface area for each unit for as many as 5 consecutive years. The digital model was calibrated by comparing simulated and historical measured water volumes for specific test years.

  6. Vascular flora of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge, westernmost Alaska Peninsula, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Talbot, S. S.; Talbot, S.L.; Schofield, W.B.

    2006-01-01

    The vascular flora of Izembek National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), where few previous collections had been reported, was collected and recorded at sites selected to represent the totality of environmental variation. A total of 349 species (339 native and 10 introduced) was identified. To provide a comparative phytogeographic framework, we analyzed data from published reports that categorized vascular plant distribution patterns from a circumpolar, North American, and Alaskan perspective. The native flora of the Izembek NWR primarily includes species of circumpolar (38%), eastern Asian (23%), Eurasian (18%), and North American (13%) distribution. The most important longitudinal distributional classes in North America consist of transcontinental (62%) and extreme western species (31%). The annotated list of species in Izembek NWR expands the range of many species, filling a distributional gap in Hulte??n's Western Pacific Coast district. Forty notable range extensions are reported. The flora of Izembek NWR is primarily made up of boreal species and lacks many of the species considered to be Arctic. Comparison with the Raunkiaer life-form spectrum similarly points to the boreal.

  7. Associations between water quality, Pasteurella multocida, and avian cholera at Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lehr, M.A.; Botzler, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Shadduck, D.J.

    2005-01-01

    We studied patterns in avian cholera mortality, the presence of Pasteurella multocida in the water or sediment, and water chemistry characteristics in 10 wetlands at the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex (California, USA), an area of recurrent avian cholera epizootics, during the winters of 1997 and 1998. Avian cholera outbreaks (a?Y50 dead birds) occurred on two wetlands during the winter of 1997, but no P. multocida were recovered from 390 water and 390 sediment samples from any of the 10 wetlands. No mortality events were observed on study wetlands during the winter of 1998; however, P. multocida was recovered from water and sediment samples in six of the 10 study wetlands. The pH levels were higher for wetlands experiencing outbreaks during the winter of 1997 than for nonoutbreak wetlands, and aluminum concentrations were higher in wetlands from which P. multocida were recovered during the winter of 1998. Water chemistry parameters (calcium, magnesium, sodium, and dissolved protein) previously linked with P. multocida and avian cholera mortality were not associated with the occurrence of avian cholera outbreaks or the presence of P. multocida in our study wetlands. Overall, we found no evidence to support the hypothesis that wetland characteristics facilitate the presence of P. multocida and, thereby, allow some wetlands to serve as long-term sources (reservoirs) for P. multocida.

  8. Abundance and distribution of feral pigs at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, 2010-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Leopold, Christina R.; Kendall, Steven J.

    2013-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest Unit of the Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex has intensively managed feral pigs (Sus scrofa) and monitored feral pig presence with surveys of all managed areas since 1988. Results of all available data regarding pig management activities through 2004 were compiled and analyzed, but no further analyses had been conducted since then. The objective of this report was to analyze recent feral ungulate surveys at the Hakalau Forest Unit to determine current pig abundance and distribution. Activity indices for feral pigs, consisting of the presence of fresh or intermediate sign at 422 stations, each with approximately 20 sample plots, were compiled for years 2010–2013. A calibrated model based on the number of pigs removed from one management unit and concurrent activity surveys was applied to estimate pig abundance in other management units. Although point estimates appeared to decrease from 489.1 (±105.6) in 2010 to 407.6 (±88.0) in 2013, 95% confidence intervals overlapped, indicating no significant change in pig abundance within all management units. Nonetheless, there were significant declines in pig abundance over the four-year period within management units 1, 6, and 7. Areas where pig abundance remained high include the southern portion of Unit 2. Results of these surveys will be useful for directing management actions towards specific management units.

  9. Influence of pre-Mississippian paleogeology on Carboniferous Lisburne Group, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Watts, K.F.; Carlson, R.; Imm, T.; Gruzlovic, P.; Hanks, C.

    1988-01-01

    The Carboniferous Lisburne Group of northern Alaska formed an extensive carbonate platform, which was later deformed as part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. In the northeast, the Lisburne Group is parautochthonous and analogous to that at Prudhoe Bay. The Lisburne's paleogeography and facies relationships pertain to assessment of the petroleum potential of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR). The Franklinian paleogeology, unconformably underlying the Ellesmerial sequence, has influenced sedimentation patterns in the Lisburne Group. The transgressive Endicott Group (Kekiktuk conglomerate and Kayak Shale) and Lisburne Group thin northward over Franklinian basement highs. In the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Katakturuk Dolomite formed a paleotopographic high over which the Endicott Group pinched out and the Lisburne Group thinned. Shallow-marine oolitic grainstone developed in the cyclic Pennsylvanian Wahoo Limestone. To the south in the Shublik Mountains, a repeated sequence of Katakturuk Dolomite and the Nanook Limestone were lower, so the Endicott Group lapped over the area and was later overlain by comparable Lisburne Group rocks. In the Fourth Range, the Lisburne Group is thicker and limestones also occur in the upper Endicott Group. Oolitic grainstone in the Wahoo Limestone is rare, and broad ooid shoals apparently pinched out into deeper water carbonates on a southward sloping carbonate ramp.

  10. Polar bear maternal den habitat in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durner, G.M.; Amstrup, Steven C.; Ambrosius, K.J.

    2006-01-01

    Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) give birth during mid-winter in dens of ice and snow. Denning polar bears subjected to human disturbances may abandon dens before their altricial young can survive the rigors of the Arctic winter. Because the Arctic coastal plain of Alaska is an area of high petroleum potential and contains existing and planned oil field developments, the distribution of polar bear dens on the plain is of interest to land managers. Therefore, as part of a study of denning habitats along the entire Arctic coast of Alaska, we examined high-resolution aerial photographs (n = 1655) of the 7994 km2 coastal plain included in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) and mapped 3621 km of bank habitat suitable for denning by polar bears. Such habitats were distributed uniformly and comprised 0.29% (23.2 km2) of the coastal plain between the Canning River and the Canadian border. Ground-truth sampling suggested that we had correctly identified 91.5% of bank denning habitats on the ANWR coastal plain. Knowledge of the distribution of these habitats will help facilitate informed management of human activities and minimize disruption of polar bears in maternal dens.

  11. Selenium and metal concentrations in waterbird eggs and chicks at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Eichhorst, B.A.; Warburton, D.

    2007-01-01

    Exceptionally high cadmium (Cd) and chromium (Cr) concentrations were reported in eggs, feathers, or livers of selected waterbird species nesting at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge (Agassiz) in 1994. Ten- to 15-day-old Franklin's gull (Larus pipixcan), black-crowned night-heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), and eared grebe (Podiceps nigricollis) chicks were collected in 1998, 1999, and 2001 at Agassiz and analyzed for selenium (Se) and metals including Cd and Cr. Freshly laid eggs were collected in 2001 from Franklin's gull, black-crowned night-heron, eared grebe, and pied-billed grebe (Podilymbus podiceps) nests at Agassiz. Based on a multivariate analysis, the pattern of Se and metal concentrations differed among species for eggs, chick feathers, and chick livers. Low Cd and Cr concentrations were measured in eggs, chick livers, and chick feathers of all four species. Mercury concentrations in black-crowned night-heron and eared grebe eggs collected from Agassiz in 2001 were lower than concentrations reported in 1994. Se and metal concentrations, including Cd and Cr, in waterbird eggs and chicks collected at Agassiz in 1998, 1999, and 2001 were not at toxic levels. ?? 2007 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.

  12. Use of flooded timber by waterfowl at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cowardin, L.M.

    1969-01-01

    Waterfowl use of bottomland hardwood timber stands which were flooded and killed was studied at the Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, Seneca Falls, New York, from 1962 to 1964. Comparisons of use were made among six habitat types containing dead timber, stumps, and no timber, and with and without emergent vegetation. An index to waterfowl use was derived by direct counts and by counts made with automatic cameras which photographed randomly selected plots in each habitat type. Movement between types was studied by observation of both marked and unmarked birds. The camera index of use showed that cut timber with emergent vegetation received the greatest overall use. Use was positively correlated with the proximity of the plot to emergent vegetation and nearest vegetative type boundary. A stand flooded for 7 years was used primarily by black ducks (Anas rubripes) and mallards (A. platyrhynchos). Use of stands flooded for 20 years was dominated by American widgeon (Mareca americana). Waterfowl spent more time resting than feeding in timbered areas, and more time feeding than resting in marsh areas. Young-of-the-year did not move between pools after they had reached an age of IIc (Gollop and Marshall 1954). Use by broods was greatest in areas near emergent vegetation. Flying birds used timbered areas during the daytime and non-timbered areas at night during fall. Flooded dead timber appeared to be attractive to waterfowl because it furnished abundant loafing sites.

  13. Contaminant biomonitoring at the Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Palawski, D.U.; Jones, W.E.; DuBois, K.; Malloy, J.C.

    1991-01-01

    Trace element concentrations in sediment samples from Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge were not elevated relative to the western U.S. geometric mean concentrations. Boron concentrations in aquatic plants approached the concentration of boron in Mallard (Anas platyrhyncos) diets that reduced hatching success. Among the three invertebrate taxa sampled, only midge larvae (Chironomidae) bioaccumulated selenium. Selenium concentrations in Eared Grebe livers exceeded the levels found in the livers of Mallards that experienced reproductive problems. Four hundred thirty-eight water bird nests were located during nest searches, and 536 eggs were examined from 179 of those nests. A minimum of 8.4% of the eggs laid contained dead embryos, and 0.1% contained abnormal embryos. Rates of embryo death and abnormality were similar to rates of presumably unpolluted natural populations. Mean selenium concentrations in Eared Grebe, Northern Pintail (Anas acuta), Mallard, and American Coot (Fulica americana) eggs exceeded the 3 micrograms/g dry weight concentration typical of natural background levels. However, only one of three deformed bird embryos had a selenium concentration greater than 3 micrograms/g dry weight. Organochlorine residues in bird eggs did not exceed concentrations believed to be harmless.

  14. Effects of ungulate management on vegetation at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai'i Island

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, S.C.; Jeffrey, J.J.; Pratt, L.W.; Ball, D.L.

    2010-01-01

    We compiled and analysed data from 1987-2004 on vegetation monitoring during feral ungulate management at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, a tropical montane rainforest on the island of Hawai'i All areas in the study had previously been used by ungulates, but cattle (Bos taurus) were removed and feral pig (Sus scrofa) populations were reduced during the study period. We monitored six line-intercept transects, three in previously high ungulate use areas and three in previously low ungulate use areas. We measured nine cover categories with the line-intercept method: native ferns; native woody plants; bryophytes; lichens; alien grasses; alien herbs; litter; exposed soil; and coarse woody debris. Vegetation surveys were repeated four times over a 16-year period. Vegetation monitoring revealed a strong increase in native fern cover and slight decreases in cover of bryophytes and exposed soil. Mean cover of native plants was generally higher in locations that were formerly lightly grazed, while alien grass and herb cover was generally higher in areas that were heavily grazed, although these effects were not statistically significant. These responses may represent early serai processes in forest regeneration following the reduction of feral ungulate populations. In contrast to many other Hawaiian forests which have become invaded by alien grasses and herbs after ungulate removal, HFNWR has not experienced this effect.

  15. Mercury and Methylmercury in Water and Bottom Sediments of Wetlands at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota, 2003-04

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Krabbenhoft, D.P.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Lundgren, Robert F.; Emerson, Douglas G.

    2007-01-01

    Certain ecosystem types, particularly wetlands, have environmental characteristics that can make them particularly sensitive to mercury inputs and that can result in large mercury concentrations in fish or other aquatic biota. To provide information needed to make effective management decisions to decrease human and wildlife exposure to methylmercury in northern prairie pothole wetlands, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the North Dakota Department of Health, conducted a study to assess mercury and methylmercury concentrations in wetlands at the Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge (the Refuge) in northwest North Dakota. In April 2003 and 2004, water and bottom-sediment samples were collected from 44 individual wetlands that were classified as one of four wetland types. Many factors that may affect methylmercury production were considered in the study. The prairie pothole wetlands at the Refuge had large ranges in major environmental characteristics. Hydrologic differences, most notably semiannual wetting and drying cycles, that are intrinsic to prairie pothole wetlands affected methylmercury concentrations. This likely resulted from the stimulation of anaerobic microbial activity following reflooding of soils, particularly soils containing substantial organic carbon. Among the four wetland types considered for this study, seasonal and semipermanent wetlands generally had the largest methylmercury concentrations. Regardless of wetland type, however, methylmercury concentrations at the Refuge are large in relation to reported concentrations for natural aquatic systems.

  16. Information to support to monitoring and habitat restoration on Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoppettone, G. Gary

    2013-01-01

    The Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge staff focuses on improving habitat for the highest incidence of endemic species for an area of its size in the continental United States. Attempts are being made to restore habitat to some semblance of its pre-anthropogenic undisturbed condition, and to provide habitat conditions to which native plant and animal species have evolved. Unfortunately, restoring the Ash Meadows’ Oases to its pre-anthropogenic undisturbed condition is almost impossible. First, there are constraints on water manipulation because there are private holdings within the refuge boundary; second, there has been at least one species extinction—the Ash Meadows pool fish (Empetrichthys merriami). It is also quite possible that thermal endemic invertebrate species were lost before ever being described. Perhaps the primary obstacle to restoring Ash Meadows to its pre-anthropogenic undisturbed conditions is the presence of invasive species. However, invasive species, such as red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarki) and western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis), are a primary driving force in restoring Ash Meadows’ spring systems, because under certain habitat conditions they can all but replace native species. Returning Ash Meadows’ physical landscape to some semblance of its pre-anthropogenic undisturbed condition through natural processes may take decades. Meanwhile, the natural dissolution of concrete and earthen irrigation channels threatens to allow cattail marshes to flourish instead of spring-brooks immediately downstream of spring discharge. This successional stage favors non-native crayfish and mosquitofish over the native Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis). Thus, restoration is needed to control non-natives and to promote native species, and without such intervention the probability of native fish reduction or loss, is anticipated. The four studies in this report are intended to provide information for restoring native fish habitat and

  17. Geological Assessment of Cores from the Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foley, Nora K.; Ayuso, Robert A.; Ayotte, Joseph D.; Montgomery, Denise L.; Robinson,, Gilpin R.

    2007-01-01

    Geological sources of metals (especially arsenic and zinc) in aquifer bedrock were evaluated for their potential to contribute elevated values of metals to ground and surface waters in and around Rockingham County, New Hampshire. Ayotte and others (1999, 2003) had proposed that arsenic concentrations in ground water flowing through bedrock aquifers in eastern New England were elevated as a result of interaction with rocks. Specifically in southeastern New Hampshire, Montgomery and others (2003) established that nearly one-fifth of private bedrock wells had arsenic concentrations that exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) maximum contamination level for public water supplies. Two wells drilled in coastal New Hampshire were sited to intersect metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks in the Great Bay National Wildlife Refuge. Bulk chemistry, mineralogy, and mineral chemistry data were obtained on representative samples of cores extracted from the two boreholes in the Kittery and Eliot Formations. The results of this study have established that the primary geologic source of arsenic in ground waters sampled from the two well sites was iron-sulfide minerals, predominantly arsenic-bearing pyrite and lesser amounts of base-metal-sulfide and sulfosalt minerals that contain appreciable arsenic, including arsenopyrite, tetrahedrite, and cobaltite. Secondary minerals containing arsenic are apparently limited to iron-oxyhydroxide minerals. The geologic source of zinc was sphalerite, typically cadmium-bearing, which occurs with pyrite in core samples. Zinc also occurred as a secondary mineral in carbonate form. Oxidation of sulfides leading to the liberation of acid, iron, arsenic, zinc, and other metals was most prevalent in open fractures and vuggy zones in core intervals containing zones of high transmissivity in the two units. The presence of significant calcite and lesser amounts of other acid-neutralizing carbonate and silicate minerals, acting as a natural

  18. 77 FR 60135 - St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-02

    ..., Florida. In the final CCP, we describe how we will manage this refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES... (Draft CCP/EA). The CCP will guide us in managing and administering St. Johns NWR for the next 15 years... wildlife refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan...

  19. Adaptive management in the U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System: science-management partnerships for conservation delivery.

    PubMed

    Moore, Clinton T; Lonsdorf, Eric V; Knutson, Melinda G; Laskowski, Harold P; Lor, Socheata K

    2011-05-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to recurrent decision making in which uncertainty about the decision is reduced over time through comparison of outcomes predicted by competing models against observed values of those outcomes. The National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is a large land management program charged with making natural resource management decisions, which often are made under considerable uncertainty, severe operational constraints, and conditions that limit ability to precisely carry out actions as intended. The NWRS presents outstanding opportunities for the application of adaptive management, but also difficult challenges. We describe two cooperative programs between the Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey to implement adaptive management at scales ranging from small, single refuge applications to large, multi-refuge, multi-region projects. Our experience to date suggests three important attributes common to successful implementation: a vigorous multi-partner collaboration, practical and informative decision framework components, and a sustained commitment to the process. Administrators in both agencies should consider these attributes when developing programs to promote the use and acceptance of adaptive management in the NWRS. PMID:21109341

  20. Adaptive management in the U.S. National Wildlife Refuge System: Science-management partnerships for conservation delivery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, C.T.; Lonsdorf, E.V.; Knutson, M.G.; Laskowski, H.P.; Lor, S.K.

    2011-01-01

    Adaptive management is an approach to recurrent decision making in which uncertainty about the decision is reduced over time through comparison of outcomes predicted by competing models against observed values of those outcomes. The National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS) of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is a large land management program charged with making natural resource management decisions, which often are made under considerable uncertainty, severe operational constraints, and conditions that limit ability to precisely carry out actions as intended. The NWRS presents outstanding opportunities for the application of adaptive management, but also difficult challenges. We describe two cooperative programs between the Fish and Wildlife Service and the U.S. Geological Survey to implement adaptive management at scales ranging from small, single refuge applications to large, multi-refuge, multi-region projects. Our experience to date suggests three important attributes common to successful implementation: a vigorous multi-partner collaboration, practical and informative decision framework components, and a sustained commitment to the process. Administrators in both agencies should consider these attributes when developing programs to promote the use and acceptance of adaptive management in the NWRS. ?? 2010 .

  1. 75 FR 17430 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Kern, San Luis Obispo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... condor, its habitat, and other wildlife resources. The refuge encompasses 2,471 contiguous acres owned in... for California condors. The refuge encompasses nearly 14,097 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish... condor. Blue Ridge NWR encompasses 897 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  2. 75 FR 63502 - Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Sonny Bono Salton Sea National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography... include wildlife observation, photography, interpretation, environmental education, waterfowl hunting,...

  3. The North Slope of Alaska and Tourism: Potential Impacts on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Everett, L. R.

    2004-12-01

    The hydrocarbon industry of Alaska is currently the leading producer of revenue for the Alaskan state economy. Second only to hydrocarbons is the tourism industry. Tourism has been a viable industry since the 1890's when cruises touted the beauty of glaciers and icebergs along the Alaskan coastline. This industry has seen a steady growth for the past few decades throughout the state. The North Slope of Alaska, particularly Prudhoe Bay and the National Petroleum Reserve, has long been associated with hydrocarbon development and today displays a landscape dotted with gravel drill pads, gas and oil pipelines and housing for the oil workers. While tourism is not usually considered hand in hand with the hydrocarbon industry, it has mimicked the development of hydrocarbons almost since the beginning. Today one not only sees the effects of the oil industry on the North Slope, but also the tourist industry as planes unload dozens of tourists, or tour buses and private vehicles arrive daily via the Dalton Highway. In Deadhorse, hotels that once only housed the oil workers now welcome the tourist, offering tours of the oil fields and adjacent areas and have become jumping off sites for wilderness trips. Tourism will create jobs as well as revenue. However, at present, there are few restrictions or guidelines in place that will deal with the potential impacts of increased tourism. Because of this there are many concerns about the possible impacts tourism and the infrastructure development will have on the North Slope. To list several concerns: (1) What are the impacts of increased tourism and the infrastructure development? (2) What will the impacts be on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR), which sits a mere 60 miles to the east of Deadhorse? (3) Will hydrocarbon development in ANWR and the associated infrastructure exacerbate potential impact by encouraging greater use of the Refuge by tourists? (4) Will tourism itself have a negative impact on this fragile

  4. Water resources of the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge, Genesee and Orleans counties, New York 2008-2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kappel, William M.; Jennings, Matthew B.

    2012-01-01

    A 2-year study of the water resources of the Iroquois National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) in western New York was carried out in 2009-2010 in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service to assist the Refuge in the development of a 15-year Comprehensive Conservtion plan. The study focused on Oak Orchard Creek, which flows through the Refuge, the groundwater resources that underlie the Refuge, and the possible changes to these resources related to the potential development of a bedrock quarry along the northern side of the Refuge. Oak Orchard Creek was monitored seasonally for flow and water quality; four tributary streams, which flowed only during early spring, also were monitored. A continuous streamgage was operated on Oak Orchard Creek, just north of the Refuge at Harrison Road. Four bedrock wells were drilled within the Refuge to determine the type and thickness of unconsolidated glacial sediments and to characterize the thickness and type of bedrock units beneath the Refuge, primarily the Lockport Dolomite. Water levels were monitored in 17 wells within and adjacent to the Refuge and water-quality samples were collected from 11 wells and 6 springs and analyzed for physical properties, nutrients, major ions, and trace metals. Flow in Oak Orchard Creek is from two different sources. During spring runoff, flow from the Onondaga Limestone Escarpment, several miles south of the Refuge, supplements surface-water runoff and groundwater discharge from the Salina Group to the south and east of the Refuge. Flow to Oak Orchard Creek also comes from surface-water runoff from the Lockport Dolomite Escarpment, north of the Refuge, and from groundwater discharging from the Lockport Dolomite and unconsolidated deposits that overlie the Lockport Dolomite. During the summer and fall low-flow period, only small quantities of groundwater flow from the Salina shales and Lockport Dolomite bedrock and the unconsolidated sediments that overlie them; most of this flow is lost to

  5. Effects of exploitation on black bear populations at White River National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, J.D.; Eastridge, R.; Hooker, M.J.

    2010-01-01

    We live-trapped American black bears (Ursus americanus) and sampled DNA from hair at White River National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas, USA, to estimate annual population size (N), growth (λ), and density. We estimated N and λ with open population models, based on live-trapping data collected from 1998 through 2006, and robust design models for genotyped hair samples collected from 2004 through 2007. Population growth was weakly negative (i.e., 95% CI included 1.0) for males (0.901, 95% CI  =  0.645–1.156) and strongly negative (i.e., 95% CI excluded 1.0) for females (0.846, 95% CI  =  0.711–0.981), based on live-trapping data, with N from 1999 to 2006 ranging from 94.1 (95% CI  =  70.3–137.1) to 45.2 (95% CI  =  27.1–109.3), respectively, for males and from 151.4 (95% CI  =  127.6–185.8) to 47.1 (95% CI  =  24.4–140.4), respectively, for females. Likewise, mean annual λ based on hair-sampling data was weakly negative for males (0.742, 95% CI  =  0.043–1.441) and strongly negative for females (0.782, 95% CI  =  0.661–0.903), with abundance estimates from 2004 to 2007 ranging from 29.1 (95% CI  =  21.2–65.8) to 11.9 (95% CI  =  11.0–26.9), respectively, for males and from 54.4 (95% CI  =  44.3–77.1) to 27.4 (95% CI  = 24.9–36.6), respectively, for females. We attribute the decline in the number of females in this isolated population to a decrease in survival caused by a past translocation program and by hunting adjacent to the refuge. We suggest that managers restructure the quota-based harvest limits until these growth rates recover.

  6. Mercury and other element exposure to tree swallows (Tachycineta bicolor) nesting on Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Custer, T.W.; Custer, Christine M.; Johnson, K.M.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Elevated mercury concentrations in water were reported in the prairie wetlands at Lostwood National Wildlife Refuge, ND. In order to determine whether wildlife associated with these wetlands was exposed to and then accumulated higher mercury concentrations than wildlife living near more permanent wetlands (e.g. lakes), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor) eggs and nestlings were collected from nests near seasonal wetlands, semi-permanent wetlands, and lakes. Mercury concentrations in eggs collected near seasonal wetlands were higher than those collected near semi-permanent wetlands or lakes. In contrast, mercury concentrations in nestling livers did not differ among wetland types. Mercury and other element concentrations in tree swallow eggs and nestlings collected from all wetlands were low. As suspected from these low concentrations, mercury concentrations in sample eggs were not a significant factor explaining the hatching success of the remaining eggs in each clutch.

  7. Conceptual ecological models to support detection of ecological change on Alaska National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Andrea; Beever, Erik A.

    2011-01-01

    More than 31 million hectares of land are protected and managed in 16 refuges by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) in Alaska. The vastness and isolation of Alaskan refuges give rise to relatively intact and complete ecosystems. The potential for these lands to provide habitat for trust species is likely to be altered, however, due to global climate change, which is having dramatic effects at high latitudes. The ability of USFWS to effectively manage these lands in the future will be enhanced by a regional inventory and monitoring program that integrates and supplements monitoring currently being implemented by individual refuges. Conceptual models inform monitoring programs in a number of ways, including summarizing important ecosystem components and processes as well as facilitating communication, discussion and debate about the nature of the system and important management issues. This process can lead to hypotheses regarding future changes, likely results of alternative management actions, identification of monitoring indicators, and ultimately, interpretation of monitoring results. As a first step towards developing a monitoring program, the 16 refuges in Alaska each created a conceptual model of their refuge and the landscape context. Models include prominent ecosystem components, drivers, and processes by which components are linked or altered. The Alaska refuge system also recognizes that designing and implementing monitoring at regional and ecoregional extents has numerous scientific, fiscal, logistical, and political advantages over monitoring conducted exclusively at refuge-specific scales. Broad-scale monitoring is particularly advantageous for examining phenomena such as climate change because effects are best interpreted at broader spatial extents. To enable an ecoregional perspective, a rationale was developed for deriving ecoregional boundaries for four ecoregions (Polar, Interior Alaska, Bering Coast, and North Pacific Coast) from the

  8. Long-Billed Curlew Breeding Success on Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuges, South-Central Washington and North-Central Oregon, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stocking, Jessica; Elliott-Smith, Elise; Holcomb, Neil; Haig, Susan M.

    2010-01-01

    Long-billed curlew (Numenius americanus) reproductive success was evaluated on the Mid-Columbia River National Wildlife Refuges of south-central Washington and north-central Oregon during the 2007 and 2008 breeding seasons. Additionally, we assisted the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in collecting information on distribution, abundance, and brood habitat for this shorebird species of conservation concern. A total of 32 breeding pairs were located on the refuges in 2007 and 35 pairs were located in 2008. We monitored 17 nests in 2007 and 23 nests in 2008. Curlew pairs were most abundant on Hanford Reach National Monument in 2007 but more nests were located on Umatilla National Wildlife Refuge in both years, with Columbia National Wildlife Refuge supporting few pairs. Nest success was 23.6 percent in 2007 and 32.9 percent in 2008 after taking into account exposure time and combining data for all the refuges. We were unable to detect any relationship between nest success and habitat type or habitat variables measured. However, our study was the first to document use of agricultural fields on the refuge as curlew nest habitat. We collected 39 and 28 brood locations in 2007 and 2008, respectively, and many observations were likely resightings of the same brood. Broods used a similar variety of habitats as nesting curlew and no clear habitat use pattern was detected.

  9. Heavy metal and selenium levels in birds at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge, Minnesota: Food chain differences.

    PubMed

    Burger, J; Gochfeld, M

    1996-12-01

    The levels of heavy metals and selenium in the eggs and in breast feathers of adult doublecrested cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus), black-crowned night heron (Nycticorax nycticorax), and franklin's gull (Larus pipixcan) nesting at Agassiz National Wildlife Refuge in Marshall County, northwestern Minnesota were examined. Also examined were metal levels in the feathers of fledgling night herons and gulls, in the feathers of adult and fledgling American bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), in eggs of American coot (Fulica americana) and eared grebe (Podiceps caspicus), and in feathers of adult Canada geese (Branta canadensis). These species represent different levels on the food chain from primarily vegetation-eating species (geese, coot) to species that eat primarily fish (cormorant). A clear, positive relationship between level on the food chain and levels of heavy metals occurred only for mercury in feathers and eggs. Otherwise, eared grebes had the highest levels of all other metals in their eggs compared to the other species. No clear food chain pattern existed for feathers for the other metals. For eggs at Agassiz: 1) lead, selenium, and manganese levels were similar to those reported in the literature, 2) mercury levels were slightly higher for cormorants and night herons, 3) all species had higher chromium and cadmium levels than generally reported, and 4) eared grebes had significantly higher levels of cadmium than reported for any species from elsewhere. For adult feathers: 1) gulls had higher levels of lead than the other species, 2) cadmium levels were elevated in gulls and adult herons and cormorants, 3) mercury levels showed an increase with position on the food chain, 4) selenium and chromium levels of all birds at Agassiz were generally low and 5) manganese levels in adults were generally higher than in the literature for other species. Adults had significantly higher mercury levels than fledgling gulls, night herons, and bitterns.

  10. Stratigraphy and sedimentology of ledge sandstone in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge northeastern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Cloft, H.S.

    1983-03-01

    Data collected from four measured sections of the Ledge Sandstone member of the Ivishak Formation are presented. These sections are located in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) in northeastern Alaska. The Ledge Sandstone is the time equivalent of the Ivishak sandstones that form the reservoir in the Prudhoe Bay field, east of the study area. The ANWR region is of interest for oil and gas exploration owing to the numerous oil seeps on the coastal plain and surficial expression of possible subsurface antiforms. The Ledge Sandstone in ANWR consists primarily of a massive, thickly bedded, very fine to fine-grained, well-sorted quartz sandstone. The thick sandstones are separated by thin siltstone intervals ranging from less than an inch to several feet in thickness. Although the thicker siltstones appear laterally continuous, the thinner beds generally are lenticular over short distances (10 to 20 ft; 3 to 6 m). Cementation of the siltstone appears sporadic, varying laterally and vertically within the unit. Burrowing is extensive in the siltstone intervals. Typically, burrowing cannot be detected in the sandstones because of the obliteration by lithification and diagenetic processes. Fossils are sparse throughout the unit, even in the poorly lithified silts. These data are consistent with a shallow marine environment, within wave base. This contrasts with the nonmarine conglomerates and sandstones of Prudhoe Bay. Time-equivalent units to the south and west consist primarily of cherts and shales of probable deep marine origin, with some arkosic sandstones dolomites occuring in NPRA. Thus a paloshoreline is probably located somewha north of the measured sections.

  11. Efficacy of feral pig removals at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Jeffrey, John J.; Ball, Donna; Babich, Lev

    2006-01-01

    We compiled and analyzed data from 1987–2004 on feral pig (Sus scrofa) management and monitoring activities at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, a tropical montane rainforest on the island of Hawai`i. These data included annual surveys of feral pig and cattle (Bos taurus) activity, the number of feral ungulates removed from closed management units, age and reproductive status from necropsies, and vegetation surveys repeated 4 times over a 16 year period. We found an essentially even sex ratio within the feral pig population and within age classes, although males lived to 60 months while females lived to only 48 months. The pregnancy rate was 23.5%, and lactation rate was 8.3%, regardless of season and age, but lactation peaked in April-June. Reproductive rates also increased with age, peaking at 2–4 years in females. We reconstructed the standing population within a closed unit to examine demographic processes. We estimated that annual removal in excess of approximately 41–43% would be necessary to affect a population decline. We examined annual feral pig activity surveys and found a strong and sustained decline in pig sign after 1997 relative to unmanaged areas. We related the standing population to feral pig activity surveys to build a predictive model of feral pig density, and then applied this model to other management units. We evaluated control methods and found snaring to be more efficient than staff or public hunting. Vegetation monitoring revealed a strong temporal increase in cover of native ferns, and marginally non-significant decreases in cover of bryophytes and exposed soil.

  12. Comparison of detection rates of breeding marsh birds in passive and playback surveys at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, T.; Finkbeiner, S.L.; Johnson, D.H.

    2004-01-01

    We compared detection rates of passive and playback breeding bird survey techniques on elusive marsh birds - Pied-billed Grebe (Podilymbus podiceps), American Bittern (Botaurus lentiginosus), Least Bittern (Ixobrychus exilis), Virginia Rail (Rallus limicola), and Sora (Porzana carolina) - during a two-year study at Lacreek National Wildlife Refuge, in southwestern South Dakota. We conducted 151 passive point counts followed by playback-response surveys at the same points in marsh-bird habitat on the refuge. Playback surveys detected secretive water birds more frequently than our passive surveys, increasing rates for each species by factors of 2.4 to 7.0. The distance a bird was detected from a point varied with the species and the survey technique.

  13. Accuracy assessment, using stratified plurality sampling, of portions of a LANDSAT classification of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Card, Don H.; Strong, Laurence L.

    1989-01-01

    An application of a classification accuracy assessment procedure is described for a vegetation and land cover map prepared by digital image processing of LANDSAT multispectral scanner data. A statistical sampling procedure called Stratified Plurality Sampling was used to assess the accuracy of portions of a map of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge coastal plain. Results are tabulated as percent correct classification overall as well as per category with associated confidence intervals. Although values of percent correct were disappointingly low for most categories, the study was useful in highlighting sources of classification error and demonstrating shortcomings of the plurality sampling method.

  14. Soil data for a collapse-scar bog chronosequence in Koyukuk Flats National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O’Donnell, Jonathan A.; Harden, Jennifer W.; Manies, Kristen L.; Jorgenson, M. Torre

    2012-01-01

    Peatlands in the northern permafrost region store large amounts of organic carbon, most of which is currently stored in frozen peat deposits. Recent warming at high-latitudes has accelerated permafrost thaw in peatlands, which will likely result in the loss of soil organic carbon from previously frozen peat deposits to the atmosphere. Here, we report soil organic carbon inventories, soil physical data, and field descriptions from a collapse-scar bog chronosequence located in a peatland ecosystem at Koyukuk Flats National Wildlife Refuge in Alaska.

  15. Estimation of Streamflow Characteristics for Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge, Northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sando, Steven K.; Morgan, Timothy J.; Dutton, DeAnn M.; McCarthy, Peter M.

    2009-01-01

    Charles M. Russell National Wildlife Refuge (CMR) encompasses about 1.1 million acres (including Fort Peck Reservoir on the Missouri River) in northeastern Montana. To ensure that sufficient streamflow remains in the tributary streams to maintain the riparian corridors, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is negotiating water-rights issues with the Reserved Water Rights Compact Commission of Montana. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, conducted a study to gage, for a short period, selected streams that cross CMR, and analyze data to estimate long-term streamflow characteristics for CMR. The long-term streamflow characteristics of primary interest include the monthly and annual 90-, 80-, 50-, and 20-percent exceedance streamflows and mean streamflows (Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM, respectively), and the 1.5-, 2-, and 2.33- year peak flows (PK1.5, PK2, and PK2.33, respectively). The Regional Adjustment Relationship (RAR) was investigated for estimating the monthly and annual Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM, and the PK1.5, PK2, and PK2.33 for the short-term CMR gaging stations (hereinafter referred to as CMR stations). The RAR was determined to provide acceptable results for estimating the long-term Q.90, Q.80, Q.50, Q.20, and QM on a monthly basis for the months of March through June, and also on an annual basis. For the months of September through January, the RAR regression equations did not provide acceptable results for any long-term streamflow characteristic. For the month of February, the RAR regression equations provided acceptable results for the long-term Q.50 and QM, but poor results for the long-term Q.90, Q.80, and Q.20. For the months of July and August, the RAR provided acceptable results for the long-term Q.50, Q.20, and QM, but poor results for the long-term Q.90 and Q.80. Estimation coefficients were developed for estimating the long-term streamflow characteristics for which the RAR did not provide

  16. 75 FR 32205 - Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Ashley, Bradley, and Union Counties, AR; Overflow National...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-07

    ... Overflow NWRs. We started the process through a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR... photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every... recreation activities (e.g., hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and...

  17. 75 FR 22832 - Lake Wales Ridge National Wildlife Refuge, Highlands and Polk Counties, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-30

    ... develop and conduct an annual refuge day where guided tours, information, and refuge awareness through... annual refuge day to promote refuge awareness. This alternative would seek to expand partnerships and..., 2008 (73 FR 35149). For more about the refuge and our CCP process, please see that notice. Lake...

  18. 76 FR 9047 - Ridgefield National Wildlife Refuge, Clark County, WA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-16

    ... (Refuge). In this final CCP, we describe how we will manage this Refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES... managing and administering the Refuge for the next 15 years. Alternative 2, as we described in the draft... developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes...

  19. 77 FR 76510 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-28

    ... Refuge (NWR). The CCP/EIS describes how we propose to manage the refuge for the next 15 years. DATES: We... developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and goals... 15 years, in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. Prime Hook NWR In 1963, Prime Hook...

  20. Regional economic effects of current and proposed management alternatives for Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koontz, Lynne; Lambert, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This report first provides a description of the local community and economy near the Refuge. An analysis of current and proposed management strategies that could affect the local economy is then presented. The Refuge management activities of economic concern in this analysis are Refuge personnel staffing and Refuge spending within the local community, and spending in the local community by Refuge visitors.

  1. Regional economic effects of current and proposed management alternatives for Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koontz, Lynne; Lambert, Heather

    2005-01-01

    This report first provides a description of the local community and economy near the Refuge. An analysis of current and proposed management strategies that could affect the local economy is then presented. The Refuge management activities of economic concern in this analysis are Refuge personnel staffing and Refuge spending within the local community, and spending in the local community by Refuge visitors.

  2. Estimates of evapotranspiration from the Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge area, Ruby Valley, northeastern Nevada, May 1999-October 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berger, David L.; Johnson, Michael J.; Tumbusch, Mary L.; Mackay, Jeffrey

    2001-01-01

    The Ruby Lake National Wildlife Refuge in Ruby Valley, Nevada, contains the largest area of perennial wetlands in northeastern Nevada and provides habitat to a large number of migratory and nesting waterfowl. The long-term preservation of the refuge depends on the availability of sufficient water to maintain optimal habitat conditions. In the Ruby Valley water budget, evapotranspiration (ET) from the refuge is one of the largest components of natural outflow. To help determine the amount of inflow needed to maintain wetland habitat, estimates of ET for May 1999 through October 2000 were made at major habitats throughout the refuge. The Bowen-ratio method was used to estimate daily ET at four sites: over open water, in a moderate-to-dense cover of bulrush marsh, in a moderate cover of mixed phreatophytic shrubs, and in a desert-shrub upland. The eddy-correlation method was used to estimate daily ET for periods of 2 to 12 weeks at a meadow site and at four sites in a sparse-to-moderate cover of phreatophytic shrubs. Daily ET rates ranged from less than 0.010 inch per day at all of the sites to a maximum of 0.464 inch per day at the open-water site. Average daily ET rates estimated for open water and a bulrush marsh were about four to five times greater than in areas of mixed phreatophytic shrubs, where the depth to ground water is less than 5 feet. Based on the seasonal distribution of major habitats in the refuge and on winter and summer ET rates, an estimated total of about 89,000 acre-feet of water was consumed by ET during October 1999-September 2000 (2000 water year). Of this total, about 49,800 acre-feet was consumed by ET in areas of open water and bulrush marsh.

  3. Factors affecting settling, survival, and viability of black bears reintroduced to Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wear, B.J.; Eastridge, R.; Clark, J.D.

    2005-01-01

    We used radiotelemetry and population modeling techniques to examine factors related to population establishment of black bears (Ursus americanus) reintroduced to Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Arkansas. Our objectives were to determine whether settling (i.e., establishment of a home range at or near the release site), survival, recruitment, and population viability were related to age class of reintroduced bears, presence of cubs, time since release, or number of translocated animals. We removed 23 adult female black bears with 56 cubs from their winter dens at White River NWR and transported them 160 km to man-made den structures at Felsenthal NWR during spring 2000–2002. Total movement and average circuity of adult females decreased from 1 month, 6 months, and 1 year post-emergence (F2,14 =19.7, P < 0.001 and F2,14 =5.76, P=0.015, respectively). Mean first-year post-release survival of adult female bears was 0.624 (SE = 0.110, SEinterannual = 0.144), and the survival rate of their cubs was 0.750 (SE = 0.088, SEinterannual = 0.109). The homing rate (i.e., the proportion of bears that returned to White River NWR) was 13%. Annual survival for female bears that remained at the release site and survived >1-year post-release increased to 0.909 (SE = 0.097, SEinterannual=0.067; Z=3.5, P < 0.001). Based on stochastic population growth simulations, the average annual growth rate (λ) was 1.093 (SD = 0.053) and the probability of extinction with no additional stockings ranged from 0.56-1.30%. The bear population at Felsenthal NWR is at or above the number after which extinction risk declines dramatically, although additional releases of bears could significantly decrease time to population reestablishment. Poaching accounted for at least 3 of the 8 adult mortalities that we documented; illegal kills could be a significant impediment to population re-establishment at Felsenthal NWR should poaching rates escalate.

  4. Contaminant Loading in Drainage and Fresh Water Used for Wetland Management at Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge

    PubMed

    Kilbride; Paveglio; Altstatt; Henry; Janik

    1998-08-01

    Throughout the western United States, studies have identified various detrimental effects of contaminants to aquatic biota from the use of agricultural drainage water for management of arid wetlands. However, little is known about the relative contributions of contaminant loading from pollutants dissolved in water compared with those carried by drifting material (e.g., detritus) associated with drainage water. Consequently, we determined loading rates for contaminants dissolved in water and those incorporated by drifting material for drainage (Diagonal Drain) as well as fresh (S-Line Canal) water used for wetland management at Stillwater National Wildlife Refuge (SNWR), Nevada during the early, middle, and late periods of the irrigation season (June through mid-November) in 1993. We found loading rates for trace elements throughout the irrigation season were almost entirely (> 98%) associated with contaminants dissolved in the water rather than incorporated by drift. Although drift contributed little to the total loading for trace elements to SNWR wetlands, contaminant concentrations were much greater in drift compared with those dissolved in water. Loading rates for dissolved As, B, Hg, and total dissolved solids (TDS) differed among periods for the Diagonal Drain. Along the Diagonal Drain, loading rates for dissolved As, B, Hg, Mo, unionized ammonia (NH3-N), TDS, and Zn differed among its three sampling sites. B was the only trace element with differences in loading rates for drift among periods from the Diagonal Drain. In contrast, loading rates for As, B, Cr, Cu, Hg, Se, and Zn in drift differed among periods for the S-Line Canal. Along Diagonal Drain, loading rates in drift for B (middle and late periods), Cr, Cu, and Zn differed among sites. Hg (x- >/= 12.0 ng/L) and NH3-N (x- >/= 0.985 mg/L) dissolved in water as well as B (x- >/= 97.4 µg/g DW) and Hg (x- >/= 0.461 µg/g DW) in drift from the Diagonal Drain and S-Line Canal exceeded screening levels (SLs

  5. 1. VIEW OF HEADQUARTERS OF J. CLARK SALYER NATIONAL WILDLIFE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. VIEW OF HEADQUARTERS OF J. CLARK SALYER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, SHOWING PART OF THE POND BEHIND DAM 326, LOOKING SOUTHEAST FROM THE LOOKOUT TOWER - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  6. Yukon Flats National Wildlife Refuge land cover mapping project users guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS) has the responsibility for collecting the resource information to address the research, management, development and planning requirements identified in Section 304. Because of the brief period provided by the Act for data collection, habitat mapping, and habitat assessment, the USFWS in cooperation with the U.S. Geological Survey's EROS Field Office, used digital Landsat multispectral scanner (MSS) data and digital terrain data to produce land cover and terrain maps. A computer assisted digital analysis of Landsat MSS data was used because coverage by aerial photographs was incomplete for much of the refuge and because the level of detail obtained from Landsat data was adequate to meet most USFWS research, management and planning needs. Relative cost and time requirements were also factors in the decision to use the digital analysis approach.

  7. Wildlife and habitat damage assessment from Hurricane Charley: recommendations for recovery of the J. N. "Ding" Darling National Wildlife Refuge Complex

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Meyers, J. Michael; Langtimm, Catherine A.; Smith, Thomas J.; Pednault-Willett, Kendra

    2006-01-01

    • On 13 August 2004, the first of four hurricanes to strike Florida in <6 weeks came ashore near J. N. “Ding” Darling National Wildlife Refuge (JNDDNWR) Complex, Sanibel Island, Florida. The eye of Category 4 Hurricane Charley passed just north of Sanibel Island with maximum sustained winds of 145 mph (123 knots) and a storm surge of 0.3-2.7 m (1-9 ft). Three USGS-BRD scientists (coastal ecologist and research wildlife biologists) and a USFWS wildlife biologist surveyed the storm damage to JNDDNWR Complex on the ground from 20-24 September 2004. • At the request of United States Fish and Wildlife Service refuge staff, the USGS team concentrated on assessing damage to wetlands and habitat for selected bird populations (especially mangrove forests, Mangrove Cuckoos [Coccyzus minor], and Black-whiskered Vireo [Vireo altiloquus]), waterbird rookeries (mangrove islands), impoundments (waterbirds and waterfowl), sea grass beds (manatees), and upland hardwood hammocks and ridges (threatened eastern indigo snake [Drymarchon couperi]). • The refuge complex sustained moderate to catastrophic damage to vegetation, especially mangrove forests and waterbird nesting or roosting islands. Lumpkin Island, Hemp Island, and Bird Key waterbird nesting areas had >50% and sometimes 90% of their vegetation severely damaged (dead, broken tree stems, and tipped trees). The Shell Mound Trail area of JNDDNWR sustained catastrophic damage to its old growth mangrove forests. Direct storm mortality and injury to manatees in the area of the JNDDNWR Complex was probably slight as manatees may have several strategies to reduce storm mortality. Damage to seagrass beds, an important habitat for manatees, fishes and invertebrates, is believed to be limited to the breach at North Captiva Island. At this breach, refuge staff documented inundation of beds by sand and scarring by trees dragged by winds. • Because seagrass beads and manatee habitat extend beyond refuge boundaries (see p. 28

  8. A multivariate assessment of changes in wetland habitat for waterbirds at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge, Maine, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hierl, L.A.; Loftin, C.S.; Longcore, J.R.; McAuley, D.G.; Urban, D.L.

    2007-01-01

    We assessed changes in vegetative structure of 49 impoundments at Moosehorn National Wildlife Refuge (MNWR), Maine, USA, between the periods 1984-1985 to 2002 with a multivariate, adaptive approach that may be useful in a variety of wetland and other habitat management situations. We used Mahalanobis Distance (MD) analysis to classify the refuge?s wetlands as poor or good waterbird habitat based on five variables: percent emergent vegetation, percent shrub, percent open water, relative richness of vegetative types, and an interspersion juxtaposition index that measures adjacency of vegetation patches. Mahalanobis Distance is a multivariate statistic that examines whether a particular data point is an outlier or a member of a data cluster while accounting for correlations among inputs. For each wetland, we used MD analysis to quantify a distance from a reference condition defined a priori by habitat conditions measured in MNWR wetlands used by waterbirds. Twenty-five wetlands declined in quality between the two periods, whereas 23 wetlands improved. We identified specific wetland characteristics that may be modified to improve habitat conditions for waterbirds. The MD analysis seems ideal for instituting an adaptive wetland management approach because metrics can be easily added or removed, ranges of target habitat conditions can be defined by field-collected data, and the analysis can identify priorities for single or multiple management objectives.

  9. Seed rain under native and non-native tree species in the Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Arias Garcia, Andrea; Chinea, J Danilo

    2014-09-01

    Seed dispersal is a fundamental process in plant ecology and is of critical importance for the restoration of tropical communities. The lands of the Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge (CRNWR), formerly under agriculture, were abandoned in the 1970s and colonized mainly by non-native tree species of degraded pastures. Here we described the seed rain under the most common native and non-native trees in the refuge in an attempt to determine if focal tree geographic origin (native versus non-native) influences seed dispersal. For this, seed rain was sampled for one year under the canopies of four native and four non-native tree species common in this refuge using 40 seed traps. No significant differences were found for the abundance of seeds, or their diversity, dispersing under native versus non-native focal tree species, nor under the different tree species. A significantly different seed species composition was observed reaching native versus non-native focal species. However, this last result could be more easily explained as a function of distance of the closest adults of the two most abundantly dispersed plant species to the seed traps than as a function of the geographic origin of the focal species. We suggest to continue the practice of planting native tree species, not only as a way to restore the community to a condition similar to the original one, but also to reduce the distances needed for effective dispersal.

  10. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report : Oleson Tracts of the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, 2001-2002 Technical Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Allard, Donna; Smith, maureen; Schmidt, Peter

    2004-09-01

    Located in the northern Willamette River basin, Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge) was established in 1992 with an approved acquisition boundary to accommodate willing sellers with potentially restorable holdings within the Tualatin River floodplain. The Refuge's floodplain of seasonal and emergent wetlands, Oregon ash riparian hardwood, riparian shrub, coniferous forest, and Garry oak communities are representative of remnant plant communities historically common in the Willamette River valley and offer an opportunity to compensate for wildlife habitat losses associated with the Willamette River basin federal hydroelectric projects. The purchase of the Oleson Units as additions to the Refuge using Bonneville Power Administration (BPA) funds will partially mitigate for wildlife habitat and target species losses incurred as a result of construction and inundation activities at Dexter and Detroit Dams. Lands acquired for mitigation of Federal Columbia River Power System (FCRPS) impacts to wildlife are evaluated using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology, which quantifies how many Habitat Units (HUs) are to be credited to BPA. HUs or credits gained lessen BPA's debt, which was formally tabulated in the FCRPS Loss Assessments and adopted as part of the Northwest Power and Conservation Council's Fish and Wildlife Program as a BPA obligation (NWPCC, 1994 and 2000). There are two basic management scenarios to consider for this evaluation: (1) Habitats can be managed without restoration activities to benefit wildlife populations, or (2) Habitats can be restored using a number of techniques to improve habitat values more quickly. Without restoration, upland and wetland areas may be periodically mowed and disced to prevent invasion of exotic vegetation, volunteer trees and shrubs may grow to expand forested areas, and cooperative farming may be employed to provide forage for migrating and wintering waterfowl. Abandoned cropland would comprise

  11. 76 FR 24512 - Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge, Lajas, Puerto Rico; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... Draft CCP/ EA, we describe the alternative we propose to use to manage this refuge for the 15 years... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... least every 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act. The establishment of the refuge...

  12. Modeling potential impacts of the Garrison Diversion Unit project on Sand Lake and Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuges: a feasibility analysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamilton, David B.; Auble, Gregor T.; Farmer, Adrian H.; Roelle, James E.

    1987-01-01

    The Garrison Diversion Unit (GDU) of the Pick-Sloan Missouri Basin program was authorized in 1965, with the purpose of diverting Missouri River water to the James River for irrigation, municipal and industrial water supply, fish and wildlife habitat, recreation, and flood control. The project was reauthorized in 1986, with the specification that comprehensive studies be conducted to address a variety of issues. One of these ongoing studies addresses potential impacts of GDU construction and operation on lands of the National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) system, including Arrowwood and Sand Lake Refuges (the Refuges) on the James River. A number of concerns at these Refuges have been identified; the primary concerns addressed in this report include increased winter return flows, which would limit control of rough fish; increased turbidity during project construction, which would decrease production of sago pondweed; and increased water level fluctuations in the late spring and early summer, which would destroy the nests of some over-water nesting birds. The facilitated workshop described in this report was conducted February 18-20, 1987, under the joint sponsorship of the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the North Dakota Game and Fish Department. The primary objectives of the workshop were to evaluate the feasibility of using simulation modeling techniques to estimate GDU impacts on Arrowwood and Sand Lake Refuges and to suggest enhancements to the James River Refuge monitoring program. The workshop was structured around the formulation of four submodels: a Hydrology and Water Quality submodel to simulate changes in Refuge pool elevations, turnover rates, and water quality parameters (e.g., total dissolved solids, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, nutrients, water temperature, pesticides) due to GDU construction and operation; a Vegetation submodel to simulate concomitant changes in wetland communities (e.g., sago pondweed, wet meadows, deep

  13. 78 FR 23778 - Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, Stafford, KS; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-22

    ... through a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 8394, February 24, 2010). The 22,135-acre Quivira National..., wildlife observation and photography, interpretation and environmental education for students and visitors... observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the...

  14. A comprehensive list and photographic collection of the vascular flora of Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Texas, March 2011-March 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allain, Larry

    2014-01-01

    A floristics inventory was conducted to identify and photograph the vascular plants occurring at Caddo Lake National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Texas, from March 2011 to March 2012 by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. This research resulted in the identification of 511 taxa of vascular plants representing 111 families and 317 genera. Despite the degree of development of the refuge at the time it was transferred to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, plant diversity was high. Of the 511 species identified in this study, 346 species are new records for Harrison County, and 3 species are new discoveries for Texas. Caddo Lake NWR is primarily forested with 55 tree species and 35 shrub species identified in this study. Of the species identified, 289 are associated with wetlands having a wetland classification of facultative or wetter, possibly reflecting the proximity of Caddo Lake to the refuge and the three streams that intersect the refuge. Sixty-two of the species found on the refuge are introduced. Chinese tallow tree (Triadica sebifera) is one of the more common invasive tree species on the refuge and is actively controlled by refuge staff. Chinese privet (Ligustrum sinense), sacred bamboo (Nandina domestica), and King’s Ranch bluestem (Bothriochloa ischaemum var. songarica) are present on the refuge and have the potential to become invasive. More than 10,000 photographs were taken of the plants found on the refuge in an effort to document general appearance and capture diagnostic characters of each plant species. Photographs were also taken of many of the animals and landscapes encountered during the project. Select images of each of the plants and animals are included in the collection of more than 1,600 photographs (all photographs by Larry Allain).

  15. Mercury concentrations in largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) collected from Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada.

    PubMed

    Goodchild, Shawn; Gerstenberger, Shawn

    2011-04-01

    Mercury is a known neurotoxin and contaminant of concern worldwide. Mercury may occur at elevated concentrations adjacent to industrial sources, such as coal-fired power plants, or in remote environments and newly filled water bodies. Mercury tissue concentrations were determined for a sample of largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) from Crystal Reservoir, Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada. This investigation was triggered by (1) the presence of several conditions in soil and water that facilitate mercury bioaccumulation, (2) previous investigations that detected mercury in source springs, and (3) the presence of game fish and endangered pupfish within the reservoir. Mercury concentrations were significantly correlated with both fish mass and condition, but were lower than national human health and safety standards. It is possible that high pH and salinity inhibited methylation and subsequent bioaccumulation; however, additional studies are needed to determine causation of the low concentration in fish tissue compared with ambient conditions.

  16. Identification of Wetland Source Waters Using Strontium and Uranium Isotopes, Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Nevada,USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wurster, F. C.; Paces, J. B.

    2008-12-01

    Physical hydrologic data coupled with water chemistry and radiogenic isotope analyses were used to investigate source waters for a 230-hectare wet meadow/fen complex on Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge. Surface water entering the refuge originates from high-volume springs discharging from a regional carbonate aquifer at Ash and Crystal Springs, 16 and 24 km upstream of the refuge, respectively. Streamflow from these springs supplies irrigation water to agriculture in Pahranagat Valley prior to reaching the refuge. Surface water is stored in a reservoir within the refuge and then diverted to various wetland units through a network of irrigation ditches. Physical hydrologic data were obtained from gaging stations and shallow (<5 m) monitoring wells installed to evaluate recharge to the shallow ground-water system from surface-water diversions. Water-table contours show that ground water from adjacent volcanic uplands discharges near low-volume springs within the wetland complex. Contributions from precipitation are negligible. Major-element, trace-element, δ18O, and δ2H data indicate extensive evaporation of surface flow reaching the reservoir. Additional evaporation further modifies surface water used to maintain wetlands. In contrast, Sr and U isotope ratios are not affected by evaporation. Carbonate aquifer water discharging at Ash and Crystal Springs has similar chemical and stable-isotope compositions, but distinct 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U activity ratios (AR); 0.7135 and 2.48, respectively, for Ash; and 0.7107 and 3.20 for Crystal. Local, low-volume springs on the refuge have variable but distinct 87Sr/86Sr and 234U/238U AR. These isotope ratios are used to define three primary sources of water supporting the wet meadow/fen complex and to quantify their contributions in space and time. Results indicate that surface water entering the refuge reservoir between May 2007 and March 2008 consisted of a ~70:20:10 mixture of Crystal, Ash, and local spring water

  17. Vegetation of Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana-Recent plant communities with comparison to a three-decade-old survey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Michot, Thomas C.; Allain, Larry

    2011-01-01

    Shifts in plant community composition and structure can affect the quality of habitat for wildlife species. Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge in southwestern Louisiana was established in 1937 with a primary goal of providing habitat for wintering waterfowl species. A large freshwater impoundment constructed on the refuge to improve waterfowl habitat value was completed in 1943. About 10 years after construction was completed, staff at the refuge became concerned that emergent vegetation cover was increasing in the impoundment over time while open water areas, which are critical as foraging and resting areas for waterfowl, were decreasing. To document vegetation change over time, we collected information on plant community species composition for comparison to similar data collected in 1973. A total of 84 sampling plots was established in 2006 within the impoundment to coincide as closely as possible to plots sampled in the earlier study. Plant species composition and cover were recorded at each plot in the summers of 2006 and 2007. Change between sampling events separated by more than three decades was determined by comparing the frequency of occurrence of 20 species identified in 1973 to their frequency in 2006 and 2007. Interannual variation was determined by comparing plot data between 2006 and 2007. In plots dominated by emergent vegetation, it was found that Bacopa caroliniana, Eleocharis equisetoides, Leersia hexandra, Panicum hemitomon, and Sagittaria lancifolia were significantly less frequent in 2006 and 2007 than in 1973. The frequency of Brasenia schreberi, Cabomba caroliniana, Nitella gracilis, and Nymphoides aquatica was significantly lower in 2006 and 2007 than in 1973 in plots dominated by floating-leaved plants, submersed plants, or open water. In 2007, Hydrocotyle sp. and Sacciolepis striata were more frequent than in 1973 in emergent vegetation plots, and Utricularia sp. was more frequent in submersed or open-water plots. We documented

  18. 75 FR 57053 - Camas National Wildlife Refuge, Jefferson County, ID; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... refuge lies in the upper Snake River plain at approximately 4,800 feet in elevation. The refuge was... continually flooded the wetlands during the drier summer and fall months. The upper Snake River climate...

  19. 76 FR 21001 - Presquile National Wildlife Refuge, Chesterfield County, VA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-14

    ... important anchor in the network of refuges on and around the Chesapeake Bay. Refuge habitats include swamp... protection of water quality on the James River and throughout the Chesapeake Bay Watershed; (2)...

  20. 77 FR 47433 - Presquile National Wildlife Refuge, Chesterfield County, VA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    ... aggressive response to habitat changes associated with invasive species, global climate change, or storm... impacts of climate change on existing refuge habitats? How will the refuge improve its biological... facilities, control invasive species, protect cultural resources, monitor for climate change...

  1. 76 FR 36571 - Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Malta, MT; Comprehensive Conservation Plan

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... is to provide migration, nesting, resting, and feeding habitat for migratory birds in their wetlands... migrating shorebirds and waterfowl to the refuge complex. Approximately 25,000 people visit the refuge... management activities at the refuge complex would not change. The current staff of five Service...

  2. 78 FR 68858 - Seal Beach National Wildlife Refuge, Orange County, CA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-15

    ... Refuge for the next 15 years. DATES: The CCP and FONSI are available now. The FONSI was signed on... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act. Our draft CCP and EA were available for a...

  3. 75 FR 50777 - Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan; John Hay National Wildlife Refuge, Merrimack County, NH

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-17

    ... manage this refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the final CCP and... for the next 15 years. Alternative B, as we described in the draft CCP/ EA, is the foundation for the... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward...

  4. 77 FR 8890 - Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, KY; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-15

    ... refuge for the 15 years following approval of the final CCP. DATES: To ensure consideration, we must... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... least every 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act. Significant issues addressed in...

  5. 76 FR 63945 - White River National Wildlife Refuge, AR; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... this refuge for the 15 years following approval of the final CCP. DATES: To ensure consideration, we... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... least every 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act. CCP Alternatives, Including Our...

  6. 76 FR 46317 - Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge, Nantucket, MA; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Land...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-02

    ... for the next 15 years. DATES: To ensure consideration, please send your written comments by September... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... 15 years in accordance with the Refuge Administration Act. Public Outreach The extensive...

  7. 76 FR 45600 - Columbia National Wildlife Refuge, Adams and Grant Counties, WA; Draft Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... CCP/ EA describes our proposal and alternatives for managing the Refuge for the next 15 years. DATES... CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing... interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the...

  8. 78 FR 13692 - Clarks River National Wildlife Refuge, KY; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan/Land Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ..., we describe how we will manage this refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may obtain a copy of... administering Clarks River NWR for the next 15 years. The LPP will expand the current acquisition boundary of... is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and...

  9. Letter Report: Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Englebrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2008-08-01

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  10. Letter Report Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative - Air Quality Scoping Study for Pahranagat National Wildlife Refuge, Lincoln County, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    J. Engelbrecht; I. Kavouras; D. Campbell; S. Campbell; S. Kohl; D. Shafer

    2009-04-02

    The Desert Research Institute (DRI) is performing a scoping study as part of the U.S. Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI). The main objective is to obtain baseline air quality information for Yucca Mountain and an area surrounding the Nevada Test Site (NTS). Air quality and meteorological monitoring and sampling equipment housed in a mobile trailer (shelter) is collecting data at eight sites outside the NTS, including Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Pahranagat NWR, Beatty, Rachel, Caliente, Crater Flat, and Tonopah Airport, and at four sites on the NTS (Engelbrecht et al., 2007a-d). The trailer is stationed at any one site for approximately eight weeks at a time. This letter report provides a summary of air quality and meteorological data on completion of the site's sampling program.

  11. Sediment capture in flood plains of the Mississippi River: A case study in Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, M.; Bentley, S. J., Sr.

    2015-03-01

    To plan restoration of the Mississippi River Delta, it is imperative to know how much sediment the Mississippi River currently provides. Recent research has demonstrated that between Tarbert Landing and St Francisville on the Mississippi, as much as 67 million metric tons (Mt) per year is lost from river transport, of which ~16 Mt is muddy suspended sediment. So where does this sediment go? Two pathways for loss have been proposed: riverbed storage, and overbank deposition in regions that lack manmade levées. Cat Island National Wildlife Refuge, on the unleveed Mississippi River east bank near St Francisville, Louisiana, consists of undisturbed bottomland forest that is inundated most years by river flooding. To determine fluvial sediment accumulation rates (SAR) from flooding, pushcores 40-50 cm long were collected then dated by Pb-210 and Cs-137 geochronology. Preliminary data suggests that muddy sediment accumulation is 10-13% of muddy suspended sediment lost from river transport along this river reach.

  12. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  13. A condensed middle Cenomanian succession in the Dakota Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, Stephen C.; Cobban, William A.

    2007-01-01

    The upper part of the Dakota Sandstone exposed on the Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, northern Socorro County, New Mexico, is a condensed, Upper Cretaceous, marine succession spanning the first five middle Cenomanian ammonite zones of the U.S. Western Interior. Farther north in New Mexico these five ammonite zones occur over a stratigraphic interval more than an order of magnitude thicker. The basal part of this marine sequence was deposited in Seboyeta Bay, an elongate east-west embayment into New Mexico that marked the initial transgression of the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous seaway into New Mexico. The primary mechanism for condensing this section was nearshore, submarine erosion, although nondeposition played a minor role. The ammonite fossils from each zone are generally fragments of internal molds that are corroded on one side, indicating submarine burial, erosion of the prefossilized steinkern, and corrosion on the sea floor. In addition, the base of the condensed succession is marked by a thin bed that contains abundant, white-weathering, spherical to cylindrical phosphate nodules, many of which contain a cylindrical axial cavity of unknown origin. The nodules lie on the bedding surface of the highly burrowed, ridge-forming sandstone near the top of the Dakota and occur in the overlying breccia. The breccia consists of rip-up clasts of sandstone and eroded internal molds of the ammonite Conlinoceras tarrantense, the zonal index for the basal middle Cenomanian. The nodules below the breccia imply a time of erosion followed by nondeposition or sediment bypass during which the phosphatization occurred. The breccia implies a time of submarine erosion, probably storm-related. Remarkably, this condensed succession and the basal part of the overlying Mancos Shale tongue contain one of the most complete middle Cenomanian ammonite sequences in the U.S. Western Interior. Five of the six ammonite zones that characterize the middle Cenomanian of the

  14. A condensed middle Cenomanian succession in the Dakota Sandstone (Upper Cretaceous), Sevilleta National Wildlife Refuge, Socorro County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hook, S.C.; Cobban, W.A.

    2007-01-01

    The upper part of the Dakota Sandstone exposed on the Sevilleta National Wild-life Refuge, northern Socorro County, New Mexico, is a condensed, Upper Cretaceous, marine succession spanning the first five middle Cenomanian ammonite zones of the U.S. Western Interior. Farther north in New Mexico these five ammonite zones occur over a stratigraphic interval more than an order of magnitude thicker. The basal part of this marine sequence was deposited in Seboyeta Bay, an elongate east-west embayment into New Mexico that marked the initial transgression of the western shoreline of the Late Cretaceous seaway into New Mexico. The primary mechanism for condensing this section was nearshore, submarine erosion, although nondeposition played a minor role. The ammonite fossils from each zone are generally fragments of internal molds that are corroded on one side, indicating submarine burial, erosion of the prefossilized steinkern, and corrosion on the sea floor. In addition, the base of the condensed succession is marked by a thin bed that contains abundant, white-weathering, spherical to cylindrical phosphate nodules, many of which contain a cylindrical axial cavity of unknown origin. The nodules lie on the bedding surface of the highly burrowed, ridge-forming sand-stone near the top of the Dakota and occur in the overlying breccia. The breccia consists of rip-up clasts of sandstone and eroded internal molds of the ammonite Conlinoceras tarrantense, the zonal index for the basal middle Cenomanian. The nodules below the breccia. imply a time of erosion followed by nondeposition or sediment bypass during which the phosphatization occurred. The breccia implies a time of submarine erosion, probably storm-related. Remarkably, this condensed succession and the basal part of the overlying Mancos Shale tongue contain one of the most complete middle Cenomanian ammonite sequences in the U.S. Western Interior. Five of the six ammonite zones that characterize the middle Cenomanian of the

  15. Forest bird monitoring protocol for strategic habitat conservation and endangered species management on O'ahu Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Island of O'ahu, Hawai'i

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Camp, Richard J.; Gorresen, P. Marcos; Banko, Paul C.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes the results of a pilot forest bird survey and a consequent forest bird monitoring protocol that was developed for the O'ahu Forest National Wildlife Refuge, O'ahu Island, Hawai'i. The pilot survey was conducted to inform aspects of the monitoring protocol and to provide a baseline with which to compare future surveys on the Refuge. The protocol was developed in an adaptive management framework to track bird distribution and abundance and to meet the strategic habitat conservation requirements of the Refuge. Funding for this research was provided through a Science Support Partnership grant sponsored jointly by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS).

  16. Summary of bird-survey and banding results at W.L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge, 1998-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagar, Joan

    2012-01-01

    With some of the best remaining examples of oak habitats in the Willamette Valley, the Willamette Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (WVNWRC) has been implementing restoration efforts to reverse the successional trend towards Douglas-fir and maple that is threatening existing oak woodlands. The restoration work has been considered a model for other public and private efforts within the Willamette Valley, and has been showcased through the Oregon Oak Communities Working Group (http://www.oregonoaks.org). Although many oak restoration projects have been initiated over the last several years, and grant recipients typically identify wildlife species that are likely to benefit from their project, measures of success have not included the actual response of wildlife, such as a change in the probability of species occurrence or abundance. Monitoring in the WVNWRC has so far been limited to vegetative and structural changes within the plant community. Hagar and Stern (2001) identified bird species occurring in Willamette Valley oak woodlands that might be expected to benefit from such restoration efforts, including an endemic subspecies of the White-breasted Nuthatch (see Appendix 1 for scientific names of bird and plant species listed in this document), and the Acorn Woodpecker, both of which are species of concern in Oregon. However, empirical data documenting responses of bird assemblages to restoration actions are needed. The goal of this study was to document the effects of a restoration project in an Oregon White Oak woodland on Pigeon Butte in the W.L. Finley National Wildlife Refuge. Restoration treatments on Pigeon Butte include the removal of shade-tolerant tree species (primarily big-leaf maple and Douglas-fir) to reduce competition with oak trees and to return the stand to a more open structure. The objectives of this ongoing study are to compare abundance, survival, and productivity of diurnal songbird species before and after application of these

  17. 43 CFR 3101.5-1 - Wildlife refuge lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wildlife refuge lands. 3101.5-1 Section... § 3101.5-1 Wildlife refuge lands. (a) Wildlife refuge lands are those lands embraced in a withdrawal of.... (b) No offers for oil and gas leases covering wildlife refuge lands shall be accepted and no...

  18. 43 CFR 3101.5-1 - Wildlife refuge lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wildlife refuge lands. 3101.5-1 Section... § 3101.5-1 Wildlife refuge lands. (a) Wildlife refuge lands are those lands embraced in a withdrawal of.... (b) No offers for oil and gas leases covering wildlife refuge lands shall be accepted and no...

  19. 43 CFR 3101.5-1 - Wildlife refuge lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wildlife refuge lands. 3101.5-1 Section... § 3101.5-1 Wildlife refuge lands. (a) Wildlife refuge lands are those lands embraced in a withdrawal of.... (b) No offers for oil and gas leases covering wildlife refuge lands shall be accepted and no...

  20. 43 CFR 3101.5-1 - Wildlife refuge lands.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wildlife refuge lands. 3101.5-1 Section... § 3101.5-1 Wildlife refuge lands. (a) Wildlife refuge lands are those lands embraced in a withdrawal of.... (b) No offers for oil and gas leases covering wildlife refuge lands shall be accepted and no...

  1. 75 FR 1073 - Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, Pope and Yell Counties, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-08

    ... observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update..., wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation). We would... environmental education services to the public, including limited visits to schools, environmental...

  2. Topography and Sedimentation Characteristics of the Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge, Holt County, Missouri, 1937-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Richards, Joseph M.

    2003-01-01

    The Squaw Creek National Wildlife Refuge (hereafter referred to as the Refuge), located on the Missouri River floodplain in northwest Missouri, was established in 1935 to provide habitat for migratory birds and wildlife. Results of 1937 and 1964 topographic surveys indicate that sedimenta-tion, primarily from Squaw Creek and Davis Creek inflows, had substantially reduced Refuge pool volumes and depths. A study was undertaken by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, to quantify and spatially analyze historic rates of sedimentation in the Refuge and determine the surface elevations, depths, and pool capacities for selected managed pools from a 2002 survey.The 1937 to 1964 mean total sediment depo-sition, in the area corresponding to the 2002 sur-veyed pool area (about 4,900 acres), was 1.26 ft (feet), or 0.047 ft/yr (foot per year). Mean annual rates of deposition, by pool, from 1937 to 1964 varied from 0.016 to 0.083 ft/yr. From 1964 to 2002, the mean total sediment deposition in the 2002 surveyed pools was 0.753 ft, or 0.020 ft/yr. Therefore, the mean rate of sediment-depth accu-mulation from 1964 to 2002 was about 42 percent of the mean 1937 to 1964 rate, or a 58 percent reduction. Mean annual rates of deposition by pool from 1964 to 2002 varied from 0.010 to 0.049 ft/yr. Despite a substantial reduction in the average sediment accumulation rate for the Refuge, 5 of the 15 separate pools for which annual rates were calculated for both periods showed a small increase in the deposition rates of up to 0.008 ft/yr. Sediment deposits have resulted in a sub-stantial cumulative loss of volume in the Refuge pools since 1937. The 1937 to 2002 total sediment volume deposited in the 2002 surveyed pool area was about 9,900 acre-ft (acre-feet), or 152 acre-ft/yr (acre-feet per year). The volume of sediment deposited from 1937 to 1964 for these pools was about 6,200 acre-ft, or 230 acre-ft/yr. The volume deposited from 1964 to 2002

  3. 75 FR 67763 - Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, Washington and Yamhill Counties, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-03

    ... observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP..., wildlife observation, and wildlife photography. Scoping: Preliminary Issues, Concerns, and Opportunities...

  4. 75 FR 49516 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and the Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-13

    ... the refuges. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (71 FR 55214; September... notice of availability in the Federal Register (75 FR 6694; February 10, 2010). The Lewis and Clark... observation and photography, ] and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update...

  5. 76 FR 77247 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... process in a Federal Register notice (71 FR 55214; September 21, 2006). We released the draft CCP/EIS to... FR 6694; February 10, 2010). We announced the availability of the final CCP/EIS in the Federal Register (75 FR 49516) on August 13, 2010. The Lewis and Clark Refuge was established in 1972 to...

  6. 75 FR 6694 - Lewis and Clark National Wildlife Refuge and Julia Butler Hansen Refuge for the Columbian White...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Federal Register on September 21, 2006 (71 FR 55214), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EIS for..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. As part of a single..., including hunting, fishing, and wildlife observation and photography, would continue at current...

  7. 77 FR 49011 - Texas Mid-Coast National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Brazoria, Fort Bend, Matagorda, and Wharton...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-15

    ... programs; and use habitat composition/ ``green'' technologies wildlife diversity; and building products update refuge on all new displays; and increase construction. use of ``green'' technologies. Ecoregion... this process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 29714; June 23, 2009). The Complex...

  8. 78 FR 9410 - Ozark Plateau National Wildlife Refuge; Adair, Cherokee, Craig, Delaware, Mayes, Ottawa, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-08

    ... this process through a notice in the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge... the Federal Register on June 19, 1998 (63 FR 33693). The Refuge solicited public comments on issues... maternity sites; for cave species; survey cavefish and research effects of cave crayfish; map...

  9. 77 FR 26035 - St. Vincent National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-02

    ... 15 years following approval of the final CCP. DATES: To ensure consideration, we must receive your... purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge... and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act....

  10. 78 FR 66056 - Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge and Carlton Pond Waterfowl Production Area, Penobscot...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-04

    ... 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the CCP by any of the ] following methods. You... refuge. The purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving... interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with the...

  11. 76 FR 1190 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-07

    ... 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the final CCP and FONSI by any of the following... administering Back Bay NWR for the next 15 years. Alternative B, as we described in the draft CCP/EA, is the... developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes...

  12. 75 FR 65371 - Klamath Marsh National Wildlife Refuge, Klamath County, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ... for the next 15 years. DATES: The CCP and FONSI are available now. The FONSI was signed on June 14... provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the... 15 years in accordance with the Administration Act. Our Draft CCP and Environmental Assessment...

  13. 75 FR 5102 - Farallon National Wildlife Refuge, San Francisco County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-01

    ... Refuge for the next 15 years. DATES: The CCP and FONSI are available now. The FONSI was signed on... notice (73 FR 78386, December 22, 2008). The Draft CCP/EA identified and evaluated four alternatives for managing the Refuge for the next 15 years. Alternative A was the no- action alternative, which...

  14. 76 FR 60522 - Selawik National Wildlife Refuge, Kotzebue, AK; Revised Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-29

    ... how we will manage the Refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the..., 2010). The draft CCP and EA evaluated three alternatives for managing the Refuge for the next 15 years... Register (73 FR 57143; October 1, 2008). We made available our draft CCP and Environmental Assessment...

  15. 76 FR 12365 - Canaan Valley National Wildlife Refuge, Tucker and Grant Counties, WV; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-07

    ... 15 years. ADDRESSES: You may view or obtain copies of the final CCP and FONSI by any of the following... administering Canaan Valley NWR for the next 15 years. Alternative B, as we described in the draft CCP/EA, is... developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes...

  16. Assessment of water-quality data from Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota--2008 through 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Gleason, Robert A.; Rabenberg, Michael J.; Dahl, Charles F.; Ell, Mike J.

    2013-01-01

    ong Lake National Wildlife Refuge, located in south-central North Dakota, is an important habitat for numerous migratory birds and waterfowl, including several threatened or endangered species. The refuge is distinguished by Long Lake, which is approximately 65 square kilometers and consists of four primary water management units. Water levels in the Long Lake units are maintained by low-level dikes and water-control structures, which after construction during the 1930s increased the water-storage capacity of Long Lake and reduced the frequency and volume of flushing flows downstream. The altered water regime, along with the negative precipitation:evaporation ratio of the region, may be contributing to the accumulation of water-borne chemical constituents such as salts, trace metals, and other constituents, which at certain threshold concentrations may impair aquatic plant, invertebrate, and bird communities of the refuge. The refuge’s comprehensive conservation planning process identified the need for water-quality monitoring to assess current (2013) conditions, establish comparative baselines, evaluate changes over time (trends), and support adaptive management of the wetland units. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and North Dakota Department of Health began a water-quality monitoring program at Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge to address these needs. Biweekly water-quality samples were collected for ions, trace metals, and nutrients; and in situ sensors and data loggers were installed for the continuous measurement of specific conductance and water depth. Long Lake was characterized primarily by sodium, bicarbonate, and sulfate ions. Overall results for total alkalinity and hardness were 580 and 329 milligrams per liter, respectively; thus, Long Lake is considered alkaline and classified as very hard. The mean pH and sodium adsorption ratio for Long Lake were 8.8 and 10, respectively. Total dissolved solids concentrations

  17. Hydrology and Water and Sediment Quality at James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge near Kahuku, Island of Oahu, Hawaii

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hunt, Charles D.; De Carlo, Eric H.

    2000-01-01

    The James Campbell National Wildlife Refuge occupies two lowland marsh and pond complexes on the northern coastal plain of Oahu: the mostly natural ponds and wetlands of the Punamano Unit and the constructed ponds of the Kii Unit. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service manages the Refuge primarily to protect and enhance habitat for four endangered species of Hawaiian waterbirds. Kii Unit is fed by artesian wells and rainfall, whereas Punamano Unit is fed naturally by rainfall, runoff, and ground-water seepage. Streams drain from the uplands into lowland ditches that pass through Kii Unit on their way to the ocean. A high-capacity pump transfers water from the inner ditch terminus at Kii to the ocean outlet channel. Stormwaters also exit the inner ditch system over flood-relief swales near the outlet pump and through a culvert with a one-way valve. A hydrologic investigation was done from November 1996 through February 1998 to identify and quantify principal inflows and outflows of water to and from the Refuge, identify hydraulic factors affecting flooding, document ground-water/surface-water interactions, determine the adequacy of the current freshwater supply, and determine water and sediment quality. These goals were accomplished by installing and operating a network of stream-gaging stations, meteorology stations, and shallow ground-water piezometers, by computing water budgets for the two Refuge units, and by sampling and analyzing water and pond-bottom sediments for major ions, trace metals, and organic compounds. Streamflow during the study was dominated by winter stormflows, followed by a gradual recession of flow into summer 1997, as water that had been stored in alluvial fans drained to lowland ditches. Outflow at the ditch terminus in 1997 was 125 million gallons greater than measured inflow to the coastal plain, mainly reflecting gains from ground water along the ditches between outlying gages and the ditch terminus. Of the measured 1997 outflow, 98 percent

  18. Seasonal Variation of Total Mercury Burden in the American Alligator (Alligator Mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nilsen, Frances M.; Dorsey, Jonathan E.; Long, Stephen E.; Schock, Tracey B.; Bowden, John A.; Lowers, Russell H.; Guillette, Louis J., Jr.

    2016-01-01

    Seasonal variation of mercury (Hg) is not well studied in free-ranging wildlife. Atmospheric deposition patterns of Hg have been studied in detail and have been modeled for both global and specific locations with great accuracy and correlates to environment impact. However, monitoring these trends in wildlife is complicated due to local environmental parameters (e.g., rainfall, humidity, pH, bacterial composition) that can affect the transformation of atmospheric Hg to the biologically available forms. Here, we utilized an abundant and healthy population of American alligators (Alligator mississippiensis) at Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge (MINWR), FL, and assessed Hg burden in whole blood samples over a span of 7 years (2007 2014; n 174) in an effort to assess seasonal variation of total [Hg]. While the majority of this population is assumed healthy, 18 individuals with low body mass indices (BMI, defined in this study) were captured throughout the 7 year sampling period. These individual alligators exhibited [Hg] that were not consistent with the observed overall seasonal [Hg] variation, and were statistically different from the healthy population of alligators. The alligators with low BMI had elevated concentrations of Hg compared to their age/sex/season matched counterparts with normal BMI. Statistically significant differences were found between the winter and spring seasons for animals with normal BMI. The data in this report supports the conclusion that organismal total [Hg] do fluctuate directly with seasonal deposition rates as well as other seasonal environmental parameters, such as average rainfall and prevailing wind direction. This study highlights the unique environment of MINWR to permit annual assessment of apex predators, such as the American alligator, to determine detailed environmental impact of contaminants of concern.

  19. Literature Review and Database of Relations Between Salinity and Aquatic Biota: Applications to Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gleason, Robert A.; Tangen, Brian A.; Laubhan, Murray K.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Stamm, John F.

    2009-01-01

    Long-term accumulation of salts in wetlands at Bowdoin National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Mont., has raised concern among wetland managers that increasing salinity may threaten plant and invertebrate communities that provide important habitat and food resources for migratory waterfowl. Currently, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is evaluating various water management strategies to help maintain suitable ranges of salinity to sustain plant and invertebrate resources of importance to wildlife. To support this evaluation, the USFWS requested that the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) provide information on salinity ranges of water and soil for common plants and invertebrates on Bowdoin NWR lands. To address this need, we conducted a search of the literature on occurrences of plants and invertebrates in relation to salinity and pH of the water and soil. The compiled literature was used to (1) provide a general overview of salinity concepts, (2) document published tolerances and adaptations of biota to salinity, (3) develop databases that the USFWS can use to summarize the range of reported salinity values associated with plant and invertebrate taxa, and (4) perform database summaries that describe reported salinity ranges associated with plants and invertebrates at Bowdoin NWR. The purpose of this report is to synthesize information to facilitate a better understanding of the ecological relations between salinity and flora and fauna when developing wetland management strategies. A primary focus of this report is to provide information to help evaluate and address salinity issues at Bowdoin NWR; however, the accompanying databases, as well as concepts and information discussed, are applicable to other areas or refuges. The accompanying databases include salinity values reported for 411 plant taxa and 330 invertebrate taxa. The databases are available in Microsoft Excel version 2007 (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2009/5098/downloads/databases_21april2009.xls) and contain

  20. 75 FR 41879 - Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, Morris County, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... listed endangered Indiana bats are known to occur on the refuge. Reptile and amphibian species of..., over 600 plant, 224 bird, 38 mammal, 23 reptile, 38 fish, and 19 amphibian species have been...

  1. 76 FR 26751 - Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Sussex County, DE; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-09

    ... the planting of genetically modified organisms until the refuge completed compatibility determinations... 17, 2005 (70 FR 60365) stating we intended to prepare a CCP and EA for Prime Hook NWR. We held...

  2. 75 FR 26979 - Piedmont National Wildlife Refuge, Jones and Jasper Counties, GA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-13

    ... notice in the Federal Register on April 4, 2008 (73 FR 18552). For more about the refuge and our CCP... dragonflies, crayfish, and mussels. We would continue to collect quail, turkey, and deer data through...

  3. Stakeholder survey results for Lake Umbagog National Wildlife Refuge: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Stewart, Susan C.; Koontz, Lynne; Wundrock, Katherine D.

    2005-01-01

    Lake Umbagog is a newly established Refuge (in 1993) with an increasing visitation. Current visitation numbers are around 55,000 visits/year. Though limited visitor services are currently offered, additional services will be proposed in the CCP. The purpose of this survey is to assess interested publics' and stakeholders' satisfaction with existing visitor conditions and experiences on the Refuge and the preferences for proposed changes to the Refuge affecting visitation. An additional purpose is to gauge customers' understanding and knowledge regarding the Refuge so that future communications with stakeholders regarding proposed changes can be most effective. Appendix A of this report includes the survey instrument. Appendix B includes the summary data for all of the questions in the survey, in the order that they appear in the survey. For the most part, that information is not repeated in the body of the report, which focuses on the meaning of more in-depth analyses of the survey data.

  4. 75 FR 39702 - San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Sonoma, Napa, and Solano Counties, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-12

    ... published on July 26, 2006 (71 FR 42413), one stakeholder meeting, one public meeting, planning updates, and... public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, environmental..., fishing, wildlife observation, photography, environmental education, and interpretation...

  5. 75 FR 69123 - Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge, Charleston County, SC; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-10

    ..., environmental education and interpretation, surf fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and bicycling... observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update.... Environmental education and interpretation will continue, with additional education and outreach efforts...

  6. 76 FR 13427 - Ellicott Slough National Wildlife Refuge, Santa Cruz County, CA; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We... energy efficiency; develop a trail system; expand the in-class environmental education program to other... quality wildlife-dependent recreation with expanded environmental education opportunities. In...

  7. 76 FR 5196 - Aransas National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Aransas, Calhoun, and Refugio Counties, TX; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and... current levels. Visitor facilities and interpretive and environmental education programs would be improved...-dependent recreation activities, such as hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, photography,...

  8. 77 FR 40893 - Desecheo National Wildlife Refuge, PR; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-11

    ... started the process through a notice in the Federal Register on December 19, 2008 (73 FR 77828). For more... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and... observation and photography. We would also allow for appropriate and compatible non-wildlife-dependent uses...

  9. 77 FR 20840 - Bogue Chitto National Wildlife Refuge, LA and MS; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-06

    ... in the Federal Register on February 20, 2009 (74 FR 7913). Please see that notice for more about the... in the CCP for: (1) Wildlife observation/photography; (2) recreational fishing; (3) recreational... hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education...

  10. 76 FR 5193 - Felsenthal/Overflow National Wildlife Refuges, Ashley, Desha, Union, and Bradley Counties, AR...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-28

    ... (1) Hunting; (2) fishing; (3) wildlife observation and photography; (4) environmental education and... hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and... NWRs. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register on April 2, 2008 (73 FR...

  11. [Species richness and diversity of a fish community in a temporal water body at Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge, Costa Rica].

    PubMed

    Sáenz Sánchez, Idania; Protti Quesada, Maurizio; Cabrera Peña, Jorge

    2006-06-01

    We evaluated fish community, species richness and diversity in a temporal water body of Rio Frio, Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge. These evaluations were done for three categories of water levels: low (below 1.5 m), intermediate (between 1.5 and 3.0 m) and high (deeper than 3 m). A total of 10,264 individuals were collected (nine families, 18 genera and 21 species). The most abundant species were Poecilia gillii (37%) and Astyanax aeneus (19%) and the least abundant were Ophisternon aenigmaticum (0.06%) and Rhamdia nicaraguensis (0.05%). The highest values in diversity (H' = 2.07), in the inverse of the Simpson index (1/D = 6.2) and of the Berger-Parker (1/d = 4.2), were recorded in the deepest water category. Diversity differed clearly among water levels (p < 0.001). The high and intermediate categories were the most similar (conglomerate analysis: 72.9%). Out of the 21 species captured, only O. aenigmaticum constitutes a new record for the ichthyofauna of Rio Frio in the Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge. The temporal water body of the Rio Frio, considered in this study in the Playuela sector of Caño Negro National Wildlife Refuge is a nonhomogeneous ichthyological system. PMID:18494329

  12. Abundance, distribution, and removals of feral pigs at Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2010–2015

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leopold, Christina R.; Hess, Steve; Kendall, Steve J.; Judge, Seth W.

    2016-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest Unit (HFU) of Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (BINWRC) has intensively monitored non-native ungulate presence and distribution during surveys of all managed areas since 1988. In this report we: 1) provide results from recent ungulate surveys and the number of removals at HFU to determine the distribution, abundance, and efficacy of removals of feral pigs, the dominant ungulate, from 2010 to 2015; 2) present results of surveys of the presence and distribution of several ungulate species at the Kona Forest Unit (KFU) of BINWRC from November of 2012 to April of 2015; 3) present results of surveys of weed presence and cover at both refuge units; and 4) present comparative analyses of forest canopy cover at KFU from visual estimates and geospatial imagery. Removals of feral pigs at HFU appear to have significantly decreased pig abundance over the study period from 2010–2015. A grand total of 1,660 feral pigs were removed from managed areas of HFU from 2010 until September of 2015. Management units 2 and 4 contained the majority of pigs at HFU. Recent surveys recorded high densities of pigs in the unenclosed, unmanaged area of Lower Maulua, reaching 14.9 ± (3.2) pigs/km2 in March of 2015. The total amount of ungulate sign ranged from 22.2 to 54.3 percent of plots surveyed at KFU from November of 2012 to April of 2015. The ability to differentiate sign of ungulate species remains problematic at KFU; although there appears to have been a significant decline in feral cattle sign at KFU, this result is likely to be unreliable because cattle and pig sign were not differentiated consistently during later surveys. Spatial distributions in weed cover are distinctive; however, some weed species may not be reliably represented due to observers’ inconsistencies in recording data and abilities to recognize less common weeds.

  13. Vegetation and non-native ungulate monitoring at the Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex 2010–2014.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hess, Steven C.; Leopold, Christina R.; Kendall, Steven J.

    2015-01-01

    The Hakalau Forest Unit (HFU) of Big Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex (BINWRC) has intensively managed feral cattle (Bos taurus) and pigs (Sus scrofa) and monitored non-native ungulate presence and distribution during surveys of all managed areas since 1988. We: 1) provide results from recent ungulate surveys at HFU to determine current feral pig abundance and distribution; 2) present results of surveys of ungulate presence and distribution at the Kona Forest Unit (KFU); 3) present results of surveys of weed presence and cover at both refuge units; and 4) present baseline results from long-term vegetation monitoring plots at KFU. Overall pig abundance appears to have decreased at HFU, although not significantly, over the period from 2010 to 2014. Management units 2 and 4 contained the majority of pigs at HFU. Pig density outside of adjacent managed areas has declined significantly from 2010 to 2014 for unknown reasons. Ungulate sign occurred in > 50% of plots at KFU during the November 2012 and September 2013 surveys, but ungulate sign occurred in < 28% of plots during three other surveys. The ability to differentiate sign of ungulate species remains problematic at KFU. Changes in weed cover do not yet demonstrate any strong temporal pattern. Spatial patterns are more pronounced; however, some weed species may not be reliably represented due to observers’ abilities to recognize less common weeds. Nonetheless, the distribution and cover of fireweed (Senecio madagascariensis) at KFU may have increased over the study period. Vegetation surveys documented baseline floristic composition and forest structure at KFU. It is not known if this current amount of emerging cover is sufficient for long-term self-sustaining forest canopy regeneration; however, numerous ‘ōhi‘a seedlings were found in the wet forest and mesic ‘ōhi‘a habitats, indicating an ample viable seed source and robust potential for forest regeneration.

  14. Values and attitudes of National Wildlife Refuge managers and biologists; Report to respondents

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brinson, Ayeisha A.; Benson, Delwin E.

    2002-01-01

    Analyses of data revealed that these managers and biologists did not differ substantially in terms of their environmental values. Refuge professionals were supportive of public involvement in planning and management, but hoped to maintain management authority throughout the process. Professionals were skeptical concerning the applicability of long term planning, but were generally supportive of the planning process. Attitudes toward the Service were conflicting: professionals felt that the Service needed to provide better leadership and direction, but that the Refuge System needed to assert its autonomy and independence from the rest of the Service.

  15. 75 FR 35829 - Bear Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Oxford Slough Waterfowl Production Area, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-23

    ... input in local news media throughout the CCP planning process. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  16. 76 FR 22140 - Parker River and Thacher Island National Wildlife Refuges, Essex County, MA; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-20

    ... input in local news media throughout the CCP process. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or requests for more... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  17. 2. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING J. CLARK SALYER NATIONAL WILDLIFE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW, LOOKING EAST, SHOWING J. CLARK SALYER NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, JUST EAST OF WESTHOPE, NORTH DAKOTA (THE NORTH END OF THE REFUGE JUST SOUTH OF DAM 357 AND THE CANADIAN BORDER) - J. Clark Salyer National Wildlife Refuge Dams, Along Lower Souris River, Kramer, Bottineau County, ND

  18. 78 FR 3024 - Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee National Wildlife Refuge, MS; Intent To Prepare a Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-15

    ... of issues to consider in the planning process. DATES: To ensure consideration, we must receive your... determine how the public can use each refuge. The planning process is a way for us and the public to... our process for developing a CCP for Sam D. Hamilton Noxubee NWR in Mississippi. This notice...

  19. 75 FR 15721 - Back Bay National Wildlife Refuge, City of Virginia Beach, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... the eastern, barrier island portion of the refuge, where annual visitation is greater than 100,000... Register (67 FR 30950) on May 8, 2002, and then updating that notice (72 FR 8196) on February 23, 2007. We..., a 900-acre freshwater impoundment complex, numerous bay islands, bottomland mixed forests,...

  20. 76 FR 78940 - Minidoka National Wildlife Refuge, Blaine, Cassia, Minidoka, and Power Counties, ID...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-20

    .... The Refuge is located 12 miles northeast of Rupert, ID, in the Snake River Plain, at approximately 4,200 feet in elevation. The area was historically comprised of a portion of the Snake River surrounded... impounded the Snake River and created Lake Walcott to store water for irrigation, and provide...

  1. 77 FR 29358 - Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Soldotna, AK; Environmental Impact Statement for the Shadura...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-17

    ... intermingled with hundreds of lakes. Boreal forests are home to moose, wolves, black and brown bears, lynx... ) established the Refuge from the Kenai Moose Range and other lands and set forth the following major purposes... their natural diversity, including, but not limited to, moose, bear, mountain goats, Dall sheep,...

  2. 77 FR 75646 - Kenai National Wildlife Refuge, Soldotna, AK; Draft Environmental Impact Statement for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... of lakes. Boreal forests are home to moose, wolves, black and brown bears, lynx, snowshoe hares, and... (Section 303 ) established the Refuge from the Kenai Moose Range and other lands, and set forth the... populations and habitats in their natural diversity, including, but not limited to, moose, bear,...

  3. 75 FR 9924 - Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan for the Red Rock Lakes National Wildlife Refuge, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-04

    ... review and comment following the announcement in the Federal Register on September 26, 2008 (73 FR 55864... other species of waterfowl and waterbirds. Common mammalian species include Shiras moose, Rocky Mountain... refuge is open to limited hunting of ducks, geese, coots, and moose. Elk, pronghorn, moose, mule...

  4. 78 FR 35640 - Establishment of the Valle de Oro National Wildlife Refuge, Bernalillo County, New Mexico

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-13

    ... United States, this refuge will provide ] easy access and key outdoor recreation opportunities to more... recreation and outdoor education for urban youth. It also serves as a gateway to other outdoor venues in the... acres of protected lands for public access, recreation, and environmental education. ADDRESSES: A...

  5. 76 FR 39890 - St. Johns National Wildlife Refuge, FL; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-07

    ... resources and would adapt management based on discovery of climate change related impacts. We would work... process through a Federal Register notice on December 14, 2009 (74 FR 66147). Please see that notice for... not actively collect data related to climate change trends and their effects on the refuge....

  6. 76 FR 36143 - Bombay Hook National Wildlife Refuge, Kent County, DE; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-21

    .... The refuge's location along the Atlantic Flyway makes it a vital resting and feeding spot for a large... issues. Climate Change and Interior Marsh Loss A growing body of evidence indicates that accelerating climate change, associated with increasing global temperatures, is affecting water, land, and...

  7. 78 FR 27989 - Bandon Marsh, Nestucca Bay, and Siletz Bay National Wildlife Refuges, Coos, Tillamook, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... through a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 73121; November 29, 2010). We released the draft CCP/EAs... (77 FR 57107; September 17, 2012). For more information about the history and purposes of the refuges... comments on the draft CCP/EAs for 30 days, from September 17 to October 22, 2012 (77 FR 57107). We...

  8. 77 FR 16058 - Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Pacific County, WA; Record of Decision for Final Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-19

    ... April 9, 2008 (73 FR 19238). We announced the availability of our draft and final documents in the Federal Register as well. Our Draft CCP/EIS was released on January 21, 2011 (76 FR 3922), and our Final CCP/EIS was released on August 12, 2011 (76 FR 50247). The Refuge was established in 1937 to...

  9. 76 FR 24511 - Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge, Cabo Rojo, Puerto Rico; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    .../EA, we describe the alternative we propose to use to manage this refuge for the 15 years following... education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15 years in accordance with... process through a notice of intent in the Federal Register on March 12, 2007 (72 FR 11047). For more...

  10. 78 FR 20687 - Nantucket National Wildlife Refuge, Nantucket, MA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-05

    ..., Massachusetts. In this final CCP, we describe how we will manage the refuge for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES... prepared another notice in the Federal Register (66 FR 10506; February 15, 2001), to indicate that a... guide us in managing and administering Nantucket NWR for the next 15 years. Alternative B, as...

  11. 77 FR 2754 - Establishment of Everglades Headwaters National Wildlife Refuge and Conservation Area

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-19

    ... the refuge. On September 8, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register notice (76 ] FR 55699.... On October 26, 2011, the Service published a Federal Register notice (76 FR 66321) announcing the... in central and south Florida, helping to protect and restore one of the great grassland and...

  12. Waterfowl Migration on Klamath Basin National Wildlife Refuges 1953-2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gilmer, David S.; Yee, Julie L.; Mauser, David M.; Hainline, James M.

    2004-01-01

    Waterfowl abundance, species composition, and distribution on Klamath Basin refuges have fluctuated over the decades and have been influenced by events such as productivity on breeding grounds and habitat conditions on wintering grounds that cause shifts in migration patterns. A major c

  13. 76 FR 50247 - Willapa National Wildlife Refuge, Pacific County, WA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... in the Federal Register (73 FR 19238; April 9, 2008). We announced ] the availability of the Draft... Register (76 FR 3922; January 21, 2011). The Refuge was established in 1937 to protect migrating and... solicited public comments on the Draft CCP/EIS for 45 days, from January 21 to March 7, 2011 ] (76 FR...

  14. 76 FR 29782 - Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai‘i County, HI; Final Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-23

    ... notice of intent in the Federal Register (74 FR 8564; February 25, 2009). We released the draft CCP/EA to... FR 52546; August 26, 2010). The Refuge is located on the Island of Hawai`i. It encompasses two units... protect endangered forest birds and their rainforest habitat. The Hakalau Forest Unit encompasses...

  15. 75 FR 22618 - Eastern Neck National Wildlife Refuge, Kent County, MD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-29

    ... the diversity, health, and distribution of the refuge's deciduous-mixed forest to benefit forest... Federal Register on June 11, 2002 (67 FR 40002). Because of changes in budget and staffing priorities, we... Register on January 22, 2007 (72 FR 2709). We released the draft CCP/EA to the public, announcing...

  16. 77 FR 30312 - Montezuma National Wildlife Refuge, Cayuga, Seneca, and Wayne Counties, NY; Draft Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-22

    ... notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 25286; May 7, 2010). Montezuma NWR was established in 1938 to... available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography... priority public uses: hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, photography, environmental education,...

  17. 75 FR 36437 - Holla Bend National Wildlife Refuge, Pope and Yell Counties, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ... process through a notice in the Federal Register on May 17, 2007 (72 FR 27837). Holla Bend NWR is about 6... review period as announced in the Federal Register on January 8, 2010 (75 FR 1073). Five public comments... opportunities for wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and...

  18. 75 FR 51098 - Protection Island and San Juan Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Jefferson, Island, San Juan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and... Register on August 14, 2007 (72 FR 45444), announcing our intent to complete a CCP/EA and inviting public... partnerships. Recreational activities, including wildlife observation, photography, and camping on Turn...

  19. 75 FR 39038 - Tamarac National Wildlife Refuge and Wetland Management District, Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ..., and other media announcements will inform people of the meetings and opportunities for written... began by publishing a notice of intent on (72 FR 27587- 27588, May 16, 2007). For more about the initial..., fishing, wildlife observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation....

  20. 78 FR 16523 - Deer Flat National Wildlife Refuge, Canyon, Payette, Owyhee, and Washington Counties, ID, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ..., and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least every 15..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. The Draft CCP/EIS..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, environmental education and interpretation as well...

  1. Marsh soils as potential sinks for Bacteroides fecal indicator bacteria, Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge, Georgetown, SC, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drexler, Judith Z.; Johnson, Heather E.; Duris, Joseph W.; Krauss, Ken W.

    2014-01-01

    A soil core collected in a tidal freshwater marsh in the Waccamaw National Wildlife Refuge (Georgetown, SC) exuded a particularly strong odor of cow manure upon extrusion. In order to test for manure and determine its provenance, we carried out microbial source tracking using DNA markers for Bacteroides, a noncoliform, anaerobic bacterial group that represents a broad group of the fecal population. Three core sections from 0-3 cm, 9-12 cm and 30-33 were analyzed for the presence of Bacteroides. The ages of core sediments were estimated using 210Pb and 137Cs dating. All three core sections tested positive for Bacteroides DNA markers related to cow or deer feces. Because cow manure is stockpiled, used as fertilizer, and a source of direct contamination in the Great Pee Dee River/Winyah Bay watershed, it is very likely the source of the Bacteroides that was deposited on the marsh. The mid-points of the core sections were dated as follows: 0-3 cm: 2009; 9-12 cm: 1999, and 30-33 cm: 1961. The presence of Bacteroides at different depths/ages in the soil profile indicates that soils in tidal freshwater marshes are, at the least, capable of being short-term sinks for Bacteroides and, may have the potential to be long-term sinks of stable, naturalized populations.

  2. Availability of nest cavity trees for wood ducks (Aix sponsa) at Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Maine

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clugston, D.A.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of natural cavities for cavitynesting waterfowl, especially wood ducks (Aix sponsa), was unknown ferating forest of Sunkhaze Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, ME. An assessment of cavity availability was needed to determine if the existing nesting box program should be increased. During November to March, 199697 and 199798, I sampled 56 onehalf ha random plots, stratified into 5 types (upland hardwood, upland conifer, upland mixwood, wetland conifer, and wetland hardwood) to assess availability of trees with cavities. The predominant tree species with cavities were red maple (Acer rubrum; 39%) and aspen (Populus sp.; 31%); 72% of all trees with cavities were alive. Density ees/plot averaged from 1.0 +0.4 (x +SE) in wetland softwoods to 1.9 +0.4 in upland hardwoods. This low density of potential cavity trees and the small mean dbh (39.4 +1.6 cm) indicate a young forest with few suitable cavities. Forested areas, especially hardwoods near canopy openings, need to be allowed to mature to increase the number and quality of future cavities. An expanded nest box program seems justified.

  3. Relationship between deer mouse population parameters and dieldrin contamination in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, D.L.; Otis, D.L.

    1998-01-01

    A small-mammal capture-recapture study was conducted in the Rocky Mountain Arsenal National Wildlife Refuge to quantify the effects of soil contamination with dieldrin on demographic parameters of deer mouse (Peromyscus maniculatus) populations. Increased dieldrin concentrations were significantly associated with larger deer mouse populations, although the size of populations on contaminated sites decreased during the study. The most parsimonious model for estimating survival rates was one in which survival was a decreasing function of dieldrin concentration. A significantly higher proportion of female deer mice in the populations residing on the more highly contaminated sites exhibited signs of reproductive activity. Development of genetic resistance in P. maniculatus to chronic chemical exposure is suggested as a possible mechanism responsible for the species' observed dominance and relatively high densities on contaminated sites. Under the additional stress of unfavorable environmental conditions, however, these populations may suffer disproportionately greater mortality. The design and analytical methods presented offer a rigorous statistical approach to assessing the effects of environmental contamination on small mammals at the population level.

  4. Summary of oceanographic and water-quality measurements in Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge, Wells, Maine, in 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Montgomery, Ellyn T.; Ganju, Neil K.; Dickhudt, Patrick J.; Borden, Jonathan; Martini, Marinna A.; Brosnahan, Sandra M.

    2015-01-01

    Suspended-sediment transport is a critical element controlling the geomorphology of tidal wetland complexes. Wetlands rely on organic material and inorganic sediment deposition to maintain their elevation relative to sea level. The U.S. Geological Survey performed observational deployments to measure suspended-sediment concentration and water flow rates in the tidal channels of the wetlands in the Rachel Carson National Wildlife Refuge in Wells, Maine. The objective was to characterize the sediment-transport mechanisms that contribute to the net sediment budget of the wetland complex. We deployed a meteorological tower, optical turbidity sensors, and acoustic velocity meters at sites on Stephens Brook and the Ogunquit River between March 27 and December 9, 2013. This report presents the time-series oceanographic and atmospheric data collected during those field studies. The oceanographic parameters include water velocity, depth, turbidity, salinity, temperature, and pH. The atmospheric parameters include wind direction, speed, and gust; air temperature; air pressure; relative humidity; short wave radiation; and photosynthetically active radiation.

  5. CHARLES M. RUSSELL WILDLIFE REFUGE, MONTANA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rice, Dudley D.; Miller, Michael S.

    1984-01-01

    A mineral survey of the Charles M. Russell Wildlife Refuge in Montana indicates that parts of the area have demonstrated resources of low-rank coal and bentonite in areas of substantiated potential and all of the area is assigned a probable resource potential for oil and gas because it is underlain by sedimentary strata known to contain hydrocarbons in other areas. Potential hydrocarbon accumulations, including both oil and gas, are difficult to delineate because of the absence of subsurface control points within the refuge. Geophysical surveys and directional drilling along the fringes of the wildlife refuge would aid in refining resource estimates for organic fuels. 1 ref.

  6. Teaching change to local youth: Plant phenology, climate change and citizen science at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Litton, C. M.; Laursen, S. C.; Phifer, C.; Giardina, C. P.

    2012-12-01

    Plant phenology is a powerful indicator of how climate change affects native ecosystems, and also provides an experiential outdoor learning opportunity for promoting youth conservation education and awareness. We developed a youth conservation education curriculum, including both classroom and field components, for local middle and high school students from Hawaii. The curriculum is focused on linking plant phenology and climate change, with emphasis on ecologically and culturally important native trees and birds at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), on the Island of Hawaii. In this curriculum, students: (i) visit Hakalau Forest NWR to learn about the ecology of native ecosystems, including natural disturbance regimes and the general concept of change in forest ecosystems; (ii) learn about human-induced climate change and its potential impact on native species; and (iii) collect plant phenology measurements and publish these data on the USA National Phenology Network website. This youth conservation education curriculum represents a close collaboration between Hakalau Forest NWR; the Friends of Hakalau Forest NWR; the College of Tropical Agriculture and Human Resources at the University of Hawaii at Manoa; the USDA Forest Service; and Imi Pono no Ka Aina, an environmental education and outreach program for the Three Mountain Alliance Watershed Partnership. In the Winter and Spring of 2011-2012, we developed classroom and field portions of the curriculum. In the Spring and Summer of 2012, we recruited four groups of participants, with a total of ~40 students, who visited the refuge to participate in the curriculum. Preliminary phenology observations based upon ~4 months of measurements show low to medium levels of flowering, fruiting and leaf flush. However, the real science value of this program will come over years to decades of accumulated student activity. From this, we anticipate the emergence of a unique tropical montane forest dataset on plant

  7. 50 CFR 32.7 - What refuge units are open to hunting and/or sport fishing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Refuge Upper Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge Kansas Flint Hills National Wildlife Refuge... Wildlife Refuge Upper Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge Windom Wetland Management District... National Wildlife Refuge Swan River National Wildlife Refuge UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge War...

  8. Hydrologic and landscape database for the Cache and White River National Wildlife Refuges and contributing watersheds in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buell, Gary R.; Wehmeyer, Loren L.; Calhoun, Daniel L.

    2012-01-01

    A hydrologic and landscape database was developed by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, for the Cache River and White River National Wildlife Refuges and their contributing watersheds in Arkansas, Missouri, and Oklahoma. The database is composed of a set of ASCII files, Microsoft Access® files, Microsoft Excel® files, an Environmental Systems Research Institute (ESRI) ArcGIS® geodatabase, ESRI ArcGRID® raster datasets, and an ESRI ArcReader® published map. The database was developed as an assessment and evaluation tool to use in examining refuge-specific hydrologic patterns and trends as related to water availability for refuge ecosystems, habitats, and target species; and includes hydrologic time-series data, statistics, and hydroecological metrics that can be used to assess refuge hydrologic conditions and the availability of aquatic and riparian habitat. Landscape data that describe the refuge physiographic setting and the locations of hydrologic-data collection stations are also included in the database. Categories of landscape data include land cover, soil hydrologic characteristics, physiographic features, geographic and hydrographic boundaries, hydrographic features, regional runoff estimates, and gaging-station locations. The database geographic extent covers three hydrologic subregions—the Lower Mississippi–St Francis (0802), the Upper White (1101), and the Lower Arkansas (1111)—within which human activities, climatic variation, and hydrologic processes can potentially affect the hydrologic regime of the refuges and adjacent areas. Database construction has been automated to facilitate periodic updates with new data. The database report (1) serves as a user guide for the database, (2) describes the data-collection, data-reduction, and data-analysis methods used to construct the database, (3) provides a statistical and graphical description of the database, and (4) provides detailed information on

  9. Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment: Report and recommendation to the Congress of the United States and final legislative environmental impact statement

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1987-01-01

    The Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in the northeastern corner of Alaska, was first established as the Arctic National Wildlife Range by Public Land Order 2214 in 1960, for the purpose of preserving unique wildlife, wilderness, and recreational values. The original 8.9-millionacre Range was withdrawn from all forms of appropriation under the public land laws, including mining laws but not including mineral leasing laws. This order culminated extensive efforts begun more than a decade earlier to preserve this unique part of Alaska. The following report analyzes the potential environmental consequences of five management alternatives for the coastal plain, ranging from opening for lease of the entire area for oil and gas development, to wilderness designation. A legislative environmental impact statement has been integrated into the report.

  10. 77 FR 1078 - San Pablo Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Sonoma, Napa, and Solano Counties, CA; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-09

    ... Register notice (75 FR 39702; July 12, 2010). The Draft CCP/EA identified and evaluated three alternatives..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We intend to...

  11. 77 FR 37702 - Grays Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Caribou and Bonneville Counties, ID; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-22

    ... comments by August 21, 2012. We will announce opportunities for public input in local news media throughout..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review...

  12. Assessment of water-quality data from Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge, North Dakota--2008 through 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Finocchiaro, Raymond G.; Gleason, Robert A.; Rabenberg, Michael J.; Dahl, Charles F.; Ell, Mike J.

    2013-01-01

    ong Lake National Wildlife Refuge, located in south-central North Dakota, is an important habitat for numerous migratory birds and waterfowl, including several threatened or endangered species. The refuge is distinguished by Long Lake, which is approximately 65 square kilometers and consists of four primary water management units. Water levels in the Long Lake units are maintained by low-level dikes and water-control structures, which after construction during the 1930s increased the water-storage capacity of Long Lake and reduced the frequency and volume of flushing flows downstream. The altered water regime, along with the negative precipitation:evaporation ratio of the region, may be contributing to the accumulation of water-borne chemical constituents such as salts, trace metals, and other constituents, which at certain threshold concentrations may impair aquatic plant, invertebrate, and bird communities of the refuge. The refuge’s comprehensive conservation planning process identified the need for water-quality monitoring to assess current (2013) conditions, establish comparative baselines, evaluate changes over time (trends), and support adaptive management of the wetland units. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and North Dakota Department of Health began a water-quality monitoring program at Long Lake National Wildlife Refuge to address these needs. Biweekly water-quality samples were collected for ions, trace metals, and nutrients; and in situ sensors and data loggers were installed for the continuous measurement of specific conductance and water depth. Long Lake was characterized primarily by sodium, bicarbonate, and sulfate ions. Overall results for total alkalinity and hardness were 580 and 329 milligrams per liter, respectively; thus, Long Lake is considered alkaline and classified as very hard. The mean pH and sodium adsorption ratio for Long Lake were 8.8 and 10, respectively. Total dissolved solids concentrations

  13. Visitor and community survey results for Prime Hook National Wildlife Refuge: Completion report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Stewart, Susan C.; Koontz, Lynne; Ponds, Phadrea; Walters, Katherine D.

    2007-01-01

    Community residents’ perceptions and opinions Data for this study were collected using a survey administered to visitors to Prime Hook NWR and individuals living in the communities surrounding the Refuge. Surveys were randomly distributed to both consumptive and nonconsumptive use visitors over a one year period (September 2004 to September 2005) to account for seasonal variation in Refuge use. Three hundred thirty-two visitor surveys were returned for a response rate of 80 percent with a confidence interval of ± 5.4. Surveys were also distributed to a stratified random sample of community members in adjacent and surrounding areas (Slaughter Beach, Broadkill Beach, Prime Hook Beach, Milton, Lewes, Milford, and surrounding communities). Four hundred ninety-one surveys from the overall community sample were returned for a response rate of 39 percent with a ± 4.4 confidence interval. Community member results were weighted by U.S. Census Bureau data to correct for age and gender bias, and for community proportionality.

  14. 75 FR 60808 - Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, Chesterfield County, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-01

    ... this process through a notice in the Federal Register on August 22, 2007 (72 FR 47062). Carolina... period via a Federal Register notice on January 21, 2010 (75 FR 3484). We received five comments on the..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, environmental education and interpretation,...

  15. 76 FR 77245 - Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge, Austin and Colorado Counties, TX...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... process through a notice in the Federal Register (73 FR 65871; November 5, 2008). The Attwater Prairie... conservation plan and environmental assessment (EA) in the Federal Register on November 5, 2008 (73 FR 65871... opportunities for wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We...

  16. 78 FR 68088 - Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, Clallam County, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... (76 FR 61378; October 4, 2011). We released the draft CCP/EA to the public, announcing it and requesting comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (77 FR 71011; November 28, 2012). We... opportunities available to the public, including hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography,...

  17. 75 FR 3484 - Carolina Sandhills National Wildlife Refuge, Chesterfield and Marlboro Counties, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-21

    ... in the Federal Register on August 22, 2007 (72 FR 47062). Carolina Sandhills NWR is in rural... observation, wildlife photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update... photography would be supported with existing facilities. We would provide quality environmental education...

  18. 78 FR 16286 - Neal Smith National Wildlife Refuge, Jasper County, IA; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 76677) on December 17, 2008. For more about the initial process and the history of... comments in a notice of availability (77 FR 50155) on August 20, 2012. The 30-day comment period ended on... available to the public, including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and...

  19. 77 FR 51044 - Laguna Cartagena National Wildlife Refuge, PR; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... this process through a Federal Register notice on May 16, 2007 (72 FR 27588). We announce our decision... period via a Federal Register notice on May 2, 2011 (76 FR 24511). Several comments were received..., wildlife photography, environmental education and interpretation, fishing, non- commercial harvesting...

  20. 77 FR 71011 - Dungeness National Wildlife Refuge, Clallam County, WA; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-28

    ... started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (76 FR 61378; October 4, 2011). For more..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will.... Public Outreach We began public outreach by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (76...

  1. 77 FR 47660 - Attwater Prairie Chicken National Wildlife Refuge, Austin and Colorado Counties, TX; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (73 FR 65871; November 5, 2008). We released... in the Federal Register (76 FR 77245; December 12, 2011). The Attwater Prairie Chicken NWR, which... for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  2. 77 FR 13139 - Malheur National Wildlife Refuge, Harney County, OR; Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... process for Malheur NWR. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (74 FR 31046... observation and photography, environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at... cattails. Public uses, including compatible wildlife observation, photography,...

  3. 77 FR 27245 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-09

    ... articles, internet postings, and other media announcements to inform people of opportunities for input... Register (73 FR 76677) on December 17, 2008. For more about the initial process and the history of this..., wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review...

  4. 77 FR 51552 - The Great Lakes Islands National Wildlife Refuges in Michigan and Wisconsin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... addition, we will use special mailings, newspaper articles, internet postings, and other media... publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (73 FR 76677) on December 17, 2008. For more about the... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  5. 77 FR 65011 - Buffalo Lake National Wildlife Refuge, Randall County, TX; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-24

    ... 23, 2012. We will announce upcoming public meetings in local news media. ADDRESSES: You may submit... this process through a notice in the Federal Register (63 FR 33693; June 19, 1998). The Buffalo Lake..., including opportunities for wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  6. 75 FR 3753 - Tishomingo National Wildlife Refuge, Comprehensive Conservation Plan, Johnston County, OK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-22

    ... announce upcoming public meetings in local news media. ADDRESSES: You may request a hard copy or CD-ROM... November 17, 1999, issue of the Federal Register (64 FR 62683). For more about the initiation of this... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education...

  7. 77 FR 64541 - Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge, Liberty County, TX; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... process for Trinity River NWR. We started this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR... comments in a notice of availability in the Federal Register (77 FR 18853-18856; March 28, 2012). The..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and...

  8. 77 FR 18853 - Trinity River National Wildlife Refuge, Liberty County, TX; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-28

    ... will announce upcoming public meetings in local news media. ADDRESSES: You may submit comments or... this process through a notice in the Federal Register (72 FR 45059; August 10, 2007). The Trinity River... opportunities available to the public, including opportunities for wildlife observation and photography,...

  9. 77 FR 7172 - Sequoyah National Wildlife Refuge, Sequoyah, Muskogee, and Haskell Counties, OK; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-10

    ... opportunities for public input in local news media throughout the CCP process. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or... observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP...-dependent uses: Hunting, fishing, wildlife observation, photography, interpretation, and...

  10. 78 FR 68085 - Proposed Information Collection; National Wildlife Refuge Special Use Permit Applications and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... Wildlife Service, MS 2042- PDM, 4401 North Fairfax Drive, Arlington, VA 22203 (mail); or hope_grey@fws.gov..., including those facilitated by commercial visitor and management support services, on lands of the System..., such as activity reports, before and after site photographs, or data sharing, would qualify as...

  11. 75 FR 55599 - Little River National Wildlife Refuge, McCurtain County, OK; Revised Comprehensive Conservation...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... species, and change forest productivity. Human activities causing pollution and water quantity and quality..., and can transmit infectious diseases to humans, domestic livestock, and native wildlife species. Trust... at risk from a number of stressors (e.g., habitat loss and degradation, development, pollution,...

  12. 75 FR 74073 - Laguna Atascosa National Wildlife Refuge, Cameron and Willacy Counties, TX; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Register July 19, 2004 (69 FR 43010). Laguna Atascosa NWR is located in Cameron and Willacy Counties, Texas...; Final Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Finding of No Significant Impact for Environmental Assessment... and Wildlife Service (Service), announce the availability of our final comprehensive conservation...

  13. Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) Report; Weig [Weir] Property Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge, Technical Report 1997-1998.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Maureen

    1998-02-01

    A habitat evaluation of the Weir property, an approximately 200-acre in holding of private property within the Little Pend Oreille National Wildlife Refuge (Refuge), was conducted using the Habitat Evaluation Procedures (HEP) methodology. The Weir property consists of two separate parcels, an upper unit of 40 acres and a 160-acre lower unit. Evaluation species were ruffed grouse and white-tailed deer. Life requisites evaluated were available browse for white-tailed deer and winter food and fall-to-spring cover for ruffed grouse. Field data were collected on October 16, 17, and 21, 1997. Approximately 37 acres of the lower 160-acre unit are currently grasslands with no shrub or tree cover, and therefore do not provide suitable ruffed grouse or white-tailed deer cover. They excluded this acreage from the HEP calculations for current conditions. This acreage was included in the HEP calculations for ruffed grouse after future management strategies were factored in. It was not included in projections for white-tailed deer. The entire property was stratified into 6 stands (2 in the upper unit and 4 in the lower unit) for data collection. Data were collected at 10 points, spaced 20 paces (approximately 16 m) apart along one randomly selected transect in each stand, for a total of six transects. A circular quadrat (.004 ha) was used at each sampling point. Within this quadratwe counted all deciduous, coniferous, and shrub stems {ge} 0.9 m in height and made an ocular estimate of shrub (< 1.5 m in height) canopy cover. We measured the height of the closest (to the center of the quadrat) three deciduous trees, conifer trees, deciduous shrubs, and lowest conifer branch. We estimated the distance to 20 aspen trees at three points along each transect. For a ruffed grouse a Habitat Suitability Index (HSI) was calculated for each stand for each variable. Therefore, two HSIs were calculated for each stand, one for winter food and one for fall-to-spring cover. Weighted HSI scores

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF LAND COVER AND TERRAIN DATA BASES FOR THE INNOKO NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE, ALASKA, USING LANDSAT AND DIGITAL TERRAIN DATA.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Markon, Carl J.; Talbot, Stephen

    1986-01-01

    Landsat-derived land cover maps and associated elevation, slope, and aspect class maps were produced for the Innoko National Wildlife Refuge (3,850,000 acres; 1,555,095 hectares) in northwestern Alaska. These maps and associated digital data products are being used by the U. S. Fish and Wildlife Service for wildlife management, research, and comprehensive conservation planning. Portions of two Landsat Multispectral Scanner (MSS) scenes and digital terrain data were used to produce 1:250,000 scale land cover and terrain maps. Prints of summer and winter Landsat MSS scenes were used to manually interpret broad physiographic strata. These strata were transferred to U. S. Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale topographic maps and digitized. Seven major land cover classes and 23 subclasses were identified. The major land cover classes include: forest, scrub, dwarf scrub and related types, herbaceous, scarcely vegetated areas, water, and shadow.

  15. An evaluation and review of water-use estimates and flow data for the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuges, Oregon and California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Risley, John C.; Gannett, Marshall W.

    2006-01-01

    The Lower Klamath and Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuges, located in the upper Klamath Basin of Oregon and California, encompass approximately 46,700 and 39,100 acres, respectively. Demand for water in the semiarid upper Klamath Basin has increased in recent years, resulting in the need to better quantify water availability and use in the refuges. This report presents an evaluation of water-use estimates for both refuges derived on the basis of two approaches. One approach used evaporation and evapotranspiration estimates and the other used measured inflow and outflow data. The quality of the inflow and outflow data also was assessed. Annual water use in the refuges, using evapotranspiration estimates, was computed with the use of different rates for each of four land-use categories. Annual water-use rates for grain fields, seasonal wetlands, permanently flooded wetlands with emergent vegetation, and open-water bodies were 2.5, 2.9, 2.63, and 4.07 feet per year, respectively. Total water use was estimated as the sum of the products of each rate and the number of acres in its associated land-use category. Mean annual (2003-2005) water use for the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake refuges was approximately 124,000 and 95,900 acre-feet, respectively. To estimate water deliveries needed for each refuge, first, annual precipitation for 2003-2005 was subtracted from the annual water use for those years. Then, an adjusted total was obtained by adding 20 percent to the difference to account for salinity flushing. Resulting estimated mean annual adjusted needed water deliveries in 2003-2005 for the Lower Klamath and Tule Lake refuges were 107,000 and 82,800 acre-feet, respectively. Mean annual net inflow to the refuges for 2003-2005 was computed by subtracting estimated and measured surface-water outflows from inflows. Mean annual net inflow during the 3-year period for the Lower Klamath refuge, calculated for a subsection of the refuge, was approximately 73,700 acre-feet. The

  16. Community Survey Results for Rappahannock River Valley National Wildlife Refuge: Completion Report

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sexton, Natalie R.; Stewart, Susan C.; Koontz, Lynne

    2008-01-01

    This report provides a summary of results for the survey of residents of communities adjacent to Rappahannock River Valley NWR conducted from the spring through the summer in 2006. This research was commissioned by the Northeast Region of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in support of the Rappahannock River Valley NWR CCP and conducted by the Policy Analysis and Science Assistance Branch (PASA) of the U.S. Geological Survey/Fort Collins Science Center.

  17. Evaluating hydrologic response to land cover and climate change: An example from the Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lane, J. W.; Briggs, M.; Kulongoski, J. T.; Pollock, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge is located in the central Pacific Ocean, about 1,000 miles south of the island of Oahu. Impacts on the atoll's hydrologic and ecologic systems are anticipated from two key anthropogenic drivers of change: (1) eradication of invasive coconut palms and replanting of native Pisonia grandis trees, and (2) global climate change. In the near-term, the palm eradication program is expected to modify the distribution and quality of groundwater proximal to the reforested areas. Longer term, sea level rise, changes in precipitation, and changes in storm frequency and intensity are expected to have a broader impact on the freshwater resources of the atoll. We have initiated a project to characterize current climatic and hydrologic conditions on Palmyra, and monitor changes in order to model baseline conditions and future changes in groundwater distribution. Because rain water harvest satisfies human need on Palmyra, the atoll enables study of groundwater resource change uncomplicated by groundwater pumping stress. Field trips conducted in 2008 and 2013 have included geophysical surveys, weather station upgrades, installation of monitoring wells, and geochemical sampling. Nine wells have been installed on Cooper Island (the largest island of the atoll), each instrumented with a combination of temperature, conductivity, and pressure sensors. Repeated frequency-domain electromagnetic conductivity surveys indicate a reduction in the thickness of the freshwater lens on the southern side of the Cooper Island since 2008, possibly linked to recent modification to the atoll's runway and drainage system. These results indicate that we can successfully capture future transformations induced by land cover and climate changes. The Palmyra Atoll project provides open-source information and insight about human-driven change to the vulnerable freshwater resources of low-lying islands; we hope others will take interest in, and make use of the

  18. Deformation and the timing of gas generation and migration in the eastern Brooks Range foothills, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parris, T.M.; Burruss, R.C.; O'Sullivan, P. B.

    2003-01-01

    Along the southeast border of the 1002 Assessment Area in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, an explicit link between gas generation and deformation in the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt is provided through petrographic, fluid inclusion, and stable isotope analyses of fracture cements integrated with zircon fission-track data. Predominantly quartz-cemented fractures, collected from thrusted Triassic and Jurassic rocks, contain crack-seal textures, healed microcracks, and curved crystals and fluid inclusion populations, which suggest that cement growth occurred before, during, and after deformation. Fluid inclusion homogenization temperatures (175-250??C) and temperature trends in fracture samples suggest that cements grew at 7-10 km depth during the transition from burial to uplift and during early uplift. CH4-rich (dry gas) inclusions in the Shublik Formation and Kingak Shale are consistent with inclusion entrapment at high thermal maturity for these source rocks. Pressure modeling of these CH4-rich inclusions suggests that pore fluids were overpressured during fracture cementation. Zircon fission-track data in the area record postdeposition denudation associated with early Brooks Range deformation at 64 ?? 3 Ma. With a closure temperature of 225-240??C, the zircon fission-track data overlap homogenization temperatures of coeval aqueous inclusions and inclusions containing dry gas in Kingak and Shublik fracture cements. This critical time-temperature relationship suggests that fracture cementation occurred during early Brooks Range deformation. Dry gas inclusions suggest that Shublik and Kingak source rocks had exceeded peak oil and gas generation temperatures at the time structural traps formed during early Brooks Range deformation. The timing of hydrocarbon generation with respect to deformation therefore represents an important exploration risk for gas exploration in this part of the Brooks Range fold and thrust belt. The persistence of gas high at

  19. Archive of bathymetry and backscatter data collected in 2014 nearshore Breton and Gosier Islands, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wiese, Dana S.; Browning, Trevor

    2016-08-01

    As part of the Barrier Island Monitoring Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted nearshore geophysical surveys off Breton and Gosier Islands, Louisiana, in July and August of 2014. To assist the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with restoration planning efforts, the USGS was tasked with answering fundamental questions about the physical environment of the southern Chandeleur Islands, including the geology, morphology, and oceanography. Baseline data needed to answer these questions were either insufficient or missing. The USGS conducted a comprehensive geologic investigation in the summer of 2014, collecting geophysical and sedimentological data.Breton Island, located at the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeastern Louisiana, was recognized as a natural, globally significant nesting sanctuary for several bird species and was established as the Breton National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in 1904. The areal extent of Breton Island has diminished 90 percent since 1920. Land loss is attributed to ongoing relative sea-level rise, diminished sediment supply, and storm impacts. The bird population on Breton Island has also declined over the years, most notably after Hurricane George in 1998 and after Hurricane Katrina in 2015; the latter completely submerged the island. Despite decreasing habitable acreage, migratory seabirds continue to return and nest on Breton Island. To prevent the island from being submerged in the future, and to protect, stabilize, and provide more nesting and foraging areas for the bird population, the USFWS proposed a restoration effort to rebuild Breton Island to its pre-Katrina footprint.This data series serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry data, and side-scan sonar data, collected in the nearshore of Breton and Gosier Islands, NWR, Louisiana. The data were collected during two USGS cruises (USGS

  20. Archive of bathymetry and backscatter data collected in 2014 nearshore Breton and Gosier Islands, Breton National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeWitt, Nancy T.; Fredericks, Jake J.; Flocks, James G.; Miselis, Jennifer L.; Locker, Stanley D.; Kindinger, Jack G.; Bernier, Julie C.; Kelso, Kyle W.; Reynolds, Billy J.; Wiese, Dana S.; Browning, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Barrier Island Monitoring Project, scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) St. Petersburg Coastal and Marine Science Center conducted nearshore geophysical surveys off Breton and Gosier Islands, Louisiana, in July and August of 2014. To assist the United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) with restoration planning efforts, the USGS was tasked with answering fundamental questions about the physical environment of the southern Chandeleur Islands, including the geology, morphology, and oceanography. Baseline data needed to answer these questions were either insufficient or missing. The USGS conducted a comprehensive geologic investigation in the summer of 2014, collecting geophysical and sedimentological data.Breton Island, located at the southern end of the Chandeleur Island chain in southeastern Louisiana, was recognized as a natural, globally significant nesting sanctuary for several bird species and was established as the Breton National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) in 1904. The areal extent of Breton Island has diminished 90 percent since 1920. Land loss is attributed to ongoing relative sea-level rise, diminished sediment supply, and storm impacts. The bird population on Breton Island has also declined over the years, most notably after Hurricane George in 1998 and after Hurricane Katrina in 2015; the latter completely submerged the island. Despite decreasing habitable acreage, migratory seabirds continue to return and nest on Breton Island. To prevent the island from being submerged in the future, and to protect, stabilize, and provide more nesting and foraging areas for the bird population, the USFWS proposed a restoration effort to rebuild Breton Island to its pre-Katrina footprint.This data series serves as an archive of processed interferometric swath and single-beam bathymetry data, and side-scan sonar data, collected in the nearshore of Breton and Gosier Islands, NWR, Louisiana. The data were collected during two USGS cruises (USGS

  1. Engaging Visitors in Climate Change Communication: A Case Study of Southern Florida's National Parks and Wildlife Refuges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beard, Caroline A.; Thompson, Jessica Leigh

    2012-01-01

    Through the lens of place-based climate change communication, this manuscript compares results from internal and external assessments of capacity to communicate about climate change at national parks and refuges in southern Florida. The internal survey sample included agency staff, stakeholders, community partners, and concessionaires; the…

  2. Effects of a drawdown on plant communities in a freshwater impoundment at Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge, Louisiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Allain, Larry

    2012-01-01

    Disturbance is an important natural process in the creation and maintenance of wetlands. Water depth manipulation and prescribed fire are two types of disturbance commonly used by humans to influence vegetation succession and composition in wetlands with the intention of improving wildlife habitat value. A 6,475-hectare (ha) impoundment was constructed in 1943 on Lacassine National Wildlife Refuge in southwest Louisiana to create freshwater wetlands as wintering waterfowl habitat. Ten years after construction of the impoundment, called Lacassine pool, was completed, refuge staff began expressing concerns about increasing emergent vegetation cover, organic matter accumulation, and decreasing area of open water within the pool. Because the presence of permanent standing water impedes actions that can address these concerns, a small impoundment within the pool where it was possible to manipulate water depth was created. The 283-ha subimpoundment called Unit D was constructed in 1989. Water was pumped from Unit D in 1990, and the unit was permanently reflooded about 3 years later. Four prescribed fires were applied during the drawdown. A study was initiated in 1990 to investigate the effect of the experimental drawdown on vegetation and soils in Unit D. Four plant community types were described, and cores were collected to measure the depth of the soil organic layer. A second study of Unit D was conducted in 1997, 4 years after the unit was reflooded, by using the same plots and similar sampling methods. This report presents an analysis and synthesis of the data from the two studies and provides an evaluation of the impact of the management techniques applied. We found that plant community characteristics often differed among the four communities and varied with time. Species richness increased in two of the communities, and total aboveground biomass increased in all four during the drawdown. These changes, however, did not persist when Unit D was reflooded; by 1997

  3. Spring migratory pathways and migration chronology of Canada geese (Branta canadensis interior) wintering at the Santee National Wildlife Refuge, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giles, Molly M.; Jodice, Patrick G.; Baldwin, Robert F.; Stanton, John D.; Epstein, Marc

    2013-01-01

    We assessed the migratory pathways, migration chronology, and breeding ground affiliation of Canada Geese (Branta canadensis interior) that winter in and adjacent to the Santee National Wildlife Refuge in Summerton, South Carolina, United States. Satellite transmitters were fitted to eight Canada Geese at Santee National Wildlife Refuge during the winter of 2009–2010. Canada Geese departed Santee National Wildlife Refuge between 5 and 7 March 2010. Six Canada Geese followed a route that included stopovers in northeastern North Carolina and western New York, with three of those birds completing spring migration to breeding grounds associated with the Atlantic Population (AP). The mean distance between stopover sites along this route was 417 km, the mean total migration distance was 2838 km, and the Canada Geese arrived on AP breeding grounds on the eastern shore of Hudson Bay between 20 and 24 May 2010. Two Canada Geese followed a different route from that described above, with stopovers in northeastern Ohio, prior to arriving on the breeding grounds on 9 June 2010. Mean distance between stopover sites was 402 and 365 km for these two birds, and total migration distance was 4020 and 3650 km. These data represent the first efforts to track migratory Canada Geese from the southernmost extent of their current wintering range in the Atlantic Flyway. We did not track any Canada Geese to breeding grounds associated with the Southern James Bay Population. Caution should be used in the interpretation of this finding, however, because of the small sample size. We demonstrated that migratory Canada Geese wintering in South Carolina use at least two migratory pathways and that an affiliation with the Atlantic Population breeding ground exists.

  4. Arctic Refuge coastal plain terrestrial wildlife research summaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Douglas, David C.; Reynolds, Patricia E.; Rhode, E.B.

    2002-01-01

    In 1980, when the U.S. Congress enacted the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act (ANILCA), it also mandated a study of the coastal plain of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge. Section 1002 of ANILCA stated that a comprehensive inventory of fish and wildlife resources would be conducted on 1.5 million acres of the Arctic Refuge coastal plain (1002 Area). Potential petroleum reserves in the 1002 Area were also to be evaluated from surface geological studies and seismic exploration surveys. Results of these studies and recommendations for future management of the Arctic Refuge coastal plain were to be prepared in a report to Congress. In 1987, the Department of the Interior published the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, Coastal Plain Resource Assessment - Report and Recommendations to the Congress of the United States and Final Environmental Impact Statement. This report to Congress identified the potential for oil and gas production (updated* most recently by the U.S. Geological Survey in 2001), described the biological resources, and evaluated the potential adverse effects to fish and wildlife resources. The 1987 report analyzed the potential environmental consequences of five management alternatives for the coastal plain, ranging from wilderness designation to opening the entire area to lease for oil and gas developement. The report's summary recommended opening the 1002 Area to an orderly oil and gas leasing program, but cautioned that adverse effects to some wildlife populations were possible. Congress did not act on this recommendation nor any other alternative for the 1002 Area, and scientists continued studies of key wildlife species and habitats on the coastal plain of the Arctic Refuge and surrounding areas. This report contains updated summaries of those scientific investigations of caribou, muskoxen, predators (grizzly bears, wolves, golden eagles), polar bears, snow geese, and their wildlife habitats. Contributions to this report were

  5. Effects of drought and fire on bird communities of the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCreedy, Chris; van Riper, Charles, III; Esque, Todd C.; Darrah, Abigail J.

    2015-01-01

    In chapter 2, we examine the effects of the King Valley fire on breeding and migrant birds within the Kofa NWR. This fire was caused by incendiary weapons testing within Yuma Proving Ground, south of the Kofa NWRboundary (Esque and others, 2013). We found large differences in spring migrant and breeding species abundance and richness between bird count stations within the 2005 King Valley fire zone and bird count stations immediately outside the fire perimeter. Habitat loss to fire, and the subsequent slow regeneration of a Sonoran Desert flora that is not well adapted to fire disturbance, is a recognized threat to bird populations (McCreedy and others, 2009; Latta, 1999), and of all Sonoran Desert wildlife, birds may be the most impacted by loss of perennial Sonoran Desert vegetation to fire (Esque and Schwalbe, 2002). We conclude that decreases in both breeding and migrant use of washes within burned areas will likely persist into the long term (>25 years) due to slow return rates of xeroriparian woodlands lost in the fire.

  6. Effects of drought and fire on bird communities of the Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCreedy, Chris; van Riper, Charles; Esque, Todd C.; Darrah, Abigail J.

    2016-01-08

    In chapter 2, we examine the effects of the King Valley fire on breeding and migrant birds within the Kofa NWR. This fire was caused by incendiary weapons testing within Yuma Proving Ground, south of the Kofa NWRboundary (Esque and others, 2013). We found large differences in spring migrant and breeding species abundance and richness between bird count stations within the 2005 King Valley fire zone and bird count stations immediately outside the fire perimeter. Habitat loss to fire, and the subsequent slow regeneration of a Sonoran Desert flora that is not well adapted to fire disturbance, is a recognized threat to bird populations (McCreedy and others, 2009; Latta, 1999), and of all Sonoran Desert wildlife, birds may be the most impacted by loss of perennial Sonoran Desert vegetation to fire (Esque and Schwalbe, 2002). We conclude that decreases in both breeding and migrant use of washes within burned areas will likely persist into the long term (>25 years) due to slow return rates of xeroriparian woodlands lost in the fire.

  7. Sedimentation History of Halfway Creek Marsh, Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge, Wisconsin, 1846-2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Knox, James C.; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P.

    2007-01-01

    of Halfway Creek through the lower marsh continued to form and are currently (2006) about 1 foot higher than the surrounding marsh. Natural levee building in the lower marsh from 1994?2006 was accentuated by the lack of overbank sediment storage in the upper marsh. The historical storage of sediment in the upper and lower marsh affects modern streamflow and sediment transport processes of Halfway Creek and Sand Lake Coulee through the marsh, and it also affects marsh vegetation and wildlife habitat. Results from this investigation will help improve the understanding of how past overbank sedimentation patterns continue to influence modern and future water quality, sediment transport, nutrient loads, and water-related resources in riparian habitats common to the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge.

  8. Survey of oil and gas activities on federal wildlife refuges and waterfowl production areas

    SciTech Connect

    Ethridge, M.; Guerrieri, U.

    1983-01-01

    An analysis of survey data provides empirical evidence of the effects of oil and gas activities on federal wildlife refuges. The paper reports the results of a systematic survey of units of the National Wildlife Refuge System by the American Petroleum Institute in the form of questionnaires sent to refuge managers. The data suggest that oil and gas operations have had little or no adverse effect on wildlife on most refuges and Waterfowl Protection Areas, that oil and gas activities have detracted little from and have often enhanced other economic and recreational uses which occur on the refuges, and that appropriate regulations, stipulations, and restrictions are a key government management tool for protecting wildlife and other refuge resources. 3 figures, 44 tables.

  9. 77 FR 64538 - Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, Washington and Yamhill Counties, OR, Draft Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ... process through a notice in the Federal Register (75 FR 67763; November 3, 2010). Tualatin River National... and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. Background The CCP Process The... photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCP at least...

  10. Age, Growth and Reproduction of the Eastern Mudminnow (Umbra pygmaea) at the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge, New Jersey.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panek, Frank; Weis, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Umbra pygmaea DeKay (Eastern Mudminnow) is one of four species of Umbridae in North America. There is little published life-history information on the species within its native range, particularly on age, growth, and reproduction. This study focuses on these aspects of the life history of this fish at the Great Swamp National Wildlife Refuge in Morris County, NJ. A total of 336 fish of seven species was collected from June 1978 through May 1979, with the Eastern Mudminnow comprising 74% of the total. The average annual growth increment in total length for the Eastern Mudminnow was 15.3 2.06 mm, with age-1 fish averaging 40 mm total length and age-5 fish, the oldest collected, averaging 107 mm total length. The length-weight relationship was log10W = -5.291 + 3.182 log10TL mm for males and log10W = -4.999 + 3.032 log10TL mm for females. We observed no statistically significant sexually dimorphic differences in length-weight relationships in this population. The ratio of females to males increased from a low of 0.6 (predominance of male fish) at age-1 to a high of 4.6 (predominance of females) at age-5. Annual mortality for age 2–5 fish ranged from 40–76% with a mean of 59 13%. Age-specific fecundity estimates ranged from 250 eggs/female at age-1 to 2168 eggs/female at age-5. The relationship of number of mature ova to age was best described by the exponential function y = 149.29e0.5287x, where y = age-specific fecundity and x = age in years. Ova ranged from 0.1–0.2 mm in diameter in June and July and averaged 1.41 0.1 mm (range = 1.29–1.62 mm) in early February prior to spawning. Peak spawning occurred in mid-April at temperatures of 9–12 °C, and all females were spent by late April (13–15 °C).

  11. Precipitation, density, and population dynamics of desert bighorn sheep on San Andres National Wildlife Refuge, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bender, L.C.; Weisenberger, M.E.

    2005-01-01

    Understanding the determinants of population size and performance for desert bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis mexicana) is critical to develop effective recovery and management strategies. In arid environments, plant communities and consequently herbivore populations are strongly dependent upon precipitation, which is highly variable seasonally and annually. We conducted a retrospective exploratory analysis of desert bighorn sheep population dynamics on San Andres National Wildlife Refuge (SANWR), New Mexico, 1941-1976, by modeling sheep population size as a function of previous population sizes and precipitation. Population size and trend of desert bighorn were best and well described (R 2=0.89) by a model that included only total annual precipitation as a covariate. Models incorporating density-dependence, delayed density-dependence, and combinations of density and precipitation were less informative than the model containing precipitation alone (??AlCc=8.5-22.5). Lamb:female ratios were positively related to precipitation (current year: F1,34=7.09, P=0.012; previous year: F1,33=3.37, P=0.075) but were unrelated to population size (current year. F1,34=0.04, P=0.843; previous year: F1,33 =0.14, P=0.715). Instantaneous population rate of increase (r) was related to population size (F1,33=5.55; P=0.025). Precipitation limited populations of desert bighorn sheep on SANWR primarily in a density-independent manner by affecting production or survival of lambs, likely through influences on forage quantity and quality. Habitat evaluations and recovery plans for desert bighorn sheep need to consider fundamental influences on desert bighorn populations such as precipitation and food, rather than focus solely on proximate issues such as security cover, predation, and disease. Moreover, the concept of carrying capacity for desert bighorn sheep may need re-evaluation in respect to highly variable (CV =35.6%) localized precipitation patterns. On SANWR carrying capacity for desert

  12. Evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption in smallmouth and largemouth bass inhabiting Northeast U.S. national wildlife refuge waters: A reconnaissance study.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, L R; Blazer, V S; Pinkney, A E; Guy, C P; Major, A M; Munney, K; Mierzykowski, S; Lingenfelser, S; Secord, A; Patnode, K; Kubiak, T J; Stern, C; Hahn, C M; Iwanowicz, D D; Walsh, H L; Sperry, A

    2016-02-01

    Intersex as the manifestation of testicular oocytes (TO) in male gonochoristic fishes has been used as an indicator of estrogenic exposure. Here we evaluated largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) form 19 National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. inhabiting waters on or near NWR lands for evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption. Waterbodies sampled included rivers, lakes, impoundments, ponds, and reservoirs. Here we focus on evidence of endocrine disruption in male bass evidenced by gonad histopathology including intersex or abnormal plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations. During the fall seasons of 2008-2010, we collected male smallmouth bass (n=118) from 12 sites and largemouth bass (n=173) from 27 sites. Intersex in male smallmouth bass was observed at all sites and ranged from 60% to 100%; in male largemouth bass the range was 0-100%. Estrogenicity, as measured using a bioluminescent yeast reporter, was detected above the probable no effects concentration (0.73ng/L) in ambient water samples from 79% of the NWR sites. Additionally, the presence of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor ligands were noted as measured via novel nuclear receptor translocation assays. Mean plasma Vtg was elevated (>0.2mg/ml) in male smallmouth bass at four sites and in male largemouth bass at one site. This is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope conducted on US National Wildlife Refuges. The baseline data collected here provide a necessary benchmark for future monitoring and justify more comprehensive NWR-specific studies.

  13. Experimental low-altitude aeromagnetic reconnaissance for petroleum in Arctic-National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska, using horizontal gradients: a progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Donovan, T.J.; Hendricks, J.D.; Roberts, A.A.; Eliason, P.T.

    1983-03-01

    Variations in the earth's magnetic field arising from areally restricted increased amounts of shallow-buried magnetite over hydrocarbon deposits have been mapped in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge and elsewhere is northern Alaska. The anomalies have been delineated with a low-flying (90 m; 295 ft) magnetic horizontal gradiometer mounted on a fixed-wing airplane. Limited data from stable carbon isotope and remanent magnetism measurements of rock cores from the Cape Simpson region strongly suggest that the magnetic anomalies result from the chemical reduction of iron oxides in the presence of seeping hydrocarbons. Magnetometers extended from each wingtip and in a tail stinger permit calculation of the resultant horizontal gradient vector relative to the flight path. This calculation provides data for the unmeasured area between adjacent flight lines spaced at 1.5 km (.9 mi), thereby allowing generation of accurate computer-enhanced images or maps. Problems related to diurnal variations and solar storms at high magnetic latitude are largely overcome because changes in the total magnetic field do not significantly affect the magnetic gradient. Analysis of an experimental survey, covering 4418 line km (2745 line mi), suggests that the Marsh Creek anticline in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge is prospective for oil and/or gas. Additional magnetic anomalies were also identified. Although the effect of permafrost on epigenetic processes has not been investigated, the data suggest that special purpose aeromagnetic surveying may be a useful and relatively inexpensive way to explore for oil and gas in this hostile environment.

  14. Naphthalenes associated with treated wastewater effluents in an urban national wildlife refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Tanacredi, J.T. )

    1990-02-01

    This project demonstrates the polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbon character of Jamaica Bay sediments and the wastewater effluents entering the Bay from four major water pollution control facilities. Jamaica Bay, is a part of the Hudson-Raritan estuarine ecosystem and is incorporated into the Gateway National Recreation Area. Jamaica Bay, because of its hydrological characteristics, affords a long residence time for introduced pollutants. This study was conducted to further characterize the PAH character of the wastewater effluents. These fused ring structures are of interest in that they represent the carcinogenic, mutagenic, and toxic components of petroleum compounds to marine organisms. Because of their high molecular weight, the solubility of PAH in water, is of a very low order. Consequently, in estuarine environments, PAH compounds will be found associated with suspended solids and sediments. Although PAH degrading microorganisms are known to occur in estuarine environments, the degradation rates of these compounds are very slow. Coupled with the low degradation rates and known carcinogenicity of many of these compounds, investigations have shown that fish and other organisms taken from areas with a history of oil contamination have been found to exhibit elevated levels of compounds which bioactivate complex PAH compounds into mutagens.

  15. Dissolved constituents including selenium in waters in the vicinity of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and the west grassland, Fresno and Merced Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, T.S.; Barnes, Ivan

    1985-01-01

    Analyses were made for dissolved constituents including selenium (Se) in waters associated with subsurface agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley of California. In the vicinity of Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and the Grassland wetlands area Se was found to be mobilized in water. As a consequence of this mobility and bioaccumulation in the aquatic food chain, Se occurred in waterfowl at levels toxic enough to cause deformities and deaths. Se concentrations in sumps that collect subsurface agricultural drainage water and inflows to drains sampled, ultimately leading into Kesterson National Wildlife Refuge and the Grassland, ranged from 84 to 4200 microgram/L (ug/L) Se. Levels of Se were reduced in the San Luis Drain flowing into Kesterson National Wildlife Refute to approximately 300 ug/L Se and in three of the drains sampled flowing into the Grassland to approximately 50 ug/L Se. Serious effects on water fowl habitat were caused by both these levels. Se contents of algal mats and salt crusts from evaporation ponds of the San Luis Drain contained up to parts per million Se. Total ecosystem assessment of Se may be necessary for the evaluation of the toxicity of Se to the environment. No other trace element reported exceeded the various criteria for water at the level of magnitude of Se. Other dissolved constituents and the isotopic ratios of oxygen and hydrogen were analyzed to elucidate water types, reaction states of the aqueous solution with respect to minerals, and the origin of mixed waters. These data will be used later to evaluate the geologic source of Se. Methods used for collection and analysis are described and documented. Hydrologic effects were found to be complex. Preliminary indications from wells are also given. A historical sequence is adhered to and other data from the study area which serve as a guide to the toxicity of Se are included. (Author 's abstract)

  16. Road impacts on the Baca National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, with emphasis on effects to surface- and shallow ground-water hydrology - A literature review

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas C.

    2007-01-01

    A review of published research on unpaved road effects on surface-water and shallow ground-water hydrology was undertaken to assist the Baca National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, in understanding factors potentially influencing refuge ecology. Few studies were found that addressed hydrological effects of roads on a comparable area of shallow slope in a semiarid region. No study dealt with road effects on surface- and ground-water supplies to ephemeral wetlands, which on the refuge are sustained by seasonal snowmelt in neighboring mountains. Road surfaces increase runoff, reduce infiltration, and serve as a sediment source. Roadbeds can interfere with normal surface- and ground-water flows and thereby influence the quantity, timing, and duration of water movement both across landscapes and through the soil. Hydrologic effects can be localized near the road as well as widespread and distant. The number, arrangement, and effectiveness of road-drainage structures (culverts and other devices) largely determine the level of hydrologic alteration produced by a road. Undesirable changes to natural hydrologic patterns can be minimized by considering potential impacts during road design, construction, and maintenance. Road removal as a means to restore desirable hydrologic conditions to landscapes adversely affected by roads has yet to be rigorously evaluated.

  17. A system to evaluate the scientific quality of biological and restoration objectives using National Wildlife Refuge Comprehensive Conservation Plans as a case study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schroeder, R.L.

    2006-01-01

    It is widely accepted that plans for restoration projects should contain specific, measurable, and science-based objectives to guide restoration efforts. The United States Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) is in the process of developing Comprehensive Conservation Plans (CCPs) for more than 500 units in the National Wildlife Refuge System (NWRS). These plans contain objectives for biological and ecosystem restoration efforts on the refuges. Based on USFWS policy, a system was developed to evaluate the scientific quality of such objectives based on three critical factors: (1) Is the objective specific, measurable, achievable, results-oriented, and time-fixed? (2) What is the extent of the rationale that explains the assumptions, logic, and reasoning for the objective? (3) How well was available science used in the development of the objective? The evaluation system scores each factor on a scale of 1 (poor) to 4 (excellent) according to detailed criteria. The biological and restoration objectives from CCPs published as of September 2004 (60 total) were evaluated. The overall average score for all biological and restoration objectives was 1.73. Average scores for each factor were: Factor 1-1.97; Factor 2-1.86; Factor 3-1.38. The overall scores increased from 1997 to 2004. Future restoration efforts may benefit by using this evaluation system during the process of plan development, to ensure that biological and restoration objectives are of the highest scientific quality possible prior to the implementation of restoration plans, and to allow for improved monitoring and adaptive management.

  18. Twelve Months of Air Quality Monitoring at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Southwestern Rural Nevada, U.S.A (EMSI April 2007)

    SciTech Connect

    Engelbrecht, Johann P; Shafer, David S; Campbell, Dave; Campbell, Scott; McCurdy, Greg; Kohl, Steven D; Nikolich, George; Sheetz, Larry

    2011-08-01

    The one year of air quality monitoring data collected at the Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) was the final part of the air quality "Scoping Studies" for the Environmental Monitoring Systems Initiative (EMSI) in southern and central Nevada. The objective of monitoring at Ash Meadows was to examine aerosol and meteorological data, seasonal trends in aerosol and meteorological parameters as well as to examine evidence for long distance transport of some constituents. The 9,307 hectare refuge supports more than 50 springs and 24 endemic species, including the only population of the federally listed endangered Devil’s Hole pupfish (Cyprinodon diabolis) (U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, 1990). Ash Meadows NWR is located in a Class II air quality area, and the aerosol measurements collected with this study are compared to those of Interagency Monitoring of Protected Visual Environments (IMPROVE) sites. Measurements taken at Ash Meadows NWR over a period of 12 months provide new baseline air quality and meteorological information for rural southwestern Nevada, specifically Nye County and the Amargosa Valley.

  19. Relative abundance and distribution of fishes and crayfish at Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge, Nye County, Nevada, 2007-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scoppettone, G. Gary; Rissler, Peter; Johnson, Danielle; Hereford, Mark

    2011-01-01

    This study provides baseline data of native and non-native fish populations in Ash Meadows National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Nye County, Nevada, that can serve as a gauge in native fish enhancement efforts. In support of Carson Slough restoration, comprehensive surveys of Ash Meadows NWR fishes were conducted seasonally from fall 2007 through summer 2008. A total of 853 sampling stations were created using Geographic Information Systems and National Agricultural Imagery Program. In four seasons of sampling, Amargosa pupfish (genus Cyprinodon) was captured at 388 of 659 stations. The number of captured Amargosa pupfish ranged from 5,815 (winter 2008) to 8,346 (summer 2008). The greatest success in capturing Amargosa pupfish was in warm water spring-pools with temperature greater than 25 degrees C, headwaters of warm water spring systems, and shallow (depths less than 10 centimeters) grassy marshes. In four seasons of sampling, Ash Meadows speckled dace (Rhinichthys osculus nevadesis) was captured at 96 of 659 stations. The number of captured Ash Meadows speckled dace ranged from 1,009 (summer 2008) to 1,552 (winter 2008). The greatest success in capturing Ash Meadows speckled dace was in cool water spring-pools with temperature less than 20 degrees C and in the high flowing water outflows. Among 659 sampling stations within the range of Amargosa pupfish, red swamp crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) was collected at 458 stations, western mosquitofish (Gambusia affinis) at 374 stations, and sailfin molly (Poecilia latipinna) at 128 stations. School Springs was restored during the course of this study. Prior to restoration of School Springs, maximum Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish (Cyprinodon nevadensis pectoralis) captured from the six springs of the Warm Springs Complex was 765 (fall 2007). In four seasons of sampling, Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish were captured at 85 of 177 stations. The greatest success in capturing Warm Springs Amargosa pupfish when co-occurring with red

  20. 75 FR 28642 - Limiting Mountain Lion Predation on Desert Bighorn Sheep on Kofa National Wildlife Refuge, Yuma...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... in the Federal Register (74 FR 38667; August 4, 2009). We received 220 responses during the comment... Fish and Wildlife Service Limiting Mountain Lion Predation on Desert Bighorn Sheep on Kofa National... significant impact (FONSI) for the environmental assessment (EA) for limiting mountain lion (Puma...

  1. Finding the Exotic Faucet Snail (Bithynia tentaculata): Investigation of Waterbird Die-Offs on the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sauer, Jennifer S.; Cole, Rebecca A.; Nissen, James M.

    2007-01-01

    Beginning in 2002, there have been major waterbird die-offs every spring and fall in Lake Onalaska (Navigation Pool 7 of the Upper Mississippi River) located near La Crosse, Wisconsin. This area is part of the Upper Mississippi River National Wildlife and Fish Refuge (UMR Refuge) and lies within the Mississippi Flyway, through which an estimated 40 percent of the continent's waterfowl migrate. Through the 2006 spring migration, total mortality on the UMR Refuge was estimated at 22,000 to 26,000 birds, primarily American coots (Fulica americana) and lesser scaup (Aythya affinis). Two trematodes (Sphaeridiotrema globulus and Cyathocotyle bushiensis) that use the exotic faucet snail (Bithynia tentaculata) as an intermediate host were found to infect and kill the waterbirds. The faucet snail was introduced into the United States from Europe in the late 1800s. Because Lake Onalaska is a major spring and fall stop-over area for waterfowl in the Mississippi Flyway, concerns were raised that the snail and trematodes may be spreading to other waterfowl stop-over areas on the river. Exploratory sampling for faucet snails was conducted in 2005 and 2006 in navigation Pools 4-9 (excluding Pool 5a which is located between Pools 5 and 6), 11, and 13. Infected snails were found in all the sampled pools except Pool 6. To our knowledge, these are the first records of faucet snails and associated trematodes beyond those found in Pool 7, Lake Onalaska. Waterbird die-offs are becoming a UMR Refuge-wide problem. Information obtained through research and monitoring, including the identification of the origin of infections in snails and birds and the role various environmental factors have on this process, should help guide managers to develop effective mitigation and control measures.

  2. Evapotranspiration from selected fallowed agricultural fields on the Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge, California, during May to October 2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bidlake, W.R.

    2002-01-01

    An investigation of evapotranspiration, vegetation quantity and composition, and depth to the water table below the land surface was made at three sites in two fallowed agricultural lots on the 15,800-hectare Tule Lake National Wildlife Refuge in northern California during the 2000 growing season. All three sites had been farmed during 1999, but were not irrigated since the 1999 growing season. Vegetation at the lot C1B and lot 6 stubble sites included weedy species and small grain plants. The lot 6 cover crop site supported a crop of cereal rye that had been planted during the previous winter. Percentage of coverage by live vegetation ranged from 0 to 43.2 percent at the lot C1B site, from approximately 0 to 63.2 percent at the lot 6 stubble site, and it was estimated to range from 0 to greater than 90 percent at the lot 6 cover crop site. Evapotranspiration was measured using the Bowen ratio energy balance technique and it was estimated using a model that was based on the Priestley-Taylor equation and a model that was based on reference evapotranspiration with grass as the reference crop. Total evapotranspiration during May to October varied little among the three evapotranspiration measurement sites, although the timing of evapotranspiration losses did vary among the sites. Total evapotranspiration from the lot C1B site was 426 millimeters, total evapotranspiration from the lot 6 stubble site was 444 millimeters, and total evapotranspiration from the lot 6 cover crop site was 435 millimeters. The months of May to July accounted for approximately 78 percent of the total evapotranspiration from the lot C1B site, approximately 63 percent of the evapotranspiration from the lot 6 stubble site, and approximately 86 percent of the total evapotranspiration from the lot 6 cover crop site. Estimated growing season precipitation accounted for 16 percent of the growing-season evapotranspiration at the lot C1B site and for 17 percent of the growing-season evapotranspiration

  3. Dynamics and ecological consequences of the 2013−2014 koa moth outbreak at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Banko, Paul C.; Peck, Robert W.; Yelenik, Stephanie G.; Paxton, Eben; Bonaccorso, Frank J.; Montoya-Aiona, Kristina; Foote, David

    2014-01-01

    A massive outbreak of the koa moth (Geometridea: Scotorythra paludicola) defoliated more than a third of the koa (Acacia koa) forest on Hawai‘i Island during 2013−2014. This was the largest koa moth outbreak ever recorded and the first on the island since 1953. The outbreak spread to sites distributed widely around the island between 800−2,000 m elevation and in wet rainforest to dry woodland habitats. We monitored the outbreak at two windward forest sites (Laupāhoehoe and Saddle Road Kīpuka) and one leeward forest site (Kona), and we studied the dynamics of the outbreak and its impacts on the forest ecosystem at Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, our higher elevation windward site. Study sites at Hakalau included two stands of koa that were planted (reforestation stands) in former cattle pastureland about 20 years earlier and two stands of koa that were dominated by ‘ōhi‘a (Metrosideros polymorpha) and that were naturally recovering from cattle grazing (forest stands). We observed one outbreak at Hakalau, multiple outbreaks at the two other windward sites, but no outbreak at the leeward site. Caterpillars at Hakalau reached peak estimated abundances of more than 250,000 per tree and 18,000,000 per hectare, and they removed between 64−93% of the koa canopy in managed forest stands. Defoliation was more extensive in naturally recovering forest, where ‘ōhi‘a dominated and koa was less abundant, compared to the planted stands, where koa density was high. Koa trees were still growing new foliage six months after being defoliated, and leaves were produced in greater proportion to phyllodes, especially by small koa (≤ 8 cm dbh) and by larger trees in forest stands, where light levels may have remained relatively low after defoliation due to the high cover of ‘ōhi‘a. Small branches of many trees apparently died, and canopy regrowth was absent or low in 9% of koa trees and seedlings, which indicates the likely level of mortality. Between 2

  4. Vegetation Response to the 1995 Drawdown of the Navigation Pool at Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge, Crossett, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Rebecca J.; Wells, Christopher J.

    2007-01-01

    Felsenthal Navigation Pool (?the pool?) at Felsenthal National Wildlife Refuge near Crossett, Ark., was continuously flooded to a baseline elevation of 19.8 m (65.0 ft) mean sea level (m.s.l.) from late fall 1985, when the final in a series of locks and dams was constructed, until the summer of 1995. Water level within the pool was reduced by 0.3 m (1.0 ft) beginning July 5, 1995, exposing about 1,591 ha (3,931 acres) of sediment; the reduced water level was maintained until October 25 of that year. A total of 15 transects was established along the pool margin before the drawdown, extending perpendicular from the pool edge to 19.5 m (64.0 ft) in elevation. Plant species composition and cover were recorded at six to seven quadrats on each transect; 14 of the transects were also monitored three times during the drawdown and in June 1996. Soil near five of the original transects was disturbed two weeks into the drawdown by scraping the soil surface with a bulldozer. Soil cores were collected to characterize soil organic matter, texture class, carbon and nitrogen content, and plant nutrient concentrations; soil samples were also collected to identify species present in the seed bank prior to and during the drawdown. Plant species, several of which were high quality food sources for waterfowl, colonized the drawdown zone within four weeks. Vegetation response, measured by species richness, total cover, and cover of Cyperus species, was often greater at low compared to high elevations in the drawdown zone; this effect was probably intensified by low rainfall during the summer of 1995. Vegetation response on the disturbed transects was reduced compared to that on the undisturbed transects. This effect was attributed to two factors: (1) removal of the existing seed bank by the disturbance technique applied and (2) reduced incorporation of seeds recruited during the drawdown because of unusually low summer rainfall. Seed bank studies demonstrated that several species

  5. Forage site selection by lesser snow geese during autumn staging on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hupp, J.W.; Robertson, Donna G.

    1998-01-01

    Lesser snow geese (Chen caerulescens caerulescens) of the Western Canadian Arctic Population feed intensively for 2-4 weeks on the coastal plain of the Beaufort Sea in Canada and Alaska at the beginning of their autumn migration. Petroleum leasing proposed for the Alaskan portion of the staging area on the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) could affect staging habitats and their use by geese. Therefore we studied availability, distribution, and use by snow geese of tall and russett cotton-grass (Eriophorum angustifolium and E. russeolum, respectively) feeding habitats on the ANWR. We studied selection of feeding habitats at 3 spatial scales (feeding sites [0.06 m2], feeding patches [ca. 100 m2], and feeding areas [>1 ha]) during 1990-93. We used logistic regression analysis to discriminate differences in soil moisture and vegetation between 1,548 feeding sites where snow geese exploited individual cotton-grass plants and 1,143 unexploited sites at 61 feeding patches in 1990. Feeding likelihood increased with greater soil moisture and decreased where nonforage species were present. We tested the logistic regression model in 1991 by releasing human-imprinted snow geese into 4 10 ?? 20-m enclosed plots where plant communities had been mapped, habitats sampled, and feeding probabilities calculated. Geese selected more feeding sites per square meter in areas of predicted high quality feeding habitat (feeding probability ??? 0.6) than in medium (feeding probability = 0.3-0.59) or poor (feeding probability < 0.3) quality habitat (P < 0.0001). Geese increasingly used medium quality areas and spent more time feeding as trials progressed and forage was presumably reduced in high quality habitats. We examined relationships between underground biomass of plants, feeding probability, and surface microrelief at 474 0.06-m2 sites in 20 thermokarst pits in 1992. Feeding probability was correlated with the percentage of underground biomass composed of cotton-grass (r = 0

  6. 76 FR 4719 - Draft Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Assessment, Selawik National Wildlife...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-26

    ... Assessment for Selawik National Wildlife Refuge. SUMMARY: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service published FR Doc... Wildlife Service published FR Doc. 2010-26655 in the Federal Register on October 21, 2010, announcing... Selawik National Wildlife Refuge (75 FR 65026). The document identified a review period ending on...

  7. 76 FR 55937 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Washoe and Humboldt Counties, NV, and Lake County, OR; Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... managing the Refuge for 15 years, following approval of the final CCP. DATES: To ensure consideration... managers with a 15-year plan for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the... identified and evaluated three alternatives for managing the Sheldon Refuge for the next 15 years,...

  8. 77 FR 51556 - Sheldon National Wildlife Refuge, Humboldt County and Washoe County, NV; Lake County, OR; Final...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... propose to manage the Refuge for the next 15 years. DATES: We will sign a record of decision no sooner... administering the Refuge for the next 15 years. Alternative 2, as we described in the Final CCP/EIS, is our... purpose for developing a CCP is to provide refuge managers with a 15-year plan for achieving...

  9. Hydroacoustic mapping to define sedimentation rates and characterize lentic habitats in DeSoto Lake, DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Chojnacki, Kimberly A.

    2006-01-01

    Hydroacoustic tools were used to map depth, elevation, and substrate on DeSoto Lake in March 2006. DeSoto Lake, located on the DeSoto National Wildlife Refuge in Iowa and Nebraska, is one of the largest oxbow lakes of the Missouri River system. It is used by over 500,000 migratory birds each fall and spring and is also an important aquatic resource for anglers. Management concerns at the lake include the effects of erosion and sedimentation, aquatic vegetation establishment, shorebird habitat availability at different lake levels, and fish habitat structure. DeSoto Lake was cut off from the Missouri River in 1960, and the current mapping updates previous lower-resolution bathymetric maps created from lake surveys in 1967 and 1979. The new maps provide managers tools to assess aquatic habitats and provide a baseline for future monitoring of lake sedimentation and erosion.

  10. Health Hazard Evaluation Report HETA-85-020-1587, Department of the Interior, San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Newark, California

    SciTech Connect

    Belanger, P.L.

    1985-05-01

    Area air samples were analyzed for formaldehyde at the San Francisco Bay National Wildlife Refuge, Newark, California in November and December, 1984. The evaluation was requested by the manager to investigate whether the office staff at the headquarters and visitor center were being exposed to indoor air contaminants due to outgassing from plastic furniture, wood paneling, and the synthetic carpet. Six employees were interviewed to determine if they had experienced any symptoms of formaldehyde exposure. The author concludes that a health hazard does not exist at the facility, but recommends that the formalin solution be well controlled to prevent vapors from spreading to other areas. The formalin solution and other chemicals should be properly stored.

  11. Characterization of surface-water quality based on real-time monitoring and regression analysis, Quivira National Wildlife Refuge, south-central Kansas, December 1998 through June 2001

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, V.G.

    2001-01-01

    Because of the considerable wildlife benefits offered by the Quivira National Wildlife Refuge in south-central Kansas, there is a desire to ensure suitable water quality. To assess the quality of water flowing from Rattlesnake Creek into the refuge, the U.S. Geological Survey collected periodic water samples from December 1998 through June 2001 and analyzed the samples for physical properties, dissolved solids, total suspended solids, suspended sediment, major ions, nutrients, metals, pesticides, and indicator bacteria. Concentrations of 10 of the 125 chemicals analyzed did not meet water-quality criteria to protect aquatic life and drinking water in a least one sample. These were pH, turbidity, dissolved oxygen, dissolved solids, sodium, chloride, phosphorus, total coliform bacteria, E. coli bacteria, and fecal coliform bacteria. No metal or pesticide concentrations exceeded water-quality criteria. Twenty-two of the 43 metals analyzed were not detected, and 36 of the 46 pesticides analyzed were not detected. Because dissolved solids, sodium, chloride, fecal coliform bacteria, and other chemicals that are a concern for the health and habitat of fish and wildlife at the refuge cannot be measured continuously, regression equations were developed from a comparison of the analytical results of periodic samples and in-stream monitor measurements of specific conductance, pH, water temperature, turbidity, and dissolved oxygen. A continuous record of estimated chemical concentrations was developed from continuously recorded in-stream measurements. Annual variation in water quality was evaluated by comparing 1999 and 2000 sample data- the 2 years for which complete data sets were available. Median concentrations of alkalinity, fluoride, nitrate, and fecal coliform bacteria were smaller or did not change from 1999 to 2000. Dissolved solids, total suspended solids, sodium, chloride, sulfate, total organic nitrogen, and total phosphorus had increases in median concentrations

  12. Evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption in smallmouth and largemouth bass inhabiting Northeast U.S. National Wildlife Refuge waters: A reconnaissance study

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Iwanowicz, Luke; Blazer, Vicki; Pinkney, A.E.; Guy, C.P.; Major, A.M.; Munney, K.; Mierzykowski, S.; Lingenfelser, S.; Secord, A.; Patnode, K.; Kubiak, T.J.; Stern, C.; Hahn, Cassidy M.; Iwanowicz, Deborah; Walsh, Heather L.; Sperry, Adam J.

    2016-01-01

    Intersex as the manifestation of testicular oocytes (TO) in male gonochoristic fishes has been used as an indicator of estrogenic exposure. Here we evaluated largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) form 19 National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. inhabiting waters on or near NWR lands for evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption. Waterbodies sampled included rivers, lakes, impoundments, ponds, and reservoirs. Here we focus on evidence of endocrine disruption in male bass evidenced by gonad histopathology including intersex or abnormal plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations. During the fall seasons of 2008–2010, we collected male smallmouth bass (n=118) from 12 sites and largemouth bass (n=173) from 27 sites. Intersex in male smallmouth bass was observed at all sites and ranged from 60% to 100%; in male largemouth bass the range was 0–100%. Estrogenicity, as measured using a bioluminescent yeast reporter, was detected above the probable no effects concentration (0.73 ng/L) in ambient water samples from 79% of the NWR sites. Additionally, the presence of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor ligands were noted as measured via novel nuclear receptor translocation assays. Mean plasma Vtg was elevated (>0.2 mg/ml) in male smallmouth bass at four sites and in male largemouth bass at one site. This is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope conducted on US National Wildlife Refuges. The baseline data collected here provide a necessary benchmark for future monitoring and justify more comprehensive NWR-specific studies.

  13. Evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption in smallmouth and largemouth bass inhabiting Northeast U.S. national wildlife refuge waters: A reconnaissance study.

    PubMed

    Iwanowicz, L R; Blazer, V S; Pinkney, A E; Guy, C P; Major, A M; Munney, K; Mierzykowski, S; Lingenfelser, S; Secord, A; Patnode, K; Kubiak, T J; Stern, C; Hahn, C M; Iwanowicz, D D; Walsh, H L; Sperry, A

    2016-02-01

    Intersex as the manifestation of testicular oocytes (TO) in male gonochoristic fishes has been used as an indicator of estrogenic exposure. Here we evaluated largemouth bass (Micropterus salmoides) or smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu) form 19 National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs) in the Northeast U.S. inhabiting waters on or near NWR lands for evidence of estrogenic endocrine disruption. Waterbodies sampled included rivers, lakes, impoundments, ponds, and reservoirs. Here we focus on evidence of endocrine disruption in male bass evidenced by gonad histopathology including intersex or abnormal plasma vitellogenin (Vtg) concentrations. During the fall seasons of 2008-2010, we collected male smallmouth bass (n=118) from 12 sites and largemouth bass (n=173) from 27 sites. Intersex in male smallmouth bass was observed at all sites and ranged from 60% to 100%; in male largemouth bass the range was 0-100%. Estrogenicity, as measured using a bioluminescent yeast reporter, was detected above the probable no effects concentration (0.73ng/L) in ambient water samples from 79% of the NWR sites. Additionally, the presence of androgen receptor and glucocorticoid receptor ligands were noted as measured via novel nuclear receptor translocation assays. Mean plasma Vtg was elevated (>0.2mg/ml) in male smallmouth bass at four sites and in male largemouth bass at one site. This is the first reconnaissance survey of this scope conducted on US National Wildlife Refuges. The baseline data collected here provide a necessary benchmark for future monitoring and justify more comprehensive NWR-specific studies. PMID:26454754

  14. Reconnaissance investigation of water quality, bottom sediment, and biota associated with irrigation drainage in the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge Complex, California, 1988-89. Water resources investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Dileanis, P.D.; Sorenson, S.K.; Schwarzbach, S.E.; Maurer, T.C.

    1992-01-01

    The report describes results of a reconnaissance field investigation of the quality of irrigation drainwater and the effects of its use on five federally managed wildlife refuges in the Sacramento Valley, California. The investigation was designed to determine the magnitude and extent of any water-quality problems that could threaten wildlife and human health. Samples of water, sediment, and biological tissue were collected on or near the refuges and analyzed for selected chemical constituents. The results of the chemical analyses were compared to various standards and criteria, baseline data, and toxicological studies. These comparisons are discussed in the context of the geological, hydrological, and biological systems in the study area.

  15. Ambient air concentrations of PCDDs, PCDFs, coplanar PCBs, and PAHs at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge, Jackson County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    White, D.H.; Hardy, J.W.

    1994-01-01

    Our objective was to determine the levels of selected airborne contaminants in ambient air at the Mississippi Sandhill Crane National Wildlife Refuge, Mississippi, that might be affecting the health of endangered cranes living there. Two high-volume air samplers were operated at separate locations on the Refuge during May?September 1991. The sampling media were micro-quartz filters in combination with polyurethane foam plugs. Composite bimonthly samples from each station were analyzed for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), dibenzofurans (PCDFs), coplanar polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Overall, residue concentrations were low. The toxic PCDD isomer 2,3,7,8-tetra-CDD was not detected, nor was penta-CDD. There was no difference (P>0.05) in residue concentrations between stations or over time and meteorological parameters were not correlated with residue concentrations. Because contaminant levels and patterns may differ seasonally, we recommend that air samples collected during winter months also be analyzed for these same chemical groups.

  16. Detailed study of selenium in soil, water, bottom sediment, and biota in the Sun River Irrigation Project, Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana, 1990-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nimick, D.A.; Lambing, J.H.; Palawski, D.U.; Malloy, J.C.

    1996-01-01

    Selenium and other constituents are adversely affecting water quality and creating a potential hazard to wildlife in several areas of the Sun River Irrigation Project, Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge in west-central Montana. Selenium derived from Cretaceous shale and Tertiary and Quaternary deposits containing shale detritus is transported in the oxic shallow ground-water systems. At Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, drainage from irrigated glacial deposits is the primary source of selenium; drainage from non-irrigated farmland is a significant source locally. Benton Lake generally receives more selenium from natural runoff from its non-irrigated basin than from the trans-basin diversion of irrigation return flow. Selenium has accumulated in aquatic plants and invertebrates, fish, and water birds, particularly in wetlands that receive the largest selenium loads. Although selenium residues in biological tissue from some wetland units exceeded biological risk levels, water-bird reproduction generally has not been impaired. The highest selenium residues in biota commonly occurred in samples from Priest Butte Lakes, which also had the highest selenium concentration in wetland water. Selenium concentrations in all invertebrate samples from Priest Butte Lakes and the south end of Freezeout Lake exceeded the critical dietary threshold for water birds. Selenium delivered to wetlands accumulates in bottom sediment, predominantly in near-shore areas. Potential impacts to water quality, and presumably biota, may be greatest near the mouths of inflows. Most selenium delivered to wetlands will continue to accumulate in bottom sediment and biota.

  17. Investigation of eggshell thickness and biochemical indicators of contaminant exposure in Great Blue Herons(Ardea herodias) from Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, K.N.; Pinkney, A.E.; Melancon, M.J.; Hoffman, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Mason Neck National Wildlife Refuge supports the largest great blue heron (Ardea herodias) rookery in the State of Virginia. The presence of bioaccumulative compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls and DDT in fish collected from the Potomac River and tidal tributaries along the Refuge led to this study. The objective was to determine if there were any indications of pollutant-induced eggshell thinning or evidence of biochemical exposure to contaminants. We examined eggshell thickness and biomarkers of contaminant exposure in livers of embryos collected from the refuge and Coaches Island, a reference location in Chesapeake Bay. There was no evidence of eggshell thinning. Cytochrome P450 activity, measured as ethoxyresomfin-O-dealkylase (EROD) and benzyloxy-resorufin-O-dealkylase (BROD), was not significantly different in embryos from the two colonies. Biochemical indicators of oxidative stress can be reflected as changes in levels of reduced thiols, oxidized glutathione, and thiobarbituric reactive substances (TBARS). Although there were significant differences in the levels of reduced glutathione (GSH) and total thiol (TSH) activities in the embryo livers, there were no statistically significant differences in TBARS, protein-bound sulfhydryls (PBSH), oxidized glutathione (GSSG) and the ratio of GSSG to GSH. In fact, the concentrations of GSH and TSH were higher in the Mason Neck birds relative to Coaches Island. Under conditions of increased oxidative stress at least one or more of the following would be expected: decreased concentrations of reduced thiols (GSH and TSH), increased GSSG, and increased TBARS. In conclusion, we did not detect eggshell thinning or find evidence of a biochemical response to contaminant exposure in the Mason Neck great blue herons.

  18. 76 FR 41284 - Cold Springs and McKay Creek National Wildlife Refuges, Umatilla County, OR; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-13

    ... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and... pursuit of pheasant and quail. Other visitors simply enjoy bird watching, wildlife photography, or...

  19. 78 FR 57876 - DeSoto and Boyer Chute National Wildlife Refuges; Washington County, Nebraska, and Harrison and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-20

    ... use mailings, newspaper articles, internet postings, and other media announcements to inform people of... Boyer Chute Refuge by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (75 FR 7289) on February 18, 2010 and for DeSoto Refuge by publishing a notice of intent in the Federal Register (76 FR 76745)...

  20. Sand Resources, Regional Geology, and Coastal Processes of the Chandeleur Islands Coastal System: an Evaluation of the Breton National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lavoie, Dawn

    2009-01-01

    Breton National Wildlife Refuge, the Chandeleur Islands chain in Louisiana, provides habitat and nesting areas for wildlife and is an initial barrier protecting New Orleans from storms. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in partnership with the University of New Orleans Pontchartrain Institute for Environmental Sciences undertook an intensive study that included (1) an analysis of island change based on historical maps and remotely sensed shoreline and topographic data; (2) a series of lidar surveys at 3- to 4-month intervals after Hurricane Katrina to determine barrier island recovery potential; (3) a discussion of sea level rise and effects on the islands; (4) an analysis of sea floor evolution and sediment dynamics in the refuge over the past 150 years; (5) an assessment of the local sediment transport and sediment resource availability based on the bathymetric and subbottom data; (6) a carefully selected core collection effort to groundtruth the geophysical data and more fully characterize the sediments composing the islands and surrounds; (7) an additional survey of the St. Bernard Shoals to assess their potential as a sand resource; and (8) a modeling study to numerically simulate the potential response of the islands to the low-intensity, intermediate, and extreme events likely to affect the refuge over the next 50 years. Results indicate that the islands have become fragmented and greatly diminished in subaerial extent over time: the southern islands retreating landward as they reorganize into subaerial features, the northern islands remaining in place. Breton Island, because maintenance of the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) outer bar channel requires dredging, is deprived of sand sufficient to sustain itself. Regional sediment transport trends indicate that large storms are extremely effective in transporting sand and controlling the shoreline development and barrier island geometry. Sand is transported north and south from a divergent zone near

  1. 50 CFR 32.7 - What refuge units are open to hunting and/or sport fishing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge Upper Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge Kansas Flint... Wild Life and Fish Refuge Windom Wetland Management District Mississippi Bogue Chitto National Wildlife... Swan River National Wildlife Refuge UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge War Horse National Wildlife...

  2. Physical, chemical, and biological data for detailed study of the Sun River Irrigation Project, Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area, and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge, west-central Montana, 1990-92, with selected data for 1987-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambing, J.H.; Nimick, D.A.; Knapton, J.R.; Palawski, D.U.

    1994-01-01

    Physical chemical, and biological data were collected in the lower Sun River area of west-central Montana during 1990-92 as part of a U.S. Department of the Interior detailed study of the extent, magnitude, sources, and potential biological impacts of contaminants associated with irrigation drainage. Physical and chemical data were collected from areas within and near the Sun River Irrigation Project and from wetland areas receiving irrigation drainage. Biological data were collected from areas in and near Freezout Lake Wildlife Management Area and Benton Lake National Wildlife Refuge. Additional biological data were collected previously during 1987-89 as part of a U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service program. This report presents data for selenium and other potentially toxic constituents in solid-phase, water, and biological media. Data consist of concentrations of major and trace elements in soil and drill cores; concen- trations of major ions, nutrients, and trace elements in ground water and surface water; and trace-element concentrations in bottom sediment and biological tissue. Hydrogeologic data for domestic and test wells and daily streamflow data for selected sites also are included.

  3. 50 CFR 32.7 - What refuge units are open to hunting and/or sport fishing?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Union Slough National Wildlife Refuge Upper Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge Kansas Flint... Mississippi River Wild Life and Fish Refuge Windom Wetland Management District Mississippi Bogue Chitto... National Wildlife Refuge Swan River National Wildlife Refuge UL Bend National Wildlife Refuge War...

  4. 76 FR 33339 - Grays Harbor National Wildlife Refuge (NWR) and Black River Unit of Nisqually NWR; Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    .... Wildlife observation, interpretation, and photography, and environmental education are provided at the..., including opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We will review and update the CCPs at least every 15 years in accordance...

  5. Summary and Analysis of Water-Quality Data for the Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge, East-Central North Dakota, 1987-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryberg, Karen R.; Hiemenz, Gregory

    2009-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation collected water-quality samples at 16 sites on the James River and the Arrowwood National Wildlife Refuge, N. Dak., as part of its refuge-monitoring program from 1987-93 and as part of an environmental impact statement commitment from 1999-2004. Climatic and hydrologic conditions varied greatly during both sampling periods. The first period was dominated by drought conditions, which abruptly changed to cooler and wetter conditions in 1992-93. During the second period, conditions were near normal to very wet and included higher inflow from the James River into the refuge. The two periods also differed in the sites sampled, seasons sampled, and properties and constituent concentrations measured. Summary statistics were reported separately for the two sampling periods for all physical properties and constituents. Nonparametric statistical tests were used to further analyze some of the water-quality data. During the first sampling period, 1987-93, specific conductance, turbidity, hardness, alkalinity, total dissolved solids, total suspended solids, nonvolatile suspended solids, calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, sulfate, chloride, phosphate, total phosphorus, total organic carbon, chlorophyll a, and arsenic were determined to have significantly different medians among the sites tested. During the second sampling period, 1999-2004, the medians of pH, sodium, chloride, barium, and boron varied significantly among sites. Sites sampled and period of record varied between the two sampling periods and the period of record varied among the sites. Also, some constituents analyzed during the first period (1987-93) were not analyzed during the second period (1999-2004), and winter sampling was done during the second sampling period only. This variability reduces the number of direct comparisons that can be made between the two periods. Three sites had complete periods of record for both sampling periods and were compared. Differences in variability

  6. 77 FR 21797 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Ventura, Kern, San Luis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... intent published on April 6, 2010 (75 FR 17430), two planning updates, a CCP Web page ( http://www.fws.... 1531 et seq.), primarily to restore the endangered California condor population to its native range. Due to the sensitivity of the California condor recovery activities, the Refuges are currently...

  7. 76 FR 10621 - Palmyra Atoll National Wildlife Refuge, U.S. Pacific Island Territory; Nonnative Rat Eradication...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-25

    ... the Federal Register (75 FR 2158) published on January 14, 2010. Refuge Overview Palmyra Atoll... from January 14 to March 1, 2010 (75 FR 2158). During that time we requested public comments through... land crab fauna including the coconut crab, ecologically intact predator-dominated fish...

  8. 78 FR 3911 - Big Stone National Wildlife Refuge, Big Stone and Lac Qui Parle Counties, MN; Final Comprehensive...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-17

    ... for the next 15 years. ADDRESSES: You will find the final CCP, a summary of the final CCP, and the EA... managers with a 15-year strategy for achieving refuge purposes and contributing toward the mission of the... Federal Register (73 FR 76677) on December 17, 2008. For more about the initial process and the history...

  9. 75 FR 52546 - Hakalau Forest National Wildlife Refuge, Hawai`i County, HI; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-26

    ... process by publishing a notice of intent in the ] Federal Register on February 25, 2009 (74 FR 8564). The... February 25, 2009 (74 FR 8564), announcing our intention to complete a CCP/EA for the refuge, inviting the... endangered forest birds and their rainforest habitat. The Hakalau Forest Unit encompasses 32,733 acres...

  10. Science to support adaptive habitat management: Overton Bottoms North Unit, Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Missouri [Volumes 1-6

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    Extensive efforts are underway along the Lower Missouri River to rehabilitate ecosystem functions in the channel and flood plain. Considerable uncertainty inevitably accompanies ecosystem restoration efforts, indicating the benefits of an adaptive management approach in which management actions are treated as experiments, and results provide information to feed back into the management process. The Overton Bottoms North Unit of the Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge is a part of the Missouri River Fish and Wildlife Habitat Mitigation Project. The dominant management action at the Overton Bottoms North Unit has been excavation of a side-channel chute to increase hydrologic connectivity and to enhance shallow, slow current-velocity habitat. The side-channel chute also promises to increase hydrologic gradients, and may serve to alter patterns of wetland inundation and vegetation community growth in undesired ways. The U.S. Geological Survey's Central Region Integrated Studies Program (CRISP) undertook interdisciplinary research at the Overton Bottoms North Unit in 2003 to address key areas of scientific uncertainty that were highly relevant to ongoing adaptive management of the site, and to the design of similar rehabilitation projects on the Lower Missouri River. This volume presents chapters documenting the surficial geologic, topographic, surface-water, and ground-water framework of the Overton Bottoms North Unit. Retrospective analysis of vegetation community trends over the last 10 years is used to evaluate vegetation responses to reconnection of the Overton Bottoms North Unit to the river channel. Quasi-experimental analysis of cottonwood growth rate variation along hydrologic gradients is used to evaluate sensitivity of terrestrial vegetation to development of aquatic habitats. The integrated, landscape-specific understanding derived from these studies illustrates the value of scientific information in design and management of rehabilitation projects.

  11. Landscape unit based digital elevation model development for the freshwater wetlands within the Arthur C. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, Southeastern Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xie, Zhixiao; Liu, Zhongwei; Jones, John W.; Higer, Aaron L.; Telis, Pamela A.

    2011-01-01

    The hydrologic regime is a critical limiting factor in the delicate ecosystem of the greater Everglades freshwater wetlands in south Florida that has been severely altered by management activities in the past several decades. "Getting the water right" is regarded as the key to successful restoration of this unique wetland ecosystem. An essential component to represent and model its hydrologic regime, specifically water depth, is an accurate ground Digital Elevation Model (DEM). The Everglades Depth Estimation Network (EDEN) supplies important hydrologic data, and its products (including a ground DEM) have been well received by scientists and resource managers involved in Everglades restoration. This study improves the EDEN DEMs of the Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, also known as Water Conservation Area 1 (WCA1), by adopting a landscape unit (LU) based interpolation approach. The study first filtered the input elevation data based on newly available vegetation data, and then created a separate geostatistical model (universal kriging) for each LU. The resultant DEMs have encouraging cross-validation and validation results, especially since the validation is based on an independent elevation dataset (derived by subtracting water depth measurements from EDEN water surface elevations). The DEM product of this study will directly benefit hydrologic and ecological studies as well as restoration efforts. The study will also be valuable for a broad range of wetland studies.

  12. Some aspects of resource uncertainty and their economic consequences in assessment of the 1002 area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Attanasi, E.D.; Schuenemeyer, J.H.

    2002-01-01

    Exploration ventures in frontier areas have high risks. Before committing to them, firms prepare regional resource assessments to evaluate the potential payoffs. With no historical basis for directly estimating size distribution of undiscovered accumulations, reservoir attribute probability distributions can be assessed subjectively and used to project undiscovered accumulation sizes. Three questions considered here are: (1) what distributions should be used to characterize the subjective assessments of reservoir attributes, (2) how parsimonious can the analyst be when eliciting subjective information from the assessment geologist, and (3) what are consequences of ignoring dependencies among reservoir attributes? The standard or norm used for comparing outcomes is the computed cost function describing costs of finding, developing, and producing undiscovered oil accumulations. These questions are examined in the context of the US Geological Survey's recently published regional assessment of the 1002 Area of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska. We study effects of using the various common distributions to characterize the geologist's subjective distributions representing reservoir attributes. Specific findings show that triangular distributions result in substantial bias in economic forecasts when used to characterize skewed distributions. Moreover, some forms of the lognormal distribution also result in biased economic inferences. Alternatively, we generally determined four fractiles (100, 50, 5, 0) to be sufficient to capture essential economic characteristics of the underlying attribute distributions. Ignoring actual dependencies among reservoir attributes biases the economic evaluation. ?? 2002 International Association for Mathematical Geology.

  13. Reproductive Ecology Of The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma Coerulescens) On John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: A Long-Term Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Geoffry M.; Breininger, David R.; Larson, Vicky L.; Oddy, Donna M.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Stolen, Eric D.

    2005-01-01

    From 1988 to 2002 we studied the breeding ecology of Florida Scrub-Jays (Aphelocoma coerulescens) on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. We examined phenology, clutch size, hatching failure rates, fledgling production, nest success, predation rates, sources egg and nestling mortality, and the effects of helpers on these measures. Nesting phenology was similar among sites. Mean clutch size at Titan was significantly larger than at HC or T4. Pairs with helpers did not produce larger clutches than pairs without helpers. Fledgling production at T4 was significantly greater than at HC and similar to Titan. Pairs with helpers at HC produced significantly more fledglings than pairs without helpers; helpers did not influence fledgling production at the other sites. Nest success at HC and Titan was low, 19% and 32% respectively. Nest success at T4 was 48% and was significantly greater than at HC. Average predation rates at all sites increased with season progression. Predation rates at all sight rose sharply by early June. The main cause of nest failure at all sites was predation, 93%.

  14. A Conservation Strategy for the Florida Scrub-Jay on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge: An Initial Scientific Basis for Recovery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Breininger, D. R.; Larson, V. L.; Schaub, R.; Duncan, B. W.; Schmalzer, P. A.; Oddy, D. M.; Smith, R. B.; Adrian, F.; Hill, H., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The Florida Scrub-Jay (Aphelocoma coerulescens) is an indicator of ecosystem integrity of Florida scrub, an endangered ecosystem that requires frequent fire. One of the largest populations of this federally threatened species occurs on John F. Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Population trends were predicted using population modeling and field data on reproduction and survival of Florida Scrub-Jays collected from 1988 - 1995. Analyses of historical photography indicated that habitat suitability has been declining for 30 years. Field data and computer simulations suggested that the population declined by at least 40% and will decline by another 40% in 1 0 years, if habitat management is not greatly intensified. Data and computer simulations suggest that habitat suitability cannot deviate greatly from optimal for the jay population to persist. Landscape trajectories of vegetation structure, responsible for declining habitat suitability, are associated with the disruption of natural fire regimes. Prescribed fire alone can not reverse the trajectories. A recovery strategy was developed, based on studies of Florida Scrub-Jays and scrub vegetation. A reserve design was formulated based on conservation science principles for scrub ecosystems. The strategy emphasizes frequent fire to restore habitat, but includes mechanical tree cutting for severely degraded areas. Pine thinning across large areas can produce rapid increases in habitat quality. Site-specific strategies will need to be developed, monitored, and modified to achieve conditions suitable for population persistence.

  15. Analysis of Wading Bird use of Impounded Wetland Habitat on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, 1987-1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stolen, Eric D.; Breininger, David R.; Smith, Rebecca B.; Quincy, Charlie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This report summarizes results of the first eleven years of monthly aerial surveys of wading bird use of foraging habitats within impoundments on the Kennedy Space Center/Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge. Some impoundments were used much more heavily by wading birds than were others. Analysis suggests that an increase in interspersion of open water and vegetated habitats is preferred foraging habitat. Many wading bird species increased their use of vegetated habitat in Fall and Winter when impoundments were flooded. The mean number of wading birds per survey was greatest during the Pre-nesting and Nesting seasons, declined during Post-nesting season, and was lowest during Winter when water levels within impoundments were high. During these times, shallow habitat along the IRL shoreline provided alternative habitats for wading birds. Various measures of monthly precipitation and impoundment water level were well correlated with the numbers of wading birds observed. Numbers of nesting attempts was steady during the study period, with the exception of an unusually high number of attempts in 1990. White Ibis accounted for over half of all wading bird nests counted. The mean number of nests per colony decreased during the study period, and the number of individual colonies increased.

  16. 78 FR 60306 - Big Muddy National Fish and Wildlife Refuge, Authorized Within the Twenty Counties That Lie Along...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-01

    ... notice of intent in the Federal Register (72 FR 27587) on May 16, 2007. For more about the initial..., fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and interpretation. We...

  17. Viability of male gametes in common carp (Cyprinus carpio) along the Lower Colorado River from the Cibola National Wildlife Refuge (NWR), Havasu NWR, and Lake Mohave of Lake Mead National Recreation Area

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenkins, Jill A.; Goodbred, Steven L.

    2005-01-01

    To contribute to an investigation on possible endocrine impacts in three sites along the lower Colorado River in Arizona, especially in male fishes, this study addressed the null hypothesis that aquatic species in southern sites did not exhibit evidence of endocrine disruption as compared with those in nonimpacted sites. The results presented are intended to provide managers with science-based information and interpretations about the reproductive condition of biota in their habitat along the lower Colorado River to minimize any potential adverse effects to trust fish and wildlife resources and to identify water resources of acceptable quality. In particular, these data can inform decision making about wastewater discharges into the Colorado River that directly supplies water to Arizona refuges located along the river. These data are integral to the USFWS proposal entitled 'AZ - Endocrine Disruption in Razorback Sucker and Common Carp on National Wildlife Refuges along the Lower Colorado River' that was proposed to assess evidence of endocrine disruption in carp and razorback suckers downstream of Hoover Dam.

  18. A model for evaluating effects of climate, water availability, and water management on wetland impoundments--a case study on Bowdoin, Long Lake, and Sand Lake National Wildlife Refuges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tangen, Brian A.; Gleason, Robert A.; Stamm, John F.

    2013-01-01

    Many wetland impoundments managed by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) National Wildlife Refuge System throughout the northern Great Plains rely on rivers as a primary water source. A large number of these impoundments currently are being stressed from changes in water supplies and quality, and these problems are forecast to worsen because of projected changes to climate and land use. For example, many managed wetlands in arid regions have become degraded owing to the long-term accumulation of salts and increased salinity associated with evapotranspiration. A primary goal of the USFWS is to provide aquatic habitats for a diversity of waterbirds; thus, wetland managers would benefit from a tool that facilitates evaluation of wetland habitat quality in response to current and anticipated impacts of altered hydrology and salt balances caused by factors such as climate change, water availability, and management actions. A spreadsheet model that simulates the overall water and salinity balance (WSB model) of managed wetland impoundments is presented. The WSB model depicts various habitat metrics, such as water depth, salinity, and surface areas (inundated, dry), which can be used to evaluate alternative management actions under various water-availability and climate scenarios. The WSB model uses widely available spreadsheet software, is relatively simple to use, relies on widely available inputs, and is readily adaptable to specific locations. The WSB model was validated using data from three National Wildlife Refuges with direct and indirect connections to water resources associated with rivers, and common data limitations are highlighted. The WSB model also was used to conduct simulations based on hypothetical climate and management scenarios to demonstrate the utility of the model for evaluating alternative management strategies and climate futures. The WSB model worked well across a range of National Wildlife Refuges and could be a valuable tool for USFWS

  19. Hydraulic model and flood-inundation maps developed for the Pee Dee National Wildlife Refuge, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Douglas G.; Wagner, Chad R.

    2016-04-08

    A series of digital flood-inundation maps were developed on the basis of the water-surface profiles produced by the model. The inundation maps, which can be accessed through the USGS Flood Inundation Mapping Program Web site at http://water.usgs.gov/osw/flood_inundation, depict estimates of the areal extent and depth of flooding corresponding to selected water levels at the USGS streamgage Pee Dee River at Pee Dee Refuge near Ansonville, N.C. These maps, when combined with real-time water-level information from USGS streamgages, provide managers with critical information to help plan flood-response activities and resource protection efforts.

  20. To amend the Fish and Wildlife Act of 1956 to reauthorize the volunteer programs and community partnerships for the benefit of national wildlife refuges, and for other purposes.

    THOMAS, 113th Congress

    Rep. Runyan, Jon [R-NJ-3

    2013-03-20

    07/16/2014 Committee on Environment and Public Works Subcommittee on Water and Wildlife. Hearings held. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status Passed HouseHere are the steps for Status of Legislation: