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Sample records for native heterotetrameric mofe

  1. Fe Protein-Independent Substrate Reduction by Nitrogenase MoFe Protein Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Rasmussen, Andrew J.; Keable, Stephen M.; Inglet, Boyd S.; Shaw, Sudipta; Zadvornyy, Oleg; Duval, Simon S.; Dean, Dennis R.; Raugei, Simone; Peters, John W.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2015-04-21

    The reduction of substrates catalyzed by nitrogenase normally requires nucleotide-dependent Fe protein delivery of electrons to the MoFe protein, which contains the active site FeMo-cofactor. Here, it is reported that independent substitution of three amino acids (ß-98Tyr→His, α-64Tyr→His, and ß-99Phe→His) located between the P cluster and FeMo-cofactor within the MoFe protein endows it with the ability to reduce protons to H2, azide to ammonia, and hydrazine to ammonia without the need for Fe protein or ATP. Instead, electrons can be provided by the low potential reductant polyaminocarboxylate ligated Eu(II) (Em -1.1 to -0.84 V vs NHE). The crystal structure of the ß-98Tyr→His variant MoFe protein was determined, revealing only small changes near the amino acid substitution that affect the solvent structure and immediate vicinity between the P cluster and the FeMo-cofactor, with no global conformational changes observed. Computational normal mode analysis on the nitrogenase complex reveal coupling in the motions of the Fe protein and the region of the MoFe protein with these three amino acids, which suggests a possible mechanism for how Fe protein might communicate deep within the MoFe protein subtle changes that profoundly affect intramolecular electron transfer and substrate reduction. This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (MCB-1330807) to JWP and LCS. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DE-SC0010687 and DE-SC0010834 to LCS and DRD) and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Bio-Sciences (SR). The coordinates for the ß-98His MoFe protein were deposited with the Protein Data Bank (PDB 4XPI).

  2. Nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution: comparison with the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Morrison, Christine N.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-02-01

    Determination of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from C. pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution and comparison to its distinct ortholog from A. vinelandii at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp1) has been determined at 1.08 Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Cp1 and the ortholog from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1) represent two distinct families of nitrogenases, differing primarily by a long insertion in the α-subunit and a deletion in the β-subunit of Cp1 relative to Av1. Comparison of these two MoFe protein structures at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The FeMo cofactors defining the active sites of the MoFe protein are essentially identical between the two proteins. The surrounding environment is also highly conserved, suggesting that this structural arrangement is crucial for nitrogen reduction. The P clusters are likewise similar, although the surrounding protein and solvent environment is less conserved relative to that of the FeMo cofactor. The P cluster and FeMo cofactor in Av1 and Cp1 are connected through a conserved water tunnel surrounded by similar secondary-structure elements. The long α-subunit insertion loop occludes the presumed Fe protein docking surface on Cp1 with few contacts to the remainder of the protein. This makes it plausible that this loop is repositioned to open up the Fe protein docking surface for complex formation.

  3. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. PMID:26052177

  4. Uncoupling nitrogenase: catalytic reduction of hydrazine to ammonia by a MoFe protein in the absence of Fe protein-ATP.

    PubMed

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Inglet, Boyd S; Vincent, Kylie A; Barney, Brett M; Hoffman, Brian M; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2010-09-29

    The catalytic reduction of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to ammonia by a β-98(Tyr→His) MoFe protein in the absence of the Fe protein or ATP is reported. The reduction of N(2) or other substrates (e.g., hydrazine, protons, acetylene) by nitrogenase normally requires the transient association of the two nitrogenase component proteins, the Fe protein and the MoFe protein. The Fe protein, with two bound MgATP molecules, transfers one electron to the MoFe protein during each association, coupled to the hydrolysis of two MgATP. All substrate reduction reactions catalyzed by nitrogenase require delivery of electrons by the Fe protein coupled to the hydrolysis of MgATP. We report that when a single amino acid within the MoFe protein (β-98(Tyr)) is substituted by His, the resulting MoFe protein supports catalytic reduction of the nitrogenous substrate hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to two ammonia molecules when provided with a low potential reductant, polyaminocarboxylate ligated Eu(II) (E(m) -1.1 V vs NHE). The wild-type and a number of other MoFe proteins with amino acid substitutions do not show significant rates of hydrazine reduction under these conditions, whereas the β-98(His) MoFe protein catalyzes hydrazine reduction at rates up to 170 nmol NH(3)/min/mg MoFe protein. This rate of hydrazine reduction is 94% of the rate catalyzed by the β-98(His) or wild-type MoFe protein when combined with the Fe protein, ATP, and reductant under comparable conditions. The β-98(His) MoFe protein reduction of hydrazine in the absence of the Fe protein showed saturation kinetics for the concentration of reductant and substrate. The implications of these results in understanding the nitrogenase mechanism are discussed.

  5. A heterotetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor from emmer (Triticum dicoccon Schrank) seeds.

    PubMed

    Capocchi, A; Muccilli, V; Cunsolo, V; Saletti, R; Foti, S; Fontanini, D

    2013-04-01

    Plants have developed a constitutive defense system against pest attacks, which involves the expression of a set of inhibitors acting on heterologous amylases of different origins. Investigating the soluble protein complement of the hulled wheat emmer we have isolated and characterized a heterotetrameric α-amylase inhibitor (ETI). Based on mass spectrometry data, it is an assembly of proteins highly similar to the CM2/CM3/CM16 found in durum wheat. Our data indicate that these proteins can also inhibit exogenous α-amylases in binary assemblies. The calculated dissociation constants (K(i)) for the pancreatic porcine amylase- and human salivary amylase-ETI complexes are similar to those found in durum and soft wheat. Homology modeling of the CM subunits indicate structural similarities with other proteins belonging to the cereal family of trypsin/α-amylase inhibitors; a possible homology modeled structure for a tetrameric assembly of the subunits is proposed.

  6. ESCRT-0 assembles as a heterotetrameric complex on membranes and binds multiple ubiquitinylated cargoes simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jonathan R; Fyfe, Ian; Schuh, Amber L; Chapman, Edwin R; Edwardson, J Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2011-03-18

    The ESCRT machinery consists of multiple protein complexes that collectively participate in the biogenesis of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). The ESCRT-0 complex is composed of two subunits, Hrs and STAM, both of which can engage ubiquitinylated substrates destined for lysosomal degradation. Here, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of ESCRT-0:ubiquitin interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry and define the affinity of each ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) within the intact ESCRT-0 complex. Our data demonstrate that ubiquitin binding is non-cooperative between the ESCRT-0 UBDs. Additionally, our findings show that the affinity of the Hrs double ubiquitin interacting motif (DUIM) for ubiquitin is more than 2-fold greater than that of UBDs found in STAM, suggesting that Hrs functions as the major ubiquitin-binding protein in ESCRT-0. In vivo, Hrs and STAM localize to endosomal membranes. To study recombinant ESCRT-0 assembly on lipid bilayers, we used atomic force microscopy. Our data show that ESCRT-0 forms mostly heterodimers and heterotetramers of Hrs and STAM when analyzed in the presence of membranes. Consistent with these findings, hydrodynamic analysis of endogenous ESCRT-0 indicates that it exists largely as a heterotetrameric complex of its two subunits. Based on these data, we present a revised model for ESCRT-0 function in cargo recruitment and concentration at the endosome.

  7. Assembly of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex via Heterotetrameric Glutathione Transferase-homology Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Maeng, Seo Jin; Cho, Hyo Je; Choi, Yoon Seo; Chung, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Hoi Kyoung; Kim, Jong Hyun; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Guo, Min; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kang, Beom Sik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Many multicomponent protein complexes mediating diverse cellular processes are assembled through scaffolds with specialized protein interaction modules. The multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC), consisting of nine different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and three non-enzymatic factors (AIMP1–3), serves as a hub for many signaling pathways in addition to its role in protein synthesis. However, the assembly process and structural arrangement of the MSC components are not well understood. Here we show the heterotetrameric complex structure of the glutathione transferase (GST) domains shared among the four MSC components, methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS), glutaminyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS), AIMP2 and AIMP3. The MRS-AIMP3 and EPRS-AIMP2 using interface 1 are bridged via interface 2 of AIMP3 and EPRS to generate a unique linear complex of MRS-AIMP3:EPRS-AIMP2 at the molar ratio of (1:1):(1:1). Interestingly, the affinity at interface 2 of AIMP3:EPRS can be varied depending on the occupancy of interface 1, suggesting the dynamic nature of the linear GST tetramer. The four components are optimally arranged for maximal accommodation of additional domains and proteins. These characteristics suggest the GST tetramer as a unique and dynamic structural platform from which the MSC components are assembled. Considering prevalence of the GST-like domains, this tetramer can also provide a tool for the communication of the MSC with other GST-containing cellular factors. PMID:26472928

  8. Separation of domain contacts is required for heterotetrameric assembly of functional NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Anthony N.; Blain, Katherine Y.; Maruo, Tomohiko; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2011-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the subunit assembly process of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) is essential to understand the receptor architecture and underlying mechanism of channel function. Because NMDA-Rs are obligatory heterotetramers requiring the GluN1 subunit, it is critical to investigate how GluN1 and GluN2 type subunits co-assemble into tetramers. By combining approaches in cell biology, biochemistry, single particle electron microscopy, and X-ray crystallography, we report the mechanisms and phenotypes of mutant GluN1 subunits that are defective in receptor maturation. The T110A mutation in the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the GluN1 promotes heterodimerization between the NTDs of GluN1 and GluN2, whereas the Y109C mutation in the adjacent residue stabilizes the homodimer of the NTD of GluN1. The crystal structure of the NTD of GluN1 revealed the mechanism underlying the biochemical properties of these mutants. Effects of these mutations on the maturation of heteromeric NMDA-Rs were investigated using a receptor trafficking assay. Our results suggest that the NTDs of the GluN1 subunit initially form homodimers and the subsequent dimer dissociation is critical for forming heterotetrameric NMDA-Rs containing GluN2 subunits, defining a molecular determinant for receptor assembly. The domain arrangement of the dimeric NTD of GluN1 is unique among the ionotropic glutamate receptors and predicts that the structure and mechanism around the NTDs of NMDA-Rs are different from those of the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors. PMID:21389213

  9. Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizes a unique heterotetrameric structure for dehydrogenation of the cholesterol side chain

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2013-01-01

    Compounding evidence supports the important role in pathogenesis that the metabolism of cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) plays. Elucidating the pathway by which cholesterol is catabolized is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism by which this pathway contributes to infection. Based on early metabolite identification studies in multiple actinomycetes, it has been proposed that cholesterol side chain metabolism requires one or more acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). There are 35 genes annotated as encoding ACADs in the M. tuberculosis genome. Here we characterize a heteromeric ACAD encoded by Rv3544c and Rv3543c, formerly named fadE28 and fadE29, respectively. We now refer to genes Rv3544c and Rv3543c as chsE1 and chsE2 in recognition of their validated activity in cholesterol side chain dehydrogenation. Analytical ultracentrifugation and LC/UV experiments establish that ChsE1-ChsE2 forms an α2β2 heterotetramer, a new architecture for an ACAD. Our bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies reveal that heterotetrameric ChsE1-ChsE2 has only two active sites. E241 in ChsE2 is required for catalysis of dehydrogenation by ChsE1-ChsE2. Steady state kinetic analysis establishes the enzyme is specific for an intact steroid ring system compared to hexahydroindanone substrates with specificity constants (kcat/KM) of 2.5 × 105 ± 0.5 s-1 M-1 vs 9.8 × 102 ± s-1 M-1 respectively, at pH 8.5. The characterization of a unique ACAD quaternary structure involved in sterol metabolism that is encoded by two distinct cistronic ACAD genes opens the way to identification of additional sterol metabolizing ACADs in M. tuberculosis and other actinomycetes through bioinformatic analysis. PMID:23560677

  10. Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizes a unique heterotetrameric structure for dehydrogenation of the cholesterol side chain.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Suzanne T; Sampson, Nicole S

    2013-04-30

    Compounding evidence supports the important role in pathogenesis that the metabolism of cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays. Elucidating the pathway by which cholesterol is catabolized is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism by which this pathway contributes to infection. On the basis of early metabolite identification studies in multiple actinomycetes, it has been proposed that cholesterol side chain metabolism requires one or more acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). There are 35 genes annotated as encoding ACADs in the M. tuberculosis genome. Here we characterize a heteromeric ACAD encoded by Rv3544c and Rv3543c, formerly named fadE28 and fadE29, respectively. We now refer to genes Rv3544c and Rv3543c as chsE1 and chsE2, respectively, in recognition of their validated activity in cholesterol side chain dehydrogenation. Analytical ultracentrifugation and liquid chromatography-ultraviolet experiments establish that ChsE1-ChsE2 forms an α(2)β(2) heterotetramer, a new architecture for an ACAD. Our bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies reveal that heterotetrameric ChsE1-ChsE2 has only two active sites. E241 in ChsE2 is required for catalysis of dehydrogenation by ChsE1-ChsE2. Steady state kinetic analysis establishes the enzyme is specific for an intact steroid ring system versus hexahydroindanone substrates with specificity constants (k(cat)/K(M)) of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10(5) s(-1) M(-1) versus 9.8 × 10(2) s(-1) M(-1), respectively, at pH 8.5. The characterization of a unique ACAD quaternary structure involved in sterol metabolism that is encoded by two distinct cistronic ACAD genes opens the way to identification of additional sterol-metabolizing ACADs in M. tuberculosis and other actinomycetes through bioinformatic analysis.

  11. Light-driven dinitrogen reduction catalyzed by a CdS:nitrogenase MoFe protein biohybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. A.; Harris, D. F.; Wilker, M. B.; Rasmussen, A.; Khadka, N.; Hamby, H.; Keable, S.; Dukovic, G.; Peters, J. W.; Seefeldt, L. C.; King, P. W.

    2016-04-21

    The splitting of dinitrogen (N2) and reduction to ammonia (NH3) is a kinetically complex and energetically challenging multistep reaction. In the Haber-Bosch process, N2 reduction is accomplished at high temperature and pressure, whereas N2 fixation by the enzyme nitrogenase occurs under ambient conditions using chemical energy from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. We show that cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals can be used to photosensitize the nitrogenase molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein, where light harvesting replaces ATP hydrolysis to drive the enzymatic reduction of N2 into NH3. The turnover rate was 75 per minute, 63% of the ATP-coupled reaction rate for the nitrogenase complex under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of nitrogenase (i.e., acetylene, carbon monoxide, and dihydrogen) suppressed N2 reduction. The CdS:MoFe protein biohybrids provide a photochemical model for achieving light-driven N2 reduction to NH3.

  12. An all-ferrous state of the Fe protein of nitrogenase. Interaction with nucleotides and electron transfer to the MoFe protein.

    PubMed

    Angove, H C; Yoo, S J; Münck, E; Burgess, B K

    1998-10-09

    The MoFe protein of nitrogenase catalyzes the six-electron reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia. It has long been believed that this protein receives the multiple electrons it requires one at a time, from the [4Fe-4S]2+/+ couple of the Fe protein. Recently an all-ferrous [4Fe-4S]0 state of the Fe protein was demonstrated suggesting instead a series of two electron steps involving the [4Fe-4S]2+/0 couple. We have examined the interactions of the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein with nucleotides and its ability to transfer electrons to the MoFe protein. The [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein binds both MgATP and MgADP and undergoes the MgATP induced conformational change and then binds properly to the MoFe protein, as evidenced by the fact that the behavior of the 0 and +1 oxidation states in the chelation and chelation protection assays are indistinguishable. Nucleotide binding does not effect the distinctive UV/Vis, CD, or Mössbauer spectra exhibited by the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein; however, because the intensity of the g = 16.4 EPR signal of the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein is extremely sensitive to minor variations of the rhombicity parameter E/D, the EPR signal is sensitive to the binding of nucleotides. A 50:50 mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+ and [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein results in electron self-exchange and 100% production of [4Fe-4S]+ Fe protein, demonstrating that the +1/0 couple is fully reversible. MgATP is absolutely required for electron transfer from the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein to the reduced state of the MoFe protein. In that reaction both electrons are transferred and are used to reduce substrate.

  13. Heterotetrameric forms of human phenylalanine hydroxylase: co-expression of wild-type and mutant forms in a bicistronic system.

    PubMed

    Leandro, João; Leandro, Paula; Flatmark, Torgeir

    2011-05-01

    Hybrid forms of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH) mutants have been found to present catalytic activities lower than predicted from the individual recombinant forms, indicating that interallelic complementation could be a major determinant of the metabolic phenotype of compound heterozygous phenylketonuric (PKU) patients. To provide a molecular explanation for interallelic complementation we have here developed a bicistronic expression system and a purification strategy to obtain isolated hPAH heteromeric forms. On co-expression of WT-hPAH (~50% tetramer; ~10% dimer) and the N- and C-terminally truncated form ΔN102/ΔC24-hPAH (~80% dimer) no heterodimers were recovered. Moreover, by co-expression of WT-hPAH and the N-terminally truncated form ΔN102-hPAH (~95% tetramer), heterotetramers, as a result of an assembly of two different homodimers, were isolated. The recovered (WT)/(ΔN102)-hPAH heterotetramers revealed a catalytic activity deviating significantly from that calculated by averaging the respective recombinant homotetrameric forms. The heterotetramer assembly also results in conformational changes in the WT-hPAH protomer, as detected by trypsin limited proteolysis. The finding that the presence of two homodimers with different kinetic parameters influences the properties of the resulting heterotetrameric protein indicates that the dimers exhibit interactions which are transmitted across the assembled tetramer. The bicistronic expression system developed here allowed the isolation of hybrid forms that exhibit negative interallelic complementation, and may represent a model system for studying the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of PAH gene mutations in compound heterozygous PKU patients, providing the rationale to understand the observed inconsistencies both in genotype/phenotype correlations and in the response to BH(4) supplementation.

  14. Long-range interactions between the Fe protein binding sites of the MoFe protein of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Maritano, S; Fairhurst, S A; Eady, R R

    2001-06-01

    We report the properties and reactivity of the catalytically active heterologous nitrogenase formed between the Fe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp2) and the MoFe protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp1). Under turnover conditions, in the presence of MgATP, a stable 2:1 (Cp2)2Kp1 electron transfer complex is formed, in which the [4Fe-4S]+ centre of Cp2 is protected from chelation by alpha,alpha'-bipyridyl. However, the two Fe protein-binding sites on Kp1 are not equivalent, since a 1:1 Cp2.Kp1 complex was isolated by gel filtration. The non-equivalence of the Fe protein binding sites was also indicated by the inhibition pattern of Klebsiella nitrogenase by Cp2. The EPR spectrum of the isolated 1:1 Cp2.Kp1 complex showed an S=1/2 signal characteristic of dithionite-reduced Cp2 and signals with g values of 4.27, 3.73, 2.01 and 4.32, 3.63, 2.00 characteristic of the high- and low-pH forms of the FeMoco centre of Kp1, respectively. The unoccupied binding site of Kp1 of the isolated 1:1 Cp2Kp1 complex was shown to be catalytically fully functional in combination with Kp2. In contrast to homologous nitrogenases, which require MgATP for detectable rates of electron transfer from the Fe protein, stopped-flow kinetic studies revealed that electron transfer from Cp2 to Kp1 occurred in the absence of MgATP with a rate constant of 0.065 s(-1). Subsequently, a slower transient decrease and restoration of absorption in the electronic spectrum in the 500-700 nm region was observed. These changes corresponded with those in the intensity of the S=3/2 EPR signal of the FeMoco centres of Kp1 and were consistent with the transient reduction of the FeMoco centre of Kp1 to an EPR-silent form, followed by restoration of the signal at longer reaction times. These changes were not associated with catalysis since no evolution of H2 was detectable.

  15. Shrinking the FadE proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into cholesterol metabolism through identification of an α2β2 heterotetrameric acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Wipperman, Matthew F; Yang, Meng; Thomas, Suzanne T; Sampson, Nicole S

    2013-10-01

    The ability of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to metabolize steroids like cholesterol and the roles that these compounds play in the virulence and pathogenesis of this organism are increasingly evident. Here, we demonstrate through experiments and bioinformatic analysis the existence of an architecturally distinct subfamily of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (ACAD) enzymes that are α2β2 heterotetramers with two active sites. These enzymes are encoded by two adjacent ACAD (fadE) genes that are regulated by cholesterol. FadE26-FadE27 catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 3β-hydroxy-chol-5-en-24-oyl-CoA, an analog of the 5-carbon side chain cholesterol degradation intermediate. Genes encoding the α2β2 heterotetrameric ACAD structures are present in multiple regions of the M. tuberculosis genome, and subsets of these genes are regulated by four different transcriptional repressors or activators: KstR1 (also known as KstR), KstR2, Mce3R, and SigE. Homologous ACAD gene pairs are found in other Actinobacteria, as well as Proteobacteria. Their structures and genomic locations suggest that the α2β2 heterotetrameric structural motif has evolved to enable catalysis of dehydrogenation of steroid- or polycyclic-CoA substrates and that they function in four subpathways of cholesterol metabolism.

  16. Fission yeast decaprenyl diphosphate synthase consists of Dps1 and the newly characterized Dlp1 protein in a novel heterotetrameric structure.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Ryoichi; Nagata, Ai; Uchida, Naonori; Kainou, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Hideyuki; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2003-10-01

    The analysis of the structure and function of long chain-producing polyprenyl diphosphate synthase, which synthesizes the side chain of ubiquinone, has largely focused on the prokaryotic enzymes, and little is known about the eukaryotic counterparts. Here we show that decaprenyl diphosphate synthase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe is comprised of a novel protein named Dlp1 acting in partnership with Dps1. Dps1 is highly homologous to other prenyl diphosphate synthases but Dlp1 shares only weak homology with Dps1. We showed that the two proteins must be present simultaneously in Escherichia coli transformants before ubiquinone-10, which is produced by S. pombe but not by E. coli, is generated. Furthermore, the two proteins were shown to form a heterotetrameric complex. This is unlike the prokaryotic counterparts, which are homodimers. The deletion mutant of dlp1 lacked the enzymatic activity of decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, did not produce ubiquinone-10 and had the typical ubiquinone-deficient S. pombe phenotypes, namely hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, the need for antioxidants for growth on minimal medium and an elevated production of H2S. Both the dps1 (formerly dps) and dlp1 mutants could generate ubiquinone when they were transformed with a bacterial decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, which functions in its host as a homodimer. This indicates that both dps1 and dlp1 are required for the S. pombe enzymatic activity. Thus, decaprenyl diphosphate from a eukaryotic origin has a heterotetrameric structure that is not found in prokaryotes.

  17. The rice endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit is essential for optimal catalysis and allosteric regulation of the heterotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Aytug; Kawaguchi, Joe; Ihara, Yasuharu; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Nishi, Aiko; Nakamura, Tetsuhiro; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Yasunori; Cakir, Bilal; Nagamine, Ai; Okita, Thomas W; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Satoh, Hikaru

    2014-06-01

    Although an alternative pathway has been suggested, the prevailing view is that starch synthesis in cereal endosperm is controlled by the activity of the cytosolic isoform of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). In rice, the cytosolic AGPase isoform is encoded by the OsAGPS2b and OsAGPL2 genes, which code for the small (S2b) and large (L2) subunits of the heterotetrameric enzyme, respectively. In this study, we isolated several allelic missense and nonsense OsAGPL2 mutants by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) treatment of fertilized egg cells and by TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes). Interestingly, seeds from three of the missense mutants (two containing T139I and A171V) were severely shriveled and had seed weight and starch content comparable with the shriveled seeds from OsAGPL2 null mutants. Results from kinetic analysis of the purified recombinant enzymes revealed that the catalytic and allosteric regulatory properties of these mutant enzymes were significantly impaired. The missense heterotetramer enzymes and the S2b homotetramer had lower specific (catalytic) activities and affinities for the activator 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA). The missense heterotetramer enzymes showed more sensitivity to inhibition by the inhibitor inorganic phosphate (Pi) than the wild-type AGPase, while the S2b homotetramer was profoundly tolerant to Pi inhibition. Thus, our results provide definitive evidence that starch biosynthesis during rice endosperm development is controlled predominantly by the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic AGPase and its allosteric regulation by the effectors. Moreover, our results show that the L2 subunit is essential for both catalysis and allosteric regulatory properties of the heterotetramer enzyme.

  18. Formation of a tight 1:1 complex of Clostridium pasteurianum Fe protein-Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein: evidence for long-range interactions between the Fe protein binding sites during catalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T A; Maritano, S; Eady, R R

    2000-09-19

    It has been well documented that the combination of the MoFe protein of Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase (Av1) with the Fe protein (Cp2) from Clostridium pasteurianum nitrogenase produces an inactive, stable complex. However, we report that this heterologous nitrogenase has a low level of activity for H(2) evolution, with a specific activity of 12 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1) of Av1. This activity does not arise from contaminating hydrogenase since it required the presence of both Cp2 and Av1 and showed saturation kinetics when increasing amounts of Cp2 were added to the assay. Incubation of the two proteins at a 4:1 Cp2:Av1 ratio in the absence of MgATP followed by analytical gel filtration showed, surprisingly, that the stoichiometry of the isolated complex was Av1.Cp2 instead of Av1.(Cp2)(2) as determined previously. The presence of MgATP in the elution buffer did not change the elution profile of the complex. The hydrodynamic radius of the isolated complex determined by dynamic light scattering was 5.93 +/- 0.14 nm, intermediate between Av1 and a stable 2:1 nitrogenase complex, consistent with a 1:1 assignment for the Av1.Cp2 complex. When assayed with Av2, the isolated Av1.Cp2 complex showed full half-site reactivity with a specific activity of 750 nmol of C(2)H(2) reduced min(-)(1) mg(-)(1) of Av1. The EPR spectrum of the isolated complex showed the Cp2 to be oxidized and the Av1 to retain the S = (3)/(2) signal characteristic of FeMoco. In the presence of MgATP, under turnover conditions at a 2:1 ratio of Cp2:Av1, the [4Fe-4S] center of Cp2 was protected from the chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl. This is consistent with the formation of a tight 2:1 complex of Av1.(Cp2)(2) which is more stable than the homologous Cp nitrogenase. Assuming that the Lowe-Thorneley model for nitrogenase applies and that a rate-limiting dissociation of the complex is required for H(2) evolution, then with a rate of 0.032 s(-)(1) the 1:1 complex is too stable to be involved in catalysis. The

  19. Native Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seven, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Amid concerns from tribal leaders that No Child Left Behind testing is squeezing out electives that have traditionally covered their history and cultures, an ambitious brace of programs is making Native America part of the core curriculum at David Wolfle Elementary School and other schools in the western Washington State. By tapping into…

  20. Native Americans with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  1. Native American Discursive Tactic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jason Edward

    2013-01-01

    This essay derives from a course called ‘"The Rhetoric of Native America,’" which is a historical-critical survey of Native American primary texts. The course examines the rhetoric employed by Natives to enact social change and to build community in the face of exigencies. The main goal of exploring a native text (particularly, Simon…

  2. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  3. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  4. Native American Homeschooling Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozon, Gina

    2000-01-01

    The Native American Home School Association helps Native parents to provide a good education free from the assimilationist tendencies of public school and to transmit Native values and culture. Discusses various home schooling styles, the effectiveness of home schooling in terms of academic achievement and socialization, and the effectiveness of…

  5. Content in Native Literature Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    Including Native literature in school curricula is an important way of enhancing the Native student's self-concept and providing accurate Native cultural knowledge to Native and non-Native students alike. Nevertheless, Canadian school literature programs generally contain neither contemporary nor traditional Native literature. Some programs…

  6. Traditional Native Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    1985-01-01

    While Native myths and legends were educational tools to transmit tribal beliefs and history, traditional American Indian poetry served a ritualistic function in everyday life. Few traditional Native songs, which all poems were, survive; only Mayan and Aztec poems were written, and most of these were burned by a Spanish bishop. In addition, many…

  7. Native American Preparatory School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Preparatory School, Rowe, NM.

    This booklet provides information on the Native American Preparatory School, a residential secondary school in Rowe, New Mexico, for high-achieving Native American students. The school sponsors two programs: a 5-week rigorously academic summer school for junior high school students and, beginning in fall 1995, a 4-year college preparatory program.…

  8. Native American Entrepreneurship. Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    Although Native Americans have owned and started the fewest small businesses of all U.S. minority groups, entrepreneurship is considered to be an efficient tool for alleviating their economic problems. Barriers to Native American entrepreneurship include poverty, scarce start-up capital, poor access to business education and technical assistance,…

  9. Native SAD is maturing

    PubMed Central

    Rose, John P.; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Weiss, Manfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Native SAD phasing uses the anomalous scattering signal of light atoms in the crystalline, native samples of macromolecules collected from single-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments. These atoms include sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium. Native SAD phasing is challenging and is critically dependent on the collection of accurate data. Over the past five years, advances in diffraction hardware, crystallographic software, data-collection methods and strategies, and the use of data statistics have been witnessed which allow ‘highly accurate data’ to be routinely collected. Today, native SAD sits on the verge of becoming a ‘first-choice’ method for both de novo and molecular-replacement structure determination. This article will focus on advances that have caught the attention of the community over the past five years. It will also highlight both de novo native SAD structures and recent structures that were key to methods development. PMID:26175902

  10. Native American Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horse, Perry G.

    2005-01-01

    Many issues and elements--including ethnic nomenclature, racial attitudes, and the legal and political status of American Indian nations and Indian people--influence Native American identity. (Contains 3 notes.)

  11. Native Knowledge in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1985-01-01

    Native American science is defined as activities of native peoples of the New World in observing physical phenomena and attempting to explain and control them. Problems in studying native science, ethnoscience and native science, archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy, ethnobotany, agriculture, technology, and future directions are discussed. (JN)

  12. Native plant diversity increases herbivory to non-natives.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Hipp, Andrew L

    2014-11-07

    There is often an inverse relationship between the diversity of a plant community and the invasibility of that community by non-native plants. Native herbivores that colonize novel plants may contribute to diversity-invasibility relationships by limiting the relative success of non-native plants. Here, we show that, in large collections of non-native oak trees at sites across the USA, non-native oaks introduced to regions with greater oak species richness accumulated greater leaf damage than in regions with low oak richness. Underlying this trend was the ability of herbivores to exploit non-native plants that were close relatives to their native host. In diverse oak communities, non-native trees were on average more closely related to native trees and received greater leaf damage than those in depauperate oak communities. Because insect herbivores colonize non-native plants that are similar to their native hosts, in communities with greater native plant diversity, non-natives experience greater herbivory.

  13. Native American Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Julie Anna

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of independent living philosophy with regard to compatibility with Native American cultures, including definition or conceptualization of disability; self-advocacy; systems advocacy; peer counseling; and consumer control and involvement. Discusses an actualizing process as one method of resolving cultural conflicts and…

  14. The Native American Speaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Walter; And Others

    This publication is the product of several workshops and is aimed at multi-ethnic integration of teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching techniques. The 7 articles and 3 bibliographies, contributed by Native American consultants, emphasize recognition and alteration of bias in teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching…

  15. Native American Health

    MedlinePlus

    Every racial or ethnic group has specific health concerns. Differences in the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Americans.

  16. Rebuilding Native American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyhis, Don; Simonelli, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Wellbriety Movement in Native American communities draws on the wisdom and participation of traditional elders. Beginning with a basic community teaching called the Four Laws of Change and the Healing Forest Model, the Wellbriety Movement blends Medicine Wheel knowledge with the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to provide culture-specific…

  17. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  18. Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, C. Fayne; And Others

    Designed to accommodate a semester course in Native American Literature for secondary students, this teacher's guide includes a general introduction, a statement of the philosophy and goals upon which it is predicated, a nine-week block on post-Columbian literature, a nine-week block on oral literature, separate appendices for each block, a…

  19. Is Nativism Sufficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the empiricism-nativism issue, considering present-day intellectual roots of nativist and empiricist inclinations. A schema is proposed for explaining the ontogenetic origin of an innate attribute or principle relevant to language. An attempt is made to explain the origin of primitives as derived by learning. (Contains…

  20. Native American Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1998-01-01

    On the Fajada Butte in New Mexico, 11th-century Anasazi constructed a site that marks the high and low points of the orbits of the sun and the moon. This unit on astronomy challenges students to think differently about the moon and about the ability of native people to understand the natural world. Includes resources for further study. (PVD)

  1. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  2. The Native American Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Russell

    1989-01-01

    Describes the American Indian "Holocaust," decimation of Indian populations following European discovery of the Americas. European and African diseases, warfare with Europeans, and genocide reduced native populations from 75 million to only a few million. Discusses population statistics and demographic effects of epidemics, continuing infection,…

  3. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  4. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  5. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  6. 76 FR 22413 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ...) to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions Native Corporation. The decision... surface estate is conveyed to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions...

  7. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  8. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  9. The Native Educators Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Octaviana; Viri, Denis; Figueira, Anna

    In fall 2001, the Center for Indian Education at Arizona State University received a federal grant to conduct research on issues of Native language and culture in the classroom. Currently in its first year, the 3-year study focuses on a large cohort of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian candidates in teacher preparation programs…

  10. Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Stroke Stroke and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders Native Hawaiians/Pacific ... non-Hispanic white adults to die from a stroke in 2010. In general, Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander ...

  11. Our Native Ways: The Voices of Native American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toke, Arun Narayan, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    To celebrate the "Decade of the Indigenous Peoples," this issue of a nonprofit children's magazine includes art and writings by Native American youth who share their ways of looking at and living life. Emphasizes the distinct customs, traditions, languages, and folklore of the different Native Nations and Tribes. (LZ)

  12. Student Attitudes toward Native and Non-Native Language Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertel, Tammy Jandrey; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates students' attitudes toward native and nonnative speaking instructors of Spanish. A quantitative questionnaire was administered to 292 students enrolled in three different levels of undergraduate Spanish courses at a U.S. university. Participants were asked to rate Likert scale items related to native versus nonnative…

  13. Native Plants, Native Knowledge: Insights from Judy Bluehorse Skelton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bracken

    2003-01-01

    Judy Bluehorse Skelton is an herbalist of Native American descent who conducts field trips to identify plants and classroom activities to demonstrate their uses. She also works with Portland (Oregon) schools developing culturally appropriate strategies for presenting Native American content. She encourages students to look at events such as the…

  14. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  15. Earth's Caretakers: Native American Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyberg, Lisa M., Ed.

    Written by Native American teachers and by teachers of Native Americans, this book presents examples of ways to learn respect for the Earth and its people. The hope is that students will learn to walk softly upon the Earth and to respect all living things. Lessons and activities engage elementary and middle school students in a four-step…

  16. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    1982-01-01

    Using a Native American parable, compares the Standard Average European (SAE) world view with the Standard Native American (SNA) world view and the effects they have on education. Points out possible areas of interethnic confusion as a result of these two world views in communication dealing with cognitive schemes. (LC)

  17. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    The document compares and contrasts the Standard Average European (SAE) and the Standard Native American (SNA) viewpoints with regard to fostering cognitive development in children. One basic difference is demonstrated by relating a story and noting that, in terms of Native American cognitive development, no further teaching would be done. In…

  18. Native Americans: The First Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Bonnie; Frebertshauser, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Questions are presented to help camps determine if their usage of American Indian culture truly honors Native Americans. Camps that plan to use Indian lore should research the tribe's name, location, symbols, legends, and living habits. A 5-day program is presented for enhancing campers' understanding of Native peoples and their relationship to…

  19. Native American Professional Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honahni, Daniel

    The "Native American Professional Resource Directory" contains 1,076 Indian individuals representing various tribes and academic degree backgrounds. The directory is divided into three major categories: (1) academic degree index, (2) individual information index, and (3) tribal index. Criteria for selection are: (1) Native Americans of Indian or…

  20. Reflecting on Native Speaker Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The issues surrounding native speakers (NSs) and nonnative speakers (NNSs) as teachers (NESTs and NNESTs, respectively) in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are a current topic of interest. In many contexts, the native speaker of English is viewed as the model teacher, thus putting the NEST into a position of…

  1. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  2. Native Americans in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Three Native American physical therapists share stories of their careers, including educational background; motivation to enter the field; and experiences as a volunteer in Vietnam and working with the Indian Health Service and various rehabilitation programs. Advice on appropriate preparation in the sciences is offered to Native students…

  3. Ohiyesa's Path: Reclaiming Native Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Renville, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As Natives have assumed increasing authority and responsibility for tribal and federally funded and administered schools, a more balanced and enlightened view is emerging. Notable among these events is the recognition of the critical need to shift emphasis to the untapped heritage of more recently recognized and acknowledged Native American…

  4. Native Music in College Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Loran

    1986-01-01

    Culminating a 10-year effort to include the study of Native Americans and their music as it reflects cultural realities, life, thought, religion, and history as a choice in requirements for graduation, the elective course, "Native Music of North America," is now recognized at Washington State University as meeting both…

  5. Native Language Literacy Screening Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    The purpose the Native Language Literacy Screening Device (NLLSD) is to give English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) practitioners a sense of the native language literacy levels of learners coming into their programs. This is worth knowing because when learners have had limited schooling in their first language instructional strategies used…

  6. Listening Natively across Perceptual Domains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langus, Alan; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Uysal, Ertugrul; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Marino, Caterina; Asaadi, Sina; Eren, Ömer; Toro, Juan M.; Peña, Marcela; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Our native tongue influences the way we perceive other languages. But does it also determine the way we perceive nonlinguistic sounds? The authors investigated how speakers of Italian, Turkish, and Persian group sequences of syllables, tones, or visual shapes alternating in either frequency or duration. We found strong native listening effects…

  7. Native Americans as Sports Mascots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the controversy over whether sport teams should use Native American logos, mascots, or native symbols. Suggests that by implementing role-reversal techniques (putting the nonnative people in the same place) uncaring sports fans may recognize the disrespect involved; offers a hypothetical newspaper article that illustrates the…

  8. Establishing Success with Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hains, Shaun

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Native research methods (talking circles and vision quests), a teacher at Edmonton (Alberta) Public Schools discovered why Canadian Native students' dropout rate was so high. Kids' complaints about poor relationships with teachers, racism, peer pressure, and poor family support were heeded, and successful interventions were…

  9. Education and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannucilli, Mary V.

    Traditionally, Native Americans educated their children through the oral transmission of beliefs and values. Christian missions dominated Indian education from the 16th to the 19th century and began the process of erasing Native American identity and culture. After the Civil War, control of 73 Indian agencies was assigned to 13 religious…

  10. Vanishing native American dog lineages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dogs were an important element in many native American cultures at the time Europeans arrived. Although previous ancient DNA studies revealed the existence of unique native American mitochondrial sequences, these have not been found in modern dogs, mainly purebred, studied so far. Results We identified many previously undescribed mitochondrial control region sequences in 400 dogs from rural and isolated areas as well as street dogs from across the Americas. However, sequences of native American origin proved to be exceedingly rare, and we estimate that the native population contributed only a minor fraction of the gene pool that constitutes the modern population. Conclusions The high number of previously unidentified haplotypes in our sample suggests that a lot of unsampled genetic variation exists in non-breed dogs. Our results also suggest that the arrival of European colonists to the Americas may have led to an extensive replacement of the native American dog population by the dogs of the invaders. PMID:21418639

  11. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resides in Alaska; or (2) Any non-native permanent resident of an Alaskan native village who is primarily... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may be sold in native villages or towns in Alaska for native consumption within native villages and towns in Alaska. (c) Non-edible by-products of endangered or...

  12. Use and Acquisition of Idiomatic Expressions in Referring by Native and Non-Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortfeld, Heather; Brennan, Susan E.

    1997-01-01

    Examines how native and nonnative undergraduate-student speakers adjust their referring expressions to each other in conversation. Finds that lexical entrainment was just as common in native/nonnative pairs as in native/native pairs; natives uttered more words than nonnatives in the same roles; and native expressions were judged less…

  13. Informational Publications on Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Contains a bibliography of free or inexpensive informational publications on American Indian culture, history, and problems. The list will also acquaint teachers with some of the educational centers across the nation that have significant materials on Native Americans. (AM)

  14. Native American Folklorist: Paul Goble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents ideas for extending activities focusing on Paul Goble's books and Native Americans. Provides an annotated bibliography of Goble's books and lists audio recordings, video recordings, and biographical information. (PEN)

  15. Native Geoscience: Pathways to Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.; Seielstad, G.

    2006-12-01

    We are living in a definite time of change. Distinct changes are being experienced in our most sacred and natural environments. This is especially true on Native lands. Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways. The knowledge of balancing the needs of people with the needs of our natural environments is paramount in all tribal societies. This inherent accumulated knowledge has become the foundation on which to build a "blended" contemporary understanding of western science. The Dakota's and Northern California have embraced the critical need of understanding successful tribal strategies to engage educational systems (K-12 and higher education), to bring to prominence the professional development opportunities forged through working with tribal peoples and ensure the continued growth of Native earth and environmental scientists The presentation will highlight: 1) past and present philosophies on building and maintaining Native/Tribal students in earth and environmental sciences; 2) successful educational programs/activities in PreK-Ph.D. systems; 3) current Native leadership development in earth and environmental sciences; and 4) forward thinking for creating proaction collaborations addressing sustainable environmental, educational and social infrastructures for all people. Humboldt State University (HSU) and the University of North Dakota's Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment and the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) have been recognized nationally for their partnerships with Native communities. Unique collaborations are emerging "bridging" Native people across geographic areas in developing educational/research experiences which integrate the distinctive earth/environmental knowledge of tribal people. The presentation will highlight currently funded projects and initiatives as well as success stories of emerging Native earth system students and scientists.

  16. Native and Non-Native Teachers and Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson

    This paper discusses issues in the recruitment, retention, and training of Native college students as teachers and school administrators. The number of Native educational professionals serving schools for Native students is extremely small, and there is evidence that even this number is declining relative to the increasing Native school…

  17. Cross-Language Perception of Cantonese Vowels Spoken by Native and Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Connie K.; Attina, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners' perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers. They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results…

  18. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  19. Indian Education - Curriculum Development: Native Languages, Native Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Toronto (Ontario). Education Div.

    Brief program descriptions derived from a cross-Canada survey of current enrichment programs and teaching materials for Native Studies programs are presented in this document. Prices for materials and some funding sources are also presented. Brief paragraphs describe on-going programs in each of the following subject areas: art (5 programs);…

  20. Native American Adult Reader I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    Aspects of Native American history and culture as well as issues and concerns of American Indians are presented in the twelve short articles in this reader for adults. Intended for use in an adult basic education/GED program, the reader features simply written stories (for grades 0-3), illustrations, vocabulary lists and student study questions.…

  1. Native Literacy: A Living Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Rhonda L.

    2003-01-01

    Aboriginal literacy encompasses oral tradition, culture, language, identity, and world view in addition to the written word, and is a process of lifelong learning, much of which occurs beyond school walls. When defining Native literacy, one must move away from measuring Aboriginal students by Euro-Western definitions and move toward a balanced,…

  2. Native Birthrights and Indigenous Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Lunday, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    In traditional tribal cultures, children are treated with great respect and eagerly learn from their elders. But in contemporary Western society, Native students have the highest dropout rates and are subjected to disproportionate school disciplinary exclusion, which becomes a pipeline into the justice system (Sprague, Vincent, Tobin, & Pavel,…

  3. Census Data and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Nampeo D. R.; Crook, Karen A.

    Designed for those seeking data on Native Americans, this paper presents U.S. census data sources and the developments which have taken place in data collection procedures and definitions between 1860 and 1970. Specifically, this paper presents: (1) development of race concept and definitions (emphasis on American Indian, Aleut and Eskimo, and…

  4. Native Art of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langham, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides historical information on native Southwest peoples and their arts to encourage appreciation and understanding of this cultural heritage. Provides instructions and supply lists for age-appropriate craft projects including woven baskets and rugs, clay pots, clay and paper beads, silver bracelets, kachina dolls, sand paintings, dream…

  5. Learning Styles and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna Bell

    1990-01-01

    Reviews 5 models of learning or cognitive styles and the concept of brain hemispheric functions. Discusses the right hemisphere dominant learning style of many Native American children. Presents points to consider when modifying curricula or designing a reading program aimed at all learners. Contains 19 references. (SV)

  6. Native American College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  7. Resiliency and Native American Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Driving-Hawk, Christopher; Baartman, Jyl

    2009-01-01

    The term resiliency is used to describe the "human capacity and ability to face, overcome, be strengthened by, and even be transformed by experiences of adversity." Native American culture provides a framework for fostering resiliency. The Lakota Sioux society identifies four core needs that foster resiliency and motivate individuals to reach…

  8. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers' performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English learning and teaching, and the inappropriate…

  9. Learning Styles and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna B.

    This paper summarizes research on learning styles, then examines the cognitive style of Native American primary school students. Five theories of cognitive style (Dunn and Dunn, Gregorc, Kagan, Witkin, and Cohen) are examined along with the test instruments these theories have fostered. A sixth concept of cognitive style, brain hemispheric…

  10. The Schooling of Native America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Thomas, Ed.

    The collection of ten essays by Native Americans who are involved in Indian education includes a preface by Thomas Thompson; "The Indian Student Amid American Inconsistencies" by Vine Deloria, Jr.; "Growing Up in E'da How-One Idaho Girlhood" by LaNada Boyer; "Multicultural Teacher Education at Rough Rock" by Dillon…

  11. Amyloidogenesis of Natively Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation, which shares many structural properties with the pre-molten globule state, a partially folded intermediate first found during the equilibrium and kinetic (un)folding studies of several globular proteins and later described as one of the structural forms of natively unfolded proteins. The flexibility of this structural form is essential for the conformational rearrangements driving the formation of the core cross-beta structure of the amyloid fibril. Obviously, molecular mechanisms describing amyloidogenesis of ordered and natively unfolded proteins are different. For ordered protein to fibrillate, its unique and rigid structure has to be destabilized and partially unfolded. On the other hand, fibrillogenesis of a natively unfolded protein involves the formation of partially folded conformation; i.e., partial folding rather than unfolding. In this review recent findings are surveyed to illustrate some unique features of the natively unfolded proteins amyloidogenesis. PMID:18537543

  12. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  13. NABS Program: (Native Americans in Biological Science).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettys, Nancy, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the four-week summer program of the Native Americans in Biological Sciences Program that engages Native American eighth- and ninth-grade students in studying the problems related to the waste water treatment plant in Cushing, Oklahoma. (MDH)

  14. 76 FR 47234 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... conveyed to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Togiak Natives Limited... will also be published four times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a...

  15. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below... is conveyed to Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Chignik...

  16. 50 CFR 216.23 - Native exceptions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... town. (2) No marine mammal taken for purposes of creating and selling authentic native articles of... sold (A) in an Alaskan Native village or town, or (B) to an Alaskan Native for his consumption. (c) Any... beluga harvest. (B) Strike/harvest levels for each 5-year planning interval beginning in 2008 will...

  17. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  18. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  19. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  20. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  1. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  2. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  3. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  4. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  5. Native Education: The Next 100 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atleo, E. R.

    This paper discusses the history and trauma of Native education in Canada and stresses the importance of integrating the best of the Native culture with the best of the Western culture in future Native education. The paper is organized in three parts. The first section acknowledges the trauma inflicted on the indigenous peoples by means of early…

  6. Canadian Journal of Native Studies: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes and critically analyzes volume of "Canadian Journal of Native Studies" (v4 n2 1984). Sketches journal's history and critiques three articles. Article topics include history (Indian treaties and Indian policy administration); resource development impacts (reserve land flooding, native health, and fishing); and native education…

  7. Native Americans and Wage Labor: Ethnohistorical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Alice, Ed.; Knack, Martha C., Ed.

    This book reconsiders a largely ignored fact of North American Indian economic life--the place of wage labor in the culture and history of Native Americans. Case studies examine social networks of Native agricultural laborers, the decline of Native communities from self-sufficient producers to lower-class wage laborers, vocational education in…

  8. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  9. Education and Attitudes toward Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugaj, Albert M.

    A survey of 123 students enrolled in Introduction to Social Psychology at the University of Wisconsin--Green Bay examined attitudes toward Native Americans. The research assessed the effects of educational programs at the secondary and postsecondary level on attitudes toward Native Americans and Native American treaty rights, and also measured the…

  10. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  11. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  12. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  13. Native American Children in Michigan. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Native American Children in Michigan," provides a historical context for the tenuous relationship between Michigan's 12 federally recognized tribes and the state government, paying particular attention to the erosion of Native American education programs and the disproportionate number of Native children who find themselves in both the…

  14. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  15. The State of Native American Youth Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Div. of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health.

    This survey on the health status of Native American adolescents living on or near reservations was completed by 14,000 American Indian and Alaska Native youths from 50 tribes attending 200 schools in 12 states. Results indicate that most Native teenagers felt their family cared about them a great deal, and many would go to a family member first…

  16. Native American Studies: A Personal Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, C. Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Native American Studies programs, however small, are the Native community's academic foothold in higher education. To maintain and expand this foothold of approximately 105 programs on university and college campuses throughout the United States, Native American Studies must continue to develop its professional capacity to act as an "independent…

  17. Significant Literature by and about Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Cecilia A., Comp.; Travis, M. Eunice, Comp.

    Significant literature about Native Americans, some written by Native Americans, comprises this bibliography. Materials relevant to Native Americans found at Kansas State University are listed. Over 850 books, articles on microfiche, studies, documents, and publications arranged by subject categories are contained in this bibliography. The subject…

  18. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  19. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  20. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  1. Optimal control of native predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; O'Connell, Allan F.; Kendall, William L.; Runge, Michael C.; Simons, Theodore R.; Waldstein, Arielle H.; Schulte, Shiloh A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Smith, Graham W.; Pinion, Timothy; Rikard, Michael; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply decision theory in a structured decision-making framework to evaluate how control of raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native predator, can promote the conservation of a declining population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Our management objective was to maintain Oystercatcher productivity above a level deemed necessary for population recovery while minimizing raccoon removal. We evaluated several scenarios including no raccoon removal, and applied an adaptive optimization algorithm to account for parameter uncertainty. We show how adaptive optimization can be used to account for uncertainties about how raccoon control may affect Oystercatcher productivity. Adaptive management can reduce this type of uncertainty and is particularly well suited for addressing controversial management issues such as native predator control. The case study also offers several insights that may be relevant to the optimal control of other native predators. First, we found that stage-specific removal policies (e.g., yearling versus adult raccoon removals) were most efficient if the reproductive values among stage classes were very different. Second, we found that the optimal control of raccoons would result in higher Oystercatcher productivity than the minimum levels recommended for this species. Third, we found that removing more raccoons initially minimized the total number of removals necessary to meet long term management objectives. Finally, if for logistical reasons managers cannot sustain a removal program by removing a minimum number of raccoons annually, managers may run the risk of creating an ecological trap for Oystercatchers.

  2. Chinese College Students' Views on Native English and Non-Native English in EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Yang; Jingxia, Liu

    2016-01-01

    With the development of globalization, English is clearly spoken by many more non-native than native speakers, which raises the discussion of English varieties and the debate regarding the conformity to Standard English. Although a large number of studies have shown scholars' attitudes towards native English and non-native English, little research…

  3. Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the int...

  4. Error Gravity: Perceptions of Native-Speaking and Non-Native Speaking Faculty in EFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresovich, Brant M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of teachers of composition in English as a Second Language in Japan addressed the perceptions of native-English-speaking and non-native-English-speaking teachers of the acceptability of specific error types within sentences. The native speakers of English were one British and 16 Americans. The non-native group was comprised of 26 Japanese…

  5. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2009-01-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance. PMID:20161400

  6. Building a Native Teaching Force: Important Considerations. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuelito, Kathryn D.

    Since 1975, the political climate has increasingly supported the inclusion of American Indian culture and language in Native education and the training of Native teachers. Native teachers enhance the teacher-student relationship for Native students, are role models for Native youth, and are aware of Native learning styles. The ongoing Native…

  7. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    PubMed

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America.

  8. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    PubMed Central

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  9. Native Americans: Where in Environmental Justice Research?

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Jamie; Hunter, Lori M.

    2016-01-01

    While the last two decades have seen important theoretical, empirical, and policy advancements in environmental justice generally, much remains to be done regarding Native Americans. Unique political and cultural dynamics shape the study and pursuit of environmental justice (EJ) in Native American communities. This review summarizes Native American EJ issues based on a cross-disciplinary search of over 60 publications. In so doing, we discuss the unique nature of Native American EJ in terms of conducting research and working toward reducing the continuation of historical trauma associated with environmental ills, the types of strategies used in Native American EJ research, and issues of Native American climate justice. We conclude with discussion of remaining knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27103758

  10. Native Americans: Where in Environmental Justice Research?

    PubMed

    Vickery, Jamie; Hunter, Lori M

    While the last two decades have seen important theoretical, empirical, and policy advancements in environmental justice generally, much remains to be done regarding Native Americans. Unique political and cultural dynamics shape the study and pursuit of environmental justice (EJ) in Native American communities. This review summarizes Native American EJ issues based on a cross-disciplinary search of over 60 publications. In so doing, we discuss the unique nature of Native American EJ in terms of conducting research and working toward reducing the continuation of historical trauma associated with environmental ills, the types of strategies used in Native American EJ research, and issues of Native American climate justice. We conclude with discussion of remaining knowledge gaps and future research needs.

  11. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattling Leaf, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the spirit of collaboration and reciprocity, James Rattling Leaf of Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation of South Dakota will present recent developments, experiences, insights and a vision for education in Indian Country. As a thirty-year young institution, Sinte Gleska University is founded by a strong vision of ancestral leadership and the values of the Lakota Way of Life. Sinte Gleska University (SGU) has initiated the development of a Geospatial Education Curriculum project. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building is a two-year project that entails a disciplined approach towards the development of a relevant Geospatial academic curriculum. This project is designed to meet the educational and land management needs of the Rosebud Lakota Tribe through the utilization of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). In conjunction with the strategy and progress of this academic project, a formal presentation and demonstration of the SGU based Geospatial software RezMapper software will exemplify an innovative example of state of the art information technology. RezMapper is an interactive CD software package focused toward the 21 Lakota communities on the Rosebud Reservation that utilizes an ingenious concept of multimedia mapping and state of the art data compression and presentation. This ongoing development utilizes geographic data, imagery from space, historical aerial photography and cultural features such as historic Lakota documents, language, song, video and historical photographs in a multimedia fashion. As a tangible product, RezMapper will be a project deliverable tool for use in the classroom and to a broad range of learners.

  12. Word Durations in Non-Native English

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Rachel E.; Baese-Berk, Melissa; Bonnasse-Gahot, Laurent; Kim, Midam; Van Engen, Kristin J.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare the effects of English lexical features on word duration for native and non-native English speakers and for non-native speakers with different L1s and a range of L2 experience. We also examine whether non-native word durations lead to judgments of a stronger foreign accent. We measured word durations in English paragraphs read by 12 American English (AE), 20 Korean, and 20 Chinese speakers. We also had AE listeners rate the `accentedness' of these non-native speakers. AE speech had shorter durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, greater reduction of function words, and less between-speaker variance than non-native speech. However, both AE and non-native speakers showed sensitivity to lexical predictability by reducing second mentions and high frequency words. Non-native speakers with more native-like word durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, and greater function word reduction were perceived as less accented. Overall, these findings identify word duration as an important and complex feature of foreign-accented English. PMID:21516172

  13. Genetic Research and Native American Cultural Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Francine; Bemis, Lynne T.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Dignan, Mark

    Cultural issues relevant to genetic education and research arc the focus of a new and innovative curriculum being developed for Native American college students and health professionals. Genetic Education for Native Americans (GENA) is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The goal of the GENA project is to provide a balance of scientific and cultural information about genetic research, genetic testing, and careers in genetics for Native American students. This article describes issues related to the implementation of GENA and provides an example of an innovative approach to teaching about genetic research among Native American populations.

  14. Perceiving non-native speech: Word segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondini, Michèle; Miller, Joanne L.

    2001-05-01

    One important source of information listeners use to segment speech into discrete words is allophonic variation at word junctures. Previous research has shown that non-native speakers impose their native-language phonetic norms on their second language; as a consequence, non-native speech may (in some cases) exhibit altered patterns of allophonic variation at word junctures. We investigated the perceptual consequences of this for word segmentation by presenting native-English listeners with English word pairs produced either by six native-English speakers or six highly fluent, native-French speakers of English. The target word pairs had contrastive word juncture involving voiceless stop consonants (e.g., why pink/wipe ink; gray ties/great eyes; we cash/weak ash). The task was to identify randomized instances of each individual target word pair (as well as control pairs) by selecting one of four possible choices (e.g., why pink, wipe ink, why ink, wipe pink). Overall, listeners were more accurate in identifying target word pairs produced by the native-English speakers than by the non-native English speakers. These findings suggest that one contribution to the processing cost associated with listening to non-native speech may be the presence of altered allophonic information important for word segmentation. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  15. Sleep and native language interference affect non-native speech sound learning.

    PubMed

    Earle, F Sayako; Myers, Emily B

    2015-12-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one's native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, 2 factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in 3 studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hr after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep.

  16. Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria S.; Fridley, Jason D.; Yin, Jingjing; Bauerle, Taryn L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons. PMID:24348490

  17. Sleep and Native Language Interference Affect Non-Native Speech Sound Learning

    PubMed Central

    Earle, F. Sayako; Myers, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one’s native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, two factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in three studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hours after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep. PMID:26280264

  18. Speaking C++ as a native

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroustrup, Bjarne

    2001-08-01

    C++ supports several styles ("multiple paradigms") of programming. This allows great flexibility, notational convenience, maintainability, and close-to-optimal performance. Programmers who don't know the basic native C++ styles and techniques "speak" C++ with a thick accent, limiting themselves to relatively restrictive pidgin dialects. Here, I present language features such as classes, class hierarchies, abstract classes, and templates, together with the fundamental programming styles they support. In particular, I show how to provide generic algorithms, function objects, access objects, and delayed evaluation as needed to build and use flexible and efficient libraries. The aim is to give an idea of what's possible to provide, and some understanding of the fundamental techniques of modern C++ libraries.

  19. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  20. Invasive non-native species' provision of refugia for endangered native species.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-08-01

    The influence of non-native species on native ecosystems is not predicted easily when interspecific interactions are complex. Species removal can result in unexpected and undesired changes to other ecosystem components. I examined whether invasive non-native species may both harm and provide refugia for endangered native species. The invasive non-native plant Casuarina stricta has damaged the native flora and caused decline of the snail fauna on the Ogasawara Islands, Japan. On Anijima in 2006 and 2009, I examined endemic land snails in the genus Ogasawarana. I compared the density of live specimens and frequency of predation scars (from black rats [Rattus rattus]) on empty shells in native vegetation and Casuarina forests. The density of land snails was greater in native vegetation than in Casuarina forests in 2006. Nevertheless, radical declines in the density of land snails occurred in native vegetation since 2006 in association with increasing predation by black rats. In contrast, abundance of Ogasawarana did not decline in the Casuarina forest, where shells with predation scars from rats were rare. As a result, the density of snails was greater in the Casuarina forest than in native vegetation. Removal of Casuarina was associated with an increased proportion of shells with predation scars from rats and a decrease in the density of Ogasawarana. The thick and dense litter of Casuarina appears to provide refugia for native land snails by protecting them from predation by rats; thus, eradication of rats should precede eradication of Casuarina. Adaptive strategies, particularly those that consider the removal order of non-native species, are crucial to minimizing the unintended effects of eradication on native species. In addition, my results suggested that in some cases a given non-native species can be used to mitigate the impacts of other non-native species on native species.

  1. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  2. Troublesome Discourse: Analysis of Native Speaker/Non-Native Speaker Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairley, Michael S.

    This paper presents a case study of an episode in a conversation between a native English speaker (the female director of an English language school) and a non-native English speaker (a student apparently with minimal language skills) in which the native speaker is engaged in an extended telling of seemingly crucial information. The troublesome…

  3. Voices of Native Educators: Strategies that Support Success of Native High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a conversation that took place in April of 2010 in Washington, DC regarding high school reform and Native American, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian students. The meeting was co-sponsored by the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) and the National Education Association (NEA). The meeting was attended by a broad…

  4. Profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs). Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report on profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs) include: (1) Largest Percentage of ELs Who Were Native American and/or…

  5. Politics and Alaska Natives: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoleon, Harold

    As one in a series of eight articles written by different professionals concerned with Alaska Native land claims, this article focuses on utilization of Alaska Native political resources as a means to achieve beneficial legislation beyond that of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1972. Designed to stimulate careful political and…

  6. Advocacy for Native American Indian and Alaska Native Clients and Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Roger

    Helping professionals need to be more informed and more active advocates for proactive counseling strategies with Native American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. The paper discusses the major advocacy needs of these populations. The negative impact of historical and contemporary discriminatory policies and practices on Native peoples has…

  7. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  8. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  9. Relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for two generalist native trematodes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A.; Lal, Aparna; Dale, Marcia; Townsend, Colin R.; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Exotic fish species frequently acquire native parasites despite the absence of closely related native hosts. They thus have the potential to affect native counterparts by altering native host–parasite dynamics. In New Zealand, exotic brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have acquired two native trematodes (Telogaster opisthorchis and Stegodexamene anguillae) from their native definitive host (the longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii). We used a combination of field surveys and experimental infections to determine the relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for these native parasites. Field observations indicated that the longfin eel was the superior host for both parasites, although differences between native and exotic hosts were less apparent for S. anguillae. Experimental infections indicated that both parasites had poorer establishment and survival in salmonids, although some worms matured and attained similar sizes to those in eels before dying. Overall, the field surveys and experimental infections indicate that these exotic salmonids are poor hosts of both native trematodes and their presence may decrease native parasite flow to native hosts. PMID:24533327

  10. Native Aging Visions: A Resource for Native Elders. Volume 1, 1994-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native Aging Visions, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This volume of newsletters reports on the activities and research projects of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging located at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. The Center studies health issues and access problems facing American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian elders. Specifically, the resource center was…

  11. Handbook of Native American Studies and Chronology of Native American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Jack D.; And Others

    Intended as "a practical guide to the development of Native American Studies programs, Native American Studies courses, and Indian-oriented higher education programs," this handbook places emphasis upon materials actually utilized in the development of Native American Studies at the University of California, Davis, and in the creation of…

  12. Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Reich, Peter B; Lind, Eric M; Sullivan, Lauren L; Seabloom, Eric W; Yahdjian, Laura; MacDougall, Andrew S; Reichmann, Lara G; Alberti, Juan; Báez, Selene; Bakker, Jonathan D; Cadotte, Marc W; Caldeira, Maria C; Chaneton, Enrique J; D'Antonio, Carla M; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Harpole, W Stanley; Iribarne, Oscar; Kirkman, Kevin P; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Laungani, Ramesh; Leakey, Andrew D B; McCulley, Rebecca L; Moore, Joslin L; Pascual, Jesus; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2016-05-19

    Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of nutrient addition would be greatest where climate was stable and benign, owing to reduced niche partitioning. We found that the abundance of non-native species increased with nutrient addition independent of climate; however, nutrient addition increased non-native species richness and decreased native species richness, with these effects dampened in warmer or wetter sites. Eutrophication also altered the time scale in which grassland invasion responded to climate, decreasing the importance of long-term climate and increasing that of annual climate. Thus, climatic conditions mediate the responses of native and non-native flora to nutrient enrichment. Our results suggest that the negative effect of nutrient addition on native abundance is decoupled from its effect on richness, and reduces the time scale of the links between climate and compositional change.

  13. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  14. Tenure Experiences of Native Hawaiian Women Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka opua, Heipua

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the status of women of color in academe with a particular focus on Native Hawaiian women faculty. Using a qualitative narrative design, this research examined the experiences of tenured instructional Native Hawaiian women faculty (Na Wahine) at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Two research questions guided this inquiry: 1)…

  15. Community Health Resource Training for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Elizabeth L.; Schrader, David C.

    This paper applies concepts from intercultural communication theory, adult learning theory, and traditional Native American medicine to a specific learning experience for Native Americans. The background is an educational opportunity offered by the Indian Health Services Bureau to tribe members to become employed on their reservations as Health…

  16. 1994 State Legislation on Native American Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Kimberly A.

    This report includes state-by-state summaries of 1994 legislation pertaining to Native American issues. Of 344 bills introduced in the state legislatures in 1994, 92 were enacted and 20 are still pending. Major issues addressed in 1994 legislation included Native American education; history, language, and culture preservation; sovereignty; law…

  17. Theoretical Perspectives of How Digital Natives Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Marck Prensky, an authority on teaching and learning especially with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies, has referred to 21st century children born after 1980 as "Digital Natives". This paper reviews literature of leaders in the field to shed some light on theoretical perspectives of how Digital Natives learn and how…

  18. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  19. Native Perspectives on Childbearing and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Heather F.

    This ethnographic study sought to understand, from the native perspective, the traditional childbearing values and practices of Coast Salish peoples and the difficulties in maintaining these in a society that is not oriented to native values and practices. Observations and interviews were carried out over a 4-year period on the Songhees reserve in…

  20. Inside the Circle: Kehewin Native Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Rosa; And Others

    The book is divided into four sections in a way that ensures seasonal recognition and environmental awareness. Each chapter within the sections begins with one or more oral histories from Native nations relevant to the concepts and ideas covered in that chapter. The student is introduced to the Native perspective through the concept of the circle,…

  1. Support for Native Americans with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Wylie; Rife, Christine

    This report addresses the high incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE) among Native Americans and suggests that there is a lack of comprehensive effort to provide outreach services to the Native American population in Illinois. The report begins with an overview of American Indian history and the migration of…

  2. Success Models for Gifted Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, David K.

    The Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children at the University of Hawaii at Hilo aims to develop culturally appropriate gifted and talented programs and identification procedures for Native Hawaiian children. Every Center program incorporates four elements of the Na Pua No'eau model: talent enhancement, self-esteem development,…

  3. Staphylococcus saprophyticus causing native valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Eugenio; Márquez, Irene; Beteta, Alicia; Said, Ibrahim; Blanco, Javier; Pineda, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are a rare cause of native valve endocarditis. Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infrequently reported as a human pathogen, and most of the cases reported are urinary tract infections. We describe a case of native valve endocarditis attributed to this organism. The patient needed valve replacement due to heart failure.

  4. Nature Study Tips: Native American Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1984-01-01

    Discusses Native American foods, focusing on Native American cultivated crops, methods of cooking, and methods of preserving food. Includes suggestions for 19 classroom activities, including collecting wild plants used as food, gathering/drying and eating various wild plants and plant products (such as acorns and corn), and making a garden. (JN)

  5. 75 FR 45649 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross, Alaska, and... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision approving lands for conveyance. SUMMARY: As required by 43 CFR...

  6. Native American Biographies. Multicultural Biographies Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Virginia, Ed.; And Others

    This book, appropriate for secondary students, includes brief biographies of 21 Native Americans of the 20th century. The biographies focus on childhood experiences, cultural heritage, and career goals. The book is divided into four units that feature Native Americans with successful careers in the fields of literature and drama; fine arts and…

  7. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  8. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  9. Astronomy in the Native-Oriented Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Murray R.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines background, materials, operation, and evaluation of four activities for grades six-nine designed to illustrate how curriculum activities can enhance astronomy concepts and native awareness: "Were Native People Aware of Milky Way Galaxy?,""Constellation Cans,""Travels of the Big Dipper," and "How Did the…

  10. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Investigator Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...2. Developing an identification protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called...of parkinsonism among Alaska Natives. Status: Complete 3. Developing a secure Alaska Native parkinsonism registry database. Status: The database

  11. Canadian Native Students and Inequitable Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Discusses inequitable learning opportunities of Canada Natives. Finds that rules and expectations of schools often create feelings of shame in Native learners that lead to withdrawal and failure. Asserts that when teachers become cultural brokers they can eliminate the inequalities and develop an environment conducive to learning. (CMK)

  12. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  13. A Race to Rescue Native Tongues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elyse

    2007-01-01

    Of the 300 or so native languages once spoken in North America, only about 150 are still spoken--and the majority of those have just a handful of mostly elderly speakers. For most Native American languages, colleges and universities are their last great hope, if not their final resting place. People at a number of institutions across the country…

  14. Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Ronnie D.; Day, Gretchen M.; Lanier, Anne P.; Provost, Ellen M.; Hamel, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of stroke among Alaska Natives, which is essential for designing effective stroke prevention and intervention efforts for this population. Methods. We conducted an analysis of death certificate data for the state of Alaska for the period 1984 to 2003, comparing age-standardized stroke mortality rates among Alaska Natives residing in Alaska vs US Whites by age category, gender, stroke type, and time. Results. Compared with US Whites, Alaska Natives had significantly elevated stroke mortality from 1994 to 2003 but not from 1984 to 1993. Alaska Native women of all age groups and Alaska Native men younger than 45 years of age had the highest risk, although the rates for those younger than 65 years were statistically imprecise. Over the 20-year study period, the stroke mortality rate was stable for Alaska Natives but declined for US Whites. Conclusions. Stroke mortality is higher among Alaska Natives, especially women, than among US Whites. Over the past 20 years, there has not been a significant decline in stroke mortality among Alaska Natives. PMID:19762671

  15. Native Tribal Scholars: Building an Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, J. Cedric

    2012-01-01

    When the author first started as interim director of the Institute for New England Native American Studies (INENAS) based at the University of Massachusetts Boston, he was given three studies that broadly identified specific needs and disparities of Native people in the region. Given that he was at an institution of higher education, his immediate…

  16. Native plants fare better against an introduced competitor with native microbes and lower nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Gaya Shivega, W; Aldrich-Wolfe, Laura

    2017-01-24

    While the soil environment is generally acknowledged as playing a role in plant competition, the relative importance of soil resources and soil microbes in determining outcomes of competition between native and exotic plants has rarely been tested. Resilience of plant communities to invasion by exotic species may depend on the extent to which native and exotic plant performance are mediated by abiotic and biotic components of the soil. We used a greenhouse experiment to compare performance of two native prairie plant species and one exotic species, when grown in intraspecific competition and when each native was grown in interspecific competition with the exotic species, in the presence and absence of a native prairie soil community, and when nitrogen availability was elevated or was maintained at native prairie levels. We found that elevated nitrogen availability was beneficial to the exotic species and had no effect on or was detrimental to the native plant species, that the native microbial community was beneficial to the native plant species and either had no effect or was detrimental to the exotic species, and that intraspecific competition was stronger than interspecific competition for the exotic plant species and vice-versa for the natives. Our results demonstrate that soil nitrogen availability and the soil microbial community can mediate the strength of competition between native and exotic plant species. We found no evidence for native microbes enhancing the performance of the exotic plant species. Instead, loss of the native soil microbial community appears to reinforce the negative effects of elevated N on native plant communities and its benefits to exotic invasive species. Resilience of plant communities to invasion by exotic plant species is facilitated by the presence of an intact native soil microbial community and weakened by anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen.

  17. Cardiovascular Disease Among Alaska Native Peoples

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alaska Native peoples were thought to be protected from cardiovascular disease (CVD), data now show that this is not the case, despite traditional lifestyles and high omega-3 fatty acid intake. In this article, the current understanding of CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples, particularly among the Yupik and Inupiat populations, will be discussed, using data from three major studies funded by the National Institutes of Health: Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease among Alaska Natives (GOCADAN), Center for Native Health Research (CANHR), and Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH). Data from these epidemiologic studies have focused concern on CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples. This review will summarize the findings of these three principal studies and will suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. PMID:24367710

  18. Native American Music and Curriculum: Controversies and Cultural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyea, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Native American music and curricula, the differences in Western and Native American perspectives of music, the role of music in Native American life, and music as art. Considers how Native Americans live in two worlds (the preserved and lived cultures) and how Native American music should be taught. (CMK)

  19. Effective Language Education Practices and Native Language Survival. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Dick

    The importance of Native languages to Native Americans and the effort needed to maintain them are discussed in this keynote address at the ninth Native American Language Issues Institute. It is noted that the current cultural transition has demeaned Native languages and cultures and that strategies must be devised by Native Americans to counter…

  20. Patterns of English phoneme confusions by native and non-native listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Anne; Weber, Andrea; Smits, Roel; Cooper, Nicole

    2004-12-01

    Native American English and non-native (Dutch) listeners identified either the consonant or the vowel in all possible American English CV and VC syllables. The syllables were embedded in multispeaker babble at three signal-to-noise ratios (0, 8, and 16 dB). The phoneme identification performance of the non-native listeners was less accurate than that of the native listeners. All listeners were adversely affected by noise. With these isolated syllables, initial segments were harder to identify than final segments. Crucially, the effects of language background and noise did not interact; the performance asymmetry between the native and non-native groups was not significantly different across signal-to-noise ratios. It is concluded that the frequently reported disproportionate difficulty of non-native listening under disadvantageous conditions is not due to a disproportionate increase in phoneme misidentifications. .

  1. Review of the negative influences of non-native salmonids on native fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Non-native salmonids are often introduced into areas containing species of concern, yet a comprehensive overview of the short- and long-term consequences of these introductions is lacking in the Great Plains. Several authors have suggested that non-native salmonids negatively inflfluence species of concern. The objective of this paper is to review known interactions between non-native salmonids and native fifishes, with a focus on native species of concern. After an extensive search of the literature, it appears that in many cases non-native salmonids do negatively inflfl uence species of concern (e.g., reduce abundance and alter behavior) via different mechanisms (e.g., predation and competition). However, there are some instances in which introduced salmonids have had no perceived negative inflfl uence on native fifi shes. Unfortunately, the majority of the literature is circumstantial, and there is a need to experimentally manipulate these interactions.

  2. Native bees and plant pollination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Bees are important pollinators, but evidence suggests that numbers of some species are declining. Decreases have been documented in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (which was introduced to North America), but there are no monitoring programs for the vast majority of native species, so we cannot be sure about the extent of this problem. Recent efforts to develop standardized protocols for bee sampling will help us collect the data needed to assess trends in bee populations. Unfortunately, diversity of bee life cycles and phenologies, and the large number of rare species, make it difficult to assess trends in bee faunas. Changes in bee populations can affect plant reproduction, which can influence plant population density and cover, thus potentially modifying horizontal and vertical structure of a community, microclimate near the ground, patterns of nitrogen deposition, etc. These potential effects of changes in pollination patterns have not been assessed in natural communities. Effects of management actions on bees and other pollinators should be considered in conservation planning.

  3. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How ... conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Breast cancer Cancer ...

  4. Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... American Indian/Alaska Native > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and American Indians/Alaska Natives Among American Indians and Alaska Natives, chronic liver disease is a leading cause of death. While ...

  5. Non-native plants add to the British flora without negative consequences for native diversity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Chris D; Palmer, G

    2015-04-07

    Plants are commonly listed as invasive species, presuming that they cause harm at both global and regional scales. Approximately 40% of all species listed as invasive within Britain are plants. However, invasive plants are rarely linked to the national or global extinction of native plant species. The possible explanation is that competitive exclusion takes place slowly and that invasive plants will eventually eliminate native species (the "time-to-exclusion hypothesis"). Using the extensive British Countryside Survey Data, we find that changes to plant occurrence and cover between 1990 and 2007 at 479 British sites do not differ between native and non-native plant species. More than 80% of the plant species that are widespread enough to be sampled are native species; hence, total cover changes have been dominated by native species (total cover increases by native species are more than nine times greater than those by non-native species). This implies that factors other than plant "invasions" are the key drivers of vegetation change. We also find that the diversity of native species is increasing in locations where the diversity of non-native species is increasing, suggesting that high diversities of native and non-native plant species are compatible with one another. We reject the time-to-exclusion hypothesis as the reason why extinctions have not been observed and suggest that non-native plant species are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain. Further research is needed in island-like environments, but we question whether it is appropriate that more than three-quarters of taxa listed globally as invasive species are plants.

  6. Non-native plants add to the British flora without negative consequences for native diversity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Chris D.; Palmer, G.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are commonly listed as invasive species, presuming that they cause harm at both global and regional scales. Approximately 40% of all species listed as invasive within Britain are plants. However, invasive plants are rarely linked to the national or global extinction of native plant species. The possible explanation is that competitive exclusion takes place slowly and that invasive plants will eventually eliminate native species (the “time-to-exclusion hypothesis”). Using the extensive British Countryside Survey Data, we find that changes to plant occurrence and cover between 1990 and 2007 at 479 British sites do not differ between native and non-native plant species. More than 80% of the plant species that are widespread enough to be sampled are native species; hence, total cover changes have been dominated by native species (total cover increases by native species are more than nine times greater than those by non-native species). This implies that factors other than plant “invasions” are the key drivers of vegetation change. We also find that the diversity of native species is increasing in locations where the diversity of non-native species is increasing, suggesting that high diversities of native and non-native plant species are compatible with one another. We reject the time-to-exclusion hypothesis as the reason why extinctions have not been observed and suggest that non-native plant species are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain. Further research is needed in island-like environments, but we question whether it is appropriate that more than three-quarters of taxa listed globally as invasive species are plants. PMID:25831537

  7. Unprecedented restoration of a native oyster metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, David M; Burke, Russell P; Lipcius, Romuald N

    2009-08-28

    Native oyster species were once vital ecosystem engineers, but their populations have collapsed worldwide because of overfishing and habitat destruction. In 2004, we initiated a vast (35-hectare) field experiment by constructing native oyster reefs of three types (high-relief, low-relief, and unrestored) in nine protected sanctuaries throughout the Great Wicomico River in Virginia, United States. Upon sampling in 2007 and 2009, we found a thriving metapopulation comprising 185 million oysters of various age classes. Oyster density was fourfold greater on high-relief than on low-relief reefs, explaining the failure of past attempts. Juvenile recruitment and reef accretion correlated with oyster density, facilitating reef development and population persistence. This reestablished metapopulation is the largest of any native oyster worldwide and validates ecological restoration of native oyster species.

  8. Safeguarding the Seeds of Native Plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    As pharmaceutical demand, land restoration efforts, and conservation concerns increase there is an emerging emphasis by various organizations worldwide prioritizing germplasm collection of both native and medicinal taxa. Bioversity International, an organization coordinating the conservation of gen...

  9. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  10. 75 FR 65644 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ...), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management will issue an appealable decision to Bristol Bay Native Corporation. The decision will approve the conveyance of the surface and subsurface...

  11. 76 FR 16805 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Bristol Bay Native Corporation. The decision approves conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in... of the decision will also be published four times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party...

  12. 78 FR 62656 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-22

    ... subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the ] surface estate.... Notice of the decision will also be published once a week for four consecutive weeks in the Bristol...

  13. 75 FR 43198 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Bristol Bay... times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a property interest in the lands affected...

  14. 76 FR 3156 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Oceanside Corporation. The... times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a property interest in the lands affected...

  15. 78 FR 65354 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... estate in these lands will be conveyed to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is... week for four consecutive weeks in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a property...

  16. 76 FR 38678 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Bristol Bay Native Corporation. The decision approves conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in... approximately 19,244 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times in the Bristol Bay...

  17. American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu

    MedlinePlus

    ... CDC Features American Indians, Alaska Natives, and the Flu Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Vaccination against ... the flu. Protect Indian Country by Getting Your Flu Vaccine A flu vaccine not only protects you ...

  18. Wild Plants Used by the Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Study, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes 10 wild plants used by Native Americans. They include: rose hips; the common milkweed; cattails; elderberries; cactus fruits; lamb's quarters pigweeds (Chenopodium sp.); persimmons; mints (Monardo sp.); the yucca; and the hawthorn. Illustrations of each plant are included. (JN)

  19. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  20. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... factor in many problems, including alcohol abuse. 7 Poverty and inadequate access to health care also play ... 32 percent of Native Americans live below the poverty level, compared with 13 percent of all Americans. ...

  1. Kaitiakitanga: protecting New Zealand's native biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Morad, M; Jay, M

    2000-09-01

    Kaitiakanga is a Maori word meaning guardianship. It is a word that has become central to New Zealand's efforts to conserve native biodiversity as well as encapsulating the new emphasis on inclusion of Maori cultural values and land concerns.

  2. Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.

  3. Epistemologies in the Text of Children's Books: Native- and non-Native-authored books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Morteza; Bang, Megan; Medin, Douglas; Marin, Ananda; Leddon, Erin; Waxman, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    An examination of artifacts provides insights into the goals, practices, and orientations of the persons and cultures who created them. Here, we analyze storybook texts, artifacts that are a part of many children's lives. We examine the stories in books targeted for 4-8-year-old children, contrasting the texts generated by Native American authors versus popular non-Native authors. We focus specifically on the implicit and explicit 'epistemological orientations' associated with relations between human beings and the rest of nature. Native authors were significantly more likely than non-Native authors to describe humans and the rest of nature as psychologically close and embedded in relationships. This pattern converges well with evidence from a behavioral task in which we probed Native (from urban inter-tribal and rural communities) and non-Native children's and adults' attention to ecological relations. We discuss the implications of these differences for environmental cognition and science learning.

  4. Intraguild Predation and Native Lady Beetle Decline

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Mary M.; O'Neal, Matthew E.; Landis, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows that intraguild

  5. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Questionable 0 DK f. seborrheic dermatitis 0 Yes 0 No 0 Questionable 0 DK Exclusion criteria O Prominent postural instability in the first 3...4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...the Alaska Native Medical Center. B. Body The intent of this proposal is to establish a registry of parkinsonism cases among Alaska native

  6. Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent

    2004-01-01

    This proposal, Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model) features a unique diversity component stemming from the exceptional reputation NNSGC has built by delivering geospatial science experiences to Nebraska s Native Americans. For 7 years, NNSGC has partner4 with the 2 tribal colleges and 4 reservation school districts in Nebraska to form the Nebraska Native American Outreach Program (NNAOP), a partnership among tribal community leaders, academia, tribal schools, and industry reaching close to 1,OOO Native American youth, over 1,200 community members (Lehrer & Zendajas, 2001).NativeGEM addresses all three key components of Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) goals for advancing decision support, education, and workforce development through the GES. The existing long term commitments that the NNSGC and the GES have in these areas allow for the pursuit of a broad range of activities. NativeGEM builds upon these existing successful programs and collaborations. Outcomes and metrics for each proposed project are detailed in the Approach section of this document.

  7. Perceptual prothesis in native Spanish speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Rachel M.; Schmidt, Anna M.

    2003-04-01

    Previous research suggests a perceptual bias exists for native phonotactics [D. Massaro and M. Cohen, Percept. Psychophys. 34, 338-348 (1983)] such that listeners report nonexistent segments when listening to stimuli that violate native phonotactics [E. Dupoux, K. Kakehi, Y. Hirose, C. Pallier, and J. Mehler, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 25, 1568-1578 (1999)]. This study investigated how native-language experience affects second language processing, focusing on how native Spanish speakers perceive the English clusters /st/, /sp/, and /sk/, which represent phonotactically illegal forms in Spanish. To preserve native phonotactics, Spanish speakers often produce prothetic vowels before English words beginning with /s/ clusters. Is the influence of native phonotactics also present in the perception of illegal clusters? A stimuli continuum ranging from no vowel (e.g., ``sku'') to a full vowel (e.g., ``esku'') before the cluster was used. Four final vowel contexts were used for each cluster, resulting in 12 sCV and 12 VsCV nonword endpoints. English and Spanish listeners were asked to discriminate between pairs differing in vowel duration and to identify the presence or absence of a vowel before the cluster. Results will be discussed in terms of implications for theories of second language speech perception.

  8. Do immigrants improve the health of natives?

    PubMed

    Giuntella, Osea; Mazzonna, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    This paper studies the effects of immigration on health. Specifically, we merge information on individual characteristics from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984-2009) with detailed local labour market characteristics, and we then exploit the longitudinal component of the data to determine how immigration affects the health of both immigrants and natives over time. We find that immigrants to Germany are healthier than natives upon their arrival (the healthy immigrant effect) but that immigrants' health deteriorates over time. We show that the convergence in health is heterogeneous across immigrants and occurs more rapidly among those working in more physically demanding jobs. Because immigrants are significantly more likely to work in strenuous occupations, we investigate whether changes in the spatial concentration of immigrants affect the health of the native population. Our results suggest that immigration reduces the likelihood that residents will report negative health outcomes. We show that these effects are concentrated in blue-collar occupations and are stronger among low-educated natives. Improvements in natives' average working conditions and workloads help explain the positive effects of immigration on the health of the native population.

  9. The Native Comic Book Project: Native Youth Making Comics and Healthy Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Michelle; Manuelito, Brenda; Nass, Carrie; Chock, Tami; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    Background American Indians and Alaska Natives have traditionally used stories and drawings to positively influence the well-being of their communities. Objectives The objective of this study was to describe the development of a curriculum that trains Native youth leaders to plan, write, and design original comic books to enhance healthy decision making. Methods Project staff developed the Native Comic Book Project by adapting Dr. Michael Bitz’s Comic Book Project to incorporate Native comic book art, Native storytelling, and decision-making skills. After conducting five train-the-trainer sessions for Native youth, staff were invited by youth participants to implement the full curriculum as a pilot test at one tribal community site in the Pacific Northwest. Implementation was accompanied by surveys and weekly participant observations and was followed by an interactive meeting to assess youth engagement, determine project acceptability, and solicit suggestions for curriculum changes. Results Six youths aged 12 to 15 (average age = 14) participated in the Native Comic Book Project. Youth participants stated that they liked the project and gained knowledge of the harmful effects of commercial tobacco use but wanted better integration of comic book creation, decision making, and Native storytelling themes. Conclusion Previous health-related comic book projects did not recruit youth as active producers of content. This curriculum shows promise as a culturally appropriate intervention to help Native youth adopt healthy decision-making skills and healthy behaviors by creating their own comic books. PMID:22259070

  10. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called “short-distance pronouns”), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead. PMID:24611060

  11. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called "short-distance pronouns"), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  12. Auditory-motor interactions for the production of native and non-native speech.

    PubMed

    Parker Jones, Oiwi; Seghier, Mohamed L; Kawabata Duncan, Keith J; Leff, Alex P; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

    2013-02-06

    During speech production, auditory processing of self-generated speech is used to adjust subsequent articulations. The current study investigated how the proposed auditory-motor interactions are manifest at the neural level in native and non-native speakers of English who were overtly naming pictures of objects and reading their written names. Data were acquired with functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed with dynamic causal modeling. We found that (1) higher activity in articulatory regions caused activity in auditory regions to decrease (i.e., auditory suppression), and (2) higher activity in auditory regions caused activity in articulatory regions to increase (i.e., auditory feedback). In addition, we were able to demonstrate that (3) speaking in a non-native language involves more auditory feedback and less auditory suppression than speaking in a native language. The difference between native and non-native speakers was further supported by finding that, within non-native speakers, there was less auditory feedback for those with better verbal fluency. Consequently, the networks of more fluent non-native speakers looked more like those of native speakers. Together, these findings provide a foundation on which to explore auditory-motor interactions during speech production in other human populations, particularly those with speech difficulties.

  13. Alaskan Native Early School Leavers: A Study with Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumb, Jeanmarie

    In response to a request by the Anchorage Native Caucus and the Anchorage Native Education Coalition, this study by the Anchorage School District Community Relations Department focuses on the Alaskan Native dropout problem. The study indicates that between September 1976 and March 1981, Native Alaskans, who compose approximately 4% of the total…

  14. Gifted Native American Students: Underperforming, Under-Identified, and Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited focus among researchers on the nature and needs of gifted Native American students in the past 30 years, and the work that has been done frequently generalizes findings across Native American cultures. This article reviews recent literature on Native American youth and on gifted Native American students; examines the current…

  15. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  16. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  17. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  18. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  19. 45 CFR 670.20 - Designation of native birds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of native birds. 670.20 Section 670.20... CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates § 670.20 Designation of native birds. The following are designated native birds: Albatross...

  20. Comparing Native and Non-Native Raters of US Federal Government Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rachel Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Previous Language Testing research has largely reported that although many raters' characteristics affect their evaluations of language assessments (Reed & Cohen, 2001), being a native speaker or non-native speaker rater does not significantly affect final ratings (Kim, 2009). In Second Language Acquisition, some researchers conclude that…

  1. University Students' Perceptions of the Influence of Native and Non-Native Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alseweed, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a study carried out in Qassim University with 169 Saudi male novice university students to obtain a deeper insight into their perceptions of their native English speaker teachers (NESTs) and non-native English speaker teachers (NNESTs) in the English language classroom. Quantitative and qualitative data were…

  2. Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy. Native American Politics Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.; Johansen, Bruce E.

    Drawing on the historical record and primary sources, this book portrays how Native American political confederacies of the colonial era operated and how their organization and underlying principles influenced the founding fathers of U.S. political institutions. A complementary theme of this book is the intense debate about Native American…

  3. Native Alaskan Dropouts in Western Alaska: Systemic Failure in Native Alaskan Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Craig D.; Samson, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The number of Native Alaska secondary students choosing not to complete high school is of great concern to educators and Native communities. In this study, schools in small communities throughout western Alaska were observed while teachers and dropouts were interviewed concerning their perceptions of the education process. It became very clear…

  4. Women of the Native Struggle. Portraits & Testimony of Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Ronnie, Ed.

    This book portrays images and views of approximately 45 Native American women in their roles as mothers, grandmothers, tribal elders, teachers, preservers of traditional beliefs and practices, and leaders in the continuing struggle for survival. An introduction by Anna Lee Walter presents an overview of the modern Native American woman. In the…

  5. An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range.

    PubMed

    Veale, A J; Holland, O J; McDonald, R A; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2015-05-01

    Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species' native range in Great Britain, we reveal the opposite effect. We demonstrate that the New Zealand stoat population contains four mitochondrial haplotypes that have not been found in the native range. Stoats in Britain rely heavily on introduced rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus as their primary prey and were introduced to New Zealand in a misguided attempt at biological control of rabbits, which had also been introduced there. While invasive stoats have since decimated the New Zealand avifauna, native stoat populations were themselves decimated by the introduction to Britain of Myxoma virus as a control measure for rabbits. We highlight the irony that while introduced species (rabbits) and subsequent biocontrol (myxomatosis) have caused population crashes of native stoats, invasive stoats in New Zealand, which were also introduced for biological control, now contain more genetic haplotypes than their most likely native source.

  6. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ..., Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... Housing Needs. OMB Approval Number: 2528-0288. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Form Number: None. Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The...

  7. Non-native populations of an invasive tree outperform their native conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Heidi; Hensen, Isabell; Wesche, Karsten; Renison, Daniel; Wypior, Catherina; Hartmann, Matthias; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduced plants often face new environmental conditions in their non-native ranges. To become invasive, they need to overcome several biotic and abiotic filters that may trigger adaptive changes in life-history traits, like post-germination processes. Such early life cycle traits may play a crucial role in the colonization and establishment success of invasive plants. As a previous study revealed that seeds of non-native populations of the woody Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, germinated faster than those of native populations, we expected growth performance of seedlings to mirror this finding. Here, we conducted a common garden greenhouse experiment using different temperature and watering treatments to compare the biomass production of U. pumila seedlings derived from 7 native and 13 populations from two non-native ranges. Our results showed that under all treatments, non-native populations were characterized by higher biomass production and enhanced resource allocation to aboveground biomass compared to the native populations. The observed enhanced growth performance of non-native populations might be one of the contributing factors for the invasion success of U. pumila due to competitive advantages during the colonization of new sites. PMID:27742647

  8. Compliment Responses: Comparing American Learners of Japanese, Native Japanese Speakers, and American Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsumi, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that American learners of Japanese (AJs) tend to differ from native Japanese speakers in their compliment responses (CRs). Yokota (1986) and Shimizu (2009) have reported that AJs tend to respond more negatively than native Japanese speakers. It has also been reported that AJs' CRs tend to lack the use of avoidance or…

  9. The Processing of Subject-Object Ambiguities in Native and Near-Native Mexican Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegerski, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This self-paced reading study first tested the prediction that the garden path effect previously observed during the processing of subject-object ambiguities in native English would not obtain in a null subject language like Spanish. The investigation then further explored whether the effect would be evident among near-native readers of Spanish…

  10. Native and Non-Native English Speaking Student Teachers Engage in Peer Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarrell, Hedy

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on data from questionnaires and participant discussion posts on WebCT to show how native and non-native English speaking student teachers explore the topic of peer feedback. Engaging in peer feedback for their own draft papers provides student teachers an opportunity to gain experience, then reflect on their experience and…

  11. Alaska Native Languages: Past, Present, and Future. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.

    Three papers (1978-80) written for the non-linguistic public about Alaska Native languages are combined here. The first is an introduction to the prehistory, history, present status, and future prospects of all Alaska Native languages, both Eskimo-Aleut and Athabaskan Indian. The second and third, presented as appendixes to the first, deal in…

  12. Differences between Business Letters from Native and Non-Native Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Brenda R.; Guice, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Compares 214 letters of inquiry written by native and nonnative speakers of English to test the assumption that cultural factors beyond language such as the knowledge of the business communication practices and cultural expectations greatly affect communication. Finds that native speakers' letters deviated less from U.S. business communication…

  13. Cross-language perception of Cantonese vowels spoken by native and non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    So, Connie K; Attina, Virginie

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners' perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers. They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results indicated that visual cues did not facilitate perception, and performance was better in clear than in noisy conditions. More importantly, the Cantonese talker's vowels were the easiest to discriminate, and the Mandarin talker's vowels were as intelligible as the native talkers' speech. These results supported the interlanguage speech native intelligibility benefit patterns proposed by Hayes-Harb et al. (J Phonetics 36:664-679, 2008). The Mandarin and English listeners' identification patterns were similar to those of the Cantonese listeners, suggesting that they might have assimilated Cantonese vowels to their closest native vowels. In addition, listeners' perceptual patterns were consistent with the principles of Best's Perceptual Assimilation Model (Best in Speech perception and linguistic experience: issues in cross-language research. York Press, Timonium, 1995).

  14. SNPs and Haplotypes in Native American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Judith R.; Friedlaender, Françoise; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Furtado, Manohar; Fang, Rixun; Wang, Xudong; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal DNA polymorphisms can provide new information and understanding of both the origins of and relationships among modern Native American populations. At the same time that autosomal markers can be highly informative, they are also susceptible to ascertainment biases in the selection of the markers to use. Identifying markers that can be used for ancestry inference among Native American populations can be considered separate from identifying markers to further the quest for history. In the current study we are using data on nine Native American populations to compare the results based on a large haplotype-based dataset with relatively small independent sets of SNPs. We are interested in what types of limited datasets an individual laboratory might be able to collect are best for addressing two different questions of interest. First, how well can we differentiate the Native American populations and/or infer ancestry by assigning an individual to her population(s) of origin? Second, how well can we infer the historical/evolutionary relationships among Native American populations and their Eurasian origins. We conclude that only a large comprehensive dataset involving multiple autosomal markers on multiple populations will be able to answer both questions; different small sets of markers are able to answer only one or the other of these questions. Using our largest dataset we see a general increasing distance from Old World populations from North to South in the New World except for an unexplained close relationship between our Maya and Quechua samples. PMID:21913176

  15. The Box and the Circle--Two Systems of Life: A Model for Understanding Native-Non-Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jann

    Working as a family systems therapist with Native and non-Native families, the author observed two opposing social systems. Non-native families systems typify "The Box System," whereas native family systems portray "The Circle System." A few characteristics of the Circle System are: (1) a focus on life and peacefulness; (2) females and children…

  16. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  17. Diabetic retinopathy in native and non-native Sarawakians--findings from the Diabetic Eye Registry.

    PubMed

    Mallika, P S; Aziz, S; Goh, P P; Lee, P Y; Cheah, W L; Chong, M S; Tan, A K

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) among natives and non-natives Sarawakians who were seen at 3 public hospitals and one health clinic in Sarawak. It is a cross sectional study where data on patients with DM were collected by staff at these healthcare facilities and entered into the web-based Diabetic Eye Registry. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to determine the association factors for DR. DR was significantly less associated with natives (24.4%) compared to non-native Sarawakians (34.1%) (p < 0.001). The odds of getting DR was higher in patients whose duration of DM was more than 20 years (OR = 2.6), who have renal impairment (OR = 1.7) and non-natives (OR = 1.4).

  18. Linking Native and Invader Traits Explains Native Spider Population Responses to Plant Invasion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer N; Emlen, Douglas J; Pearson, Dean E

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders' web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion plots compared to controls. Additionally, irregular web-spiders on simulated invasion plots built webs that were 4.4 times larger and 5.0 times more likely to capture prey, leading to >2-fold increases in recruitment. Orb-weavers showed no differences in web size or prey captures between treatments. Web-spider responses to simulated invasion mimicked patterns following natural invasions, confirming that C. stoebe's architecture is likely the primary attribute driving native spider responses to these invasions. Differences in spider responses were attributable to differences in web construction behaviors relative to historic web substrate constraints. Orb-weavers in this system constructed webs between multiple plants, so they were limited by the overall quantity of native substrates but not by the architecture of individual native plant species. Irregular web-spiders built their webs within individual plants and were greatly constrained by the diminutive architecture of native plant substrates, so they were limited both by quantity and quality of native substrates. Evaluating native species traits in the context of invader-driven change can explain invasion outcomes and help to identify factors limiting native populations.

  19. Linking Native and Invader Traits Explains Native Spider Population Responses to Plant Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Emlen, Douglas J.; Pearson, Dean E.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders’ web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion plots compared to controls. Additionally, irregular web-spiders on simulated invasion plots built webs that were 4.4 times larger and 5.0 times more likely to capture prey, leading to >2-fold increases in recruitment. Orb-weavers showed no differences in web size or prey captures between treatments. Web-spider responses to simulated invasion mimicked patterns following natural invasions, confirming that C. stoebe’s architecture is likely the primary attribute driving native spider responses to these invasions. Differences in spider responses were attributable to differences in web construction behaviors relative to historic web substrate constraints. Orb-weavers in this system constructed webs between multiple plants, so they were limited by the overall quantity of native substrates but not by the architecture of individual native plant species. Irregular web-spiders built their webs within individual plants and were greatly constrained by the diminutive architecture of native plant substrates, so they were limited both by quantity and quality of native substrates. Evaluating native species traits in the context of invader-driven change can explain invasion outcomes and help to identify factors limiting native populations. PMID:27082240

  20. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  1. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  2. Translation Model Decision Differences between Expert (Native or Near-Native) Target Language Speakers and Non-Expert (Non-Native or Second) Target Language Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Doug

    A study of the translation process compared the decisions that native speakers (experts) and non-native speakers (non-experts) made that influenced resulting translations. Subjects were 40 students, graduate students, and faculty in a university foreign language department. English language proficiency was measured for native speakers by using the…

  3. Bidirectional clear speech perception benefit for native and high-proficiency non-native talkers and listeners: Intelligibility and accentednessa

    PubMed Central

    Smiljanić, Rajka; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how native language background interacts with speaking style adaptations in determining levels of speech intelligibility. The aim was to explore whether native and high proficiency non-native listeners benefit similarly from native and non-native clear speech adjustments. The sentence-in-noise perception results revealed that fluent non-native listeners gained a large clear speech benefit from native clear speech modifications. Furthermore, proficient non-native talkers in this study implemented conversational-to-clear speaking style modifications in their second language (L2) that resulted in significant intelligibility gain for both native and non-native listeners. The results of the accentedness ratings obtained for native and non-native conversational and clear speech sentences showed that while intelligibility was improved, the presence of foreign accent remained constant in both speaking styles. This suggests that objective intelligibility and subjective accentedness are two independent dimensions of non-native speech. Overall, these results provide strong evidence that greater experience in L2 processing leads to improved intelligibility in both production and perception domains. These results also demonstrated that speaking style adaptations along with less signal distortion can contribute significantly towards successful native and non-native interactions. PMID:22225056

  4. Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joe; Middaugh, John; Boudreau, Donald; Malcom, Gray; Parry, Steve; Tracy, Richard; Newman, William

    2005-08-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.

  5. Predicting novel trophic interactions in a non-native world.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Altermatt, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Humans are altering the global distributional ranges of plants, while their co-evolved herbivores are frequently left behind. Native herbivores often colonise non-native plants, potentially reducing invasion success or causing economic loss to introduced agricultural crops. We developed a predictive model to forecast novel interactions and verified it with a data set containing hundreds of observed novel plant-insect interactions. Using a food network of 900 native European butterfly and moth species and 1944 native plants, we built an herbivore host-use model. By extrapolating host use from the native herbivore-plant food network, we accurately forecasted the observed novel use of 459 non-native plant species by native herbivores. Patterns that governed herbivore host breadth on co-evolved native plants were equally important in determining non-native hosts. Our results make the forecasting of novel herbivore communities feasible in order to better understand the fate and impact of introduced plants.

  6. Automatically Detecting Authors’ Native Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    for detecting Chinese and Japanese, but it performed less well with Slavic and Romance languages . Empirical analysis of character trigrams also...well for detecting Chinese and Japanese, but it performed less well with Slavics and Romance languages . We also compared the overall performance...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS AUTOMATICALLY DETECTING AUTHORS’ NATIVE LANGUAGE by Charles S. Ahn March 2011 Thesis Advisor

  7. Does Language Testing Need the Native Speaker?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Alan

    2011-01-01

    Opinions differ on the importance of the native speaker's concept for language teaching and testing. This Commentary maintains that it is important and seeks to explain why. Three types of grammar are distinguished, the individual's, the community's and the human faculty of language. For first language teaching and testing it is the community's…

  8. Exploring Native American Students' Perceptions of Scientists

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laubach, Timothy A.; Crofford, Geary Don; Marek, Edmund A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore Native American (NA) students' perceptions of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test and to determine if differences in these perceptions exist between grade level, gender, and level of cultural tradition. Data were collected for students in Grades 9-12 within a NA grant off-reservation…

  9. Grassroots Involvement in Recreation for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carleton, Nancy L.; And Others

    Through efforts of concerned, knowledgeable, and culturally aware individuals, recreational programs which may help the special needs of Native Americans can be designed and implemented. Knowledge of tribal similarities and differences, cultural values, diverse life-styles, tribal beliefs, socioeconomic status, and leisure pursuits is paramount in…

  10. Native American Health Promotion and Disease Prevention.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Two Feathers, Jackie

    1999-01-01

    Asserts that there are growing concerns among Native-American communities regarding chronic health problems, such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Provides health resources specific to particular tribes or regions, which can be applied to other indigenous people. Lists programs and organizations, databases, videos, Internet sites,…

  11. Native American Rights Fund: 1982 Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Rights Fund, Boulder, CO.

    The 1982 annual report of the Native American Rights Fund (NARF), a non-profit organization specializing in the protection of Indian rights, explains the organization, its structure, its priorities, its activities, and its financial status. Opening statements by the chairman, Roger Jim, and the executive director, John Echohawk, note that despite…

  12. 76 FR 13428 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... conveyed to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Pedro Bay Corporation... of the decision will also be published four times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming... Pedro Bay Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below...

  13. State Legislation Relating to Native Americans, 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, James B.

    1991-01-01

    This report summarizes legislative activities in states that enacted bills and resolutions relating to Native Americans in 1991. Conflicts between states and the Indian tribes within their borders were the subject of significant legislation in 1991. In all, 220 bills and resolutions were introduced in state legislatures; 77 passed and 20 are still…

  14. Technology Leadership in Native American Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Jayson W.; McLeod, Scott

    2011-01-01

    Principals of schools serving Native American students have a unique role as technology leaders. They must be cognizant of technological demands, government mandates, as well as unique societal and cultural needs. In this study, the researchers conducted interviews with nine principals in federally-funded, Bureau of Indian Education schools that…

  15. Desert Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the history and culture of the Navajo, Pueblo, and other Indian tribes of the southwest desert. Written in simple language, the booklet provides background information, activities, legends, and illustrations. Topics include the climate of the…

  16. Coastal Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    Background information, legends, games, illustrations, and art projects are provided in this booklet introducing elementary students to the history and culture of Indian tribes of the North Pacific Coast and Pacific Northwest. One in a series of Native American instructional materials, the booklet provides an overview of the coastal culture area,…

  17. Learning Science by Studying Native American Pottery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zastrow, Leona M.

    Principles of science and art are found in all phases of daily life. This book helps teachers and students in grades 7 and 8 discover specific scientific information as they experience "making pottery" using Native American pottery techniques. Lessons are built upon discover techniques--observation followed by conclusion--and begin with…

  18. Wisdomkeepers: Meetings with Native American Spiritual Elders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arden, Harvey; Wall, Steve

    This book documents meetings with Native American elders who shared their tribal stories of origin, sacred traditions, social life and customs, and traditional wisdom. The idea for the book began when a Cherokee medicine man requested that his tribal knowledge be documented for future generations. For the past 10 years, the spiritual elders of…

  19. English Stress Rules and Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baptista, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Describes a study that compares Chomsky and Halle's main stress rule with Guierre's stress rules to discover which rules lead to the same word stress replacement that native speakers would give to totally unfamiliar words. Only five of Chomsky and Halle's rules were as consistently followed as Guierre's suffix rules. (SED)which+that

  20. Anthropological Studies of Native American Place Names.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Thomas F.

    1997-01-01

    Traces development of Native American place name studies from Boas (1880s) to the present. Argues that place names convey information about physical environments but also reveal how people perceive, conceptualize, and utilize their environment. Suggests the utility of place names as a framework for cultural analysis and describes recent…

  1. Interpreting Native American Literature: An Archetypal Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sevillano, Mando

    1986-01-01

    Compares two approaches to discussing Indian literature and religion. Demonstrates Jungian archetypal approach as transcultural method of analyzing Indian literature. Relates and analyzes Hopi traditional story. Emphasizes accessibility of Native American literature to the non-Indian while supporting multicultural plurality of interpretations.…

  2. Native Indian Teachers: A Key to Progress.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirkness, Verna J.

    1986-01-01

    Indian teachers are critical to the realization of quality education for the Indian population. Indians would be effective teachers of Indian identity, traditions, language, and psychology in addition to the usual subjects. Home-school and community-school relationships would likely improve if Native Indian staff were a significant presence in the…

  3. Historical Writing on Native People in Canada.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fisher, Robin

    1982-01-01

    Reviews recent studies of native Canadian history. Because of more adequate available documentation, findings showed the most extensive work was on European-Indian contacts resulting from the fur trade. The author cites the need for more work on individual Indian cultural histories as well as a good general history of Canada's indigenous groups.…

  4. Examining Test Speededness by Native Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Talento-Miller, Eileen; Guo, Fanmin; Han, Kyung T.

    2013-01-01

    When power tests include a time limit, it is important to assess the possibility of speededness for examinees. Past research on differential speededness has examined gender and ethnic subgroups in the United States on paper and pencil tests. When considering the needs of a global audience, research regarding different native language speakers is…

  5. 77 FR 24217 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Iqfijouaq Company. The decision approves for conveyance the surface estate in the lands described...

  6. Native Americans and Aboriginal Australian Stereotypes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    Aboriginal Australians represent 1.5% of Australia's population, nearly double the percentage of native people in the U.S. population. While indigenous peoples throughout the world share common similarities, particularly contemporary issues and their spiritual regard for nature, many aspects of their lifestyles are different, such as governance,…

  7. 75 FR 9427 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ..., Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross and Huslia, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River... Bureau of Land Management [AA-8103-63, AA-8103-65, F-21902-06, F-21903-54, F-21903-55, F-21903- 56; LLAK-96400-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  8. 78 FR 16527 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-10782, AA-11132, AA-10784, AA-12440, AA-11020, AA-10783, AA-10774; LLAK-944000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  9. 76 FR 5395 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-12252, AA-12250, AA-12280, AA-12291, AA-12292, AA-12293; LLAK- 962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior....

  10. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-9915, AA-9916, AA-9921, AA-9936, AA-9937, AA-9965; LLAK-965000- L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice...

  11. 75 FR 13296 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-6679-B, AA-6679-C, AA-6679-F, AA-6679-G, AA-6679-K, AA-6679-M, AA- 6679-A2, LLAK964000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  12. 76 FR 55415 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-9428, AA-9752, AA-11237, AA-9755, AA-9837, AA-10075, AA-11467; LLAK-965000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior....

  13. 75 FR 21033 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-22

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-6670-F, AA-6670-L, AA-6670-M, AA-6670-A2; LLAK964000-L14100000- HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  14. 75 FR 80838 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-11908, AA-11915, AA-11916, AA-11917, AA-11909, AA-11913, AA-11914; LLAK-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  15. 77 FR 72383 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-10282, AA-10291, AA-10292, AA-10369; LLAK-944000-L14100000-HY0000- P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  16. 76 FR 43340 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-6682-B, AA-6682-D, AA-6682-E, AA-6682-G, AA-6682-H, AA-6682-I, AA- 6682-A2; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  17. 78 FR 10634 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-10756, AA-11061, AA-10764, AA-10765, AA-10766, AA-11083; LLAK- 944000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior....

  18. 76 FR 16804 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-8102-05, AA-8102-08, AA-8102-10, AA-8102-25, AA-8102-28, AA-8102- 37, AA-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of...

  19. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  20. Growing Up Native American. An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Patricia, Ed.

    This anthology contains 22 essays and fictional writings about childhood by well-known Native American writers of the United States and Canada, from the 19th century to the 1990s. Selections include short stories, excerpts from novels, autobiographical sketches, and essays about the relationship between language and culture, family relationships,…

  1. Native American Housing: The Solar Hogan Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Describes development of a hybrid modern-traditional Navajo hogan that meets religious and cultural needs and the needs of modern Southwestern living, and uses passive and active solar technologies. Discusses housing problems on the Navajo Reservation, and plans for a Native American Housing Center at University of Colorado, Boulder. (SV)

  2. Plains Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the plains culture area, extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River and from Texas to Canada. Written in simple language, the booklet begins with a brief description of the region--its extreme climate and the…

  3. OERI Native American Youth at Risk Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Ardy Sixkiller

    This report examines personal, cultural, school, and family factors that contribute to the decision of American Indian students to remain in school until graduation or to drop out. A 140-item questionnaire, the Native American School Study, was completed by 165 participants who had either graduated or dropped out of school during 1989-91.…

  4. Native dynamics from diversity in NMR structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lammert, Heiko; Onuchic, Jose

    2015-03-01

    Protein function relies on the characteristic dynamics that arise in the protein's unique native structure, controlled by the smooth, funneled energy landscape evolved to enable fast and reliable folding. Structure-based models draw on energy landscape theory to build an ideally funneled energy landscape only from a protein's native structure. Simplified interactions of homogeneous strength are used to eliminate energetic frustration. The dynamics of the model are controlled by geometric constraints imposed by the native fold. The energy landscapes of many actual proteins are smooth enough to let such unfrustrated models describe their folding mechanisms. But conflicting functional demands upon the sequence may introduce sufficient frustration into the energetics to affect the dynamics. For such cases heterogeneous interactions can be optimized based on additional data. We use the diversity among the conformations deposited in a set of NMR structures to estimate the extent of fluctuations in the native state to build an improved model of protein S6. Qualitative modifications bring the observed mechanism into agreement with experiment, and matching of the entire fluctuation profile leads to similar contact maps as optimization based on either phi-values of sequence data.

  5. Stylized Figures: Inspired by Native American Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Susie B.

    2013-01-01

    Teaching elementary-level art in the Pacific Northwest makes it natural for the author to develop a lesson based on Native American art of the area. The designs of the Northwest Indians can sometimes be a bit too sophisticated for the students to grasp, however, and it can be frustrating when developing such a project. Over a Labor Day weekend,…

  6. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... this part, that: (1) The low-income members of an Indian tribe are not receiving benefits under this part equivalent to the assistance provided to other low-income persons in the State under this part...

  7. Left Dislocation in Near-Native French

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2011-01-01

    The present study is concerned with the upper limits of SLA--specifically, mastery of the syntax-discourse interface in successful endstate learners of second-language (L2) French (near-native speakers). Left dislocation (LD) is a syntactic means of structuring spoken French discourse by marking topic. Its use requires speakers to coordinate…

  8. Plains Native American Literature. Multicultural Literature Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Virginia, Ed.; And Others

    This textbook contains five units of literature by the Plains Native Americans. The first unit presents examples of oral tradition, in which mythology, legends, stories, songs, and personal accounts pass on values, beliefs, and experiences. The second unit contains nonfiction: an account of a young girl's first days at an Indian boarding school,…

  9. Woodland Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the woodland culture area, extending from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean and from Florida to the Great Lakes. Written in simple language, the booklet provides an overview of the regional culture, as well as,…

  10. Native Hawaiian Community College Students: What Happens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Lester, Jaime; Moon, Hye Sun; Tibbetts, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Using a weighted database of approximately 3,000 students, this study involves the tracing of the postsecondary history of 2,516 students who identified as Native Hawaiian, graduated from high school between 1993 and 1995, and attended college. Virtually none of the students are 100% Hawaiian. Due to a long history of intermarriage, the Hawaiian…

  11. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  12. Career Development Opportunities for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Washington, DC.

    Information pertaining to adult education and vocational-technical programs as well as college and university aids is provided in this booklet. The booklet has been divided into three chapters: (1) "Education Beyond High School"; (2) "Native American Programs of Assistance"; and (3) "Student Aids Programs (not specifically for Indians)." Chapter 1…

  13. Will HTML5 Kill the Native App?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    For colleges and universities today, the question is no longer whether to develop a campus app or not. Instead, the debate has shifted to the best--and most cost-efficient--way to make campus applications accessible to the myriad devices and operating systems out there. Schools have a few options: They can develop multiple native app versions;…

  14. Conceptualizing Native Identity with a Multidimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, John; Bennett, Russell

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on a Native Identity Scale (NIS) adapted from an African American identity scale (Sellers et al., 1997). American Indian (AIs) and First Nations Canadian participants (N = 199) completed the NIS at powwows in the Upper Midwest. The majority of respondents were Ojibwe, but other tribal groups were represented. A principal…

  15. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  16. Community-Based Native Teacher Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heimbecker, Connie; Minner, Sam; Prater, Greg

    This paper describes two exemplary school-based Native teacher education programs offered by Northern Arizona University (NAU) to serve Navajo students and by Lakehead University (Ontario) to serve members of the Nishnabe Nation of northern Ontario. The Reaching American Indian Special/Elementary Educators (RAISE) program is located in Kayenta,…

  17. Self-Development for Native American Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nevo, Dana; Wiese, Dorene

    This instructional package consists of activity guides, materials, and background information on selected areas pertinent to the self-development of a native American Indian participant group. Covered in its six units are the following topics: self-image and success (motivation and success, personal discovery, tools and assessment instruments,…

  18. Positive effects of non-native grasses on the growth of a native annual in a southern california ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Pec, Gregory J; Carlton, Gary C

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem.

  19. Positive Effects of Non-Native Grasses on the Growth of a Native Annual in a Southern California Ecosystem

    PubMed Central

    Pec, Gregory J.; Carlton, Gary C.

    2014-01-01

    Fire disturbance is considered a major factor in the promotion of non-native plant species. Non-native grasses are adapted to fire and can alter environmental conditions and reduce resource availability in native coastal sage scrub and chaparral communities of southern California. In these communities persistence of non-native grasses following fire can inhibit establishment and growth of woody species. This may allow certain native herbaceous species to colonize and persist beneath gaps in the canopy. A field manipulative experiment with control, litter, and bare ground treatments was used to examine the impact of non-native grasses on growth and establishment of a native herbaceous species, Cryptantha muricata. C. muricata seedling survival, growth, and reproduction were greatest in the control treatment where non-native grasses were present. C. muricata plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses produced more than twice the number of flowers and more than twice the reproductive biomass of plants growing in the treatments where non-native grasses were removed. Total biomass and number of fruits were also greater in the plants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. Total biomass and reproductive biomass was also greater in late germinants than early germinants growing in the presence of non-native grasses. This study suggests a potential positive effect of non-native grasses on the performance of a particular native annual in a southern California ecosystem. PMID:25379790

  20. Small mammal use of native warm-season and non-native cool-season grass forage fields

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ryan L Klimstra,; Christopher E Moorman,; Converse, Sarah J.; Royle, J. Andrew; Craig A Harper,

    2015-01-01

    Recent emphasis has been put on establishing native warm-season grasses for forage production because it is thought native warm-season grasses provide higher quality wildlife habitat than do non-native cool-season grasses. However, it is not clear whether native warm-season grass fields provide better resources for small mammals than currently are available in non-native cool-season grass forage production fields. We developed a hierarchical spatially explicit capture-recapture model to compare abundance of hispid cotton rats (Sigmodon hispidus), white-footed mice (Peromyscus leucopus), and house mice (Mus musculus) among 4 hayed non-native cool-season grass fields, 4 hayed native warm-season grass fields, and 4 native warm-season grass-forb ("wildlife") fields managed for wildlife during 2 summer trapping periods in 2009 and 2010 of the western piedmont of North Carolina, USA. Cotton rat abundance estimates were greater in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields and greater in native warm-season grass fields than in non-native cool-season grass fields. Abundances of white-footed mouse and house mouse populations were lower in wildlife fields than in native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields, but the abundances were not different between the native warm-season grass and non-native cool-season grass fields. Lack of cover following haying in non-native cool-season grass and native warm-season grass fields likely was the key factor limiting small mammal abundance, especially cotton rats, in forage fields. Retention of vegetation structure in managed forage production systems, either by alternately resting cool-season and warm-season grass forage fields or by leaving unharvested field borders, should provide refugia for small mammals during haying events.

  1. Native Power: A Handbook on Renewable Energy and Energy Efficiency for Native American Communities

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This handbook is a practical introduction to energy efficiency and renewable energy. Each chapter provides basic information about the kinds of sustainable energy projects that may be useful to native communities.

  2. Reflections on the Referendum and on Native Health Care. Native Viewpoints.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steinhauer, Noella

    1996-01-01

    Summarizes Canadian Native Indian's objections to recent health care budget cuts. For many years Canadian Indians enjoyed subsidized health care that included therapy, prescriptions, eyeglasses, dental, and medical transportation. Details the programs to be cut and laments their passing. (MJP)

  3. Food sources of dominant macrozoobenthos between native and non-native mangrove forests: A comparative study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Luzhen; Yan, Ting; Xiong, Yiyi; Zhang, Yihui; Lin, Guanghui

    2017-03-01

    The macrozoobenthos is an important link of the food web in coastal wetlands. Diet-habitat relationships may significantly depend on qualitative differences and seasonal availability of food sources. Increasing interest has been shown in food web structure altered by non-native plants. In particular, however, a non-native mangrove species from Bangladesh, Sonneratia apetala, has been widely planted in China, but little is known about its possible impact on food sources of macrozoobenthos living in these non-native mangrove forests. Therefore, in this study, we used fatty acid analysis to compare the food sources of one littorinid snail and two grapsid crab species between two native mangrove forests and one non-native S. apetala plantation in the Zhanjiang Mangrove National Nature Reserve of China. We found that the sediment of all three forests had high diatom and bacteria signals, but low mangrove leaf signals, while the opposite patterns were detected in the three macrozoobenthos. Specifically, the gastropod Littoraria melanostoma relied mainly on mangrove leaves and brown algae as food sources, with significant differences among the three mangrove forests, and showed significant seasonal variation in its diet. The grapsidae species (Perisesarma bidens and Parasesarma plicatum) mainly grazed on mangrove litter, brown and green algae, and occasionally consumed diatoms and bacteria, also showing significant seasonal variation in their diet. Overall, Principle Components Analysis (PCA) of the fatty acid profiles showed a significant overlapping in food sources among the macrozoobenthos living in the non-native and native mangrove forests, but significant seasonal variations in their food sources. This suggests that the planting of non-native S. apetala near original mangrove forests has had little effect on the feeding behavior of macrozoobenthos some 10 years after planting.

  4. Growth rate differences between resident native brook trout and non-native brown trout

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, S.M.; Hendry, A.P.; Letcher, B.H.

    2007-01-01

    Between species and across season variation in growth was examined by tagging and recapturing individual brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and brown trout Salmo trutta across seasons in a small stream (West Brook, Massachusetts, U.S.A.). Detailed information on body size and growth are presented to (1) test whether the two species differed in growth within seasons and (2) characterize the seasonal growth patterns for two age classes of each species. Growth differed between species in nearly half of the season- and age-specific comparisons. When growth differed, non-native brown trout grew faster than native brook trout in all but one comparison. Moreover, species differences were most pronounced when overall growth was high during the spring and early summer. These growth differences resulted in size asymmetries that were sustained over the duration of the study. A literature survey also indicated that non-native salmonids typically grow faster than native salmonids when the two occur in sympatry. Taken together, these results suggest that differences in growth are not uncommon for coexisting native and non-native salmonids. ?? 2007 The Authors.

  5. 36 CFR 51.83 - Sale of Native Handicrafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Public Law 101-644, as amended. (c) Definitions. (1) Alaska Native means any citizen of the United States... whose father or mother is (or, if deceased, was) regarded as an Alaska Native by any village or...

  6. 36 CFR 51.83 - Sale of Native Handicrafts.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Public Law 101-644, as amended. (c) Definitions. (1) Alaska Native means any citizen of the United States... whose father or mother is (or, if deceased, was) regarded as an Alaska Native by any village or...

  7. Native Mass Spectrometry of Photosynthetic Pigment-Protein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Cui, Weidong; Gross, Michael L.; Blankenship, Robert E.

    2013-01-01

    Native mass spectrometry, or as is sometimes called “native electrospray (ESI)” allows proteins in their native or near-native protein in solution to be introduced into gas phase and interrogated by MS. This approach is now a powerful tool to investigate protein complexes. This article reviews the background of native MS of protein complexes and describes its strengths, taking photosynthetic pigment-protein complexes as examples. Native MS can be utilized in combination with other MS-based approaches to obtain complementary information to that provided by tools such as X-ray crystallography and NMR spectroscopy to understand the structure-function relationships of protein complexes. When additional information beyond that provided by native MS is required, other MS-based strategies can be successfully applied to augment the results of native MS. PMID:23337874

  8. Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Chronic Liver Disease Chronic Liver Disease and Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander Native Hawaiian/ ... times more likely to be diagnosed with chronic liver disease in 2006. American Samoans were 8 times ...

  9. Effects of speaker variability and noise on Mandarin fricative identification by native and non-native listeners.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chao-Yang; Zhang, Yu; Li, Ximing; Tao, Liang; Bond, Z S

    2012-08-01

    Speaker variability and noise are two common sources of acoustic variability. The goal of this study was to examine whether these two sources of acoustic variability affected native and non-native perception of Mandarin fricatives to different degrees. Multispeaker Mandarin fricative stimuli were presented to 40 native and 52 non-native listeners in two presentation formats (blocked by speaker and mixed across speakers). The stimuli were also mixed with speech-shaped noise to create five levels of signal-to- noise ratios. The results showed that noise affected non-native identification disproportionately. By contrast, the effect of speaker variability was comparable between the native and non-native listeners. Confusion patterns were interpreted with reference to the results of acoustic analysis, suggesting native and non-native listeners used distinct acoustic cues for fricative identification. It was concluded that not all sources of acoustic variability are treated equally by native and non-native listeners. Whereas noise compromised non-native fricative perception disproportionately, speaker variability did not pose a special challenge to the non-native listeners.

  10. Study of Native Type I Collagen Fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heim, August

    2006-03-01

    Presented in this work is direct imaging and force microscopy of native, intact type I collagen fibrils extracted from the sea cucumber Cucumaria frondosa dermis with affiliated proteoglycan molecules. The prototypical collagen fibril structure is well conserved through higher mammalian species and presents a model for study of the mechanical properties of the primary individual components of the dermis and skeletal ligature. Common practice is to use reconstituted fibrils which lack the precise conformal structure and affiliated proteoglycans. We have performed force microscopy to probe the mechanical properties of native fibrils and extract the elastic modulus under natural conditions. This knowledge is combined transmission and atomic force imaging, in conjunction with applied computation models, to demonstrate an inherent semitubular structure of these fibrils.

  11. Native point defects in GaSb

    SciTech Connect

    Kujala, J.; Segercrantz, N.; Tuomisto, F.; Slotte, J.

    2014-10-14

    We have applied positron annihilation spectroscopy to study native point defects in Te-doped n-type and nominally undoped p-type GaSb single crystals. The results show that the dominant vacancy defect trapping positrons in bulk GaSb is the gallium monovacancy. The temperature dependence of the average positron lifetime in both p- and n-type GaSb indicates that negative ion type defects with no associated open volume compete with the Ga vacancies. Based on comparison with theoretical predictions, these negative ions are identified as Ga antisites. The concentrations of these negatively charged defects exceed the Ga vacancy concentrations nearly by an order of magnitude. We conclude that the Ga antisite is the native defect responsible for p-type conductivity in GaSb single crystals.

  12. Native fruit tree genetic resources in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Iketani, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    The diversity of climate, from subarctic to subtropical, and the complex geological history of Japan have produced a rich biodiversity. The flora includes several hundred species of native woody plants with edible fleshy fruits or nuts. People have eaten them from prehistoric times until about a half century ago. In Hokkaidō and the Ryūkyū Islands nut species had an important role in the diet, but fleshy fruits were also eaten until recently. Only Castanea crenata and a few minor species became domesticated as edible fruit trees in pre-modern times. Recently, Vitis coignetiae, Lonicera caerulea, Akebia quinata, Akebia trifoliata, Stauntonia hexaphylla, and Actinidia arguta have entered small-scale cultivation. The conservation of the germplasm of many of these native species, both in situ and ex situ, is precarious. PMID:27069393

  13. Nativity and cardiovascular disease screening practices.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Janine M

    2006-10-01

    Cardiovascular diseases (CVD) are the leading causes of death among Mexican American adults living in the United States. Using data from a modified Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance Survey and guided by the Anderson Model, this study examined the effect of nativity on CVD screening practices among 423 Mexican American adults living in Chicago. Dependent variables included having had a blood pressure and cholesterol screening and a routine check up in the past 2 years. Multivariate analyses were used to control for sociodemographic factors, while accounting for complex sampling design. Compared to those born in Mexico, US-born Mexican Americans had significantly greater odds of obtaining blood pressure (OR=5.61), and cholesterol screenings (OR=1.60) and having a routine checkup (OR=2.69) in the past 2 years. Health professionals with an agenda to increase screenings for CVD risk factors among Mexican Americans living in northern cities should understand the impact of nativity on screening practices.

  14. Slow digestion property of native cereal starches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Genyi; Ao, Zihua; Hamaker, Bruce R

    2006-11-01

    The slow digestion property of native cereal starches, represented by normal maize starch, was investigated. The in vitro Englyst test showed that 53.0% of the maize starch is slowly digestible starch (SDS), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed that SDS starts from an increase of pore size until almost complete fragmentation of starch granules. However, similar amounts of SDS ( approximately 50%) were shown for partially digested fragmented starch residuals, which would normally be considered resistant to digestion based on the Englyst assay. Molecularly, both amylopectin (AP) and amylose (AM) contributed to the amount of SDS as evidenced by a similar ratio of AP to AM at different digestion times. Consistently, similar degrees of crystallinity, comparable gelatinization behavior, and similar debranched profiles of starch residuals following different digestion times indicated that the crystalline and amorphous regions of starch granules were evenly digested through a mechanism of side-by-side digestion of concentric layers of semicrystalline shells of native starch granules.

  15. End State Renal Disease among Native Americans, 1983-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Jeffrey M.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Determines the incidence of end-stage renal disease (ESRD) among Native Americans and Whites in the United States from 1983-86. Findings indicate 1,075 Native American cases represented an annual incidence 2.8 times the rate for Whites. Fifty-six percent of Native American cases and 27 percent of White cases were attributed to diabetes. (JS)

  16. 34 CFR 303.403 - Prior notice; native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Prior notice; native language. 303.403 Section 303.403... TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards General § 303.403 Prior notice; native language. (a... file a complaint and the timelines under those procedures. (c) Native language. (1) The notice must...

  17. 34 CFR 303.403 - Prior notice; native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prior notice; native language. 303.403 Section 303.403... TODDLERS WITH DISABILITIES Procedural Safeguards General § 303.403 Prior notice; native language. (a... file a complaint and the timelines under those procedures. (c) Native language. (1) The notice must...

  18. Native Studies: Early Years (K-4). A Teacher's Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manitoba Dept. of Education and Training, Winnipeg.

    This curriculum guide was developed to give a Native American perspective to the social studies curriculum for Native students in Manitoba (Canada). The curriculum is appropriate for students in grades K-4 and is based on Native values such as respect, caring, sharing, honesty, kindness, and faith. The first section of the guide outlines three…

  19. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody, the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  20. Expanding Job Opportunities for Alaska Natives. (Interim Report).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDiarmid, G. Williamson; Goldsmith, Scott; Killorin, Mary; Sharp, Suzanne; Hild, Carl

    A majority of adults in most Alaska Native villages were without jobs in 1990, and the situation was probably not substantially better in 1998. This report summarizes current Alaska Native employment data and employment trends, provides information on public and private programs that target Native hire, and describes promising approaches for…

  1. Out of Harmony: Health Problems and Young Native American Men.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joe, Jennie R.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the health of young Native American males using data from a survey of existing literature, noting that studies of the current health status of healthy young Native American men are rare. The article presents information on accidents, suicide, homicide, cancer, heart disease, and alcohol use and abuse among young Native American males. (SM)

  2. Natives and Academics: Researching and Writing about American Indians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mihesuah, Devon A., Ed.

    This anthology provides Native perspectives on the ethics of researching, writing about, and teaching about American Indians, and may be used as a text for discussion in American Indian Studies classes. Leading Native scholars discuss the representativeness of Native informants, the merits of various data collection methods, the role and veracity…

  3. 77 FR 66527 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-06

    ... marred by violence and tragic mistreatment. For centuries, Native Americans faced cruelty, injustice, and... opportunities for Native American students. It aims to preserve Native languages, cultures, and histories while offering a competitive education that prepares young people to succeed in college and careers. And...

  4. Native American Education: A Reference Handbook. Contemporary Education Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hale, Lorraine

    This handbook presents information and resource materials on various aspects of Native American education. Chapters 1-2 trace the history of Native education in the 18th-20th centuries, including the loss of Indian lands and movement west, Christian conversion and acculturation as the main motivations for providing Native American education,…

  5. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  6. Cultural Strengths to Persevere: Native American Women in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waterman, Stephanie J.; Lindley, Lorinda S.

    2013-01-01

    Beginning with an overview of historical perspectives of Native American women, this article includes some discussion of values and practices of contemporary Native American women, data pertaining to Native American women's participation in higher education, and an introduction of familial cultural capital, community cultural wealth, Native…

  7. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  8. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  9. The Use of Public Libraries by Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Susan K.

    2007-01-01

    Library services to Native Americans have expanded greatly in the past several decades, but more work still needs to be done to provide for the information needs of Native Americans. Data from the U.S. Current Population Survey were used to compare library use rates of Native American households to rates of Anglo households. Results show that…

  10. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  11. 21 CFR 1307.31 - Native American Church.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Native American Church. 1307.31 Section 1307.31... Persons § 1307.31 Native American Church. The listing of peyote as a controlled substance in Schedule I does not apply to the nondrug use of peyote in bona fide religious ceremonies of the Native...

  12. 76 FR 68623 - National Native American Heritage Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-04

    ... Revolution to Iraq and Afghanistan. Native Americans have demonstrated time and again their commitment to... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8749 of November 1, 2011 National Native American Heritage Month, 2011 By the..., American Indians and Alaska Natives have contributed immensely to our country's heritage. During...

  13. Negation in Near-Native French: Variation and Sociolinguistic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Bryan

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated how adult second language (L2) speakers of French with near-native proficiency realize verbal negation, a well-known sociolinguistic variable in contemporary spoken French. Data included 10 spontaneous informal conversations between near-native speakers of French and native speakers (NSs) closely acquainted with them.…

  14. A Model for Promoting Native American Language Preservation and Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Richard E.; Martinez, Alicia, Ed.

    The Interface Alaska Multifunctional Resource Center developed a model for training Native American language teachers to effectively teach Native languages. The model provides Native American paraprofessional language teachers with basic knowledge of classroom techniques and effective teaching strategies. The training introduces the Total Physical…

  15. The Development of "New" Languages in Native American Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodfellow, Anne

    This paper examines the belief that as English rapidly infiltrates Native American cultures, school programs for teaching and maintaining native languages are not working. It suggests that Native American children who learn English first and their heritage languages second have difficulty learning the structures of their ancestral languages…

  16. Gifted and Talented American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tonemah, Stuart

    Native American tribes have a critical need for effective leadership, which can be found in the brightest of their youth. However, the focus of federal and state Native programs has been to provide remedial education. Historically, Native students at federal boarding schools did not perform at high levels because of low teacher expectations,…

  17. The Native Learner and Distance Education: An Annotated Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Confederation Coll. of Applied Arts and Technology, Thunder Bay (Ontario).

    This annotated bibliography consists of 76 entries dated 1975 through 1988, describing publications in the area of distance education and the Native learner. The bibliography represents one phase of a project entitled "Native Priorities for Distance Education," with the goal being the participation of Native peoples in the planning and…

  18. Injury Prevention Awareness in an Urban Native American Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hsu, James S. J.; Williams, Scott D.

    1991-01-01

    A survey of 50 Native American and 100 other families assessed injury prevention awareness and practices among urban Native Americans in Salt Lake City (Utah). Native American families were less aware of and less likely to practice prevention than others. These characteristics are more likely caused by low-income status than culture. (SLD)

  19. Adapting Manualized Treatments: Treating Anxiety Disorders among Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Coteau, Tami; Anderson, Jessiline; Hope, Debra

    2006-01-01

    Although there is a small but growing body of literature examining the psychopathology of anxiety among Native Americans, no data are available regarding the efficacy of empirically supported treatments for anxiety disorders among Native Americans. Moreover, exceptional challenges arise in adapting mainstream approaches to Native Americans, such…

  20. Native American Student Resiliency within Southwestern Tribal Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralez, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which Native American culture impacts the resiliency of Native American students earning degrees at three tribal colleges in the southwestern part of the United States. This study was a qualitative case study that was based on the following research question: "How does Native American…

  1. The Future in the Past of Native and Indigenous Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warrior, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, the author talks about some of the issues of the beginnings of Native and Indigenous studies and suggests that one looks more precisely at what people mean when they talk about those beginnings. The author is not a big fan of Native people emerging vaguely from the mists of time, but he is always tracing a history of Native studies…

  2. Educational Provisions for the Alaskan Natives Since 1867.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopkins, Thomas Robert

    The study compiles and records the history of the administration of education for Alaskan natives since the United States purchased the territory from Russia in 1876. Chapter 1, An Overview of the Development of the Alaskan Native, covers the development of missionary and government schools, the growth and development of Native education from 1906…

  3. Evaluation of Native U.S. Shrubs at Purdue

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is a growing demand for native plants in the landscape. Native plants account for an increasing proportion of all plant sales and use of native plants by landscape designers has increased in recent years. Unfortunately, there are many factors that influence plant performance both biologically...

  4. Poverty and Public Assistance among Alaska Natives: Implications for 1991.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berman, Matthew; Foster, Karen Pyle

    The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) distributed 44 million acres of land and nearly $1 billion to Alaska Natives. The land and equity is currently being held by 12 regional corporations and 150 village corporations formed by the act. Native shareholders, however, will be free to sell their stock in these corporations for the first time…

  5. Native valve Escherichia coli endocarditis following urosepsis.

    PubMed

    Rangarajan, D; Ramakrishnan, S; Patro, K C; Devaraj, S; Krishnamurthy, V; Kothari, Y; Satyaki, N

    2013-05-01

    Gram-negative organisms are a rare cause of infective endocarditis. Escherichia coli, the most common cause of urinary tract infection and gram-negative septicemia involves endocardium rarely. In this case report, we describe infection of native mitral valve by E. coli following septicemia of urinary tract origin in a diabetic male; subsequently, he required prosthetic tissue valve replacement indicated by persistent sepsis and congestive cardiac failure.

  6. Native Freshwater Fish and Mussel Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native freshwater fish and freshwater mussels in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  7. The Alaska Native Women's Wellness Project.

    PubMed

    Stillwater, B

    1999-01-01

    Alaska Native women have encountered many obstacles in the health care system which deter them from adhering to cancer screening recommendations. To improve access, it was necessary for us to listen to them and their attitudes about health care. As a result of this assessment, we changed our approach resulting in an overall increase in screening rates from 14% to 62%. A case example is presented to demonstrate barriers to cancer screening and our techniques for overcoming them.

  8. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome...characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form of PS... parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management System (RPMS), but the protocol will

  9. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-11-01

    W81XWH-07-1-0001 Brian A Trimble, MD Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry Principal Investigator A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a...syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance. Parkinson’s disease is the most common form...protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called the Resource and Patient Management

  10. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-07-01

    Investigator 4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking...2011. The aims of this project are: Specific Aim 1: Identify cases of parkinsonism among Alaska Native people and populate a secure electronic...registry database. Specific Aim 2: Provide education on parkinsonism and its treatment to primary care physicians and other health care providers

  11. 77 FR 2998 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-20

    ...As required by 43 CFR 2650.7(d), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Sea Lion Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). These lands lie entirely within the Clarence Rhode National Wildlife Refuge......

  12. 76 FR 55414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...As required by 43 CFR 2650.7(d), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Nunakauiak Yupik Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Calista......

  13. Propagation and Production of Native Aquatic Plants

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    ERDC/TN APCRP-EA-11 September 2005 Propagation and Production of Native Aquatic Plants by Gary Owen Dick , R. Michael Smart, and Joe R. Snow...small, protected plant colonies at strategic locations within unvegetated reservoirs (Smart and Dick 1999). Once successfully established, these...specific treatment of this information is given in Smart and Dick (1999). FACILITIES FOR OFF-SITE PRODUCTION: Production of aquatic plants requires

  14. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-01

    07-1-0001 TITLE: Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Caroline M. Tanner, M.D...The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department...GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER E-Mail: 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING

  15. Trophic Strategies of a Non-Native and a Native Amphibian Species in Shared Ponds.

    PubMed

    San Sebastián, Olatz; Navarro, Joan; Llorente, Gustavo A; Richter-Boix, Álex

    2015-01-01

    One of the critical factors for understanding the establishment, success and potential impact on native species of an introduced species is a thorough knowledge of how these species manage trophic resources. Two main trophic strategies for resource acquisition have been described: competition and opportunism. In the present study our objective was to identify the main trophic strategies of the non-native amphibian Discoglossus pictus and its potential trophic impact on the native amphibian Bufo calamita. We determine whether D. pictus exploits similar trophic resources to those exploited by the native B. calamita (competition hypothesis) or alternative resources (opportunistic hypothesis). To this end, we analyzed the stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in larvae of both species, in natural ponds and in controlled laboratory conditions. The similarity of the δ15N and δ13C values in the two species coupled with isotopic signal variation according to pond conditions and niche partitioning when they co-occurred indicated dietary competition. Additionally, the non-native species was located at higher levels of trophic niches than the native species and B. calamita suffered an increase in its standard ellipse area when it shared ponds with D. pictus. These results suggest niche displacement of B. calamita to non-preferred resources and greater competitive capacity of D. pictus in field conditions. Moreover, D. pictus showed a broader niche than the native species in all conditions, indicating increased capacity to exploit the diversity of resources; this may indirectly favor its invasiveness. Despite the limitations of this study (derived from potential variability in pond isotopic signals), the results support previous experimental studies. All the studies indicate that D. pictus competes with B. calamita for trophic resources with potential negative effects on the fitness of the latter.

  16. The Paradox of Restoring Native River Landscapes and Restoring Native Ecosystems in the Colorado River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, J. C.

    2014-12-01

    Throughout the Colorado River basin (CRb), scientists and river managers collaborate to improve native ecosystems. Native ecosystems have deteriorated due to construction of dams and diversions that alter natural flow, sediment supply, and temperature regimes, trans-basin diversions that extract large amounts of water from some segments of the channel network, and invasion of non-native animals and plants. These scientist/manager collaborations occur in large, multi-stakeholder, adaptive management programs that include the Lower Colorado River Multi-Species Conservation Program, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program, and the Upper Colorado River Endangered Species Recovery Program. Although a fundamental premise of native species recovery is that restoration of predam flow regimes inevitably leads to native species recovery, such is not the case in many parts of the CRb. For example, populations of the endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha) are largest in the sediment deficit, thermally altered conditions of the Colorado River downstream from Glen Canyon Dam, but these species occur in much smaller numbers in the upper CRb even though the flow regime, sediment supply, and sediment mass balance are less perturbed. Similar contrasts in the physical and biological response of restoration of predam flow regimes occurs in floodplains dominated by nonnative tamarisk (Tamarix spp.) where reestablishment of floods has the potential to exacerbate vertical accretion processes that disconnect the floodplain from the modern flow regime. A significant challenge in restoring segments of the CRb is to describe this paradox of physical and biological response to reestablishment of pre-dam flow regimes, and to clearly identify objectives of environmentally oriented river management. In many cases, understanding the nature of the perturbation to sediment mass balance caused by dams and diversions and understanding the constraints imposed by societal commitments to provide

  17. Trophic Strategies of a Non-Native and a Native Amphibian Species in Shared Ponds

    PubMed Central

    San Sebastián, Olatz; Navarro, Joan; Llorente, Gustavo A.; Richter-Boix, Álex

    2015-01-01

    One of the critical factors for understanding the establishment, success and potential impact on native species of an introduced species is a thorough knowledge of how these species manage trophic resources. Two main trophic strategies for resource acquisition have been described: competition and opportunism. In the present study our objective was to identify the main trophic strategies of the non-native amphibian Discoglossus pictus and its potential trophic impact on the native amphibian Bufo calamita. We determine whether D. pictus exploits similar trophic resources to those exploited by the native B. calamita (competition hypothesis) or alternative resources (opportunistic hypothesis). To this end, we analyzed the stable isotope values of nitrogen and carbon in larvae of both species, in natural ponds and in controlled laboratory conditions. The similarity of the δ15N and δ13C values in the two species coupled with isotopic signal variation according to pond conditions and niche partitioning when they co-occurred indicated dietary competition. Additionally, the non-native species was located at higher levels of trophic niches than the native species and B. calamita suffered an increase in its standard ellipse area when it shared ponds with D. pictus. These results suggest niche displacement of B. calamita to non-preferred resources and greater competitive capacity of D. pictus in field conditions. Moreover, D. pictus showed a broader niche than the native species in all conditions, indicating increased capacity to exploit the diversity of resources; this may indirectly favor its invasiveness. Despite the limitations of this study (derived from potential variability in pond isotopic signals), the results support previous experimental studies. All the studies indicate that D. pictus competes with B. calamita for trophic resources with potential negative effects on the fitness of the latter. PMID:26101880

  18. Antibody microarrays for native toxin detection.

    PubMed

    Rucker, Victor C; Havenstrite, Karen L; Herr, Amy E

    2005-04-15

    We have developed antibody-based microarray techniques for the multiplexed detection of cholera toxin beta-subunit, diphtheria toxin, anthrax lethal factor and protective antigen, Staphylococcus aureus enterotoxin B, and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked samples. Two detection schemes were investigated: (i) a direct assay in which fluorescently labeled toxins were captured directly by the antibody array and (ii) a competition assay that employed unlabeled toxins as reporters for the quantification of native toxin in solution. In the direct assay, fluorescence measured at each array element is correlated with labeled toxin concentration to yield baseline binding information (Langmuir isotherms and affinity constants). Extending from the direct assay, the competition assay yields information on the presence, identity, and concentration of toxins. A significant advantage of the competition assay over reported profiling assays is the minimal sample preparation required prior to analysis because the competition assay obviates the need to fluorescently label native proteins in the sample of interest. Sigmoidal calibration curves and detection limits were established for both assay formats. Although the sensitivity of the direct assay is superior to that of the competition assay, detection limits for unmodified toxins in the competition assay are comparable to values reported previously for sandwich-format immunoassays of antibodies arrayed on planar substrates. As a demonstration of the potential of the competition assay for unlabeled toxin detection, we conclude with a straightforward multiplexed assay for the differentiation and identification of both native S. aureus enterotoxin B and tetanus toxin C fragment in spiked dilute serum samples.

  19. Thiaminase activity in native freshwater mussels

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blakeslee, Carrie J.; Sweet, Stephanie; Galbraith, Heather S.; Honeyfield, Dale C.

    2015-01-01

    Thiamine (vitamin B1) deficiency in the Great Lakes has been attributed to elevated levels of thiaminase I enzyme activity in invasive prey species; however, few studies have investigated thiaminase activity in native prey species. Some of the highest levels of thiaminase activity have been measured in invasive dreissenid mussels with little understanding of background levels contributed by native freshwater mussels (Bivalvia: Unionidae). In this study, thiaminase activity was measured in two freshwater mussel species, Elliptio complanata and Strophitus undulatus, from the Delaware and Susquehanna River drainage basins located in north eastern United States. Thiaminase activity was also measured in gravid and non-gravid S. undulatus. Average thiaminase activity differed significantly between species (7.2 and 42.4 μmol/g/min, for E. complanata and S. undulatus respectively) with no differences observed between drainage basins. Gravid S. undulatus had significantly lower thiaminase activity (28.0 μmol/g/min) than non-gravid mussels (42.4 μmol/g/min). Our results suggest that a suite of factors may regulate thiaminase activity in freshwater mussels and that native freshwater mussel thiaminase activity is within the range observed for invasive dreissenids. These results add to our understanding of the complexities in identifying the ecological conditions that set the stage for thiamine deficiency.

  20. Exploring Native American Students' Perceptions of Scientists

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubach, Timothy A.; Crofford, Geary Don; Marek, Edmund A.

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this descriptive study was to explore Native American (NA) students' perceptions of scientists by using the Draw-A-Scientist Test and to determine if differences in these perceptions exist between grade level, gender, and level of cultural tradition. Data were collected for students in Grades 9-12 within a NA grant off-reservation boarding school. A total of 133 NA students were asked to draw a picture of a scientist at work and to provide a written explanation as to what the scientist was doing. A content analysis of the drawings indicated that the level of stereotype differed between all NA subgroups, but analysis of variance revealed that these differences were not significant between groups except for students who practised native cultural tradition at home compared to students who did not practise native cultural tradition at home (p < 0.05). The results suggest that NA students who practise cultural traditions at home are more able to function fluidly between indigenous knowledge and modern western science than their non-practising counterparts. Overall, these NA students do not see themselves as scientists, which may influence their educational and career science, technology, engineering, and mathematics paths in the future. The educational implication is that once initial perceptions are identified, researchers and teachers can provide meaningful experiences to combat the stereotypes.

  1. Report to the Legislature by the Native American Heritage Commission on Protection of Native American Sacred Places in California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Heritage Commission, Sacramento, CA.

    Created by act of the California Legislature in September of 1976, the Native American Heritage Commission seeks to identify and protect places of cultural significance to California Native Americans and to safeguard Indian religious rights. The Commission, which is composed entirely of Native Americans, provides community services to solve the…

  2. Seed rain under native and non-native tree species in the Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge, Puerto Rico.

    PubMed

    Arias Garcia, Andrea; Chinea, J Danilo

    2014-09-01

    Seed dispersal is a fundamental process in plant ecology and is of critical importance for the restoration of tropical communities. The lands of the Cabo Rojo National Wildlife Refuge (CRNWR), formerly under agriculture, were abandoned in the 1970s and colonized mainly by non-native tree species of degraded pastures. Here we described the seed rain under the most common native and non-native trees in the refuge in an attempt to determine if focal tree geographic origin (native versus non-native) influences seed dispersal. For this, seed rain was sampled for one year under the canopies of four native and four non-native tree species common in this refuge using 40 seed traps. No significant differences were found for the abundance of seeds, or their diversity, dispersing under native versus non-native focal tree species, nor under the different tree species. A significantly different seed species composition was observed reaching native versus non-native focal species. However, this last result could be more easily explained as a function of distance of the closest adults of the two most abundantly dispersed plant species to the seed traps than as a function of the geographic origin of the focal species. We suggest to continue the practice of planting native tree species, not only as a way to restore the community to a condition similar to the original one, but also to reduce the distances needed for effective dispersal.

  3. Self-Control, Native Traditionalism, and Native American Substance Use: Testing the Cultural Invariance of a General Theory of Crime

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Gregory D.; Wood, Peter B.; Dunaway, R. Gregory

    2006-01-01

    Using a sample of White and Native American high school students, the authors provide a test of (a) self-control theory's invariance thesis and (b) native traditionalism as an explanation of Native American substance use. Self-control significantly influenced all forms of substance use when controlling for race and in race-specific analyses.…

  4. A Conceptual Framework for Non-Native Instructors Who Teach Adult Native American Students at the University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckmiller, Tom M.; Cramer, Renee A.

    2013-01-01

    Native students often desire an education that will enable them to contribute to their home communities and facilitate tribal development, while retaining close ties to their cultural heritage and identity. We outline a conceptual framework that provides a starting point for non-Native American educators to consider as they engage Native American…

  5. Higher Dropout Rate in Non-Native Patients than in Native Patients in Rehabilitation in The Netherlands

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sloots, Maurits; Scheppers, Emmanuel F.; van de Weg, Frans B.; Dekker, Jos H.; Bartels, Edien A.; Geertzen, Jan H.; Dekker, Joost

    2009-01-01

    Dropout from a rehabilitation programme often occurs in patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain of non-native origin. However, the exact dropout rate is not known. The objective of this study was to determine the difference in dropout rate between native and non-native patients with chronic nonspecific low back pain participating in a…

  6. Modulation of Legume Defense Signaling Pathways by Native and Non-native Pea Aphid Clones

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Arcos, Carlos; Reichelt, Michael; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Kunert, Grit

    2016-01-01

    The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) is a complex of at least 15 genetically different host races that are native to specific legume plants, but can all develop on the universal host plant Vicia faba. Despite much research, it is still unclear why pea aphid host races (biotypes) are able to colonize their native hosts while other host races are not. All aphids penetrate the plant and salivate into plant cells when they test plant suitability. Thus plants might react differently to the various pea aphid host races. To find out whether legume species vary in their defense responses to different pea aphid host races, we measured the amounts of salicylic acid (SA), the jasmonic acid-isoleucine conjugate (JA-Ile), other jasmonate precursors and derivatives, and abscisic acid (ABA) in four different species (Medicago sativa, Trifolium pratense, Pisum sativum, V. faba) after infestation by native and non-native pea aphid clones of various host races. Additionally, we assessed the performance of the clones on the four plant species. On M. sativa and T. pratense, non-native clones that were barely able to survive or reproduce, triggered a strong SA and JA-Ile response, whereas infestation with native clones led to lower levels of both phytohormones. On P. sativum, non-native clones, which survived or reproduced to a certain extent, induced fluctuating SA and JA-Ile levels, whereas the native clone triggered only a weak SA and JA-Ile response. On the universal host V. faba all aphid clones triggered only low SA levels initially, but induced clone-specific patterns of SA and JA-Ile later on. The levels of the active JA-Ile conjugate and of the other JA-pathway metabolites measured showed in many cases similar patterns, suggesting that the reduction in JA signaling was due to an effect upstream of OPDA. ABA levels were downregulated in all aphid clone-plant combinations and were therefore probably not decisive factors for aphid-plant compatibility. Our results suggest that A

  7. Use of Native American imagery to sell tobacco.

    PubMed

    BlueEye, LaDonna

    2004-05-01

    The tobacco plant has been used in Native American communities in sacred, traditional and cultural ways prior to the arrival of Christopher Columbus. Early immigrants to North America were introduced to tobacco use by Native Americans and the plant was quickly turned into a commercial success in Europe. Native American images have been used for centuries to commercialize a product that once held only spiritual significance to American Indian tribes. This article provides a history of tobacco, from the sacred use by Native Americans, to the commercialism of tobacco in North America. Included is a review of early to current advertisements using Native American images.

  8. Phylogenetic and trait similarity to a native species predict herbivory on non-native oaks

    PubMed Central

    Pearse, Ian S.; Hipp, Andrew L.

    2009-01-01

    Introduced plants tend to experience less herbivory than natives, although herbivore loads vary widely. Herbivores may switch hosts onto an introduced plant for at least two reasons. They may recognize the novel plant as a potential host based on similarity of the plant's traits to the traits of one of its native hosts, a similarity that may or may not exhibit phylogenetic signal. Alternatively, herbivores may feed optimally, assessing which introduced plants provide the best nutrition irrespective of similarity to native species. Here, we created a phylogeny of 57 oak (Quercus) taxa, which were grown outside of their ranges in a common botanical garden that contained one abundant native oak (Quercus lobata). We used the phylogeny to estimate the phylogenetic conservatism of herbivory by two feeding guilds of insects (leaf chewers and leaf miners) and 11 plant traits expected to affect herbivore performance. We found high phylogenetic signal in chewing damage but not mining damage and all traits except for leaf maturation time. Introduced oaks that are more closely related to the native oak received more chewing and mining damage than distantly related oaks, and introduced oaks that had greater overall similarity in leaf traits also received higher chewing damage but not mining damage. These results demonstrate that interactions between introduced plants and their herbivores are driven independently by traits that track plant phylogeny and leaf traits that likely affect herbivore performance. PMID:19841257

  9. A Multidimensional Scaling Study of Native and Non-Native Listeners' Perception of Second Language Speech.

    PubMed

    Foote, Jennifer A; Trofimovich, Pavel

    2016-04-01

    Second language speech learning is predicated on learners' ability to notice differences between their own language output and that of their interlocutors. Because many learners interact primarily with other second language users, it is crucial to understand which dimensions underlie the perception of second language speech by learners, compared to native speakers. For this study, 15 non-native and 10 native English speakers rated 30-s language audio-recordings from controlled reading and interview tasks for dissimilarity, using all pairwise combinations of recordings. PROXSCAL multidimensional scaling analyses revealed fluency and aspects of speakers' pronunciation as components underlying listener judgments but showed little agreement across listeners. Results contribute to an understanding of why second language speech learning is difficult and provide implications for language training.

  10. Duck productivity in restored species-rich native and species-poor non-native plantings.

    PubMed

    Haffele, Ryan D; Eichholz, Michael W; Dixon, Cami S

    2013-01-01

    Conservation efforts to increase duck production have led the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to restore grasslands with multi-species (3-5) mixtures of introduced cool season vegetation often termed dense nesting cover (DNC). The effectiveness of DNC to increase duck production has been variable, and maintenance of the cover type is expensive. In an effort to decrease the financial and ecological costs (increased carbon emissions from plowing and reseeding) of maintaining DNC and provide a long-term, resilient cover that will support a diversity of grassland fauna, restoration of multi-species (16-32) plantings of native plants has been explored. We investigated the vegetation characteristics, nesting density and nest survival between the 2 aforementioned cover types in the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota, USA from 2010-2011 to see if restored-native plantings provide similar benefits to nesting hens as DNC. We searched 14 fields (7 DNC, 271 ha; and 7 restored native, 230 ha) locating 3384 nests (1215 in restored-native vegetation and 2169 in DNC) in 2010-2011. Nest survival was similar between cover types in 2010, while DNC had greater survival than native plantings in 2011. Densities of nests adjusted for detection probability were not different between cover types in either year. We found no structural difference in vegetation between cover types in 2010; however, a difference was detected during the late sampling period in 2011 with DNC having deeper litter and taller vegetation. Our results indicate restored-native plantings are able to support similar nesting density as DNC; however, nest survival is more stable between years in DNC. It appears the annual variation in security between cover types goes undetected by hens as hens selected cover types at similar levels both years.

  11. Duck Productivity in Restored Species-Rich Native and Species-Poor Non-Native Plantings

    PubMed Central

    Haffele, Ryan D.; Eichholz, Michael W.; Dixon, Cami S.

    2013-01-01

    Conservation efforts to increase duck production have led the United States Fish and Wildlife Service to restore grasslands with multi-species (3-5) mixtures of introduced cool season vegetation often termed dense nesting cover (DNC). The effectiveness of DNC to increase duck production has been variable, and maintenance of the cover type is expensive. In an effort to decrease the financial and ecological costs (increased carbon emissions from plowing and reseeding) of maintaining DNC and provide a long-term, resilient cover that will support a diversity of grassland fauna, restoration of multi-species (16-32) plantings of native plants has been explored. We investigated the vegetation characteristics, nesting density and nest survival between the 2 aforementioned cover types in the Prairie Pothole Region of North Dakota, USA from 2010–2011 to see if restored-native plantings provide similar benefits to nesting hens as DNC. We searched 14 fields (7 DNC, 271 ha; and 7 restored native, 230 ha) locating 3384 nests (1215 in restored-native vegetation and 2169 in DNC) in 2010-2011. Nest survival was similar between cover types in 2010, while DNC had greater survival than native plantings in 2011. Densities of nests adjusted for detection probability were not different between cover types in either year. We found no structural difference in vegetation between cover types in 2010; however, a difference was detected during the late sampling period in 2011 with DNC having deeper litter and taller vegetation. Our results indicate restored-native plantings are able to support similar nesting density as DNC; however, nest survival is more stable between years in DNC. It appears the annual variation in security between cover types goes undetected by hens as hens selected cover types at similar levels both years. PMID:23840898

  12. Discrimination and obesity among Native Hawaiians.

    PubMed

    McCubbin, Laurie D; Antonio, Mapuana

    2012-12-01

    Among ethnic populations in Hawai'i, Native Hawaiians continue to be over-represented with the highest rates in: morbidity and mortality, chronic health conditions, and the health risks of being overweight and obese. Focused on these two health risks, the investigation reported in this article has a specific aim of empirically determining whether social stigma as manifested in the form of perceived overt or covert discrimination is a contributing factor. Current studies focused on select ethnic populations, particularly African Americans point to discrimination as an important but understudied predictor of adverse health outcomes. Acknowledging the paucity of research on discrimination and its role in the health of Native Hawaiians, this investigation utilizes data from the 2007 Hawaiian Health Survey which was coordinated by the Department of Health, and the Office of Health Status Monitoring and implemented by SMS Hawai'i. The weighted sample of Hawai'i adults included measures of race/ethnicity and of everyday discrimination and the BMI (Body Mass Index). Logistic regression analyses were applied to determine if: (a) discrimination was significantly related to being overweight and/or obesity; and (b) whether this relationship remained a salient predictor after key demographic factors of gender, age, education, income, and length of time in the Islands were taken into account. This study confirmed the negative influence of overt discrimination as well as the protective nature of covert discrimination in explaining the variability in obesity/overweight in Native Hawaiians. The implications of this study for strategic interventions and research are discussed.

  13. Charging of Proteins in Native Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susa, Anna C.; Xia, Zijie; Tang, Henry Y. H.; Tainer, John A.; Williams, Evan R.

    2017-02-01

    Factors that influence the charging of protein ions formed by electrospray ionization from aqueous solutions in which proteins have native structures and function were investigated. Protein ions ranging in molecular weight from 12.3 to 79.7 kDa and pI values from 5.4 to 9.6 were formed from different solutions and reacted with volatile bases of gas-phase basicities higher than that of ammonia in the cell of a Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer. The charge-state distribution of cytochrome c ions formed from aqueous ammonium or potassium acetate is the same. Moreover, ions formed from these two solutions do not undergo proton transfer to 2-fluoropyridine, which is 8 kcal/mol more basic than ammonia. These results provide compelling evidence that proton transfer between ammonia and protein ions does not limit protein ion charge in native electrospray ionization. Both circular dichroism and ion mobility measurements indicate that there are differences in conformations of proteins in pure water and aqueous ammonium acetate, and these differences can account for the difference in the extent of charging and proton-transfer reactivities of protein ions formed from these solutions. The extent of proton transfer of the protein ions with higher gas-phase basicity bases trends with how closely the protein ions are charged to the value predicted by the Rayleigh limit for spherical water droplets approximately the same size as the proteins. These results indicate that droplet charge limits protein ion charge in native mass spectrometry and are consistent with these ions being formed by the charged residue mechanism.

  14. Bacillus cereus endocarditis in native aortic valve.

    PubMed

    Ngow, H A; Wan Khairina, W M N

    2013-02-01

    Bacillus cereus endocarditis is rare. It has been implicated in immunocompromised individuals, especially in intravenous drug users as well as in those with a cardiac prosthesis. The patient was a 31-year-old ex-intravenous drug addict with a past history of staphylococcal pulmonary valve endocarditis, who presented with symptoms of decompensated cardiac failure. Echocardiography showed severe aortic regurgitation with an oscillating vegetation seen on the right coronary cusp of the aortic valve. The blood cultures grew Bacillus cereus. We report this as a rare case of Bacillus cereus endocarditis affecting a native aortic valve.

  15. Potential population and assemblage influences of non-native trout on native nongame fish in Nebraska headwater streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.; Schainost, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Non-native trout are currently stocked to support recreational fisheries in headwater streams throughout Nebraska. The influence of non-native trout introductions on native fish populations and their role in structuring fish assemblages in these systems is unknown. The objectives of this study were to determine (i) if the size structure or relative abundance of native fish differs in the presence and absence of non-native trout, (ii) if native fish-assemblage structure differs in the presence and absence of non-native trout and (iii) if native fish-assemblage structure differs across a gradient in abundances of non-native trout. Longnose dace Rhinichthys cataractae were larger in the presence of brown trout Salmo trutta and smaller in the presence of rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss compared to sites without trout. There was also a greater proportion of larger white suckers Catostomus commersonii in the presence of brown trout. Creek chub Semotilus atromaculatus and fathead minnow Pimephales promelas size structures were similar in the presence and absence of trout. Relative abundances of longnose dace, white sucker, creek chub and fathead minnow were similar in the presence and absence of trout, but there was greater distinction in native fish-assemblage structure between sites with trout compared to sites without trout as trout abundances increased. These results suggest increased risk to native fish assemblages in sites with high abundances of trout. However, more research is needed to determine the role of non-native trout in structuring native fish assemblages in streams, and the mechanisms through which introduced trout may influence native fish populations.

  16. Fine-Grained Distribution of a Non-Native Resource Can Alter the Population Dynamics of a Native Consumer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    New interactions with non-native species can alter selection pressures on native species. Here, we examined the effect of the spatial distribution of a non-native species, a factor that determines ecological and evolutionary outcomes but that is poorly understood, particularly on a fine scale. Specifically, we explored a native butterfly population and a non-native plant on which the butterfly oviposits despite the plant’s toxicity to larvae. We developed an individual-based model to describe movement and oviposition behaviors of each butterfly, which were determined by plant distribution and the butterfly's host preference genotype. We estimated the parameter values of the model from rich field data. We simulated various patterns of plant distributions and compared the rates of butterfly population growth and changes in the allele frequency of oviposition preference. Neither the number nor mean area of patches of non-native species affected the butterfly population, whereas plant abundance, patch shape, and distance to the nearest native and non-native patches altered both the population dynamics and genetics. Furthermore, we found a dramatic decrease in population growth rates when we reduced the distance to the nearest native patch from 147 m to 136 m. Thus changes in the non-native resource distribution that are critical to the fate of the native herbivore could only be detected at a fine-grained scale that matched the scale of a female butterfly’s movement. In addition, we found that the native butterfly population was unlikely to be rescued by the exclusion of the allele for acceptance of the non-native plant as a host. This study thus highlights the importance of including both ecological and evolutionary dynamics in analyses of the outcome of species interactions and provides insights into habitat management for non-native species. PMID:26575843

  17. The role of abstraction in non-native speech perception

    PubMed Central

    Pajak, Bozena; Levy, Roger

    2014-01-01

    The end-result of perceptual reorganization in infancy is currently viewed as a reconfigured perceptual space, “warped” around native-language phonetic categories, which then acts as a direct perceptual filter on any non-native sounds: naïve-listener discrimination of non-native-sounds is determined by their mapping onto native-language phonetic categories that are acoustically/articulatorily most similar. We report results that suggest another factor in non-native speech perception: some perceptual sensitivities cannot be attributed to listeners’ warped perceptual space alone, but rather to enhanced general sensitivity along phonetic dimensions that the listeners’ native language employs to distinguish between categories. Specifically, we show that the knowledge of a language with short and long vowel categories leads to enhanced discrimination of non-native consonant length contrasts. We argue that these results support a view of perceptual reorganization as the consequence of learners’ hierarchical inductive inferences about the structure of the language’s sound system: infants not only acquire the specific phonetic category inventory, but also draw higher-order generalizations over the set of those categories, such as the overall informativity of phonetic dimensions for sound categorization. Non-native sound perception is then also determined by sensitivities that emerge from these generalizations, rather than only by mappings of non-native sounds onto native-language phonetic categories. PMID:25197153

  18. Perceived nativeness and sensitivity to temporal adjustments in speech

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yue; Behne, Dawn M.

    2005-04-01

    Native Mandarin Chinese speakers productions of English consonant-vowel (CV) syllables have shown syllable-internal temporal adjustments in the direction of native (English)-like CVs (Wang and Behne, 2004). The current study presents two experiments investigating whether these temporal adjustments affect perceived nativeness. For three production types (native-English, Chinese productions of English, native-Chinese), three syllable-internal timing patterns (English-like, Chinese-English-like, Chinese-like) were applied, resulting in nine stimuli types. Native English listeners judged how English-like each stimulus was on a 7-point scale. In the first experiment, production-types and timing patterns were randomized. Results show that listeners can reliably identify nativeness of the three productions, with Chinese productions of English perceived as intermediate to the native Chinese and native American English productions. Listeners also showed a tendency toward using timing within the CV to identify nativeness. In the second experiment the same materials were therefore blocked by production type. Results reveal the perceptual saliency of the temporal adjustments in nonnative productions. These findings support a view of L2 acquisition as a gradual process toward the target L2 (e.g., Caramazza et al., 1973). The current study extends this view, showing evidence that listeners can perceive the inter-language system, bearing the nature of both L1 and L2.

  19. Cancer Education Resources for American Indians and Alaska Natives. Supplement to Native American Monograph No. 1: Documentation of the Cancer Research Needs of American Indians and Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda, Comp.; Barry, Kathleen Cooleen, Comp.

    This directory provides information on cancer education materials that have been developed specifically for American Indians and Alaska Natives. The goal is to develop and implement culturally appropriate cancer prevention and control programs for Native Americans. The directory includes a matrix of cancer education materials that identifies…

  20. Introduced birds incompletely replace seed dispersal by a native frugivore.

    PubMed

    Pejchar, Liba

    2015-07-02

    The widespread loss of native species and the introduction of non-native species has important consequences for island ecosystems. Non-native species may or may not functionally replace the role of native species in ecological processes such as seed dispersal. Although the majority of Hawaii's native plants require bird-mediated seed dispersal, only one native frugivore, Omao (Myadestes obscurus), persists in sufficient numbers to fill this functional role. Omao are restricted to less than half their original range, but two introduced frugivores are abundant throughout Hawaii. Given large-scale extinctions on islands, it is important to understand whether introduced birds serve as functional replacements or whether the absence of native frugivores alters plant communities. To assess seed dispersal by native and introduced birds, seed rain, vegetation characteristics, bird diet, density and habitat use were measured at three sites with Omao and three sites without Omao on Hawaii Island. The diet of native and introduced birds overlapped substantially, but Omao dispersed a variety of native species (n = 6) relatively evenly. In contrast, introduced birds dispersed an invasive species and fewer native species (n = 4), and >90 % of seeds dispersed by introduced birds were from two ubiquitous small-seeded species. Seed rain was significantly greater and more species rich at sites with Omao. These findings suggest that patterns of seed dispersal are altered following the local extinction of a native island frugivore. To more directly evaluate the relative roles of native and introduced frugivores in ecological processes, future studies could include reintroducing Omao to a suitable habitat within its historic range, or novel introductions to nearby islands where closely related species are now extinct. In an era of widespread extinction and invasion of island ecosystems, understanding the consequences of novel animal assemblages for processes like seed dispersal will be

  1. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... develop high levels of academic attainment in English among English learners (ELs) \\1\\, and to promote... methods of evaluation will provide performance feedback and permit periodic assessment of progress toward... American and Alaska Native Children in School Program: (i) The percentage of English learners (ELs)...

  2. Interactions between ecosystem engineers: A native species indirectly facilitates a non-native one

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sueiro, María Cruz; Schwindt, Evangelina; Mendez, María Martha (Pitu); Bortolus, Alejandro

    2013-08-01

    The positive impact that native species have on the survival, persistence and/or range-expansion of invasive species, is receiving increasing attention from ecologists and land managers trying to better understand and predict future invasions worldwide. Ecosystem engineers are among the best-known model organisms for such studies. The austral cordgrass Spartina densiflora is an ecosystem engineer native to South America coast, where it colonizes rocky shores that were recently successfully invaded by the acorn barnacle Balanus glandula. We conducted a field experiment combining living Spartina transplants and artificial model plants in order to address the following questions: Does the native ecosystem engineer S. densiflora facilitate the invasion of rocky shores by B. glandula? If so, how much of this facilitation is caused by its physical structure alone? We found that S. densiflora had a positive effect on the invasive barnacle by trapping among its stems, the mussels, shells and gravels where B. glandula settles. Dislodged mussels, cobbles, and small shells covered and agglutinated by living barnacles were retained within the aboveground structures of S. densiflora while the control plots (without living or artificial plant structures) remained mostly bare throughout the experiment, showing how plant structures speed the colonization process. Moreover, transplanting living Spartina and artificial Spartina models led to a maximum increase in the area covered by barnacles of more than 1700% relative to the unvegetated control plots. Our study clearly shows how a native ecosystem engineers can enhance the success of invasive species and facilitate their local spread.

  3. Haunting Native Speakerism? Students' Perceptions toward Native Speaking English Teachers in Taiwan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wu, Kun-huei; Ke, Chung

    2009-01-01

    This paper intends to explore how Taiwanese university students perceive their native-speaking English teachers (NESTs). Mutual expectations between the NESTs and students are also investigated. Collected data include questionnaires from 107 students and interviews with three NESTs and 19 students who have filled out the questionnaire. The result…

  4. Using Stimulated Recall to Investigate Native Speaker Perceptions in Native-Nonnative Speaker Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polio, Charlene; Gass, Susan; Chapin, Laura

    2006-01-01

    Implicit negative feedback has been shown to facilitate SLA, and the extent to which such feedback is given is related to a variety of task and interlocutor variables. The background of a native speaker (NS), in terms of amount of experience in interactions with nonnative speakers (NNSs), has been shown to affect the quantity of implicit negative…

  5. Native insect herbivory limits population growth rate of a non-native thistle.

    PubMed

    Eckberg, James O; Tenhumberg, Brigitte; Louda, Svata M

    2014-05-01

    The influence of native fauna on non-native plant population growth, size, and distribution is not well documented. Previous studies have shown that native insects associated with tall thistle (Cirsium altissimum) also feed on the leaves, stems, and flower heads of the Eurasian congener C. vulgare, thus limiting individual plant performance. In this study, we tested the effects of insect herbivores on the population growth rate of C. vulgare. We experimentally initiated invasions by adding seeds at four unoccupied grassland sites in eastern Nebraska, USA, and recorded plant establishment, survival, and reproduction. Cumulative foliage and floral herbivory reduced C. vulgare seedling density, and prevented almost any reproduction by C. vulgare in half the sites. The matrix model we constructed showed that this herbivory resulted in a reduction of the asymptotic population growth rate (λ), from an 88% annual increase to a 54% annual decline. These results provide strong support for the hypothesis that indigenous herbivores limit population invasion of this non-native plant species into otherwise suitable grassland habitat.

  6. Conversational Openings in Kiswahili: The Pragmatic Performance of Native and Non-Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Alwiya S.

    1992-01-01

    A study investigated the production of conventional conversational openings by five advanced learners of Kiswahili with experience in the Kiswahili speaking environment. Native speakers of Kiswahili usually engage in lengthy openings including several phatic inquiries (PIs) and phatic responses (PRs). The number and manner in which the PIs and PRs…

  7. Impact of Non-Native Birds on Native Ecosystems: A Global Analysis.

    PubMed

    Martin-Albarracin, Valeria L; Amico, Guillermo C; Simberloff, Daniel; Nuñez, Martin A

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and naturalization of non-native species is one of the most important threats to global biodiversity. Birds have been widely introduced worldwide, but their impacts on populations, communities, and ecosystems have not received as much attention as those of other groups. This work is a global synthesis of the impact of nonnative birds on native ecosystems to determine (1) what groups, impacts, and locations have been best studied; (2) which taxonomic groups and which impacts have greatest effects on ecosystems, (3) how important are bird impacts at the community and ecosystem levels, and (4) what are the known benefits of nonnative birds to natural ecosystems. We conducted an extensive literature search that yielded 148 articles covering 39 species belonging to 18 families -18% of all known naturalized species. Studies were classified according to where they were conducted: Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America, South America, Islands of the Indian, of the Pacific, and of the Atlantic Ocean. Seven types of impact on native ecosystems were evaluated: competition, disease transmission, chemical, physical, or structural impact on ecosystem, grazing/ herbivory/ browsing, hybridization, predation, and interaction with other non-native species. Hybridization and disease transmission were the most important impacts, affecting the population and community levels. Ecosystem-level impacts, such as structural and chemical impacts were detected. Seven species were found to have positive impacts aside from negative ones. We provide suggestions for future studies focused on mechanisms of impact, regions, and understudied taxonomic groups.

  8. FACILITATED INVASIONS: A NON-NATIVE FISH INCREASES SURVIVAL OF A NON-NATIVE ANURAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The introduction of a variety of non-native gamefish to formerly fishless ponds and lakes represents one of the most widespread alterations of freshwater habitats in western North America. We hypothesized that introduced bluegill are facilitating the survival of introduced bullf...

  9. (Non)native Speakered: Rethinking (Non)nativeness and Teacher Identity in TESOL Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aneja, Geeta A.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its imprecision, the native-nonnative dichotomy has become the dominant paradigm for examining language teacher identity development. The nonnative English speaking teacher (NNEST) movement in particular has considered the impact of deficit framings of nonnativeness on "NNEST" preservice teachers. Although these efforts have…

  10. Native Education Directory, 2002: Organizations and Resources for Educators of Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammer, Patricia Cahape, Comp.; Moellendick, Charlotte, Comp.; Moellendick, Joseph, Comp.

    This fifth edition of the Native Education Directory presents a rich array of activity in Indian country: organizing, leading, researching, administering, governing, publishing, broadcasting, and educating. Section 1, national and international nongovernment organizations, is broken down into four subsections covering advocacy, networking, and…

  11. Impact of Non-Native Birds on Native Ecosystems: A Global Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Martin-Albarracin, Valeria L.; Amico, Guillermo C.; Simberloff, Daniel; Nuñez, Martin A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction and naturalization of non-native species is one of the most important threats to global biodiversity. Birds have been widely introduced worldwide, but their impacts on populations, communities, and ecosystems have not received as much attention as those of other groups. This work is a global synthesis of the impact of nonnative birds on native ecosystems to determine (1) what groups, impacts, and locations have been best studied; (2) which taxonomic groups and which impacts have greatest effects on ecosystems, (3) how important are bird impacts at the community and ecosystem levels, and (4) what are the known benefits of nonnative birds to natural ecosystems. We conducted an extensive literature search that yielded 148 articles covering 39 species belonging to 18 families -18% of all known naturalized species. Studies were classified according to where they were conducted: Africa, Asia, Australasia, Europe, North America, South America, Islands of the Indian, of the Pacific, and of the Atlantic Ocean. Seven types of impact on native ecosystems were evaluated: competition, disease transmission, chemical, physical, or structural impact on ecosystem, grazing/ herbivory/ browsing, hybridization, predation, and interaction with other non-native species. Hybridization and disease transmission were the most important impacts, affecting the population and community levels. Ecosystem-level impacts, such as structural and chemical impacts were detected. Seven species were found to have positive impacts aside from negative ones. We provide suggestions for future studies focused on mechanisms of impact, regions, and understudied taxonomic groups. PMID:26576053

  12. Topic Continuity in Informal Conversations between Native and Non-Native Speakers of English

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris-Adams, Muna

    2013-01-01

    Topic management by non-native speakers (NNSs) during informal conversations has received comparatively little attention from researchers, and receives surprisingly little attention in second language learning and teaching. This article reports on one of the topic management strategies employed by international students during informal, social…

  13. Ininatig's Gift of Sugar: Traditional Native Sugarmaking. We Are Still Here: Native Americans Today Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittstock, Laura Waterman

    This book describes the traditional method of making maple syrup and maple sugar as practiced by the Anishinabe people in Minnesota. It begins with the Ojibway story of Ininatig "the man tree" and how Native Americans have relied on the sugar maple tree for food. It then tells how an Anishinabe man named Porky White continues his…

  14. Native Alaska's Floating Factoryship--She Plies the Pacific Ocean for Native Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wassaja, The Indian Historian, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes the history of the Al-Ind-Esk-A Sea, a floating fish processing factory representing a major hope for the economic independence of Alaska Natives residing outside the state. Discusses employment practices in effect on the ship. Notes interesting facts about the ship's engines and fittings. (SB)

  15. To What Extent Do Native and Non-Native Writers Make Use of Collocations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durrant, Philip; Schmitt, Norbert

    2009-01-01

    Usage-based models claim that first language learning is based on the frequency-based analysis of memorised phrases. It is not clear though, whether adult second language learning works in the same way. It has been claimed that non-native language lacks idiomatic formulas, suggesting that learners neglect phrases, focusing instead on orthographic…

  16. 78 FR 75365 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... URBAN DEVELOPMENT 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American..., Department of Housing and Urban Development, 451 7th Street SW., Washington, DC 20410; email Colette Pollard... Number: 2528-0288. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Form Number:...

  17. Politeness Strategies in Business Letters by Native and Non-Native English Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maier, Paula

    1992-01-01

    A study of business letters indicates striking differences in the politeness strategies used by native and nonnative English speakers. Nonnative speakers' language tended to be less formal, more direct, and showed an avoidance of certain politeness strategies. The findings suggest that even grammatically flawless business writing may be perceived…

  18. Auditory language comprehension of temporally reversed speech signals in native and non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Miklos; Cristescu, Tamara; Fink, Martina; Wittmann, Marc

    2008-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies in brain-injured patients with aphasia and children with specific language-learning deficits have shown the dependence of language comprehension on auditory processing abilities, i.e. the detection of temporal order. An impairment of temporal-order perception can be simulated by time reversing segments of the speech signal. In our study, we investigated how different lengths of time-reversed segments in speech influenced comprehension in ten native German speakers and ten participants who had acquired German as a second language. Results show that native speakers were still able to understand the distorted speech at segment lengths of 50 ms, whereas non-native speakers only could identify sentences with reversed intervals of 32 ms duration. These differences in performance can be interpreted by different levels of semantic and lexical proficiency. Our method of temporally-distorted speech offers a new approach to assess language skills that indirectly taps into lexical and semantic competence of non-native speakers.

  19. Native carotenoids composition of some tropical fruits.

    PubMed

    Murillo, Enrique; Giuffrida, Daniele; Menchaca, Dania; Dugo, Paola; Torre, Germana; Meléndez-Martinez, Antonio J; Mondello, Luigi

    2013-10-15

    Many tropical fruits can be considered a reservoir of bioactive substances with a special interest due to their possible health-promoting properties. The interest in carotenoids from a nutritional standpoint has recently greatly increased, because of their important health benefits. Here we report the native carotenoids composition in six tropical fruits from Panama, which is considered a region of great biodiversity. The native carotenoid composition was directly investigated by an HPLC-DAD-APCI-MS methodology, for the first time. In Corozo 32 different carotenoids were detected, including a high content of β-carotene and lycopene. Sastra showed the highest content of zeaxanthin among the fruit investigated. In Sapote 22 different carotenoids were detected, including β-carotene and 10 different zeaxanthin-di-esters. Frutita showed a very high content of the apo-carotenoid β-citraurin, and of a number of its esters. In Maracuyà chino 14 carotenoids were detected, including a high amounts of mono-esterified lauric acid with β-cryptoxanthin and with cryptocapsin. Mamey rojo was characterised by ketocarotenoids with κ rings, both hydroxylated and not hydroxylated.

  20. Reflections of Native American Teen Mothers

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Janelle; Kennedy, Holly Powell

    2010-01-01

    Objective To understand the previously lived experience of early childbearing among adult Native American women. Design A community-based participatory research approach. Setting The first interview took place at a mutually agreed upon time and place and averaged 120 minutes. Second interviews were conducted 1 to 3 months later. Participants A convenience sample of 30 self-identified Native American adult women was recruited, and a semi-structured interview explored their early childbearing experiences. Method An interpretive phenomenological study was conducted with a Northwestern tribe. Results All of the women in the study described stressful childhoods. Two primary themes were identified: “Chaotic childhoods,” represented stressful events in youth that introduced or resulted in ongoing chaos in women’s lives. “Diminished childhoods” was used to describe early maturity as a result of assuming extensive responsibilities at a young age. Conclusions The findings suggest that the childhood experiences described by participants may be related to the risk for early childbearing. Prospective research should examine the relationship between young women’s lives and early childbearing in order to design interventions to support them in postponing pregnancy and when they do become pregnant. PMID:20629929

  1. Crossing boundaries: nativity, ethnicity, and mate selection.

    PubMed

    Qian, Zhenchao; Glick, Jennifer E; Batson, Christie D

    2012-05-01

    The influx of immigrants has increased diversity among ethnic minorities and indicates that they may take multiple integration paths in American society. Previous research on ethnic integration has often focused on panethnic differences, and few have explored ethnic diversity within a racial or panethnic context. Using 2000 U.S. census data for Puerto Rican-, Mexican-, Chinese-, and Filipino-origin individuals, we examine differences in marriage and cohabitation with whites, with other minorities, within a panethnic group, and within an ethnic group by nativity status. Ethnic endogamy is strong and, to a lesser extent, so is panethnic endogamy. Yet, marital or cohabiting unions with whites remain an important path of integration but differ significantly by ethnicity, nativity, age at arrival, and educational attainment. Meanwhile, ethnic differences in marriage and cohabitation with other racial or ethnic minorities are strong. Our analysis supports that unions with whites remain a major path of integration, but other paths of integration also become viable options for all ethnic groups.

  2. Native fluorescence characterization of human liver abnormalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Singaravelu; Madhuri, S.; Aruna, Prakasa R.; Suchitra, S.; Srinivasan, T. G.

    1999-05-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy of intrinsic biomolecules has been extensively used in biology and medicine for the past several decades. In the present study, we report the native fluorescence characteristics of blood plasma from normal human subjects and patients with different liver abnormalities such as hepatitis, leptospirosis, jaundice, cirrhosis and liver cell failure. Native fluorescence spectra of blood plasma -- acetone extract were measured at 405 nm excitation. The average spectrum of normal blood plasma has a prominent emission peak around 464 nm whereas in the case of liver diseased subjects, the primary peak is red shifted with respect to normal. In addition, liver diseased cases show distinct secondary emission peak around 615 nm, which may be attributed to the presence of endogenous porphyrins. The red shift of the prominent emission peak with respect to normal is found to be maximum for hepatitis and minimum for cirrhosis whereas the secondary emission peak around 615 nm was found to be more prominent in the case of cirrhosis than the rest. The ratio parameter I465/I615 is found to be statistically significant (p less than 0.001) in discriminating liver abnormalities from normal.

  3. Native Purification and Analysis of Long RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Chillón, Isabel; Marcia, Marco; Legiewicz, Michal; Liu, Fei; Somarowthu, Srinivas; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2015-01-01

    The purification and analysis of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) in vitro is a challenge, particularly if one wants to preserve elements of functional structure. Here, we describe a method for purifying lncRNAs that preserves the cotranscriptionally derived structure. The protocol avoids the misfolding that can occur during denaturation–renaturation protocols, thus facilitating the folding of long RNAs to a native-like state. This method is simple and does not require addition of tags to the RNA or the use of affinity columns. LncRNAs purified using this type of native purification protocol are amenable to biochemical and biophysical analysis. Here, we describe how to study lncRNA global compaction in the presence of divalent ions at equilibrium using sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation and analytical size-exclusion chromatography as well as how to use these uniform RNA species to determine robust lncRNA secondary structure maps by chemical probing techniques like selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension and dimethyl sulfate probing. PMID:26068736

  4. Therapeutic Use of Native and Recombinant Enteroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ylä-Pelto, Jani; Tripathi, Lav; Susi, Petri

    2016-02-23

    Research on human enteroviruses has resulted in the identification of more than 100 enterovirus types, which use more than 10 protein receptors and/or attachment factors required in cell binding and initiation of the replication cycle. Many of these "viral" receptors are overexpressed in cancer cells. Receptor binding and the ability to replicate in specific target cells define the tropism and pathogenesis of enterovirus types, because cellular infection often results in cytolytic response, i.e., disruption of the cells. Viral tropism and cytolytic properties thus make native enteroviruses prime candidates for oncolytic virotherapy. Copy DNA cloning and modification of enterovirus genomes have resulted in the generation of enterovirus vectors with properties that are useful in therapy or in vaccine trials where foreign antigenic epitopes are expressed from or on the surface of the vector virus. The small genome size and compact particle structure, however, set limits to enterovirus genome modifications. This review focuses on the therapeutic use of native and recombinant enteroviruses and the methods that have been applied to modify enterovirus genomes for therapy.

  5. Cancer detection by native fluorescence of urine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masilamani, Vadivel; Vijmasi, Trinka; Al Salhi, Mohammad; Govindaraj, Kanagaraj; Vijaya-Raghavan, Ayanam Parthasarathy; Antonisamy, Belavendra

    2010-09-01

    Because cancer is a dreaded disease, a number of techniques such as biomarker evaluation, mammograms, colposcopy, and computed tomography scan are currently employed for early diagnosis. Many of these are specific to a particular site, invasive, and often expensive. Hence, there is a definite need for a simple, generic, noninvasive protocol for cancer detection, comparable to blood and urine tests for diabetes. Our objective is to show the results of a novel study in the diagnosis of several cancer types from the native or intrinsic fluorescence of urine. We use fluorescence emission spectra (FES) and stokes shift spectra (SSS) to analyze the native fluorescence of the first voided urine samples of healthy controls (N=100) and those of cancer patients (N=50) of different etiology. We show that flavoproteins and porphyrins released into urine can act as generic biomarkers of cancer with a specificity of 92%, a sensitivity of 76%, and an overall accuracy of 86.7%. We employ FES and SSS for rapid and cost-effective quantification of certain intrinsic biomarkers in urine for screening and diagnosis of most common cancer types with an overall accuracy of 86.7%.

  6. Counteracting effects of a non-native prey on the demography of a native predator culminate in positive population growth.

    PubMed

    Cattau, Christopher E; Fletcher, Robert J; Reichert, Brian E; Kitchens, Wiley M

    2016-10-01

    Identifying impacts of non-native species on native populations is central to conservation and ecology. While effects of non-native predators on native prey populations have recently received much attention, impacts of introduced prey on native predator populations are less understood. Non-native prey can influence predator behavior and demography through direct and indirect pathways, yet quantitative assessments of the relative impacts of multiple, potentially counteracting, effects on native predator population growth remain scarce. Using ≈20 years of range-wide monitoring data, we tested for effects of a recently introduced, rapidly spreading non-native prey species (Pomacea maculata) on the behavior and demography of the endangered Snail Kite (Rostrhamus sociabilis). Previous studies found that food-handling difficulties caused by the large size of P. maculata (relative to the native P. paludosa) can lead to energetic deficiencies in juvenile kites, suggesting the potential for evolutionary traps to occur. However, high densities of P. maculata populations could facilitate kites by providing supplemental food resources. Contrary to prior hypotheses, we found that juvenile apparent survival increased ≈50% in wetlands invaded by non-native snails. Breeding rates and number of young fledged/successful nests were also positively associated with non-native snail presence, suggesting direct trophic benefits to kites. We found no direct effects of the invasive snail on adult survival or daily nest survival rates. Kite movements and breeding distribution closely tracked the spread of non-native snail populations. Since 2005, kites have been heavily concentrated in northern regions where non-native snails have established. This geographic shift has had hidden costs, as use of northern regions is associated with lower adult survival. Despite negative impacts to this key vital rate, matrix population modeling indicated that the multifarious effects of the non-native

  7. Comparing the ecological impacts of native and invasive crayfish: could native species' translocation do more harm than good?

    PubMed

    James, J; Slater, F M; Vaughan, I P; Young, K A; Cable, J

    2015-05-01

    Biological invasions are a principal threat to global biodiversity. Omnivores, such as crayfish, are among the most important groups of invaders. Their introduction often results in biodiversity loss, particularly of their native counterparts. Managed relocations of native crayfish from areas under threat from invasive crayfish into isolated 'ark sites' are sometimes suggested as a conservation strategy for native crayfish; however, such relocations may have unintended detrimental consequences for the recipient ecosystem. Despite this, there have been few attempts to quantify the relative impacts of native and invasive crayfish on aquatic ecosystems. To address this deficiency we conducted a meta-analysis on the effects of native and invasive crayfish on nine ecosystem components: decomposition rate, primary productivity, plant biomass, invertebrate density, biomass and diversity, fish biomass and refuge use, and amphibian larval survival. Native and invasive crayfish significantly reduced invertebrate density and biomass, fish biomass and amphibian survival rate and significantly increased decomposition rates. Invasive crayfish also significantly reduced plant biomass and invertebrate diversity and increased primary productivity. These results show that native and invasive crayfish have wide-ranging impacts on aquatic ecosystems that may be exacerbated for invasive species. Subsequent analysis showed that the impacts of invasive crayfish were significantly greater, in comparison to native crayfish, for decomposition and primary productivity but not invertebrate density, biomass and diversity. Overall, our findings reconfirm the ecosystem altering abilities of both native and invasive crayfish, enforcing the need to carefully regulate managed relocations of native species as well as to develop control programs for invasives.

  8. Syntactic Constraints and Individual Differences in Native and Non-Native Processing of Wh-Movement

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Adrienne; Fiorentino, Robert; Gabriele, Alison

    2016-01-01

    There is a debate as to whether second language (L2) learners show qualitatively similar processing profiles as native speakers or whether L2 learners are restricted in their ability to use syntactic information during online processing. In the realm of wh-dependency resolution, research has examined whether learners, similar to native speakers, attempt to resolve wh-dependencies in grammatically licensed contexts but avoid positing gaps in illicit contexts such as islands. Also at issue is whether the avoidance of gap filling in islands is due to adherence to syntactic constraints or whether islands simply present processing bottlenecks. One approach has been to examine the relationship between processing abilities and the establishment of wh-dependencies in islands. Grammatical accounts of islands do not predict such a relationship as the parser should simply not predict gaps in illicit contexts. In contrast, a pattern of results showing that individuals with more processing resources are better able to establish wh-dependencies in islands could conceivably be compatible with certain processing accounts. In a self-paced reading experiment which examines the processing of wh-dependencies, we address both questions, examining whether native English speakers and Korean learners of English show qualitatively similar patterns and whether there is a relationship between working memory, as measured by counting span and reading span, and processing in both island and non-island contexts. The results of the self-paced reading experiment suggest that learners can use syntactic information on the same timecourse as native speakers, showing qualitative similarity between the two groups. Results of regression analyses did not reveal a significant relationship between working memory and the establishment of wh-dependencies in islands but we did observe significant relationships between working memory and the processing of licit wh-dependencies. As the contexts in which these

  9. Assessment of Nanosecond Time Scale Motions in Native and Non-Native States of Ubiquitin.

    PubMed

    Morozova, Olga B; Yurkovskaya, Alexandra V

    2015-10-01

    The paramagnetic relaxation times of the aromatic and β protons of Tyr59 and His68 residues of the native ubiquitin and of Tyr59 residue of the non-native ubiquitin were determined from an analysis of chemically induced dynamic nuclear polarization (CIDNP) kinetics obtained during the photoreaction of the protein and 2,2'-dipyridyl excited in the triplet state. Using the paramagnetic relaxation times determined earlier for the radicals of free amino acids as an internal standard and assuming that the hyperfine interaction (HFI) anisotropy is very similar for the radicals of free amino acids and the corresponding radicals of amino acid residues in the proteins, we determined parameters that characterize the intramolecular mobility of different protons in native and two non-native states of ubiquitin. The latter are denatured at pH 2 and 57 °C, and the A-state at pH 2 in a 60%/40% methanol/water mixture. The determination of the two parameters of intramolecular mobility (i.e., the correlation time of internal motion, τ(e), and the order parameter, S(2)) was only possible by analyzing paramagnetic relaxation data obtained at two magnetic fields (4.7 and 9.4 T) using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectrometry. Intramolecular correlation times fall into the submicrosecond-microsecond time scale. Longer correlation times and higher order parameters were found for the less accessible Tyr59 residue than for the His68 residue, as well as for the more buried β protons than for the aromatic protons for both of the protein residues in the native state. For Tyr59, intramolecular mobility increases following the loss of the tertiary structure of ubiquitin. These findings strongly support the reliability of the obtained data.

  10. Exotic taxa less related to native species are more invasive

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, Sharon Y.; Webb, Campbell O.; Salamin, Nicolas

    2006-01-01

    Some species introduced into new geographical areas from their native ranges wreak ecological and economic havoc in their new environment. Although many studies have searched for either species or habitat characteristics that predict invasiveness of exotic species, the match between characteristics of the invader and those of members of the existing native community may be essential to understanding invasiveness. Here, we find that one metric, the phylogenetic relatedness of an invader to the native community, provides a predictive tool for invasiveness. Using a phylogenetic supertree of all grass species in California, we show that highly invasive grass species are, on average, significantly less related to native grasses than are introduced but noninvasive grasses. The match between the invader and the existing native community may explain why exotic pest species are not uniformly noxious in all novel habitats. Relatedness of invaders to the native biota may be one useful criterion for prioritizing management efforts of exotic species. PMID:16581902

  11. Native Grass Community Management Plan for the Oak Ridge Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Ryon, Michael G; Parr, Patricia Dreyer; Cohen, Kari

    2007-06-01

    Land managers at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory in East Tennessee are restoring native warm-season grasses and wildflowers to various sites across the Oak Ridge Reservation (ORR). Some of the numerous benefits to planting native grasses and forbs include improved habitat quality for wildlife, improved aesthetic values, lower long-term maintenance costs, and compliance with Executive Order 13112 (Clinton 1999). Challenges to restoring native plants on the ORR include the need to gain experience in establishing and maintaining these communities and the potentially greater up-front costs of getting native grasses established. The goals of the native grass program are generally outlined on a fiscal-year basis. An overview of some of the issues associated with the successful and cost-effective establishment and maintenance of native grass and wildflower stands on the ORR is presented in this report.

  12. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- During a pre-launch Native American ceremony, Radmilla Cody (right) , the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, sings the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language. With her is her grandmother. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  13. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. - An elder of her Navaho tribe, Dorothy Cody shares the stage with her granddaughter Radmilla Cody (not shown), the 2001 Miss Navaho Nation, who is singing the 'Star Spangled Banner' in her native language during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. The ceremony was part of several days' activities commemorating John B. Herrington as the first tribally enrolled Native American astronaut to fly on a Shuttle mission. Herrington is a Mission Specialist on STS-113.

  14. Characteristics of Native Americans with HIV and implications for care.

    PubMed

    Connel, Christina; Stroup, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Johnny R; Martin, Erica

    2014-04-01

    Limited data have been published about HIV infections and response to antiretroviral therapy in the Native American population. We reviewed baseline characteristics of 112 Native American patients to determine if there were any shared characteristics that would dictate the best treatment for this population. Metabolic diseases and psychiatric disorders were common findings among our patients. Native American patients should be monitored and screened as appropriate for comorbid conditions, and these disease states should be considered when choosing an antiretroviral regimen.

  15. Wind Power on Native American Lands: Process and Progress (Poster)

    SciTech Connect

    Jimenez, A.; Flowers, L.; Gough, R.; Taylor, R.

    2005-05-01

    The United States is home to more than 700 American Indian tribes and Native Alaska villages and corporations located on 96 million acres. Many of these tribes and villages have excellent wind resources that could be commercially developed to meet their electricity needs or for electricity export. The Wind Powering America program engages Native Americans in wind energy development. This poster describes the process and progress of Wind Powering America's involvement with Native American wind energy projects.

  16. Reconceptualizing native women's health: an "indigenist" stress-coping model.

    PubMed

    Walters, Karina L; Simoni, Jane M

    2002-04-01

    This commentary presents an "indigenist" model of Native women's health, a stress-coping paradigm that situates Native women's health within the larger context of their status as a colonized people. The model is grounded in empirical evidence that traumas such as the "soul wound" of historical and contemporary discrimination among Native women influence health and mental health outcomes. The preliminary model also incorporates cultural resilience, including as moderators identity, enculturation, spiritual coping, and traditional healing practices. Current epidemiological data on Native women's general health and mental health are reconsidered within the framework of this model.

  17. Native sulfur/chlorine SAD phasing for serial femtosecond crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Nakane, Takanori; Song, Changyong; Suzuki, Mamoru; Nango, Eriko; Kobayashi, Jun; Masuda, Tetsuya; Inoue, Shigeyuki; Mizohata, Eiichi; Nakatsu, Toru; Tanaka, Tomoyuki; Tanaka, Rie; Shimamura, Tatsuro; Tono, Kensuke; Joti, Yasumasa; Kameshima, Takashi; Hatsui, Takaki; Yabashi, Makina; Nureki, Osamu; Iwata, So; Sugahara, Michihiro

    2015-11-27

    Sulfur SAD phasing facilitates the structure determination of diverse native proteins using femtosecond X-rays from free-electron lasers via serial femtosecond crystallography. Serial femtosecond crystallography (SFX) allows structures to be determined with minimal radiation damage. However, phasing native crystals in SFX is not very common. Here, the structure determination of native lysozyme from single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (SAD) by utilizing the anomalous signal of sulfur and chlorine at a wavelength of 1.77 Å is successfully demonstrated. This sulfur SAD method can be applied to a wide range of proteins, which will improve the determination of native crystal structures.

  18. Socioeconomic profiles of native American communities: Duckwater Shoshone Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Hamby, M.

    1991-10-01

    This report presents socioeconomic aspects of Native Americans of the Duckwater Shoshone Reservation. A survey is included concerning their views on the proposed Yucca Mountain waste repository. (CBS)

  19. Septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum.

    PubMed

    Molina Collada, Juan; Rico Nieto, Alicia; Díaz de Bustamante Ussia, Macarena; Balsa Criado, Alejandro

    2017-03-07

    We describe a case of septic arthritis in a native knee due to Corynebacterium striatum, gram-positive bacilli that are usually commensal organisms of skin and mucosal membranes, but are seldom implicated in native septic arthritis. An 84-year-old man with Corynebacterium striatum septic arthritis of his native left knee and no response to conventional antibiotic therapy. Thus, the patient was allowed to take dalbavancin for compassionate use, with an excellent clinical outcome. This case emphasizes de role of Corynebacterium striatum in native joint infections and highlights the importance of early detection and appropriate treatment in improving the clinical outcome.

  20. "Our culture is medicine": perspectives of Native healers on posttrauma recovery among American Indian and Alaska Native patients.

    PubMed

    Bassett, Deborah; Tsosie, Ursula; Nannauck, Sweetwater

    2012-01-01

    American Indian and Alaska Native (Native) people experience more traumatic events and are at higher risk for developing posttraumatic stress disorder compared with the general population. We conducted in-depth interviews with six Native healers about their perspectives on traumatic injury and healing. We analyzed the interviews using an inductive approach to identify common themes. We categorized these themes into four categories: causes and consequences of traumatic injury, risk factors, protective factors, and barriers to care. The implications of our study include a need for improving cultural competence among health care and social services personnel working with Native trauma patients. Additional cumulative analyses of Native healers and trauma patients would contribute to a much-needed body of knowledge on improving recovery and promoting healing among Native trauma patients.

  1. Lying in a native and foreign language.

    PubMed

    Duñabeitia, Jon Andoni; Costa, Albert

    2015-08-01

    This study explores the interaction between deceptive language and second language processing. One hundred participants were asked to produce veridical and false statements in either their first or second language. Pupil size, speech latencies, and utterance durations were analyzed. Results showed additive effects of statement veracity and the language in which these statements were produced. That is, false statements elicited larger pupil dilations and longer naming latencies compared with veridical statements, and statements in the foreign language elicited larger pupil dilations and longer speech durations and compared with first language. Importantly, these two effects did not interact, suggesting that the processing cost associated with deception is similar in a native and foreign language. The theoretical implications of these observations are discussed.

  2. New Bioactive Compounds from Korean Native Mushrooms

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seong-Eun; Hwang, Byung Soon; Song, Ja-Gyeong; Lee, Seung Woong; Lee, In-Kyoung

    2013-01-01

    Mushrooms are ubiquitous in nature and have high nutritional attributes. They have demonstrated diverse biological effects and therefore have been used in treatments of various diseases, including cancer, diabetes, bacterial and viral infections, and ulcer. In particular, polysaccharides, including β-glucan, are considered as the major constituents responsible for the biological activity of mushrooms. Although an overwhelming number of reports have been published on the importance of polysaccharides as immunomodulating agents, not all of the healing properties found in these mushrooms could be fully accounted for. Recently, many research groups have begun investigations on biologically active small-molecular weight compounds in wild mushrooms. In this mini-review, both structural diversity and biological activities of novel bioactive substances from Korean native mushrooms are described. PMID:24493936

  3. Native American Training Program in Petroleum Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, Winifred M.; Kokesh, Judith H.

    1999-04-27

    This report outlines a comprehensive training program for members of Native American tribes whose lands have oil and gas resources. The program has two components: short courses and internships. Programs are proposed for: (1) adult tribes representatives who are responsible for managing tribal mineral holdings, setting policy, or who work in the oil and gas industry; (2) graduate and undergraduate college students who are tribal members and are studying in the appropriate fields; and (3) high school and middle school teachers, science teachers. Materials and program models already have been developed for some components of the projects. The plan is a coordinated, comprehensive effort to use existing resources to accomplish its goals. Partnerships will be established with the tribes, the BIA, tribal organizations, other government agencies, and the private sector to implement the program.

  4. Introducing native landscape ecology to Hanford cleanup

    SciTech Connect

    Jim, R.; Nguyen, G.; Barry, B.

    1995-12-31

    Responsible management of environmental and public health risk requires a fundamental understanding of the intra-, inter-, and integral components of the hierarchical interaction dynamics within a pollution affected ecosystem. Because the ecosphere is a heterogeneous combination of many subecosystems of plant and animal species, its component interactions sustaining the complex whole are spatially mediated, and such an adaptive self-stabilizing ecomosaic often possesses long disintegration and regeneration times for the manifestation of observable consequences, quantitative assessment of its future structural and functional changes can be deceptive or plagued with irreducible uncertainty. This paper presents an holistic framework for the direct integration of native traditional environmental knowledge with the landscape ecology information system to refine and actualize the understanding of acceptable long-range risk and its collective estimation for an endangered population or community. An illustrative application of riparian zone restoration in the Hanford reach for wild salmon runs and habitat preservation is also discussed.

  5. Native Americans and state and local governments

    SciTech Connect

    Rusco, E.R.

    1991-10-01

    Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

  6. Sandia secure processor : a native Java processor.

    SciTech Connect

    Wickstrom, Gregory Lloyd; Gale, Jason Carl; Ma, Kwok Kee

    2003-08-01

    The Sandia Secure Processor (SSP) is a new native Java processor that has been specifically designed for embedded applications. The SSP's design is a system composed of a core Java processor that directly executes Java bytecodes, on-chip intelligent IO modules, and a suite of software tools for simulation and compiling executable binary files. The SSP is unique in that it provides a way to control real-time IO modules for embedded applications. The system software for the SSP is a 'class loader' that takes Java .class files (created with your favorite Java compiler), links them together, and compiles a binary. The complete SSP system provides very powerful functionality with very light hardware requirements with the potential to be used in a wide variety of small-system embedded applications. This paper gives a detail description of the Sandia Secure Processor and its unique features.

  7. Direct and Indirect Influence of Non-Native Neighbours on Pollination and Fruit Production of a Native Plant

    PubMed Central

    Montero-Castaño, Ana; Vilà, Montserrat

    2015-01-01

    Background Entomophilous non-native plants can directly affect the pollination and reproductive success of native plant species and also indirectly, by altering the composition and abundance of floral resources in the invaded community. Separating direct from indirect effects is critical for understanding the mechanisms underlying the impacts of non-native species on recipient communities. Objectives Our aims are: (a) to explore both the direct effect of the non-native Hedysarum coronarium and its indirect effect, mediated by the alteration of floral diversity, on the pollinator visitation rate and fructification of the native Leopoldia comosa and (b) to distinguish whether the effects of the non-native species were due to its floral display or to its vegetative interactions. Methods We conducted field observations within a flower removal experimental setup (i.e. non-native species present, absent and with its inflorescences removed) at the neighbourhood scale. Results Our study illustrates the complexity of mechanisms involved in the impacts of non-native species on native species. Overall, Hedysarum increased pollinator visitation rates to Leopoldia target plants as a result of direct and indirect effects acting in the same direction. Due to its floral display, Hedysarum exerted a direct magnet effect attracting visits to native target plants, especially those made by the honeybee. Indirectly, Hedysarum also increased the visitation rate of native target plants. Due to the competition for resources mediated by its vegetative parts, it decreased floral diversity in the neighbourhoods, which was negatively related to the visitation rate to native target plants. Hedysarum overall also increased the fructification of Leopoldia target plants, even though such an increase was the result of other indirect effects compensating for the observed negative indirect effect mediated by the decrease of floral diversity. PMID:26110630

  8. Bioengineering Human Myocardium on Native Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Guyette, Jacques P.; Charest, Jonathan M; Mills, Robert W; Jank, Bernhard J.; Moser, Philipp T.; Gilpin, Sarah E.; Gershlak, Joshua R.; Okamoto, Tatsuya; Gonzalez, Gabriel; Milan, David J.; Gaudette, Glenn R.; Ott, Harald C.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale More than 25 million individuals suffer from heart failure worldwide, with nearly 4,000 patients currently awaiting heart transplantation in the United States. Donor organ shortage and allograft rejection remain major limitations with only about 2,500 hearts transplanted each year. As a theoretical alternative to allotransplantation, patient-derived bioartificial myocardium could provide functional support and ultimately impact the treatment of heart failure. Objective The objective of this study is to translate previous work to human scale and clinically relevant cells, for the bioengineering of functional myocardial tissue based on the combination of human cardiac matrix and human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes. Methods and Results To provide a clinically relevant tissue scaffold, we translated perfusion-decellularization to human scale and obtained biocompatible human acellular cardiac scaffolds with preserved extracellular matrix composition, architecture, and perfusable coronary vasculature. We then repopulated this native human cardiac matrix with cardiac myocytes derived from non-transgenic human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) and generated tissues of increasing three-dimensional complexity. We maintained such cardiac tissue constructs in culture for 120 days to demonstrate definitive sarcomeric structure, cell and matrix deformation, contractile force, and electrical conduction. To show that functional myocardial tissue of human scale can be built on this platform, we then partially recellularized human whole heart scaffolds with human iPSC-derived cardiac myocytes. Under biomimetic culture, the seeded constructs developed force-generating human myocardial tissue, showed electrical conductivity, left ventricular pressure development, and metabolic function. Conclusions Native cardiac extracellular matrix scaffolds maintain matrix components and structure to support the seeding and engraftment of human iPS-derived cardiac myocytes, and enable

  9. Phytophagous Insects on Native and Non-Native Host Plants: Combining the Community Approach and the Biogeographical Approach

    PubMed Central

    Meijer, Kim; Zemel, Hidde; Chiba, Satoshi; Smit, Christian; Beukeboom, Leo W.; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    During the past centuries, humans have introduced many plant species in areas where they do not naturally occur. Some of these species establish populations and in some cases become invasive, causing economic and ecological damage. Which factors determine the success of non-native plants is still incompletely understood, but the absence of natural enemies in the invaded area (Enemy Release Hypothesis; ERH) is one of the most popular explanations. One of the predictions of the ERH, a reduced herbivore load on non-native plants compared with native ones, has been repeatedly tested. However, many studies have either used a community approach (sampling from native and non-native species in the same community) or a biogeographical approach (sampling from the same plant species in areas where it is native and where it is non-native). Either method can sometimes lead to inconclusive results. To resolve this, we here add to the small number of studies that combine both approaches. We do so in a single study of insect herbivory on 47 woody plant species (trees, shrubs, and vines) in the Netherlands and Japan. We find higher herbivore diversity, higher herbivore load and more herbivory on native plants than on non-native plants, generating support for the enemy release hypothesis. PMID:25955254

  10. Occurrence of the non-native annual bluegrass on the Antarctic mainland and its negative effects on native plants.

    PubMed

    Molina-Montenegro, Marco A; Carrasco-Urra, Fernando; Rodrigo, Cristian; Convey, Peter; Valladares, Fernando; Gianoli, Ernesto

    2012-08-01

    Few non-native species have colonized Antarctica, although increased human activity and accelerated climate change may increase their number, distributional range, and effects on native species on the continent. We searched 13 sites on the maritime Antarctic islands and 12 sites on the Antarctic Peninsula for annual bluegrass (Poa annua), a non-native flowering plant. We also evaluated the possible effects of competition between P. annua and 2 vascular plants native to Antarctica, Antarctic pearlwort (Colobanthus quitensis) and Antarctic hairgrass (Deschampsia antarctica). We grew the native species in experimental plots with and without annual bluegrass under conditions that mimicked the Antarctic environment. After 5 months, we measured photosynthetic performance on the basis of chlorophyll fluorescence and determined total biomass of both native species. We found individual specimens of annual bluegrass at 3 different sites on the Antarctic Peninsula during the 2007-2008 and 2009-2010 austral summers. The presence of bluegrass was associated with a statistically significant reduction in biomass of pearlwort and hairgrass, whereas the decrease in biomass of bluegrass was not statistically significant. Similarly, the presence of bluegrass significantly reduced the photosynthetic performance of the 2 native species. Sites where bluegrass occurred were close to major maritime routes of scientific expeditions and of tourist cruises to Antarctica. We believe that if current levels of human activity and regional warming persist, more non-native plant species are likely to colonize the Antarctic and may affect native species.

  11. Phytophagous insects on native and non-native host plants: combining the community approach and the biogeographical approach.

    PubMed

    Meijer, Kim; Zemel, Hidde; Chiba, Satoshi; Smit, Christian; Beukeboom, Leo W; Schilthuizen, Menno

    2015-01-01

    During the past centuries, humans have introduced many plant species in areas where they do not naturally occur. Some of these species establish populations and in some cases become invasive, causing economic and ecological damage. Which factors determine the success of non-native plants is still incompletely understood, but the absence of natural enemies in the invaded area (Enemy Release Hypothesis; ERH) is one of the most popular explanations. One of the predictions of the ERH, a reduced herbivore load on non-native plants compared with native ones, has been repeatedly tested. However, many studies have either used a community approach (sampling from native and non-native species in the same community) or a biogeographical approach (sampling from the same plant species in areas where it is native and where it is non-native). Either method can sometimes lead to inconclusive results. To resolve this, we here add to the small number of studies that combine both approaches. We do so in a single study of insect herbivory on 47 woody plant species (trees, shrubs, and vines) in the Netherlands and Japan. We find higher herbivore diversity, higher herbivore load and more herbivory on native plants than on non-native plants, generating support for the enemy release hypothesis.

  12. Native Geosciences: Strengthening the Future Through Tribal Traditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.; Quigley, I.; Douville, V.; Hollow Horn Bear, D.

    2008-12-01

    Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways in our natural sacred homelands and environments. Tribal cultures are the expression of deep understandings of geosciences shared through oral histories, language and ceremonies. Today, Native people as all people are living in a definite time of change. The developing awareness of "change" brings forth an immense opportunity to expand and elevate Native geosciences knowledge, specifically in the areas of earth, wind, fire and water. At the center of "change" is the need to balance the needs of the people with the needs of the environment. Native tradition and our inherent understanding of what is "sacred above is sacred below" is the foundation for an emerging multi-faceted approach to increasing the representation of Natives in geosciences. The approach is also a pathway to assist in Tribal language revitalization, connection of oral histories and ceremonies as well as building an intergenerational teaching/learning community. Humboldt State University, Sinte Gleska University and South Dakota School of Mines and Technology in partnership with Northern California (Hoopa, Yurok, & Karuk) and Great Plains (Lakota) Tribes have nurtured Native geosciences learning communities connected to Tribal Sacred Sites and natural resources. These sites include the Black Hills (Mato Paha, Mato Tiplia, Hinhan Kaga Paha, Mako Sica etc.), Klamath River (Ishkêesh), and Hoopa Valley (Natinixwe). Native geosciences learning is centered on the themes of earth, wind, fire and water and Native application of remote sensing technologies. Tribal Elders and Native geoscientists work collaboratively providing Native families in-field experiential intergenerational learning opportunities which invite participants to immerse themselves spiritually, intellectually, physically and emotionally in the experiences. Through this immersion and experience Native students and families strengthen the circle of our future Tribal

  13. Non-native ecosystem engineer alters estuarine communities.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Kimberly W; Micheli, Fiorenza

    2010-08-01

    Many ecosystems are created by the presence of ecosystem engineers that play an important role in determining species' abundance and species composition. Additionally, a mosaic environment of engineered and non-engineered habitats has been shown to increase biodiversity. Non-native ecosystem engineers can be introduced into environments that do not contain or have lost species that form biogenic habitat, resulting in dramatic impacts upon native communities. Yet, little is known about how non-native ecosystem engineers interact with natives and other non-natives already present in the environment, specifically whether non-native ecosystem engineers facilitate other non-natives, and whether they increase habitat heterogeneity and alter the diversity, abundance, and distribution of benthic species. Through sampling and experimental removal of reefs, we examine the effects of a non-native reef-building tubeworm, Ficopomatus enigmaticus, on community composition in the central Californian estuary, Elkhorn Slough. Tubeworm reefs host significantly greater abundances of many non-native polychaetes and amphipods, particularly the amphipods Monocorophium insidiosum and Melita nitida, compared to nearby mudflats. Infaunal assemblages under F. enigmaticus reefs and around reef's edges show very low abundance and taxonomic diversity. Once reefs are removed, the newly exposed mudflat is colonized by opportunistic non-native species, such as M. insidiosum and the polychaete Streblospio benedicti, making removal of reefs a questionable strategy for control. These results show that provision of habitat by a non-native ecosystem engineer may be a mechanism for invasional meltdown in Elkhorn Slough, and that reefs increase spatial heterogeneity in the abundance and composition of benthic communities.

  14. Native fish conservation areas: A vision for large-scale conservation of native fish communities

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jack E.; Williams, Richard N.; Thurow, Russell F.; Elwell, Leah; Philipp, David P.; Harris, Fred A.; Kershner, Jeffrey L.; Martinez, Patrick J.; Miller, Dirk; Reeves, Gordon H.; Frissell, Christopher A.; Sedell, James R.

    2011-01-01

    The status of freshwater fishes continues to decline despite substantial conservation efforts to reverse this trend and recover threatened and endangered aquatic species. Lack of success is partially due to working at smaller spatial scales and focusing on habitats and species that are already degraded. Protecting entire watersheds and aquatic communities, which we term "native fish conservation areas" (NFCAs), would complement existing conservation efforts by protecting intact aquatic communities while allowing compatible uses. Four critical elements need to be met within a NFCA: (1) maintain processes that create habitat complexity, diversity, and connectivity; (2) nurture all of the life history stages of the fishes being protected; (3) include a long-term enough watershed to provide long-term persistence of native fish populations; and (4) provide management that is sustainable over time. We describe how a network of protected watersheds could be created that would anchor aquatic conservation needs in river basins across the country.

  15. Contrasting Pollinators and Pollination in Native and Non-Native Regions of Highbush Blueberry Production

    PubMed Central

    Gibbs, Jason; Elle, Elizabeth; Bobiwash, Kyle; Haapalainen, Tiia; Isaacs, Rufus

    2016-01-01

    Highbush blueberry yields are dependent on pollination by bees, and introduction of managed honey bees is the primary strategy used for pollination of this crop. Complementary pollination services are also provided by wild bees, yet highbush blueberry is increasingly grown in regions outside its native range where wild bee communities may be less adapted to the crop and growers may still be testing appropriate honey bee stocking densities. To contrast crop pollination in native and non-native production regions, we sampled commercial ‘Bluecrop’ blueberry fields in British Columbia and Michigan with grower-selected honey bee stocking rates (0–39.5 hives per ha) to compare bee visitors to blueberry flowers, pollination and yield deficits, and how those vary with local- and landscape-scale factors. Observed and Chao-1 estimated species richness, as well as Shannon diversity of wild bees visiting blueberries were significantly higher in Michigan where the crop is within its native range. The regional bee communities were also significantly different, with Michigan farms having greater dissimilarity than British Columbia. Blueberry fields in British Columbia had fewer visits by honey bees than those in Michigan, irrespective of stocking rate, and they also had lower berry weights and a significant pollination deficit. In British Columbia, pollination service increased with abundance of wild bumble bees, whereas in Michigan the abundance of honey bees was the primary predictor of pollination. The proportion of semi-natural habitat at local and landscape scales was positively correlated with wild bee abundance in both regions. Wild bee abundance declined significantly with distance from natural borders in Michigan, but not in British Columbia where large-bodied bumble bees dominated the wild bee community. Our results highlight the varying dependence of crop production on different types of bees and reveal that strategies for pollination improvement in the same crop

  16. Differences in ecological structure, function, and native species abundance between native and invaded Hawaiian streams.

    PubMed

    Holitzki, Tara M; MacKenzie, Richard A; Wiegner, Tracy N; McDermid, Karla J

    2013-09-01

    Poeciliids, one of the most invasive species worldwide, are found on almost every continent and have been identified as an "invasive species of concern" in the United States, New Zealand, and Australia. Despite their global prevalence, few studies have quantified their impacts on tropical stream ecosystem structure, function, and biodiversity. Utilizing Hawaiian streams as model ecosystems, we documented how ecological structure, function, and native species abundance differed between poeciliid-free and poeciliid-invaded tropical streams. Stream nutrient yields, benthic biofilm biomass, densities of macroinvertebrates and fish, and community structures of benthic algae, macroinvertebrates, and fish were compared between streams with and without established poeciliid populations on the island of Hawai'i, Hawaii, USA. Sum nitrate (sigmaNO3(-) = NO3(-) + NO2(-)), total nitrogen, and total organic carbon yields were eight times, six times, and five times higher, respectively, in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Benthic biofilm ash-free dry mass was 1.5x higher in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free streams. Percentage contributions of chironomids and hydroptilid caddisflies to macroinvertebrate densities were lower in poeciliid streams compared to poeciliid-free streams, while percentage contributions of Cheumatopsyche analis caddisflies, Dugesia sp. flatworms, and oligochaetes were higher. Additionally, mean densities of native gobies were two times lower in poeciliid streams than in poeciliid-free ones, with poeciliid densities being approximately eight times higher than native fish densities. Our results, coupled with the wide distribution of invasive poeciliids across Hawaii and elsewhere in the tropics, suggest that poeciliids may negatively impact the ecosystem structure, function, and native species abundance of tropical streams they invade. This underscores the need for increased public awareness to prevent future introductions and for

  17. Yesterday Still Lives...Our Native People Remember Alaska.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeMarco, Pat, Ed.; And Others

    In the summer of 1978, seven teenagers and several staff members from the Fairbanks Native Association-Johnson O'Malley program set out to record some of Alaska's past by interviewing a number of older Alaska Natives and writing their biographical sketches. Some of the students spent a week along the Yukon River taping and photographing people;…

  18. 7 CFR 1780.49 - Rural or Native Alaskan villages.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 12 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rural or Native Alaskan villages. 1780.49 Section... § 1780.49 Rural or Native Alaskan villages. (a) General. (1) This section contains regulations for providing grants to remedy the dire sanitation conditions in rural Alaskan villages using funds...

  19. Native American Community Academy: The Power of Embracing Culture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Principal Leadership, 2013

    2013-01-01

    The value that Native American nations place on deliberative experiential learning and oral reflection often is opposed to traditional practices in US schools. The inherent differences between those cultural approaches to learning have contributed to the large achievement gap between Native American schools and traditional public schools. In 2006…

  20. Native American Education Program, 1982-83. OEE Evaluation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inman, Deborah

    During 1982-83, the Native American Education Program provided after-school and summer session instruction and supportive services to approximately 450 Native American grade K-12 students scattered throughout New York City. Goals of visiting and interviewing 50% of the target population were realized, with 220 home visits made. Materials and…

  1. From Realities to Values: A Strategy Framework for Digital Natives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blowers, Helene

    2010-01-01

    For many Digital Natives, text messaging or SMS is the communication channel of choice, but preferences in communication channels aren't the only distinguishing traits of Digital Natives. Attitudes and perceptions related to digital privacy, identity, creativity, piracy, and advocacy also help to set younger generations apart. So how does one take…

  2. The Native American Learner and Bicultural Science Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cajete, Gregory A.

    Explanations of natural phenomena within a traditional Native American context are often at odds with Western scientific philosophy and what is taught in school science. Herein lies a very real conflict between two distinctly different worldviews: the mutualistic/holistic-oriented worldview of Native American cultures and the…

  3. Alaska Native Population and Manpower: 1975. A Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Laurel L.

    Numbering approximately 62,005 and representing 15.3% of the total Alaska population in 1975, Alaska Natives are a finite and predominately rural subpopulation. However, a significant portion of the Alaska Native Work Force (estimated at 13,854) now resides in the major urban areas and is available to the Statewide Work Force. Statistics from May,…

  4. Give It Your Best! Profiles of Native American Athletes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coker, Russell; Kast, Sherry

    The purpose of this publication is to encourage and enhance the participation of American Indian and Alaska Native athletes in organized sports at the secondary, collegiate, and professional levels. Profiles are given of 37 young Native American women and men who are succeeding in competitive athletics, as well as in the classroom. One page is…

  5. Multicompetence and Native Speaker Variation in Clausal Packaging in Japanese

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Amanda; Gullberg, Marianne

    2012-01-01

    Native speakers show systematic variation in a range of linguistic domains as a function of a variety of sociolinguistic variables. This article addresses native language variation in the context of multicompetence, i.e. knowledge of two languages in one mind (Cook, 1991). Descriptions of motion were elicited from functionally monolingual and…

  6. Native Hawaiian women and the experience of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Eide, Phyllis

    2006-01-01

    This article describes a qualitative inquiry into the experiences of Native Hawaiian women living through and beyond a diagnosis of breast cancer. Native Hawaiian women have increased incidence and mortality breast cancer rates compared with other ethnic groups in Hawaii. Health promotion programs targeted at Native Hawaiians have often failed because of cultural inappropriateness. A lack of knowledge about the culture is frequently a part of this failure. Therefore, the specific purpose of this study was to examine the lived experience of a selected group of Native Hawaiian breast cancer survivors, uncover the connections between their narratives and their personal and cultural milieux, and generate knowledge about the Native Hawaiian woman's breast cancer experience that would be useful in planning future health promotion outreach efforts. The study consisted of interview data collected from 11 Native Hawaiian female participants, ranging from 44 to 82 years of age. An interpretive phenomenological analysis of the data identified recurrent contexts and themes. The three major contexts in their stories were discovery, transformation (physical, emotional and spiritual), and life realignment. Themes included the importance of spiritual connection, an altruistic desire to reach out and assist others in a similar situation, and a context of familial silence about cancer history. These elements can assist in formulating health promotion and intervention activities for this population. Interwoven with these themes was the Native Hawaiian concept of pono--a sense of rightness and balance, and the crucial importance of the participants' Native Hawaiian identity and cultural heritage.

  7. Female Flight? Gender Balance and Outmigration by Native Alaskan Villagers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Lawrence C.; Seyfrit, Carole L.

    Surveys in Alaska's predominantly Native, Bristol Bay and Northwest Arctic regions examined attitudes toward education and migration among high school students, as well as outcomes among high school graduates. These surveys encompassed 430 high school students and 144 recent high school graduates in 15 predominantly Native villages. About 63…

  8. Facts and Myths of AIDS and Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Irene S.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses risk factors for AIDS among Native women: rates of infected male partners, biological factors affecting vulnerability, other sexually transmitted diseases, poverty, access to health services, relationships with partners, lack of trust in health care providers, and intravenous drug use. Describes the work of the Native American Women's…

  9. Mapping the Marias: The Interface of Native and Scientific Cartographies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Belyea, Barbara

    1997-01-01

    As Lewis and Clark moved west across the North American continent, their contact with Native informants revealed spatial and topographic concepts at variance with their own "scientific" methods of cartography. The explorers' failure to understand and integrate Native patterns of geographical knowledge resulted in long detours where…

  10. Initial Teacher Training Courses and Non-Native Speaker Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Jason

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study contrasting 41 native speakers (NSs) and 38 non-native speakers (NNSs) of English from two short initial teacher training courses, the Cambridge Certificate in English Language Teaching to Adults and the Trinity College London CertTESOL. After a brief history and literature review, I present findings on teachers'…

  11. Addressing Cultural and Native Language Interference in Second Language Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allard, Daniele; Bourdeau, Jacqueline; Mizoguchi, Riichiro

    2011-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of cultural and native language interference in second/foreign language acquisition. More specifically, it examines issues of interference that can be traced to a student's native language and that also have a cultural component. To this effect, an understanding of what actually comprises both interference and…

  12. Recovering Native Traditions and Tales for Younger Readers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stott, Jon C.

    1995-01-01

    Reviews 14 children's books concerned with traditional Native American tales and experiences, written mostly by Native authors and published 1989-93. Includes books on Hiawatha, buffalo, the battle of the Little Bighorn, the Fetterman Fight, and traditional beliefs and values; Cree, Navajo, Chickasaw, and Seneca tales and stories; fictional…

  13. Activities commemorating John B. Herrington as first Native American astronaut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    KENNEDY SPACE CENTER, FLA. -- Joyce and James Herrington, parents of John Herrington, accept a gift during a pre-launch Native American ceremony. They are the parents of John Herrington, mission specialist on mission STS-113. Herrington is the first Native American to be going into space.

  14. Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention in a Rural Native American Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagen, Janet W.; Skenandore, Alice H.; Scow, Beverly M.; Schanen, Jennifer G.; Clary, Frieda Hugo

    2012-01-01

    Nationally, the United States has a higher rate of teen pregnancy than any other industrialized nation. Native American youth have a higher birth rate than the national rate. A full-year healthy relationship program, based on Native American teachings, traditions, and cultural norms, was delivered to all eighth-grade students at a rural tribal…

  15. Sociocultural Dimensions of Voice in Non-Native Language Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harklau, Linda A.; Schecter, Sandra R.

    Discussion of one form of pragmatic competence, projecting a sense of stylistic voice into texts, explores how writing in a non-native language affects the ability to express stylistic voice and enter into social dialogue with readers. Using the published reflections of authors writing professionally in a non-native language, the analysis shows…

  16. Inculturation: Sowing Seeds of Catholicism in Native Soil.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Larry

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the history of the Plains Indians' relationship with the Catholic Church. Argues that some Catholics who denied the validity of Native American ritual turned Indians away from the Church. But currently, the Church's attempts to allow incorporation of those rituals into Church services have helped to revitalize the Native Catholic Church.…

  17. Your Rights: A Handbook for Native American Youth in Arizona.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dale, Michael; And Others

    A handbook for Arizona Native Americans under 18 years old explains rights and responsibilities as young people, Native Americans, tribal members, and residents of Arizona. Rights are defined, ways of protecting rights outlined, and the fact that young people's rights are changing noted. Rights as a family member are discussed, as well as changes…

  18. Beyond the Asterisk: Understanding Native Students in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shotton, Heather, Ed.; Lowe, Shelly C., Ed.; Waterman, Stephanie J., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    While the number of Native Americans attending post-secondary institutions continues to rise, Native Americans remain one of the least represented and least understood populations in our colleges and universities. The lack of knowledge about, and understanding of this particular population may be attributed to its invisibility within the academy,…

  19. The Current Condition of Native Americans. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgkinson, Harold

    This digest provides an overview of Native American demography, education, employment, and health conditions. In the 1990 census, 1.9 million Americans claimed American Indian status and over 5 million indicated Indian descent. About 637,000 lived on reservations or trust lands, while over 250,000 lived in cities. Half of Native Americans lived in…

  20. Digital Natives and Digital Divide: Analysing Perspective for Emerging Pedagogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Onye, Uriel U.; Du, Yunfei

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the concepts of digital natives and digital divide from the perspective of the digital outsiders (part of digital natives). It takes a critical look at the implications of available ICT in both developed and underdeveloped countries in the fight against digital divide. The major contribution to literature is by drawing…

  1. The Need for Cultural Awareness in Native American Sex Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ponzetti, James J., Jr.; Abrahamson, Rose Ann

    1990-01-01

    Increased pregnancies among Native American adolescents emphasizes the need for a more comprehensive approach to sex education. Incorporation of cultural awareness in sex education could improve self-concept among Native adolescents and help them reconcile the cognitive, socialization, and situational dimensions of sexual decision making. Contains…

  2. The Non-Native English Speaker Teachers in TESOL Movement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamhi-Stein, Lía D.

    2016-01-01

    It has been almost 20 years since what is known as the non-native English-speaking (NNES) professionals' movement--designed to increase the status of NNES professionals--started within the US-based TESOL International Association. However, still missing from the literature is an understanding of what a movement is, and why non-native English…

  3. Health Education Interventions among Native Americans: A Review and Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    LeMaster, Pamela L.; Connell, Cathleen M.

    1994-01-01

    A review of 19 studies on Native Americans examined 12 focused on chronic conditions (diabetes, heart disease, substance abuse, fetal alcohol syndrome) and 7 on prevention (dental disease, prenatal/infant health, nutrition, HIV prevention, health promotion). Results showed Native Americans particularly at risk for diabetes and alcohol abuse and…

  4. Funding and Resources for American Indian and Alaska Native Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brescia, William

    The Federal Government has a responsibility to fulfill treaty promises for Native education. However, spending for Native education has fallen since 1975, while overall educational spending has increased. Reversal of this trend must include a shift in focus from quantitative goals to qualitative goals and support of culturally relevant education.…

  5. Unemployed Native Americans in a Work Orientation Program in Phoenix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntosh, Billie Jane

    The unemployment rate for Native Americans is 49% nationwide and 54% in Arizona. The Job Training Partnership Act (JPTA) program at the Phoenix Indian Center trains Native American adults to enter the urban work force. The Center offers work orientation programs, individual counseling, and work experience programs. The majority of the participants…

  6. American Indian and Alaska Native Cancer Data Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burhansstipanov, Linda; Tenney, Martha J.; Hampton, James W.

    1999-01-01

    Data on cancer among American Indians and Alaska Natives are sparse and riddled with misclassification errors, resulting in underreporting of cancer incidence and mortality. Incidence rates are discussed for various cancer types in seven Native nations. Barriers to participation in cancer prevention and control programs are examined. Contains…

  7. Android: Call C Functions with the Native Development Kit (NDK)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    mechanism to call embedded C native codes , which are used to increase the performance of a computationally intensive application. This step-by-step...Vu a. REPORT Unclassified b. ABSTRACT Unclassified c. THIS PAGE Unclassified 19b. TELEPHONE NUMBER (Include area code ) 301-394-5324 Standard... codes to add 2 integer numbers......................................................7 Fig. 7 Native library Java class

  8. Native aphids of New Zealand--diversity and host associations.

    PubMed

    Teulon, D A J; Stufkens, M A W; Drayton, G M; Maw, H E L; Scott, I A W; Bulman, S R; Carver, M; Von Dohlen, C D; Eastop, V F; Foottit, R G

    2013-01-01

    At least 15 species of aphids are now recognised as New Zealand natives and most of these are very likely to be endemic. Most native aphids belong in the subfamily Aphidinae (Aphidini), with a possible single species in Aphidinae-Macrosiphini, at least two in Neophyllaphidinae and one in Taiwanaphidinae. With one exception, native aphids are restricted to a single host plant genus, and these hosts are from 13 genera and 12 plant families in the Pinales and Angiospermae-Eudicotyledonae, suggesting that the aphids are a remnant fauna. No known native aphids have host plants from the Pteridophyta or Angiospermae-Monocotyledonae, with the possible exception of two possibly native species extracted from native tussock grassland turfs. Most host plant genera have some degree of Gondwanan distribution, but only two indigenous species are found on large forest trees and only one host is deciduous. Native aphids have been recorded from sea level to the subalpine zone, reflecting their host plant distributions. Sexual reproduction, followed by several parthenogenetic generations on the same host plant, appears to be the norm for most species. Eggs appear to be used for surviving winter conditions in some species and summer conditions in others. Native aphid distribution and abundance varies with five species considered to be scarce, one species localised, two species sparse and three relatively common based on current knowledge.

  9. Serving Native American Children and Families: Considering Cultural Variables.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-Zanartu, Carol

    1996-01-01

    This article examines the different world views and belief systems, acculturation stress, school-home discontinuity, learning styles, communication patterns, and parent participation of Native American students. The assessment and evaluation of Native American students and culturally compatible service delivery models are also discussed. (CR)

  10. Native Students Speak: What Makes a Good Teacher?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peacock, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses what Native students have to say about teachers and good teaching. In an interview with the teachers of Native students and the students themselves, the teachers emphasized the importance of tapping students' intrinsic motivators--their need to feel self-determined, to satisfy their natural curiosity, to…

  11. Native American Women and HIV/AIDS: Building Healthier Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vernon, Irene S.; Thurman, Pamela Jumper

    2009-01-01

    A quote From chief Wilma Mankiller in her "Rebuilding the Cherokee Nation" asks Natives to focus on their strengths and wisdom; for those in the health field, it motivates them to create a vision of health parity and community wellness. In following her lead the authors share general information about the health of Natives, focus on the health of…

  12. Writing Like a Native: The Process of Reformulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen, Andrew D.

    A procedure for providing feedback on compositions of advanced second language learners is described. Under this procedure, called reformulation, a native speaker rewrites second language learners' essays so that the ideas are preserved but presented in a native-like manner. A case study in reformulating Hebrew-as-a-second-language essay and a…

  13. Pausing Patterns: Differences between L2 Learners and Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tavakoli, Parvaneh

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a comparative study of pauses made by L2 learners and native speakers of English while narrating picture stories. The comparison is based on the number of pauses and total amount of silence in the middle and at the end of clauses in the performance of 40 native speakers and 40 L2 learners of English. The results of the…

  14. Women of Hope: Native American/Hawaiian. Study Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschfelder, Arlene; Molin, Paulette Fairbanks; Oneita, Kathryn; Wakim, Yvonne B.

    This study guide accompanies a poster series and documentary video about 12 American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian "women of hope." The women vary by age, education, profession, and geographic locale, but they share an unwavering commitment and dedication to their people's struggle to survive and flourish as distinct…

  15. Dimensions of Acculturation in Native American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reynolds, Amy L.; Sodano, Sandro M.; Ecklund, Timothy R.; Guyker, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Exploratory and confirmatory factor analyses were applied to the responses of two respective independent samples of Native American college students on the Native American Acculturation Scale (NAAS). Three correlated dimensions were found to underlie NAAS items and these dimensions may also comprise a broader higher order dimension of Native…

  16. New Social Learning from Two Spirit Native Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, J. B., Jr.; Sheppard, Maia

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors highlight connections between research on Two Spirit Native Americans and standard social studies curriculum. Two Spirit is a Pan-Indian term describing Native Americans who believe they embody both masculine and feminine characteristics/traits in one physical body. Findings from this research expand the field's…

  17. 76 FR 42713 - Notice of Meeting; Administration for Native Americans

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-19

    .... FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lillian A. Sparks, Commissioner, Administration for Native Americans... for Native Americans, 370 L'Enfant Promenade, SW., Washington, DC 20447, anacommissioner@acf.hhs.gov... HUMAN SERVICES Administration for Children and Families Notice of Meeting; Administration for...

  18. Native and L2 Processing of Homonyms in Sentential Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elston-Guttler, K.E.; Friederici, A.D.

    2005-01-01

    We compare native and non-native processing of homonyms in sentence context whose two most frequent meanings are nouns (e.g., sentence) or a noun and a verb (e.g., trip). With both participant groups, we conducted a combined reaction time (RT)/event-related brain potential (ERP) lexical decision experiment with two stimulus-onset asynchronies…

  19. Teaching English in China: A Handbook for Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Wei

    2004-01-01

    This handbook is designed for native English speakers who are preparing to teach English in China. The contents of the handbook are selected based on the findings of face-to-face interviews and a questionnaire survey conducted by the author with experienced native English teachers to China as the partial fulfillment of her Master's in TESOL…

  20. Lifelong Learning and Cultural Identity: Canada's Native People.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Brian; Steckley, John

    This paper focuses on lifelong learning and the cultural identity of Canada's native people. The introduction reviews educational programs instituted by indigenous minority groups in New Zealand and Hawaii. The second section reviews the importance of storytelling and ritual ceremonies in Native education. The third section discusses the tension…

  1. American Indian/Alaska Native College Student Retention Strategies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.

    2009-01-01

    This article presents findings from a qualitative study examining the similarities and differences between American Indian/Alaska Native student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to American Indian/Alaska Native students…

  2. It's about Family: Native American Student Persistence in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guillory, Raphael M.; Wolverton, Mimi

    2008-01-01

    This article presents findings from a study examining the similarities and differences between Native American student perceptions and the perceptions of state representatives, university presidents, and faculty about persistence factors and barriers to degree completion specific to Native American students at three land-grant universities in…

  3. The Way It Is Today. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    The final issue in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet for elementary students discusses contemporary Indian leaders and issues, the survival of traditions, and the effects of Indian stereotyping. Designed to help students understand the problems that have faced Native Americans since the first Europeans settled on…

  4. SI-YUU-DZE: Service Learning in Native Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, McClellan

    1995-01-01

    Many reasons are cited for the failure of Western-based schooling in reference to Native American youth. Presents and discusses three different "service learning" schools which utilize the value system and integrated learning approach of traditional Native American education: Acoma Pueblo, Zuni Pueblo, and the National Indian Youth…

  5. Cardiovascular Deaths among Alaskan Natives, 1980-86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middaugh, John P.

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes death certificate data to discover the number of deaths of Alaskan natives caused by cardiovascular disease. Rates from cardiovascular diseases and atherosclerosis from 1980-86 among Alaskan natives were lower than rates among other Alaskans, while death rates from other causes were higher. Discusses the possible impact of diet. (JS)

  6. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  7. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  8. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  9. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  10. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  11. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  12. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  13. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  14. 45 CFR 670.21 - Designation of native plants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of native plants. 670.21 Section 670.21 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  15. 45 CFR 670.19 - Designation of native mammals.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Designation of native mammals. 670.19 Section 670.19 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION CONSERVATION OF ANTARCTIC ANIMALS AND PLANTS Native Mammals, Birds, Plants, and Invertebrates §...

  16. Mismatch: Globalization and Native Speaker Models of Linguistic Competence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hodgson, Kevin Michael

    2014-01-01

    Although the paradigm shift towards English as an International Language (EIL) has been generally accepted within the academic community, a valorization of native speaker norms continues to be prevalent among many non-native speakers (NNSs). Through data drawn from a qualitative questionnaire and proficiency assessment results (TOEIC), this mixed…

  17. Substance Abuse and Spirituality: A Program for Native American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Navarro, Jay; And Others

    1997-01-01

    This report describes an innovative program to prevent substance abuse among Native American students that was implemented at the Institute for American Indian Arts in Santa Fe (New Mexico). The program emphasized traditional values, history, and spirituality to enhance self-esteem. It involved readings, classroom discussions, Native American…

  18. Native Networking: Telecommunications and Information Technology in Indian Country.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casey, James; Ross, Randy; Warren, Marcia

    This report on the status of telecommunications and information technology in Indian Country was created as a tool for reference, training, planning, and general educational purposes to be used by Native Americans, government policy makers, and others. A background section discusses policy and the current state of Native communities with regard to…

  19. A Summary of Changes in the Status of Alaska Natives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alaska Univ., Anchorage. Inst. of Social and Economic Research.

    Replication of 78 tables from the 1973 2(c) Report by the Secretary of the Interior using 1980 census information provided data to document the social and economic changes in the status of Alaska Natives since the passage of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. Comparison of 1970 and 1980 data showed an average 2.4% growth rate in the Native…

  20. Native American Visual Vocabulary: Ways of Thinking and Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dyc, Gloria; Milligan, Carolyn

    Visual literacy is a culturally-derived strength of Native American students. On a continent with more than 200 languages, Native Americans relied heavily on visual intelligence for trade and communication between tribes. Tribal people interpreted medicine paint, tattoos, and clothing styles to determine the social roles of those with whom they…