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Sample records for native heterotetrameric mofe

  1. Functional NifD-K fusion protein in Azotobacter vinelandii is a homodimeric complex equivalent to the native heterotetrameric MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, Surobhi; Pulakat, Lakshmi; Gavini, Nara . E-mail: gavini@biology.msstate.edu

    2005-11-18

    The MoFe protein of the complex metalloenzyme nitrogenase folds as a heterotetramer containing two copies each of the homologous {alpha} and {beta} subunits, encoded by the nifD and the nifK genes respectively. Recently, the functional expression of a fusion NifD-K protein of nitrogenase was demonstrated in Azotobacter vinelandii, strongly implying that the MoFe protein is flexible as it could accommodate major structural changes, yet remain functional [M.H. Suh, L. Pulakat, N. Gavini, J. Biol. Chem. 278 (2003) 5353-5360]. This finding led us to further explore the type of interaction between the fused MoFe protein units. We aimed to determine whether an interaction exists between the two fusion MoFe proteins to form a homodimer that is equivalent to native heterotetrameric MoFe protein. Using the Bacteriomatch Two-Hybrid System, translationally fused constructs of NifD-K (fusion) with the full-length {lambda}CI of the pBT bait vector and also NifD-K (fusion) with the N-terminal {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG target vector were made. To compare the extent of interaction between the fused NifD-K proteins to that of the {beta}-{beta} interactions in the native MoFe protein, we proceeded to generate translationally fused constructs of NifK with the {alpha}-RNAP of the pTRG vector and {lambda}CI protein of the pBT vector. The strength of the interaction between the proteins in study was determined by measuring the {beta}-galactosidase activity and extent of ampicillin resistance of the colonies expressing these proteins. This analysis demonstrated that direct protein-protein interaction exists between NifD-K fusion proteins, suggesting that they exist as homodimers. As the interaction takes place at the {beta}-interfaces of the NifD-K fusion proteins, we propose that these homodimers of NifD-K fusion protein may function in a similar manner as that of the heterotetrameric native MoFe protein. The observation that the extent of protein-protein interaction between the {beta

  2. Native cone photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated channel is a heterotetrameric complex comprising both CNGA3 and CNGB3: a study using the cone-dominant retina of Nrl-/- mice.

    PubMed

    Matveev, Alexander V; Quiambao, Alexander B; Browning Fitzgerald, J; Ding, Xi-Qin

    2008-09-01

    Cone vision mediated by photoreceptor cyclic nucleotide-gated (CNG) channel activation is essential for central and color vision and visual acuity. Mutations in genes encoding the cone CNG channel subunits, CNGA3 and CNGB3, have been linked to various forms of achromatopsia and progressive cone dystrophy in humans. This study investigates the biochemical components of native cone CNG channels, using the cone-dominant retina in mice deficient in the transcription factor neural retina leucine zipper (Nrl). Abundant expression of CNGA3 and CNGB3 but no rod CNG channel expression was detected in Nrl-/- retina by western blotting and immunolabeling. Localization of cone CNG channel in both blue (S)- and red/green (M)-cones was shown by double immunolabeling using antibodies against the channel subunits and against the S- and M-opsins. Immunolabeling also showed co-localization of CNGA3 and CNGB3 in the mouse retina. Co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated the direct interaction between CNGA3 and CNGB3. Chemical cross-linking readily generated products at sizes consistent with oligomers of the channel complexes ranging from dimeric to tetrameric complexes, in a concentration- and time-dependent pattern. Thus this work provides the first biochemical evidence showing the inter-subunit interaction between CNGA3 and CNGB3 and the presence of heterotetrameric complexes of the native cone CNG channel in retina. No association between CNGA3 and the cone Na(+)/Ca(2+)-K(+) exchanger (NCKX2) was shown by co-immunoprecipitation and chemical cross-linking. This may implicate a distinct modulatory mechanism for Ca(2+) homeostasis in cones compared to rods.

  3. Fe Protein-Independent Substrate Reduction by Nitrogenase MoFe Protein Variants

    SciTech Connect

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Rasmussen, Andrew J.; Keable, Stephen M.; Inglet, Boyd S.; Shaw, Sudipta; Zadvornyy, Oleg; Duval, Simon S.; Dean, Dennis R.; Raugei, Simone; Peters, John W.; Seefeldt, Lance C.

    2015-04-21

    The reduction of substrates catalyzed by nitrogenase normally requires nucleotide-dependent Fe protein delivery of electrons to the MoFe protein, which contains the active site FeMo-cofactor. Here, it is reported that independent substitution of three amino acids (ß-98Tyr→His, α-64Tyr→His, and ß-99Phe→His) located between the P cluster and FeMo-cofactor within the MoFe protein endows it with the ability to reduce protons to H2, azide to ammonia, and hydrazine to ammonia without the need for Fe protein or ATP. Instead, electrons can be provided by the low potential reductant polyaminocarboxylate ligated Eu(II) (Em -1.1 to -0.84 V vs NHE). The crystal structure of the ß-98Tyr→His variant MoFe protein was determined, revealing only small changes near the amino acid substitution that affect the solvent structure and immediate vicinity between the P cluster and the FeMo-cofactor, with no global conformational changes observed. Computational normal mode analysis on the nitrogenase complex reveal coupling in the motions of the Fe protein and the region of the MoFe protein with these three amino acids, which suggests a possible mechanism for how Fe protein might communicate deep within the MoFe protein subtle changes that profoundly affect intramolecular electron transfer and substrate reduction. This work was supported by a grant from the National Science Foundation (MCB-1330807) to JWP and LCS. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (DE-SC0010687 and DE-SC0010834 to LCS and DRD) and the Division of Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Bio-Sciences (SR). The coordinates for the ß-98His MoFe protein were deposited with the Protein Data Bank (PDB 4XPI).

  4. Nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution: comparison with the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Li-Mei; Morrison, Christine N.; Kaiser, Jens T.; Rees, Douglas C.

    2015-02-01

    Determination of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from C. pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution and comparison to its distinct ortholog from A. vinelandii at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp1) has been determined at 1.08 Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Cp1 and the ortholog from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1) represent two distinct families of nitrogenases, differing primarily by a long insertion in the α-subunit and a deletion in the β-subunit of Cp1 relative to Av1. Comparison of these two MoFe protein structures at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The FeMo cofactors defining the active sites of the MoFe protein are essentially identical between the two proteins. The surrounding environment is also highly conserved, suggesting that this structural arrangement is crucial for nitrogen reduction. The P clusters are likewise similar, although the surrounding protein and solvent environment is less conserved relative to that of the FeMo cofactor. The P cluster and FeMo cofactor in Av1 and Cp1 are connected through a conserved water tunnel surrounded by similar secondary-structure elements. The long α-subunit insertion loop occludes the presumed Fe protein docking surface on Cp1 with few contacts to the remainder of the protein. This makes it plausible that this loop is repositioned to open up the Fe protein docking surface for complex formation.

  5. Nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum at 1.08 Å resolution: comparison with the Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Mei; Morrison, Christine N; Kaiser, Jens T; Rees, Douglas C

    2015-02-01

    The X-ray crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp1) has been determined at 1.08 Å resolution by multiwavelength anomalous diffraction phasing. Cp1 and the ortholog from Azotobacter vinelandii (Av1) represent two distinct families of nitrogenases, differing primarily by a long insertion in the α-subunit and a deletion in the β-subunit of Cp1 relative to Av1. Comparison of these two MoFe protein structures at atomic resolution reveals conserved structural arrangements that are significant to the function of nitrogenase. The FeMo cofactors defining the active sites of the MoFe protein are essentially identical between the two proteins. The surrounding environment is also highly conserved, suggesting that this structural arrangement is crucial for nitrogen reduction. The P clusters are likewise similar, although the surrounding protein and solvent environment is less conserved relative to that of the FeMo cofactor. The P cluster and FeMo cofactor in Av1 and Cp1 are connected through a conserved water tunnel surrounded by similar secondary-structure elements. The long α-subunit insertion loop occludes the presumed Fe protein docking surface on Cp1 with few contacts to the remainder of the protein. This makes it plausible that this loop is repositioned to open up the Fe protein docking surface for complex formation.

  6. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W; Adams, Michael W W; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P

    2013-12-01

    We have applied (57)Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure.

  7. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W. W.; , Francis E. Jenney, Jr.; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2013-12-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Iron-sulfur protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the crystal structure.

  8. Nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) of rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Yisong; Brecht, Eric; Aznavour, Kristen; Nix, Jay C.; Xiao, Yuming; Wang, Hongxin; George, Simon J.; Bau, Robert; Keable, Stephen; Peters, John W.; Adams, Michael W.W.; Jenney, Francis; Sturhahn, Wolfgang; Alp, Ercan E.; Zhao, Jiyong; Yoda, Yoshitaka; Cramer, Stephen P.

    2014-01-01

    We have applied 57Fe nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) for the first time to study the dynamics of Fe centers in Fe-S protein crystals, including oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus, and the MoFe protein of nitrogenase from Azotobacter vinelandii. Thanks to the NRVS selection rule, selectively probed vibrational modes have been observed in both oriented rubredoxin and MoFe protein crystals. The NRVS work was complemented by extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS) measurements on oxidized wild type rubredoxin crystals from Pyrococcus furiosus. The EXAFS spectra revealed the Fe-S bond length difference in oxidized Pf Rd protein, which is qualitatively consistent with the X-ray crystal structure. PMID:26052177

  9. Uncoupling nitrogenase: catalytic reduction of hydrazine to ammonia by a MoFe protein in the absence of Fe protein-ATP.

    PubMed

    Danyal, Karamatullah; Inglet, Boyd S; Vincent, Kylie A; Barney, Brett M; Hoffman, Brian M; Armstrong, Fraser A; Dean, Dennis R; Seefeldt, Lance C

    2010-09-29

    The catalytic reduction of hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to ammonia by a β-98(Tyr→His) MoFe protein in the absence of the Fe protein or ATP is reported. The reduction of N(2) or other substrates (e.g., hydrazine, protons, acetylene) by nitrogenase normally requires the transient association of the two nitrogenase component proteins, the Fe protein and the MoFe protein. The Fe protein, with two bound MgATP molecules, transfers one electron to the MoFe protein during each association, coupled to the hydrolysis of two MgATP. All substrate reduction reactions catalyzed by nitrogenase require delivery of electrons by the Fe protein coupled to the hydrolysis of MgATP. We report that when a single amino acid within the MoFe protein (β-98(Tyr)) is substituted by His, the resulting MoFe protein supports catalytic reduction of the nitrogenous substrate hydrazine (N(2)H(4)) to two ammonia molecules when provided with a low potential reductant, polyaminocarboxylate ligated Eu(II) (E(m) -1.1 V vs NHE). The wild-type and a number of other MoFe proteins with amino acid substitutions do not show significant rates of hydrazine reduction under these conditions, whereas the β-98(His) MoFe protein catalyzes hydrazine reduction at rates up to 170 nmol NH(3)/min/mg MoFe protein. This rate of hydrazine reduction is 94% of the rate catalyzed by the β-98(His) or wild-type MoFe protein when combined with the Fe protein, ATP, and reductant under comparable conditions. The β-98(His) MoFe protein reduction of hydrazine in the absence of the Fe protein showed saturation kinetics for the concentration of reductant and substrate. The implications of these results in understanding the nitrogenase mechanism are discussed.

  10. Iron EXAFS of Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase Mo-Fe and V-Fe proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, J. ); Christiansen, J.; George, S.J. ); Tittsworth, R.C.; Hales, B.J. ); Concouvanis, D. ); Cramer, S.P. Univ. of California, Davis )

    1993-06-30

    The structure of the iron sites of nitrogenase in dithionite-reduced and thionine-oxidized forms of the Mo-Fe and V-Fe proteins has been investigated using Fe K-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy. For the dithionite-reduced Azotobacter vinelandii Mo-Fe protein, the dominant EXAFS Fourier transform peaks are assigned to Fe-S and Fe-Fe interactions at approximately 2.32 and 2.64 [angstrom], as expected for Fe-S clusters. An additional Fe-Mo component at 2.73 [angstrom] is required to completely fit the EXAFS in the 1-3-[angstrom] region. In the 3-5-[angstrom] region, a 3.8-[angstrom] Fe-Fe component is identified, with an amplitude corresponding to almost one long Fe-Fe interaction, averaged over all of the iron in the sample. Features that can be explained as Fe-S and Fe-Fe interactions at 4.3 and 4.7 [angstrom] are also observed. A similar pattern of Fe interactions is observed for the reduced A. vinelandii V-Fe protein, except that the short Fe-Mo interaction is no longer required. In both Mo-Fe and V-Fe proteins, the first coordination sphere Fe-S distances contract slightly upon thionine oxidation. The long-range Fe-S and Fe-Fe interactions are very close (within 0.1 [angstrom]) to corresponding distances in Fe[sub 6]S[sub 6] prismane clusters. If the amplitudes are adjusted by assuming that only 14 of 30 nitrogenase irons participate in the M center, then they are consistent with recently proposed crystallographic models. 43 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  11. A heterotetrameric alpha-amylase inhibitor from emmer (Triticum dicoccon Schrank) seeds.

    PubMed

    Capocchi, A; Muccilli, V; Cunsolo, V; Saletti, R; Foti, S; Fontanini, D

    2013-04-01

    Plants have developed a constitutive defense system against pest attacks, which involves the expression of a set of inhibitors acting on heterologous amylases of different origins. Investigating the soluble protein complement of the hulled wheat emmer we have isolated and characterized a heterotetrameric α-amylase inhibitor (ETI). Based on mass spectrometry data, it is an assembly of proteins highly similar to the CM2/CM3/CM16 found in durum wheat. Our data indicate that these proteins can also inhibit exogenous α-amylases in binary assemblies. The calculated dissociation constants (K(i)) for the pancreatic porcine amylase- and human salivary amylase-ETI complexes are similar to those found in durum and soft wheat. Homology modeling of the CM subunits indicate structural similarities with other proteins belonging to the cereal family of trypsin/α-amylase inhibitors; a possible homology modeled structure for a tetrameric assembly of the subunits is proposed.

  12. Assembly of Multi-tRNA Synthetase Complex via Heterotetrameric Glutathione Transferase-homology Domains*

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Ha Yeon; Maeng, Seo Jin; Cho, Hyo Je; Choi, Yoon Seo; Chung, Jeong Min; Lee, Sangmin; Kim, Hoi Kyoung; Kim, Jong Hyun; Eom, Chi-Yong; Kim, Yeon-Gil; Guo, Min; Jung, Hyun Suk; Kang, Beom Sik; Kim, Sunghoon

    2015-01-01

    Many multicomponent protein complexes mediating diverse cellular processes are assembled through scaffolds with specialized protein interaction modules. The multi-tRNA synthetase complex (MSC), consisting of nine different aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases and three non-enzymatic factors (AIMP1–3), serves as a hub for many signaling pathways in addition to its role in protein synthesis. However, the assembly process and structural arrangement of the MSC components are not well understood. Here we show the heterotetrameric complex structure of the glutathione transferase (GST) domains shared among the four MSC components, methionyl-tRNA synthetase (MRS), glutaminyl-prolyl-tRNA synthetase (EPRS), AIMP2 and AIMP3. The MRS-AIMP3 and EPRS-AIMP2 using interface 1 are bridged via interface 2 of AIMP3 and EPRS to generate a unique linear complex of MRS-AIMP3:EPRS-AIMP2 at the molar ratio of (1:1):(1:1). Interestingly, the affinity at interface 2 of AIMP3:EPRS can be varied depending on the occupancy of interface 1, suggesting the dynamic nature of the linear GST tetramer. The four components are optimally arranged for maximal accommodation of additional domains and proteins. These characteristics suggest the GST tetramer as a unique and dynamic structural platform from which the MSC components are assembled. Considering prevalence of the GST-like domains, this tetramer can also provide a tool for the communication of the MSC with other GST-containing cellular factors. PMID:26472928

  13. ESCRT-0 assembles as a heterotetrameric complex on membranes and binds multiple ubiquitinylated cargoes simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Jonathan R; Fyfe, Ian; Schuh, Amber L; Chapman, Edwin R; Edwardson, J Michael; Audhya, Anjon

    2011-03-18

    The ESCRT machinery consists of multiple protein complexes that collectively participate in the biogenesis of multivesicular endosomes (MVEs). The ESCRT-0 complex is composed of two subunits, Hrs and STAM, both of which can engage ubiquitinylated substrates destined for lysosomal degradation. Here, we conduct a comprehensive analysis of ESCRT-0:ubiquitin interactions using isothermal titration calorimetry and define the affinity of each ubiquitin-binding domain (UBD) within the intact ESCRT-0 complex. Our data demonstrate that ubiquitin binding is non-cooperative between the ESCRT-0 UBDs. Additionally, our findings show that the affinity of the Hrs double ubiquitin interacting motif (DUIM) for ubiquitin is more than 2-fold greater than that of UBDs found in STAM, suggesting that Hrs functions as the major ubiquitin-binding protein in ESCRT-0. In vivo, Hrs and STAM localize to endosomal membranes. To study recombinant ESCRT-0 assembly on lipid bilayers, we used atomic force microscopy. Our data show that ESCRT-0 forms mostly heterodimers and heterotetramers of Hrs and STAM when analyzed in the presence of membranes. Consistent with these findings, hydrodynamic analysis of endogenous ESCRT-0 indicates that it exists largely as a heterotetrameric complex of its two subunits. Based on these data, we present a revised model for ESCRT-0 function in cargo recruitment and concentration at the endosome.

  14. Structure of a heterotetrameric geranyl pyrophosphate synthase from mint (Mentha piperita) reveals intersubunit regulation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang; Wang, Andrew H-J

    2010-02-01

    Terpenes (isoprenoids), derived from isoprenyl pyrophosphates, are versatile natural compounds that act as metabolism mediators, plant volatiles, and ecological communicators. Divergent evolution of homomeric prenyltransferases (PTSs) has allowed PTSs to optimize their active-site pockets to achieve catalytic fidelity and diversity. Little is known about heteromeric PTSs, particularly the mechanisms regulating formation of specific products. Here, we report the crystal structure of the (LSU . SSU)(2)-type (LSU/SSU = large/small subunit) heterotetrameric geranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GPPS) from mint (Mentha piperita). The LSU and SSU of mint GPPS are responsible for catalysis and regulation, respectively, and this SSU lacks the essential catalytic amino acid residues found in LSU and other PTSs. Whereas no activity was detected for individually expressed LSU or SSU, the intact (LSU . SSU)(2) tetramer produced not only C(10)-GPP at the beginning of the reaction but also C(20)-GGPP (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate) at longer reaction times. The activity for synthesizing C(10)-GPP and C(20)-GGPP, but not C(15)-farnesyl pyrophosphate, reflects a conserved active-site structure of the LSU and the closely related mustard (Sinapis alba) homodimeric GGPPS. Furthermore, using a genetic complementation system, we showed that no C(20)-GGPP is produced by the mint GPPS in vivo. Presumably through protein-protein interactions, the SSU remodels the active-site cavity of LSU for synthesizing C(10)-GPP, the precursor of volatile C(10)-monoterpenes.

  15. Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizes a unique heterotetrameric structure for dehydrogenation of the cholesterol side chain

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Suzanne T.; Sampson, Nicole S.

    2013-01-01

    Compounding evidence supports the important role in pathogenesis that the metabolism of cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tuberculosis) plays. Elucidating the pathway by which cholesterol is catabolized is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism by which this pathway contributes to infection. Based on early metabolite identification studies in multiple actinomycetes, it has been proposed that cholesterol side chain metabolism requires one or more acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). There are 35 genes annotated as encoding ACADs in the M. tuberculosis genome. Here we characterize a heteromeric ACAD encoded by Rv3544c and Rv3543c, formerly named fadE28 and fadE29, respectively. We now refer to genes Rv3544c and Rv3543c as chsE1 and chsE2 in recognition of their validated activity in cholesterol side chain dehydrogenation. Analytical ultracentrifugation and LC/UV experiments establish that ChsE1-ChsE2 forms an α2β2 heterotetramer, a new architecture for an ACAD. Our bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies reveal that heterotetrameric ChsE1-ChsE2 has only two active sites. E241 in ChsE2 is required for catalysis of dehydrogenation by ChsE1-ChsE2. Steady state kinetic analysis establishes the enzyme is specific for an intact steroid ring system compared to hexahydroindanone substrates with specificity constants (kcat/KM) of 2.5 × 105 ± 0.5 s-1 M-1 vs 9.8 × 102 ± s-1 M-1 respectively, at pH 8.5. The characterization of a unique ACAD quaternary structure involved in sterol metabolism that is encoded by two distinct cistronic ACAD genes opens the way to identification of additional sterol metabolizing ACADs in M. tuberculosis and other actinomycetes through bioinformatic analysis. PMID:23560677

  16. Mycobacterium tuberculosis utilizes a unique heterotetrameric structure for dehydrogenation of the cholesterol side chain.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Suzanne T; Sampson, Nicole S

    2013-04-30

    Compounding evidence supports the important role in pathogenesis that the metabolism of cholesterol by Mycobacterium tuberculosis plays. Elucidating the pathway by which cholesterol is catabolized is necessary to understand the molecular mechanism by which this pathway contributes to infection. On the basis of early metabolite identification studies in multiple actinomycetes, it has been proposed that cholesterol side chain metabolism requires one or more acyl-CoA dehydrogenases (ACADs). There are 35 genes annotated as encoding ACADs in the M. tuberculosis genome. Here we characterize a heteromeric ACAD encoded by Rv3544c and Rv3543c, formerly named fadE28 and fadE29, respectively. We now refer to genes Rv3544c and Rv3543c as chsE1 and chsE2, respectively, in recognition of their validated activity in cholesterol side chain dehydrogenation. Analytical ultracentrifugation and liquid chromatography-ultraviolet experiments establish that ChsE1-ChsE2 forms an α(2)β(2) heterotetramer, a new architecture for an ACAD. Our bioinformatic analysis and mutagenesis studies reveal that heterotetrameric ChsE1-ChsE2 has only two active sites. E241 in ChsE2 is required for catalysis of dehydrogenation by ChsE1-ChsE2. Steady state kinetic analysis establishes the enzyme is specific for an intact steroid ring system versus hexahydroindanone substrates with specificity constants (k(cat)/K(M)) of (2.5 ± 0.5) × 10(5) s(-1) M(-1) versus 9.8 × 10(2) s(-1) M(-1), respectively, at pH 8.5. The characterization of a unique ACAD quaternary structure involved in sterol metabolism that is encoded by two distinct cistronic ACAD genes opens the way to identification of additional sterol-metabolizing ACADs in M. tuberculosis and other actinomycetes through bioinformatic analysis.

  17. Separation of domain contacts is required for heterotetrameric assembly of functional NMDA receptors

    PubMed Central

    Farina, Anthony N.; Blain, Katherine Y.; Maruo, Tomohiko; Kwiatkowski, Witek; Choe, Senyon; Nakagawa, Terunaga

    2011-01-01

    The precise knowledge of the subunit assembly process of NMDA receptors (NMDA-Rs) is essential to understand the receptor architecture and underlying mechanism of channel function. Because NMDA-Rs are obligatory heterotetramers requiring the GluN1 subunit, it is critical to investigate how GluN1 and GluN2 type subunits co-assemble into tetramers. By combining approaches in cell biology, biochemistry, single particle electron microscopy, and X-ray crystallography, we report the mechanisms and phenotypes of mutant GluN1 subunits that are defective in receptor maturation. The T110A mutation in the N-terminal domain (NTD) of the GluN1 promotes heterodimerization between the NTDs of GluN1 and GluN2, whereas the Y109C mutation in the adjacent residue stabilizes the homodimer of the NTD of GluN1. The crystal structure of the NTD of GluN1 revealed the mechanism underlying the biochemical properties of these mutants. Effects of these mutations on the maturation of heteromeric NMDA-Rs were investigated using a receptor trafficking assay. Our results suggest that the NTDs of the GluN1 subunit initially form homodimers and the subsequent dimer dissociation is critical for forming heterotetrameric NMDA-Rs containing GluN2 subunits, defining a molecular determinant for receptor assembly. The domain arrangement of the dimeric NTD of GluN1 is unique among the ionotropic glutamate receptors and predicts that the structure and mechanism around the NTDs of NMDA-Rs are different from those of the homologous AMPA and kainate receptors. PMID:21389213

  18. Structural, electronic and elastic properties of the Laves phases WFe2, MoFe2, WCr2 and MoCr2 from first-principles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lv, Z. Q.; Zhang, Z. F.; Zhang, Q.; Wang, Z. H.; Sun, S. H.; Fu, W. T.

    2016-06-01

    A theoretical analysis of the phase stability, electronic and mechanical properties, and Debye temperatures of the C14-type Laves phases (WFe2, MoFe2, WCr2 and MoCr2) has been presented from density functional theory. The phase stability follows the order: WFe2>MoFe2>WCr2>MoCr2. An exchange of electrons takes place between Fe and W/Mo atoms, and there is also electron transfer between Cr and W/Mo. The W-W and Mo-Mo bonds are of the valence character, while the Fe-W/Mo and Cr-W/Mo bonds are of ionic character. The bonding force of A-A is greater than that of A-B in C-14 AB2 type Laves phases (WFe2, MoFe2, WCr2 and MoCr2). The ductility of MoCr2 is higher than others. The hardness of WFe2 (14.1 GPa) is the highest, and the hardness of MoCr2 is the lowest. The incompressibility for these laves phases along c-axis is larger than that along a-axis. The Debye temperature (θD) of MoFe2 is 619 K, which is the highest in those phases. These laves phases also have high melting points, which follows the order: WFe2>MoFe2>WCr2>MoCr2.

  19. Structural studies of the molybdenum site in the MoFe protein and it FeMo cofactor by EXAFS

    SciTech Connect

    Conradson, S.D.; Burgess, B.K.; Newton, W.E.; Mortenson, L.E.; Hodgson, K.O.

    1987-11-25

    Nitrogenase is a complex bacterial enzyme system that is responsible for the conversion of atmospheric N/sub 2/ to ammonia. The structure and function of molybdenum in the MoFe protein of this system has been the subject of a number of investigations, including the use of X-ray absorption spectroscopy. This paper reports the results of the authors recent studies on several states of the MoFe protein and its FeMo cofactor (which is extruded by treatment with N-methylformamide). Mo K-edge (XANES) and extended fine structure (EXAFS) spectra have been recorded to high energies above the absorption edge with excellent signal-to-nose on the semireduced form of the MoFe protein from both Clostridium pasteurianum and Azotobacter vinelandii and on the as isolated FeMo-co and FeMo-co treated with benzenethiol and with benzeneselenol. In all of the states studied, EXAFS results reveal that the Mo is in an environment that contains two or three oxygen (or nitrogen) atoms at 2.10-2.12 A, three to five S atoms at 2.37 A, and three to four Fe atoms at 2.68-2.70 A. The numbers of these ligands change upon removal of the cofactor from the protein as discussed in the paper. For FeMo-co, comparisons also show that thil/selenol is not binding directly to the Mo site. The results of these EXAFS (and their XANES published earlier) definitely show the presence of several low-Z ligands and are not compatible with a tetrahedral arrangement of only nearest S neighbors at the Mo site.

  20. Light-driven dinitrogen reduction catalyzed by a CdS:nitrogenase MoFe protein biohybrid

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, K. A.; Harris, D. F.; Wilker, M. B.; Rasmussen, A.; Khadka, N.; Hamby, H.; Keable, S.; Dukovic, G.; Peters, J. W.; Seefeldt, L. C.; King, P. W.

    2016-04-21

    The splitting of dinitrogen (N2) and reduction to ammonia (NH3) is a kinetically complex and energetically challenging multistep reaction. In the Haber-Bosch process, N2 reduction is accomplished at high temperature and pressure, whereas N2 fixation by the enzyme nitrogenase occurs under ambient conditions using chemical energy from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. We show that cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals can be used to photosensitize the nitrogenase molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein, where light harvesting replaces ATP hydrolysis to drive the enzymatic reduction of N2 into NH3. The turnover rate was 75 per minute, 63% of the ATP-coupled reaction rate for the nitrogenase complex under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of nitrogenase (i.e., acetylene, carbon monoxide, and dihydrogen) suppressed N2 reduction. The CdS:MoFe protein biohybrids provide a photochemical model for achieving light-driven N2 reduction to NH3.

  1. Structure of a Heterotetrameric Geranyl Pyrophosphate Synthase from Mint (Mentha piperita) Reveals Intersubunit Regulation[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Tao-Hsin; Hsieh, Fu-Lien; Ko, Tzu-Ping; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang; Wang, Andrew H.-J.

    2010-01-01

    Terpenes (isoprenoids), derived from isoprenyl pyrophosphates, are versatile natural compounds that act as metabolism mediators, plant volatiles, and ecological communicators. Divergent evolution of homomeric prenyltransferases (PTSs) has allowed PTSs to optimize their active-site pockets to achieve catalytic fidelity and diversity. Little is known about heteromeric PTSs, particularly the mechanisms regulating formation of specific products. Here, we report the crystal structure of the (LSU · SSU)2-type (LSU/SSU = large/small subunit) heterotetrameric geranyl pyrophosphate synthase (GPPS) from mint (Mentha piperita). The LSU and SSU of mint GPPS are responsible for catalysis and regulation, respectively, and this SSU lacks the essential catalytic amino acid residues found in LSU and other PTSs. Whereas no activity was detected for individually expressed LSU or SSU, the intact (LSU · SSU)2 tetramer produced not only C10-GPP at the beginning of the reaction but also C20-GGPP (geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate) at longer reaction times. The activity for synthesizing C10-GPP and C20-GGPP, but not C15-farnesyl pyrophosphate, reflects a conserved active-site structure of the LSU and the closely related mustard (Sinapis alba) homodimeric GGPPS. Furthermore, using a genetic complementation system, we showed that no C20-GGPP is produced by the mint GPPS in vivo. Presumably through protein–protein interactions, the SSU remodels the active-site cavity of LSU for synthesizing C10-GPP, the precursor of volatile C10-monoterpenes. PMID:20139160

  2. An all-ferrous state of the Fe protein of nitrogenase. Interaction with nucleotides and electron transfer to the MoFe protein.

    PubMed

    Angove, H C; Yoo, S J; Münck, E; Burgess, B K

    1998-10-09

    The MoFe protein of nitrogenase catalyzes the six-electron reduction of dinitrogen to ammonia. It has long been believed that this protein receives the multiple electrons it requires one at a time, from the [4Fe-4S]2+/+ couple of the Fe protein. Recently an all-ferrous [4Fe-4S]0 state of the Fe protein was demonstrated suggesting instead a series of two electron steps involving the [4Fe-4S]2+/0 couple. We have examined the interactions of the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein with nucleotides and its ability to transfer electrons to the MoFe protein. The [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein binds both MgATP and MgADP and undergoes the MgATP induced conformational change and then binds properly to the MoFe protein, as evidenced by the fact that the behavior of the 0 and +1 oxidation states in the chelation and chelation protection assays are indistinguishable. Nucleotide binding does not effect the distinctive UV/Vis, CD, or Mössbauer spectra exhibited by the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein; however, because the intensity of the g = 16.4 EPR signal of the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein is extremely sensitive to minor variations of the rhombicity parameter E/D, the EPR signal is sensitive to the binding of nucleotides. A 50:50 mixture of [4Fe-4S]2+ and [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein results in electron self-exchange and 100% production of [4Fe-4S]+ Fe protein, demonstrating that the +1/0 couple is fully reversible. MgATP is absolutely required for electron transfer from the [4Fe-4S]0 Fe protein to the reduced state of the MoFe protein. In that reaction both electrons are transferred and are used to reduce substrate.

  3. In-Situ Fixation of All-Inorganic Mo-Fe-S Clusters for Highly Selective Removal of Lead(II).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wentao; Shi, Shuo; Zhu, Wenxin; Yang, Chengyuan; Li, Sihang; Liu, Xinnan; Hu, Na; Huang, Lunjie; Wang, Rong; Suo, Yourui; Li, Zhonghong; Wang, Jianlong

    2017-09-05

    Selective adsorption by suitable substrate materials is considered as one of the most economical methods. In this work, all-inorganic bimetallic Mo-Fe-S cluster is facilely achieved through in-situ chemical fixation of tetrathiomolybdate (TTM) on Fe3O4 NPs at room temperature (donated as FeMoS NPs). The bimetallic building blocks on the obtained FeMoS NPs possess monovacancy species sulfur, endowing FeMoS NPs with a selectivity order of Zn(2)(+), Mn(2)(+), Ni(2)(+) < Cd(2)(+) ≪ Cu(2)(+) < Pb(2)(+) for metal ions adsorption, a novel application for Mo-Fe-S cluster. Particularly, with the highest selectivity for Pb(2)(+) (Kd≈10(7)), which is about 3×10(3)-1×10(6) times higher than those for other ions and has exceeded that of a series of outstanding sorbents reported for Pb(2)(+), FeMoS NPs can efficiently reduce the concentration of Pb(2)(+) from ∼10 ppm to extremely low level of ∼1 ppb. This facile and rational fabrication of Mo-Fe-S cluster with Fe3O4 represents a feasible approach to cheaply develop novel and efficient materials for selective removal of lead(II).

  4. Heterotetrameric forms of human phenylalanine hydroxylase: co-expression of wild-type and mutant forms in a bicistronic system.

    PubMed

    Leandro, João; Leandro, Paula; Flatmark, Torgeir

    2011-05-01

    Hybrid forms of human phenylalanine hydroxylase (hPAH) mutants have been found to present catalytic activities lower than predicted from the individual recombinant forms, indicating that interallelic complementation could be a major determinant of the metabolic phenotype of compound heterozygous phenylketonuric (PKU) patients. To provide a molecular explanation for interallelic complementation we have here developed a bicistronic expression system and a purification strategy to obtain isolated hPAH heteromeric forms. On co-expression of WT-hPAH (~50% tetramer; ~10% dimer) and the N- and C-terminally truncated form ΔN102/ΔC24-hPAH (~80% dimer) no heterodimers were recovered. Moreover, by co-expression of WT-hPAH and the N-terminally truncated form ΔN102-hPAH (~95% tetramer), heterotetramers, as a result of an assembly of two different homodimers, were isolated. The recovered (WT)/(ΔN102)-hPAH heterotetramers revealed a catalytic activity deviating significantly from that calculated by averaging the respective recombinant homotetrameric forms. The heterotetramer assembly also results in conformational changes in the WT-hPAH protomer, as detected by trypsin limited proteolysis. The finding that the presence of two homodimers with different kinetic parameters influences the properties of the resulting heterotetrameric protein indicates that the dimers exhibit interactions which are transmitted across the assembled tetramer. The bicistronic expression system developed here allowed the isolation of hybrid forms that exhibit negative interallelic complementation, and may represent a model system for studying the molecular pathogenic mechanisms of PAH gene mutations in compound heterozygous PKU patients, providing the rationale to understand the observed inconsistencies both in genotype/phenotype correlations and in the response to BH(4) supplementation.

  5. Light-driven dinitrogen reduction catalyzed by a CdS:nitrogenase MoFe protein biohybrid.

    PubMed

    Brown, Katherine A; Harris, Derek F; Wilker, Molly B; Rasmussen, Andrew; Khadka, Nimesh; Hamby, Hayden; Keable, Stephen; Dukovic, Gordana; Peters, John W; Seefeldt, Lance C; King, Paul W

    2016-04-22

    The splitting of dinitrogen (N2) and reduction to ammonia (NH3) is a kinetically complex and energetically challenging multistep reaction. In the Haber-Bosch process, N2 reduction is accomplished at high temperature and pressure, whereas N2 fixation by the enzyme nitrogenase occurs under ambient conditions using chemical energy from adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP) hydrolysis. We show that cadmium sulfide (CdS) nanocrystals can be used to photosensitize the nitrogenase molybdenum-iron (MoFe) protein, where light harvesting replaces ATP hydrolysis to drive the enzymatic reduction of N2 into NH3 The turnover rate was 75 per minute, 63% of the ATP-coupled reaction rate for the nitrogenase complex under optimal conditions. Inhibitors of nitrogenase (i.e., acetylene, carbon monoxide, and dihydrogen) suppressed N2 reduction. The CdS:MoFe protein biohybrids provide a photochemical model for achieving light-driven N2 reduction to NH3. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  6. Low frequency dynamics of the nitrogenase MoFe protein via femtosecond pump probe spectroscopy - Observation of a candidate promoting vibration.

    PubMed

    Maiuri, Margherita; Delfino, Ines; Cerullo, Giulio; Manzoni, Cristian; Pelmenschikov, Vladimir; Guo, Yisong; Wang, Hongxin; Gee, Leland B; Dapper, Christie H; Newton, William E; Cramer, Stephen P

    2015-12-01

    We have used femtosecond pump-probe spectroscopy (FPPS) to study the FeMo-cofactor within the nitrogenase (N2ase) MoFe protein from Azotobacter vinelandii. A sub-20-fs visible laser pulse was used to pump the sample to an excited electronic state, and a second sub-10-fs pulse was used to probe changes in transmission as a function of probe wavelength and delay time. The excited protein relaxes to the ground state with a ~1.2ps time constant. With the short laser pulse we coherently excited the vibrational modes associated with the FeMo-cofactor active site, which are then observed in the time domain. Superimposed on the relaxation dynamics, we distinguished a variety of oscillation frequencies with the strongest band peaks at ~84, 116, 189, and 226cm(-1). Comparison with data from nuclear resonance vibrational spectroscopy (NRVS) shows that the latter pair of signals comes predominantly from the FeMo-cofactor. The frequencies obtained from the FPPS experiment were interpreted with normal mode calculations using both an empirical force field (EFF) and density functional theory (DFT). The FPPS data were also compared with the first reported resonance Raman (RR) spectrum of the N2ase MoFe protein. This approach allows us to outline and assign vibrational modes having relevance to the catalytic activity of N2ase. In particular, the 226cm(-1) band is assigned as a potential 'promoting vibration' in the H-atom transfer (or proton-coupled electron transfer) processes that are an essential feature of N2ase catalysis. The results demonstrate that high-quality room-temperature solution data can be obtained on the MoFe protein by the FPPS technique and that these data provide added insight to the motions and possible operation of this protein and its catalytic prosthetic group. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Isotopic hybrids of nitrogenase. Mössbauer study of MoFe protein with selective 57Fe enrichment of the P-cluster.

    PubMed

    McLean, P A; Papaefthymiou, V; Orme-Johnson, W H; Münck, E

    1987-09-25

    Previous Mössbauer and EPR studies of the MoFe protein (approximately 30 Fe and 2 Mo) of nitrogenase have revealed the presence of two unique clusters, namely, the P-clusters (presumably of the Fe4S4 type) and the molybdenum- and iron-containing cofactors (or M-clusters). Mössbauer components D (approximately 10-12 Fe) and Fe2+ (approximately 4 Fe) represent subsites of the P-clusters while component S (approximately 2 Fe) appeared to belong to a separate, unidentified cluster. In order to refine the analyses of Mössbauer spectra, we have constructed an isotopic hybrid of the Klebsiella pneumoniae protein which contains 57Fe-enriched P-clusters and 56Fe-enriched M-clusters. The highly resolved 57Fe Mössbauer spectra of this hybrid show that component S behaves spectroscopically like the P-cluster sites D and Fe2+ in oxidized and reduced MoFe protein. This suggests that S is a subset of the P-clusters rather than a different cluster type. The present study shows, for the first time, that the Debye-Waller factors of different P-cluster subsites have a different temperature dependence. Thus, the Fe2+/D absorption ratio is 4.0:10.0 at 4.2 K and 4.0:11.6 at 173 K. We propose that the reduced MoFe protein contains two pairs of P-clusters: one pair containing one Fe2+ and three D-sites and the other one Fe2+, two D, and one S-site. We have argued previously that the oxidized P-clusters occur in pairs as well.

  8. Shrinking the FadE Proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: Insights into Cholesterol Metabolism through Identification of an α2β2 Heterotetrameric Acyl Coenzyme A Dehydrogenase Family

    PubMed Central

    Wipperman, Matthew F.; Yang, Meng; Thomas, Suzanne T.

    2013-01-01

    The ability of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to metabolize steroids like cholesterol and the roles that these compounds play in the virulence and pathogenesis of this organism are increasingly evident. Here, we demonstrate through experiments and bioinformatic analysis the existence of an architecturally distinct subfamily of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (ACAD) enzymes that are α2β2 heterotetramers with two active sites. These enzymes are encoded by two adjacent ACAD (fadE) genes that are regulated by cholesterol. FadE26-FadE27 catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 3β-hydroxy-chol-5-en-24-oyl-CoA, an analog of the 5-carbon side chain cholesterol degradation intermediate. Genes encoding the α2β2 heterotetrameric ACAD structures are present in multiple regions of the M. tuberculosis genome, and subsets of these genes are regulated by four different transcriptional repressors or activators: KstR1 (also known as KstR), KstR2, Mce3R, and SigE. Homologous ACAD gene pairs are found in other Actinobacteria, as well as Proteobacteria. Their structures and genomic locations suggest that the α2β2 heterotetrameric structural motif has evolved to enable catalysis of dehydrogenation of steroid- or polycyclic-CoA substrates and that they function in four subpathways of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:23836861

  9. Fission yeast decaprenyl diphosphate synthase consists of Dps1 and the newly characterized Dlp1 protein in a novel heterotetrameric structure.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Ryoichi; Nagata, Ai; Uchida, Naonori; Kainou, Tomohiro; Matsuda, Hideyuki; Kawamukai, Makoto

    2003-10-01

    The analysis of the structure and function of long chain-producing polyprenyl diphosphate synthase, which synthesizes the side chain of ubiquinone, has largely focused on the prokaryotic enzymes, and little is known about the eukaryotic counterparts. Here we show that decaprenyl diphosphate synthase from Schizosaccharomyces pombe is comprised of a novel protein named Dlp1 acting in partnership with Dps1. Dps1 is highly homologous to other prenyl diphosphate synthases but Dlp1 shares only weak homology with Dps1. We showed that the two proteins must be present simultaneously in Escherichia coli transformants before ubiquinone-10, which is produced by S. pombe but not by E. coli, is generated. Furthermore, the two proteins were shown to form a heterotetrameric complex. This is unlike the prokaryotic counterparts, which are homodimers. The deletion mutant of dlp1 lacked the enzymatic activity of decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, did not produce ubiquinone-10 and had the typical ubiquinone-deficient S. pombe phenotypes, namely hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide, the need for antioxidants for growth on minimal medium and an elevated production of H2S. Both the dps1 (formerly dps) and dlp1 mutants could generate ubiquinone when they were transformed with a bacterial decaprenyl diphosphate synthase, which functions in its host as a homodimer. This indicates that both dps1 and dlp1 are required for the S. pombe enzymatic activity. Thus, decaprenyl diphosphate from a eukaryotic origin has a heterotetrameric structure that is not found in prokaryotes.

  10. Shrinking the FadE proteome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis: insights into cholesterol metabolism through identification of an α2β2 heterotetrameric acyl coenzyme A dehydrogenase family.

    PubMed

    Wipperman, Matthew F; Yang, Meng; Thomas, Suzanne T; Sampson, Nicole S

    2013-10-01

    The ability of the pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis to metabolize steroids like cholesterol and the roles that these compounds play in the virulence and pathogenesis of this organism are increasingly evident. Here, we demonstrate through experiments and bioinformatic analysis the existence of an architecturally distinct subfamily of acyl coenzyme A (acyl-CoA) dehydrogenase (ACAD) enzymes that are α2β2 heterotetramers with two active sites. These enzymes are encoded by two adjacent ACAD (fadE) genes that are regulated by cholesterol. FadE26-FadE27 catalyzes the dehydrogenation of 3β-hydroxy-chol-5-en-24-oyl-CoA, an analog of the 5-carbon side chain cholesterol degradation intermediate. Genes encoding the α2β2 heterotetrameric ACAD structures are present in multiple regions of the M. tuberculosis genome, and subsets of these genes are regulated by four different transcriptional repressors or activators: KstR1 (also known as KstR), KstR2, Mce3R, and SigE. Homologous ACAD gene pairs are found in other Actinobacteria, as well as Proteobacteria. Their structures and genomic locations suggest that the α2β2 heterotetrameric structural motif has evolved to enable catalysis of dehydrogenation of steroid- or polycyclic-CoA substrates and that they function in four subpathways of cholesterol metabolism.

  11. Long-range interactions between the Fe protein binding sites of the MoFe protein of nitrogenase.

    PubMed

    Maritano, S; Fairhurst, S A; Eady, R R

    2001-06-01

    We report the properties and reactivity of the catalytically active heterologous nitrogenase formed between the Fe protein from Clostridium pasteurianum (Cp2) and the MoFe protein from Klebsiella pneumoniae (Kp1). Under turnover conditions, in the presence of MgATP, a stable 2:1 (Cp2)2Kp1 electron transfer complex is formed, in which the [4Fe-4S]+ centre of Cp2 is protected from chelation by alpha,alpha'-bipyridyl. However, the two Fe protein-binding sites on Kp1 are not equivalent, since a 1:1 Cp2.Kp1 complex was isolated by gel filtration. The non-equivalence of the Fe protein binding sites was also indicated by the inhibition pattern of Klebsiella nitrogenase by Cp2. The EPR spectrum of the isolated 1:1 Cp2.Kp1 complex showed an S=1/2 signal characteristic of dithionite-reduced Cp2 and signals with g values of 4.27, 3.73, 2.01 and 4.32, 3.63, 2.00 characteristic of the high- and low-pH forms of the FeMoco centre of Kp1, respectively. The unoccupied binding site of Kp1 of the isolated 1:1 Cp2Kp1 complex was shown to be catalytically fully functional in combination with Kp2. In contrast to homologous nitrogenases, which require MgATP for detectable rates of electron transfer from the Fe protein, stopped-flow kinetic studies revealed that electron transfer from Cp2 to Kp1 occurred in the absence of MgATP with a rate constant of 0.065 s(-1). Subsequently, a slower transient decrease and restoration of absorption in the electronic spectrum in the 500-700 nm region was observed. These changes corresponded with those in the intensity of the S=3/2 EPR signal of the FeMoco centres of Kp1 and were consistent with the transient reduction of the FeMoco centre of Kp1 to an EPR-silent form, followed by restoration of the signal at longer reaction times. These changes were not associated with catalysis since no evolution of H2 was detectable.

  12. Computational Design and Elaboration of a De Novo Heterotetrameric α-Helical Protein that Selectively Binds an Emissive Abiological (Porphinato)zinc Chromophore

    PubMed Central

    Fry, H. Christopher; Lehmann, Andreas; Saven, Jeffrey G.; DeGrado, William F.; Therien, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    The first example of a computationally de novo designed protein that binds an emissive abiological chromophore is presented, in which a sophisticated level of cofactor discrimination is pre-engineered. This heterotetrameric, C2-symmetric bundle, AHis:BThr, uniquely binds (5,15-di[(4-carboxymethyleneoxy)phenyl]porphinato)zinc [(DPP)Zn] via histidine coordination and complementary noncovalent interactions. The A2B2 heterotetrameric protein reflects ligand-directed elements of both positive and negative design, including hydrogen-bonds to second-shell ligands. Experimental support for the appropriate formulation of [(DPP)Zn:AHis:BThr]2 is provided by UV/visible and circular dichroism spectroscopies, size exclusion chromatography, and analytical ultracentrifugation. Time-resolved transient absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic data reveal classic excited-state singlet and triplet PZn photophysics for the AHis:BThr:(DPP)Zn protein (kfluorescence = 4 × 108 s−1; τriplet = 5 ms). The A2B2 apoprotein has immeasurably low binding affinities for related [porphinato]metal chromophores that include a (DPP)Fe(III) cofactor and the zinc metal ion hemin derivative [(PPIX)Zn], underscoring the exquisite active site binding discrimination realized in this computationally designed protein. Importantly, elements of design in the AHis:Bthr protein ensure that interactions within the tetra-α-helical bundle are such that only the heterotetramer is stable in solution; corresponding homomeric bundles present unfavorable ligand-binding environments, and thus preclude protein structural rearrangements that could lead to binding of (porphinato)iron cofactors. PMID:20192195

  13. Nonenzymatic Synthesis of the P-Cluster in the Nitrogenase MoFe Protein: Evidence of the Involvement of All-Ferrous [Fe4S4]0 Intermediates

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The P-cluster in the nitrogenase MoFe protein is a [Fe8S7] cluster and represents the most complex FeS cluster found in Nature. To date, the exact mechanism of the in vivo synthesis of the P-cluster remains unclear. What is known is that the precursor to the P-cluster is a pair of neighboring [Fe4S4]-like clusters found on the ΔnifH MoFe protein, a protein expressed in the absence of the nitrogenase Fe protein (NifH). Moreover, incubation of the ΔnifH MoFe protein with NifH and MgATP results in the synthesis of the MoFe protein P-clusters. To improve our understanding of the mechanism of this reaction, we conducted a magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic study of the [Fe4S4]-like clusters on the ΔnifH MoFe protein. Reducing the ΔnifH MoFe protein with Ti(III) citrate results in the quenching of the S = 1/2 electron paramagnetic resonance signal associated with the [Fe4S4]+ state of the clusters. MCD spectroscopy reveals this reduction results in all four 4Fe clusters being converted into the unusual, all-ferrous [Fe4S4]0 state. Subsequent increases of the redox potential generate new clusters. Most significantly, one of these newly formed clusters is the P-cluster, which represents approximately 20–25% of the converted Fe concentration. The other two clusters are an X cluster, of unknown structure, and a classic [Fe4S4] cluster, which represents approximately 30–35% of the Fe concentration. Diamagnetic FeS clusters may also have been generated but, because of their low spectral intensity, would not have been identified. These results demonstrate that the nitrogenase P-cluster can be generated in the absence of NifH and MgATP. PMID:24520862

  14. Nonenzymatic synthesis of the P-cluster in the nitrogenase MoFe protein: evidence of the involvement of all-ferrous [Fe4S4](0) intermediates.

    PubMed

    Rupnik, Kresimir; Lee, Chi Chung; Wiig, Jared A; Hu, Yilin; Ribbe, Markus W; Hales, Brian J

    2014-02-25

    The P-cluster in the nitrogenase MoFe protein is a [Fe8S7] cluster and represents the most complex FeS cluster found in Nature. To date, the exact mechanism of the in vivo synthesis of the P-cluster remains unclear. What is known is that the precursor to the P-cluster is a pair of neighboring [Fe4S4]-like clusters found on the ΔnifH MoFe protein, a protein expressed in the absence of the nitrogenase Fe protein (NifH). Moreover, incubation of the ΔnifH MoFe protein with NifH and MgATP results in the synthesis of the MoFe protein P-clusters. To improve our understanding of the mechanism of this reaction, we conducted a magnetic circular dichroism (MCD) spectroscopic study of the [Fe4S4]-like clusters on the ΔnifH MoFe protein. Reducing the ΔnifH MoFe protein with Ti(III) citrate results in the quenching of the S = (1)/2 electron paramagnetic resonance signal associated with the [Fe4S4](+) state of the clusters. MCD spectroscopy reveals this reduction results in all four 4Fe clusters being converted into the unusual, all-ferrous [Fe4S4](0) state. Subsequent increases of the redox potential generate new clusters. Most significantly, one of these newly formed clusters is the P-cluster, which represents approximately 20-25% of the converted Fe concentration. The other two clusters are an X cluster, of unknown structure, and a classic [Fe4S4] cluster, which represents approximately 30-35% of the Fe concentration. Diamagnetic FeS clusters may also have been generated but, because of their low spectral intensity, would not have been identified. These results demonstrate that the nitrogenase P-cluster can be generated in the absence of NifH and MgATP.

  15. The rice endosperm ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase large subunit is essential for optimal catalysis and allosteric regulation of the heterotetrameric enzyme.

    PubMed

    Tuncel, Aytug; Kawaguchi, Joe; Ihara, Yasuharu; Matsusaka, Hiroaki; Nishi, Aiko; Nakamura, Tetsuhiro; Kuhara, Satoru; Hirakawa, Hideki; Nakamura, Yasunori; Cakir, Bilal; Nagamine, Ai; Okita, Thomas W; Hwang, Seon-Kap; Satoh, Hikaru

    2014-06-01

    Although an alternative pathway has been suggested, the prevailing view is that starch synthesis in cereal endosperm is controlled by the activity of the cytosolic isoform of ADPglucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase). In rice, the cytosolic AGPase isoform is encoded by the OsAGPS2b and OsAGPL2 genes, which code for the small (S2b) and large (L2) subunits of the heterotetrameric enzyme, respectively. In this study, we isolated several allelic missense and nonsense OsAGPL2 mutants by N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) treatment of fertilized egg cells and by TILLING (Targeting Induced Local Lesions in Genomes). Interestingly, seeds from three of the missense mutants (two containing T139I and A171V) were severely shriveled and had seed weight and starch content comparable with the shriveled seeds from OsAGPL2 null mutants. Results from kinetic analysis of the purified recombinant enzymes revealed that the catalytic and allosteric regulatory properties of these mutant enzymes were significantly impaired. The missense heterotetramer enzymes and the S2b homotetramer had lower specific (catalytic) activities and affinities for the activator 3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA). The missense heterotetramer enzymes showed more sensitivity to inhibition by the inhibitor inorganic phosphate (Pi) than the wild-type AGPase, while the S2b homotetramer was profoundly tolerant to Pi inhibition. Thus, our results provide definitive evidence that starch biosynthesis during rice endosperm development is controlled predominantly by the catalytic activity of the cytoplasmic AGPase and its allosteric regulation by the effectors. Moreover, our results show that the L2 subunit is essential for both catalysis and allosteric regulatory properties of the heterotetramer enzyme.

  16. Formation of a tight 1:1 complex of Clostridium pasteurianum Fe protein-Azotobacter vinelandii MoFe protein: evidence for long-range interactions between the Fe protein binding sites during catalytic hydrogen evolution.

    PubMed

    Clarke, T A; Maritano, S; Eady, R R

    2000-09-19

    It has been well documented that the combination of the MoFe protein of Azotobacter vinelandii nitrogenase (Av1) with the Fe protein (Cp2) from Clostridium pasteurianum nitrogenase produces an inactive, stable complex. However, we report that this heterologous nitrogenase has a low level of activity for H(2) evolution, with a specific activity of 12 nmol min(-)(1) mg(-)(1) of Av1. This activity does not arise from contaminating hydrogenase since it required the presence of both Cp2 and Av1 and showed saturation kinetics when increasing amounts of Cp2 were added to the assay. Incubation of the two proteins at a 4:1 Cp2:Av1 ratio in the absence of MgATP followed by analytical gel filtration showed, surprisingly, that the stoichiometry of the isolated complex was Av1.Cp2 instead of Av1.(Cp2)(2) as determined previously. The presence of MgATP in the elution buffer did not change the elution profile of the complex. The hydrodynamic radius of the isolated complex determined by dynamic light scattering was 5.93 +/- 0.14 nm, intermediate between Av1 and a stable 2:1 nitrogenase complex, consistent with a 1:1 assignment for the Av1.Cp2 complex. When assayed with Av2, the isolated Av1.Cp2 complex showed full half-site reactivity with a specific activity of 750 nmol of C(2)H(2) reduced min(-)(1) mg(-)(1) of Av1. The EPR spectrum of the isolated complex showed the Cp2 to be oxidized and the Av1 to retain the S = (3)/(2) signal characteristic of FeMoco. In the presence of MgATP, under turnover conditions at a 2:1 ratio of Cp2:Av1, the [4Fe-4S] center of Cp2 was protected from the chelator 2,2'-bipyridyl. This is consistent with the formation of a tight 2:1 complex of Av1.(Cp2)(2) which is more stable than the homologous Cp nitrogenase. Assuming that the Lowe-Thorneley model for nitrogenase applies and that a rate-limiting dissociation of the complex is required for H(2) evolution, then with a rate of 0.032 s(-)(1) the 1:1 complex is too stable to be involved in catalysis. The

  17. Native Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seven, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Amid concerns from tribal leaders that No Child Left Behind testing is squeezing out electives that have traditionally covered their history and cultures, an ambitious brace of programs is making Native America part of the core curriculum at David Wolfle Elementary School and other schools in the western Washington State. By tapping into…

  18. Native Intelligence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seven, Richard

    2006-01-01

    Amid concerns from tribal leaders that No Child Left Behind testing is squeezing out electives that have traditionally covered their history and cultures, an ambitious brace of programs is making Native America part of the core curriculum at David Wolfle Elementary School and other schools in the western Washington State. By tapping into…

  19. Native Skies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benningfield, Damond

    2001-03-01

    People native to North America practiced their own version of astronomy. They tracked the motions of the Sun to help them decide when to plant crops, move their camps, and stage sacred rituals. Some tribes built great circles of stones to help them predict the changing seasons. Others built great mounds of earth to reflect the patterns they saw in the heavens and to align their ceremonial centers with the Sun and the Moon.

  20. Structural and Functional Analysis of the Native Peripherin-ROM1 Complex Isolated from Photoreceptor Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Kevany, Brian M.; Tsybovsky, Yaroslav; Campuzano, Iain D. G.; Schnier, Paul D.; Engel, Andreas; Palczewski, Krzysztof

    2013-01-01

    Peripherin and its homologue ROM1 are retina-specific members of the tetraspanin family of integral membrane proteins required for morphogenesis and maintenance of photoreceptor outer segments, regions that collect light stimuli. Over 100 pathogenic mutations in peripherin cause inherited rod- and cone-related dystrophies in humans. Peripherin and ROM1 interact in vivo and are predicted to form a core heterotetrameric complex capable of creating higher order oligomers. However, structural analysis of tetraspanin proteins has been hampered by their resistance to crystallization. Here we present a simplified methodology for high yield purification of peripherin-ROM1 from bovine retinas that permitted its biochemical and biophysical characterization. Using size exclusion chromatography and blue native gel electrophoresis, we confirmed that the core native peripherin-ROM1 complex exists as a tetramer. Peripherin, but not ROM1, is glycosylated and we examined the glycosylation site and glycan composition of ROM1 by liquid chromatographic tandem mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometry was used to analyze the native complex in detergent micelles, demonstrating its tetrameric state. Our electron microscopy-generated structure solved to 18 Å displayed the tetramer as an elongated structure with an apparent 2-fold symmetry. Finally, we demonstrated that peripherin-ROM1 tetramers induce membrane curvature when reconstituted in lipid vesicles. These results provide critical insights into this key retinal component with a poorly defined function. PMID:24196967

  1. Native Americans with Diabetes

    MedlinePlus

    ... Read the MMWR Science Clips Native Americans with Diabetes Better diabetes care can decrease kidney failure Language: ... between 1996 and 2013. Problem Kidney failure from diabetes was highest among Native Americans. Native Americans are ...

  2. Native American Discursive Tactic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jason Edward

    2013-01-01

    This essay derives from a course called ‘"The Rhetoric of Native America,’" which is a historical-critical survey of Native American primary texts. The course examines the rhetoric employed by Natives to enact social change and to build community in the face of exigencies. The main goal of exploring a native text (particularly, Simon…

  3. Native American Discursive Tactic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, Jason Edward

    2013-01-01

    This essay derives from a course called ‘"The Rhetoric of Native America,’" which is a historical-critical survey of Native American primary texts. The course examines the rhetoric employed by Natives to enact social change and to build community in the face of exigencies. The main goal of exploring a native text (particularly, Simon…

  4. Regional native plant strategies

    Treesearch

    Wendell G. Hassell

    1999-01-01

    Because of increasing public interest in native plants, regional groups have been cooperating to develop native species. The Federal Native Plants Initiative was formed in 1994 to coordinate and encourage the development and use of native plants. The program they developed includes public involvement, organizational structure, technical work groups, implementation...

  5. Alaska Natives & the Land.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Robert D.; And Others

    Pursuant to the Native land claims within Alaska, this compilation of background data and interpretive materials relevant to a fair resolution of the Alaska Native problem seeks to record data and information on the Native peoples; the land and resources of Alaska and their uses by the people in the past and present; land ownership; and future…

  6. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  7. Native American Healing Traditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portman, Tarrell A. A.; Garrett, Michael T.

    2006-01-01

    Indigenous healing practices among Native Americans have been documented in the United States since colonisation. Cultural encapsulation has deterred the acknowledgement of Native American medicinal practices as a precursor to folk medicine and many herbal remedies, which have greatly influenced modern medicine. Understanding Native American…

  8. Native American Homeschooling Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rozon, Gina

    2000-01-01

    The Native American Home School Association helps Native parents to provide a good education free from the assimilationist tendencies of public school and to transmit Native values and culture. Discusses various home schooling styles, the effectiveness of home schooling in terms of academic achievement and socialization, and the effectiveness of…

  9. Content in Native Literature Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    Including Native literature in school curricula is an important way of enhancing the Native student's self-concept and providing accurate Native cultural knowledge to Native and non-Native students alike. Nevertheless, Canadian school literature programs generally contain neither contemporary nor traditional Native literature. Some programs…

  10. Native American Entrepreneurship. Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seymour, Nicole

    Although Native Americans have owned and started the fewest small businesses of all U.S. minority groups, entrepreneurship is considered to be an efficient tool for alleviating their economic problems. Barriers to Native American entrepreneurship include poverty, scarce start-up capital, poor access to business education and technical assistance,…

  11. Native American Preparatory School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native American Preparatory School, Rowe, NM.

    This booklet provides information on the Native American Preparatory School, a residential secondary school in Rowe, New Mexico, for high-achieving Native American students. The school sponsors two programs: a 5-week rigorously academic summer school for junior high school students and, beginning in fall 1995, a 4-year college preparatory program.…

  12. Listen to the Natives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prensky, Marc

    2006-01-01

    "Digital natives" refer to today's students because they are native speakers of technology, fluent in the digital language of computers, video games, and the Internet. Those who were not born into the digital world are referred to as digital immigrants. Educators, considered digital immigrants, have slid into the 21st century--and into the digital…

  13. Traditional Native Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    1985-01-01

    While Native myths and legends were educational tools to transmit tribal beliefs and history, traditional American Indian poetry served a ritualistic function in everyday life. Few traditional Native songs, which all poems were, survive; only Mayan and Aztec poems were written, and most of these were burned by a Spanish bishop. In addition, many…

  14. Traditional Native Poetry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grant, Agnes

    1985-01-01

    While Native myths and legends were educational tools to transmit tribal beliefs and history, traditional American Indian poetry served a ritualistic function in everyday life. Few traditional Native songs, which all poems were, survive; only Mayan and Aztec poems were written, and most of these were burned by a Spanish bishop. In addition, many…

  15. Native SAD is maturing

    PubMed Central

    Rose, John P.; Wang, Bi-Cheng; Weiss, Manfred S.

    2015-01-01

    Native SAD phasing uses the anomalous scattering signal of light atoms in the crystalline, native samples of macromolecules collected from single-wavelength X-ray diffraction experiments. These atoms include sodium, magnesium, phosphorus, sulfur, chlorine, potassium and calcium. Native SAD phasing is challenging and is critically dependent on the collection of accurate data. Over the past five years, advances in diffraction hardware, crystallographic software, data-collection methods and strategies, and the use of data statistics have been witnessed which allow ‘highly accurate data’ to be routinely collected. Today, native SAD sits on the verge of becoming a ‘first-choice’ method for both de novo and molecular-replacement structure determination. This article will focus on advances that have caught the attention of the community over the past five years. It will also highlight both de novo native SAD structures and recent structures that were key to methods development. PMID:26175902

  16. Large native ungulates

    Treesearch

    Bryce Rickel

    2005-01-01

    This chapter addresses the large native ungulates (American bison (Bos bison), elk (Cervus elaphus), white-tailed deer (Odocoileus virginianus), mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus), and pronghorn (Antilocapra americana) of the grasslands. The information presented includes...

  17. Native American Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horse, Perry G.

    2005-01-01

    Many issues and elements--including ethnic nomenclature, racial attitudes, and the legal and political status of American Indian nations and Indian people--influence Native American identity. (Contains 3 notes.)

  18. Native American Identity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Horse, Perry G.

    2005-01-01

    Many issues and elements--including ethnic nomenclature, racial attitudes, and the legal and political status of American Indian nations and Indian people--influence Native American identity. (Contains 3 notes.)

  19. Native American Tribal Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  20. Native American Tribal Websites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Eric L.

    1999-01-01

    Lists Web sites maintained by 38 different Native American nations that deal with topics ranging from tribal history, news, arts and crafts, tourism, entertainment, and commerce. Represented nations include Apache, Blackfeet, Creek, Iroquois, Mohegan, and Sioux. (CMK)

  1. Native Knowledge in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1985-01-01

    Native American science is defined as activities of native peoples of the New World in observing physical phenomena and attempting to explain and control them. Problems in studying native science, ethnoscience and native science, archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy, ethnobotany, agriculture, technology, and future directions are discussed. (JN)

  2. Native Knowledge in the Americas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kidwell, Clara Sue

    1985-01-01

    Native American science is defined as activities of native peoples of the New World in observing physical phenomena and attempting to explain and control them. Problems in studying native science, ethnoscience and native science, archaeostronomy and ethnoastronomy, ethnobotany, agriculture, technology, and future directions are discussed. (JN)

  3. Native American Arts 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New, Lloyd; And Others

    The primary focus of this issue in a series of special topic publications is the Institute of American Indian Arts, a national educational institution administered by the Bureau of Indian Affairs for the purpose of training youthful native Americans in the arts. An introductory article by the Institute director entitled "Cultural Differences as…

  4. Teaching Alaskan Native Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunger, Marianna

    During the 1969-70 school year, a follow-up program was conducted for participants of the summer 1969 institute on Teaching Alaskan Native Youth. On-site seminars and individual conferences were conducted with 20 teachers and aides (serving in 16 rural Alaskan communities in which the predominant first language is Yupik, Inupik, or Athabascan) to…

  5. Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, C. Fayne; And Others

    Designed to accommodate a semester course in Native American Literature for secondary students, this teacher's guide includes a general introduction, a statement of the philosophy and goals upon which it is predicated, a nine-week block on post-Columbian literature, a nine-week block on oral literature, separate appendices for each block, a…

  6. Rebuilding Native American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyhis, Don; Simonelli, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Wellbriety Movement in Native American communities draws on the wisdom and participation of traditional elders. Beginning with a basic community teaching called the Four Laws of Change and the Healing Forest Model, the Wellbriety Movement blends Medicine Wheel knowledge with the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to provide culture-specific…

  7. The Native American Speaks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bromberg, Walter; And Others

    This publication is the product of several workshops and is aimed at multi-ethnic integration of teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching techniques. The 7 articles and 3 bibliographies, contributed by Native American consultants, emphasize recognition and alteration of bias in teacher attitudes, curriculum content, and teaching…

  8. Rebuilding Native American Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyhis, Don; Simonelli, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The Wellbriety Movement in Native American communities draws on the wisdom and participation of traditional elders. Beginning with a basic community teaching called the Four Laws of Change and the Healing Forest Model, the Wellbriety Movement blends Medicine Wheel knowledge with the 12 Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous to provide culture-specific…

  9. Is Nativism Sufficient?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braine, Martin D. S.

    1994-01-01

    Provides a brief history of the empiricism-nativism issue, considering present-day intellectual roots of nativist and empiricist inclinations. A schema is proposed for explaining the ontogenetic origin of an innate attribute or principle relevant to language. An attempt is made to explain the origin of primitives as derived by learning. (Contains…

  10. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  11. Native American Independent Living.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clay, Julie Anna

    1992-01-01

    Examines features of independent living philosophy with regard to compatibility with Native American cultures, including definition or conceptualization of disability; self-advocacy; systems advocacy; peer counseling; and consumer control and involvement. Discusses an actualizing process as one method of resolving cultural conflicts and…

  12. Exploring Native American Symbolism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dufrene, Phoebe

    This paper described the events and results of a workshop on Native American symbolism presented to educators and held in Kansas City, Missouri. The presenter maintained that some of the most crucial problems facing U.S. educators and students are caused by racial misunderstandings, and that the universality of artistic expression can be a vehicle…

  13. Native American Resource Book.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spears, Carl D., Comp.; And Others

    Focusing on the Southeastern American Indian cultures, this Native American resource guide is designed for use in the elementary and secondary schools of the East Baton Rouge Parish and is a product of a 1975 Indian Advisory Committee composed of Indian parents, teachers, and staff members. Objectives of these materials require the Indian student,…

  14. The Native American Holocaust.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Russell

    1989-01-01

    Describes the American Indian "Holocaust," decimation of Indian populations following European discovery of the Americas. European and African diseases, warfare with Europeans, and genocide reduced native populations from 75 million to only a few million. Discusses population statistics and demographic effects of epidemics, continuing infection,…

  15. Native American Cultural Groups.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene, Comp.

    Part of a larger report on the Four Directions Project, an American Indian technology innovation project, this section includes 13 "pathfinders" to locating information on Native American and other indigenous cultural groups. The pathfinders were designed by students in the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the…

  16. Symbolicity Among Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hill, L. Brooks; Lujan, Philip

    Within the framework of "symbolicity" and "nativistic movement" the paper presents a "reasonably balanced and illustrative" examination of selected negative and positive trends in Native American symbolicity. Symbolicity is defined as the state, condition, and tendency of people to organize their perceptions and…

  17. Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, C. Fayne; And Others

    Designed to accommodate a semester course in Native American Literature for secondary students, this teacher's guide includes a general introduction, a statement of the philosophy and goals upon which it is predicated, a nine-week block on post-Columbian literature, a nine-week block on oral literature, separate appendices for each block, a…

  18. Native American Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Walter S.

    1998-01-01

    On the Fajada Butte in New Mexico, 11th-century Anasazi constructed a site that marks the high and low points of the orbits of the sun and the moon. This unit on astronomy challenges students to think differently about the moon and about the ability of native people to understand the natural world. Includes resources for further study. (PVD)

  19. Studying Native America: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Russell, Ed.

    Based on a conference, this volume examines the past, present, and future of Native American studies. Native American studies seeks to understand Native Americans, America, and the world from a Native American indigenous perspective, and thereby broaden the education of both Native and non-Native Americans. Part 1 asks who Native Americans are…

  20. Studying Native America: Problems and Prospects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thornton, Russell, Ed.

    Based on a conference, this volume examines the past, present, and future of Native American studies. Native American studies seeks to understand Native Americans, America, and the world from a Native American indigenous perspective, and thereby broaden the education of both Native and non-Native Americans. Part 1 asks who Native Americans are…

  1. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  2. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maynard, N. G.

    2003-12-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01, 1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists from government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally- appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  3. Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop: Lessons Learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy G.

    2003-01-01

    The Native Peoples-Native Homelands Climate Change Workshop was held on October 28 through November 01,1998, as part of a series of workshops being held around the U.S. to improve the understanding of the potential consequences of climate variability and change for the Nation. This workshop was specifically designed by Native Peoples to examine the impacts of climate change and extreme weather variability on Native Peoples and Native Homelands from an indigenous cultural and spiritual perspective and to develop recommendations as well as identify potential response actions. The workshop brought together interested Native Peoples, representatives of Tribal governments, traditional elders, Tribal leaders, natural resource managers, Tribal College faculty and students, and climate scientists fiom government agencies and universities. It is clear that Tribal colleges and universities play a unique and critical role in the success of these emerging partnerships for decision-making in addition to the important education function for both Native and non-Native communities such as serving as a culturally-appropriate vehicle for access, analysis, control, and protection of indigenous cultural and intellectual property. During the discussions between scientists and policy-makers from both Native and non-Native communities, a number of important lessons emerged which are key to building more effective partnerships between Native and non-Native communities for collaboration and decision-making for a more sustainable future. This talk summarizes the key issues, recommendations, and lessons learned during this workshop.

  4. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  5. Native Americans' Interest in Horticulture.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Hockenberry

    1999-01-01

    Focus groups arranged by local Native American Master Gardeners on two Minnesota reservations determined community interest in extension-horticulture programs. Topics of interest included food preservation and historical Native-American uses of plants. (SK)

  6. 76 FR 22413 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ...) to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions Native Corporation. The decision... surface estate is conveyed to Afognak Native Corporation, Successor in Interest to Port Lions...

  7. The Native Educators Research Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trujillo, Octaviana; Viri, Denis; Figueira, Anna

    In fall 2001, the Center for Indian Education at Arizona State University received a federal grant to conduct research on issues of Native language and culture in the classroom. Currently in its first year, the 3-year study focuses on a large cohort of American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian candidates in teacher preparation programs…

  8. Working with Native American Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little Soldier, Lee

    1992-01-01

    Discusses some of the cultural and value differences between Native Americans and the dominant society that often cause discontinuity between traditional home and school life among Native American children and their families. Also discusses ways in which elementary school teachers can help Native American children achieve inner harmony between two…

  9. Who Stole Native American Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook-Lynn, Elizabeth

    1997-01-01

    Native American Studies has failed to develop into an academic discipline because of the continued influence of postcolonial theories, attempts to discredit Native American scholars, politically determined research agendas, and the ideology of the "New Historicism." Native American Studies must seek autonomy from other opportunistic…

  10. Digital Natives or Digital Tribes?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watson, Ian Robert

    2013-01-01

    This research builds upon the discourse surrounding digital natives. A literature review into the digital native phenomena was undertaken and found that researchers are beginning to identify the digital native as not one cohesive group but of individuals influenced by other factors. Primary research by means of questionnaire survey of technologies…

  11. Navajo use of native healers.

    PubMed

    Kim, C; Kwok, Y S

    1998-11-09

    Although the Indian Health Service provides extensive health care service to Navajo people, the role of native healers, or medicine men, has not been quantitatively described. To determine the prevalence of native healer use, the reasons for use, cost of use, and the nature of any conflict with conventional medicine. We conducted a cross-sectional interview of 300 Navajo patients seen consecutively in an ambulatory care clinic at a rural Indian Health Service hospital. Sixty-two percent of Navajo patients had used native healers and 39% used native healers on a regular basis; users were not distinguishable from nonusers by age, education, income, fluency in English, identification of a primary provider, or compliance, but Pentecostal patients used native healers less than patients of other faiths. Patients consulted native healers for common medical conditions such as arthritis, depression, and diabetes mellitus as well as "bad luck." Perceived conflict between native healer advice and medical provider advice was rare. Cost was the main barrier to seeking native healer care. Among the Navajo, use of native healers for medical conditions is common and is not related to age, sex, or income but is inversely correlated with the Pentecostal faith; use of healers overlaps with use of medical providers for common medical conditions. Patients are willing to discuss use of native healers and rarely perceive conflict between native healer and conventional medicine. This corroborates other research suggesting that alternative medicine is widely used by many cultural groups for common diseases.

  12. Introduced brown trout alter native acanthocephalan infections in native fish.

    PubMed

    Paterson, Rachel A; Townsend, Colin R; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M

    2011-09-01

    1. Native parasite acquisition provides introduced species with the potential to modify native host-parasite dynamics by acting as parasite reservoirs (with the 'spillback' of infection increasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) or sinks (with the 'dilution' of infection decreasing the parasite burdens of native hosts) of infection. 2. In New Zealand, negative correlations between the presence of introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta) and native parasite burdens of the native roundhead galaxias (Galaxias anomalus) have been observed, suggesting that parasite dilution is occurring. 3. We used a multiple-scale approach combining field observations, experimental infections and dynamic population modelling to investigate whether native Acanthocephalus galaxii acquisition by brown trout alters host-parasite dynamics in native roundhead galaxias. 4. Field observations demonstrated higher infection intensity in introduced trout than in native galaxias, but only small, immature A. galaxii were present in trout. Experimental infections also demonstrated that A. galaxii does not mature in trout, although parasite establishment and initial growth were similar in the two hosts. Taken together, these results support the hypothesis that trout may serve as an infection sink for the native parasite. 5. However, dynamic population modelling predicts that A. galaxii infections in native galaxias should at most only be slightly reduced by dilution in the presence of trout. Rather, model exploration indicates parasite densities in galaxias are highly sensitive to galaxias predation on infected amphipods, and to relative abundances of galaxias and trout. Hence, trout presence may instead reduce parasite burdens in galaxias by either reducing galaxias density or by altering galaxias foraging behaviour. © 2011 The Authors. Journal of Animal Ecology © 2011 British Ecological Society.

  13. Native Plants, Native Knowledge: Insights from Judy Bluehorse Skelton.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reed, Bracken

    2003-01-01

    Judy Bluehorse Skelton is an herbalist of Native American descent who conducts field trips to identify plants and classroom activities to demonstrate their uses. She also works with Portland (Oregon) schools developing culturally appropriate strategies for presenting Native American content. She encourages students to look at events such as the…

  14. Native Speakers' Perception of Non-Native English Speech

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jaber, Maysa; Hussein, Riyad F.

    2011-01-01

    This study is aimed at investigating the rating and intelligibility of different non-native varieties of English, namely French English, Japanese English and Jordanian English by native English speakers and their attitudes towards these foreign accents. To achieve the goals of this study, the researchers used a web-based questionnaire which…

  15. Our Native Ways: The Voices of Native American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toke, Arun Narayan, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    To celebrate the "Decade of the Indigenous Peoples," this issue of a nonprofit children's magazine includes art and writings by Native American youth who share their ways of looking at and living life. Emphasizes the distinct customs, traditions, languages, and folklore of the different Native Nations and Tribes. (LZ)

  16. Our Native Ways: The Voices of Native American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Toke, Arun Narayan, Ed.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    To celebrate the "Decade of the Indigenous Peoples," this issue of a nonprofit children's magazine includes art and writings by Native American youth who share their ways of looking at and living life. Emphasizes the distinct customs, traditions, languages, and folklore of the different Native Nations and Tribes. (LZ)

  17. Student Attitudes toward Native and Non-Native Language Instructors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hertel, Tammy Jandrey; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2009-01-01

    This study investigates students' attitudes toward native and nonnative speaking instructors of Spanish. A quantitative questionnaire was administered to 292 students enrolled in three different levels of undergraduate Spanish courses at a U.S. university. Participants were asked to rate Likert scale items related to native versus nonnative…

  18. Native Music in College Curricula?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Loran

    1986-01-01

    Culminating a 10-year effort to include the study of Native Americans and their music as it reflects cultural realities, life, thought, religion, and history as a choice in requirements for graduation, the elective course, "Native Music of North America," is now recognized at Washington State University as meeting both…

  19. Listening Natively across Perceptual Domains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langus, Alan; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Uysal, Ertugrul; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Marino, Caterina; Asaadi, Sina; Eren, Ömer; Toro, Juan M.; Peña, Marcela; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Our native tongue influences the way we perceive other languages. But does it also determine the way we perceive nonlinguistic sounds? The authors investigated how speakers of Italian, Turkish, and Persian group sequences of syllables, tones, or visual shapes alternating in either frequency or duration. We found strong native listening effects…

  20. Native Americans as Sports Mascots.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, Sharon Pray

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the controversy over whether sport teams should use Native American logos, mascots, or native symbols. Suggests that by implementing role-reversal techniques (putting the nonnative people in the same place) uncaring sports fans may recognize the disrespect involved; offers a hypothetical newspaper article that illustrates the…

  1. Native Language Literacy Screening Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hudson River Center for Program Development, Glenmont, NY.

    The purpose the Native Language Literacy Screening Device (NLLSD) is to give English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) practitioners a sense of the native language literacy levels of learners coming into their programs. This is worth knowing because when learners have had limited schooling in their first language instructional strategies used…

  2. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  3. Establishing Success with Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hains, Shaun

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Native research methods (talking circles and vision quests), a teacher at Edmonton (Alberta) Public Schools discovered why Canadian Native students' dropout rate was so high. Kids' complaints about poor relationships with teachers, racism, peer pressure, and poor family support were heeded, and successful interventions were…

  4. Native Americans in Physical Therapy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2003-01-01

    Three Native American physical therapists share stories of their careers, including educational background; motivation to enter the field; and experiences as a volunteer in Vietnam and working with the Indian Health Service and various rehabilitation programs. Advice on appropriate preparation in the sciences is offered to Native students…

  5. Listening Natively across Perceptual Domains?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langus, Alan; Seyed-Allaei, Shima; Uysal, Ertugrul; Pirmoradian, Sahar; Marino, Caterina; Asaadi, Sina; Eren, Ömer; Toro, Juan M.; Peña, Marcela; Bion, Ricardo A. H.; Nespor, Marina

    2016-01-01

    Our native tongue influences the way we perceive other languages. But does it also determine the way we perceive nonlinguistic sounds? The authors investigated how speakers of Italian, Turkish, and Persian group sequences of syllables, tones, or visual shapes alternating in either frequency or duration. We found strong native listening effects…

  6. Native Americans: The First Campers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Bonnie; Frebertshauser, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Questions are presented to help camps determine if their usage of American Indian culture truly honors Native Americans. Camps that plan to use Indian lore should research the tribe's name, location, symbols, legends, and living habits. A 5-day program is presented for enhancing campers' understanding of Native peoples and their relationship to…

  7. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    1982-01-01

    Using a Native American parable, compares the Standard Average European (SAE) world view with the Standard Native American (SNA) world view and the effects they have on education. Points out possible areas of interethnic confusion as a result of these two world views in communication dealing with cognitive schemes. (LC)

  8. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    The document compares and contrasts the Standard Average European (SAE) and the Standard Native American (SNA) viewpoints with regard to fostering cognitive development in children. One basic difference is demonstrated by relating a story and noting that, in terms of Native American cognitive development, no further teaching would be done. In…

  9. Native American Adult Reader III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    This reader, one of three designed to provide adults in basic education/GED programs with meaningful material based on Native American cultures, includes selections appropriate for advanced reading ability (grade 7 and above). The twelve readings focus on culture, history, and contemporary concerns of Native Americans. Each selection includes a…

  10. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    1982-01-01

    Using a Native American parable, compares the Standard Average European (SAE) world view with the Standard Native American (SNA) world view and the effects they have on education. Points out possible areas of interethnic confusion as a result of these two world views in communication dealing with cognitive schemes. (LC)

  11. Coyote's Eyes: Native Cognition Styles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tafoya, Terry

    The document compares and contrasts the Standard Average European (SAE) and the Standard Native American (SNA) viewpoints with regard to fostering cognitive development in children. One basic difference is demonstrated by relating a story and noting that, in terms of Native American cognitive development, no further teaching would be done. In…

  12. Native American Foods and Cookery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Tom; Potter, Eloise F.

    Native Americans had a well-developed agriculture long before the arrival of the Europeans. Three staples--corn, beans, and squash--were supplemented with other gathered plants or cultivated crops such as white potatoes, sweet potatoes, pumpkins, and peanuts. Native Americans had no cows, pigs, or domesticated chickens; they depended almost…

  13. Native American Professional Resource Directory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Honahni, Daniel

    The "Native American Professional Resource Directory" contains 1,076 Indian individuals representing various tribes and academic degree backgrounds. The directory is divided into three major categories: (1) academic degree index, (2) individual information index, and (3) tribal index. Criteria for selection are: (1) Native Americans of Indian or…

  14. Establishing Success with Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hains, Shaun

    2001-01-01

    Using traditional Native research methods (talking circles and vision quests), a teacher at Edmonton (Alberta) Public Schools discovered why Canadian Native students' dropout rate was so high. Kids' complaints about poor relationships with teachers, racism, peer pressure, and poor family support were heeded, and successful interventions were…

  15. Alaska Native Arts Education Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naccereto, R. W.

    In 1987 the Alaska Department of Education conducted a survey of the state fine arts curriculum. The resulting information revealed an inconsistency in Alaska Native Arts Education throughout the state. To explore this situation further, the Arts in Education Program conducted its own survey in the spring of 1990, entitled, "Native Arts…

  16. Earth's Caretakers: Native American Lessons.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nyberg, Lisa M., Ed.

    Written by Native American teachers and by teachers of Native Americans, this book presents examples of ways to learn respect for the Earth and its people. The hope is that students will learn to walk softly upon the Earth and to respect all living things. Lessons and activities engage elementary and middle school students in a four-step…

  17. Native Speakers: Integrating the Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolkomir, Richard

    1980-01-01

    St. Anselm College's new core humanities program includes as a language requirement a special culture and civilization segment. The Native Speaker Program is described. Students meet once a week with native speakers. The textbooks contain magazine articles from the countries under study. (MLW)

  18. Ohiyesa's Path: Reclaiming Native Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Renville, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As Natives have assumed increasing authority and responsibility for tribal and federally funded and administered schools, a more balanced and enlightened view is emerging. Notable among these events is the recognition of the critical need to shift emphasis to the untapped heritage of more recently recognized and acknowledged Native American…

  19. Education and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iannucilli, Mary V.

    Traditionally, Native Americans educated their children through the oral transmission of beliefs and values. Christian missions dominated Indian education from the 16th to the 19th century and began the process of erasing Native American identity and culture. After the Civil War, control of 73 Indian agencies was assigned to 13 religious…

  20. Reflecting on Native Speaker Privilege

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berger, Kathleen

    2014-01-01

    The issues surrounding native speakers (NSs) and nonnative speakers (NNSs) as teachers (NESTs and NNESTs, respectively) in the field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL) are a current topic of interest. In many contexts, the native speaker of English is viewed as the model teacher, thus putting the NEST into a position of…

  1. Native American Curriculum Resource Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCoy, Melanie, Ed.

    This guide aims to assist the faculty member who wishes to integrate Native American materials into core courses of the curriculum. The first section is a bibliography of over 350 entries, primarily books and journal articles, arranged in the following categories: Native American bibliographies and general sources, history, economics,…

  2. Ohiyesa's Path: Reclaiming Native Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Renville, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    As Natives have assumed increasing authority and responsibility for tribal and federally funded and administered schools, a more balanced and enlightened view is emerging. Notable among these events is the recognition of the critical need to shift emphasis to the untapped heritage of more recently recognized and acknowledged Native American…

  3. Vanishing native American dog lineages

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dogs were an important element in many native American cultures at the time Europeans arrived. Although previous ancient DNA studies revealed the existence of unique native American mitochondrial sequences, these have not been found in modern dogs, mainly purebred, studied so far. Results We identified many previously undescribed mitochondrial control region sequences in 400 dogs from rural and isolated areas as well as street dogs from across the Americas. However, sequences of native American origin proved to be exceedingly rare, and we estimate that the native population contributed only a minor fraction of the gene pool that constitutes the modern population. Conclusions The high number of previously unidentified haplotypes in our sample suggests that a lot of unsampled genetic variation exists in non-breed dogs. Our results also suggest that the arrival of European colonists to the Americas may have led to an extensive replacement of the native American dog population by the dogs of the invaders. PMID:21418639

  4. 50 CFR 17.5 - Alaska natives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... resides in Alaska; or (2) Any non-native permanent resident of an Alaskan native village who is primarily... pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section may be sold in native villages or towns in Alaska for native consumption within native villages and towns in Alaska. (c) Non-edible by-products of endangered or...

  5. Vulnerability of freshwater native biodiversity to non-native ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Background/Question/Methods Non-native species pose one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity. The literature provides plentiful empirical and anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon; however, such evidence is limited to local or regional scales. Employing geospatial analyses, we investigate the potential threat of non-native species to threatened and endangered aquatic animal taxa inhabiting unprotected areas across the continental US. We compiled distribution information from existing publicly available databases at the watershed scale (12-digit hydrologic unit code). We mapped non-native aquatic plant and animal species richness, and an index of cumulative invasion pressure, which weights non-native richness by the time since invasion of each species. These distributions were compared to the distributions of native aquatic taxa (fish, amphibians, mollusks, and decapods) from the International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) database. We mapped the proportion of species listed by IUCN as threatened and endangered, and a species rarity index per watershed. An overlay analysis identified watersheds experiencing high pressure from non-native species and also containing high proportions of threatened and endangered species or exhibiting high species rarity. Conservation priorities were identified by generating priority indices from these overlays and mapping them relative to the distribution of protected areas across the US. Results/Conclusion

  6. Use and Acquisition of Idiomatic Expressions in Referring by Native and Non-Native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bortfeld, Heather; Brennan, Susan E.

    1997-01-01

    Examines how native and nonnative undergraduate-student speakers adjust their referring expressions to each other in conversation. Finds that lexical entrainment was just as common in native/nonnative pairs as in native/native pairs; natives uttered more words than nonnatives in the same roles; and native expressions were judged less…

  7. Native American Folklorist: Paul Goble.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    1998-01-01

    Presents ideas for extending activities focusing on Paul Goble's books and Native Americans. Provides an annotated bibliography of Goble's books and lists audio recordings, video recordings, and biographical information. (PEN)

  8. Informational Publications on Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Contains a bibliography of free or inexpensive informational publications on American Indian culture, history, and problems. The list will also acquaint teachers with some of the educational centers across the nation that have significant materials on Native Americans. (AM)

  9. Native Geoscience: Pathways to Knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolman, J. R.; Seielstad, G.

    2006-12-01

    We are living in a definite time of change. Distinct changes are being experienced in our most sacred and natural environments. This is especially true on Native lands. Native people have lived for millennia in distinct and unique ways. The knowledge of balancing the needs of people with the needs of our natural environments is paramount in all tribal societies. This inherent accumulated knowledge has become the foundation on which to build a "blended" contemporary understanding of western science. The Dakota's and Northern California have embraced the critical need of understanding successful tribal strategies to engage educational systems (K-12 and higher education), to bring to prominence the professional development opportunities forged through working with tribal peoples and ensure the continued growth of Native earth and environmental scientists The presentation will highlight: 1) past and present philosophies on building and maintaining Native/Tribal students in earth and environmental sciences; 2) successful educational programs/activities in PreK-Ph.D. systems; 3) current Native leadership development in earth and environmental sciences; and 4) forward thinking for creating proaction collaborations addressing sustainable environmental, educational and social infrastructures for all people. Humboldt State University (HSU) and the University of North Dakota's Northern Great Plains Center for People and the Environment and the Upper Midwest Aerospace Consortium (UMAC) have been recognized nationally for their partnerships with Native communities. Unique collaborations are emerging "bridging" Native people across geographic areas in developing educational/research experiences which integrate the distinctive earth/environmental knowledge of tribal people. The presentation will highlight currently funded projects and initiatives as well as success stories of emerging Native earth system students and scientists.

  10. Native and Non-Native Teachers and Administrators for Elementary and Secondary Schools Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noley, Grayson

    This paper discusses issues in the recruitment, retention, and training of Native college students as teachers and school administrators. The number of Native educational professionals serving schools for Native students is extremely small, and there is evidence that even this number is declining relative to the increasing Native school…

  11. Native American Healing Practices and Counseling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rybak, Christopher J.; Eastin, Carol Lakota; Robbins, Irma

    2004-01-01

    An experiential Native American healing practices course, co-taught by a Native American pastoral counselor and a counselor educator, was offered to graduate counseling students to help them better understand Native American worldviews. A student participant's reflections are included. Students attended Native American ceremonies and learned…

  12. Something new - the Native Plants Journal

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese

    2002-01-01

    The demand for native plants continues to increase, but published information on how to propagate natives is extremely limited. The Native Plants Journal, a full-color publication produced as a cooperative between the University of Idaho and the USDA Forest Service, provides a forum for sharing practical information about growing and planting native plants.

  13. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  14. Cross-Language Perception of Cantonese Vowels Spoken by Native and Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Connie K.; Attina, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners' perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers. They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results…

  15. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S.

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension…

  16. Cross-Language Perception of Cantonese Vowels Spoken by Native and Non-Native Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    So, Connie K.; Attina, Virginie

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners' perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers. They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results…

  17. Invasive non-native plants have a greater effect on neighbouring natives than other non-natives.

    PubMed

    Kuebbing, Sara E; Nuñez, Martin A

    2016-09-12

    Human activity is creating a global footprint by changing the climate, altering habitats and reshuffling the distribution of species. The movement of species around the globe has led to the naturalization and accumulation of multiple non-native species within ecosystems, which is frequently associated with habitat disturbance and changing environmental conditions. However, interactions among species will also influence community composition, but little is known about the full range of direct and indirect interactions among native and non-native species. Here, we show through a meta-analysis of 1,215 pairwise plant interactions between 274 vascular plant species in 21 major habitat types that interactions between non-native plants are asymmetrical with interactions between non-native and native plants. Non-native plants were always bad neighbours, but the negative effect of non-natives on natives was around two times greater than the effect of non-natives on other non-natives. In contrast, the performance of non-native plants was five times higher in the presence of a neighbouring native plant species than in the presence of a neighbouring non-native plant species. Together, these results demonstrate that invaded plant communities may accumulate additional non-native species even if direct interactions between non-natives species are negative. Put another way, invasions may be more likely to lead to more invasions, requiring more active management of ecosystems by promoting native species restoration to undermine invasive positive feedback and to assist native species recovery in invaded ecosystems.

  18. University Students' Perceptions of Native and Non-Native Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ustunluoglu, Evrim

    2007-01-01

    The employment of native teachers of English in countries where English is a foreign language, coupled with a growing concern over teaching effectiveness, has led to collecting data about teachers' performance through student feedback. Not much research has been carried out in Turkey to evaluate the process and output of language teaching by…

  19. Indian Education - Curriculum Development: Native Languages, Native Studies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Toronto (Ontario). Education Div.

    Brief program descriptions derived from a cross-Canada survey of current enrichment programs and teaching materials for Native Studies programs are presented in this document. Prices for materials and some funding sources are also presented. Brief paragraphs describe on-going programs in each of the following subject areas: art (5 programs);…

  20. Speech Recognition of Non-Native Speech Using Native and Non-Native Acoustic Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-08-01

    NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE ACOUSTIC MODELS David A. van Leeuwen and Rosemary Orr vanLeeuwentm .tno. nl R. 0rr~kno. azn. nl TNO Human Factors Research...a] is pronounced closer to the [c] by the vowels . Journal of Phonetics, 25:437-470, 1997. 32 [2] D. B. Paul and J. M. Baker. The design for [9] R. H...J. Kershaw, [12] Tony Robinson. Private Communication. L. Lamel, D. A. van Leeuwen , D. Pye, A. J. Robinson, H. J. M. Steeneken, and P. C. Wood- [13

  1. Native Birthrights and Indigenous Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Lunday, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    In traditional tribal cultures, children are treated with great respect and eagerly learn from their elders. But in contemporary Western society, Native students have the highest dropout rates and are subjected to disproportionate school disciplinary exclusion, which becomes a pipeline into the justice system (Sprague, Vincent, Tobin, & Pavel,…

  2. Native Birthrights and Indigenous Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    James, Adrienne Brant; Lunday, Tammy

    2014-01-01

    In traditional tribal cultures, children are treated with great respect and eagerly learn from their elders. But in contemporary Western society, Native students have the highest dropout rates and are subjected to disproportionate school disciplinary exclusion, which becomes a pipeline into the justice system (Sprague, Vincent, Tobin, & Pavel,…

  3. Native Americans in Public Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westberg, Jane

    2003-01-01

    The Family Spirit Project provides health and parenting education and in-home support to Navajo and Apache teen parents. The public-health careers of Native professionals allied with the project are described, including a public health administrator, a trainer of field workers, and a medical researcher specializing in communicable diseases that…

  4. Resiliency and Native American Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Driving-Hawk, Christopher; Baartman, Jyl

    2009-01-01

    The term resiliency is used to describe the "human capacity and ability to face, overcome, be strengthened by, and even be transformed by experiences of adversity." Native American culture provides a framework for fostering resiliency. The Lakota Sioux society identifies four core needs that foster resiliency and motivate individuals to reach…

  5. Learning Styles and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna B.

    This paper summarizes research on learning styles, then examines the cognitive style of Native American primary school students. Five theories of cognitive style (Dunn and Dunn, Gregorc, Kagan, Witkin, and Cohen) are examined along with the test instruments these theories have fostered. A sixth concept of cognitive style, brain hemispheric…

  6. Learning Styles and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Browne, Dauna Bell

    1990-01-01

    Reviews 5 models of learning or cognitive styles and the concept of brain hemispheric functions. Discusses the right hemisphere dominant learning style of many Native American children. Presents points to consider when modifying curricula or designing a reading program aimed at all learners. Contains 19 references. (SV)

  7. Native Art of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langham, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides historical information on native Southwest peoples and their arts to encourage appreciation and understanding of this cultural heritage. Provides instructions and supply lists for age-appropriate craft projects including woven baskets and rugs, clay pots, clay and paper beads, silver bracelets, kachina dolls, sand paintings, dream…

  8. Native Art of the Southwest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Langham, Barbara A.

    1997-01-01

    Provides historical information on native Southwest peoples and their arts to encourage appreciation and understanding of this cultural heritage. Provides instructions and supply lists for age-appropriate craft projects including woven baskets and rugs, clay pots, clay and paper beads, silver bracelets, kachina dolls, sand paintings, dream…

  9. Studies in Native American Languages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ok, Jong-seok, Ed.; Taneri, Mubeccel, Ed.

    1989-01-01

    Eight original research papers on Native American languages by faculty and students of the Linguistics Department and other related departments of the University of Kansas are presented. The titles and authors include the following: "Comanche Consonant Mutation: Initial Association or Feature Spread?" (James L. Armagost); "The Alsea…

  10. Resiliency and Native American Teenagers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feinstein, Sheryl; Driving-Hawk, Christopher; Baartman, Jyl

    2009-01-01

    The term resiliency is used to describe the "human capacity and ability to face, overcome, be strengthened by, and even be transformed by experiences of adversity." Native American culture provides a framework for fostering resiliency. The Lakota Sioux society identifies four core needs that foster resiliency and motivate individuals to reach…

  11. Native American Adult Reader I.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Lovern Root, Ed.

    Aspects of Native American history and culture as well as issues and concerns of American Indians are presented in the twelve short articles in this reader for adults. Intended for use in an adult basic education/GED program, the reader features simply written stories (for grades 0-3), illustrations, vocabulary lists and student study questions.…

  12. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers' performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English learning and teaching, and the inappropriate…

  13. The Schooling of Native America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Thomas, Ed.

    The collection of ten essays by Native Americans who are involved in Indian education includes a preface by Thomas Thompson; "The Indian Student Amid American Inconsistencies" by Vine Deloria, Jr.; "Growing Up in E'da How-One Idaho Girlhood" by LaNada Boyer; "Multicultural Teacher Education at Rough Rock" by Dillon…

  14. Native Speakers in Linguistic Imperialism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillipson, Robert

    2016-01-01

    An investigation of Native English Speaking Teachers' performance in schemes in six Asian contexts, commissioned by the British Council, and undertaken by three British academics, is subjected to critical evaluation. Key issues for exploration are the issue of a monolingual approach to English learning and teaching, and the inappropriate…

  15. Native American College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  16. Census Data and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Nampeo D. R.; Crook, Karen A.

    Designed for those seeking data on Native Americans, this paper presents U.S. census data sources and the developments which have taken place in data collection procedures and definitions between 1860 and 1970. Specifically, this paper presents: (1) development of race concept and definitions (emphasis on American Indian, Aleut and Eskimo, and…

  17. Native American College Student Persistence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mosholder, Richard; Goslin, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    Native American students are the most likely racial/ethnic group tracked in post-secondary American education to be affected by poverty and limited access to educational opportunities. In addition, they are the most likely to be required to take remedial course work and are the least likely to graduate from college. A review of the literature was…

  18. Native Literacy: A Living Language.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulsen, Rhonda L.

    2003-01-01

    Aboriginal literacy encompasses oral tradition, culture, language, identity, and world view in addition to the written word, and is a process of lifelong learning, much of which occurs beyond school walls. When defining Native literacy, one must move away from measuring Aboriginal students by Euro-Western definitions and move toward a balanced,…

  19. Census Data and Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenney, Nampeo D. R.; Crook, Karen A.

    Designed for those seeking data on Native Americans, this paper presents U.S. census data sources and the developments which have taken place in data collection procedures and definitions between 1860 and 1970. Specifically, this paper presents: (1) development of race concept and definitions (emphasis on American Indian, Aleut and Eskimo, and…

  20. The Schooling of Native America.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Thomas, Ed.

    The collection of ten essays by Native Americans who are involved in Indian education includes a preface by Thomas Thompson; "The Indian Student Amid American Inconsistencies" by Vine Deloria, Jr.; "Growing Up in E'da How-One Idaho Girlhood" by LaNada Boyer; "Multicultural Teacher Education at Rough Rock" by Dillon…

  1. Amyloidogenesis of Natively Unfolded Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Uversky, Vladimir N.

    2009-01-01

    Aggregation and subsequent development of protein deposition diseases originate from conformational changes in corresponding amyloidogenic proteins. The accumulated data support the model where protein fibrillogenesis proceeds via the formation of a relatively unfolded amyloidogenic conformation, which shares many structural properties with the pre-molten globule state, a partially folded intermediate first found during the equilibrium and kinetic (un)folding studies of several globular proteins and later described as one of the structural forms of natively unfolded proteins. The flexibility of this structural form is essential for the conformational rearrangements driving the formation of the core cross-beta structure of the amyloid fibril. Obviously, molecular mechanisms describing amyloidogenesis of ordered and natively unfolded proteins are different. For ordered protein to fibrillate, its unique and rigid structure has to be destabilized and partially unfolded. On the other hand, fibrillogenesis of a natively unfolded protein involves the formation of partially folded conformation; i.e., partial folding rather than unfolding. In this review recent findings are surveyed to illustrate some unique features of the natively unfolded proteins amyloidogenesis. PMID:18537543

  2. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  3. History of NASA/Native People Native Homelands Initiative

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maynard, Nancy

    2000-01-01

    This workshop is one of the follow-on local assessment activities from the US National Assessment on the Impact of Climate Change on the US. N. Maynard (for NASA) helped create and get under way an initiative which brought together climate change scientists from around the US with Native Americans to bring together classic Western European scientists with knowledge from native peoples - from such sources as oral histories of drought, major fires, etc. The purpose of this was to encourage not only joint science but also bring NASA resources and education materials to Tribal schools and encourage joint preparation of educational and training materials. N. Maynard's talk will provide history of that process and discuss possible ways to collaborate in the future, building on this effort.

  4. Native and Non-Native Perceptions on a Non-Native Oral Discourse in an Academic Setting

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dikilitas, Kenan; Demir, Bora

    2012-01-01

    This qualitative study investigates discourse-level patterns typically employed by a Turkish lecturer based on the syntactic patterns found in the collected data. More specifically, the study aims to reveal how different native and non-native speakers of English perceive discourse patterns used by a non-native lecturer teaching in English. The…

  5. Stereotypes of Cantonese English, Apparent Native/Non-Native Status, and Their Effect on Non-Native English Speakers' Perception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hu, Guiling; Lindemann, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the effect of information about native/non-native speaker status on non-native listeners' perception of English words with word-final stops. A survey study conducted with 38 Chinese learners of English in Guangzhou, China examined their stereotypes about Cantonese English. They described it negatively and named features…

  6. NABS Program: (Native Americans in Biological Science).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettys, Nancy, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the four-week summer program of the Native Americans in Biological Sciences Program that engages Native American eighth- and ninth-grade students in studying the problems related to the waste water treatment plant in Cushing, Oklahoma. (MDH)

  7. Native Communities and the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Indian Journal, 1978

    1978-01-01

    A loosely knit coalition of over 25 native groups, the Peruvian Amazon Peoples has prepared a statement directed at the Peruvian Constitutional Assembly for purposes of Native input into the preparation of a revised national constitution. (JC)

  8. Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Population Profiles > Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander > Asthma Asthma and Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders National data for ... very limited. While all of the causes of asthma remain unclear, children exposed to secondhand tobacco smoke ...

  9. 43 CFR 2653.6 - Native groups.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... § 2653.6 Native groups. (a) Eligibility. (1) The head or any authorized representative of a Native group... will forward a copy of such application to the Director, Juneau Area Office, Bureau of Indian Affairs...

  10. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below... is conveyed to Chignik Lagoon Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Chignik Lagoon...

  11. NABS Program: (Native Americans in Biological Science).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gettys, Nancy, Comp.

    1994-01-01

    Describes the four-week summer program of the Native Americans in Biological Sciences Program that engages Native American eighth- and ninth-grade students in studying the problems related to the waste water treatment plant in Cushing, Oklahoma. (MDH)

  12. The State of Native American Youth Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minnesota Univ., Minneapolis. Div. of General Pediatrics and Adolescent Health.

    This survey on the health status of Native American adolescents living on or near reservations was completed by 14,000 American Indian and Alaska Native youths from 50 tribes attending 200 schools in 12 states. Results indicate that most Native teenagers felt their family cared about them a great deal, and many would go to a family member first…

  13. The individual structures of native celluloses

    Treesearch

    R. H. Atalla

    1999-01-01

    Our understanding of the diversity of native celluloses has been limited by the fact that studies of their structures have sought to establish ideal crystal lattice forms for the native state. Departures from ideal structures in the native state are viewed as defects in the ideal lattice. In most instances real celluloses have been regarded as departing from the ideal...

  14. Significant Literature by and about Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Cecilia A., Comp.; Travis, M. Eunice, Comp.

    Significant literature about Native Americans, some written by Native Americans, comprises this bibliography. Materials relevant to Native Americans found at Kansas State University are listed. Over 850 books, articles on microfiche, studies, documents, and publications arranged by subject categories are contained in this bibliography. The subject…

  15. Native-American Women in History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Nancy

    1995-01-01

    Maintains that, although a few Native American women figure prominently in U.S. history, women's perspectives and experiences have largely been excluded from research into Native American history. Reviews life experiences and contributions of Native American women throughout U.S. history. (CFR)

  16. Native Americans and Wage Labor: Ethnohistorical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Alice, Ed.; Knack, Martha C., Ed.

    This book reconsiders a largely ignored fact of North American Indian economic life--the place of wage labor in the culture and history of Native Americans. Case studies examine social networks of Native agricultural laborers, the decline of Native communities from self-sufficient producers to lower-class wage laborers, vocational education in…

  17. Native timber harvests in southeast Alaska.

    Treesearch

    G. Knapp

    1992-01-01

    The Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act established 13 Native corporations in southeast Alaska. There are 12 "village" corporations and 1 "regional" corporation (Sealaska Corporation). The Native corporations were entitled to select about 540,000 acres of land out of the Tongass National Forest; about 95 percent have been conveyed. This study...

  18. North Dakota Native American Essential Understandings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    North Dakota Department of Public Instruction, 2015

    2015-01-01

    In the spring of 2015, the North Dakota Department of Public Instruction brought together tribal Elders from across North Dakota to share stories, memories, songs, and wisdom in order to develop the North Dakota Native American Essential Understandings (NDNAEU) to guide the learning of both Native and non-Native students across the state. They…

  19. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  20. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  1. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  2. Native American Children in Michigan. [Executive Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    W. K. Kellogg Foundation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    "Native American Children in Michigan," provides a historical context for the tenuous relationship between Michigan's 12 federally recognized tribes and the state government, paying particular attention to the erosion of Native American education programs and the disproportionate number of Native children who find themselves in both the…

  3. 10 CFR 440.11 - Native Americans.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Native Americans. 440.11 Section 440.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION WEATHERIZATION ASSISTANCE FOR LOW-INCOME PERSONS § 440.11 Native... involved as the population of all low-income Native Americans for whom a determination under paragraph...

  4. 77 FR 59220 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-26

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Decision... Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface estate in these lands will... Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Council, Alaska, and are located in: Lot 1, U.S...

  5. 78 FR 7807 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... estate is conveyed to Sitnasuak Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nome, Alaska, and...

  6. 76 FR 57759 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1604 et seq.). The subsurface... conveyed to Sitnasuak Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nome, Alaska, and are located in...

  7. 76 FR 43340 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ...; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Alaska Peninsula Corporation, Successor in Interest to Newhalen Native Corporation. The decision approves the surface estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims...

  8. 76 FR 55414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface... ] Bethel Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Bethel, Alaska, and are located in: Lots 33...

  9. 78 FR 26064 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... estate is conveyed to Unalakleet Native Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Unalakleet, Alaska...

  10. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  11. Native American Studies: A Personal Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, C. Patrick

    1986-01-01

    Native American Studies programs, however small, are the Native community's academic foothold in higher education. To maintain and expand this foothold of approximately 105 programs on university and college campuses throughout the United States, Native American Studies must continue to develop its professional capacity to act as an "independent…

  12. The Native American Woman: A Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Medicine, Bea

    Presenting varied perspectives describing the Native American woman, this book is divided into six chapters as follows: (1) Native Americans and Anthropology (this chapter illustrates the way in which anthropologists have helped stereotype American Indian women); (2) The Native American Woman in Ethnographic Perspective (emphasizing role…

  13. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  14. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  15. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  16. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  17. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  18. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2011-07-01 2010-07-01 true Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  19. 34 CFR 303.25 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Native language. 303.25 Section 303.25 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 303.25 Native language. (a) Native language, when used... section 602(18) of the Act), means— (1) The language normally used by that individual, or, in the case...

  20. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The...

  1. Bill Demmert and Native Education in Alaska

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnhardt, Ray

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the influences of William Demmert's formative years growing up in Alaska and his years as an educator of Native American students upon his career in Native education policy. It focuses on Alaska Native education during a ten-year period between 1980 and 1990 during which time he served as the director of the Center for…

  2. Native Americans and Wage Labor: Ethnohistorical Perspectives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlefield, Alice, Ed.; Knack, Martha C., Ed.

    This book reconsiders a largely ignored fact of North American Indian economic life--the place of wage labor in the culture and history of Native Americans. Case studies examine social networks of Native agricultural laborers, the decline of Native communities from self-sufficient producers to lower-class wage laborers, vocational education in…

  3. The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Patricia

    2002-01-01

    The Native American Fish & Wildlife Society helps over 200 tribes and Alaska Native villages implement best management practices, informs them about wildlife issues, provides hazardous materials training, trains game wardens, and conducts a summer practicum for Native youth on environmental issues and careers in natural resource fields.…

  4. Native Education: The Next 100 Years.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Atleo, E. R.

    This paper discusses the history and trauma of Native education in Canada and stresses the importance of integrating the best of the Native culture with the best of the Western culture in future Native education. The paper is organized in three parts. The first section acknowledges the trauma inflicted on the indigenous peoples by means of early…

  5. Canadian Journal of Native Studies: An Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Richard T.

    1987-01-01

    Describes and critically analyzes volume of "Canadian Journal of Native Studies" (v4 n2 1984). Sketches journal's history and critiques three articles. Article topics include history (Indian treaties and Indian policy administration); resource development impacts (reserve land flooding, native health, and fishing); and native education…

  6. Tamarisk coalition - native riparian plant materials program

    Treesearch

    Stacy Kolegas

    2012-01-01

    The Tamarisk Coalition (TC), a nonprofit organization dedicated to riparian restoration in the western United States, has created a Native Plant Materials Program to address the identified need for native riparian plant species for use in revegetation efforts on the Colorado Plateau. The specific components of the Native Plant Materials Program include: 1) provide seed...

  7. Students Bring Native Texts to Life.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parins, James W.

    2003-01-01

    At Sequoyah Research Center, University of Arkansas, Little Rock, college students receive credit for participating in the Native Writers Digital Text Project. The project identifies, collects, edits, and archives previously unknown or unavailable works by Native writers and constructs bibliographic guides to Native writing and publishing. A web…

  8. Education and Attitudes toward Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bugaj, Albert M.

    A survey of 123 students enrolled in Introduction to Social Psychology at the University of Wisconsin--Green Bay examined attitudes toward Native Americans. The research assessed the effects of educational programs at the secondary and postsecondary level on attitudes toward Native Americans and Native American treaty rights, and also measured the…

  9. 34 CFR 300.29 - Native language.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Native language. 300.29 Section 300.29 Education... DISABILITIES General Definitions Used in This Part § 300.29 Native language. (a) Native language, when used with respect to an individual who is limited English proficient, means the following: (1) The language...

  10. Ecological impacts of non-native species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkinson, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Non-native species are considered one of the greatest threats to freshwater biodiversity worldwide (Drake et al. 1989; Allen and Flecker 1993; Dudgeon et al. 2005). Some of the first hypotheses proposed to explain global patterns of amphibian declines included the effects of non-native species (Barinaga 1990; Blaustein and Wake 1990; Wake and Morowitz 1991). Evidence for the impact of non-native species on amphibians stems (1) from correlative research that relates the distribution or abundance of a species to that of a putative non-native species, and (2) from experimental tests of the effects of a non-native species on survival, growth, development or behaviour of a target species (Kats and Ferrer 2003). Over the past two decades, research on the effects of non-native species on amphibians has mostly focused on introduced aquatic predators, particularly fish. Recent research has shifted to more complex ecological relationships such as influences of sub-lethal stressors (e.g. contaminants) on the effects of non-native species (Linder et al. 2003; Sih et al. 2004), non-native species as vectors of disease (Daszak et al. 2004; Garner et al. 2006), hybridization between non-natives and native congeners (Riley et al. 2003; Storfer et al. 2004), and the alteration of food-webs by non-native species (Nystrom et al. 2001). Other research has examined the interaction of non-native species in terms of facilitation (i.e. one non-native enabling another to become established or spread) or the synergistic effects of multiple non-native species on native amphibians, the so-called invasional meltdown hypothesis (Simerloff and Von Holle 1999). Although there is evidence that some non-native species may interact (Ricciardi 2001), there has yet to be convincing evidence that such interactions have led to an accelerated increase in the number of non-native species and cumulative impacts are still uncertain (Simberloff 2006). Applied research on the control, eradication, and

  11. Native Terrestrial Animal Species Richness

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    These data represent predicted current distributions of all native mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and butterflies in the Middle-Atlantic region. The data are available for both 8-digit HUCs and EMAP hexagons and represent total species counts for each spatial unit. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  12. Chinese College Students' Views on Native English and Non-Native English in EFL Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Qian, Yang; Jingxia, Liu

    2016-01-01

    With the development of globalization, English is clearly spoken by many more non-native than native speakers, which raises the discussion of English varieties and the debate regarding the conformity to Standard English. Although a large number of studies have shown scholars' attitudes towards native English and non-native English, little research…

  13. Closing Kiswahili Conversations: The Performance of Native and Non-native Speakers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Omar, Alwiya S.

    A study investigated the ways in which native and non-native speakers of Kiswahili close conversations. Native speaker data were obtained from observation and field notes, recorded face-to-face interactions, recorded telephone conversations, reconstructed dialogues, and televised plays. Non-native speaker (American) data were drawn from role-play…

  14. Error Gravity: Perceptions of Native-Speaking and Non-Native Speaking Faculty in EFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresovich, Brant M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of teachers of composition in English as a Second Language in Japan addressed the perceptions of native-English-speaking and non-native-English-speaking teachers of the acceptability of specific error types within sentences. The native speakers of English were one British and 16 Americans. The non-native group was comprised of 26 Japanese…

  15. Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the int...

  16. Origin matters: widely distributed native and non-native species benefit from different functional traits.

    PubMed

    Knapp, Sonja; Kühn, Ingolf

    2012-07-01

    Recently, ecologists debated whether distinguishing native from non-native species is sensible or not. One argument is that widespread and less widespread species are functionally different, whether or not they are native. An opposing statement points out ecologically relevant differences between native and non-native species. We studied the functional traits that drive native and non-native vascular plant species frequency in Germany by explaining species grid-cell frequency using traits and their interaction with status. Native and non-native species frequency was equally driven by life span, ploidy type and self-compatibility. Non-native species frequency rose with later flowering cessation date, whereas this relationship was absent for native species. Native and non-native species differed in storage organs and in the number of environmental conditions they tolerate. We infer that environmental filters drive trait convergence of native and non-native species, whereas competition drives trait divergence. Meanwhile, introduction pathways functionally bias the frequency of non-native species. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd/CNRS.

  17. Error Gravity: Perceptions of Native-Speaking and Non-Native Speaking Faculty in EFL.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kresovich, Brant M.

    1988-01-01

    A survey of teachers of composition in English as a Second Language in Japan addressed the perceptions of native-English-speaking and non-native-English-speaking teachers of the acceptability of specific error types within sentences. The native speakers of English were one British and 16 Americans. The non-native group was comprised of 26 Japanese…

  18. Optimal control of native predators

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Julien; O'Connell, Allan F.; Kendall, William L.; Runge, Michael C.; Simons, Theodore R.; Waldstein, Arielle H.; Schulte, Shiloh A.; Converse, Sarah J.; Smith, Graham W.; Pinion, Timothy; Rikard, Michael; Zipkin, Elise F.

    2010-01-01

    We apply decision theory in a structured decision-making framework to evaluate how control of raccoons (Procyon lotor), a native predator, can promote the conservation of a declining population of American Oystercatchers (Haematopus palliatus) on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. Our management objective was to maintain Oystercatcher productivity above a level deemed necessary for population recovery while minimizing raccoon removal. We evaluated several scenarios including no raccoon removal, and applied an adaptive optimization algorithm to account for parameter uncertainty. We show how adaptive optimization can be used to account for uncertainties about how raccoon control may affect Oystercatcher productivity. Adaptive management can reduce this type of uncertainty and is particularly well suited for addressing controversial management issues such as native predator control. The case study also offers several insights that may be relevant to the optimal control of other native predators. First, we found that stage-specific removal policies (e.g., yearling versus adult raccoon removals) were most efficient if the reproductive values among stage classes were very different. Second, we found that the optimal control of raccoons would result in higher Oystercatcher productivity than the minimum levels recommended for this species. Third, we found that removing more raccoons initially minimized the total number of removals necessary to meet long term management objectives. Finally, if for logistical reasons managers cannot sustain a removal program by removing a minimum number of raccoons annually, managers may run the risk of creating an ecological trap for Oystercatchers.

  19. Free classification of American English dialects by native and non-native listeners

    PubMed Central

    Clopper, Cynthia G.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2009-01-01

    Most second language acquisition research focuses on linguistic structures, and less research has examined the acquisition of sociolinguistic patterns. The current study explored the perceptual classification of regional dialects of American English by native and non-native listeners using a free classification task. Results revealed similar classification strategies for the native and non-native listeners. However, the native listeners were more accurate overall than the non-native listeners. In addition, the non-native listeners were less able to make use of constellations of cues to accurately classify the talkers by dialect. However, the non-native listeners were able to attend to cues that were either phonologically or sociolinguistically relevant in their native language. These results suggest that non-native listeners can use information in the speech signal to classify talkers by regional dialect, but that their lack of signal-independent cultural knowledge about variation in the second language leads to less accurate classification performance. PMID:20161400

  20. Production and Perception of Temporal Patterns in Native and Non-Native Speech

    PubMed Central

    Bent, Tessa; Bradlow, Ann R.; Smith, Bruce L.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined production and perception of English temporal patterns by native and non-native participants. Experiment 1 indicated that native and non-native (L1 = Chinese) talkers differed significantly in their production of one English duration pattern (i.e., vowel lengthening before voiced versus voiceless consonants) but not another (i.e., tense versus lax vowels). Experiment 2 tested native and non-native listener identification of words that differed in voicing of the final consonant by the native and non-native talkers whose productions were substantially different in experiment 1. Results indicated that differences in native and non-native intelligibility may be partially explained by temporal pattern differences in vowel duration although other cues such as presence of stop releases and burst duration may also contribute. Additionally, speech intelligibility depends on shared phonetic knowledge between talkers and listeners rather than only on accuracy relative to idealized production norms. PMID:18679042

  1. Alaska Native Population and Manpower Perspectives on Native Labor Force Utilization: 1978.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bland, Laurel L.

    As part of a long-term study of the utilization of Alaska Native manpower, new data is combined with that of a similar 1975 study to estimate the Alaska Native and non-Native civilian population and work force for 1978 and 1980. Contrary to 1975 predictions the population ratio of Alaska non-Natives to Natives remains constant at 82%/18%. The…

  2. Bladder cancer in Native Americans and Alaskan Natives.

    PubMed

    Watson, Richard A; Sidor, Monika

    2008-07-01

    The prevalence of bladder cancer among Native Americans/Alaskan Natives (NAs/ANs) is generally considered to be low. However, the relative morbidity and mortality seem high. We have undertaken this survey of the published data to explore and document this observation. An extensive survey of the published data was undertaken. The Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results data in particular were assessed. The incidence of bladder cancer among the NA/AN peoples is inexplicably low. This low incidence is more remarkable, given the widespread use of tobacco products and the disproportionately high incidence of kidney cancer in this same population. Despite this low incidence, NA/AN men and women seem to be at a relatively greater risk of dying of bladder cancer, once it has been diagnosed. More and larger studies are needed to clarify and update the incidence, cell type, and clinical outcomes of bladder cancer among NA/AN men and women. Social, economic, and political barriers to treatment also need to be addressed. Effective steps need to be undertaken to ensure more timely diagnosis and treatment of this disease.

  3. Predicting Native English-Like Performance by Native Japanese Speakers

    PubMed Central

    Ingvalson, Erin M.; McClelland, James L.; Holt, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    This study tested the predictions of the Speech Learning Model (SLM, Flege, 1988) on the case of native Japanese (NJ) speakers’ perception and production of English /ɹ / and /l/. NJ speakers’ degree of foreign accent, intelligibility of /ɹ –l/ productions, and ability to perceive natural speech /ɹ –l/ were assessed as a function of length of residency in North America, age of arrival in North America, years of student status in an English environment, and percentage of Japanese usage. Additionally, the extent to which NJ speakers’ utilized the F3 onset cue when differentiating /ɹ –l/ in perception and production was assessed, this cue having previously been shown to be the most reliable indicator of category membership. As predicted, longer residencies predicted more native English-like accents, more intelligible productions, and more accurate natural speech identifications; however, no changes were observed in F3 reliance, indicating that though performance improves it does so through reliance on other cues. PMID:22021941

  4. Building a Native Teaching Force: Important Considerations. ERIC Digest.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manuelito, Kathryn D.

    Since 1975, the political climate has increasingly supported the inclusion of American Indian culture and language in Native education and the training of Native teachers. Native teachers enhance the teacher-student relationship for Native students, are role models for Native youth, and are aware of Native learning styles. The ongoing Native…

  5. Reconstructing Native American Population History

    PubMed Central

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V.; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F.; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C.; Bravi, Claudio M.; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria-Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M.; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, María José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Ángel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B.; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I.; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Rienzo, Anna Di; Freimer, Nelson B.; Price, Alkes L.; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2013-01-01

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved1–5. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred via a single6–8 or multiple streams of migration from Siberia9–15. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. We show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call “First American”. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan-speakers on both sides of the Panama Isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America. PMID:22801491

  6. Reconstructing Native American population history.

    PubMed

    Reich, David; Patterson, Nick; Campbell, Desmond; Tandon, Arti; Mazieres, Stéphane; Ray, Nicolas; Parra, Maria V; Rojas, Winston; Duque, Constanza; Mesa, Natalia; García, Luis F; Triana, Omar; Blair, Silvia; Maestre, Amanda; Dib, Juan C; Bravi, Claudio M; Bailliet, Graciela; Corach, Daniel; Hünemeier, Tábita; Bortolini, Maria Cátira; Salzano, Francisco M; Petzl-Erler, María Luiza; Acuña-Alonzo, Victor; Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos; Canizales-Quinteros, Samuel; Tusié-Luna, Teresa; Riba, Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela; Lopez-Alarcón, Mardia; Coral-Vazquez, Ramón; Canto-Cetina, Thelma; Silva-Zolezzi, Irma; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan Carlos; Contreras, Alejandra V; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Gómez-Vázquez, Maria José; Molina, Julio; Carracedo, Angel; Salas, Antonio; Gallo, Carla; Poletti, Giovanni; Witonsky, David B; Alkorta-Aranburu, Gorka; Sukernik, Rem I; Osipova, Ludmila; Fedorova, Sardana A; Vasquez, René; Villena, Mercedes; Moreau, Claudia; Barrantes, Ramiro; Pauls, David; Excoffier, Laurent; Bedoya, Gabriel; Rothhammer, Francisco; Dugoujon, Jean-Michel; Larrouy, Georges; Klitz, William; Labuda, Damian; Kidd, Judith; Kidd, Kenneth; Di Rienzo, Anna; Freimer, Nelson B; Price, Alkes L; Ruiz-Linares, Andrés

    2012-08-16

    The peopling of the Americas has been the subject of extensive genetic, archaeological and linguistic research; however, central questions remain unresolved. One contentious issue is whether the settlement occurred by means of a single migration or multiple streams of migration from Siberia. The pattern of dispersals within the Americas is also poorly understood. To address these questions at a higher resolution than was previously possible, we assembled data from 52 Native American and 17 Siberian groups genotyped at 364,470 single nucleotide polymorphisms. Here we show that Native Americans descend from at least three streams of Asian gene flow. Most descend entirely from a single ancestral population that we call 'First American'. However, speakers of Eskimo-Aleut languages from the Arctic inherit almost half their ancestry from a second stream of Asian gene flow, and the Na-Dene-speaking Chipewyan from Canada inherit roughly one-tenth of their ancestry from a third stream. We show that the initial peopling followed a southward expansion facilitated by the coast, with sequential population splits and little gene flow after divergence, especially in South America. A major exception is in Chibchan speakers on both sides of the Panama isthmus, who have ancestry from both North and South America.

  7. Literacy Skill Differences between Adult Native English and Native Spanish Speakers.

    PubMed

    Herman, Julia; Cote, Nicole Gilbert; Reilly, Lenore; Binder, Katherine S

    2013-01-01

    The goal of this study was to compare the literacy skills of adult native English and native Spanish ABE speakers. Participants were 169 native English speakers and 124 native Spanish speakers recruited from five prior research projects. The results showed that the native Spanish speakers were less skilled on morphology and passage comprehension tasks but were equally skilled on the phonology and vocabulary tasks. Morphology, coupled with phonology, was a stronger predictor of vocabulary and comprehension abilities for the native Spanish speakers, which suggests that instruction focused on morphology is likely to have a greater impact on this group.

  8. Native Americans: Where in Environmental Justice Research?

    PubMed

    Vickery, Jamie; Hunter, Lori M

    While the last two decades have seen important theoretical, empirical, and policy advancements in environmental justice generally, much remains to be done regarding Native Americans. Unique political and cultural dynamics shape the study and pursuit of environmental justice (EJ) in Native American communities. This review summarizes Native American EJ issues based on a cross-disciplinary search of over 60 publications. In so doing, we discuss the unique nature of Native American EJ in terms of conducting research and working toward reducing the continuation of historical trauma associated with environmental ills, the types of strategies used in Native American EJ research, and issues of Native American climate justice. We conclude with discussion of remaining knowledge gaps and future research needs.

  9. Native Americans: Where in Environmental Justice Research?

    PubMed Central

    Vickery, Jamie; Hunter, Lori M.

    2016-01-01

    While the last two decades have seen important theoretical, empirical, and policy advancements in environmental justice generally, much remains to be done regarding Native Americans. Unique political and cultural dynamics shape the study and pursuit of environmental justice (EJ) in Native American communities. This review summarizes Native American EJ issues based on a cross-disciplinary search of over 60 publications. In so doing, we discuss the unique nature of Native American EJ in terms of conducting research and working toward reducing the continuation of historical trauma associated with environmental ills, the types of strategies used in Native American EJ research, and issues of Native American climate justice. We conclude with discussion of remaining knowledge gaps and future research needs. PMID:27103758

  10. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rattling Leaf, J.

    2007-12-01

    In the spirit of collaboration and reciprocity, James Rattling Leaf of Sinte Gleska University on the Rosebud Reservation of South Dakota will present recent developments, experiences, insights and a vision for education in Indian Country. As a thirty-year young institution, Sinte Gleska University is founded by a strong vision of ancestral leadership and the values of the Lakota Way of Life. Sinte Gleska University (SGU) has initiated the development of a Geospatial Education Curriculum project. NativeView: A Geospatial Curriculum for Native Nation Building is a two-year project that entails a disciplined approach towards the development of a relevant Geospatial academic curriculum. This project is designed to meet the educational and land management needs of the Rosebud Lakota Tribe through the utilization of Geographic Information Systems (GIS), Remote Sensing (RS) and Global Positioning Systems (GPS). In conjunction with the strategy and progress of this academic project, a formal presentation and demonstration of the SGU based Geospatial software RezMapper software will exemplify an innovative example of state of the art information technology. RezMapper is an interactive CD software package focused toward the 21 Lakota communities on the Rosebud Reservation that utilizes an ingenious concept of multimedia mapping and state of the art data compression and presentation. This ongoing development utilizes geographic data, imagery from space, historical aerial photography and cultural features such as historic Lakota documents, language, song, video and historical photographs in a multimedia fashion. As a tangible product, RezMapper will be a project deliverable tool for use in the classroom and to a broad range of learners.

  11. Epidemiology of gonorrhoea in native Alaskans.

    PubMed Central

    Blackwood, L

    1981-01-01

    Data on gonococcal infections confirmed by culture show that the native population of Alaska has an incidence rate many times higher than the other population groups; both sexes and all age groups are affected. In contrast to the remainder of the United States, where gonorrhoea occurs much more often in men, native Alaskan women are as likely to be infected as native Alaskan men. PMID:7326551

  12. Word Durations in Non-Native English

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Rachel E.; Baese-Berk, Melissa; Bonnasse-Gahot, Laurent; Kim, Midam; Van Engen, Kristin J.; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, we compare the effects of English lexical features on word duration for native and non-native English speakers and for non-native speakers with different L1s and a range of L2 experience. We also examine whether non-native word durations lead to judgments of a stronger foreign accent. We measured word durations in English paragraphs read by 12 American English (AE), 20 Korean, and 20 Chinese speakers. We also had AE listeners rate the `accentedness' of these non-native speakers. AE speech had shorter durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, greater reduction of function words, and less between-speaker variance than non-native speech. However, both AE and non-native speakers showed sensitivity to lexical predictability by reducing second mentions and high frequency words. Non-native speakers with more native-like word durations, greater within-speaker word duration variance, and greater function word reduction were perceived as less accented. Overall, these findings identify word duration as an important and complex feature of foreign-accented English. PMID:21516172

  13. Perceiving non-native speech: Word segmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mondini, Michèle; Miller, Joanne L.

    2001-05-01

    One important source of information listeners use to segment speech into discrete words is allophonic variation at word junctures. Previous research has shown that non-native speakers impose their native-language phonetic norms on their second language; as a consequence, non-native speech may (in some cases) exhibit altered patterns of allophonic variation at word junctures. We investigated the perceptual consequences of this for word segmentation by presenting native-English listeners with English word pairs produced either by six native-English speakers or six highly fluent, native-French speakers of English. The target word pairs had contrastive word juncture involving voiceless stop consonants (e.g., why pink/wipe ink; gray ties/great eyes; we cash/weak ash). The task was to identify randomized instances of each individual target word pair (as well as control pairs) by selecting one of four possible choices (e.g., why pink, wipe ink, why ink, wipe pink). Overall, listeners were more accurate in identifying target word pairs produced by the native-English speakers than by the non-native English speakers. These findings suggest that one contribution to the processing cost associated with listening to non-native speech may be the presence of altered allophonic information important for word segmentation. [Work supported by NIH/NIDCD.

  14. Genetic Research and Native American Cultural Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romero, Francine; Bemis, Lynne T.; Burhansstipanov, Linda; Dignan, Mark

    Cultural issues relevant to genetic education and research arc the focus of a new and innovative curriculum being developed for Native American college students and health professionals. Genetic Education for Native Americans (GENA) is funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute of the National Institutes of Health. The goal of the GENA project is to provide a balance of scientific and cultural information about genetic research, genetic testing, and careers in genetics for Native American students. This article describes issues related to the implementation of GENA and provides an example of an innovative approach to teaching about genetic research among Native American populations.

  15. Sleep and native language interference affect non-native speech sound learning.

    PubMed

    Earle, F Sayako; Myers, Emily B

    2015-12-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one's native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, 2 factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in 3 studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hr after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep.

  16. Contrasting xylem vessel constraints on hydraulic conductivity between native and non-native woody understory species

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Maria S.; Fridley, Jason D.; Yin, Jingjing; Bauerle, Taryn L.

    2013-01-01

    We examined the hydraulic properties of 82 native and non-native woody species common to forests of Eastern North America, including several congeneric groups, representing a range of anatomical wood types. We observed smaller conduit diameters with greater frequency in non-native species, corresponding to lower calculated potential vulnerability to cavitation index. Non-native species exhibited higher vessel-grouping in metaxylem compared with native species, however, solitary vessels were more prevalent in secondary xylem. Higher frequency of solitary vessels in secondary xylem was related to a lower potential vulnerability index. We found no relationship between anatomical characteristics of xylem, origin of species and hydraulic conductivity, indicating that non-native species did not exhibit advantageous hydraulic efficiency over native species. Our results confer anatomical advantages for non-native species under the potential for cavitation due to freezing, perhaps permitting extended growing seasons. PMID:24348490

  17. 76 FR 3120 - Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... Native American and Alaska Native Children in School Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement for Limited English Proficient Students; Overview... Secretary and Director, Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic...

  18. Sleep and Native Language Interference Affect Non-Native Speech Sound Learning

    PubMed Central

    Earle, F. Sayako; Myers, Emily B.

    2015-01-01

    Adults learning a new language are faced with a significant challenge: non-native speech sounds that are perceptually similar to sounds in one’s native language can be very difficult to acquire. Sleep and native language interference, two factors that may help to explain this difficulty in acquisition, are addressed in three studies. Results of Experiment 1 showed that participants trained on a non-native contrast at night improved in discrimination 24 hours after training, while those trained in the morning showed no such improvement. Experiments 2 and 3 addressed the possibility that incidental exposure to perceptually similar native language speech sounds during the day interfered with maintenance in the morning group. Taken together, results show that the ultimate success of non-native speech sound learning depends not only on the similarity of learned sounds to the native language repertoire, but also to interference from native language sounds before sleep. PMID:26280264

  19. Speaking C++ as a native

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stroustrup, Bjarne

    2001-08-01

    C++ supports several styles ("multiple paradigms") of programming. This allows great flexibility, notational convenience, maintainability, and close-to-optimal performance. Programmers who don't know the basic native C++ styles and techniques "speak" C++ with a thick accent, limiting themselves to relatively restrictive pidgin dialects. Here, I present language features such as classes, class hierarchies, abstract classes, and templates, together with the fundamental programming styles they support. In particular, I show how to provide generic algorithms, function objects, access objects, and delayed evaluation as needed to build and use flexible and efficient libraries. The aim is to give an idea of what's possible to provide, and some understanding of the fundamental techniques of modern C++ libraries.

  20. Native Small Airways Secrete Bicarbonate

    PubMed Central

    Quinton, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of Cl− impermeability in cystic fibrosis (CF) and the cloning of the responsible channel, CF pathology has been widely attributed to a defect in epithelial Cl− transport. However, loss of bicarbonate (HCO3−) transport also plays a major, possibly more critical role in CF pathogenesis. Even though HCO3− transport is severely affected in the native pancreas, liver, and intestines in CF, we know very little about HCO3− secretion in small airways, the principle site of morbidity in CF. We used a novel, mini-Ussing chamber system to investigate the properties of HCO3− transport in native porcine small airways (∼ 1 mm φ). We assayed HCO3− transport across small airway epithelia as reflected by the transepithelial voltage, conductance, and equivalent short-circuit current with bilateral 25-mM HCO3− plus 125-mM NaGlu Ringer’s solution in the presence of luminal amiloride (10 μM). Under these conditions, because no major transportable anions other than HCO3− were present, we took the equivalent short-circuit current to be a direct measure of active HCO3− secretion. Applying selective agonists and inhibitors, we show constitutive HCO3− secretion in small airways, which can be stimulated significantly by β-adrenergic– (cAMP) and purinergic (Ca2+) -mediated agonists, independently. These results indicate that two separate components for HCO3− secretion, likely via CFTR- and calcium-activated chloride channel–dependent processes, are physiologically regulated for likely roles in mucus clearance and antimicrobial innate defenses of small airways. PMID:24224935

  1. Turkish Students' Perspectives on Speaking Anxiety in Native and Non-Native English Speaker Classes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bozavli, Ebubekir; Gulmez, Recep

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to reveal the effect of FLA (foreign language anxiety) in native/non-native speaker of English classrooms. In this study, two groups of students (90 in total) of whom 38 were in NS (native speaker) class and 52 in NNS (non-native speaker) class taking English as a second language course for 22 hours a week at Erzincan…

  2. Invasive non-native species' provision of refugia for endangered native species.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Satoshi

    2010-08-01

    The influence of non-native species on native ecosystems is not predicted easily when interspecific interactions are complex. Species removal can result in unexpected and undesired changes to other ecosystem components. I examined whether invasive non-native species may both harm and provide refugia for endangered native species. The invasive non-native plant Casuarina stricta has damaged the native flora and caused decline of the snail fauna on the Ogasawara Islands, Japan. On Anijima in 2006 and 2009, I examined endemic land snails in the genus Ogasawarana. I compared the density of live specimens and frequency of predation scars (from black rats [Rattus rattus]) on empty shells in native vegetation and Casuarina forests. The density of land snails was greater in native vegetation than in Casuarina forests in 2006. Nevertheless, radical declines in the density of land snails occurred in native vegetation since 2006 in association with increasing predation by black rats. In contrast, abundance of Ogasawarana did not decline in the Casuarina forest, where shells with predation scars from rats were rare. As a result, the density of snails was greater in the Casuarina forest than in native vegetation. Removal of Casuarina was associated with an increased proportion of shells with predation scars from rats and a decrease in the density of Ogasawarana. The thick and dense litter of Casuarina appears to provide refugia for native land snails by protecting them from predation by rats; thus, eradication of rats should precede eradication of Casuarina. Adaptive strategies, particularly those that consider the removal order of non-native species, are crucial to minimizing the unintended effects of eradication on native species. In addition, my results suggested that in some cases a given non-native species can be used to mitigate the impacts of other non-native species on native species.

  3. Troublesome Discourse: Analysis of Native Speaker/Non-Native Speaker Conversation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairley, Michael S.

    This paper presents a case study of an episode in a conversation between a native English speaker (the female director of an English language school) and a non-native English speaker (a student apparently with minimal language skills) in which the native speaker is engaged in an extended telling of seemingly crucial information. The troublesome…

  4. Voices of Native Educators: Strategies that Support Success of Native High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lara, Julia

    2011-01-01

    This report summarizes a conversation that took place in April of 2010 in Washington, DC regarding high school reform and Native American, Alaskan Native and Native Hawaiian students. The meeting was co-sponsored by the National Indian Education Association (NIEA) and the National Education Association (NEA). The meeting was attended by a broad…

  5. Native- and Non-Native Speaking English Teachers in Vietnam: Weighing the Benefits

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walkinshaw, Ian; Duong, Oanh Thi Hoang

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines a common belief that learners of English as a foreign language prefer to learn English from native-speaker teachers rather than non-native speakers of English. 50 Vietnamese learners of English evaluated the importance of native-speakerness compared with seven qualities valued in an English language teacher: teaching…

  6. Profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs). Fast Facts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of English Language Acquisition, US Department of Education, 2015

    2015-01-01

    The Office of English Language Acquisition (OELA) has synthesized key data on English learners (ELs) into two-page PDF sheets, by topic, with graphics, plus key contacts. The topics for this report on profiles of Native American and/or Alaska Native English Learners (ELs) include: (1) Largest Percentage of ELs Who Were Native American and/or…

  7. Native Aging Visions: A Resource for Native Elders. Volume 1, 1994-97.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Native Aging Visions, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This volume of newsletters reports on the activities and research projects of the National Resource Center on Native American Aging located at the University of North Dakota, Grand Forks. The Center studies health issues and access problems facing American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian elders. Specifically, the resource center was…

  8. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  9. Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Reich, Peter B.; Lind, Eric M.; Sullivan, Lauren L.; Seabloom, Eric W.; Yahdjian, Laura; MacDougall, Andrew S.; Reichmann, Lara G.; Alberti, Juan; Báez, Selene; Bakker, Jonathan D.; Cadotte, Marc W.; Caldeira, Maria C.; Chaneton, Enrique J.; D'Antonio, Carla M.; Fay, Philip A.; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Harpole, W. Stanley; Iribarne, Oscar; Kirkman, Kevin P.; Knops, Johannes M. H.; La Pierre, Kimberly J.; Laungani, Ramesh; Leakey, Andrew D. B.; McCulley, Rebecca L.; Moore, Joslin L.; Pascual, Jesus; Borer, Elizabeth T.

    2016-01-01

    Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of nutrient addition would be greatest where climate was stable and benign, owing to reduced niche partitioning. We found that the abundance of non-native species increased with nutrient addition independent of climate; however, nutrient addition increased non-native species richness and decreased native species richness, with these effects dampened in warmer or wetter sites. Eutrophication also altered the time scale in which grassland invasion responded to climate, decreasing the importance of long-term climate and increasing that of annual climate. Thus, climatic conditions mediate the responses of native and non-native flora to nutrient enrichment. Our results suggest that the negative effect of nutrient addition on native abundance is decoupled from its effect on richness, and reduces the time scale of the links between climate and compositional change. PMID:27114575

  10. Risk to native Uroleucon aphids (Hemiptera: Aphididae) from non-native lady beetles (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Aphids in the genus Uroleucon Mordvilko (Hemiptera: Aphididae) are native herbivores that feed on goldenrod (Solidago spp.) and other Asteraceae in North America. The aphids are potential prey for a wide variety of natural enemies, including native and non-native species of lady beetles (Coleoptera...

  11. Advocacy for Native American Indian and Alaska Native Clients and Counselees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herring, Roger

    Helping professionals need to be more informed and more active advocates for proactive counseling strategies with Native American Indian and Alaska Native peoples. The paper discusses the major advocacy needs of these populations. The negative impact of historical and contemporary discriminatory policies and practices on Native peoples has…

  12. Politics and Alaska Natives: One of a Series of Articles on the Native Land Claims.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Napoleon, Harold

    As one in a series of eight articles written by different professionals concerned with Alaska Native land claims, this article focuses on utilization of Alaska Native political resources as a means to achieve beneficial legislation beyond that of the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1972. Designed to stimulate careful political and…

  13. Native American History in a Box: A New Approach to Teaching Native American Cultures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helms, Emory C.; Hitt, Austin M.; Schipper, Jason A.; Jones, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    This article describes the Native American History in a Box curriculum which is designed to introduce elementary and middle-level students to Native American cultures. The curriculum consists of a five day unit addressing the following concepts pertaining to Native American Nations: settlements, tools, sustenance, pottery, and contact with…

  14. Germination responses of an invasive species in native and non-native ranges

    Treesearch

    Jose L. Hierro; Ozkan Eren; Liana Khetsuriani; Alecu Diaconu; Katalin Torok; Daniel Montesinos; Krikor Andonian; David Kikodze; Levan Janoian; Diego Villarreal; Maria Estanga-Mollica; Ragan M. Callaway

    2009-01-01

    Studying germination in the native and non-native range of a species can provide unique insights into processes of range expansion and adaptation; however, traits related to germination have rarely been compared between native and nonnative populations. In a series of common garden experiments, we explored whether differences in the seasonality of precipitation,...

  15. Linking native and invader traits explains native spider population responses to plant invasion

    Treesearch

    Jennifer N. Smith; Douglas J. Emlen; Dean E. Pearson

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders' web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to...

  16. Curriculum Planning and Development for Native Americans and Alaska Natives in Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Inglebret, Ella; Pavel, D. Michael

    Following a historical review of Native American educational practices, this book chapter examines various approaches for increasing Native American representation in higher education, presented within the framework of three orientations to curriculum planning. First, Native students may be expected to change to fit the curriculum--to learn the…

  17. Climate modifies response of non-native and native species richness to nutrient enrichment.

    PubMed

    Flores-Moreno, Habacuc; Reich, Peter B; Lind, Eric M; Sullivan, Lauren L; Seabloom, Eric W; Yahdjian, Laura; MacDougall, Andrew S; Reichmann, Lara G; Alberti, Juan; Báez, Selene; Bakker, Jonathan D; Cadotte, Marc W; Caldeira, Maria C; Chaneton, Enrique J; D'Antonio, Carla M; Fay, Philip A; Firn, Jennifer; Hagenah, Nicole; Harpole, W Stanley; Iribarne, Oscar; Kirkman, Kevin P; Knops, Johannes M H; La Pierre, Kimberly J; Laungani, Ramesh; Leakey, Andrew D B; McCulley, Rebecca L; Moore, Joslin L; Pascual, Jesus; Borer, Elizabeth T

    2016-05-19

    Ecosystem eutrophication often increases domination by non-natives and causes displacement of native taxa. However, variation in environmental conditions may affect the outcome of interactions between native and non-native taxa in environments where nutrient supply is elevated. We examined the interactive effects of eutrophication, climate variability and climate average conditions on the success of native and non-native plant species using experimental nutrient manipulations replicated at 32 grassland sites on four continents. We hypothesized that effects of nutrient addition would be greatest where climate was stable and benign, owing to reduced niche partitioning. We found that the abundance of non-native species increased with nutrient addition independent of climate; however, nutrient addition increased non-native species richness and decreased native species richness, with these effects dampened in warmer or wetter sites. Eutrophication also altered the time scale in which grassland invasion responded to climate, decreasing the importance of long-term climate and increasing that of annual climate. Thus, climatic conditions mediate the responses of native and non-native flora to nutrient enrichment. Our results suggest that the negative effect of nutrient addition on native abundance is decoupled from its effect on richness, and reduces the time scale of the links between climate and compositional change.

  18. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers

    PubMed Central

    Olmstead, Anne J.; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M. Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]–[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from −60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds. PMID:23898316

  19. Comparison of native and non-native phone imitation by English and Spanish speakers.

    PubMed

    Olmstead, Anne J; Viswanathan, Navin; Aivar, M Pilar; Manuel, Sarath

    2013-01-01

    Experiments investigating phonetic convergence in conversation often focus on interlocutors with similar phonetic inventories. Extending these experiments to those with dissimilar inventories requires understanding the capacity of speakers to imitate native and non-native phones. In the present study, we tested native Spanish and native English speakers to determine whether imitation of non-native tokens differs qualitatively from imitation of native tokens. Participants imitated a [ba]-[pa] continuum that varied in VOT from -60 ms (prevoiced, Spanish [b]) to +60 ms (long lag, English [p]) such that the continuum consisted of some tokens that were native to Spanish speakers and some that were native to English speakers. Analysis of the imitations showed two critical results. First, both groups of speakers demonstrated sensitivity to VOT differences in tokens that fell within their native regions of the VOT continuum (prevoiced region for Spanish and long lag region for English). Secondly, neither group of speakers demonstrated such sensitivity to VOT differences among tokens that fell in their non-native regions of the continuum. These results show that, even in an intentional imitation task, speakers cannot accurately imitate non-native tokens, but are clearly flexible in producing native tokens. Implications of these findings are discussed with reference to the constraints on convergence in interlocutors from different linguistic backgrounds.

  20. Relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for two generalist native trematodes

    PubMed Central

    Paterson, Rachel A.; Lal, Aparna; Dale, Marcia; Townsend, Colin R.; Poulin, Robert; Tompkins, Daniel M.

    2013-01-01

    Exotic fish species frequently acquire native parasites despite the absence of closely related native hosts. They thus have the potential to affect native counterparts by altering native host–parasite dynamics. In New Zealand, exotic brown trout Salmo trutta and rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss have acquired two native trematodes (Telogaster opisthorchis and Stegodexamene anguillae) from their native definitive host (the longfin eel Anguilla dieffenbachii). We used a combination of field surveys and experimental infections to determine the relative competence of native and exotic fish hosts for these native parasites. Field observations indicated that the longfin eel was the superior host for both parasites, although differences between native and exotic hosts were less apparent for S. anguillae. Experimental infections indicated that both parasites had poorer establishment and survival in salmonids, although some worms matured and attained similar sizes to those in eels before dying. Overall, the field surveys and experimental infections indicate that these exotic salmonids are poor hosts of both native trematodes and their presence may decrease native parasite flow to native hosts. PMID:24533327

  1. Handbook of Native American Studies and Chronology of Native American History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Forbes, Jack D.; And Others

    Intended as "a practical guide to the development of Native American Studies programs, Native American Studies courses, and Indian-oriented higher education programs," this handbook places emphasis upon materials actually utilized in the development of Native American Studies at the University of California, Davis, and in the creation of…

  2. Stroke Mortality Among Alaska Native People

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Ronnie D.; Day, Gretchen M.; Lanier, Anne P.; Provost, Ellen M.; Hamel, Rebecca D.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives. We aimed to describe the epidemiology of stroke among Alaska Natives, which is essential for designing effective stroke prevention and intervention efforts for this population. Methods. We conducted an analysis of death certificate data for the state of Alaska for the period 1984 to 2003, comparing age-standardized stroke mortality rates among Alaska Natives residing in Alaska vs US Whites by age category, gender, stroke type, and time. Results. Compared with US Whites, Alaska Natives had significantly elevated stroke mortality from 1994 to 2003 but not from 1984 to 1993. Alaska Native women of all age groups and Alaska Native men younger than 45 years of age had the highest risk, although the rates for those younger than 65 years were statistically imprecise. Over the 20-year study period, the stroke mortality rate was stable for Alaska Natives but declined for US Whites. Conclusions. Stroke mortality is higher among Alaska Natives, especially women, than among US Whites. Over the past 20 years, there has not been a significant decline in stroke mortality among Alaska Natives. PMID:19762671

  3. Theoretical Perspectives of How Digital Natives Learn

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kivunja, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Marck Prensky, an authority on teaching and learning especially with the aid of Information and Communication Technologies, has referred to 21st century children born after 1980 as "Digital Natives". This paper reviews literature of leaders in the field to shed some light on theoretical perspectives of how Digital Natives learn and how…

  4. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  5. Native Tribal Scholars: Building an Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, J. Cedric

    2012-01-01

    When the author first started as interim director of the Institute for New England Native American Studies (INENAS) based at the University of Massachusetts Boston, he was given three studies that broadly identified specific needs and disparities of Native people in the region. Given that he was at an institution of higher education, his immediate…

  6. Native Rights in Canada. Second Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Peter A., Ed.; Mickenberg, Neil H., Ed.

    Intended as a research and reference tool for Canada's native people and their legal advisers, this book is a comprehensive treatise on the law of aboriginal rights and treaties, the historical pattern of dealing with those rights, and alternative judicial and legislative solutions for the settlement of native claims. Secondarily, it is intended…

  7. Success Models for Gifted Native Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sing, David K.

    The Center for Gifted and Talented Native Hawaiian Children at the University of Hawaii at Hilo aims to develop culturally appropriate gifted and talented programs and identification procedures for Native Hawaiian children. Every Center program incorporates four elements of the Na Pua No'eau model: talent enhancement, self-esteem development,…

  8. Astronomy in the Native-Oriented Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Murray R.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines background, materials, operation, and evaluation of four activities for grades six-nine designed to illustrate how curriculum activities can enhance astronomy concepts and native awareness: "Were Native People Aware of Milky Way Galaxy?,""Constellation Cans,""Travels of the Big Dipper," and "How Did the…

  9. 75 FR 45649 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross, Alaska, and... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision approving lands for conveyance. SUMMARY: As required by 43 CFR...

  10. 76 FR 53150 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located south west of Mountain Village, Alaska, and contain 9.04 acres. Notice of the decision will also...

  11. 78 FR 10634 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Huna Totem Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Hoonah, Alaska, and are located in: Copper...

  12. 75 FR 55344 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-10

    ...- L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... Ivisaapaagmiit Corporation, Koovukmeut Incorporated, and Isingmakmeut Incorporated, pursuant to the Alaska Native... of Ambler, Shungnak, and Kobuk, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 21 N., R...

  13. 76 FR 8375 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Mentasta Lake, Alaska, and are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 11 N., R. 7 E., Secs...

  14. 75 FR 38537 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Manley Hot Springs, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 1 N, R. 15 W., Secs. 1 and 12. Containing 1,256.69...

  15. 78 FR 35047 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Georgetown, Alaska, and are located in...

  16. 76 FR 22414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Huslia, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 6 N., R.12 E., Sec. 21, lots 1 and 2; Sec...

  17. 75 FR 53331 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Corporation, pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Mary's Igloo, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 6 S., R. 30 W., Secs. 13 and 22...

  18. 76 FR 5395 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located east of Sand Point, Alaska, and... their rights. ADDRESSES: A copy of the decision may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska...

  19. 75 FR 27359 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be... are in the vicinity of Akutan, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 70 S., R. 107 W...

  20. 77 FR 4057 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Shageluk, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 55 W...

  1. 76 FR 13428 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be.... The lands are in the vicinity of Pedro Bay, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 4 S...

  2. 75 FR 38536 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Corporation, pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of the Colville River, Alaska and are located: Umiat Meridian, Alaska T. 5 S., R. 9 W., Secs. 1, 7, 12, and 13...

  3. 78 FR 50442 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-19

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are located north of Tuntutuliak, Alaska, and contain 4.81 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published once a...

  4. 75 FR 6694 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-10

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Doyon, Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of Tanana, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T...

  5. 78 FR 8582 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located northeast of New Stuyahok, Alaska, and contain 3.43 acres. Notice of the decision will...

  6. 76 FR 22414 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Anvik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 59 W., Sec. 36. Containing 597.36 acres...

  7. 75 FR 26785 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ...-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands to Doyon, Limited pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Rampart, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks...

  8. 75 FR 57493 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... approving the conveyance of surface estate for certain lands to Eklutna, Inc., pursuant to the Alaska Native.... when the surface estate is conveyed to Eklutna, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Birchwood, Alaska...

  9. 78 FR 7807 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napaimute, Alaska, and are located in...

  10. 76 FR 73657 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The subsurface estate in..., Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Goodnews Bay, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian...

  11. 77 FR 16256 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-20

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located northwesterly of Mentasta, Alaska, and contain 7.25 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  12. 77 FR 33231 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Napakiak Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napakiak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward...

  13. 75 FR 41511 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...., pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the Act of January 2, 1976. The lands are in the vicinity of Healy, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 10 S., R. 9 W., Sec. 5...

  14. 75 FR 1801 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Kuukpik Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Nuiqsut, Alaska, and are located in: Umiat Meridian, Alaska T. 10 N., R. 2...

  15. 75 FR 8106 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to The Aleut Corporation for 32.15 acres located on Adak Island, Alaska. Notice of the decision will also be published four...

  16. 75 FR 80838 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ...-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Near Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, and aggregate 66.01 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times in the...

  17. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act will be issued to Zho-Tse, Incorporated. The lands are in the vicinity of Shageluk, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 28 N., R...

  18. 78 FR 8581 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Sleetmute, Alaska, and are located in...

  19. 78 FR 57411 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estates in the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Umiat, Alaska, and are located in: Umiat Meridian, Alaska...

  20. 76 FR 55415 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-07

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are located south west of Pilot Station, Alaska, and contain 24.99 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published...

  1. 76 FR 13428 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... of surface estate in the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act... vicinity of Gakona, Alaska, and are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 8 N., R. 3 E., Sec. 22...

  2. 76 FR 72212 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-22

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Arviq Incorporated. The lands are in the vicinity of Platinum, Alaska, and located in: Seward Meridian...

  3. 78 FR 54481 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Evansville, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Evansville, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian...

  4. 75 FR 65644 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ..., AA-11933, AA-11928, AA-11929, AA-11931, AA-11932; LLAK- 962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native... the conveyance of only the surface estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 191.31 acres...

  5. 76 FR 47234 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be.... The lands are in the vicinity of Togiak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 11 S...

  6. 75 FR 65644 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-26

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located southwesterly of Manokotak, Alaska, aggregating 31.96 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four...

  7. 75 FR 38537 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ..., AA-11979, AA-11977; LLAK-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of... estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 370.81 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  8. 76 FR 45604 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located south west of Sheldon Point, Alaska, and contain 20.55 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times...

  9. 78 FR 65354 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... conveyed to Stuyahok, Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of New Stuyahok, Alaska, and are located in...

  10. 75 FR 43198 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to Bristol Bay... vicinity of Aleknagik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 10 S., R. 55 W., Sec. 26, 27...

  11. 78 FR 16527 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ...-944000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The ] decision will approve conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The...

  12. 75 FR 69457 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Eagle, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 1 S., R. 31 E., Sec. 36...

  13. 76 FR 61736 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.) The lands are located north of Tuluksak, Alaska, and contains 5.23 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published...

  14. 76 FR 53151 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estate in the lands described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act... Devil, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 22 N., R. 44 W., Secs. 27 to 34, inclusive...

  15. 76 FR 53151 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq.). The lands are in the vicinity of Hughes, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 7 N., R. 21 E...

  16. 75 FR 80838 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Allakaket, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 22 N., R. 22 W., Secs 4, 5, 8, and 9...

  17. 78 FR 42543 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... to The Kuskokwim Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Napaimute, Alaska, and are located in...

  18. 75 FR 43199 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The subsurface estate in these lands will be conveyed to... vicinity of Beaver, Alaska, and are located in: Fairbanks Meridian, Alaska T. 16 N., R. 1 E., Secs. 1 to 20...

  19. 78 FR 10634 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-14

    ...-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION... hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Chugach Alaska... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located south...

  20. 75 FR 28816 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located north of Fort Yukon, Alaska...: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504...

  1. 76 FR 23834 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The decision will approve the conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located east and...

  2. 77 FR 72383 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision... will approve conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located south of Napaskiak, Alaska...

  3. 78 FR 57411 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface... Qanirtuuq, Inc. The lands are in the vicinity of Quinhagak, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian...

  4. 77 FR 20046 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-03

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (ANCSA) (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The... Kassan, Alaska. The lands are located in: Copper River Meridian, Alaska T. 74 S., R. 85 E. Secs. 15, 16...

  5. 75 FR 53332 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... Chugach Alaska Corporation. The decision will approve the conveyance of the surface and subsurface estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located southwest...

  6. 77 FR 21802 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The subsurface... Kongnikilnomuit Yuita Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Bill Moore's Slough, Alaska, and are located...

  7. 78 FR 27991 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq.). The subsurface estate in... Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Kotlik, Alaska, and are located in: ] Seward Meridian, Alaska T...

  8. 77 FR 72383 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located west of Newtok, Alaska, and contain 0.16 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times in the...

  9. 77 FR 21802 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq). The lands are located north of Mountain Village, Alaska, and contain 3.11 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  10. 76 FR 14684 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... estates in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located north of Koyuk, Alaska, and aggregate 4.86 acres. Notice of the decision will also be published four times...

  11. 76 FR 53150 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-25

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601 et seq). The lands are in the vicinity of Anvik, Alaska, and are located in: Seward Meridian, Alaska T. 29 N., R. 59 W., Sec...

  12. 78 FR 49763 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... described below for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. 1601, et seq... surface estate is conveyed to Oceanside Corporation. The lands are in the vicinity of Perryville, Alaska...

  13. 76 FR 61737 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... in certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act (43 U.S.C. et seq.). The lands are located southwest of Noatak, Alaska, and contain 4.14 acres. Notice of the decision will also be...

  14. American Indians and Alaska Natives with Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Marilyn J.

    American Indian and Alaska Native children with special needs experience the same ineffective and inefficient services as other minority language children. This paper discusses the special needs of Native children, assessment and curriculum issues, and recommendations for improvement. It provides statistics for various categories of handicaps and…

  15. Native American Biographies. Multicultural Biographies Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Virginia, Ed.; And Others

    This book, appropriate for secondary students, includes brief biographies of 21 Native Americans of the 20th century. The biographies focus on childhood experiences, cultural heritage, and career goals. The book is divided into four units that feature Native Americans with successful careers in the fields of literature and drama; fine arts and…

  16. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  17. 76 FR 16805 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... the lands described below pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act and the Alaska National Interest Lands Conservation Act. The lands are in the vicinity of Clarks Point, Alaska, and are located in... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...

  18. Revamping Family Preservation Services for Native Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coleman, Heather; Unrau, Yvonne A.; Manyfingers, Brenda

    2001-01-01

    Examines the philosophy and program structures of family preservation services (FPS) in the context of providing services to Native American families with child welfare issues. Explores Native cultural concepts of family, child rearing, time, and spirituality. Outlines cross-cultural training needs for FPS workers related to cultural awareness,…

  19. A Race to Rescue Native Tongues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elyse

    2007-01-01

    Of the 300 or so native languages once spoken in North America, only about 150 are still spoken--and the majority of those have just a handful of mostly elderly speakers. For most Native American languages, colleges and universities are their last great hope, if not their final resting place. People at a number of institutions across the country…

  20. Substance Abuse among Native-American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moncher, Michael S.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Reviews social epidemiological data on substance abuse among Native American youth and discusses culturally relevant etiological factors. Highlights strategies for identification of high-risk youth, concentrating on theoretical and methodological aspects appropriate for Native American populations. Issues of sensitive technology transfer and…

  1. Support for Native Americans with Developmental Disabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodman, Wylie; Rife, Christine

    This report addresses the high incidence of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) and fetal alcohol effects (FAE) among Native Americans and suggests that there is a lack of comprehensive effort to provide outreach services to the Native American population in Illinois. The report begins with an overview of American Indian history and the migration of…

  2. Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goebel, Bruce A.

    2004-01-01

    High school and college teachers interested in offering units or courses on Native American literature have often had to carve out new teaching strategies because ready resources and guides are scarce. In "Reading Native American Literature: A Teacher's Guide," Bruce A. Goebel offers innovative and practical suggestions about how to introduce…

  3. Native Perspectives on Childbearing and Health.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarke, Heather F.

    This ethnographic study sought to understand, from the native perspective, the traditional childbearing values and practices of Coast Salish peoples and the difficulties in maintaining these in a society that is not oriented to native values and practices. Observations and interviews were carried out over a 4-year period on the Songhees reserve in…

  4. A Race to Rescue Native Tongues

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashburn, Elyse

    2007-01-01

    Of the 300 or so native languages once spoken in North America, only about 150 are still spoken--and the majority of those have just a handful of mostly elderly speakers. For most Native American languages, colleges and universities are their last great hope, if not their final resting place. People at a number of institutions across the country…

  5. Nature Study Tips: Native American Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1984-01-01

    Discusses Native American foods, focusing on Native American cultivated crops, methods of cooking, and methods of preserving food. Includes suggestions for 19 classroom activities, including collecting wild plants used as food, gathering/drying and eating various wild plants and plant products (such as acorns and corn), and making a garden. (JN)

  6. Tenure Experiences of Native Hawaiian Women Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka opua, Heipua

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the status of women of color in academe with a particular focus on Native Hawaiian women faculty. Using a qualitative narrative design, this research examined the experiences of tenured instructional Native Hawaiian women faculty (Na Wahine) at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Two research questions guided this inquiry: 1)…

  7. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  8. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    Investigator Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor , rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...2. Developing an identification protocol. The primary source of parkinsonism cases will be the Indian Health Service (IHS) provider database, called...of parkinsonism among Alaska Natives. Status: Complete 3. Developing a secure Alaska Native parkinsonism registry database. Status: The database

  9. Community Health Resource Training for Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schrader, Elizabeth L.; Schrader, David C.

    This paper applies concepts from intercultural communication theory, adult learning theory, and traditional Native American medicine to a specific learning experience for Native Americans. The background is an educational opportunity offered by the Indian Health Services Bureau to tribe members to become employed on their reservations as Health…

  10. Staphylococcus saprophyticus causing native valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Garduño, Eugenio; Márquez, Irene; Beteta, Alicia; Said, Ibrahim; Blanco, Javier; Pineda, Tomás

    2005-01-01

    Coagulase negative staphylococci are a rare cause of native valve endocarditis. Staphylococcus saprophyticus is a coagulase-negative Staphylococcus infrequently reported as a human pathogen, and most of the cases reported are urinary tract infections. We describe a case of native valve endocarditis attributed to this organism. The patient needed valve replacement due to heart failure.

  11. Canadian Native Students and Inequitable Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Wayne

    1999-01-01

    Discusses inequitable learning opportunities of Canada Natives. Finds that rules and expectations of schools often create feelings of shame in Native learners that lead to withdrawal and failure. Asserts that when teachers become cultural brokers they can eliminate the inequalities and develop an environment conducive to learning. (CMK)

  12. Sharing Our Worlds. Native American Children Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neal, Colleen, Ed.

    The book furthers cultural awareness with first person narratives describing the lives of five elementary school children who represent Native American tribes or a mix of Native American tribes with another culture. In a simple style, the children describe their activities, families, foods, recreational activities, and values, and explain their…

  13. Astronomy in the Native-Oriented Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Murray R.

    1984-01-01

    Outlines background, materials, operation, and evaluation of four activities for grades six-nine designed to illustrate how curriculum activities can enhance astronomy concepts and native awareness: "Were Native People Aware of Milky Way Galaxy?,""Constellation Cans,""Travels of the Big Dipper," and "How Did the…

  14. How Digital Native Learners Describe Themselves

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Penny

    2015-01-01

    Eight university students from the "digital native" generation were interviewed about the connections they saw between technology use and learning, and also their reactions to the popular press claims about their generation. Themes that emerged from the interviews were coded to show patterns in how digital natives describe themselves.…

  15. Brain Hemispheric Functions and the Native American.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Allen Chuck

    1982-01-01

    Uses brain research conducted by Dr. Roger Sperry to show that traditional Native Americans are more dominant in right hemisphere thinking, setting them apart from a modern left hemisphere-oriented society (especially emphasized in schools). Describes some characteristics of Native American thinking that illustrate a right hemisphere orientation…

  16. Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program

    Treesearch

    Doug Duncan; Robert W. Clarkson

    2013-01-01

    The Gila River Basin Native Fishes Conservation Program was established to conserve native fishes and manage against nonnative fishes in response to several Endangered Species Act biological opinions between the Bureau of Reclamation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service on Central Arizona Project (CAP) water transfers to the Gila River basin. Populations of some Gila...

  17. In Search of Native American Aesthetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Leroy N.

    2001-01-01

    The Native American Church meeting is one contemporary inter-tribal form of the ancient peyote spiritual tradition, represented throughout much of North America. With its deeply integrated elements of artistic expression, the cultural context of the peyote ceremony affords an approach to the major issues of Native American aesthetics. Is some…

  18. The Native Language in Teaching Kindergarten Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Espada, Janet P.

    2012-01-01

    The use of the native language as a medium of instruction is believed to be the fastest and most natural route towards developing a strong foundation in mathematics literacy (Mimaropa, In D.O.No. 74, s.2009). This study examined the effect of using the native language in the teaching of kindergarten mathematics. A total of 34 five to six year old…

  19. Nature Study Tips: Native American Foods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell, Helen Ross

    1984-01-01

    Discusses Native American foods, focusing on Native American cultivated crops, methods of cooking, and methods of preserving food. Includes suggestions for 19 classroom activities, including collecting wild plants used as food, gathering/drying and eating various wild plants and plant products (such as acorns and corn), and making a garden. (JN)

  20. Native grass seeding and forb planting establishment

    Treesearch

    I Nan Vance; Andrew Neill; Frank Morton

    2006-01-01

    After a dense stand of conifers encroaching on an oak savanna/meadow was removed, exotic forbs and grasses quickly populated the newly disturbed area. Establishing desirable native grasses and forbs that contribute to native plant diversity and compete with exotic species could aid in restoring this oak savanna plant community. Two experiments were conducted over time...

  1. Reintroducing native plants to the American West

    Treesearch

    Derek J. Tilley

    2007-01-01

    The Aberdeen PMC is working together with other team members of the Great Basin Restoration Initiative (USDI-BLM) and the Great Basin Native Plant Selection and Increase Project (USDAFS) to develop techniques to increase native plant diversity in crested wheatgrass monocultures. Since the early 1930s crested wheatgrass has been used in range seedings in the...

  2. Stennis Space Center celebrates Native American culture

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-11-24

    Famie Willis (left), 2009-2010 Choctaw Indian Princess, displays artifacts during Native American Heritage Month activities at Stennis Space Center on Nov. 24. The celebration featured various Native American cultural displays for Stennis employees to view. Shown above are (l to r): Willis, Elaine Couchman of NASA Shared Services Center, John Cecconi of NSSC and Lakeisha Robertson of the Environmental Protection Agency.

  3. Inside the Circle: Kehewin Native Education Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    John, Rosa; And Others

    The book is divided into four sections in a way that ensures seasonal recognition and environmental awareness. Each chapter within the sections begins with one or more oral histories from Native nations relevant to the concepts and ideas covered in that chapter. The student is introduced to the Native perspective through the concept of the circle,…

  4. 1994 State Legislation on Native American Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morin, Kimberly A.

    This report includes state-by-state summaries of 1994 legislation pertaining to Native American issues. Of 344 bills introduced in the state legislatures in 1994, 92 were enacted and 20 are still pending. Major issues addressed in 1994 legislation included Native American education; history, language, and culture preservation; sovereignty; law…

  5. Tenure Experiences of Native Hawaiian Women Faculty

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ka opua, Heipua

    2013-01-01

    This study examines the status of women of color in academe with a particular focus on Native Hawaiian women faculty. Using a qualitative narrative design, this research examined the experiences of tenured instructional Native Hawaiian women faculty (Na Wahine) at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. Two research questions guided this inquiry: 1)…

  6. Raising native plants in nurseries: basic concepts

    Treesearch

    R. Kasten Dumroese; Thomas D. Landis; Tara Luna

    2012-01-01

    Growing native plants can be fun, challenging, and rewarding. This booklet, particularly the first chapter that introduces important concepts, is for the novice who wants to start growing native plants as a hobby; however, it can also be helpful to someone with a bit more experience who is wondering about starting a nursery. The second chapter provides basic...

  7. Native Tribal Scholars: Building an Academic Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Woods, J. Cedric

    2012-01-01

    When the author first started as interim director of the Institute for New England Native American Studies (INENAS) based at the University of Massachusetts Boston, he was given three studies that broadly identified specific needs and disparities of Native people in the region. Given that he was at an institution of higher education, his immediate…

  8. Native plants fare better against an introduced competitor with native microbes and lower nitrogen availability.

    PubMed

    Gaya Shivega, W; Aldrich-Wolfe, Laura

    2017-01-24

    While the soil environment is generally acknowledged as playing a role in plant competition, the relative importance of soil resources and soil microbes in determining outcomes of competition between native and exotic plants has rarely been tested. Resilience of plant communities to invasion by exotic species may depend on the extent to which native and exotic plant performance are mediated by abiotic and biotic components of the soil. We used a greenhouse experiment to compare performance of two native prairie plant species and one exotic species, when grown in intraspecific competition and when each native was grown in interspecific competition with the exotic species, in the presence and absence of a native prairie soil community, and when nitrogen availability was elevated or was maintained at native prairie levels. We found that elevated nitrogen availability was beneficial to the exotic species and had no effect on or was detrimental to the native plant species, that the native microbial community was beneficial to the native plant species and either had no effect or was detrimental to the exotic species, and that intraspecific competition was stronger than interspecific competition for the exotic plant species and vice-versa for the natives. Our results demonstrate that soil nitrogen availability and the soil microbial community can mediate the strength of competition between native and exotic plant species. We found no evidence for native microbes enhancing the performance of the exotic plant species. Instead, loss of the native soil microbial community appears to reinforce the negative effects of elevated N on native plant communities and its benefits to exotic invasive species. Resilience of plant communities to invasion by exotic plant species is facilitated by the presence of an intact native soil microbial community and weakened by anthropogenic inputs of nitrogen.

  9. Spatial Arrangement Overrules Environmental Factors to Structure Native and Non-Native Assemblages of Synanthropic Harvestmen

    PubMed Central

    Muster, Christoph; Meyer, Marc; Sattler, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how space affects the occurrence of native and non-native species is essential for inferring processes that shape communities. However, studies considering spatial and environmental variables for the entire community – as well as for the native and non-native assemblages in a single study – are scarce for animals. Harvestmen communities in central Europe have undergone drastic turnovers during the past decades, with several newly immigrated species, and thus provide a unique system to study such questions. We studied the wall-dwelling harvestmen communities from 52 human settlements in Luxembourg and found the assemblages to be largely dominated by non-native species (64% of specimens). Community structure was analysed using Moran's eigenvector maps as spatial variables, and landcover variables at different radii (500 m, 1000 m, 2000 m) in combination with climatic parameters as environmental variables. A surprisingly high portion of pure spatial variation (15.7% of total variance) exceeded the environmental (10.6%) and shared (4%) components of variation, but we found only minor differences between native and non-native assemblages. This could result from the ecological flexibility of both, native and non-native harvestmen that are not restricted to urban habitats but also inhabit surrounding semi-natural landscapes. Nevertheless, urban landcover variables explained more variation in the non-native community, whereas coverage of semi-natural habitats (forests, rivers) at broader radii better explained the native assemblage. This indicates that some urban characteristics apparently facilitate the establishment of non-native species. We found no evidence for competitive replacement of native by invasive species, but a community with novel combination of native and non-native species. PMID:24595309

  10. Identifying native Cantonese stops: Implication for native speakers perception

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Man

    2005-04-01

    A series of perception tasks were conducted to probe Cantonese speakers ability to perceive their languages syllable-final unreleased stops. Stimuli consisted of minimal sets of monosyllabic words with contrasting codas produced by a speaker of Hong Kong Cantonese. Twelve Guangzhou Cantonese speakers and five Hong Kong Cantonese speakers performed the perceptual tasks which included: matching stimuli with the corresponding orthographic character; AXB discrimination; and identifying word-final [p], [t], [k] and vowel explicitly. Five native speakers of Mandarin (where final stops are not allowed) also took the AXB and identification tasks. Both Guangzhou and Hong Kong speakers scored high in matching task: 93 and 96 percent correct respectively; for AXB task, subjects from Hong Kong (93%) did slightly better than those from Guangzhou (85%), and Mandarin speakers scored the lowest (78%). The most interesting findings were in the identification tasks, although subjects from Hong Kong scored the highest (82%), the accuracy of Guangzhou Cantonese speakers was surprisingly low (49%)-even worse than Mandarin speakers (69%). Explanation for the observed discrepancy between Guangzhou and Hong Kong subjects will be discussed with respect to their different language education as well as their distinct language experience. Implications for phonological awareness will also be discussed.

  11. Cardiovascular Disease Among Alaska Native Peoples

    PubMed Central

    Jolly, Stacey E.; Howard, Barbara V.; Umans, Jason G.

    2013-01-01

    Although Alaska Native peoples were thought to be protected from cardiovascular disease (CVD), data now show that this is not the case, despite traditional lifestyles and high omega-3 fatty acid intake. In this article, the current understanding of CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples, particularly among the Yupik and Inupiat populations, will be discussed, using data from three major studies funded by the National Institutes of Health: Genetics of Coronary Artery Disease among Alaska Natives (GOCADAN), Center for Native Health Research (CANHR), and Education and Research Towards Health (EARTH). Data from these epidemiologic studies have focused concern on CVD and its risk factors among Alaska Native peoples. This review will summarize the findings of these three principal studies and will suggest future directions for research and clinical practice. PMID:24367710

  12. Non-native plants and wildlife in the Intermountain West

    Treesearch

    Andrea R. Litt; Dean E. Pearson

    2013-01-01

    Non-native plant invasions can change communities and ecosystems by altering the structure and composition of native vegetation. Changes in native plant communities caused by non-native plants can influence native wildlife species in diverse ways, but the outcomes and underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Here, we review and synthesize current information for...

  13. Native American Music and Curriculum: Controversies and Cultural Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyea, Andrea

    1999-01-01

    Discusses Native American music and curricula, the differences in Western and Native American perspectives of music, the role of music in Native American life, and music as art. Considers how Native Americans live in two worlds (the preserved and lived cultures) and how Native American music should be taught. (CMK)

  14. Effective Language Education Practices and Native Language Survival. Keynote Address.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Littlebear, Dick

    The importance of Native languages to Native Americans and the effort needed to maintain them are discussed in this keynote address at the ninth Native American Language Issues Institute. It is noted that the current cultural transition has demeaned Native languages and cultures and that strategies must be devised by Native Americans to counter…

  15. Native Teen Voices: adolescent pregnancy prevention recommendations.

    PubMed

    Garwick, Ann W; Rhodes, Kristine L; Peterson-Hickey, Melanie; Hellerstedt, Wendy L

    2008-01-01

    American Indian adolescent pregnancy rates are high, yet little is known about how Native youth view primary pregnancy prevention. The aim was to identify pregnancy prevention strategies from the perspectives of both male and female urban Native youth to inform program development. Native Teen Voices (NTV) was a community-based participatory action research study in Minneapolis and St. Paul, Minnesota. Twenty focus groups were held with 148 Native youth who had never been involved in a pregnancy. Groups were stratified by age (13-15 and 16-18 years) and sex. Participants were asked what they would do to prevent adolescent pregnancy if they were in charge of programs for Native youth. Content analyses were used to identify and categorize the range and types of participants' recommendations within and across the age and sex cohorts. Participants in all cohorts emphasized the following themes: show the consequences of adolescent pregnancy; enhance and develop more pregnancy prevention programs for Native youth in schools and community-based organizations; improve access to contraceptives; discuss teen pregnancy with Native youth; and use key messages and media to reach Native youth. Native youth perceived limited access to comprehensive pregnancy prevention education, community-based programs and contraceptives. They suggested a variety of venues and mechanisms to address gaps in sexual health services and emphasized enhancing school-based resources and involving knowledgeable Native peers and elders in school and community-based adolescent pregnancy prevention initiatives. A few recommendations varied by age and sex, consistent with differences in cognitive and emotional development.

  16. A Comparison of Quality of Life Between Native and Non-Native Cancer Survivors

    PubMed Central

    Dignan, Mark; Jones, Katherine L.; Krebs, Linda U.; Marchionda, Paula; Kaur, Judith Salmon

    2012-01-01

    This paper compares quality of life (QOL) outcomes between Native American and non-Native cancer survivors. Native Patient Navigators helped Native cancer patients complete a 114-item QOL survey and access survivorship information available on the NACES website. The survey was modified from Ferrell et. al’s QOL measure and assessed the four domains of cancer survivorship: physical, psychological, social, and spiritual [1]. Findings from Native survivors were compared to Ferrell’s findings. This is the first time that QOL outcomes have been compared between Native and Non-Native cancer survivors. Natives scored lower for physical and social QOL, the same for psychological QOL, and higher for spiritual QOL in comparison to non-Natives. Overall QOL scores were the same. Although this is the largest sample of Native cancer survivors reported in peer-reviewed manuscripts, these Native survivorship data are based on a self-selected group and it is unknown if the findings are generalizable to others. PMID:22302431

  17. Review of the negative influences of non-native salmonids on native fish species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turek, Kelly C.; Pegg, Mark A.; Pope, Kevin L.

    2013-01-01

    Non-native salmonids are often introduced into areas containing species of concern, yet a comprehensive overview of the short- and long-term consequences of these introductions is lacking in the Great Plains. Several authors have suggested that non-native salmonids negatively inflfluence species of concern. The objective of this paper is to review known interactions between non-native salmonids and native fifishes, with a focus on native species of concern. After an extensive search of the literature, it appears that in many cases non-native salmonids do negatively inflfl uence species of concern (e.g., reduce abundance and alter behavior) via different mechanisms (e.g., predation and competition). However, there are some instances in which introduced salmonids have had no perceived negative inflfl uence on native fifi shes. Unfortunately, the majority of the literature is circumstantial, and there is a need to experimentally manipulate these interactions.

  18. Patterns of English phoneme confusions by native and non-native listeners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cutler, Anne; Weber, Andrea; Smits, Roel; Cooper, Nicole

    2004-12-01

    Native American English and non-native (Dutch) listeners identified either the consonant or the vowel in all possible American English CV and VC syllables. The syllables were embedded in multispeaker babble at three signal-to-noise ratios (0, 8, and 16 dB). The phoneme identification performance of the non-native listeners was less accurate than that of the native listeners. All listeners were adversely affected by noise. With these isolated syllables, initial segments were harder to identify than final segments. Crucially, the effects of language background and noise did not interact; the performance asymmetry between the native and non-native groups was not significantly different across signal-to-noise ratios. It is concluded that the frequently reported disproportionate difficulty of non-native listening under disadvantageous conditions is not due to a disproportionate increase in phoneme misidentifications. .

  19. Native bees and plant pollination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ginsberg, H.S.

    2004-01-01

    Bees are important pollinators, but evidence suggests that numbers of some species are declining. Decreases have been documented in the honey bee, Apis mellifera (which was introduced to North America), but there are no monitoring programs for the vast majority of native species, so we cannot be sure about the extent of this problem. Recent efforts to develop standardized protocols for bee sampling will help us collect the data needed to assess trends in bee populations. Unfortunately, diversity of bee life cycles and phenologies, and the large number of rare species, make it difficult to assess trends in bee faunas. Changes in bee populations can affect plant reproduction, which can influence plant population density and cover, thus potentially modifying horizontal and vertical structure of a community, microclimate near the ground, patterns of nitrogen deposition, etc. These potential effects of changes in pollination patterns have not been assessed in natural communities. Effects of management actions on bees and other pollinators should be considered in conservation planning.

  20. Minority Women's Health: American Indians/Alaska Natives

    MedlinePlus

    ... Minority Women's Health > American Indians/Alaska Natives Minority Women's Health American Indians/Alaska Natives Related information How ... conditions common in American Indian and Alaska Native women Accidents Alcoholism and drug abuse Breast cancer Cancer ...

  1. The Nebulous Ecology of Native Invasions.

    PubMed

    Nackley, Lloyd L; West, Adam G; Skowno, Andrew L; Bond, William J

    2017-09-07

    In the Anthropocene, alien species are no longer the only category of biological organism establishing and rapidly spreading beyond historical boundaries. We review evidence showing that invasions by native species are a global phenomenon and present case studies from Southern Africa, and elsewhere, that reveal how climate-mediated expansions of native plants into adjacent communities can emulate the functional and structural changes associated with invasions by alien plant species. We conclude that integrating native invasions into ecological practice and theory will improve mechanistic models and better inform policy and adaptive ecological management in the 21st century. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Similarities in the Etiology of Alcohol Use Among Native American and Non-Native Young Women.

    PubMed

    Komro, Kelli A; Livingston, Melvin D; Garrett, Brady A; Boyd, Misty L

    2016-09-01

    This study examined social-and individual-level factors associated with alcohol use among young women and tested whether differences exist between Native American and non-Native young women. School-based surveys were conducted among 952 young women (ages 14-19) attending four high schools within the tribal jurisdictional service area of the Cherokee Nation in northeastern Oklahoma. Structural equation modeling using Mplus was used to assess the direct and indirect effects of social-and individual-level factors on subsequent alcohol use among Native and non-Native young women. We found no differences in the level of risk and protective factors among Native and non-Native young women. Among Native and non-Native young women, alcohol access, parental communication, and best friends' alcohol use had statistically significant direct and/or indirect effects on alcohol use. Indirect effects were mediated through alcohol expectancies and norms. A history of alcohol problems by an adult in the household and depression were not retained as independent risk factors in either model. We found more similarities than differences in level of and relations to alcohol use among social and individual risk and protective factors between Native American and non-Native young women from northeastern Oklahoma. The results provide support for universal prevention strategies, suggesting the importance of increasing perceptions that it is difficult to obtain alcohol and increasing parent-child communication.

  3. Non-native plants add to the British flora without negative consequences for native diversity.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Chris D; Palmer, G

    2015-04-07

    Plants are commonly listed as invasive species, presuming that they cause harm at both global and regional scales. Approximately 40% of all species listed as invasive within Britain are plants. However, invasive plants are rarely linked to the national or global extinction of native plant species. The possible explanation is that competitive exclusion takes place slowly and that invasive plants will eventually eliminate native species (the "time-to-exclusion hypothesis"). Using the extensive British Countryside Survey Data, we find that changes to plant occurrence and cover between 1990 and 2007 at 479 British sites do not differ between native and non-native plant species. More than 80% of the plant species that are widespread enough to be sampled are native species; hence, total cover changes have been dominated by native species (total cover increases by native species are more than nine times greater than those by non-native species). This implies that factors other than plant "invasions" are the key drivers of vegetation change. We also find that the diversity of native species is increasing in locations where the diversity of non-native species is increasing, suggesting that high diversities of native and non-native plant species are compatible with one another. We reject the time-to-exclusion hypothesis as the reason why extinctions have not been observed and suggest that non-native plant species are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain. Further research is needed in island-like environments, but we question whether it is appropriate that more than three-quarters of taxa listed globally as invasive species are plants.

  4. Non-native plants add to the British flora without negative consequences for native diversity

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Chris D.; Palmer, G.

    2015-01-01

    Plants are commonly listed as invasive species, presuming that they cause harm at both global and regional scales. Approximately 40% of all species listed as invasive within Britain are plants. However, invasive plants are rarely linked to the national or global extinction of native plant species. The possible explanation is that competitive exclusion takes place slowly and that invasive plants will eventually eliminate native species (the “time-to-exclusion hypothesis”). Using the extensive British Countryside Survey Data, we find that changes to plant occurrence and cover between 1990 and 2007 at 479 British sites do not differ between native and non-native plant species. More than 80% of the plant species that are widespread enough to be sampled are native species; hence, total cover changes have been dominated by native species (total cover increases by native species are more than nine times greater than those by non-native species). This implies that factors other than plant “invasions” are the key drivers of vegetation change. We also find that the diversity of native species is increasing in locations where the diversity of non-native species is increasing, suggesting that high diversities of native and non-native plant species are compatible with one another. We reject the time-to-exclusion hypothesis as the reason why extinctions have not been observed and suggest that non-native plant species are not a threat to floral diversity in Britain. Further research is needed in island-like environments, but we question whether it is appropriate that more than three-quarters of taxa listed globally as invasive species are plants. PMID:25831537

  5. 75 FR 53331 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-31

    ... Interest to Hadohdleekaga, Incorporated, for the Native village of Hughes, Alaska, pursuant to the Alaska... Hughes, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T. 9 N., R. 23 E., Sec. 5. Containing...

  6. Unprecedented restoration of a native oyster metapopulation.

    PubMed

    Schulte, David M; Burke, Russell P; Lipcius, Romuald N

    2009-08-28

    Native oyster species were once vital ecosystem engineers, but their populations have collapsed worldwide because of overfishing and habitat destruction. In 2004, we initiated a vast (35-hectare) field experiment by constructing native oyster reefs of three types (high-relief, low-relief, and unrestored) in nine protected sanctuaries throughout the Great Wicomico River in Virginia, United States. Upon sampling in 2007 and 2009, we found a thriving metapopulation comprising 185 million oysters of various age classes. Oyster density was fourfold greater on high-relief than on low-relief reefs, explaining the failure of past attempts. Juvenile recruitment and reef accretion correlated with oyster density, facilitating reef development and population persistence. This reestablished metapopulation is the largest of any native oyster worldwide and validates ecological restoration of native oyster species.

  7. Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... the health of groups can result from: Genetics Environmental factors Access to care Cultural factors On this page, you'll find links to health issues that affect Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders.

  8. Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders among Native Americans

    MedlinePlus

    ... factor in many problems, including alcohol abuse. 7 Poverty and inadequate access to health care also play ... 32 percent of Native Americans live below the poverty level, compared with 13 percent of all Americans. ...

  9. Native cool-season grasses in Missouri

    Treesearch

    Nadia. Navarrete-Tindall

    2010-01-01

    Although they may be overlooked, underestimated, unknown or simply ignored, native cool-season grasses are significant components of many plant communities in Missouri, including prairies, savannas, and woodlands.

  10. Language Learning of Native American Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little Soldier, Lee

    1989-01-01

    To help Native American students succeed in school, educators must pay attention to the sociocultural context in which learning takes place. By following several simple precepts, teachers of culturally and linguistically diverse students can enhance language learning. (Author/TE)

  11. Kaitiakitanga: protecting New Zealand's native biodiversity.

    PubMed

    Morad, M; Jay, M

    2000-09-01

    Kaitiakanga is a Maori word meaning guardianship. It is a word that has become central to New Zealand's efforts to conserve native biodiversity as well as encapsulating the new emphasis on inclusion of Maori cultural values and land concerns.

  12. Advancing Efforts to Energize Native Alaska (Brochure)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2013-04-01

    This brochure describes key programs and initiatives of the DOE Office of Indian Energy Policy and Programs to advance energy efficiency, renewable energy, and energy infrastructure projects in Alaska Native villages.

  13. Wild Plants Used by the Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Study, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes 10 wild plants used by Native Americans. They include: rose hips; the common milkweed; cattails; elderberries; cactus fruits; lamb's quarters pigweeds (Chenopodium sp.); persimmons; mints (Monardo sp.); the yucca; and the hawthorn. Illustrations of each plant are included. (JN)

  14. Text and Context: Teaching Native American Literature.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoeveler, Diane Long

    1988-01-01

    Outlines a six-week unit on contemporary Native American literature at the secondary level, presenting themes, reading materials, ideas for individual student projects, and other possible resources. (MM)

  15. Wild Plants Used by the Native Americans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nature Study, 1984

    1984-01-01

    Describes 10 wild plants used by Native Americans. They include: rose hips; the common milkweed; cattails; elderberries; cactus fruits; lamb's quarters pigweeds (Chenopodium sp.); persimmons; mints (Monardo sp.); the yucca; and the hawthorn. Illustrations of each plant are included. (JN)

  16. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  17. 76 FR 3156 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-19

    ... to Bristol Bay Native Corporation when the surface estate is conveyed to Oceanside Corporation. The... times in the Bristol Bay Times. DATES: Any party claiming a property interest in the lands affected...

  18. Quantifying Differences Between Native and Introduced Species.

    PubMed

    Lemoine, Nathan P; Burkepile, Deron E; Parker, John D

    2016-05-01

    Introduced species have historically been presumed to be evolutionarily novel and 'different' from native species. Recent studies question these assumptions, however, as the traits and factors promoting successful introduced and native species can be similar. We advocate a novel statistical framework utilizing quantifiable metrics of evolutionary and ecological differences among species to test whether different forces govern the success of native versus introduced species. In two case studies, we show that native and introduced species appear to follow the same 'rules' for becoming abundant. We propose that incorporating quantitative differences in traits and evolutionary history among species might largely account for many perceived effects of geographic origin, leading to more rigorous and general tests of the factors promoting organism success. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Nonverbal Communications in Native North America

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Allan Ross

    1975-01-01

    This article describes several types of native American nonspeech communications systems, including the Plains sign language, distance signaling of various kinds, picture writing and whistle speech. See FL 508 188 for availability. (CLK)

  20. Safeguarding the Seeds of Native Plants

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    As pharmaceutical demand, land restoration efforts, and conservation concerns increase there is an emerging emphasis by various organizations worldwide prioritizing germplasm collection of both native and medicinal taxa. Bioversity International, an organization coordinating the conservation of gen...

  1. Epistemologies in the Text of Children's Books: Native- and non-Native-authored books

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Morteza; Bang, Megan; Medin, Douglas; Marin, Ananda; Leddon, Erin; Waxman, Sandra

    2013-09-01

    An examination of artifacts provides insights into the goals, practices, and orientations of the persons and cultures who created them. Here, we analyze storybook texts, artifacts that are a part of many children's lives. We examine the stories in books targeted for 4-8-year-old children, contrasting the texts generated by Native American authors versus popular non-Native authors. We focus specifically on the implicit and explicit 'epistemological orientations' associated with relations between human beings and the rest of nature. Native authors were significantly more likely than non-Native authors to describe humans and the rest of nature as psychologically close and embedded in relationships. This pattern converges well with evidence from a behavioral task in which we probed Native (from urban inter-tribal and rural communities) and non-Native children's and adults' attention to ecological relations. We discuss the implications of these differences for environmental cognition and science learning.

  2. Automatically Detecting Authors’ Native Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-01

    theory , we will be able to identify authors’ native languages just based on their writing style in English. Although, as far as we know, a type of...have to find those errors that help us to distinguish one language from the rest. Although there are linguistic theories about which er- ror types...NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS AUTOMATICALLY DETECTING AUTHORS’ NATIVE LANGUAGE by Charles S. Ahn March 2011 Thesis Advisor

  3. Intraguild Predation and Native Lady Beetle Decline

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Mary M.; O'Neal, Matthew E.; Landis, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    Coccinellid communities across North America have experienced significant changes in recent decades, with declines in several native species reported. One potential mechanism for these declines is interference competition via intraguild predation; specifically, increased predation of native coccinellid eggs and larvae following the introduction of exotic coccinellids. Our previous studies have shown that agricultural fields in Michigan support a higher diversity and abundance of exotic coccinellids than similar fields in Iowa, and that the landscape surrounding agricultural fields across the north central U.S. influences the abundance and activity of coccinellid species. The goal of this study was to quantify the amount of egg predation experienced by a native coccinellid within Michigan and Iowa soybean fields and explore the influence of local and large-scale landscape structure. Using the native lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata as a model, we found that sentinel egg masses were subject to intense predation within both Michigan and Iowa soybean fields, with 60.7% of egg masses attacked and 43.0% of available eggs consumed within 48 h. In Michigan, the exotic coccinellids Coccinella septempunctata and Harmonia axyridis were the most abundant predators found in soybean fields whereas in Iowa, native species including C. maculata, Hippodamia parenthesis and the soft-winged flower beetle Collops nigriceps dominated the predator community. Predator abundance was greater in soybean fields within diverse landscapes, yet variation in predator numbers did not influence the intensity of egg predation observed. In contrast, the strongest predictor of native coccinellid egg predation was the composition of edge habitats bordering specific fields. Field sites surrounded by semi-natural habitats including forests, restored prairies, old fields, and pasturelands experienced greater egg predation than fields surrounded by other croplands. This study shows that intraguild

  4. Alaska Native Parkinson’s Disease Registry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-01

    Questionable 0 DK f. seborrheic dermatitis 0 Yes 0 No 0 Questionable 0 DK Exclusion criteria O Prominent postural instability in the first 3...4 A. Introduction Parkinsonism (PS) is a syndrome characterized by tremor, rigidity, slowness of movement, and problems with walking and balance...the Alaska Native Medical Center. B. Body The intent of this proposal is to establish a registry of parkinsonism cases among Alaska native

  5. Discharge Anomalies Underlie Strong Negative Co-Variation Between Native and Non-Native Fishes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruhí, A.; Sabo, J. L.; Rinne, J.

    2013-12-01

    Discharge variation has long been known to mediate species interactions between native and non-native fishes. For example, brook trout (from eastern US rivers) outcompete rainbow trout (from western rivers) in Sierra Nevada streams, but only below dams where muted winter floods are not strong enough to export or kill their fall-emerging young of the year (YOY). Here, the natural hydrograph in the Sierra Nevada produces flows that are uncharacteristic in eastern rivers and these unfamiliar or 'anomalous' flows would naturally keep brook trout at bay. In desert rivers of Arizona, floods and droughts are common and assemblages of native and non-native fishes respond differently to this extreme variation. Here we study the relationship between discharge variation and covariation in abundance of native and non-native fishes in the Verde River of Arizona. We use the Fourier analysis to quantify the magnitude (maximum), frequency and timing of high- and low-flow anomalies in the daily discharge record from 1963-2012 (50 yr). We use wavelet analysis to quantify regime shifts in discharge anomalies between high- and low-flow periods over this record. We then link spectral anomalies and several summary statistics from the wavelet power spectrum to fish abundance in a Multivariate Autoregressive (MAR) framework. Results from MAR indicate that discharge anomalies determine the abundance of non-native (not native) fishes at lag zero (same year) but determine the abundance of native (but not non-native) fishes at a lag of one. Our results suggest that timing of high- and low-flow events (indexed by anomalies) is critical in determining the relationship between native and non-native fishes but that the time scale of response is different for each group of fishes.

  6. Perceptual prothesis in native Spanish speakers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Theodore, Rachel M.; Schmidt, Anna M.

    2003-04-01

    Previous research suggests a perceptual bias exists for native phonotactics [D. Massaro and M. Cohen, Percept. Psychophys. 34, 338-348 (1983)] such that listeners report nonexistent segments when listening to stimuli that violate native phonotactics [E. Dupoux, K. Kakehi, Y. Hirose, C. Pallier, and J. Mehler, J. Exp. Psychol.: Human Percept. Perform. 25, 1568-1578 (1999)]. This study investigated how native-language experience affects second language processing, focusing on how native Spanish speakers perceive the English clusters /st/, /sp/, and /sk/, which represent phonotactically illegal forms in Spanish. To preserve native phonotactics, Spanish speakers often produce prothetic vowels before English words beginning with /s/ clusters. Is the influence of native phonotactics also present in the perception of illegal clusters? A stimuli continuum ranging from no vowel (e.g., ``sku'') to a full vowel (e.g., ``esku'') before the cluster was used. Four final vowel contexts were used for each cluster, resulting in 12 sCV and 12 VsCV nonword endpoints. English and Spanish listeners were asked to discriminate between pairs differing in vowel duration and to identify the presence or absence of a vowel before the cluster. Results will be discussed in terms of implications for theories of second language speech perception.

  7. Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Brent

    2004-01-01

    This proposal, Nebraska NativeGEM (Geospatial Extension Model) features a unique diversity component stemming from the exceptional reputation NNSGC has built by delivering geospatial science experiences to Nebraska s Native Americans. For 7 years, NNSGC has partner4 with the 2 tribal colleges and 4 reservation school districts in Nebraska to form the Nebraska Native American Outreach Program (NNAOP), a partnership among tribal community leaders, academia, tribal schools, and industry reaching close to 1,OOO Native American youth, over 1,200 community members (Lehrer & Zendajas, 2001).NativeGEM addresses all three key components of Cooperative State Research, Education, and Extension Service (CSREES) goals for advancing decision support, education, and workforce development through the GES. The existing long term commitments that the NNSGC and the GES have in these areas allow for the pursuit of a broad range of activities. NativeGEM builds upon these existing successful programs and collaborations. Outcomes and metrics for each proposed project are detailed in the Approach section of this document.

  8. Endemic predators, invasive prey and native diversity

    PubMed Central

    Wanger, Thomas C.; Wielgoss, Arno C.; Motzke, Iris; Clough, Yann; Brook, Barry W.; Sodhi, Navjot S.; Tscharntke, Teja

    2011-01-01

    Interactions between native diversity and invasive species can be more complex than is currently understood. Invasive ant species often substantially reduce diversity in the native ants diversity that act as natural control agents for pest insects. In Indonesia (on the island of Sulawesi), the third largest cacao producer worldwide, we show that a predatory endemic toad (Ingerophrynus celebensis) controls invasive ant (Anoplolepis gracilipes) abundance, and positively affects native ant diversity. We call this the invasive-naivety effect (an opposite of enemy release), whereby alien species may not harbour anti-predatory defences against a novel native predator. A positive effect of the toads on native ants may facilitate their predation on insect vectors of cacao diseases. Hence, toads may increase crop yield, but further research is needed on this aspect. Ironically, amphibians are globally the most threatened vertebrate class and are strongly impacted by the conversion of rainforest to cacao plantations in Sulawesi. It is, therefore, crucial to manage cacao plantations to maintain these endemic toads, as they may provide critical ecosystem services, such as invasion resistance and preservation of native insect diversity. PMID:20826488

  9. Do immigrants improve the health of natives?

    PubMed

    Giuntella, Osea; Mazzonna, Fabrizio

    2015-09-01

    This paper studies the effects of immigration on health. Specifically, we merge information on individual characteristics from the German Socio-Economic Panel (1984-2009) with detailed local labour market characteristics, and we then exploit the longitudinal component of the data to determine how immigration affects the health of both immigrants and natives over time. We find that immigrants to Germany are healthier than natives upon their arrival (the healthy immigrant effect) but that immigrants' health deteriorates over time. We show that the convergence in health is heterogeneous across immigrants and occurs more rapidly among those working in more physically demanding jobs. Because immigrants are significantly more likely to work in strenuous occupations, we investigate whether changes in the spatial concentration of immigrants affect the health of the native population. Our results suggest that immigration reduces the likelihood that residents will report negative health outcomes. We show that these effects are concentrated in blue-collar occupations and are stronger among low-educated natives. Improvements in natives' average working conditions and workloads help explain the positive effects of immigration on the health of the native population.

  10. Reading ability influences native and non-native voice recognition, even for unimpaired readers.

    PubMed

    Kadam, Minal A; Orena, Adriel John; Theodore, Rachel M; Polka, Linda

    2016-01-01

    Research suggests that phonological ability exerts a gradient influence on talker identification, including evidence that adults and children with reading disability show impaired talker recognition for native and non-native languages. The present study examined whether this relationship is also observed among unimpaired readers. Learning rate and generalization of learning in a talker identification task were examined in average and advanced readers who were tested in both native and non-native language conditions. The results indicate that even among unimpaired readers, phonological competence as captured by reading ability exerts a gradient influence on perceptual learning for talkers' voices.

  11. Auditory-motor interactions for the production of native and non-native speech.

    PubMed

    Parker Jones, Oiwi; Seghier, Mohamed L; Kawabata Duncan, Keith J; Leff, Alex P; Green, David W; Price, Cathy J

    2013-02-06

    During speech production, auditory processing of self-generated speech is used to adjust subsequent articulations. The current study investigated how the proposed auditory-motor interactions are manifest at the neural level in native and non-native speakers of English who were overtly naming pictures of objects and reading their written names. Data were acquired with functional magnetic resonance imaging and analyzed with dynamic causal modeling. We found that (1) higher activity in articulatory regions caused activity in auditory regions to decrease (i.e., auditory suppression), and (2) higher activity in auditory regions caused activity in articulatory regions to increase (i.e., auditory feedback). In addition, we were able to demonstrate that (3) speaking in a non-native language involves more auditory feedback and less auditory suppression than speaking in a native language. The difference between native and non-native speakers was further supported by finding that, within non-native speakers, there was less auditory feedback for those with better verbal fluency. Consequently, the networks of more fluent non-native speakers looked more like those of native speakers. Together, these findings provide a foundation on which to explore auditory-motor interactions during speech production in other human populations, particularly those with speech difficulties.

  12. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution.

    PubMed

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called "short-distance pronouns"), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead.

  13. The Native Comic Book Project: Native Youth Making Comics and Healthy Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Montgomery, Michelle; Manuelito, Brenda; Nass, Carrie; Chock, Tami; Buchwald, Dedra

    2015-01-01

    Background American Indians and Alaska Natives have traditionally used stories and drawings to positively influence the well-being of their communities. Objectives The objective of this study was to describe the development of a curriculum that trains Native youth leaders to plan, write, and design original comic books to enhance healthy decision making. Methods Project staff developed the Native Comic Book Project by adapting Dr. Michael Bitz’s Comic Book Project to incorporate Native comic book art, Native storytelling, and decision-making skills. After conducting five train-the-trainer sessions for Native youth, staff were invited by youth participants to implement the full curriculum as a pilot test at one tribal community site in the Pacific Northwest. Implementation was accompanied by surveys and weekly participant observations and was followed by an interactive meeting to assess youth engagement, determine project acceptability, and solicit suggestions for curriculum changes. Results Six youths aged 12 to 15 (average age = 14) participated in the Native Comic Book Project. Youth participants stated that they liked the project and gained knowledge of the harmful effects of commercial tobacco use but wanted better integration of comic book creation, decision making, and Native storytelling themes. Conclusion Previous health-related comic book projects did not recruit youth as active producers of content. This curriculum shows promise as a culturally appropriate intervention to help Native youth adopt healthy decision-making skills and healthy behaviors by creating their own comic books. PMID:22259070

  14. The Native Comic Book Project: native youth making comics and healthy decisions.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Michelle; Manuelito, Brenda; Nass, Carrie; Chock, Tami; Buchwald, Dedra

    2012-04-01

    American Indians and Alaska Natives have traditionally used stories and drawings to positively influence the well-being of their communities. The objective of this study was to describe the development of a curriculum that trains Native youth leaders to plan, write, and design original comic books to enhance healthy decision making. Project staff developed the Native Comic Book Project by adapting Dr. Michael Bitz's Comic Book Project to incorporate Native comic book art, Native storytelling, and decision-making skills. After conducting five train-the-trainer sessions for Native youth, staff were invited by youth participants to implement the full curriculum as a pilot test at one tribal community site in the Pacific Northwest. Implementation was accompanied by surveys and weekly participant observations and was followed by an interactive meeting to assess youth engagement, determine project acceptability, and solicit suggestions for curriculum changes. Six youths aged 12 to 15 (average age = 14) participated in the Native Comic Book Project. Youth participants stated that they liked the project and gained knowledge of the harmful effects of commercial tobacco use but wanted better integration of comic book creation, decision making, and Native storytelling themes. Previous health-related comic book projects did not recruit youth as active producers of content. This curriculum shows promise as a culturally appropriate intervention to help Native youth adopt healthy decision-making skills and healthy behaviors by creating their own comic books.

  15. The online application of binding condition B in native and non-native pronoun resolution

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, Clare; Trompelt, Helena; Felser, Claudia

    2014-01-01

    Previous research has shown that anaphor resolution in a non-native language may be more vulnerable to interference from structurally inappropriate antecedents compared to native anaphor resolution. To test whether previous findings on reflexive anaphors generalize to non-reflexive pronouns, we carried out an eye-movement monitoring study investigating the application of binding condition B during native and non-native sentence processing. In two online reading experiments we examined when during processing local and/or non-local antecedents for pronouns were considered in different types of syntactic environment. Our results demonstrate that both native English speakers and native German-speaking learners of English showed online sensitivity to binding condition B in that they did not consider syntactically inappropriate antecedents. For pronouns thought to be exempt from condition B (so-called “short-distance pronouns”), the native readers showed a weak preference for the local antecedent during processing. The non-native readers, on the other hand, showed a preference for the matrix subject even where local coreference was permitted, and despite demonstrating awareness of short-distance pronouns' referential ambiguity in a complementary offline task. This indicates that non-native comprehenders are less sensitive during processing to structural cues that render pronouns exempt from condition B, and prefer to link a pronoun to a salient subject antecedent instead. PMID:24611060

  16. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  17. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  18. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  19. 43 CFR 2091.9-1 - Alaska Native selections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Alaska Native selections. 2091.9-1 Section... Opening of Lands § 2091.9-1 Alaska Native selections. The segregation and opening of lands authorized for selection and selected by Alaska Natives under the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act, as amended (43 U.S.C...

  20. Gifted Native American Students: Underperforming, Under-Identified, and Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited focus among researchers on the nature and needs of gifted Native American students in the past 30 years, and the work that has been done frequently generalizes findings across Native American cultures. This article reviews recent literature on Native American youth and on gifted Native American students; examines the current…

  1. Alaskan Native Early School Leavers: A Study with Recommendations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crumb, Jeanmarie

    In response to a request by the Anchorage Native Caucus and the Anchorage Native Education Coalition, this study by the Anchorage School District Community Relations Department focuses on the Alaskan Native dropout problem. The study indicates that between September 1976 and March 1981, Native Alaskans, who compose approximately 4% of the total…

  2. Current Conditions in American Indian and Alaska Native Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szasz, Margaret Connell

    The school experience of American Indian and Alaska Native children hinges on the context in which their schooling takes place. This context includes the health and well-being of their families, communities, and governments, as well as the relationship between Native and non-Native people. Many Native children are in desperate straits because of…

  3. Gifted Native American Students: Underperforming, Under-Identified, and Overlooked

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gentry, Marcia; Fugate, C. Matthew

    2012-01-01

    There has been limited focus among researchers on the nature and needs of gifted Native American students in the past 30 years, and the work that has been done frequently generalizes findings across Native American cultures. This article reviews recent literature on Native American youth and on gifted Native American students; examines the current…

  4. The Processing of Subject-Object Ambiguities in Native and Near-Native Mexican Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegerski, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This self-paced reading study first tested the prediction that the garden path effect previously observed during the processing of subject-object ambiguities in native English would not obtain in a null subject language like Spanish. The investigation then further explored whether the effect would be evident among near-native readers of Spanish…

  5. Alaska Native Languages: Past, Present, and Future. Alaska Native Language Center Research Papers No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krauss, Michael E.

    Three papers (1978-80) written for the non-linguistic public about Alaska Native languages are combined here. The first is an introduction to the prehistory, history, present status, and future prospects of all Alaska Native languages, both Eskimo-Aleut and Athabaskan Indian. The second and third, presented as appendixes to the first, deal in…

  6. Vulnerability of freshwater native biodiversity to non-native species invasions across the continental United States

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background/Question/Methods Non-native species pose one of the greatest threats to native biodiversity. The literature provides plentiful empirical and anecdotal evidence of this phenomenon; however, such evidence is limited to local or regional scales. Employing geospatial analy...

  7. Phonological Representations in Children's Native and Non-native Lexicon

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ellen; Sjerps, Matthias J.; Fikkert, Paula

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the phonological representations of vowels in children's native and non-native lexicons. Two experiments were mispronunciation tasks (i.e., a vowel in words was substituted by another vowel from the same language). These were carried out by Dutch-speaking 9-12-year-old children and Dutch-speaking adults, in their…

  8. Comparing Native and Non-Native Raters of US Federal Government Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rachel Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Previous Language Testing research has largely reported that although many raters' characteristics affect their evaluations of language assessments (Reed & Cohen, 2001), being a native speaker or non-native speaker rater does not significantly affect final ratings (Kim, 2009). In Second Language Acquisition, some researchers conclude that…

  9. Non-native populations of an invasive tree outperform their native conspecifics

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, Heidi; Hensen, Isabell; Wesche, Karsten; Renison, Daniel; Wypior, Catherina; Hartmann, Matthias; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduced plants often face new environmental conditions in their non-native ranges. To become invasive, they need to overcome several biotic and abiotic filters that may trigger adaptive changes in life-history traits, like post-germination processes. Such early life cycle traits may play a crucial role in the colonization and establishment success of invasive plants. As a previous study revealed that seeds of non-native populations of the woody Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, germinated faster than those of native populations, we expected growth performance of seedlings to mirror this finding. Here, we conducted a common garden greenhouse experiment using different temperature and watering treatments to compare the biomass production of U. pumila seedlings derived from 7 native and 13 populations from two non-native ranges. Our results showed that under all treatments, non-native populations were characterized by higher biomass production and enhanced resource allocation to aboveground biomass compared to the native populations. The observed enhanced growth performance of non-native populations might be one of the contributing factors for the invasion success of U. pumila due to competitive advantages during the colonization of new sites. PMID:27742647

  10. Non-native populations of an invasive tree outperform their native conspecifics.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Heidi; Hensen, Isabell; Wesche, Karsten; Renison, Daniel; Wypior, Catherina; Hartmann, Matthias; von Wehrden, Henrik

    2016-01-01

    Introduced plants often face new environmental conditions in their non-native ranges. To become invasive, they need to overcome several biotic and abiotic filters that may trigger adaptive changes in life-history traits, like post-germination processes. Such early life cycle traits may play a crucial role in the colonization and establishment success of invasive plants. As a previous study revealed that seeds of non-native populations of the woody Siberian elm, Ulmus pumila, germinated faster than those of native populations, we expected growth performance of seedlings to mirror this finding. Here, we conducted a common garden greenhouse experiment using different temperature and watering treatments to compare the biomass production of U. pumila seedlings derived from 7 native and 13 populations from two non-native ranges. Our results showed that under all treatments, non-native populations were characterized by higher biomass production and enhanced resource allocation to aboveground biomass compared to the native populations. The observed enhanced growth performance of non-native populations might be one of the contributing factors for the invasion success of U. pumila due to competitive advantages during the colonization of new sites. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company.

  11. Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy. Native American Politics Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.; Johansen, Bruce E.

    Drawing on the historical record and primary sources, this book portrays how Native American political confederacies of the colonial era operated and how their organization and underlying principles influenced the founding fathers of U.S. political institutions. A complementary theme of this book is the intense debate about Native American…

  12. Native and Non-Native English Speaking Student Teachers Engage in Peer Feedback

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGarrell, Hedy

    2010-01-01

    This paper draws on data from questionnaires and participant discussion posts on WebCT to show how native and non-native English speaking student teachers explore the topic of peer feedback. Engaging in peer feedback for their own draft papers provides student teachers an opportunity to gain experience, then reflect on their experience and…

  13. The Changing Dimension of Native American Health: A Critical Understanding of Contemporary Native American Health Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Gregory R.

    1989-01-01

    Traces the medical history of Native Americans since European contact. Provides background for this issue's articles concerning Native Americans and acquired immune deficiency syndrome, diabetes, substance abuse, disabilities, health problems of infants and the elderly, urban health care, and the influence of world view on health. Contains 50…

  14. Exemplar of Liberty: Native America and the Evolution of Democracy. Native American Politics Series No. 3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grinde, Donald A., Jr.; Johansen, Bruce E.

    Drawing on the historical record and primary sources, this book portrays how Native American political confederacies of the colonial era operated and how their organization and underlying principles influenced the founding fathers of U.S. political institutions. A complementary theme of this book is the intense debate about Native American…

  15. University Students' Perceptions of the Influence of Native and Non-Native Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alseweed, Mohammad A.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the outcome of a study carried out in Qassim University with 169 Saudi male novice university students to obtain a deeper insight into their perceptions of their native English speaker teachers (NESTs) and non-native English speaker teachers (NNESTs) in the English language classroom. Quantitative and qualitative data were…

  16. 78 FR 70956 - 30-Day Notice of Proposed Information Collection: Assessment of Native American, Alaska Native...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ..., Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Housing Needs AGENCY: Office of the Chief Information Officer, HUD... Housing Needs. OMB Approval Number: 2528-0288. Type of Request: Revision of a currently approved collection. Form Number: None. Description of the need for the information and proposed use: The...

  17. Natives of North America: A Selected Bibliography to Improve Resource Availability in Native Studies Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haythorne, Owen; And Others

    Curriculum material citations relevant to the Native peoples of Alberta, Canada, were assembled into a bibliography that includes books, multi-media materials, periodicals, and other educational resources. The classroom teacher searching for Native Studies materials was kept especially in mind as the project progressed. Criteria for selection…

  18. Compliment Responses: Comparing American Learners of Japanese, Native Japanese Speakers, and American Native English Speakers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tatsumi, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    Previous research shows that American learners of Japanese (AJs) tend to differ from native Japanese speakers in their compliment responses (CRs). Yokota (1986) and Shimizu (2009) have reported that AJs tend to respond more negatively than native Japanese speakers. It has also been reported that AJs' CRs tend to lack the use of avoidance or…

  19. Native Alaskan Dropouts in Western Alaska: Systemic Failure in Native Alaskan Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freed, Craig D.; Samson, Mary

    2004-01-01

    The number of Native Alaska secondary students choosing not to complete high school is of great concern to educators and Native communities. In this study, schools in small communities throughout western Alaska were observed while teachers and dropouts were interviewed concerning their perceptions of the education process. It became very clear…

  20. An invasive non-native mammal population conserves genetic diversity lost from its native range.

    PubMed

    Veale, A J; Holland, O J; McDonald, R A; Clout, M N; Gleeson, D M

    2015-05-01

    Invasive, non-native species are one of the major causes of global biodiversity loss. Although they are, by definition, successful in their non-native range, their populations generally show major reductions in their genetic diversity during the demographic bottleneck they experience during colonization. By investigating the mitochondrial genetic diversity of an invasive non-native species, the stoat Mustela erminea, in New Zealand and comparing it to diversity in the species' native range in Great Britain, we reveal the opposite effect. We demonstrate that the New Zealand stoat population contains four mitochondrial haplotypes that have not been found in the native range. Stoats in Britain rely heavily on introduced rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus as their primary prey and were introduced to New Zealand in a misguided attempt at biological control of rabbits, which had also been introduced there. While invasive stoats have since decimated the New Zealand avifauna, native stoat populations were themselves decimated by the introduction to Britain of Myxoma virus as a control measure for rabbits. We highlight the irony that while introduced species (rabbits) and subsequent biocontrol (myxomatosis) have caused population crashes of native stoats, invasive stoats in New Zealand, which were also introduced for biological control, now contain more genetic haplotypes than their most likely native source. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Women of the Native Struggle. Portraits & Testimony of Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Ronnie, Ed.

    This book portrays images and views of approximately 45 Native American women in their roles as mothers, grandmothers, tribal elders, teachers, preservers of traditional beliefs and practices, and leaders in the continuing struggle for survival. An introduction by Anna Lee Walter presents an overview of the modern Native American woman. In the…

  2. Women of the Native Struggle. Portraits & Testimony of Native American Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farley, Ronnie, Ed.

    This book portrays images and views of approximately 45 Native American women in their roles as mothers, grandmothers, tribal elders, teachers, preservers of traditional beliefs and practices, and leaders in the continuing struggle for survival. An introduction by Anna Lee Walter presents an overview of the modern Native American woman. In the…

  3. Cross-language perception of Cantonese vowels spoken by native and non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    So, Connie K; Attina, Virginie

    2014-10-01

    This study examined the effect of native language background on listeners' perception of native and non-native vowels spoken by native (Hong Kong Cantonese) and non-native (Mandarin and Australian English) speakers. They completed discrimination and an identification task with and without visual cues in clear and noisy conditions. Results indicated that visual cues did not facilitate perception, and performance was better in clear than in noisy conditions. More importantly, the Cantonese talker's vowels were the easiest to discriminate, and the Mandarin talker's vowels were as intelligible as the native talkers' speech. These results supported the interlanguage speech native intelligibility benefit patterns proposed by Hayes-Harb et al. (J Phonetics 36:664-679, 2008). The Mandarin and English listeners' identification patterns were similar to those of the Cantonese listeners, suggesting that they might have assimilated Cantonese vowels to their closest native vowels. In addition, listeners' perceptual patterns were consistent with the principles of Best's Perceptual Assimilation Model (Best in Speech perception and linguistic experience: issues in cross-language research. York Press, Timonium, 1995).

  4. Differences between Business Letters from Native and Non-Native Speakers of English.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sims, Brenda R.; Guice, Stephen

    1992-01-01

    Compares 214 letters of inquiry written by native and nonnative speakers of English to test the assumption that cultural factors beyond language such as the knowledge of the business communication practices and cultural expectations greatly affect communication. Finds that native speakers' letters deviated less from U.S. business communication…

  5. Comparing Native and Non-Native Raters of US Federal Government Speaking Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Rachel Lunde

    2013-01-01

    Previous Language Testing research has largely reported that although many raters' characteristics affect their evaluations of language assessments (Reed & Cohen, 2001), being a native speaker or non-native speaker rater does not significantly affect final ratings (Kim, 2009). In Second Language Acquisition, some researchers conclude that…

  6. The Processing of Subject-Object Ambiguities in Native and Near-Native Mexican Spanish

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jegerski, Jill

    2012-01-01

    This self-paced reading study first tested the prediction that the garden path effect previously observed during the processing of subject-object ambiguities in native English would not obtain in a null subject language like Spanish. The investigation then further explored whether the effect would be evident among near-native readers of Spanish…

  7. SNPs and Haplotypes in Native American Populations

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Judith R.; Friedlaender, Françoise; Pakstis, Andrew J.; Furtado, Manohar; Fang, Rixun; Wang, Xudong; Nievergelt, Caroline M.; Kidd, Kenneth K.

    2013-01-01

    Autosomal DNA polymorphisms can provide new information and understanding of both the origins of and relationships among modern Native American populations. At the same time that autosomal markers can be highly informative, they are also susceptible to ascertainment biases in the selection of the markers to use. Identifying markers that can be used for ancestry inference among Native American populations can be considered separate from identifying markers to further the quest for history. In the current study we are using data on nine Native American populations to compare the results based on a large haplotype-based dataset with relatively small independent sets of SNPs. We are interested in what types of limited datasets an individual laboratory might be able to collect are best for addressing two different questions of interest. First, how well can we differentiate the Native American populations and/or infer ancestry by assigning an individual to her population(s) of origin? Second, how well can we infer the historical/evolutionary relationships among Native American populations and their Eurasian origins. We conclude that only a large comprehensive dataset involving multiple autosomal markers on multiple populations will be able to answer both questions; different small sets of markers are able to answer only one or the other of these questions. Using our largest dataset we see a general increasing distance from Old World populations from North to South in the New World except for an unexplained close relationship between our Maya and Quechua samples. PMID:21913176

  8. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  9. The Box and the Circle--Two Systems of Life: A Model for Understanding Native-Non-Native Issues.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Derrick, Jann

    Working as a family systems therapist with Native and non-Native families, the author observed two opposing social systems. Non-native families systems typify "The Box System," whereas native family systems portray "The Circle System." A few characteristics of the Circle System are: (1) a focus on life and peacefulness; (2) females and children…

  10. Cancer Control Research Training for Native Researchers: A Model for Development of Additional Native Researcher Training Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Thomas M.; Dunn, Esther; Tom-Orme, Lillian; Joe, Jennie

    2005-01-01

    Several social and biological scientists who have Native status are engaged in productive research careers, but the encouragement that has been offered to Native students to formulate career goals devoted to cancer etiology or cancer control in Native peoples has had limited success. Hence, the Native Researchers' Cancer Control Training Program…

  11. Less-Detailed Representation of Non-Native Language: Why Non-Native Speakers' Stories Seem More Vague

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lev-Ari, Shiri; Keysar, Boaz

    2012-01-01

    The language of non-native speakers is less reliable than the language of native speakers in conveying the speaker's intentions. We propose that listeners expect such reduced reliability and that this leads them to adjust the manner in which they process and represent non-native language by representing non-native language in less detail.…

  12. Diabetic retinopathy in native and non-native Sarawakians--findings from the Diabetic Eye Registry.

    PubMed

    Mallika, P S; Aziz, S; Goh, P P; Lee, P Y; Cheah, W L; Chong, M S; Tan, A K

    2012-08-01

    This study aims to determine the risk factors associated with diabetic retinopathy (DR) among natives and non-natives Sarawakians who were seen at 3 public hospitals and one health clinic in Sarawak. It is a cross sectional study where data on patients with DM were collected by staff at these healthcare facilities and entered into the web-based Diabetic Eye Registry. Univariate and multivariate analysis was used to determine the association factors for DR. DR was significantly less associated with natives (24.4%) compared to non-native Sarawakians (34.1%) (p < 0.001). The odds of getting DR was higher in patients whose duration of DM was more than 20 years (OR = 2.6), who have renal impairment (OR = 1.7) and non-natives (OR = 1.4).

  13. Synthesized speech intelligibility among native speakers and non-native speakers of English.

    PubMed

    Alamsaputra, Diane Mayasari; Kohnert, Kathryn J; Munson, Benjamin; Reichle, Joe

    2006-12-01

    Using synthesized and digitized speech in electronic communication devices may greatly benefit individuals who cannot produce intelligible speech. However, multiple investigations have demonstrated that synthesized speech is not always sufficiently intelligible for its listeners. Listening to synthesized speech may be particularly problematic for listeners for whom English is a second language. We compared native and non-native English-speaking adults' listening accuracy for English sentences in natural voice and synthesized voice conditions. Results indicated a disproportionate disadvantage for the non-native English-speaking group when listening to synthesized speech compared to their native English-speaking age peers. There was, however, significant variability in performance within the non-native English group, and this was strongly related to independent measures of English language skill. Specifically, a large portion of the variance in performance on the synthesized speech task was predicted by participants' receptive vocabulary scores.

  14. Soil pathogen communities associated with native and non-native Phragmites australis populations in freshwater wetlands

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Eric B; Karp, Mary Ann

    2013-01-01

    Soil pathogens are believed to be major contributors to negative plant–soil feedbacks that regulate plant community dynamics and plant invasions. While the theoretical basis for pathogen regulation of plant communities is well established within the plant–soil feedback framework, direct experimental evidence for pathogen community responses to plants has been limited, often relying largely on indirect evidence based on above-ground plant responses. As a result, specific soil pathogen responses accompanying above-ground plant community dynamics are largely unknown. Here, we examine the oomycete pathogens in soils conditioned by established populations of native noninvasive and non-native invasive haplotypes of Phragmites australis (European common reed). Our aim was to assess whether populations of invasive plants harbor unique communities of pathogens that differ from those associated with noninvasive populations and whether the distribution of taxa within these communities may help to explain invasive success. We compared the composition and abundance of pathogenic and saprobic oomycete species over a 2-year period. Despite a diversity of oomycete taxa detected in soils from both native and non-native populations, pathogen communities from both invaded and noninvaded soils were dominated by species of Pythium. Pathogen species that contributed the most to the differences observed between invaded and noninvaded soils were distributed between invaded and noninvaded soils. However, the specific taxa in invaded soils responsible for community differences were distinct from those in noninvaded soils that contributed to community differences. Our results indicate that, despite the phylogenetic relatedness of native and non-native P. australis haplotypes, pathogen communities associated with the dominant non-native haplotype are distinct from those of the rare native haplotype. Pathogen taxa that dominate either noninvaded or invaded soils suggest different potential

  15. Decoding Speech Perception by Native and Non-Native Speakers Using Single-Trial Electrophysiological Data

    PubMed Central

    Brandmeyer, Alex; Farquhar, Jason D. R.; McQueen, James M.; Desain, Peter W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) are systems that use real-time analysis of neuroimaging data to determine the mental state of their user for purposes such as providing neurofeedback. Here, we investigate the feasibility of a BCI based on speech perception. Multivariate pattern classification methods were applied to single-trial EEG data collected during speech perception by native and non-native speakers. Two principal questions were asked: 1) Can differences in the perceived categories of pairs of phonemes be decoded at the single-trial level? 2) Can these same categorical differences be decoded across participants, within or between native-language groups? Results indicated that classification performance progressively increased with respect to the categorical status (within, boundary or across) of the stimulus contrast, and was also influenced by the native language of individual participants. Classifier performance showed strong relationships with traditional event-related potential measures and behavioral responses. The results of the cross-participant analysis indicated an overall increase in average classifier performance when trained on data from all participants (native and non-native). A second cross-participant classifier trained only on data from native speakers led to an overall improvement in performance for native speakers, but a reduction in performance for non-native speakers. We also found that the native language of a given participant could be decoded on the basis of EEG data with accuracy above 80%. These results indicate that electrophysiological responses underlying speech perception can be decoded at the single-trial level, and that decoding performance systematically reflects graded changes in the responses related to the phonological status of the stimuli. This approach could be used in extensions of the BCI paradigm to support perceptual learning during second language acquisition. PMID:23874567

  16. Linking Native and Invader Traits Explains Native Spider Population Responses to Plant Invasion.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer N; Emlen, Douglas J; Pearson, Dean E

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders' web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion plots compared to controls. Additionally, irregular web-spiders on simulated invasion plots built webs that were 4.4 times larger and 5.0 times more likely to capture prey, leading to >2-fold increases in recruitment. Orb-weavers showed no differences in web size or prey captures between treatments. Web-spider responses to simulated invasion mimicked patterns following natural invasions, confirming that C. stoebe's architecture is likely the primary attribute driving native spider responses to these invasions. Differences in spider responses were attributable to differences in web construction behaviors relative to historic web substrate constraints. Orb-weavers in this system constructed webs between multiple plants, so they were limited by the overall quantity of native substrates but not by the architecture of individual native plant species. Irregular web-spiders built their webs within individual plants and were greatly constrained by the diminutive architecture of native plant substrates, so they were limited both by quantity and quality of native substrates. Evaluating native species traits in the context of invader-driven change can explain invasion outcomes and help to identify factors limiting native populations.

  17. Linking Native and Invader Traits Explains Native Spider Population Responses to Plant Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Emlen, Douglas J.; Pearson, Dean E.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretically, the functional traits of native species should determine how natives respond to invader-driven changes. To explore this idea, we simulated a large-scale plant invasion using dead spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe) stems to determine if native spiders’ web-building behaviors could explain differences in spider population responses to structural changes arising from C. stoebe invasion. After two years, irregular web-spiders were >30 times more abundant and orb weavers were >23 times more abundant on simulated invasion plots compared to controls. Additionally, irregular web-spiders on simulated invasion plots built webs that were 4.4 times larger and 5.0 times more likely to capture prey, leading to >2-fold increases in recruitment. Orb-weavers showed no differences in web size or prey captures between treatments. Web-spider responses to simulated invasion mimicked patterns following natural invasions, confirming that C. stoebe’s architecture is likely the primary attribute driving native spider responses to these invasions. Differences in spider responses were attributable to differences in web construction behaviors relative to historic web substrate constraints. Orb-weavers in this system constructed webs between multiple plants, so they were limited by the overall quantity of native substrates but not by the architecture of individual native plant species. Irregular web-spiders built their webs within individual plants and were greatly constrained by the diminutive architecture of native plant substrates, so they were limited both by quantity and quality of native substrates. Evaluating native species traits in the context of invader-driven change can explain invasion outcomes and help to identify factors limiting native populations. PMID:27082240

  18. Purification of native myosin filaments from muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, C; Padrón, R; Horowitz, R; Zhao, F Q; Craig, R

    2001-01-01

    Analysis of the structure and function of native thick (myosin-containing) filaments of muscle has been hampered in the past by the difficulty of obtaining a pure preparation. We have developed a simple method for purifying native myosin filaments from muscle filament suspensions. The method involves severing thin (actin-containing) filaments into short segments using a Ca(2+)-insensitive fragment of gelsolin, followed by differential centrifugation to purify the thick filaments. By gel electrophoresis, the purified thick filaments show myosin heavy and light chains together with nonmyosin thick filament components. Contamination with actin is below 3.5%. Electron microscopy demonstrates intact thick filaments, with helical cross-bridge order preserved, and essentially complete removal of thin filaments. The method has been developed for striated muscles but can also be used in a modified form to remove contaminating thin filaments from native smooth muscle myofibrils. Such preparations should be useful for thick filament structural and biochemical studies. PMID:11606293

  19. Native Mutant Huntingtin in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Ellen; Valencia, Antonio; Li, Xueyi; Aronin, Neil; Kegel, Kimberly B.; Vonsattel, Jean-Paul; Young, Anne B.; Wexler, Nancy; DiFiglia, Marian

    2012-01-01

    Huntington disease (HD) is caused by polyglutamine expansion in the N terminus of huntingtin (htt). Analysis of human postmortem brain lysates by SDS-PAGE and Western blot reveals htt as full-length and fragmented. Here we used Blue Native PAGE (BNP) and Western blots to study native htt in human postmortem brain. Antisera against htt detected a single band broadly migrating at 575–850 kDa in control brain and at 650–885 kDa in heterozygous and Venezuelan homozygous HD brains. Anti-polyglutamine antisera detected full-length mutant htt in HD brain. There was little htt cleavage even if lysates were pretreated with trypsin, indicating a property of native htt to resist protease cleavage. A soluble mutant htt fragment of about 180 kDa was detected with anti-htt antibody Ab1 (htt-(1–17)) and increased when lysates were treated with denaturants (SDS, 8 m urea, DTT, or trypsin) before BNP. Wild-type htt was more resistant to denaturants. Based on migration of in vitro translated htt fragments, the 180-kDa segment terminated ≈htt 670–880 amino acids. If second dimension SDS-PAGE followed BNP, the 180-kDa mutant htt was absent, and 43–50 kDa htt fragments appeared. Brain lysates from two HD mouse models expressed native full-length htt; a mutant fragment formed if lysates were pretreated with 8 m urea + DTT. Native full-length mutant htt in embryonic HD140Q/140Q mouse primary neurons was intact during cell death and when cell lysates were exposed to denaturants before BNP. Thus, native mutant htt occurs in brain and primary neurons as a soluble full-length monomer. PMID:22375012

  20. Evaluation of a native vegetation masking technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kinsler, M. C.

    1984-01-01

    A crop masking technique based on Ashburn's vegetative index (AVI) was used to evaluate native vegetation as an indicator of crop moisture condition. A mask of the range areas (native vegetation) was generated for each of thirteen Great Plains LANDSAT MSS sample segments. These masks were compared to the digitized ground truth and accuracies were computed. An analysis of the types of errors indicates a consistency in errors among the segments. The mask represents a simple quick-look technique for evaluating vegetative cover.

  1. The resilience of Native American elders.

    PubMed

    Grandbois, Donna M; Sanders, Gregory F

    2009-09-01

    This article focuses on the lived experiences of resilience in eight Native American elders. Although resilience has not been conceptualized among this group, findings revealed five unique attributes. The study design fostered the culturally relevant use of story telling, which allowed the authentic voices of the elders to be heard. Resilience exists among these Native American elders, but it is uniquely enmeshed into the seamless fabric of their culture, world-view, and connectedness expressed as Oneness with all creation. This finding of a unified cosmology suggests an extension to Bronfenbrenner's ecological theory to include the cosmosystem as a new systemic level.

  2. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  3. College Pride, Native Pride: A Portrait of a Culturally Grounded Precollege Access Program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Adrienne J.

    2016-01-01

    In this article Adrienne J. Keene employs the portraiture methodology to explore the story of College Horizons. She examines this precollege access program for American Indian, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian students to understand how a program rooted in Native cultures and identities can not only provide a space to create knowledge…

  4. Bidirectional clear speech perception benefit for native and high-proficiency non-native talkers and listeners: Intelligibility and accentednessa

    PubMed Central

    Smiljanić, Rajka; Bradlow, Ann R.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how native language background interacts with speaking style adaptations in determining levels of speech intelligibility. The aim was to explore whether native and high proficiency non-native listeners benefit similarly from native and non-native clear speech adjustments. The sentence-in-noise perception results revealed that fluent non-native listeners gained a large clear speech benefit from native clear speech modifications. Furthermore, proficient non-native talkers in this study implemented conversational-to-clear speaking style modifications in their second language (L2) that resulted in significant intelligibility gain for both native and non-native listeners. The results of the accentedness ratings obtained for native and non-native conversational and clear speech sentences showed that while intelligibility was improved, the presence of foreign accent remained constant in both speaking styles. This suggests that objective intelligibility and subjective accentedness are two independent dimensions of non-native speech. Overall, these results provide strong evidence that greater experience in L2 processing leads to improved intelligibility in both production and perception domains. These results also demonstrated that speaking style adaptations along with less signal distortion can contribute significantly towards successful native and non-native interactions. PMID:22225056

  5. Ethnic identity, drinking motives, and alcohol consequences among Alaska Native and non-Native college students.

    PubMed

    Skewes, Monica C; Blume, Arthur W

    2015-01-01

    This research involves the examination of drinking motives, alcohol consequences, and ethnic identity in a sample of Native and non-Native college student drinkers in Alaska. Although more Alaska Native students are abstinent from alcohol compared to any other ethnic group, Native students who do drink experience greater alcohol consequences and dependence symptoms. Therefore, we attempted to examine the influence of ethnic identity on alcohol consequences in a diverse sample of Native and non-Native students in Alaska. Findings showed that drinking motives, as measured by the Drinking Motives Questionnaire (social, coping, enhancement, and conformity), significantly predicted alcohol consequences after controlling for frequency of monthly binge drinking. In addition, after controlling for depression, binge drinking, and drinking motives, one aspect of ethnic identity (Affirmation, Belonging, and Commitment) was significantly negatively related to alcohol consequences, whereas another aspect of ethnic identity (Ethnic Identity Search) was not. Taken together, these findings suggest that interventions for college student alcohol misuse that target Native students should be culturally grounded and focused on enhancing the Affirmation, Belonging, and Commitment to one's ethnic heritage and should address drinking motives, especially drinking to cope, as a way to reduce alcohol related harm.

  6. Adipose tissue triglyceride fatty acids and atherosclerosis in Alaska Natives and non-Natives.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Joe; Middaugh, John; Boudreau, Donald; Malcom, Gray; Parry, Steve; Tracy, Richard; Newman, William

    2005-08-01

    Essential polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA) of the omega-3 family are believed to protect against cardiovascular disease. A rich source of omega-3 PUFA is found in fish and marine mammals (seal, walrus, whale), which are a large part of the traditional diet of Alaska Natives (Eskimo, American Indians, Aleuts), a group that has been reported to have a lower mortality rate from cardiovascular disease than non-Natives. An autopsy study using standardized methods to evaluate the extent of atherosclerosis and its risk factors, and analyses of stored triglyceride fatty acids was conducted in a sample of Alaska Native subjects and non-Native subjects living in Alaska. Findings indicate that Alaska Natives had less advanced atherosclerosis in coronary arteries, along with higher proportions of omega-3 and lower proportions of omega-6 PUFA in adipose tissue, than did non-Natives. We conclude that high dietary intake of omega-3 PUFA may account for the lower extent of coronary artery atherosclerosis, contributing to the reported lower heart disease mortality among Alaska Natives.

  7. Predicting novel trophic interactions in a non-native world.

    PubMed

    Pearse, Ian S; Altermatt, Florian

    2013-08-01

    Humans are altering the global distributional ranges of plants, while their co-evolved herbivores are frequently left behind. Native herbivores often colonise non-native plants, potentially reducing invasion success or causing economic loss to introduced agricultural crops. We developed a predictive model to forecast novel interactions and verified it with a data set containing hundreds of observed novel plant-insect interactions. Using a food network of 900 native European butterfly and moth species and 1944 native plants, we built an herbivore host-use model. By extrapolating host use from the native herbivore-plant food network, we accurately forecasted the observed novel use of 459 non-native plant species by native herbivores. Patterns that governed herbivore host breadth on co-evolved native plants were equally important in determining non-native hosts. Our results make the forecasting of novel herbivore communities feasible in order to better understand the fate and impact of introduced plants.

  8. The vowel inherent spectral change of English vowels spoken by native and non-native speakers.

    PubMed

    Jin, Su-Hyun; Liu, Chang

    2013-05-01

    The current study examined Vowel Inherent Spectral Change (VISC) of English vowels spoken by English-, Chinese-, and Korean-native speakers. Two metrics, spectral distance (amount of spectral shift) and spectral angle (direction of spectral shift) of formant movement from the onset to the offset, were measured for 12 English monophthongs produced in a /hvd/ context. While Chinese speakers showed significantly greater spectral distances of vowels than English and Korean speakers, there was no significant speakers' native language effect on spectral angles. Comparisons to their native vowels for Chinese and Korean speakers suggest that VISC might be affected by language-specific phonological structure.

  9. Plains Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the plains culture area, extending from the Rocky Mountains to the Mississippi River and from Texas to Canada. Written in simple language, the booklet begins with a brief description of the region--its extreme climate and the…

  10. 75 FR 13296 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-6679-B, AA-6679-C, AA-6679-F, AA-6679-G, AA-6679-K, AA-6679-M, AA- 6679-A2, LLAK964000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...

  11. 76 FR 75899 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Land Management [AA-9915, AA-9916, AA-9921, AA-9936, AA-9937, AA-9965; LLAK-965000- L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of...

  12. Learning Science by Studying Native American Pottery.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zastrow, Leona M.

    Principles of science and art are found in all phases of daily life. This book helps teachers and students in grades 7 and 8 discover specific scientific information as they experience "making pottery" using Native American pottery techniques. Lessons are built upon discover techniques--observation followed by conclusion--and begin with…

  13. Native American Housing: The Solar Hogan Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simonelli, Richard

    1989-01-01

    Describes development of a hybrid modern-traditional Navajo hogan that meets religious and cultural needs and the needs of modern Southwestern living, and uses passive and active solar technologies. Discusses housing problems on the Navajo Reservation, and plans for a Native American Housing Center at University of Colorado, Boulder. (SV)

  14. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  15. 76 FR 16804 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ...-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land... 99513-7504. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at ak.blm...

  16. Invasive ants influence native lizard populations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The red imported fire ant (Solenopsis invicta; hereafter RIFA) is an invasive predator found on four continents, including South America, North America, Australia, and Asia. RIFAs are implicated in the decline of native invertebrates and vertebrates throughout their invaded range. We used the easter...

  17. Growing Up Native American. An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Patricia, Ed.

    This anthology contains 22 essays and fictional writings about childhood by well-known Native American writers of the United States and Canada, from the 19th century to the 1990s. Selections include short stories, excerpts from novels, autobiographical sketches, and essays about the relationship between language and culture, family relationships,…

  18. Native Americans with Disabilities: Postsecondary Education Outcomes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graham, Deborah J.; Eadens, Daniel W.

    2017-01-01

    This correlation study examined relationships between special education and standardized testing variables of 100 Arizona secondary school districts with Native American populations, and the archival records for postsecondary outcomes between 2012 and 2014 of students with disabilities, using archival data collected by the Arizona Department of…

  19. Hands beat machines for collecting native seed

    Treesearch

    Mary Ann Davies; Scott Jensen

    2008-01-01

    A hedge trimmer (Garden Groom Pro) and a hand-held vacuum (Euro-Pro Shark) were tested to determine whether they might be more effective for collecting the seed of native plants than common hand methods. The common hand methods worked best.

  20. Educating Native American (Indians): Better Programs Needed.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Dorrance D.

    The intention of this paper was to inform readers about educating Native Americans and what could be done to better meet the Indians' needs. To present this, the paper covered the history of Indian education, the present, and the future. Indians were initially educated to force them to change, assimilate, and become acculturized, rather than to…

  1. Native plant development and deployment [Section VII

    Treesearch

    Jessica Wright; Kas Dumroese; Amy Symstad; Theresa Pitts-Singer; Jim Cane; Gary Krupnick; Peggy Olwell; Byron Love; Elizabeth Sellers; John Englert; Troy Wood

    2015-01-01

    Native plant materials are needed to create, enhance, or restore pollinator habitat. They provide critical foraging and breeding areas for wild and managed pollinator species, including transnational migratory species such as hummingbirds and monarch butterflies. Although many pollinators and plants are generalists, some have limited, obligate relationships (i.e., one...

  2. Conceptualizing Native Identity with a Multidimensional Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, John; Bennett, Russell

    2011-01-01

    This study reports on a Native Identity Scale (NIS) adapted from an African American identity scale (Sellers et al., 1997). American Indian (AIs) and First Nations Canadian participants (N = 199) completed the NIS at powwows in the Upper Midwest. The majority of respondents were Ojibwe, but other tribal groups were represented. A principal…

  3. Will HTML5 Kill the Native App?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    For colleges and universities today, the question is no longer whether to develop a campus app or not. Instead, the debate has shifted to the best--and most cost-efficient--way to make campus applications accessible to the myriad devices and operating systems out there. Schools have a few options: They can develop multiple native app versions;…

  4. Native Hawaiian Community College Students: What Happens?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, Linda Serra; Lester, Jaime; Moon, Hye Sun; Tibbetts, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    Using a weighted database of approximately 3,000 students, this study involves the tracing of the postsecondary history of 2,516 students who identified as Native Hawaiian, graduated from high school between 1993 and 1995, and attended college. Virtually none of the students are 100% Hawaiian. Due to a long history of intermarriage, the Hawaiian…

  5. Woodland Culture Area. Native American Curriculum Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ross, Cathy; Fernandes, Roger

    One in a series of Native American instructional materials, this booklet introduces elementary students to the tribes of the woodland culture area, extending from the Mississippi River to the Atlantic Ocean and from Florida to the Great Lakes. Written in simple language, the booklet provides an overview of the regional culture, as well as,…

  6. Native American Children's Books. Book Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moulton, Kathryn Elizabeth; Cornelius, Carol

    1993-01-01

    Reviews 11 children's books, published 1990-93, suitable for elementary and middle school students, covering Native riddles; Hiawatha as founder of the Iroquois confederacy; Chief Seattle's famous speech; stories about Inuit life and Mexican village life during the 1500s; Sequoyah and the Cherokee alphabet; the Iroquois creation myth; Wampanoag…

  7. Regulation of protein function by native metastability

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Cheolju; Park, Soon-Ho; Lee, Min-Youn; Yu, Myeong-Hee

    2000-01-01

    In common globular proteins, the native form is in its most stable state. In contrast, each native form exists in a metastable state in inhibitory serpins (serine protease inhibitors) and some viral membrane fusion proteins. Metastability in these proteins is critical to their biological functions. Mutational analyses and structural examination have previously revealed unusual interactions, such as side-chain overpacking, buried polar groups, and cavities as the structural basis of the native metastability. However, the mechanism by which these structural defects regulate protein functions has not been elucidated. We report here characterization of cavity-filling mutations of α1-antitrypsin, a prototype serpin. Conformational stability of the molecule increased linearly with the van der Waals volume of the side chains. Increasing conformational stability is correlated with decreasing inhibitory activity. Moreover, the activity loss appears to correlate with the decrease in the rate of the conformational switch during complex formation with a target protease. These results strongly suggest that the native metastability of proteins is indeed a structural design that regulates protein functions. PMID:10884404

  8. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  9. 75 FR 9427 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-02

    ..., Limited. The lands are in the vicinity of Holy Cross and Huslia, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River... Bureau of Land Management [AA-8103-63, AA-8103-65, F-21902-06, F-21903-54, F-21903-55, F-21903- 56; LLAK-96400-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management,...

  10. 75 FR 8105 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-23

    ...] Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of decision... appealable decision approving the surface estates in certain lands for conveyance pursuant to the Alaska... in the vicinity of Buckland and Deering, Alaska, and are located in: Kateel River Meridian, Alaska T...

  11. 76 FR 23834 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-28

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior... may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960 or by e-mail...

  12. 75 FR 69457 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ...-32, AA-8102-33, AA-8102-34, AA-8102-47; LLAK965000-L14100000-KC0000-P] Alaska Native Claims Selection... decision may be obtained from: Bureau of Land Management, Alaska State Office, 222 West Seventh Avenue, 13, Anchorage, Alaska 99513-7504 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: The BLM by phone at 907-271-5960, by e-mail at...

  13. 75 FR 51098 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ..., AA-11950, AA-11986, AA-11981, AA-11982, AA-12004, AA-12005; LLAK-962000-L14100000-HY0000-P] Alaska... will approve the conveyance of only the surface estate for certain lands pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act. The lands are located on the Rat Islands, west of Adak, Alaska, aggregating 280.33...

  14. Plains Native American Literature. Multicultural Literature Collection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seeley, Virginia, Ed.; And Others

    This textbook contains five units of literature by the Plains Native Americans. The first unit presents examples of oral tradition, in which mythology, legends, stories, songs, and personal accounts pass on values, beliefs, and experiences. The second unit contains nonfiction: an account of a young girl's first days at an Indian boarding school,…

  15. 77 FR 24217 - Alaska Native Claims Selection

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... Bureau of Land Management Alaska Native Claims Selection AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior...), notice is hereby given that the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) will issue an appealable decision to Iqfijouaq Company. The decision approves for conveyance the surface estate in the lands described...

  16. Influence of Family on Native American Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Lisa J.

    2012-01-01

    "Native American"* postsecondary education students encounter several barriers to academic persistence including cultural assimilation issues, limited access to career information services, and an individual sense of duty and responsibility to remain tied to traditional spiritual values and beliefs systems, joined with family pressure to…

  17. Growing Up Native American. An Anthology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riley, Patricia, Ed.

    This anthology contains 22 essays and fictional writings about childhood by well-known Native American writers of the United States and Canada, from the 19th century to the 1990s. Selections include short stories, excerpts from novels, autobiographical sketches, and essays about the relationship between language and culture, family relationships,…

  18. Will HTML5 Kill the Native App?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredette, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    For colleges and universities today, the question is no longer whether to develop a campus app or not. Instead, the debate has shifted to the best--and most cost-efficient--way to make campus applications accessible to the myriad devices and operating systems out there. Schools have a few options: They can develop multiple native app versions;…

  19. Native Hawaiian Profile: State Of Hawaii 1975.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alu Like, Inc., Honolulu, HI.

    This work summarizes statistics from previous reports on native Hawaiians done for the four counties in Hawaii. The data provided were extracted from the Office of Economic Opportunity's 1975 Census Update Surveys of Oahu, Hawaii, and Maui and from the 1974 Kauai Socio-Economic Profile done by the Center for Non-Metropolitan Studies of the…

  20. Cooperative Learning and the Native American Student.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little Soldier, Lee

    1989-01-01

    Inexpensive and easy to implement, cooperative learning shifts the achievement burden from the teacher to all individuals in the classroom. Cooperative learning can prove particularly useful for Native American students, who are already fairly well advanced at sharing, working in groups, and independent reasoning when entering school. Includes…